WorldWideScience

Sample records for secondary hydrocarbon migration

  1. Finite Volume Method for Solving a Modified 3-D 3-Phase Black-Oil Hydrocarbon Secondary Migration Model, and Its Application to the Kuqa Depression of the Tarim Basin in Western China

    OpenAIRE

    Guangren SHI; MA Jinshan; YANG Xinshe; CHANG Junhua; WAN, JUN

    2011-01-01

    By using a finite volume method as a solver, a modified 3-D 3-phase (water, oil, gas) black-oil model for modeling hydrocarbon (HC) secondary migration in the context of basin modeling is presented in this paper. The model predicts the quantity and distribution of HC accumulation in space and time. The black-oil model used in basin modeling is more complex and more difficult to model than that in reservoir simulations, as the model includes variable simulation ranges, very long simul...

  2. Hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in the Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation, Changling Sag, southern Songliao Basin: Insights from integrated analyses of fluid inclusion, oil source correlation and basin modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tian; He, Sheng; Wang, Dexi; Hou, Yuguang

    2014-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation acts as both the source and reservoir sequence in the Changling Sag, situated in the southern end of the Songliao Basin, northeast China. An integrated approach involving determination of hydrocarbon charging history, oil source correlation and hydrocarbon generation dynamic modeling was used to investigate hydrocarbon migration processes and further predict the favorable targets of hydrocarbon accumulations in the Qingshankou Formation. The hydrocarbon generation and charge history was investigated using fluid inclusion analysis, in combination with stratigraphic burial and thermal modeling. The source rocks began to generate hydrocarbons at around 82 Ma and the hydrocarbon charge event occurred from approximately 78 Ma to the end of Cretaceous (65.5 Ma) when a large tectonic uplift took place. Correlation of stable carbon isotopes of oils and extracts of source rocks indicates that oil was generated mainly from the first member of Qingshankou Formation (K2qn1), suggesting that hydrocarbon may have migrated vertically. Three dimensional (3D) petroleum system modeling was used to evaluate the processes of secondary hydrocarbon migration in the Qingshankou Formation since the latest Cretaceous. During the Late Cretaceous, hydrocarbon, mainly originated from the Qianan depression, migrated laterally to adjacent structural highs. Subsequent tectonic inversion, defined as the late Yanshan Orogeny, significantly changed hydrocarbon migration patterns, probably causing redistribution of primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. In the Tertiary, the Heidimiao depression was buried much deeper than the Qianan depression and became the main source kitchen. Hydrocarbon migration was primarily controlled by fluid potential and generally migrated from relatively high potential areas to low potential areas. Structural highs and lithologic transitions are potential traps for current oil and gas exploration. Finally, several preferred hydrocarbon accumulation sites have been identified by this work, like Western Slope, Southern uplift, and Eastern Slope, helping reduce the risk on targeting hydrocarbon potential reservoirs in Changling Sag.

  3. Arsenic cycling in hydrocarbon plumes: secondary effects of natural attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Schreiber, Madeline E.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Ziegler, Brady A.

    2015-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation is widely applied as a remediation strategy at hydrocarbon spill sites. Natural attenuation relies on biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled with reduction of electron acceptors, including solid phase ferric iron (Fe(III)). Because arsenic (As) adsorbs to Fe-hydroxides, a potential secondary effect of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons coupled with Fe(III) reduction is a release of naturally occurring As to groundwater. At a crude-oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled to Fe(III) reduction has been well documented. We collected groundwater samples at the site annually from 2009 to 2013 to examine if As is released to groundwater and, if so, to document relationships between As and Fe inside and outside of the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in the plume reached 230?µg/L, whereas groundwater outside the plume contained less than 5?µg/L As. Combined with previous data from the Bemidji site, our results suggest that (1) naturally occurring As is associated with Fe-hydroxides present in the glacially derived aquifer sediments; (2) introduction of hydrocarbons results in reduction of Fe-hydroxides, releasing As and Fe to groundwater; (3) at the leading edge of the plume, As and Fe are removed from groundwater and retained on sediments; and (4) downgradient from the plume, patterns of As and Fe in groundwater are similar to background. We develop a conceptual model of secondary As release due to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons that can be applied to other sites where an influx of biodegradable organic carbon promotes Fe(III) reduction.

  4. Importance des phénomènes de migration verticale des hydrocarbures Significance of Vertical Migration Phenomea of Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiarelle A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cette publication a pour but de démonter les mécanismes de migration verticale des hydrocarbures et d'en analyser les conséquences, à partir d'exemples concrets choisis sur les domaines d'activité de la Société Nationale Elf Aquitaine (Production [SNEA (PJ. Les hydrocarbures, huile et gaz, rassemblés en phase individualisée évoluent dans un milieu poreux, fin, généralement mouillé à l'eau. Dans un tel environnement la migration suppose des pressions capillaires élevées. On démontre que cette condition se realise plus particulièrement sur Ies zones hautes fermées où les élements d'hydrocarbures expulses de la roche mère peuvent se rassembler en amas de taille importante, développant une forte poussee d'Archimède. De même le gaz, du fait de sa masse volumique faible par rapport à celle de l'eau, manifestera une grande aptitude à la migration verticale, ce qui conduira souvent à une redistribution verticale des hydrocarbures non conforme au schéma diagénétique classique : présence d'un gisement de gaz en surface et huile en profondeur. Combinés à l'effet Gussow, phénomène de refoulement de l'huile par le gaz hors de la fermeture critique d'une structure, les processus envisagés ici, où tes accidents tectoniques tiennent une place importante, aboutiront généralement à sil: aerer spatialement l'huile et le gaz. Ces transferts semblent s'accompagner fréquemment de modifications dans la composition chimique des huiles : augmentation des teneurs en soufre, en métaux traces, en hydrocarbures aromatiques, et alourdissement des huiles The purpose of this article is ta described the vertical migration mechanisms of hydrocarbons and to analyze their conséquences, on the basis of concrete examples selected in the fields of activities carried on by Société Nationale Elf Aquitaine (SNEA. When hydrocarbons (ai( and gas are gathered in a distinct phase, they evolve in a fine porous medium that is usually water wet. In such on environment, migration requires high capillary pressures. lt is shown that such conditions occur especially in high closed zones where the hydrocarbons driven out of the source rock con gather together in a large-sized mass, thus building up a high degree of buoyancy. In the same way, because gas has a louver specific gravity thon water, it has a great tendency ta migrote vertically, which often brings about a vertical redistribution of hydrocarbons that does not conform ta the conventional diagenetic pattern, i. e. the presence of a gas pool above a deeper ail pool.

  5. Hydrocarbon solubility and its migration processes: a look at the present status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamun, C.K.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1985-12-01

    In this study we review the present status of knowledge of solubility of hydrocarbons and its implications on primary migration processes. The intent is to examine the solubility and the transportation mechanisms relevant to geopressured-geothermal reservoirs, although the discussion included here accommodates a wide range of related aspects. Influences of parameters associated with hydrocarbon (especially methane) solubility have been studied. We have sought to evaluate several primary hydrocarbon migration processes and to point out their attractive features as well as their limitations. A brief discussion of hydrocarbon generation processes is also included.

  6. Secondary electron emission yield: graphite and some aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent analytical model for the secondary electron emission yield, ?, is successfully applied here to graphite and some aromatic hydrocarbons (xylene, anthracene, phenanthrene and biphenyl). In contrast to the use of conventional constant loss model, this model takes a more realistic account of the in-depth generation of the secondary electrons and permits a good description of the reduced yield curves, ?/?(max) versus E0/E0(max), via a suitable choice of the most probable energy dissipation depth, zC, of primary electrons in these low-density, low atomic-weight materials. Physical information on escape probability and on attenuation length of secondary electrons propagating in the investigated specimens is deduced from the good fit between calculated and experimental yield curves, ? = f(E0)

  7. Steering proton migration in hydrocarbons using intense few-cycle laser fields

    OpenAIRE

    Kübel, M.; Siemering, R.; Burger, C.; Kling, Nora G.; Li, H; Alnaser, A. S.; Bergues, B.; Zherebtsov, S.; Azzeer, A. M.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Moshammer, R.; de Vivie-Riedle, R.; Kling, M F

    2015-01-01

    Proton migration is a ubiquitous process in chemical reactions related to biology, combustion, and catalysis. Thus, the ability to control the movement of nuclei with tailored light, within a hydrocarbon molecule holds promise for far-reaching applications. Here, we demonstrate the steering of hydrogen migration in simple hydrocarbons, namely acetylene and allene, using waveform-controlled, few-cycle laser pulses. The rearrangement dynamics are monitored using coincident 3D ...

  8. Steering proton migration in hydrocarbons using intense few-cycle laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kübel, M; Burger, C; Kling, Nora G; Li, H; Alnaser, A S; Bergues, B; Zherebtsov, S; Azzeer, A M; Ben-Itzhak, I; Moshammer, R; de Vivie-Riedle, R; Kling, M F

    2015-01-01

    Proton migration is a ubiquitous process in chemical reactions related to biology, combustion, and catalysis. Thus, the ability to control the movement of nuclei with tailored light, within a hydrocarbon molecule holds promise for far-reaching applications. Here, we demonstrate the steering of hydrogen migration in simple hydrocarbons, namely acetylene and allene, using waveform-controlled, few-cycle laser pulses. The rearrangement dynamics are monitored using coincident 3D momentum imaging spectroscopy, and described with a quantum-dynamical model. Our observations reveal that the underlying control mechanism is due to the manipulation of the phases in a vibrational wavepacket by the intense off-resonant laser field.

  9. Public Health Impacts of Secondary Particulate Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Gasoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from gasoline?powered vehicles contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which increases the atmospheric mass concentration of fine particles (PM2.5). Here we estimate the public health burden associated w...

  10. Numerical modeling of compositional variation in petroleum secondary migration; Modelagem numerica da variacao composicional na migracao secundaria de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Marcia Santos de Almeida

    1999-07-01

    The secondary migration of petroleum is analyzed in this study from a compositional perspective, with phase separation, using a numerical simulator. The modeling is focused on two different geologic scenarios, where migration occurs along the formation rocks or through a fault. Each scenario is initialized with a single-phase hydrocarbon bank, with mixtures defined in the oil and gas zones and in the proximity of the critical point in their respective phase envelopes. These fluids are obtained using a PVT simulator based on four samples (Black-oil, volatile oil and two retrograde gases) which generate various hydrocarbon mixtures from which some are selected to meet the pressure and temperature conditions established for the models. The results obtained indicate that the phase separation process, the migration and the oil and gas differences are adequately represented, and that this type of modeling may be used to explain complex fluid distribution in a single accumulation or petroleum province. However, the analysis of post-filling processes indicate the need for the inclusion of a diffusive term in the flow equations used in the simulator and for a higher precision in the fluid properties outputs. (author)

  11. Secondary migration and relocation among African refugee families in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weine, Stevan Merrill; Hoffman, Yael; Ware, Norma; Tugenberg, Toni; Hakizimana, Leonce; Dahnweigh, Gonwo; Currie, Madeleine; Wagner, Maureen

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the secondary migration and relocation of African refugees resettled in the United States. Secondary migration refers to moves out of state, while relocation refers to moves within state. Of 73 recently resettled refugee families from Burundi and Liberia followed for 1 year through ethnographic interviews and observations, 13 instances of secondary migration and 9 instances of relocation were identified. A family ecodevelopmental framework was applied to address: Who moved again, why, and with what consequences? How did moving again impact family risk and protective factors? How might policies, researchers, and practitioners better manage refugees moving again? Findings indicated that families undertook secondary migration principally for employment, affordable housing, family reunification, and to feel more at home. Families relocated primarily for affordable housing. Parents reported that secondary migration and relocation enhanced family stability. Youth reported disruption to both schooling and attachments with peers and community. In conclusion, secondary migration and relocation were family efforts to enhance family and community protective resources and to mitigate shortcomings in resettlement conditions. Policymakers could provide newly resettled refugees jobs, better housing and family reunification. Practitioners could devise ways to better engage and support those families who consider moving. PMID:21361922

  12. Fracturing controlled primary migration of hydrocarbon fluids during heating of organic-rich shales

    CERN Document Server

    Kobchenko, Maya; Renard, Francois; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Malthe-Sorenssen, Anders; Mazzini, Adriano; Scheibert, Julien; Jamtveit, Bjorn; Meakin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved three-dimensional in situ high resolution synchrotron x-ray tomographic imaging was used to investigate the effects of slowly heating organic-rich Green River Shale from 60\\deg; to 400\\deg;C, in air without confinement, to better understand primary migration of hydrocarbon fluids in very low permeability source rock. Cracks nucleate in the interior of the sample at a temperature around 350\\deg;C. As the temperature increases, they grow and coalesce along lamination planes to form bigger cracks. This process is accompanied by a release of light hydrocarbons generated by decomposition of the initially immature organic matter, as determined by thermogravimetry and gas chromatography. These results provide the first 4D monitoring of an invasion percolation-like fracturing process in organic-rich shales. This process increases the permeability of the sample and provides pathways for fluid expulsion - an effect that might also be relevant for primary migration under natural conditions. We propose a 2D...

  13. Migration kinetics of mineral oil hydrocarbons from recycled paperboard to dry food: monitoring of two real cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, R; Biedermann, M; Grob, K; Garbini, D; Barbanera, M; Braschi, I

    2013-01-01

    Mineral oil hydrocarbons present in printing inks and recycled paper migrate from paper-based food packaging to foods primarily through the gas phase. Migration from two commercial products packed in recycled paperboard, i.e. muesli and egg pasta, was monitored up to the end of their shelf life (1 year) to study the influence of time, storage conditions, food packaging structure and temperature. Mineral oil saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons (MOSH and MOAH, respectively), and diisopropyl naphthalenes (DIPN) were monitored using online HPLC-GC/FID. Storage conditions were: free standing, shelved, and packed in transport boxes of corrugated board, to represent domestic, supermarket and warehouse storage, respectively. Migration to food whose packs were kept in transport boxes was the highest, especially after prolonged storage, followed by shelved and free-standing packs. Tested temperatures were representative of refrigeration, room temperature, storage in summer months and accelerated migration testing. Migration was strongly influenced by temperature: for egg pasta directly packed in paperboard, around 30 mg kg?¹ of MOSH migrated in 8 months at 20°C, but in only 1 week at 40°C. Muesli was contained into an internal polyethylene bag, which firstly adsorbed hydrocarbons and later released them partly towards the food. Differently, the external polypropylene bag, containing pasta and recycled paper tray, strongly limited the migration towards the atmosphere and gave rise to the highest level of food contamination. Tests at increased temperatures not only accelerated migration, but also widened the migration of hydrocarbons to higher molecular masses, highlighting thus a difficult interpretation of data from accelerated simulation. PMID:23406500

  14. Use of Invasion Percolation Models To Study the Secondary Migration of Oil and Related Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, G.

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies simulations of the slow displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting fluid in porous media and in a single fracture. The simulations are based on the invasion percolation model. New modified versions of the model are presented that simulate migration, fragmentation and coalescence processes of the clusters of non-wetting fluid. The resulting displacement patterns are characterized by scaling laws. In particular, simulations of the secondary migration of oil through porous homogeneous rock are discussed. Fractured rocks are extreme cases of inhomogeneous porous media. Simulations of the slow displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting fluid in a single fracture using the standard invasion model are presented. There is a discussion of a scenario in which a cluster of non-wetting fluid migrates through a porous medium that was saturated with a wetting fluid. The migration is driven by continuously driven buoyancy forces. Both experiments and simulations are described. The same scenario is also studied theoretically and by simulations using a simplified percolation model of fluid migration in one dimension. The migration model in two dimensions, with constant buoyancy forces, is also discussed. Simulations of fluid migration, such as the secondary migration of oil, in two- and three-dimensional media are examined, the media having multi-affine properties rather than being homogeneous. Slow immiscible displacement processes in single fractures are studied using fractal geometries to model single fractures. 167 refs., 123 figs.

  15. Analysis of carbon stable isotope to determine the origin and migration of gaseous hydrocarbon in the Brazilian sedimentary basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon isotopic composition of natural gases to determine the origin and gaseous hydrocarbon migration of Brazilian sedimentar basins is analysed. The carbon isotopic ratio of methane from natural gases depends on the process of gas formation and stage of organic matter maturation. In the geochemical surface exploration the biogenic gases are differentiated from thermogenic gases, because the last one is isotopically heavier. As the isotopic composition of methane has not changed during migration, the migrated gases from deeper and more mature source rocks are identified by its relative 13C enrichment. The methane was separated from chromatography and and the isotopic analysis was done with mass spectrometer. (M.C.K.)

  16. Mobile and immobile migrated hydrocarbons in the Embla Field, North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharati, Sunil

    1997-12-31

    This thesis deals with the geology of the Embla Field on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. This field has proven to be an excellent example to apply some of the recent ideas in reservoir geochemistry and has provided a sample set. Although the Embla field is in one of the most prolific regions of the Norwegian Continental Shelf, the Central Graben, its petroleum population is significantly different from neighbouring fields in more than one way. It is hoped that this work will provide a useful database for the planning of Embla`s further development. Migrated hydrocarbons are evaluated with respect to composition, maturity, intra-reservoir communication, compartmentalization and filling history of the field. The presence of immobile solid reservoir bitumen phase (paleo-oil) is mapped and explained and its origin and implications on overall reservoir quality are discussed. 206 refs., 118 figs., 34 tabs.

  17. Synthesis of secondary-alkyl-benzo[b]thiophene and their 2.3-dihydro derivatives with long hydrocarbon radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to synthesis of secondary-alkyl-benzo[b]thiophene and their 2.3-dihydro derivatives with long hydrocarbon radicals. The results of studies of methods of obtaining of alkyl-benzo[b]thiophene and their 2.3-dihydro derivatives with long hydrocarbon radicals were considered.

  18. A 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways in heated organic-rich shale

    OpenAIRE

    Panahi, Hamed; Kobchenko, Maya; Renard, Francois; Mazzini, Adriano; Scheibert, Julien; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjorn; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Meakin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interests in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the k...

  19. Obstructive jaundice secondary to endoclip migration into common bile duct after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormaz, I C; Keskin, M; Sönmez, R E; Soyta?, Y; Tekant, Y; Avtan, L

    2015-10-01

    Obstructive jaundice is a rare condition due to foreign body in common bile. In this article we report a 69 year-old man who was diagnosed obstructive jaundice secondary to the endoscopic clip migration. The patient had been performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy 5 years ago and had recovered without any complications. He presented with abdominal pain and jaundice. The magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) revealed filling defect in choledoch consistent with a bile duct stone. The endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) exhibited an endoclip migration into the common bile duct which caused bile duct stone. Endoclips can migrate into bile duct and cause obstructive jaundice. ERCP is the first option for its treatment. PMID:26488761

  20. / Vanadium, nickel and porphyrins as tracers of secondary migration route of petroleum: Maracaibo Lake Basin, Venezuela

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Marcos, Escobar; Angel, Da Silva; Vicmar, Azuaje; Iván, Esteves.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Vanadio, níquel y porfirinas como trazadores de rutas de migración secundaria del petróleo: Cuenca del lago de Maracaibo, Venezuela [...] Abstract in english A model of secondary migration for the Marcelina (Paleocene) reservoir of the Alturitas oil field located in the Maracaibo Basin is proposed. For this purpose, diverse trace metals and biomarker-derived parameters were used, for a suite of 30 crude oil samples analyzed by SARA, GC-MS, ICP-OES and UV [...] -Visible techniques. Considering a unique geochemical type of crude oil in the reservoir [1-2], distributional changes along the reservoir area for selected parameters was studied. Ten trace metals were analyzed and splitted into two groups using multivariate statistic. The first group (Cd, Cu, Mo, Fe, P, Zn, Ca, Mg) does not display behaviors that can be associated to the secondary migration process but which rather they indicate a chalcophic association (Cd, Cu, Mo y Zn) or colloidal complexes with naphtenic acids (Ca, Mg, Fe). The behavior of the second groups, including total crude oil vanadium, nickel, porphyrins and resins plus asphaltenes concentrations, indicates that a natural chromatographic process has been affecting the crude oil composition, leading the proposition of a secondary migration route with a south-north oriented preferential migration axis. The analysis of different biomarkers did not throw clear results as far as the characterization of the process of migration and accumulation in the reservoir.

  1. A 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways in heated organic-rich shale

    CERN Document Server

    Panahi, Hamed; Renard, Francois; Mazzini, Adriano; Scheibert, Julien; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjorn; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Meakin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interests in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms for the transport of hydrocarbons from the source rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures have been proposed, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes it is imperative to use the ...

  2. La migration des hydrocarbures dans les bassins sédimentaires: aspects géologiques et géochimiques Migration of Hydrocarbons in Sedimentary Basins: Geological and Geochemical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tissot B. P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La migration du pétrole vers les réservoirs et les pièges, et particulièrement son expulsion hors de la roche-mère où il s'est formé (migration primaire, est demeurée longtemps un des problèmes les plus mal connus de toute la géologie pétrolière. Le déplacement du pétrole et du gaz s'effectue en phase hydrocarbure séparée. L'eau, souvent considérée comme le véhicule du pétrole dans la migration, joue en fait un rôle négatif : il faut que la saturation en eau ait suffisamment diminué (par expulsion et que la saturation en hydrocarbures ait suffisamment augmenté (par génération à partir du kérogène pour que l'écoulement d'une phase hydrocarbure devienne possible. Le moteur de cette expulsion est le gradient de pression : l'élévation de la pression dans l'espace poreux des roches-mères résulte de trois causes (la charge sédimentaire, la genèse des hydrocarbures, et l'expansion thermique de l'eau. La microfissuration, qui survient quand la pression interne des fluides dépasse la résistance mécanique de la roche peut jouer un rôle important. Les observations dans les bassins sédimentaires de cas bien documentés sont encore trop rares. Il est, en particulier, difficile de calculer les réserves mobilisées à l'échelle d'un permis ou d'un bassin. La modélisation numérique de la migration, associée à celle de la genèse du pétrole et du gaz, offre des perspectives dans ce sens, mais elle demande encore des travaux complémentaires. Parmi les conséquences de la migration, on peut citer : la possibilité de corrélation huile/roche-mère, la teneur plus faible en produits lourds dans les réservoirs que dans les roches-mères et le rôle souvent joué par un déplacement où hydrocarbures liquides et gazeux forment une phase unique, qui migre en laissant progressivement derrière elle les fractions plus lourdes, par condensation rétrograde. Oil migration toward reservoirs and traps, and especially its expulsion from the source rock where it was formed (primary migration, has long remained one of the least well understood problems in all petroleum geology. The displacement of oil and gas occurs in a separate hydrocarbon phase. Water, which is often considered as the vehicle for oil during migration, effectively plays a negative role. Water saturation must have been sufficiently diminished (by expulsion and hydrocarbon saturation must be sufficiently increased (by generation from kerogen for the flow of a hydrocarbon phase to become possible. The driving force for this expulsion is the pressure gradient. A rise in pressure in the pore volume of source rocks results from three causes (the sedimentary load, the formation of hydrocarbons, and the thermal expansion of water. Microfracturing, which occurs when the internal pressure of fluids exceeds the mechanical strength of the rock, may play an important role. Observations of well documented cases in sedimentary basins are still too rare. In particular, it is difficult to compute the reserves mobilized on the scale of a permit or basin. The numerical modeling of migration combined with that of the formation of oil and gas opens up perspectives in this direction, but it still requires further work. Among the consequences of migration, mention can be made of the possibility of oil/source-rock correlation, the lower content of heavy products in reservoirs than in source rocks, and the role often played by a displacement in which liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons form a single phase that migrates while progressively leaving the heavier fractions behind it, by retrograde condensation.

  3. Use of Invasion Percolation Models To Study the Secondary Migration of Oil and Related Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, G.

    1997-09-01

    In oil reservoir engineering, multi-phase displacement processes are important. This doctoral thesis describes simulations of the slow displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting fluid in a complex, random porous medium and in a single fracture. The study is restricted to two-phase flow in the quasi-static limit in which viscous forces can be neglected. The secondary migration of oil takes place in this regime, however, the discussion is broader in scope. The thesis connects the problem of slow two-phase flow to percolation theory and discusses the mechanisms that control immiscible displacements. A new, modified version of the invasion percolation model is used to simulate an imbibition process in a porous medium and the migration of a cluster of non-wetting fluid through a porous medium saturated with a wetting fluid. The simulations include the secondary migration of oil through porous homogeneous rock. Fluid migration through heterogeneous porous media is simulated qualitatively. Slow displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting fluid in a single rock fracture is simulated by using the standard invasion percolation model. Experiments and simulations are performed to study the fragmentation of invasion percolation-like structures of non-wetting fluid in a porous medium saturated with a wetting fluid. A scenario is studied in which a cluster of non-wettable fluid migrates through a porous medium that is saturated with a wetting fluid, the migration being driven by continuously increasing buoyancy forces. There is a simulation of the secondary migration of oil in both two- and three-dimensional media. 361 refs., 115 figs.

  4. Secondary Aerosol Formation from Oxidation of Aromatics Hydrocarbons by Cl atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Griffin, R.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol Formation From the Oxidation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Chlorine Atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) affects regional and global air quality. The formation mechanisms of SOA via the oxidation of volatile organic compounds by hydroxyl radicals, ozone, and nitrate radicals have been studied intensively during the last decade. Chlorine atoms (Cl) also have been hypothesized to be effective oxidants in marine and industrially influenced areas. Recent work by the authors has indicated that significant amounts of SOA are formed from the oxidation of monoterpenes by Cl. Aromatic hydrocarbons are important for generation of both SOA and ozone in urban areas because of their large emission rates and high reactivity. The goal of this work was to quantify the SOA formation potentials of two representative aromatic hydrocarbons through laboratory chamber experiments in which oxidation was initiated by Cl. The system constructed for this study includes an experimental chamber, a gas chromatograph for quantification of aromatic mixing ratios, a Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer to measure SOA size distributions, a zero air generator, and an illuminating system. The model aromatic hydrocarbons chosen for this study are toluene and m-xylene. Aerosol yields are estimated based on measured aerosol volume concentration, the concentration of consumed hydrocarbon, and estimation of wall loss of the newly formed aerosol. Toluene and m-xylene exhibit similar SOA yields from the oxidation initiated by Cl. The toluene SOA yield from Cl-initiated oxidation, however, depends on the ratio between the mixing ratios of the initial chlorine source and toluene in the chamber. For toluene experiments with higher such ratios, SOA yields vary from 0.05 to 0.079 for generated aerosol ranging from 4.2 to12.0 micrograms per cubic meter. In the lower ratio experiments, SOA yields are from 0.033 to 0.064, corresponding to generated aerosol from 3.0 to 11.0 micrograms per cubic meter. The m-xylene SOA yield ranges from 0.04 to 0.08 for aerosol in the range of 4.0 to 12.0 micrograms per cubic meter. These yields are generally comparable to those from photooxidation. In marine and industrial areas, SOA formation from the Cl- initiated oxidation of the studied common aromatics is likely to be most important in the early morning.

  5. Secondary Organic Aerosol Produced from Non-Measured Hydrocarbons Downwind from the Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, J. A.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Warneke, C.; Ahmadov, R.; Atlas, E. L.; Bahreini, R.; Blake, D. R.; Brock, C. A.; Brioude, J.; Fahey, D. W.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Gao, R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lueb, R.; McKeen, S. A.; Meagher, J. F.; Murphy, D. M.; Parrish, D. D.; Perring, A. E.; Pollack, I. B.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Robinson, A. L.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Srinivasan, A.; Watts, L.

    2010-12-01

    An extensively instrumented NOAA WP-3D research aircraft made airborne measurements of the gaseous and aerosol composition of air over the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill that occurred in April-July of 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. A narrow plume of hydrocarbons was observed downwind from DWH that is attributed to the evaporation of fresh oil on the sea surface. A much wider plume of organic aerosol (OA) was attributed to secondary (SOA) formation from unmeasured, less volatile hydrocarbons that were emitted from a wider area around DWH. These observations provide compelling evidence for the importance of SOA formation from less volatile hydrocarbons, which has been proposed as a significant source of OA in the atmosphere.

  6. SATURATED AND AROMATIC MINERAL OIL HYDROCARBONS FROM PAPERBOARD FOOD PACKAGING: ESTIMATION OF LONG-TERM MIGRATION FROM CONTENTS IN THE PAPERBOARD & DATA ON BOXES FROM THE MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzini, Rita; Fiselier, Katel; Biedermann, Maurus; Barbanera, Martino; Braschi, Ilaria; Grob, Konrad

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In the absence of a functional barrier, mineral oil hydrocarbons from printing inks and recycled fibers tend to migrate from paper-based food packaging materials through the gas phase into dry food. Concentrations easily far exceed the limit derived from the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). Since estimation of long-term migration into the food by testing at 40°C for 10 days is difficult, it seems preferable (and...

  7. Geochemical assessment of hydrocarbon migration phenomena: Case studies from the south-western margin of the Dead Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Ella; Kozmenko, Olga; Smirnov, Sergey; Sokol, Ivan; Novikova, Sofya; Tomilenko, Anatoliy; Kokh, Svetlana; Ryazanova, Tatyana; Reutsky, Vadim; Bul'bak, Taras; Vapnik, Yevgeny; Deyak, Michail

    2014-10-01

    Calcite veins with fluid and solid bitumen inclusions have been discovered in the south-western shoulder of the Dead Sea rift within the Masada-Zohar block, where hydrocarbons exist in small commercial gas fields and non-commercial fields of heavy and light oils. The gas-liquid inclusions in calcite are dominated either by methane or CO2, and aqueous inclusions sometimes bear minor dissolved hydrocarbons. The enclosed flake-like solid bitumen matter is a residue of degraded oil, which may be interpreted as “dead carbon”. About 2/3 of this matter is soot-like amorphous carbon and 1/3 consists of n-C8sbnd C18 carboxylic acids and traces of n-alkanes, light dicarboxylic acids, and higher molecular weight (>C20) branched and/or cyclic carboxylic acids. Both bitumen and the host calcites show genetic relationship with mature Maastrichtian chalky source rocks (MCSRs) evident in isotopic compositions (?13C, ?34S, and ?18O) and in REE + Y patterns. The bitumen precursor may have been heavy sulfur-rich oil which was generated during the burial compaction of the MCSR strata within the subsided blocks of the Dead Sea graben. The ?18O and ?13C values and REE + Y signatures in calcites indicate mixing of deep buried fluids equilibrated with post-mature sediments and meteoric waters. The temperatures of fluid generation according to Mg-Li-geothermometer data range from 55 °? to 90 °? corresponding to the 2.5-4.0 km depths, and largely overlap with the oil window range (60-90 °?) in the Dead Sea rift (Hunt, 1996; Gvirtzman and Stanislavsky, 2000; Buryakovsky et al., 2005). The bitumen-rich vein calcites originated in the course of Late Cenozoic rifting and related deformation, when tectonic stress triggers damaged small hydrocarbon reservoirs in the area, produced pathways, and caused hydrocarbon-bearing fluids to rise to the subsurface; the fluids filled open fractures and crystallized to calcite with entrapped bitumen. The reported results are in good agreement with the existing views of maturation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, as well as basin fluid transport processes in the Dead Sea area.

  8. Information content of geochemical indicators of the migration direction of hydrocarbons and its quantitative evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushnirov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of factors which accompany the process of retrograde evaportion of petroleum and compressed gases on the value of different geochemical indicators which are used as criteria of the direction of carbonaceous material migration is indicated. A method of quantitative evaluation of lateral and vertical movement of liquid and gas-like carbonaceous material in gas-condensate deposits is proposed.

  9. Unraveling the Timing of Fluid Migration and Trap Formation in the Brooks Range Foothills: A Key to Discovering Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherine L. Hanks

    2008-12-31

    Naturally occurring fractures can play a key role in the evolution and producibility of a hydrocarbon accumulation. Understanding the evolution of fractures in the Brooks Range/Colville basin system of northern Alaska is critical to developing a better working model of the hydrocarbon potential of the region. This study addressed this problem by collecting detailed and regional data on fracture distribution and character, structural geometry, temperature, the timing of deformation along the Brooks Range rangefront and adjacent parts of the Colville basin, and the in situ stress distribution within the Colville basin. This new and existing data then were used to develop a model of how fractures evolved in northern Alaska, both spatially and temporally. The results of the study indicate that fractures formed episodically throughout the evolution of northern Alaska, due to a variety of mechanisms. Four distinct fracture sets were observed. The earliest fractures formed in deep parts of the Colville basin and in the underlying Ellesmerian sequence rocks as these rocks experienced compression associated with the growing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. The orientation of these deep basin fractures was controlled by the maximum in situ horizontal stress in the basin at the time of their formation, which was perpendicular to the active Brooks Range thrust front. This orientation stayed consistently NS-striking for most of the early history of the Brooks Range and Colville basin, but changed to NW-striking with the development of the northeastern Brooks Range during the early Tertiary. Subsequent incorporation of these rocks into the fold-and-thrust belt resulted in overprinting of these deep basin fractures by fractures caused by thrusting and related folding. The youngest fractures developed as rocks were uplifted and exposed. While this general order of fracturing remains consistent across the Brooks Range and adjacent Colville basin, the absolute age at any one location varies. Fracturing started in the southwest deep in the stratigraphic section during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, moving northeastward and upsection as the Colville basin filled from the west. Active fracturing is occurring today in the northeastern parts of the Colville basin, north of the northeastern Brooks thrust front. Across northern Alaska, the early deep basin fractures were probably synchronous with hydrocarbon generation. Initially, these early fractures would have been good migration pathways, but would have been destroyed where subsequently overridden by the advancing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. However, at these locations younger fracture sets related to folding and thrusting could have enhanced reservoir permeability and/or served as vertical migration pathways to overlying structural traps.

  10. Migration of mineral hydrocarbons into foods. 6. Press lubricants used in food and beverage cans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jickells, S M; Nichol, J; Castle, L

    1994-01-01

    Unused food and beverage cans were supplied by manufacturers together with two typical samples of press lubricants used to facilitate stamping of can ends. The lubricants were based on mineral hydrocarbon fractions. The cans were of aluminium two-piece construction (two sizes) and tin-plate steel three-piece construction (two sizes) and of four representative types. Gas chromatographic analysis was used to distinguish the two press lubricants from one another by their n-alkane profiles. Analysis of solvent extracts of the cans indicated that one of the two press lubricants had been used in the manufacture of the three-piece cans and the other lubricant for the two-piece cans. Residual levels of hydrocarbons were between 0.05 and 1.1 mg per can. Based on the capacity of the cans and assuming all the mineral hydrocarbon transferred to the contents, maximum levels in foods and beverages could be between 0.1 and 4.4 mg/kg. A limited number of retail products were also analysed. For the 35 samples covering 18 retail brands of canned foods and beverages, press lubricants were considered to be present in 50% of the products at levels ranging from 0.05 to 1.0 mg per can, equivalent to 0.1 to 3.6 mg/kg of food. Additionally mineral oil of unknown origin was detected in 10 of the retail products at levels of 0.1 to 4.7 mg/kg. Analysis of a sparkling apple juice packed in a glass bottle showed mineral oil at 0.3 mg/kg compared with 0.7 mg/kg for the same canned product, indicating that although mineral oils may be used in can manufacture they may also be derived from other parts of the food processing chain. PMID:7835472

  11. Petroleum Weathering Associated with Hydrocarbon Migration and Seepage, a Case Study From the Santa Barbara Channel, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, G. D.; Nelson, R. K.; Reddy, C. M.; Valentine, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    A 2003 report by the National Research Council estimates that 50 to 70 percent of oil that is released into the sea is from natural seeps (National Research Council, 2003), indicating that catastrophic oil spills or the runoff from roads and highways are not the major sources of oil in the marine environment. For example, approximately 37 tons of petroleum is emitted daily from seeps off the coast of Santa Barbara, California (Quigley et al. 1996). The Santa Barbara seeps are some of the most active in the world and have been releasing petroleum for thousands of years. Sheens of oil on the water surface and tar patches on the beaches are ubiquitous along the coastline of Santa Barbara and are continuing reminders of this natural process. Although the geochemistry of these seeps have been studied in the past, it has been hindered by the complexity of the petroleum hydrocarbons and the inability of traditional gas chromatography to separate, identify, and quantify each component of the oil. To expand on these previous efforts, we have begun to use comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC). This new technology provides at least an order of magnitude increase in the resolution and detection of petroleum hydrocarbons compared to traditional methods. Preliminary work using GCxGC has focused on examining the chemical composition of unrefined petroleum as it migrates up from depth through natural faults to the seafloor, from the seafloor to the sea surface, and from the sea surface to local beaches. Petroleum collected from a subsurface reservoir (Platform Holly Well 2342-15) is composed of a wide range of resolved petroleum hydrocarbons including n-alkanes, branched alkanes, cycloalkanes, linear alkane benzenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, steranes, hopanes, cyclic isoprenoids, and very large branched biomarkers with 38 to 40 carbons. This product is significantly different than oil emerging from the seafloor at the Jackpot seep, which we believe is due to biodegradation. Alternatively, direct comparisons of the latter to samples collected on the sea surface show extensive losses of light-end components due to evaporation and not water washing. Tar balls collected from nearby beaches appear to be the end result of biodegradation, evaporation, and water washing of the original material seeping from the ocean floor. These initial studies reveal that the geochemistry and processes acting on petroleum seeping from the ocean floor are complex. Efforts are underway to construct accurate models that will quantify each environmental process that affects the fate of petroleum in the marine environment.

  12. Migrating Tundra Peregrine Falcons accumulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons along Gulf of Mexico following Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegar, William S; Yates, Michael A; Doney, Gregg E; Jenny, J Peter; Seegar, Tom C M; Perkins, Christopher; Giovanni, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Monitoring internal crude oil exposure can assist the understanding of associated risks and impacts, as well as the effectiveness of restoration efforts. Under the auspices of a long-term monitoring program of Tundra Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus tundrius) at Assateague (Maryland) and South Padre Islands (Texas), we measured the 16 parent (unsubstituted) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), priority pollutants identified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and components of crude oil, in peripheral blood cells of migrating Peregrine Falcons from 2009 to 2011. The study was designed to assess the spatial and temporal trends of crude oil exposure associated with the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill which started 20 April 2010 and was capped on 15 July of that year. Basal PAH blood distributions were determined from pre-DWH oil spill (2009) and unaffected reference area sampling. This sentinel species, a predator of shorebirds and seabirds during migration, was potentially exposed to residual oil from the spill in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Results demonstrate an increased incidence (frequency of PAH detection and blood concentrations) of PAH contamination in 2010 fall migrants sampled along the Texas Gulf Coast, declining to near basal levels in 2011. Kaplan-Meier peak mean ?PAH blood concentration estimates varied with age (Juveniles-16.28 ± 1.25, Adults-5.41 ± 1.10 ng/g, wet weight) and PAHs detected, likely attributed to the discussed Tundra Peregrine natural history traits. Increased incidence of fluorene, pyrene and anthracene, with the presence of alkylated PAHs in peregrine blood suggests an additional crude oil source after DWH oil spill. The analyses of PAHs in Peregrine Falcon blood provide a convenient repeatable method, in conjunction with ongoing banding efforts, to monitoring crude oil contamination in this avian predator. PMID:25794559

  13. An experimental investigation of geochromatography during secondary migration of petroleum performed under subsurface conditions with a real rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larter Steve

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the size of petroleum secondary migration systems is vital for successful exploration for petroleum reserves. Geochemists have suggested that compositional fractionation of petroleum accompanying the migration process (geochromatography can potentially be used to infer distances petroleum may have travelled and the ratio of oil in the reservoir to that lost in the carrier. To date, this has been attempted by measuring concentrations and distributions of specific steranes, and aromatic oxygen and nitrogen compounds in reservoired oils which have been proposed to respond to migration rather than to source maturity or other effects. We report here an experiment involving oil migration through an initially water wet siltstone under realistic subsurface carrier bed or reservoir conditions (48 MPa, 70°C where source facies and maturity effects are eliminated. We show that geochromatography does indeed occur even for initially water-saturated rocks and that the migration fractionations observed for alkylcarbazoles, benzocarbazoles and alkylphenols are very similar to those seen in field data sets. In contrast, sterane based migration parameters show no compositional fractionation under these conditions.

  14. Stable carbon isotopic fractionation of individual n-alkanes accompanying primary migration: Evidence from hydrocarbon generation-expulsion simulations of selected terrestrial source rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of isotopic fractionation during primary migration of hydrocarbons from coals is rarely noticed because it overlaps with the isotopic effects of maturation. In this research, geological chromatography-like effects and possible physical isotopic fractionation effects on n-alkanes during primary migration from four coals and one mudstone were studied through two types of generation-expulsion simulations (generation-expulsion simulations I and II). In order to monitor the kinetic isotopic fractionation effect during primary migration and to differentiate the isotopic effects of primary migration from the isotopic effects of maturation, generation-expulsion simulation was upgraded in two aspects, source rock was separated into at least five layers, and deuterated n-C15D32 was added to the initial layer of the source rock (simulation II). The experimental results suggested that all terrestrial source rocks exhibit significant geological chromatography-like effects in generation-expulsion simulation. Expulsion efficiencies shown by vitrinite-rich coals are much lower than algal cannel, fusinite-rich coal and mudstone. There also exist significant physical isotopic fractionation effects in hydrocarbon primary migration processes from vitrinite-rich coals, but there is no significant isotopic fractionation effect from fusinite-rich brown coal and mudstone. Pore structure and specific surface area of source rock samples were measured by gas adsorption of both N2 and CO2. This indicated that vitrinite-rich coals have a higher proportion of microporosity. The differences in pore structure and adsorptive capacity of source rocks may be responsible for differences in expulsion efficiencies and isotopic fractionation effects in generation-expulsion simulations. The isotopic fractionation effect due to primary migration should be considered in making oil-source correlation when vitrinite-rich coals are concerned.

  15. Migration of selected hydrocarbon contaminants into dry semolina and egg pasta packed in direct contact with virgin paperboard and polypropylene film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barp, Laura; Suman, Michele; Lambertini, Francesca; Moret, Sabrina

    2015-09-01

    Migration of mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH), polyolefin oligomeric saturated hydrocarbons (POSH), and polyalphaolefins (PAO from hot melts) into dry semolina and egg pasta packed in direct contact with virgin paperboard or polypropylene (PP) flexible film was studied. Migration was monitored during shelf life (up to 24 months), through storage in a real supermarket (packs kept on shelves), conditions preventing exchange with the surrounding environment (packs wrapped in aluminium foil), and storage in a warehouse (packs inside of the transport box of corrugated board). Semolina pasta packed in virgin paperboard (without hot melts) had a MOSH content lower than 1.0 mg kg(-1). An increasing contamination with PAO belonging to the adhesives used to close the boxes was detected in egg pasta, wrapped in aluminium (1.5 and 5 mg kg(-1) after 3 and 24 months, respectively). An environmental contribution to total hydrocarbon contamination was observed in egg pasta kept on shelves that, after 3 and 24 months, showed levels of PAO/MOSH < C25 around 3 and 10 mg kg(-1), respectively. The migration of POSH from PP film into egg pasta wrapped in aluminium was around 0.6 mg kg(-1) after 3 months of contact and reached 1.7 mg kg(-1) after 24 months of contact. After 9 months of contact, semolina pasta packed in PP film and stored in the transport box showed that some MOSH migrated into the pasta from the board of the transport box (through the plastic film). PMID:26209063

  16. Modern Processes of Hydrocarbon Migration and Re-Formation of Oil and Gas Fields (Based on the Results of Monitoring and Geochemical Studies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, Irina; Salakhidinova, Gulmira; Nosova, Fidania; Pronin, Nikita; Ostroukhov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    Special geochemical studies of oils allowed to allocate a movable migration component of oils in the industrial oil deposits. In the field the migration component of oils varies in different parts of the field. The largest percentage of the light migration component (gas condensate of the oil) was detected in the central part of the Kama-Kinel troughs system. Monitoring of the composition of water, oil and gas (condensate light oil component) in the sedimentary cover and ni crystalline basement led to the conclusion of modern migration of hydrocarbons in sedimentary cover. This proves the existence of the modern processes of formation and reformation of oil and gas fields. This presentation is dedicated to the problem of definition of geochemical criteria of selection of hydrocarbons deposit reformation zone in the sample wells of Minibaevskaya area of Romashkinskoye field. While carrying out this work we examined 11 samples of oil from the Upper Devonian Pashiysky horizon. Four oil samples were collected from wells reckoned among the "anomalous" zones that were marked out according to the results of geophysical, oil field and geological research. Geochemical studies of oils were conducted in the laboratory of geochemistry of the Kazan (Volga-region) Federal University. The wells where the signs of hydrocarbons influx from the deep zones of the crust were recorded are considered to be "anomalous". A number of scientists connect this fact to the hypothesis about periodic influx of deep hydrocarbons to the oil deposits of Romashkinskoye field. Other researchers believe that the source rocks of the adjacent valleys sedimentary cover generate gases when entering the main zone of gas formation, which then migrate up the section and passing through the previously formed deposits of oil, change and "lighten" their composition. Regardless of the point of view on the source of the hydrocarbons, the study of the process of deposits refilling with light hydrocarbons is an important fundamental task of exceptional practical importance. The reservoir water monitoring has been conducted in five wells that have penetrated the water-saturated, loosely aggregated zones of the South Tatarstan Arch's basement. The long-term testing resulted in the production of reservoir water from the basement. The sedimentary cover in these wells is blocked by the column, which prevents water cross-flowing from the sedimentary cover. The observations have shown that the levels, gas saturation, mineralisation, density, and composition of reservoir waters from the loosely aggregated zones of the basement change with time. The varying characteristics of the water include its component composition, redox potential, and amount of chlorine and some other components and trace elements. Compositional changes in gases of the loosely aggregated zones of the basement, variations in the gas saturation of reservoir waters and of their composition, the decreasing density of oil in the sedimentary cover, - all result from one cause. This cause is the movement of fluids (solutions and gases dissolved in them) through the loosely aggregated zones and faults of the Earth's crust and the sedimentary cover. The fluids mainly move vertically in an upward direction, although their migration through subhorizontal, loosely aggregated zones of the crystalline basement is also possible. Fluid migration still takes place in the Earth's crust of ancient platforms. This phenomenon indicates that some portions of the platforms - primarily, their margins - periodically resume tectonic activities. The fluid dynamic activity of the crust define the processes in the sedimentary cover. It affects the development of the sedimentary basin during the sedimentation period, and the formation of mineral deposits. The monitoring of the present-day movement of fluid systems in the loosely aggregated zones of the basement will permit the more detailed study of the present-day fluid regime in the upper portion of the Earth's crust and the sedimentary cover.

  17. Evaluation des bassins par modélisation intégrée en deux dimensions des transferts techniques, de l'écoulement des fluides, de la genèse et de la migration des hydrocarbures Basin Evaluation by Integrated Two-Dimensional Modeling of Heat Transfer, Fluid Flow, Hydrocarbon Generation, and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenet P. Y.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le modèle de bassin exposé dans cet article décrit les phénomènes physiques et chimiques qui contrôlent la formation d'accumulations commerciales, dans le cadre évolutif d'un bassin sédimentaire affecté par la subsidence : transfert de chaleur, compaction et écoulement de l'eau, génèse des hydrocarbures, migration diphasique de l'eau et des hydrocarbures. Le modèle tient compte des variations de conductivité et des phénomènes thermiques transitoires pour reconstituer les paléo-températures. Des validations quantitatives de la reconstitution des paléo-températures et du modèle cinétique de formation des hydrocarbures peuvent être obtenues par comparaison avec les températures actuelles et les données géochimiques. Les écoulements et les surpressions induits par la compaction sont décrits en couplant une loi de compaction avec la loi de Darcy, classique pour les écoulements de l'eau, en ajoutant un critère de fracturation hydraulique naturelle. Ceci permet de modéliser les pressions anormales dans des séquences deltaïques récentes (delta de la Mahakam, comme dans des bassins liés à des rifts anciens (mer du Nord. Une adaptation de la loi de Darcy aux écoulements diphasiques permet de reproduire la migration primaire et la migration secondaire. En particulier, le modèle permet d'étudier le rôle des pressions anormales et l'influence des failles sur la migration et le piégeage. Nos résultats confirment que les modèles de bassins peuvent contribuer à synthétiser les données géologiques, géophysiques et géochimiques dans un schéma cohérent. En précisant l'évaluation pétrolière, ces modèles constituent une des principales voies pour améliorer l'efficacité de l'exploration. The basin model discussed in this paper describes the physical and chemical phenomena that control the formation of commercial accumulations of hydrocarbons in the moving framework of a subsiding sedimentary basin : heat transfer, compaction and water flow, hydrocarbon generation, and two-phase migration of fluids. The model reproduces the influence of conductivity variations and of transient heat transfer on paleotemperatures. Quantitative verification of the paleotemperature reconstruction and of the kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation may be obtained from present temperatures and geochemical data. Compaction-driven flows and overpressures are described by coupling a compaction law with Darcy's law for water flow and a criterion for natural hydraulic fracturing. This formulation allows modeling of overpressures in young deltalic sequences (e. g. , the Mahakam delta, Indonesia as well as in old rift basins (e. g. , the North Sea. An adapted two-phase Darcy's law reproduces primary and secondary migration. In particular, the model helps investigate the role of overpressures and fault behavior on hydrocarbon migration and entrapment. Our results confirm that basin models contribute to the synthesis of geological, geophysical, and geochemical data consistently. By defining parameters for petroleum evaluations, these models increase exploration efficiency.

  18. La migration des hydrocarbures dans les bassins sédimentaires: aspects géologiques et géochimiques Migration of Hydrocarbons in Sedimentary Basins: Geological and Geochemical Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Tissot B. P.

    2006-01-01

    La migration du pétrole vers les réservoirs et les pièges, et particulièrement son expulsion hors de la roche-mère où il s'est formé (migration primaire), est demeurée longtemps un des problèmes les plus mal connus de toute la géologie pétrolière. Le déplacement du pétrole et du gaz s'effectue en phase hydrocarbure séparée. L'eau, souvent considérée comme le véhicule du pétrole dans la migration, joue en fait un rôle négatif : il faut que la saturation en eau ait suffisamment diminué (par exp...

  19. Fluids in the Palaeogene Formation of Gaoyou Sag in the Southern Part of North Jiangsu Basin, China: Evidence for Hydrocarbon Migration and Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, M.; Lou, Z.; Zhu, R.; Jin, A.

    2013-12-01

    Gaoyou Sag, lying in the middle of the Dongtai Depression in the North Jiangsu basin, China, has a well developed fault system and is characterised by structurally complicated oil and gas fields. Its oil-water relationship is very complicated. In the present study, we present the distribution of formation water chemistry, crude oil density, formation pressures and fluid potential in the Palaeogene formation of the Gaoyou Sag . The purpose of this article is to: (1) analyse the cause of hydrochemical diversity; (2) identify the flow pattern and evolution; and (3) understand the interplay between the flow of formation water and hydrocarbon migration and accumulation. The results showed that large variances in formation water chemistry occur in different oilfields of the Gaoyou Sag (Figure 1) due to dilution by meteoric water recharge, concentration by membrane filtration and complexity of geological structure. The low salinity (mean values from 8.53 g/L to 9.67 g/L) of the formation water and heavy crude oil density (up to 0.94g/cm3) in the Xuchuang oilfield indicate influence from meteoric water infiltration; the deep depression areas are mainly of connate origin. Geofluids in the Xuchuang, Zhenwu and Yang'an oilfields mainly flow vertically through the Zhenwu and Hanliu faults, while geofluids in the Shanian oilfield mainly migrate laterally through the reservoirs and are adjusted vertically along some cutting faults. Palaeo-hydrodynamic evolution had an affinity with the generation, migration, accumulation and preservation of hydrocarbons. In the depositional stages of the Dainan and Sanduo formations, formation water was expelled outward and upward from lacustrine mudstones of the deep depression into shallow sands of nearby oilfields, driven by compaction and overpressure. Hydrocarbon migrated with formation water and gathered in appropriate traps, forming primary reservoirs. During the Zhenwu and Sanduo movements, there were tectonic uplifts and the strata suffered denudation. Meteoric water infiltrated inward and downward along active faults and denudated strata, meaning the original oil and gas pools suffered oxidation, damage and even loss. Figure 1 Vertical distribution of total dissolved solids (TDS) of formation water in the Xuchuang, Zhenwu, Yang'an and Shanian oilfields. (A) Location of those four oilfields in the N-S cross section shown in Figure 1; (B) TDS values of those four oilfields vary differently with burial depth.

  20. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation in Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Alters Cell Function and Pathway-Specific Gene Modulation Reflecting Changes in Cellular Trafficking and MigrationS?

    OpenAIRE

    Casado, Fanny L.; Singh, Kameshwar P.; Gasiewicz, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor belonging to the Per-ARNT-Sim family of proteins. These proteins sense molecules and stimuli from the cellular/tissue environment and initiate signaling cascades to elicit appropriate cellular responses. Recent literature reports suggest an important function of AhR in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) biology. However, the molecular mechanisms by which AhR signaling regulates HSC functions are unknown. In previous studies, we and othe...

  1. Global modeling of secondary organic aerosol formation from aromatic hydrocarbons: high- vs. low-yield pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Henze

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Formation of SOA from the aromatic species toluene, xylene, and, for the first time, benzene, is added to a global chemical transport model. A simple mechanism is presented that accounts for competition between low and high-yield pathways of SOA formation, wherein secondary gas-phase products react further with either nitric oxide (NO or hydroperoxy radical (HO2 to yield semi- or non-volatile products, respectively. Aromatic species yield more SOA when they react with OH in regions where the [NO]/[HO2] ratios are lower. The SOA yield thus depends upon the distribution of aromatic emissions, with biomass burning emissions being in areas with lower [NO]/[HO2] ratios, and the reactivity of the aromatic with respect to OH, as a lower initial reactivity allows transport away from industrial source regions, where [NO]/[HO2] ratios are higher, to more remote regions, where this ratio is lower and, hence, the ultimate yield of SOA is higher. As a result, benzene is estimated to be the most important aromatic species with regards to global formation of SOA, with a total production nearly equal that of toluene and xylene combined. Global production of SOA from aromatic sources via the mechanisms identified here is estimated at 3.5 Tg/yr, resulting in a global burden of 0.08 Tg, twice as large as previous estimates. The contribution of these largely anthropogenic sources to global SOA is still small relative to biogenic sources, which are estimated to comprise 90% of the global SOA burden, about half of which comes from isoprene. Uncertainty in these estimates owing to factors ranging from the atmospheric relevance of chamber conditions to model deficiencies result in an estimated range of SOA production from aromatics of 2–12 Tg/yr. Though this uncertainty range affords a significant anthropogenic contribution to global SOA, it is evident from comparisons to recent observations that additional pathways for production of anthropogenic SOA still exist beyond those accounted for here. Nevertheless, owing to differences in spatial distributions of sources and seasons of peak production, regions exist in which aromatic SOA produced via the mechanisms identified here are predicted to contribute substantially to, and even dominate, the local SOA concentrations, such as outflow regions from North America and South East Asia during the wintertime, though total modeled SOA concentrations there are small (~0.1 ?g/m3.

  2. Global modeling of secondary organic aerosol formation from aromatic hydrocarbons: high- vs low-yield pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Henze

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Formation of SOA from the aromatic species toluene, xylene, and, for the first time, benzene, is added to a global chemical transport model. A simple mechanism is presented that accounts for competition between low and high-yield pathways of SOA formation, wherein secondary gas-phase products react further with either nitrogen oxide (NO or hydroperoxy radical (HO2 to yield semi- or non-volatile products, respectively. Aromatic species yield more SOA when they react with OH in regions where the [NO]/[HO2] ratios are lower. The SOA yield thus depends upon the distribution of aromatic emissions, with biomass burning emissions being in areas with lower [NO]/[HO2] ratios, and the reactivity of the aromatic with respect to OH, as a lower initial reactivity allows transport away from industrial source regions, where [NO]/[HO2] ratios are higher, to more remote regions, where this ratio is lower and, hence, the ultimate yield of SOA is higher. As a result, benzene is estimated to be the most important aromatic species with regards to formation of SOA, with a total production nearly equal that of toluene and xylene combined. In total, while only 39% percent of the aromatic species react via the low-NOx pathway, 72% of the aromatic SOA is formed via this mechanism. Predicted SOA concentrations from aromatics in the Eastern United States and Eastern Europe are actually largest during the summer, when the [NO]/[HO2] ratio is lower. Global production of SOA from aromatic sources is estimated at 3.5 Tg/yr, resulting in a global burden of 0.08 Tg, twice as large as previous estimates. The contribution of these largely anthropogenic sources to global SOA is still small relative to biogenic sources, which are estimated to comprise 90% of the global SOA burden, about half of which comes from isoprene. Compared to recent observations, it would appear there are additional pathways beyond those accounted for here for production of anthropogenic SOA. However, owing to differences in spatial distributions of sources and seasons of peak production, there are still regions in which aromatic SOA produced via the mechanisms identified here are predicted to contribute substantially to, and even dominate, the local SOA concentrations, such as outflow regions from North America and South East Asia during the wintertime, though total SOA concentrations there are small (~0.1 ?g/m³.

  3. Fluid inclusion evidence for impact-related hydrothermal fluid and hydrocarbon migration in Cretaceous sediments of the ICDP-Chicxulub drill core Yax-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüders, Volker; Rickers, Karen

    2004-07-01

    Fluid inclusions studies in quartz and calcite in samples from the ICDP-Chicxulub drill core Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1) have revealed compelling evidence for impact-induced hydrothermal alteration. Fluid circulation through the melt breccia and the underlying sedimentary rocks was not homogeneous in time and space. The formation of euhedral quartz crystals in vugs hosted by Cretaceous limestones is related to the migration of hot (>200 °C), highly saline, metal-rich, hydrocarbon-bearing brines. Hydrocarbons present in some inclusions in quartz are assumed to derive from cracking of pre-impact organic matter. The center of the crater is assumed to be the source of the hot quartz-forming brines. Fluid inclusions in abundant newly-formed calcite indicate lower cyrstallization temperatures (75-100 °C). Calcite crystallization is likely related to a later stage of hydrothermal alteration. Calcite precipitated from saline fluids, most probably from formation water. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions and REE distributions in calcites and carbonate host rocks suggest that the calcite-forming fluids have achieved close equilibrium conditions with the Cretaceous limestones. The precipitation of calcite may be related to the convection of local pore fluids, possibly triggered by impact-induced conductive heating of the sediments.

  4. The Feminisation of Migration and the Migrants VET Policy Neglects: The Case of Skilled Women Secondary Migrants in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Sue

    2015-01-01

    There is increasingly scholarship on gender and migration, yet the international migration of highly skilled women is still somewhat under-researched. This article focuses on this neglected area in the context of Australia's discretionary inward migration policies to solve skills shortages. The article draws on empirical research using a…

  5. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells alters cell function and pathway-specific gene modulation reflecting changes in cellular trafficking and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Fanny L; Singh, Kameshwar P; Gasiewicz, Thomas A

    2011-10-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor belonging to the Per-ARNT-Sim family of proteins. These proteins sense molecules and stimuli from the cellular/tissue environment and initiate signaling cascades to elicit appropriate cellular responses. Recent literature reports suggest an important function of AhR in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) biology. However, the molecular mechanisms by which AhR signaling regulates HSC functions are unknown. In previous studies, we and others reported that treatment of mice with the AhR agonist 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) compromises the competitive reconstitution of bone marrow (BM) cells into irradiated host animals. Additional studies indicated a requirement for AhR in hematopoietic cells and not marrow microenvironment cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD-mediated phenotypic and functional changes of HSCs are a result of changes in gene expression that disrupt stem cell numbers and/or their migration. TCDD treatment to mice increased the numbers of phenotypically defined HSCs in BM. These cells showed compromised migration to the BM in vivo and to the chemokine CXCL12 in vitro, as well as increased expression of the leukemia-associated receptors CD184 (CXCR4) and CD44. Gene expression profiles at 6 and 12 h after exposure were consistent with the phenotypic and functional changes observed. The expressions of Scin, Nqo1, Flnb, Mmp8, Ilf9, and Slamf7 were consistently altered. TCDD also disrupted expression of other genes involved in hematological system development and function including Fos, JunB, Egr1, Ptgs2 (Cox2), and Cxcl2. These data support a molecular mechanism for an AhR ligand to disrupt the homeostatic cell signaling of HSCs that may promote altered HSC function. PMID:21791576

  6. Secondary effects of catalytic diesel particulate filters: reduced aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activity of the exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Daniela; Gerecke, Andreas C; Heeb, Norbert V; Zennegg, Markus; Kohler, Martin; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-04-15

    Diesel exhaust contains numerous toxic substances that show different modes of action such as triggering aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated pathways. We investigated AhR-mediated activity of exhaust generated by a heavy-duty diesel engine operated with or without iron- or copper/iron-catalyzed diesel particulate filters (DPFs). AhR agonists were quantified using the DR-CALUX reporter gene assay (exposure of cells for 24 h). We found 54-60 ng 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin CALUX equivalents (TCDD-CEQs) per m3 of exhaust in unfiltered samples and 6-16 ng TCDD-CEQ m3 in DPF-treated samples. DPF applications decreased TCDD-CEQ concentrations by almost 90%. Concentrations of known AhR agonists were determined with GC/HRMS and converted to TCDD-CEQ concentrations using compound-specific relative potency values. The analyzed nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the 172,3,7,8-chlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (23,7,8-PCDD/Fs) contributed only marginally (0.6-1.6%) to the total agonist concentration. However, both DPFs also decreased concentrations of individual PAHs by 7(0-80%. Variation of the assay exposure time (8, 24, 48,72, and 96 h) revealed that AhR-mediated activity decreased over time and reached a plateau after 72 h, which was most likely due to biotransformation of AhR agonists by the exposed H4IIE cells. At the plateau, we measured 1-2 ng TCDD-CEQ m(-3) in both an unfiltered and a filtered exhaust sample. Our findings show that DPFs are a promising technology to detoxify diesel exhaust regarding compounds with AhR-mediated activity. PMID:18497156

  7. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon and particulate emissions from two-stage combustion of polystyrene: the effects of the secondary furnace (afterburner) temperature and soot filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Richter, Henning; Howard, Jack B; Levendis, Yiannis A; Carlson, Joel

    2002-02-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted in a two-stage horizontal muffle furnace in order to monitor emissions from batch combustion of polystyrene (PS) and identify conditions that minimize them. PS is a dominant component of municipal and hospital waste streams. Bench-scale combustion of small samples (0.5 g) of shredded styrofoam cups was conducted in air, using an electrically heated horizontal muffle furnace, kept at Tgas = 1000 degrees C. Upon devolatilization, combustion of the polymer took place in a diffusion flame over the sample. The gaseous combustion products were mixed with additional air in a venturi and were channeled to a secondary muffle furnace (afterburner) kept at Tgas = 900-1100 degrees C; residence time therein varied between 0.6 and 0.8 s. At the exits of the primary and the secondary furnace the emissions of CO, CO2, O2, NOx, particulates as well as volatile and semivolatile hydrocarbons, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), were monitored. Online analyzers, gravimetric techniques, and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used. Experiments were also conducted with a high-temperature barrier filter, placed just before the exit of the primary furnace to prevent the particulates from entering into the secondary furnace. Results demonstrated the beneficial effect of the afterburner in reducing PAH concentrations, including those of mutagenic species such as benzo[a]pyrene. Concentrations of individual PAH exhibited a pronounced after burner temperature dependence, typically ranging from a small decrease at 900 degrees C to a larger degree of consumption at 1100 degrees C. Consumption of PAH was observed to be the dominant feature at 900 degrees C, while significant quantities of benzene and some of its derivatives, captured by means of carbosieve/Carbotrap adsorbents, were formed in the afterburner at a temperature of 1000 degrees C. In the primary furnace, about 30% of the mass of the initial polystyrene was converted into soot, while the total mass of PAH represented about 3% of the initial mass of combustible. The afterburner reduced the particulate (soot) emissions by only 20-30%, which indicates that once soot is formed its destruction is rather difficult because its oxidation kinetics are slow undertypical furnace conditions. Moreover, increasing the afterburnertemperature resulted in an increasing trend of soot emissions therefrom, which might indicate competition between soot oxidation and formation, with some additional formation occurring at the higher temperatures. Contrary to the limited effect of the afterburner, high-temperature filtration of the combustion effluent prior to the exit of the primary furnace allowed for effective soot oxidation inside of the ceramic filter. Filtration drastically reduced soot emissions, by more than 90%. Limited soot formation in the afterburner was again observed with increasing temperatures. The yields of both CO and CO2 were largely unaffected by the temperature of the afterburner but increased at the presence of the filter indicating oxidation therein. A previously developed kinetic model was used to identify major chemical reaction pathways involving PAH in the afterburner. The experimental data at the exit of the primary furnace was used as input to these model computations. A first evaluation of the predictive capability of the model was conducted for the case with ceramic filter and a temperature of 900 degrees C. The afterburner was approximated as a plug-flow reactor, and model predictions at a residence time of 0.8 s were compared to experimental data collected at its exit. In agreement with the experimental PAH concentration, only a minor impact of the afterburner treatment was observed for most species at 900 degrees C. OH was deduced to be the major reactant with a mole fraction about 4 orders of magnitudes higher than that of hydrogen radicals. Evidence for the need of further work on the quantitative assessment of oxidation of PAH and their radicals is given. PMID:11878400

  8. Oil-bearing inclusions in vein quartz and kalcite and, bitumens in veins: Testament to multiple phases of hydrocarbon migration in the Barrandian basin (lower Palaeozoic), Czech Republic.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchý, V.; Dobeš, P.; Sýkorová, Ivana; Machovi?, Vladimír; Stejskal, M.; Kroužek, J.; Chudoba, J.; Mat?jovský, L.; Havelcová, Martina; Matysová, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Ro?. 27, ?. 1 (2010), s. 285-297. ISSN 0264-8172 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R(CZ) IAA3012703; GA AV ?R IAA300460804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : hydrocarbon * fluid inclusion * bitumen Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.130, year: 2010

  9. The evolution of Devonian hydrocarbon gases in shallow aquifers of the northern Appalachian Basin: Insights from integrating noble gas and hydrocarbon geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Jackson, Robert B.; Vengosh, Avner; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Whyte, Colin J.; Walsh, Talor B.; Kondash, Andrew J.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2015-12-01

    The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in domestic energy production from unconventional reservoirs. This energy boom has generated marked economic benefits, but simultaneously evoked significant concerns regarding the potential for drinking-water contamination in shallow aquifers. Presently, efforts to evaluate the environmental impacts of shale gas development in the northern Appalachian Basin (NAB), located in the northeastern US, are limited by: (1) a lack of comprehensive "pre-drill" data for groundwater composition (water and gas); (2) uncertainty in the hydrogeological factors that control the occurrence of naturally present CH4 and brines in shallow Upper Devonian (UD) aquifers; and (3) limited geochemical techniques to quantify the sources and migration of crustal fluids (specifically methane) at various time scales. To address these questions, we analyzed the noble gas, dissolved ion, and hydrocarbon gas geochemistry of 72 drinking-water wells and one natural methane seep all located ?1 km from shale gas drill sites in the NAB. In the present study, we consciously avoided groundwater wells from areas near active or recent drilling to ensure shale gas development would not bias the results. We also intentionally targeted areas with naturally occurring CH4 to characterize the geochemical signature and geological context of gas-phase hydrocarbons in shallow aquifers of the NAB. Our data display a positive relationship between elevated [CH4], [C2H6], [Cl], and [Ba] that co-occur with high [4He]. Although four groundwater samples show mantle contributions ranging from 1.2% to 11.6%, the majority of samples have [He] ranging from solubility levels (?45 × 10-6 cm3 STP/L) with below-detectable [CH4] and minor amounts of tritiogenic 3He in low [Cl] and [Ba] waters, up to high [4He] = 0.4 cm3 STP/L with a purely crustal helium isotopic end-member (3He/4He = ?0.02 times the atmospheric ratio (R/Ra)) in samples with CH4 near saturation for shallow groundwater (P(CH4) = ?1 atmosphere) and elevated [Cl] and [Ba]. These data suggest that 4He is dominated by an exogenous (i.e., migrated) crustal source for these hydrocarbon gas- and salt-rich fluids. In combination with published inorganic geochemistry (e.g., 87Sr/86Sr, Sr/Ba, Br-/Cl-), new noble gas and hydrocarbon isotopic data (e.g., 20Ne/36Ar, C2+/C1, ?13C-CH4) suggest that a hydrocarbon-rich brine likely migrated from the Marcellus Formation (via primary hydrocarbon migration) as a dual-phase fluid (gas + liquid) and was fractionated by solubility partitioning during fluid migration and emplacement into conventional UD traps (via secondary hydrocarbon migration). Based on the highly fractionated 4He/CH4 data relative to Marcellus and UD production gases, we propose an additional phase of hydrocarbon gas migration where natural gas previously emplaced in UD hydrocarbon traps actively diffuses out into and equilibrates with modern shallow groundwater (via tertiary hydrocarbon migration) following uplift, denudation, and neotectonic fracturing. These data suggest that by integrating noble gas geochemistry with hydrocarbon and dissolved ion chemistry, one can better determine the source and migration processes of natural gas in the Earth's crust, which are two critical factors for understanding the presence of hydrocarbon gases in shallow aquifers.

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-mediated upregulation of hepatic microRNA-181 family promotes cancer cell migration by targeting MAPK phosphatase-5, regulating the activation of p38 MAPK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mi-Kyung [Center for Integrated Risk Research, Cellular and Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) (Korea, Republic of); School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seoungbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong-Keun [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seoungbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae-Chun, E-mail: ryujc@kist.re.kr [Center for Integrated Risk Research, Cellular and Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Growing evidence indicates that changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression in cancer induced by chemical carcinogens play an important role in cancer development and progression by regulating related genes. However, the mechanisms underlying miRNA involvement in hepatocarcinogenesis induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) remain unclear. Thus, the identification of aberrant miRNA expression during PAH-induced cancer cell migration will lead to a better understanding of the substantial role of miRNAs in cancer progression. In the present study, miRNA expression profiling showed significant upregulation of miR-181a, -181b, and -181d in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2 line) exposed to benzo[a]anthracene (BA) and benzo[k]fluoranthene (BF). MAPK phosphatase-5 (MKP-5), a validated miR-181 target that deactivates MAPKs, was markedly suppressed while phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was increased after BA and BF exposure. The migration of HepG2 cells, observed using the scratch wound-healing assay, also increased in a dose-dependent manner. Depletion of miR-181 family members by miRNA inhibitors enhanced the expression of MKP-5 and suppressed the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Furthermore, the depletion of the miR-181 family inhibited cancer cell migration. Based on these results, we conclude that the miR-181 family plays a critical role in PAH-induced hepatocarcinogenesis by targeting MKP-5, resulting in the regulation of p38 MAPK activation. - Highlights: • We found significant upregulation of miR-181 family in HCC exposed to BA and BF. • We identified the MKP-5 as a putative target of miR-181 family. • MKP-5 was suppressed while p-P38 was increased after BA and BF exposure. • The migration of HepG2 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner.

  11. Litiasis vesical secundaria a migración de dispositivo intrauterino: Reporte de un caso / Bladder lithiasis secondary to intrauterine device migration: Case report

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Tomás Lázaro, Rodríguez Collar; Yamel, Gil del Valle; Basily, Valdés Estévez; Víctor Osvaldo, Barquín Carmona; José Antonio, García Monzón.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Presentar un caso clínico de litiasis vesical secundaria a la migración de un dispositivo intrauterino, su sintomatología, los medios empleados para su diagnóstico y el tratamiento aplicado. Método/Resultado. Paciente de 30 años de edad, que al cabo del año de colocársele un dispositivo in [...] trauterino (T de cobre), luego de interrupción de embarazo mediante legrado endometrial, comenzó a presentar síntomas urinarios irritativos bajos. Se le trató durante dos años como si tuviese cistitis infecciosa con varios ciclos de diferentes antibióticos. Por la persistencia de las molestias asiste a la consulta de Urología, y se le detecta, mediante ultrasonido y radiografía ántero-posterior de la pelvis, una litiasis intravesical de cinco por tres centímetros de tamaño, con una T de cobre en su interior. Se le realizó la cistolitotomía suprapúbica, presentando una buena evolución y regresión total de los síntomas. Conclusión. La migración de un dispositivo intrauterino a la vejiga, es una causa infrecuente de litiasis vesical secundaria a cuerpo extraño. No obstante, debemos pensar en esta posibilidad ante la cronicidad de síntomas urinarios irritativos bajos, en toda mujer que emplee este método anticonceptivo. Abstract in english Objective: To report one clinical case of bladder lithiasis secondary to the migration of an intrauterine device, its symptoms, diagnostic tests employed and treatment. Methods/Results: 30 year old female patient who presented lower urinary tract irritative symptoms. One year before she underwent in [...] sertion of an intrauterine device (copper T) after endometrial curettage for pregnancy interruption. She received treatment for infection cystitis over two years, with various antibiotic cycles. The persistence of symptoms led her to the urology clinics, and a 5x 3 cm intravesical lithiasis with a copper T inside was detected by ultrasound and pelvic anterior-posterior x-ray. Suprapubic cystolithotomy was performed with a good outcome and disappearance of the symptoms. Conclusions: The migration of an intrauterine device to the bladder is an unfrequent cause of bladder lithiasis secondary to foreign body. Nevertheless, we must consider this possibility in front of chronic lower urinary tract irritative symptoms in every female using this birth control method.

  12. Influence of organic matter and clay minerals in migration of derivative compounds of hydrocarbons; Influencia da materia organica e argilominerais na migracao de compostos derivados de hidrocarbonetos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Denize Gloria Barcellos; Mendonca Filho, Joao Graciano de; Polivanov, Helena [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia]. E-mail: denize@geologia.ufrj.br; graciano@geologia.ufrj.br; helena@acd.ufrj.br

    2003-07-01

    Soil samples from the Guanabara Bay in Duque de Caxias city (RJ) were submitted to mineralogical and organic geochemistry analyses. This proceeding was used mainly to determine a possible interaction of hydrocarbons contaminants with the organic matter and the clay minerals presents in this mangrove. The sampling was carried out using Direct Push techniques. Thus, the mainly clay minerals characterizes were: gibbsite, illite, caulinite and smectite. The compositional analysis of organic constituents showed a predominance of amorphous material (degraded cuticles), followed of wood material and sporomorphs constituents, suggesting that the biological degradation occurred in situ. (author)

  13. Carbonate redistribution, element mobilisation and petroleum hydrocarbon migration in Posidonia shale (Hils basin, NW Germany) as a function of palaeotemperature load from the Vlotho mass; Karbonatumverteilung, Mobilisation von Elementen und Migration von Erdoel-Kohlenwasserstoffen im Posidonienschiefer (Hilsmulde, NW-Deutschland) in Abhaengigkeit von der Palaeotemperaturbeanspruchung durch das Massiv von Vlotho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochum, J.

    1993-04-01

    Temperature-controlled processes of carbonate redistribution, element mobilisation and petroleum hydrocarbon migration in the Posidonia shale of North West Germany (Lower Toarcian) were documented, and a statistical evaluation was made. The investigations focused on six Posidonia shales of the Hils basin which had been exposed to increasing palaeotemperature stress from SE to NW in the direction of the injected mass of Vlotho. According to earlier investigations, the mean values of vitrinite reflection in the six boreholes are between 0.48% Rm and 1.45% Rm. This corresponds to a maximum palaeotemperature of 93-190 C. (orig./EF) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden temperaturgesteuerte Prozesse der Umverteilung von Karbonaten, der Mobilisation von Elementen und der Migration von Erdoel-Kohlenwasserstoffen im nordwestdeutschen Posidonienschiefer (Unteres Toarcium) dokumentiert und bilanziert. Gegenstand der Untersuchungen waren sechs Posidonienschieferprofile aus dem Bereich der Hilsmulde, die von SE and NW in Annaeherung an das Intrusivmassiv von Vlotho eine zunehmende Palaeotemperaturbeanspruchung erfahren haben. Frueheren Untersuchungen zufolge liegen die Mittelwerte der Vitrinitreflexion in den sechs Bohrungen zwischen 0,48% Rm und 1,45% Rm, was einem Bereich der maximal erreichten Palaeotemperatur zwischen ca. 93 C und ca. 190 C entspricht. (orig./EF)

  14. An open-water electrical geophysical tool for mapping sub-seafloor heavy placer minerals in 3D and migrating hydrocarbon plumes in 4D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, J.; Williamson, M.; Urquhart, S.; Fleming, J.

    2011-01-01

    A towed-streamer technology has been developed for mapping placer heavy minerals and dispersed hydrocarbon plumes in the open ocean. The approach uses induced polarization (IP), an electrical measurement that encompasses several different surface-reactive capacitive and electrochemical phenomena, and thus is ideally suited for mapping dispersed or disseminated targets. The application is operated at sea by towing active electrical geophysical streamers behind a ship; a wide area can be covered in three dimensions by folding tow-paths over each other in lawn-mower fashion. This technology has already been proven in laboratory and ocean settings to detect IP-reactive titanium-and rare-earth (REE) minerals such as ilmenite and monazite. By extension, minerals that weather and accumulate/concentrate by a similar mechanism, including gold, platinum, and diamonds, may be rapidly detected and mapped indirectly even when dispersed and covered with thick, inert sediment. IP is also highly reactive to metal structures such as pipelines and cables. ?? 2011 MTS.

  15. Benzo[b]naphthothiophenes and alkyl dibenzothiophenes: molecular tracers for oil migration distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meijun; Wang, T.-G.; Shi, Shengbao; Liu, Keyu; Ellis, Geoffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    The secondary migration of petroleum is one of the most critical geological processes responsible for the accumulation of hydrocarbons in a sedimentary basin. Pyrrolic nitrogen compounds such as carbazoles and benzocarbazoles are thought to be practical molecular indicators for estimating relative migration distances of oil. In light oils or condensates, however, considerable analytical errors are usually caused by low concentrations of NSO-compounds. Here we show that polycyclic sulfur aromatic hydrocarbons such as dibenzothiophene, C1?C3 alkylated dibenzothiophenes and benzo[b]naphthothiophenes, which are present in relatively higher concentrations than the pyrrolic nitrogen compounds, exhibit changes in both absolute and relative concentrations that correlate with migration distances. The polycyclic sulfur aromatic hydrocarbons related parameters — benzo[b]naphtho[2,1-d]thiophene/{benzo[b]naphtho[2,1-d]thiophene + benzo[b]naphtho[1,2-d]thiophene} (abbreviated as [2,1]BNT/([2,1]BNT+[1,2]BNT) and the concentration of total dibenzothiophenes plus benzo[b]naphthothiophenes — are proposed by this paper to trace the oil migration distances.

  16. International Migration of Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Junge, Martin; Poutvaara, Panu

    2015-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model regarding the migration of dual-earner couples and test it in the context of international migration. Our model predicts that the probability that a couple emigrates increases with the income of the primary earner, whereas the income of the secondary earner may affect the decision in either direction. We conduct an empirical analysis that uses population-wide administrative data from Denmark, and the results are consistent with our model. We find that primary earne...

  17. Planet Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Thommes, Edward W.; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Planet migration is the process by which a planet's orbital radius changes in time. The main agent for causing gas giant planet migration is the gravitational interaction of the young planet with the gaseous disk from which it forms. We describe the migration rates resulting from these interactions based on a simple model for disk properties. These migration rates are higher than is reasonable for planet survival. We discuss some proposed models for which the migration rates...

  18. Transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in permafrost soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sampling program was conducted to determine the presence and extent of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in permafrost soils at an abandoned arctic weather station. Core samples were taken of frozen silty clay at two known contaminated sites and analyzed for total petroleum hydrocarbon content. Contamination was observed at depths of 0.5 m into the permafrost. The most influential transport mechanism is likely to be migration of hydrocarbons through cracks, fissures and filled voids in the permafrost soil due to gravity drainage and capillary action. Another possible transport mechanism is by diffusion in unfrozen water within the permafrost. 19 refs., 4 figs

  19. Ictericia obstructiva secundaria a migración de fragmentos de hepatocarcinoma a la vía biliar Obstructive jaundice secondary to hepatocellular carcinoma fragments migrated to common bile duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN HEPP K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available La ictericia obstructiva es una presentación poco común en un hepatocarcinoma (HC. Cuando en estos casos existe ictericia, habitualmente se debe a daño progresivo por cirrosis, o a infiltración tumoral extensa. El crecimiento o vaciamiento tumoral hacia la vía biliar se ha descrito ocasionalmente como causa de ictericia obstructiva. En raras ocasiones, puede tratarse de fragmentos de hepatocarcinoma que migran hacia la vía biliar, obstruyéndola. Presentamos un caso de ictericia obstructiva por migración de fragmentos de hepatocarcinoma a la vía biliar, en un paciente tratado 7 años antes por un HC, con resección curativa.Obstructive j aundice is a rare presentation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HC, and when it occurs, usually is due to progressive damage from cirrhosis, or extensive tumor infiltration. Tumor growth through the bile duct is being described with increasing frequency as a cause of obstructive j aundice. Rarely, it may be hepatocarcinoma fragments that migrate to the bile duct, obstructing it. We present a case of obstructive jaundice due to migration of fragments of hepatocellular carcinoma to the bile duct in a patient treated 7 years before, for an HC with a curative resection.

  20. Molecular and carbon isotope compositions of hydrocarbon gas in Neogene sedimentary rocks in Horonobe area, Northern Hokkaido, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted headspace gas analyses using cores from two 520 m boreholes to evaluate the gas permeability of Neogene sedimentary rocks in Horonobe, Hokkaido, Japan. Analytical data suggest that most hydrocarbon gases are microbial methane. Further analyses of these data indicated that the low concentration and heavy carbon isotope composition of methane could be explained by carbon isotopic fractionation during migration near fractures. The high residual volume of microbial methane observed in the study area suggests that the sedimentary layers have low gas permeability, and are affected less by secondary post-generation processes. The headspace gas analysis is an effective approach for detecting sedimentary layers having a high confinement capability. (author)

  1. Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in va...

  2. Hydrocarbon generation, migration and accumulation in the Eo-cretaceous continental Potiguar rift basin, Northeastern Brazil; Analise regional do trinomio geracao - migracao - acumulacao de hidrocarbonetos na sequencia continental eocretacica da Bacia Potiguar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Neves, Carlos A. de [PETROBRAS, Manaus, AM (Brazil). Distrito de Exploracao da Amazonia Ocidental

    1989-07-01

    Location and geological characteristics of Potiguar Basin are presented. Studies of the basin`s structural framework, Pre-cambrian basement physiography, chrono-stratigraphic unit structure, and areas displaying concentrations of potential hydrocarbon source rocks are also discussed. 10 figs., 1 tab., 28 refs

  3. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).

  4. Permian-Triassic maturation and multistage migration of hydrocarbons in the Assistência Formation (Irati Subgroup), Paraná Basin, Brazil: implications for the exploration model / Maturação permotriássica e os vários estágios de migração de hidrocarbonetos na Formação Assistência (Subgrupo Irati), Bacia do Paraná: implicações para os modelos exploratórios

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    António, Mateus; Claudio, Riccomini; Ezequiel J. E. C. B., Ferreira; Colombo C. G., Tassinari.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Novas linhas de evidências geológicas sugerem fortemente que o principal período de maturação de hidrocarbonetos na Formação Assistência teria ocorrido no Permotriássico, estimulado por um gradiente geotérmico elevado que também sustentou várias manifestações de atividade hidrotermal. Três fases pri [...] ncipais de migração de fluidos e hidrocarbonetos também podem ser inferidas a partir de observações em multiescala: fluxo confinado no final do Permiano ao Triássico, dependente do acúmulo local de pressões de fluidos; fluxo heterogêneo no Cretáceo Inferior, desencadeado por um gradiente de temperatura rejuvenescido, assistido pelas condições de permeabilidade antes desenvolvidas; e um fluxo tardio, possivelmente impulsionado por gradientes de pressão locais, posteriormente ao esfriamento dos diques e soleiras de diabásio. A maturação precoce e a existência de vários estágios de migração de hidrocarbonetos apresentam implicações significativas na concepção de modelos exploratórios a serem aplicados na Bacia do Paraná. Abstract in english New lines of geological evidence strongly suggest that the main period of hydrocarbon maturation within Assistência Formation should be Permian-Triassic, stimulated by a high geothermal gradient that also sustained various manifestations of hydrothermal activity. Three main stages of fluid/hydrocarb [...] on migration can also be inferred on the basis of multiscale observations: confined flow in late Permian to Triassic times, depending on the local build-up of fluid pressures; heterogeneous flow in Lower Cretaceous, triggered by a rejuvenated temperature gradient assisted by the early developed permeability conditions; and a late flow possibly driven by local pressure gradients, after complete cooling of dolerite dykes/sills. The early maturation and multistage migration of hydrocarbons have significant consequences in the design of exploration models to be applied in Paraná Basin.

  5. Italian migration

    OpenAIRE

    DEL BOCA, Daniela; Venturini, Alessandra

    2003-01-01

    Italy is a country with a long history of emigration and a very short experience of immigration. The paper first surveys the Italian emigration pattern describing the characteristics of the Italian emigrants (age, sex, skill level), their area of origins and the directions of their movement. The determinants of the migration choice are then analyzed as well as the policies affecting the decision to migrate. The end of the first section provides an analysis of the emigration effects in the are...

  6. Migration chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration chemistry, the influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour of pollutants in the environment, is an interplay between the actual natur of the pollutant and the characteristics of the environment, such as pH, redox conditions and organic matter content. The wide selection of possible pollutants in combination with varying geological media, as well as the operation of different chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions compleactes the prediction of the influence of these processes on the mobility of pollutants. The report summarizes a wide range of potential pollutants in the terrestrial environment as well as a variety of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions, which can be expected to influence the migration behaviour, comprising diffusion, dispersion, convection, sorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, transformations/degradations, biochemical reactions and complex formation. The latter comprises the complexation of metal ions as well as non-polar organics to naturally occurring organic macromolecules. The influence of the single types of processes on the migration process is elucidated based on theoretical studies. The influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour is unambiguous, as the processes apparently control the transport of pollutants in the terrestrial environment. As the simple, conventional KD concept breaks down, it is suggested that the migration process should be described in terms of the alternative concepts chemical dispersion, average-elution-time and effective retention. (AB) (134 refs.)

  7. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  8. Planetary migration

    CERN Document Server

    Armitage, P J; Armitage, Philip J.

    2005-01-01

    Gravitational torques between a planet and gas in the protoplanetary disk result in orbital migration of the planet, and are likely to play an important role in the formation and early evolution of planetary systems. For masses comparable to those of observed giant extrasolar planets, the interaction with the disk is strong enough to form a gap, leading to coupled evolution of the planet and disk on a viscous time scale (Type II migration). Both the existence of hot Jupiters, and the statistical distribution of observed orbital radii, are consistent with an important role for Type II migration in the history of currently observed systems. We discuss the possibility of improving constraints on migration by including information on the host stars' metallicity, and note that migration could also form a population of massive planets at large orbital radii that may be indirectly detected via their influence on debris disks. For lower mass planets with masses of the order of that of the Earth, surface density pertu...

  9. Migration Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crida, Aurélien

    2015-08-01

    The great variety of the architectures of the extra-solar planetary systems has revealed the fundamental role played by planetary migration: the interactions between the planets and the gaseous disk in which they form leads to a modification of their orbits. Here, I will review the basic processes and the most recent results in this area.Planets up to ~50 Earth masses are prone to so-called type I migration.I will describe the processes at play, namely the Lindblad and corotation torques, and explain how the total torque depends on the planet mass and the local disk structure. Application to realistic disks shows one or two sweet spot(s) for outward migration of planets roughly between 5 and 30 Earth masses around the snowline ; this is confirmed by dedicated 3D numerical simulations. This has strong consequences on the formation of hot Super-Earths or mini-Neptunes.For smaller mass planets, it has been recently proposed that the heating of the neighboring gas by the luminous planet can lead to a positive torque, hence promoting outward migration. On the other hand, if the planet is not a heat source, a cold finger appears, whose resulting torque is negative. Applications of these two recent results should be discussed.Giant planets open gaps in the proto-planetary disk, and then are supposedly subject to type II migration, following the viscous accretion of the disk. This standard picture has been questioned recently, as gas appears to drift through the gap. Although the gap opening process is well understood in 2D for a planet on a fixed orbit, recent results on 3D simulations or migrating planets make the picture more accurate.Our ever better understanding of planet-disk interactions is of crucial importance as the statistics on extra solar systems keep growing and the results of these interactions are now imaged.

  10. Neuronal Migration Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    NINDS Neuronal Migration Disorders Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Neuronal Migration Disorders? Is there ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neuronal Migration Disorders? Neuronal migration disorders (NMDs) are a group ...

  11. Evaluation des bassins par modélisation intégrée en deux dimensions des transferts techniques, de l'écoulement des fluides, de la genèse et de la migration des hydrocarbures Basin Evaluation by Integrated Two-Dimensional Modeling of Heat Transfer, Fluid Flow, Hydrocarbon Generation, and Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Chenet P. Y.; Bessis F.; Ungerer P.; Burrus J.; Doligez B.

    2006-01-01

    Le modèle de bassin exposé dans cet article décrit les phénomènes physiques et chimiques qui contrôlent la formation d'accumulations commerciales, dans le cadre évolutif d'un bassin sédimentaire affecté par la subsidence : transfert de chaleur, compaction et écoulement de l'eau, génèse des hydrocarbures, migration diphasique de l'eau et des hydrocarbures. Le modèle tient compte des variations de conductivité et des phénomènes thermiques transitoires pour reconstituer les paléo-températures. D...

  12. International Migration and Remittances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dattatray Sitaram Bagade

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Human migration is a physical movement by human beings from one geographical areato another geographical area. Migration is internal as well as external. At theinternational level, no universally accepted definition for “Migrant” exists. The UniteNations defines “migration as an individual who has resided in a foreign country formore than one year irrespective of the causes, voluntary or involuntary, and the means,regular or irregular, used migrate”. Key terms of migrations is documented migration,economic migration, irregular migration, skilled migration, temporary workersmigration, internally displaced persons (IDP migration, refugee, stateless person, etc. .

  13. Hydrocarbon Formation in Immature Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D.J. ANTIA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Immature sediments (Ro=<0.6 and hydrates commonly contain low concentrations of C2-8+ alkanes/alkenes, higher alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (temperature=<373 K; Pressure=<100 MPa. Their origin is enigmatic. Traditionally they are interpreted as migrated thermogenic oil. Water treatment experiments have established that they could be formed through the interaction of water and organic carbon by Fe catalysis at 298 K. This study investigates the Eh and pH associated with low temperature (263-298 K hydrocarbon formation in saline pore-waters containing Ca-montmorillonite and Fe0 (ZVI over a 300 day period in order to identify the principal reaction mechanisms. The interaction of flowing gaseous carbon dioxide-hydrocarbon mixtures with halite promoted with FexOy, Fex[OH]y at 288 – 308 K is examined experimentally. The study established that halite and mixtures of halite with organic material, Fe-montmorillonite, CaCO3, Ca(OH2, MgSO4, (NH42SO4, K2SO4, pyroclastics, ash, phosphate enriched organic material, and coal can facilitate the removal of CO2, the formation of H2O on the catalyst surface, and the formation of hydrocarbons incorporating the CO2.

    Key Word: ZVI; Oil formation; CO2; Eh; pH; NaCl; Halite; Montmorillonite

  14. The presence of hydrocarbons in southeast Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanken, Niels Martin; Hansen, Malene Dolberg; Kresten Nielsen, Jesper; Olaussen, Snorre; Buchardt, Bjørn; Eggebø, Tor

    2008-01-01

    Hydrocarbons, mostly found as solid pyrobitumen, are known from more than 30 localities in southeast Norway. They occur as inclusions in a wide range of "reservoir rocks" spanning from Permo-Carboniferous breccias to veins (vein quartz and calcite veins) in Precambrian granites, gneisses and amphibolites, and especially in primary and secondary pores in Cambrian, Ordovician and Silurian sedimentary rocks. In some places, vesicles in Carboniferous rhomb porphyry lava (RP1), gabbro and basalt (B1)...

  15. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth of reserves and resources (H. Le Leuch); Additional reserves: the role of new technologies - A global perspective on EORIOR (G. Fries); - Updating reservoir models with dynamic data and uncertainty quantification: an integrated approach (F. Roggero); Seismic technology for the OAPEC countries (P. Canal); Exploration knowledge and technologies: impact of progress - Statistical results (N. Alazard); Stratigraphic modelling as a key to find new potentialities in exploration (D. Granjeon); Modelling hydrocarbon migration as a tool for reserve estimation (J-L. Rudkiewicz); The contribution of surface and near surface geology to hydrocarbon discoveries (S.M. Kumati); Contribution of the exploration activity in renewing reserves - The case of Algeria (R. Lounissi); Egypt's petroleum hydrocarbon potential (H. Hataba); Future of hydrocarbon reserves in Syria (T. Hemsh); Natural gas, the fuel of choice for decades to com (M.F. Chabrelie); The role and importance of Arab natural gas in world market (M. Al-Lababidi); LNG and GTL: two pathways for natural gas utilization (C. Cameron); Yet to find hydrocarbon potential (S. Al Menhali); Libyan context of hydrocarbon reserves: abundance or scarcity? (M. Elazi)

  16. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth of reserves and resources (H. Le Leuch); Additional reserves: the role of new technologies - A global perspective on EORIOR (G. Fries); - Updating reservoir models with dynamic data and uncertainty quantification: an integrated approach (F. Roggero); Seismic technology for the OAPEC countries (P. Canal); Exploration knowledge and technologies: impact of progress - Statistical results (N. Alazard); Stratigraphic modelling as a key to find new potentialities in exploration (D. Granjeon); Modelling hydrocarbon migration as a tool for reserve estimation (J-L. Rudkiewicz); The contribution of surface and near surface geology to hydrocarbon discoveries (S.M. Kumati); Contribution of the exploration activity in renewing reserves - The case of Algeria (R. Lounissi); Egypt's petroleum hydrocarbon potential (H. Hataba); Future of hydrocarbon reserves in Syria (T. Hemsh); Natural gas, the fuel of choice for decades to com (M.F. Chabrelie); The role and importance of Arab natural gas in world market (M. Al-Lababidi); LNG and GTL: two pathways for natural gas utilization (C. Cameron); Yet to find hydrocarbon potential (S. Al Menhali); Libyan context of hydrocarbon reserves: abundance or scarcity? (M. Elazi)

  17. Dehydrogenation of dehydrogenatable hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, M.J.; Imai, T.; Bricker, J.C.; Mackowiak

    1986-01-21

    This patent describes a process for the dehydrogenation of dehydrogenatable hydrocarbon with separate and intermediate selective oxidation of hydrogen. The hydrocarbon is joined with a dehydrogenation catalyst which contains an alkaline metal-promoted iron compound in a first-reaction dehydrogenation zone.

  18. Evolution of cuticular hydrocarbons of Hawaiian Drosophilidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Helena; Rouault, Jacques-Deric; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Yoshiro; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Kim, Yong-Kyu; Jallon, Jean-Marc

    2010-09-01

    Hawaiian Drosophila offer an excellent model for adaptive evolution. More than 500 species are reported in Hawaiian islands, and there is considerable diversity in behavior and morphology. Such diversity is mainly driven by sexual selection. In this study qualitative and quantitative chemical compositions of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) in 138 flies belonging to 27 Hawaiian Drosophila species, picture-winged and non picture-winged, were analyzed regarding sexual dimorphism, differences in saturation, branching position, and lengths of CHCs. We found significant variation in the CHC patterns. In several subgroups, new species show decreases in unsaturated hydrocarbons, and gradual increases in branched compounds, monomethylalkanes and dimethylalkanes, not commonly found in Drosophila. Moreover, branching positions gradually shifted towards internal carbons, and chain lengths increased in the new species. The long-term evolution of CHCs in the light of the recent evolutionary migration and adaptation history of Hawaiian Drosophila species along the developing archipelago was discussed. PMID:20480222

  19. Migration of birds

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the migration of birds. Topics covered include why birds migrate, when birds migrate, speed, altitude, courses, distance, major flyways and...

  20. Migration trends in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Philippe ( Laboratoire de démographie et d'études familiales, Université de Genève, Switzerland )

    2002-01-01

    In order to grasp the complexity of migration trends in Europe it is important, given the limitations of the available statistics, to look at the wider issue, breaking it down into four separate elements: 1. the migration flows affecting Council of Europe member states in recent decades, distinguishing between migration between member states and migration flows with other parts of the world; 2. the reasons for migration, with particular reference to illegal migration or asylum; 3. the socio-d...

  1. Isoprenoid petroleum hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Al A.; Abryutina, N. N.

    1989-06-01

    The outcome of studies on the chemistry of petroleum carried out during the last 10-15 years is examined. It is shown that petroleum is a very complex mixture of natural products, the most important place among which is occupied by C10-C40 isoprenoid hydrocarbons represented by aliphatic, alicyclic, and aromatic compounds. The relations between the isoprenoid petroleum hydrocarbons and their possible bioorganic precursors are discussed. The possibility of using isoprenoid hydrocarbons (as biomarkers) in discovering the pathways leading to the genesis and chemical evolution of petroleums and also prospecting for petroleum deposits is demonstrated. The bibliography includes 104 references.

  2. Higher carotinoid petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorob`yeva, N.S.; Zemskova, Z.K.; Punanov, V.G.; Petrov, A.A. [Institute of Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1993-12-31

    Gas chromatography and chromato-mass spectrometry have been used to investigate the saturated hydrocarbon fraction of crude oil from the Sary-Bulak field (Zaisansk basin, Kazakhstan). The high concentration of higher carotinoid cyclanes in the mixture investigated is shown: lexane (C{sub 33}), {gamma}- and {beta}-carotanes (C{sub 40}). The content of the latter hydrocarbon in the saturated fraction reaches 2{center_dot}5%. Ways in which these cyclanes are formed from natural carotinoids are discussed. Mass spectra of the hydrocarbons identified are presented. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Minneapolis Multi-Ethnic Curriculum Project--Migration Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minneapolis Public Schools, Minn. Dept. of Intergroup Education.

    The student booklet presents short chapters illustrating the migration unit of the Minneapolis Multi-Ethnic Curriculum Project for secondary schools. Sixteen brief chapters describe migration, immigration, and emigration in the United States. The first six chapters offer first person accounts of immigrants from Norway, Korea, Egypt, Hitler's…

  4. Immunoassay for petroleum hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soil and ground water has become a serious environmental problem. Since the 1940s, it has been a common practice to bury fuel tanks underground to guard against fire and explosions. The leakage of petroleum fuel from these aging tanks creates a long term threat to human health. In order to location and identify these sources of contamination, an on-site screening test is very desirable. A simple, inexpensive petroleum hydrocarbon immunoassay has been developed for this purpose. The EnviroGard Petroleum Hydrocarbon test kit is designed for qualitative or semiquantitative analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon fuel in soil and ground water. The assay can be easily used on-site and takes 15 minutes to perform. Following a 2 minute methanol extraction, the test is performed in polystyrene tubes and can detect gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, home heating oil and other major fuels at ppm levels in soil and sub-ppm levels in water samples

  5. Migration and trade

    OpenAIRE

    Egger, Peter H.; Ehrlich, Maximilian von; Nelson, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical research in economics suggests that bilateral migration triggers bilateral trade through a number of channels. This paper assesses the functional form of the impact of migration on trade flows in a quasi-experimental setting. We provide evidence that the relationship is not log-linear. In particular, at small levels of migration (stocks) the elasticity of trade to migration is quite high, and it declines to zero at about 4,000 immigrants. If migration stocks exceed s...

  6. International Migration and Remittances

    OpenAIRE

    Dattatray Sitaram Bagade

    2012-01-01

    Human migration is a physical movement by human beings from one geographical areato another geographical area. Migration is internal as well as external. At theinternational level, no universally accepted definition for “Migrant” exists. The UniteNations defines “migration as an individual who has resided in a foreign country formore than one year irrespective of the causes, voluntary or involuntary, and the means,regular or irregular, used migrate”. Key terms of migrations is documented migr...

  7. Heuristical Strategies on the Study Theme "The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons -- Alkenes"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumescu, Adrienne Kozan; Pasca, Roxana-Diana

    2011-01-01

    The influence of heuristical strategies upon the level of two experimental classes is studied in this paper. The didactic experiment took place at secondary school in Cluj-Napoca, in 2008-2009 school year. The study theme "The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons--Alkenes" has been efficiently learned by using the most active methods: laboratory…

  8. Haltenbanken hydrocarbon province (offshore mid-Norway)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R.M.; Heum, O.R.

    1988-02-01

    Exploration drilling at Haltenbanken started in 1980, and to date, 11 significant hydrocarbon discoveries have been made. The estimated total recoverable reserves are 310 million standard m/sup 3/ of oil and condensate and 305 billion standard m/sup 3/ of gas. Only 14 out of 25 wildcat wells were dry, giving a pure exploration success ratio of 44%. The major structural elements at Haltenbanken are (from east to west) the Troendelag platform, the Halten terrace, and the Deep Moere basin. The major hydrocarbon discoveries are located on the Halten terrace and on the western margin of the Troendelag platform. Seven of the most important discoveries at Haltenbanken serve as case examples. The variations in types of hydrocarbons (oil vs gas or gas-condensates) entrapped in the individual fields are caused by subtle, but important, variations in source rock maturity, migration conditions (including drainage area and storage capacity), trapping conditions (fill-spill or fill-leak), timing, and pressure-volume-temperature conditions.

  9. Sulfidization and magnetization above hydrocarbon reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, R.L.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Tuttle, M.L. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Geochemical and rock magnetic studies of strata over Cement oil field (Anadarko basin, Oklahoma), Simpson oil field (North Slope basin, Alaska), and the Edwards deep gas trend, south Texas coastal plain, document changes in original magnetizations caused by postdepositional iron sulfide minerals that are, or may be, related to hydrocarbon seepage. At Cement, ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 7}S{sub 8}) formed with pyrite and marcasite in Permian red beds. The Fe-S minerals contain isotopically heavy, abiogenic sulfur derived from thermal degradation of petroleum and (or) isotopically light sulfur derived from sulfate-reducing bacteria fed by leaking hydrocarbons. At Simpson, ferrimagnetic greigite (Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4}) dominates magnetizations in Upper Cretaceous nonmarine beds that contain biodegraded oil. Sulfur isotopic data are consistent with, but do not prove, a genetic link between the greigite ({delta}{sup 34}S {gt} +20 per mil) and seepage. In middle Tertiary sandstones of southeast Texas, pyrite and marcasite formed when abiogenic H{sub 2}S migrated upward from deep reservoirs, or when H{sub 2}S was produced at shallow depths by bacteria that utilized organic material dissolved in migrating water from depth. The sulfide minerals replaced detrital magnetite to result in a systematic decrease in magnetic susceptibility toward faults that connect deep petroleum reservoirs to shallow sandstone. The authors results show that abiologic and biologic mechanisms can generate magnetic sulfide minerals in some sulfidic zones of hydrocarbon seepage. The magnetizations in such zones are diminished most commonly by replacement of detrital magnetic minerals with nonmagnetic sulfide minerals or are unchanged if such detrital minerals were originally absent.

  10. Electrokinetic studies of dispersed systems of solid hydrocarbons from crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agaev, S.G.; Gundyrev, A.A.; Kazakova, L.P.

    1971-01-01

    Electrokinetic phenomena in nonaqueous dispersed systems of solid hydrocarbons are related to deparaffinization and oil-stripping processes. Authors studied the effect of direct current on suspensions of solid hydrocarbons in organic solvents. Aromatic and aliphatic solvents, ketones, and chlorinated liquids were used. About 1 g of solid hydrocarbon was suspended in 10 ml of solvent, and exposed to a voltage of 12.5 kv/cm. In some cases, the hydrocarbon migrated to the cathode; in other cases, migration toward both cathode and anode occurred. Thus the direct electric current produced electrophoresis, double electrophoresis, and interelectrode circulation, accompanied by aggregation of dispersed phase particles and various characteristics of structure formation. All these phenomena are related to formation of the double electric layer at the phase boundaries.

  11. Theoretical base of new technology of hydrocarbons exploration in the south Caspian basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : This article provides with new data, which are of great importance for the understanding of hydrocarbon system peculiarities if the south Caspian basin. There was determined non-coincidence and sometimes back correlation in the folded structure of complexes of different ages and also different orientation of axes of the folds and directions of faults in different tectonic zones. In the sedimentary cover of the south Caspian basin there were identified specific structures associated with generation and migration of hydrocarbons. Large-scale migration of hydrocarbons occurs instantly from time to time. It was determined that most earthquakes occurs in the south Caspian basin in the sedimentary cover at depth from 10 to 20 km and paragenesis of mud volcanos eruptions was determined too. There exist an opinion that the improved technology of hydrocarbon exploration will increase the efficiency of exploration works in a complex basin like the south Caspian one.

  12. Geochemical assessment of light gaseous hydrocarbons in near-surface soils of Kutch–Saurashtra: Implication for hydrocarbon prospects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Lakshmi Srinivasa Rao; T Madhavi; D Srinu; M S Kalpana; D J Patil; A M Dayal

    2013-02-01

    Light hydrocarbons in soil have been used as direct indicators in geochemical hydrocarbon exploration, which remains an unconventional path in the petroleum industry. The occurrence of adsorbed soil gases, methane and heavier homologues were recorded in the near-surface soil samples collected from Kutch–Saurashtra, India. Soil gas alkanes were interpreted to be derived from deep-seated hydrocarbon sources and have migrated to the surface through structural discontinuities. The source of hydrocarbons is assessed to be thermogenic and could have been primarily derived from humic organic matter with partial contribution from sapropelic matter. Gas chromatographic analyses of hydrocarbons desorbed from soil samples through acid extraction technique showed the presence of methane through -butane and the observed concentrations (in ppb) vary from: methane (C1) from 4–291, ethane (C2) from 0–84, propane (C3) from 0–37, i-butane (iC4) from 0–5 and -butane (nC4) from 0–4. Carbon isotopes measured for methane and ethane by GC-C-IRMS, range between ?42.9‰ to ?13.3‰ (Pee Dee Belemnite – PDB) and ?21.2‰ to ?12.4‰ (PDB), respectively. The increased occurrence of hydrocarbons in the areas near Anjar of Kutch and the area south to Rajkot of Saurashtra signifies the area potential for oil and gas.

  13. Geochemical assessment of light gaseous hydrocarbons in near-surface soils of Kutch-Saurashtra: Implication for hydrocarbon prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P. Lakshmi Srinivasa; Madhavi, T.; Srinu, D.; Kalpana, M. S.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.

    2013-02-01

    Light hydrocarbons in soil have been used as direct indicators in geochemical hydrocarbon exploration, which remains an unconventional path in the petroleum industry. The occurrence of adsorbed soil gases, methane and heavier homologues were recorded in the near-surface soil samples collected from Kutch-Saurashtra, India. Soil gas alkanes were interpreted to be derived from deep-seated hydrocarbon sources and have migrated to the surface through structural discontinuities. The source of hydrocarbons is assessed to be thermogenic and could have been primarily derived from humic organic matter with partial contribution from sapropelic matter. Gas chromatographic analyses of hydrocarbons desorbed from soil samples through acid extraction technique showed the presence of methane through n-butane and the observed concentrations (in ppb) vary from: methane (C1) from 4-291, ethane (C2) from 0-84, propane (C3) from 0-37, i-butane (iC4) from 0-5 and n-butane (nC4) from 0-4. Carbon isotopes measured for methane and ethane by GC-C-IRMS, range between -42.9‰ to -13.3‰ (Pee Dee Belemnite - PDB) and -21.2‰ to -12.4‰ (PDB), respectively. The increased occurrence of hydrocarbons in the areas near Anjar of Kutch and the area south to Rajkot of Saurashtra signifies the area potential for oil and gas.

  14. NNDC database migration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NNDC Database Migration was necessary to replace obsolete hardware and software, to be compatible with the industry standard in relational databases (mature software, large base of supporting software for administration and dissemination and replication and synchronization tools) and to improve the user access in terms of interface and speed. The Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) consists of a Sybase Adaptive Server Enterprise (ASE), which is relatively easy to move between different RDB systems (e.g., MySQL, MS SQL-Server, or MS Access), the Structured Query Language (SQL) and administrative tools written in Java. Linux or UNIX platforms can be used. The existing ENSDF datasets are often VERY large and will need to be reworked and both the CRP (adopted) and CRP (Budapest) datasets give elemental cross sections (not relative I?) in the RI field (so it is not immediately obvious which of the old values has been changed). But primary and secondary intensities are now available on the same scale. The intensity normalization has been done for us. We will gain access to a large volume of data from Budapest and some of those gamma-ray intensity and energy data will be superior to what we already have

  15. Migration and revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nando Sigona

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Arab Spring has not radically transformed migration patterns in the Mediterranean, and the label ‘migration crisis’ does not do justice to the composite and stratified reality.

  16. Selecting hydrocarbon rocket propulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James A.

    Past studies have shown that the dry weight of future Earth-to-orbit vehicles can be reduced by the combined use of hydrogen and hydrocarbon propulsion compared to all-hydrogen propulsion. This paper shows that the use of certain hydrocarbon engines with hydrogen engines produces the lowest vehicle dry mass. These hydrocarbon engines use propane or RP-1 fuel, hydrogen cooling, and hydrogen-rich gas generators. Integration of the hydrogen and hydrocarbon nozzles is also beneficial.

  17. Irregular Migration of Egyptians

    OpenAIRE

    ROMAN, Howaida

    2008-01-01

    After defining irregular migration and tackling its different dimensions, the analytical note proposes to analyse the causes and dynamics of irregular migration in Egypt. It highlights furthermore the determinants of EU Policies in the realm of irregular migration, and Egypt’s policy-making approach towards irregular migrants. The conclusion emphasizes the necessity of forging coherent and effective policies on irregular migration in the context of a partnership between origin countries and d...

  18. Globalization, Migration and Development

    OpenAIRE

    George, Susan; Samuel, John

    2002-01-01

    EnglishMigration may become the most important branch of demography in the earlydecades of the new millennium in a rapidly globalizing world. This paper discusses the causes, costsand benefits of international migration to countries of the South and North, and key issues of commonconcern. International migration is as old as national boundaries, though its nature, volume,direction, causes and consequences have changed. The causes of migration are rooted in the rate ofpopulation growth and the...

  19. On Marriage and Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Oded

    1988-01-01

    Marriage, migration and related phenomena such as marital stability, fertility and investment in human capital may be better explained by studying marriage and migration jointly. We thus proceed in this paper to explore the role of migration in obtaining joint labour-market and marriage-market equilibrium. This facilitates identification of several novel and testable hypotheses.

  20. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

    1987-05-19

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 6 figs.

  1. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

    1988-09-13

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 5 figs.

  2. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Holly (Bethel Island, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethel Island, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  3. Hydrocarbon resources in Quebec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A leading expert in exploration geology was asked his opinion regarding government intervention in hydrocarbon exploration and development with respect to sustainable development requirements. Fifty-one per cent of Quebec's energy consumption is attributed to hydrocarbons and 38 per cent to electricity. It is expected that proportions of this demand will remain the same for several decades. This paper evaluates Quebec's hydrocarbon potential and exploration to meet future energy demands. It was suggested that the Quebec government should explore the idea of uniting government, university and private enterprises in assessing the resource potential of Quebec's sedimentary basins with the possibility of using strategic information from oil and gas companies to improve existing databases. Quebec's objective is to improve energy security and supply and to improve the economic prosperity of Quebec's natural resource development, particularly hydrocarbons. It was also emphasized that oil and gas exploration should eventually be harmonized with renewable energy source development, a transition that could take several decades. 2 tabs., 2 figs

  4. Hydrocarbonization research: completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, E.L.; Cochran, H.D. Jr.; Westmoreland, P.R.; Brown, C.H. Jr.; Oswald, G.E.; Barker, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbonization is a relatively simple process used for producing oil, substitute natural gas, and char by heating coal under a hydrogen-rich atmosphere. This report describes studies that were performed in a bench-scale hydrocarbonization system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period 1975 to 1978. The results of mock-up studies, coal metering valve and flowmeter development, and supporting work in an atmospheric hydrocarbonization system are also described. Oil, gas, and char yields were determined by hydrocarbonization of coal in a 0.1-m-diam fluidized-bed reactor operated at a pressure of 2170 kPa and at temperatures ranging from 694 to 854 K. The nominal coal feed rate was 4.5 kg/h. Wyodak subbituminous coal was used for most of the experiments. A maximum oil yield of approx. 21% based on moisture- and ash-free (maf) coal was achieved in the temperature range of 810 to 840 K. Recirculating fluidized-bed, uniformly fluidized-bed, and rapid hydropyrolysis reactors were used. A series of operability tests was made with Illinois No. 6 coal to determine whether caking coal could be processed in the recirculating fluidized-bed reactor. These tests were generally unsuccessful because of agglomeration and caking problems; however, these problems were eliminated by the use of chemically pretreated coal. Hydrocarbonization experiments were carried out with Illinois No. 6 coal that had been pretreated with CaO-NaOH, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, and CaO-Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Oil yields of 14, 24, and 21%, respectively, were obtained from the runs with treated coal. Gas and char yield data and the composition of the oil, gas, and char products are presented.

  5. [Secondary dyslipidemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargová, V; Pytliak, M; Mechírová, V

    2012-03-01

    Dyslipidemias rank among the most important preventabile factors of atherogenesis and its progression. This topic is increasingly being discussed as e.g. more than 50% of Slovak population die on atherosclerotic complications. According to etiology we distinguish primary dyslipidemias with strictly genetic background and secondary ones with origin in other disease or pathological state. Secondary dyslipidemias accompany various diseases, from common (endocrinopathies, renal diseases etc) to rare ones (thesaurismosis etc.) and represents one of symptoms of these diseases. Apart from particular clinical follow up of diagnosed dysipidemias, basic screening and secondary causes as well as treatment due to updated guidelines is recuired. In this review we present the most frequent dyslipidemias of clinical practice. PMID:22486289

  6. Review of secondary loop refrigeration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kai; Eisele, Magnus; Hwang, Yunho; Radermacher, Reinhard [Center for Environmental Energy Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Due to the environmental damage caused by HFC refrigerants, there is an increasing universal interest to research environmentally friendly fluids in refrigerants and alternative approaches to the traditional DX refrigeration system. These refrigerants include ammonia, carbon dioxide, hydrocarbon, R152a and HFO1234yf. Major drawbacks of these refrigerants are their potential flammability and safety hazards. One way to overcome this issue is to use the new refrigerants in conjunction with a secondary loop refrigeration system. Additional benefits of the secondary loop refrigeration system are refrigerant charges, leakage reduction, potential maintenance simplification, and low operating cost. This article presents a comprehensive review of the secondary loop refrigeration systems. Furthermore, this review covers the performance and risk assessment of flammable refrigerants, secondary refrigerants and components of the secondary loop refrigeration system within the following applications: commercial refrigeration, residential air conditioning/heat pumping, and mobile air conditioning. (author)

  7. Biogeochemistry of Halogenated Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaens, P.; Gruden, C.; McCormick, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    Halogenated hydrocarbons originate from both natural and industrial sources. Whereas direct anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere and biosphere are often easy to assess, particularly when they are tied to major industrial activities, the attribution of emissions to other human activities (e.g., biomass burning), diffuse sources (e.g., atmospheric discharge, run off), and natural production (e.g., soils, fungi, algae, microorganisms) are difficult to quantify. The widespread occurrence of both alkyl and aryl halides in groundwater, surface water, soils, and various trophic food chains, even those not affected by known point sources, suggests a substantial biogeochemical cycling of these compounds (Wania and Mackay, 1996; Adriaens et al., 1999; Gruden et al., 2003). The transport and reactive fate mechanisms controlling their reactivity are compounded by the differences in sources of alkyl-, aryl-, and complex organic halides, and the largely unknown impact of biogenic processes, such as enzymatically mediated halogenation of organic matter, fungal production of halogenated hydrocarbons, and microbial or abiotic transformation reactions (e.g., Asplund and Grimvall, 1991; Gribble, 1996; Watling and Harper, 1998; Oberg, 2002). The largest source may be the natural halogenation processes in the terrestrial environment, as the quantities detected often exceed the amount that can be explained by human activities in the surrounding areas ( Oberg, 1998). Since biogeochemical processes result in the distribution of a wide range of halogenated hydrocarbon profiles, altered chemical structures, and isomer distributions in natural systems, source apportionment (or environmental forensics) can often only be resolved using multivariate statistical methods (e.g., Goovaerts, 1998; Barabas et al., 2003; Murphy and Morrison, 2002).This chapter will describe the widespread occurrence of halogenated hydrocarbons, interpret their distribution and biogeochemical cycling in light of natural and anthropogenic sources, biotic and abiotic reactivity, and prevailing cycling mechanisms. Specific emphasis will be placed on the potential role of biotic and abiotic transformation reactions in soil, water, and sediment environments resulting in environmental sequestration and phase transfer.

  8. ADVANCES IN HYDROCARBON TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Bajus

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview about today’s and future trends in using hydrocarbon technologies and related hydrogen technologies. The content of this presentation is devoted to hydrogen/bio-hydrogen production – with focus on-board fuel reforming and vehicular hydrogen storage. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a major technological barrier to the successful implementation of fuel cells for transportation and portable applications. The paper shows that GTL technology is undergoing a...

  9. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  10. South Korea: An overlooked hydrocarbon province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturt, D.C.; Quinton, N.A. (Dragon Oil plc, Harpenden (United Kingdom))

    1993-11-01

    A forthcoming well about to spud off South Korea is planned to test the potential of an essentially unexplored rift basin. Should the well prove successful, it could open up a major new hydrocarbon producing province with substantial reserves. The well is being drilled in Block V which covers 7,000 sq km. is divided into two parts, and lies about 150 km south of the Korean peninsula close to Cheju Island. The larger Northern Block overlies the Fukue basin, which is a linear graben system oriented northeast-southwest. The Fukue basin is equivalent in size to the South Viking graben of the North Sea and the existence of a restricted marine source rock and play types at several stratigraphic levels helps to reinforce such a comparison Seismic mapping has revealed five prospects with combined most likely reserves of more than 1 billion bbl. The paper describes the basin evolution, source and migration of petroleum, reservoir and seals, and well location.

  11. Cloud migration research: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Jamshidi, Pooyan; Ahmad, Aakash; Pahl, Claus

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND--By leveraging cloud services, organizations can deploy their software systems over a pool of resources. However, organizations heavily depend on their business-critical systems, which have been developed over long periods. These legacy applications are usually deployed on-premise. In recent years, research in cloud migration has been carried out. However, there is no secondary study to consolidate this research. OBJECTIVE--This paper aims to identify, taxonomically classify an...

  12. Feminization of migrations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morokvaši? Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Women have always taken part in migrations, but their presence varied depending on their origins, on the labour market situation both in the areas of origin and in the target areas, as well as the migration policies in the immigration areas. Their presence was not always visible and did not attract as much scholarly and political attention as today. What happened, how can one explain such an interest lately, whereas only few years ago the subject was marginal, in the shadow of the "mainstream - malestream", i.e. migration as a phenomenon which focuses on geographic mobility of men, while women are not considered as equal protagonists, they either follow or remain at home. Could the so called "feminization" of migration explain the great and sudden interest for women and gender in migrations? This text critically examines the notion of "feminization" considered today as one of the main dimensions of global migration flows. Drawing on trends both globally and in specific countries, it shows that "feminization" is neither a new nor a sudden trend and entails variations depending on the origins, level of development and maturity of migration flows. In some groups men were primo-migrants and with a gradual feminization the flows reach a balanced sex ratio. There where women migrated first, or became numerically predominant, one observs the opposite trend: a "masculinization". Some authors rightly refer to "gender transition", the term which covers both trends. It is argued in the conclusion that the visibility and growing interest for women in migration and, more recently, for a gender perspective in migration, is not only due to the changing migration patterns and profile of migrants but also to the renewal of theoretical perspectives in migration and gender studies in a context that largely facilitated that renewal. The focus of our attention today on specific aspects of migration is triggered not only by genuine changes in migration trends, but it is also a result of a long process of visibilisation in the academic production on migration, women and gender. These trends may have existed earlier in the migration history but had remained in the shadow of categories defining, recording and analyzing migration.

  13. A dengue model incorporating saturation incidence and human migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakkhar, S.; Mishra, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a non-linear model has been proposed to investigate the effects of human migration on dengue dynamics. Human migration has been considered between two patches having different dengue strains. Due to migration secondary infection is possible. Further, the secondary infection is considered in patch-2 only as strain-2 in patch-2 is considered to be more severe than that of strain-1 in patch-1. The saturation incidence rate has been considered to incorporate the behavioral changes towards epidemic in human population. The basic reproduction number has been computed. Four Equilibrium states have been found and analyzed. Increasing saturation rate decreases the threshold thereby enhancing the stability of disease-free state in both the patches. Control on migration may lead to change in infection level of patches.

  14. Migration and pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Jha, Raghbendra; Whalley, John

    2003-01-01

    We explore the links between migration of labour and location specific (urban) pollution, suggesting a sense in which pollution can be welfare improving. In a conventional Harris-Todaro model of urban-rural migration, individuals migrate so as to equate the expected urban wage (given a downward rigid real wage in the urban sector) to the real wage. Unemployment is endogenously determined. Interpreting unemployment as damage, urban pollution (damage denoted in units of labour) can also support...

  15. Migration within the Eurozone

    OpenAIRE

    Graversen, Mads Byskov

    2013-01-01

    As society ads more and more value to human capital, it is becoming increasingly important. Especially for regions which need migration to smooth their overall unemployment. This aspect of migration within the Eurozone is of vital importance as Dreyer & Schmid (2013) earlier concluded that the fiscal transfers are highly lacking. Therefore according to Mundell’s theory (1961), in order to correct this lacking aspect of the Eurozone, there should be a high internal migration to be an optimum c...

  16. Regional Redistribution and Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manasse, Paolo; Schultz, Christian

    1999-01-01

    We study a model with free migration between a rich and a poor region. Since there is congestion, the rich region has an incentive to give the poor region a transfer in order to reduce immigration. Faced with free migration, the rich region voluntarily chooses a transfer, which turns out to be equal to that a social planner would choose. Provided migration occurs in equilibrium, this conclusion holds even in the presence of moderate mobility costs. However, large migration costs will lead to sub...

  17. Wnts induce migration and invasion of myeloma plasma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang, Ya-Wei; Walsh, Katie; Yao, Lei; Kedei, Noemi; Blumberg, Peter M; Rubin, Jeffrey S.; Shaughnessy, John; Rudikoff, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable form of lymphoid cancer characterized by accumulation of neoplastic plasma cells in the bone marrow cavity. Little is known about the mechanisms regulating myeloma cell movement within the bone marrow and metastasis to secondary sites. Herein, we identify multiple members of the wingless/int (Wnt) family as promoters of myeloma cell migration/invasion. Wnt-mediated migration was associated with the Wnt/RhoA pathway and did not necessitate signaling through ?-c...

  18. Suicidal Ideation and Migration Aspirations among Youth in Central Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Hoffman

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 100 years the state of Guanajuato has consistently been one of the highest migrant sending states in Mexico. Youth living in high migratory states such as Guanajuato are heavily influenced by the expectation that they will travel to the US, and research has shown that those who do not migrate may be looked down upon by members of their community. This secondary analysis looks at the connection between suicidal ideation and migration aspirations among a group of adolescents livin...

  19. Material erosion and migration in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Material migration is one of the outstanding issues facing successful long pulse, high power tokamak operation, both for the next step device, ITER, and the longer term economic and technological viability of fusion power. Erosion of tokamak first wall surfaces may occur via a number of processes, both steady state and transient, the relative importance of each of which depends sensitively on the nature of the driving mechanism and the wall material itself. The subsequent transport of this eroded material through the plasma and its redeposition, often in locations remote from the point of release, constitute the foundation of material migration. Such material movement is intimately linked with the critical issue of tritium retention (via the process of co-deposition), which, in ITER and beyond, will determine the duration over which the tokamak may be operated before removal of the retained fraction is imposed by nuclear safety restrictions. Of the three processes: erosion, large-scale material transport and co-deposition, transport is currently the least understood, leading to large uncertainties in the predicted T-retention in ITER, independently of the chosen wall materials. The low duty cycle and reduced energy and particle fluxes to first wall surfaces in today's tokamaks mean that the phenomena of migration is of no practical consequence to their operation. In steady state reactor-class devices, however, annual migration rates are currently predicted to be in the range of tons, even in the absence of transient events. These estimates are nevertheless associated with considerable uncertainty and, although the situation is unlikely to be completely resolved by the time ITER is constructed, a clearer understanding of the global migration picture is emerging from ongoing physics studies in current devices. In particular, the influential role of erosion at main chamber surfaces, followed by subsequent transfer to the divertor and the delicate erosion/deposition balance in the divertor itself is now recognised, even though the use of carbon in many tokamaks adds significant complexity to the problem through the requirement to account for hydrocarbon chemistry. This contribution aims both to review our current understanding of erosion and migration by compiling current experimental and modelling results, and to discuss key areas of uncertainty preventing the accurate prediction of migration rates in ITER and future reactors. Plans for a large scale investigation of migration and T-retention at JET with the hitherto untested ITER first wall material mix will also be discussed. (Author)

  20. World Migration Degree Global migration flows in directed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Porat, Idan

    2015-01-01

    In this article we analyze the global flow of migrants from 206 source countries to 145 destination countries (2006-2010) and focus on the differences in the migration network pattern between destination and source counters as represented by its degree and weight distribution. Degree represents the connectivity of a country to the global migration network, and plays an important role in defining migration processes and characteristics. Global analysis of migration degree distribution offers a strong potential contribution to understanding of migration as a global phenomenon. In regard to immigration, we found that it is possible to classify destination countries into three classes: global migration hubs with high connectivity and high migration rate; local migration hubs with low connectivity and high migration rate; and local migration hubs with opposite strategy of high connectivity and low migration rate. The different migration strategies of destination countries are emerging from similar and homogenies p...

  1. Ex-situ bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sille Bendix; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2009-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are regarded as environmental pollutants. A promising approach to reduce PAH pollution is based on the implementation of the natural potential of some microorganisms to utilize hydrocarbons. In this study Proteiniphilum acetatigenes was used for bioaugmentation of sewage sludge to improve the PAH removal. Bioaugmentation experiments were performed in parallel semi-continuously fed reactors started up with digested primary and secondary sludge. Three bioaugm...

  2. ADVANCES IN HYDROCARBON TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bajus

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview about today’s and future trends in using hydrocarbon technologies and related hydrogen technologies. The content of this presentation is devoted to hydrogen/bio-hydrogen production – with focus on-board fuel reforming and vehicular hydrogen storage. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a major technological barrier to the successful implementation of fuel cells for transportation and portable applications. The paper shows that GTL technology is undergoing a renewal of its innovative process. For more detailed information the interested reader is invited to consult the dedicated papers cited throughout the overview.

  3. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    K. Jaars; Beukes, J. P.; Zyl, P. G. van; A. D. Venter; Josipovic, M; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, V.; H. Aaltonen; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, A.; Hellén, H.; L. Laakso; Hakola, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative backgroun...

  4. HEURISTICAL STRATEGIES ON THE STUDY THEME “THE UNSATURATED HYDROCARBONS – ALKENES”

    OpenAIRE

    Adrienne Kozan Naumescu; Roxana-Diana Pa?ca

    2011-01-01

    The influence of heuristical strategies upon the level of two experimental classes is studied in this paper. The didactic experiment took place at secondary school in Cluj-Napoca, in 2008-2009 school year. The study theme “The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons – Alkenes” has been efficiently learned by using the most active methods: laboratory experiment, brain storming, modeling, problematization. The results obtained in the research demonstrate the efficiency of interactive methods in teaching-learn...

  5. Environmental change and migration.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stojanov, Robert

    Santa Barbara, Calif : Praeger, 2012 - (Segal, U.; Elliot, D.), s. 55-89 ISBN 978-0-313-37807-2 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : migration processes * environmental change * climate change * environmental migrants * human migration Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography

  6. Many Faces of Migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Anti? Gaber

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporary or permanent, local or international, voluntary or forced, legal or illegal, registered or unregistered migrations of individuals, whole communities or individual groups are an important factor in constructing and modifying (modern societies. The extent of international migrations is truly immense. At the time of the preparation of this publication more than 200 million people have been involved in migrations in a single year according to the United Nations. Furthermore, three times more wish to migrate, mostly from sub-Saharan Africa towards some of the most economically developed areas of the world according to the estimates by the Gallup Institute (Esipova, 2011. Some authors, although aware that it is not a new phenomenon, talk about the era of migration (Castles, Miller, 2009 or the globalization of migration (Friedman, 2004. The global dimensions of migration are definitely influenced also by the increasingly visible features of modern societies like constantly changing conditions, instability, fluidity, uncertainty etc. (Beck, 2009; Bauman, 2002.The extent, direction, type of migrations and their consequences are affected by many social and natural factors in the areas of emigration and immigration. In addition, researchers from many scientific disciplines who study migrations have raised a wide range of research questions (Boyle, 2009, 96, use a variety of methodological approaches and look for different interpretations in various spatial, temporal and contextual frameworks. The migrations are a complex, multi-layered, variable, contextual process that takes place at several levels. Because of this, research on migrations has become an increasingly interdisciplinary field, since the topics and problems are so complex that they cannot be grasped solely and exclusively from the perspective of a single discipline or theory. Therefore, we are witnessing a profusion of different “faces of migration”, which is reflected and at the same time also contributed to by this thematic issue of the journal Ars & Humanitas.While mobility or migration are not new phenomena, as people have moved and migrated throughout the history of mankind, only recently, in the last few decades, has theoretical and research focus on them intensified considerably. In the last two decades a number of research projects, university programs and courses, research institutes, scientific conferences, seminars, magazines, books and other publications, involving research, academia as well as politics and various civil society organizations have emerged. This shows the recent exceptional interest in the issue of migration, both in terms of knowledge of the processes involved, their mapping in the history of mankind, as well as the theoretical development of migration studies and daily management of this politically sensitive issue.Migration affects many entities on many different levels: the individuals, their families and entire communities at the local level in the emigrant societies as well as in the receiving societies. The migration is changing not only the lives of individuals but whole communities and societies, as well as social relations; it is also shifting the cultural patterns and bringing important social transformations (Castles 2010. This of course raises a number of questions, problems and issues ranging from human rights violations to literary achievements. Some of these are addressed by the authors in this thematic issue.The title “Many faces of migration”, connecting contributions in this special issue, is borrowed from the already mentioned Gallup Institute’s report on global migration (Esipova, 2011. The guiding principle in the selection of the contributions has been their diversity, reflected also in the list of disciplines represented by the authors: sociology, geography, ethnology and cultural anthropology, history, art history, modern Mediterranean studies, gender studies and media studies. Such an approach necessarily leads not only to a diverse, but at least seemingly also incompatible,

  7. Hydrocarbon potential of Ordovician and Silurian rocks. Siljan Region (Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berner, U. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Lehnert, O. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany); Meinhold, G. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Hydrocarbon exploration in the vicinity of Europe's largest impact structure (Siljan, Central Sweden) focused for years on abiogenic concepts and largely neglected state of the art knowledge on hydrocarbon generation via thermal decomposition of organic matter. In our study we use sedimentary rocks obtained from three drill sites (Mora001, Stumsnaes 1 and Solberga 1) within the ring structure around the central uplift to investigate the hydrocarbon potential of Ordovician and Silurian strata of the region and also for comparison with the shale oil and gas potential of age equivalent rocks of the Baltic Sea. Elemental analyses provided information on concentrations of carbonate and organic carbon, total sulfur as well as on the composition of major and minor elements of the sediments. The data has been used to evaluate the depositional environment and possible diagenetic alterations of the organic matter. RockEval pyrolysis and solvent hydrocarbon extraction gave insight into the hydrocarbon generation potential and the type and thermal maturity of the sediments. From the geochemistry data of the studied wells it is obvious that changes of depositional environments (lacustrine - marine) have occurred during Ordovician and Silurian times. Although, the quality of the organic matter has been influenced in marine and brackish environments through sulfate reduction, we observe for a number of marine and lacustrine sediments a good to excellent preservation of the biological precursors which qualify the sediments as hydrocarbon source rocks (Type II kerogens). Lacustrine source rocks show a higher remaining hydrocarbon potential (up to {proportional_to}550 mg HC per g C{sub org}) than those of marine or brackish environments. Our investigations indicate that the thermal maturity of organic matter of the drill sites has reached the initial stage of oil generation. However, at Mora001 some of the sediments were stained with oil indicating that hydrocarbons have migrated from more mature parts of the Siljan structure into the marginally mature sediments. Likely sources could have been the Upper Ordovician Fjaecka Shale deposited in a brackish to lacustrine environment or the Lower Silurian Kallholm Fm. of similar environments which both have an excellent hydrocarbon potential for oil and gas. Marine source rocks of the Siljan region may be compatible to unconventional shale targets of the German region of the Baltic Sea provided appropriate thermal maturities are not exceeded.

  8. On marriage and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, O

    1988-09-01

    Marriage, migration, and related phenomena such as marital stability, fertility, and investment in human capital may be better explained by studying marriage and migration jointly. This paper examines the role of migration in obtaining joint labor market and marriage market equilibrium. When broadly interpreted, marriage and migration share a number of common features. Both involve search and its resolution (pairing of mates in the former and matching of labor and firms in the latter). In both cases, success in finding a partner is sensitive to the availability of partners and to the distribution of their endowments and traits. Almost always, and along with separation and divorce, marriage mandates spatial relocation which may translate into migration. Both involve a movement that is associated with adjustment costs from 1 state into another. The decisions to enter marriage and undertake employment or the decisions to divorce and quit a job depend on exogenous parameters, some of which are determined by the marriage market and the labor market. Since both marriage and divorce take place in the context of broadly defined markets, they may and often are analyzed applying market concepts, theorems, and solutions. Yet the authors could not pinpoint 1 single, systematic attempt that checks through the interactions between marriage and migration, so this paper attempts to rectify this state of research. Essentially, this paper 1) discusses individual decision making pending possible migration prior to or following marriage, 2) examines whether it is easier for a married couple or a single person to migrate, and 3) considers whether marriage dissolution could cause migration when marriage is the only reason that has kept a spouse from moving. This integrated research agenda for both marriage and migration can delineate interesting new implications to examine. PMID:12158993

  9. Fractionation of Hydrocarbons Between Oil and Gas Phases Fractionnement des hydrocarbures entre les phases huile et gaz

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffier-Meray V.; Ungerer P.; Carpentier B.; Courcy J. P.

    2006-01-01

    The investigation of hydrocarbon fractionation between oil and gas phases is of interest for several purposes in reservoir exploitation. In reservoir geochemistry, the evolution of light hydrocarbon fractions of oils may explain some migration phenomena. In gas injection projects, the preferred dissolution of some components in gas may alter the composition as well as the properties of the oil. Underground gas storage in depleted oil reservoirs may also be concerned by these problems. Results...

  10. A Generic Process Migration Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Amirreza Zarrabi

    2012-01-01

    Process migration has been advocated as a means of improving multicomputer configuration performance. The optimized migration algorithm utilized in migration event has direct effect on the efficiency and deployment of the process migration system. However, every design has preference factors results in concentration on specific aspect of the migration algorithm. There is no generic migration algorithm which could satisfy all circumstances with almost reasonable costs. This paper reviews the...

  11. Hydrocarbon potential of Middle Eocene carbonates, Sirt Basin, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swei, Giuma H.; Tucker, Maurice E.

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of Middle Eocene carbonates in the Sirt Basin in Libya has been the subject of considerable study in recent years because of the importance of sediments of this age as hydrocarbon reservoirs. The Gialo Formation is an important gas-producing reservoir in the Assumood, Sahl and other nearby fields. The gas which is generated from the gas-prone Sirt Shale source rock of the northern Ajdabiya Trough probably migrated in to the Assumood Ridge from the northeast through late Cretaceous, Paleocene and early Eocene carbonates, before being trapped beneath the Augila Shale (Upper Eocene) which is the principal regional seal in the area. This integrated study has enhanced our understanding of reservoir heterogeneity and hydrocarbon potential of the Gialo carbonates and should lead to improved exploration in the future. Reservoir quality in the Gialo Formation is a function of grain types, pore types, grain size, sorting, cementation and compaction, and predicting areas of high reservoir quality has proved difficult; exploration should be oriented to positioning wells into the main trend of the mid-ramp, nummulite accumulation. Different nummulite facies can be reservoirs depending on their diagenetic history. A diagenetic reduction in porosity must be distinguished from a lack of porosity resulting from an unfavourable depositional environment, so that exploration alternatives can be assessed. This integrated study has demonstrated the presence of suitable reservoir rocks, hydrocarbon traps and the close proximity of potential source rocks. These features should encourage further hydrocarbon exploration in the area.

  12. Development of isotope techniques for hydrocarbon exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas preparation line has been constructed to measure D/H- in addition to 13C/12C-ratios on minute quantities of methane (down to 50 ?l CH4) from well samples. The gas oxidation line was tested with samples from 3 wells from the S. German Molasse and the Rhine Valley. Hydrogen isotopes distinguish between gases of thermogenic origin and those from the different methanogenic pathways. The combination of carbon and hydrogen isotopes is useful to classify gases affected by secondary processes such as oxidation or mixing. The maturity of the source rocks generating the gases can also be estimated using carbon and hydrogen isotopes. A previously unknown biogenic methane group has been identified which is depleted strongly in both deuterium and carbon-13. Additionally, a new genetic gas type was observed with dD -40 per mille, and with higher hydrocarbons present. (orig.)

  13. Halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbon nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary ingestion of polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) increased renal and hepatic aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activities in a dietary concentration-dependent manner. Mixed-function oxidase (MFO) activities were also induced in liver and kidney by i.p. administration of 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), but sodium phenobarbital (NaPb) increased hepatic MFO activities only. Renal and hepatic AHH activities and cytochrome P-450 (P-450) concentrations is male, Fischer 344 rats were increased by treatments with PBB, PCB and 3MC. NaPb increased hepatic AHH activity and P-450 content only. The rates of increase (and decline to normal values) of AHH activities following single oral doses of PBB, PCB, and 3MC were much greater in the kidneys than in the liver

  14. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes an article of manufacture an optrode for chemically sensing halogenated hydrocarbons comprising the elements: a capillary tube capped at one end by a semipermeable membrane of porous membrane; a fiber optic attached at a distal end thereof to a second end of the capillary tube by attaching means. The fiber optic extends into the capillary tube. A proximal end of the fiber optic is connected to an illumination source and a detector means; a column of a first reagent comprises pyridine or a pyridine derivative disposed in the capillary tube adjacent the capped end; and a column of a second reagent comprises an alkali disposed in the capillary tube adjacent to and in contact with the column of the first reagent such that a surface of contact between the alkali and the first reagent is adjacent the distal end of the fiber optic.

  15. Canada's hydrocarbon processing evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of petroleum refining, petrochemicals and natural gas industries in Canada are discussed together with future issues and prospects. Figures give data on (a) refined products trade 1998; (b) refining capacity; (c) product demand 1980-1999; (d) refinery crude runs and capacity; (e) refining and marketing, historical returns 1993-1999; (f) processing power index for Canada and USA; (g) ethylene capacity; (eye) Montreal petrochemical capacities; (j) Sarnia petrochemical capacities in 2000; (k) Alberta petrochemicals capacities 2001; (l) ethylene net equivalent trade; (m) ethylene costs 1999 for W. Canada and other countries. It was concluded that the hydrocarbon processing business continues to expand in Canada and natural gas processing is likely to increase. Petrochemicals may expand in W. Canada, possibly using feed stock from the Far North. Offshore developments may stimulate new processing on the E. Coast

  16. Global Governance of Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Rustamov, Sirus

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to analyze the recently formed global governance of migration, which has got an unprecedented trans-boundary nature due to the impacts og globalization in the post Cold War era. 

  17. Employment Protection and Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Bazillier, Rémi; Moullan, Yasser

    2012-01-01

    We argue in this paper that labor market institutions, and more particularly employment protection (EPL), are an important determinant of migration. Using a bilateral migration database, we empirically show that the employment protection di fferential has a negative impact on bilateral ows. Contrary to pop- ular wisdom which assumes that migrants look for a more protected market, we show that migrants tend to move to countries where employment protection is close to that of their country of o...

  18. Migration and culture

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Gil S.; Gang, Ira N.

    2010-01-01

    Culture is not new to the study of migration. It has lurked beneath the surface for some time, occasionally protruding openly into the discussion, usually under some pseudonym. The authors bring culture into the open. They are concerned with how culture manifests itself in the migration process for three groups of actors: the migrants, those remaining in the sending areas, and people already living in the recipient locations. The topics vary widely. What unites the authors is an understanding...

  19. Migration = cloning; aliasiing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüttel, Hans; Kleist, Josva; Nestmann, Uwe; Merro, Massimo

    1999-01-01

    In Obliq, a lexically scoped, distributed, object-oriented programming language, object migration was suggested as the creation of a copy of an object’s state at the target site, followed by turning the object itself into an alias, also called surrogate, for the remote copy. We consider the creation of object surrogates as an abstraction of the abovementioned style of migration. We introduce Øjeblik, a distribution-free subset of Obliq, and provide three different configuration-style semantics, ...

  20. Migration og etnicitet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Connie Carøe

    2004-01-01

    Migration og etnicitet er aktuelle og forbundne fænomener, idet migration øger berøringsfladerne mellem befolkningsgrupper. Etniciteter formes i takt med at grænser drages imellem disse grupper. Imod moderniserings-teoriernes forventning forsvandt etnicitet ikke som en traditionel eller oprindelig måde at skabe tilhørsforhold på; globalt set fremstår vor tid istedet som en "migrationens tidsalder", der tilsyneladende også er en tidsalder, hvor kulturelle særtræk, i form af etnicitet, udgør vigti...

  1. Migration, Narration, Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leese, Peter

    2013-01-01

    (co-editor with Carly McLaughlin and Wladyslaw Witalisz) This book presents articles resulting from joint research on the representations of migration conducted in connection with the Erasmus Intensive Programme entitled «Migration and Narration» taught to groups of international students over three consecutive summers from 2010 to 2012. The articles focus on various aspects of the migrant experience and try to answer questions about migrant identity and its representations in literature and the...

  2. Migrating for a Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2015-01-01

    Youths from the Global South migrating for further education often face various forms of discrimination. This Caribbean case study discusses how conditions in the home country can provide a foundation for educational migration that helps the migrants overcome such obstacles and even develop a strong sense of agency and self-empowerment. In the post-WWII period, numerous Caribbean women trained in nursing at British hospitals that have been described as marred by race and gender related inequalit...

  3. Migration, klima og sundhed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tellier, Siri; Carballo, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Many tentative connections have been postulated between migration and climate. This article points to rural-urban migration, particularly into low elevation urban slums prone to flooding as an issue needing urgent attention by health professionals. It also notes the no-man's land in which environmental refugees find themselves and the consequences this may have. Finally, it points to the urgent need to reform health systems in both developing and developed countries to adapt to rapidly changing ...

  4. Samtidskunst og migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ring

    2010-01-01

    "Samtidskunst og migration. En oversigt over faglitteraturen" er en forskningsoversigt der gør status over hvad der hidtil er skrevet inden for det kunsthistoriske område om vor tids billedkunst og migration som politisk, socialt og kulturelt fænomen, primært i forbindelse med immigration til Europa og i bredere forstand Vesten. Rapporten er en intern rapport som er lavet i tilknytning til det kollektive forskningsprojekt "Islam i europæisk litteratur" på Afdelingen for Litteraturvidenskab og Mo...

  5. Migration of Interplanetary Dust

    OpenAIRE

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.; Taylor, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    We numerically investigate the migration of dust particles with initial orbits close to those of the numbered asteroids, observed trans-Neptunian objects, and Comet Encke. The fraction of silicate asteroidal particles that collided with the Earth during their lifetime varied from 1.1% for 100 micron particles to 0.008% for 1 micron particles. Almost all asteroidal particles with diameter d>4 microns collided with the Sun. The peaks in the migrating asteroidal dust particles'...

  6. Migration and malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitthai, Nigoon

    2013-01-01

    Migration is an important global issue as poorly managed migration can result in a diversity of problems, including an increase in the transmission of diseases such as malaria. There is evidence to suggest that malaria is no longer a forest-dependent disease and may largely be affected by population movements, mostly to agricultural areas. While internal and transnational migration has different legal implications in most countries, both types of migration occur for the same reasons; economic and/ or safety. Although migration in itself is not a definitive risk for malaria, several factors can put, migrants and local communities alike, in vulnerable situations. In particular, infrastructure and rural development, deforestation for logging and economic farming, political movements, and natural disasters are some of the major factors that push and pull people in and out of malaria-endemic areas. Therefore, understanding the changing socio-environmental situation as well as population movements and their associated risks for malaria infection, is critical for malaria control, containment, and elimination. Efforts to address these issues should include advocacy, mapping exercises and expanded/ strengthened surveillance to also include migrant health information systems. Malaria related information, prevention measures, and early diagnosis and appropriate treatment should be made easily accessible for migrants regardless of their migration status; not only to ensure that they are equipped with appropriate knowledge and devices to protect themselves, but also to ensure that they are properly diagnosed and treated, to prevent further transmission, and to ensure that they are captured by the surveillance system. PMID:24159832

  7. Proceedings of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book reports on hydrogen contaminated soils and groundwater. Topics covered include: perspectives on hydrocarbon contamination; emerging hydrocarbon contamination issues; analytical methodologies and site assessment for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater; environmental fate and modeling; remedial technologies for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater; and risk assessment and risk management

  8. Groundwater recharge as a mechanism to replenish sulfate for natural attenuation of hydrocarbon plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrinsic biodegradation plays a critical role in limiting the lateral migration of groundwater plumes contaminated with petroleum. As such, bioremediation is often considered as a site management and remediation strategy. Various electron acceptors exist within different zones in hydrocarbon plumes. Bacterial sulfate reduction is a dominant terminal electron accepting process in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in groundwater. Therefore, the addition of sulfate can enhance the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in groundwater. This paper presented the results of two field studies in southern Alberta that showed evidence that seasonal recharge is a significant mechanism to replenish sulfate as an electron acceptor in dissolved petroleum hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater. The first site was a natural gas well site, while the other was at a natural gas processing plant. BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) was the contaminant of primary concern in plumes derived from natural gas condensates at the 2 field sites. The plumes showed evidence of downward migration of sulfate from the unsaturated zone during seasonal groundwater recharge. There was subsequent consumption of the sulfate by microbial reduction, associated with plume biodegradation. High water-soluble sulfate concentrations were found in the vadose zones. These results were in good agreement with results from other studies, but it was suggested that more research is needed to quantify the sulfate replenishment process to identify the relationship between sulfate reduction and hydrocarbon degradation, and to test the supplementation of sulfate. 18 refs., 10 figs

  9. TOWARD MIGRATION TRANSITION IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Cristian Incaltarau

    2012-01-01

    Most studies regarding the contribution of migration to development are limited to an isolated analysis of the economic effects of migration. But the migration process is in turn influenced by other processes. So a wider framework including migration and other processes of development would be more appropriate. The experience of South European and East Asian countries have shown us that, during development, countries can change their migration profile from emigration to immigration. The prese...

  10. Globalization, Migration and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishMigration may become the most important branch of demography in the earlydecades of the new millennium in a rapidly globalizing world. This paper discusses the causes, costsand benefits of international migration to countries of the South and North, and key issues of commonconcern. International migration is as old as national boundaries, though its nature, volume,direction, causes and consequences have changed. The causes of migration are rooted in the rate ofpopulation growth and the proportion of youth in the population, their education and training,employment opportunities, income differentials in society, communication and transportationfacilities, political freedom and human rights and level of urbanization. Migration benefits the Souththrough remittances of migrants, improves the economic welfare of the population (particularly womenof South countries generally, increases investment, and leads to structural changes in the economy.However, emigration from the South has costs too, be they social or caused by factors such as braindrain. The North also benefits by migration through enhancement of economic growth, development ofnatural resources, improved employment prospects, social development and through exposure toimmigrants' new cultures and lifestyles. Migration also has costs to the North such as of immigrantintegration, a certain amount of destabilization of the economy, illegal immigration, and socialproblems of discrimination and exploitation. Issues common to both North and South include impact onprivate investment, trade, international cooperation, and sustainable development. Both North andSouth face a dilemma in seeking an appropriate balance between importing South's labour or itsproducts and exporting capital and technology from the North.FrenchLa migration est sans doute devenue la partie la plus importante de la démographie des premières décennies du nouveau millénaire dans un monde qui change rapidement. Ce document porte sur les causes, les coûts et les avantages de la migration internationale vers les pays du Sud et du Nord ainsi que sur les grandes préoccupations communes. La migration internationale existe depuis l'avènement des frontières nationales, bien que sa nature, son volume, sa direction ainsi que ses causes et conséquences aient changé. Les causes de la migration trouvent leur origine dans le taux de croissance d'une population, sa proportion de jeunes, leur niveau d'éducation et de formation, les occasions d'emploi, les écarts de revenu dans la société, les systèmes de communication et de transport, la liberté politique, les droits de la personne et le niveau d'urbanisation. La migration profite au Sud parce que les migrants envoient de l'argent, améliorant généralement le bien-être économique de la population (surtout celui des femmes des pays du Sud, augmentant les investissements et donne lieu à des changements structuraux de l'économie. Cependant, l'émigration du Sud a tout de même un prix, que ce soit social ou causé par des facteurs tels que l'exode des cerveaux. Le Nord profite aussi de la migration grâce à une meilleure croissance économique, l'exploitation de richesses naturelles, de meilleures possibilités d'emploi et le développement social par l'exposition aux nouvelles cultures et styles de vie des immigrants. La migration a aussi un prix pour le Nord tel que l'intégration des immigrants, une certaine déstabilisation de l'économie, l'immigration illégale ainsi que les problèmes sociaux relatifs à la discrimination et à l'exploitation. Les préoccupations communes au Sud et au Nord incluent les incidences sur les investissements privés, le commerce, la coopération internationale et le développement durable. Autant le Nord que le Sud doivent composer avec le dilemme de trouver l'équilibre entre l'importation de la main-d'œuvre du Sud.

  11. Hydrocarbon Leak Detection Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT is proposing the development of a sensor to detect the presence of hydrocarbons in turbopump Inter-Propellant Seals (IPS). The purpose of the IPS is to prevent...

  12. Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Eke, Paul Emeka

    2008-01-01

    Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical processes involved, and the use of constructed treatment wetlands in the removal of petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons from produced and/or processed water. Wastewaters from the oil industry contain aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and x...

  13. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  14. Electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Gerard Anthony

    1993-01-01

    This work involves the characterisation of the electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A variety of methods were employed involving the use of catalytic reagents to enhance the rate at which chlorinated organic compounds are reduced. The first reagent used was oxygen which was electrochemically reduced to superoxide in nonaqueous solvents. Superoxide is a reactive intermediate and decomposes chlorinated hydrocarbons. However it was found that since the rate of reaction betw...

  15. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  16. Study of liquid hydrocarbons subjected to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is a study of liquid hydrocarbons (especially alkanes and cycloalkanes), ionized and excited by low L.E.T. high energy radiation. An analysis of radiolytical products shows a definite correlation between radiochemical yields and bond energies. The study of the influence of scavengers has been carried out and the methods for the determination of ? parameters are discussed. Ionic recombination has been fully investigated: theoretical studies, based on a phenomenological model, on primary and (in presence of solute) secondary charge recombination have been performed. Secondary species were observed by use of kinetic optical absorption spectrophotometry. A good agreement with theory is obtained only when the electron scavenging before thermalization is negligible. Electron mobility in hydrocarbons has been measured and the electron scavenging rate constants have been determined using the pulse conductivity technique. Conformational analysis calculations show a correlation between the electron mobility and the electronic structure. The rate of formation of a radiolytic product and the rate of decay of its precursor have been studied for solutions of hydrocarbons and electron scavengers

  17. Experimental investigation of hydrocarbon formation and transformation under Earth´s upper mantle conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesnikov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    The theory of the abyssal abiotic petroleum origin considers oil and natural gas to begenerated in the Earth’s upper mantle. Hydrocarbons migrate further through the deep faults into the Earth’s crust, where they can form oil and gas deposits in any kind of rock in any kind of structural position. Until recently one of the main obstacles for further development of this theory has been the lack of the data covering processes of generation and transformations of hydrocarbons. Experimental data,...

  18. Migration mechanisms of radionuclides from a clay repository toward adjacent aquifers and the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is a critical review of the current understanding of migration processes of solutes in clay. The major migration mechanisms are examined: advection through compaction, thermal convection, migration by hydrocarbon expulsion, gravitational flow, osmosis, molecular diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion. Examples are taken from the Callovo-Oxfordian clays of the Paris basin in the Meuse/Haute Marne area, near Bure, where France is studying the feasibility of a potential nuclear waste disposal facility. Recent work on the helium distribution in the aquifers of the Paris Basin confirms the importance of molecular diffusion for solute transport in clays. Migration in aquifers is also described, and the major causes of uncertainties for solute migration are discussed. (authors)

  19. Volatile hydrocarbon detector apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention is a volatile hydrocarbon detector apparatus to continuously sample methane gas in an oil well drilling mud. The detector apparatus includes 1) a gas sampler assembly to gather the methane gas from the drilling mud; 2) a control module assembly to receive and amplify electrical signals from the gas sampler assembly; and 3) a recorder assembly to receive output electrical signals from the control module assembly. The recorder assembly is of a conventional nature and operates to record on a paper roll the date, time of day and the amount of methane gas present in the drilling mud. The main novelty lies in the gas sampler assembly which includes 1) a hood housing assembly to straddle a flowing channel of drilling mud; 2) a sensing head assembly mounted in the hood housing assembly to measure amount of methane gas therein; and 3) a pump assembly operable to draw inlet air through the sensing head assembly and discharge air into the channel of drilling mud. The discharge air acts to agitate the drilling mud to increase release of methane gas therein to transmit a more accurate measurement of the methane gas to the recorder assembly

  20. HYDROCARBONS RESERVES IN VENEZUELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Cruz, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Venezuela is an important player in the energy world, because of its hydrocarbons reserves. The process for calculating oil and associated gas reserves is described bearing in mind that 90% of the gas reserves of Venezuela are associated to oil. Likewise, an analysis is made of the oil reserves figures from 1975 to 2003. Reference is also made to inconsistencies found by international experts and the explanations offered in this respect by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum (MENPET) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) regarding the changes that took place in the 1980s. In turn, Hubbert's Law is explained to determine peak production of conventional oil that a reservoir or field will reach, as well as its relationship with remaining reserves. Emphasis is placed on the interest of the United Nations on this topic. The reserves of associated gas are presented along with their relationship with the different crude oils that are produced and with injected gas, as well as with respect to the possible changes that would take place in the latter if oil reserves are revised. Some recommendations are submitted so that the MENPET starts preparing the pertinent policies ruling reserves. (auth)

  1. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  2. MOLECULAR SPECIATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FROM PHOTOOXIDATION OF THE HIGHER ALKENES: 1-OCTENE AND 1-DECENE. (R824970)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outdoor smog chamber photooxidations to determine the molecular composition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from 1-octene and 1-decene in sunlight-irradiated hydrocarbon-NOx mixtures are reported. The observed products are consistent with the current under...

  3. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunmore, R. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lidster, R. T.; Lee, J. D.; Evans, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Lewis, A. C.; Hamilton, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London), which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20-30 % of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50 % of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that 60 % of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50 % of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for, but very significant, under-reporting of diesel-related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  4. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Dunmore

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London, which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20–30 % of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50 % of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that 60 % of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50 % of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for, but very significant, under-reporting of diesel-related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  5. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Dunmore

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London, which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20–30% of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50% of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that, 60% of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50% of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for but, very significant under-reporting of diesel related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~ 4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  6. Migration from Packaging Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulenaer, B. De

    Various chemical compounds can be present in foodstuffs which may induce health problems in humans. The origin of these compounds can be very diverse. Mathematical modeling can sometimes be used to predict the concentration of these chemicals in the food. Particularly for compounds which are produced in the food during, e.g., processing and for compounds which migrate from a food contact material this technique can be very fruitful. For the former type of compounds, classical chemical kinetics can be applied. In this contribution, the modeling of the migration from polymeric food contact materials is considered. This migration phenomenon can be modeled mathematically since the physical processes which govern this process are very well studied and understood. Therefore, initially some of these fundamentals will be discussed in more detail.

  7. Quandary of migrated IUCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Pandey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Intra Uterine Contraception Device (IUCD is the most widely used method of reversible contraception. However complications are known to occur with IUCD. Although uterine perforation is not very rare, but asymptomatic migration into urinary bladder and mesoappendix, is a very rare occurrence. We hereby report two such cases. Two cases of migrated IUCD into urinary bladder and mesoappendix is described here. Both case remained asymptomatic over years and diagnosed incidentally. But IUCD was retrieved in both by surgical means. Owing to possibility of potential complications and medico-legal concerns due to migrated IUCD, it needs to be removed even in asymptomatic cases. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(4.000: 1110-1112

  8. Experimental glomerulonephritis induced by hydrocarbon exposure: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravnskov Uffe

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much epidemiological evidence suggests that hydrocarbon exposure may induce glomerulonephritis and worsen its course in many patients. The mechanisms are unknown, however, no specific microscopic pattern has been identified, and it has also been argued that hydrocarbon exposure causes tubular damage mainly. Studying experimental animals may best answer these questions, and as no systematic review of glomerulonephritis produced experimentally by hydrocarbon exposure has been performed previously, I found it relevant to search for and analyse such studies. Methods Animal experiments having mimicked human glomerulonephritis by hydrocarbon exposure were sought on Medline and Toxnet Results Twenty-six experiments using thirteen different hydrocarbons were identified. Several human subtypes were observed including IgA nephritis, mesangial, proliferative and extracapillary glomerulonephritis, focal and focal-segmental sclerosis, minimal change nephropathy, anti-GBM and anti-TBM nephritis, and glomerulonephritis associated with peiarteritis nodosa. Glomerular proteinuria was seen in 10/12 experiments that included urine analyses, and renal failure in 5/8 experiments that included measurements of glomerular function. All experiments resulted in various degrees of tubular damage as well. In most studies, where the animals were examined at different times during or after the exposure, the renal microscopic and functional changes were seen immediately, whereas deposits of complement and immunoglobulins appeared late in the course, if at all. Conclusion These experiments are in accord with epidemiological evidence that hydrocarbon exposure may cause glomerulonephritis and worsen renal function. Probable mechanisms include an induction of autologous antibodies and a disturbance of normal immunological functions. Also, tubular damage may increase postglomerular resistance, resulting in a glomerular deposition of macromolecules. In most models a causal role of glomerular immune complex formation was unlikely, but may rather have been a secondary phenomenon. As most glomerulonephritis subgroups were seen and as some of the hydrocarbons produced more than one subgroup, the microscopic findings in a patient cannot be used as a clue to the causation of his disease. By the same reason, the lack of a specific histological pattern in patients with glomerulonephritis assumed to have been caused by hydrocarbon exposure is not contradictive.

  9. Isolation and characterization of ancient hydrocarbon biomarkers from crystalline minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Carrasquillo, A.; Hallmann, C.; Sherman, L. S.; Waldbauer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrocarbon biomarker analysis is conventionally conducted on bitumen (soluble fossilized organic matter) extracted from sedimentary rocks using organic solvents. Biomarkers can also be generated by pyrolysis of kerogen (insoluble organic matter) in the same rocks. These approaches have met with much success where the organic matter has not seen significant levels of thermal metamorphism but more limited success when applied to thermally mature Archean rocks. Biomarkers have also been isolated from fluid inclusions of crystalline minerals and this approach has found wide application in petroleum exploration because of the capability of minerals that form crystals in reservoir rocks to trap organics from different episodes of fluid migration. Lastly, biogenic crystalline minerals are well known to trap organics including amino acids, fatty acids or hydrocarbons from those organisms that laid down the minerals. In fact, recent observations suggest that hydrocarbon biomarkers can be abundantly preserved in crystalline minerals where they may be protected over long periods of time and also distinguished from more recent generations of organics from endolithic organisms (modern) or anthropogenic (fossil hydrocarbon) contaminants. Here we report analyses of biomarker lipids trapped in fluid inclusions or otherwise having a "tight association" with the minerals in sedimentary rocks from Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic successions in Australia and Southern Africa. In particular, cores recovered from the Agouron Griqualand Drilling Project contain over 2500m of well-preserved late Archean Transvaal Supergroup sediments, dating from ca. 2.67 to 2.46Ga. Bitumen extracts of samples from these strata were obtained using clean drilling, sampling and handling protocols and without overprinting with contaminant hydrocarbons. Dissolution of the mineral matrix of extracted sediments, followed by another solvent extraction, yielded a second bitumen that comprised hydrocarbons that had been, somehow, enclosed within or more tightly bound to clays or carbonates. Subtle and consistent compositional differences between the freely-extractable and tightly-bound hydrocarbons provide further evidence for their syngenetic nature. The research has further applicability to biomarker studies of Early Earth materials, returned planetary samples as well as robotic analyses on flight missions. On Mars, for example, organics trapped within crystals of evaporate minerals would be protected, to a large degree, from the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation and strong oxidants that are prevalent on Mars surface. eaps.mit.edu/geobiology/

  10. Unix Application Migration Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Microsoft. Redmond

    2003-01-01

    Drawing on the experience of Microsoft consultants working in the field, as well as external organizations that have migrated from UNIX to Microsoft® Windows®, this guide offers practical, prescriptive guidance on the issues you are likely to face when porting existing UNIX applications to the Windows operating system environment. Senior IT decision makers, network managers, and operations managers will get real-world guidance and best practices on planning and implementation issues to understand the different methods through which migration or co-existence can be accomplished. Also detailing

  11. [Migration, climate and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Siri; Carballo, Manuel; Calballo, Manuel

    2009-10-26

    Many tentative connections have been postulated between migration and climate. This article points to rural-urban migration, particularly into low elevation urban slums prone to flooding as an issue needing urgent attention by health professionals. It also notes the no-man's land in which environmental refugees find themselves and the consequences this may have. Finally, it points to the urgent need to reform health systems in both developing and developed countries to adapt to rapidly changing disease patterns and to become more responsive to them. PMID:19857400

  12. An urban aquifer and the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredericton, New Brunswick gets most of its water supply from a glaciofluvial sand and gravel aquifer located beneath the downtown area. The near-surface accidental release of petroleum hydrocarbons above the aquifer and above discontinuities in the overlying aquitard has necessitated implementation of remedial measures at several locations. Three case studies are reviewed. At the Smythe Street School, ca 5,500 liters of heating oil were found to have leaked from a basement tank, penetrating into the underlying soil through cracks in the basement slab. Remedial measures included drilling an intercept well, soil venting, and bioremediation. Except for early peaks, fuel oil concentrations have not been detected in the recovery well or site monitoring wells. At a gasoline distributor, ca 1,000 liters of gasoline was released from a leaky underground tank. All tanks and 340 tonnes of soil were removed. A pump and treat system provided containment of the dissolved plume, which migrated within the shallow water table aquifer above the aquitard. At an office complex, over 36,000 liters of bunker C and fuel oil has been recovered from pumping activities after ground contamination was discovered during an underground tank replacement program. The viscous nature of the hydrocarbons means that the contaminants are mainly immobile, but low levels of hydrocarbons have been detected at monitoring wells downgradient of the site. The three cases studied do not pose a threat to the quality of the Fredericton water supply. 6 refs., 2 figs

  13. Hydrocarbon exploration risk evaluation through uncertainty and sensitivity analyses techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of the exploration risk in the oil industry is a fundamental component of the decision process related to the exploratory phase. In this paper the two basic components of the exploratory risk: trap geometry and trapped hydrocarbon quantities (fluid), are compounded in a single coherent uncertainty and sensitivity approach. The results clarify that the model geometry influences each Petroleum System Modeling step and that the geometric uncertainty is correlated with the fluid uncertainty. The geometric uncertainty evaluation makes use of geostatistical techniques that produce a number of possible realizations of the trap geometry, all compatible with available data. The evaluation of the fluid uncertainty, through a Monte Carlo methodology, allows us to compute the possible quantities of oil and gas, generated in a basin and migrated from the hydrocarbon source location to each single trap. The final result is the probability distribution of oil and gas for each trap in the basin, together with other useful indicators like: the hydrocarbon filling probability map, the closure probability map, the drainage area probability map, the spilling paths probabilities, the trap-filling scenarios

  14. Secondary ion mass spectrometry for the identification of polymers with noncharacteristic secondary ions using multivariate statistical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven different, filler-free polymers were depth profiled until all secondary ion signals were stable. Discriminant function analysis and principal components analysis were performed on a dataset containing the intensities of noncharacteristic hydrocarbon secondary ions, measured in this steady state. Discriminant function analysis showed that these secondary ions were sufficient to correctly identify all polymers using leave-one-out correction. Even with principal components analysis, which uses no prior knowledge about the origin of a data point, identification was shown to be possible

  15. Conceptual design of air sparge/soil vent systems for in situ remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual design for a sparge and vent system is presented. A sparge and vent system consists of air sparging or in situ aeration in combination with soil vapor extraction. With air sparging, a compressed air source provides sparging of the ground water through aeration points, volatizes dissolved hydrocarbons, and elevates dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in the ground water. Volatile hydrocarbon vapors migrate more readily than liquid in soil, and are extracted to atmosphere with the vapor extraction system. Increased oxygen levels in the ground water and unsaturated soil promotes natural, aerobic biodegradation of the hydrocarbons without nutrient addition. Design considerations for sparge systems include spacing and depth of installation of the sparging points, air injection rates and pressures and the air source. The design techniques for the soil vapor extraction system have been discussed extensively in the literature but generally involve spacing of the extraction wells to capture all the hydrocarbons stripped from the ground water. The soil vapor extraction system can also be modified to enhance oxygen (air) delivery to the unsaturated zone and thus promote natural biodegradation of the petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil. Techniques for monitoring the progress of remediation include measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in the soil, DO levels in the ground water, subsurface air pressures and petroleum hydrocarbon levels in the discharged air, soil and ground water

  16. Anaerobic degradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Coates, J.D. [Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology, Univ. of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Over the last two decades significant advances have been made in our understanding of the anaerobic biodegradability of monoaromatic hydrocarbons. It is now known that compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and all three xylene isomers can be biodegraded in the absence of oxygen by a broad diversity of organisms. These compounds have been shown to serve as carbon and energy sources for bacteria growing phototrophically, or respiratorily with nitrate, manganese, ferric iron, sulfate, or carbon dioxide as the sole electron acceptor. In addition, it has also been recently shown that complete degradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons can also be coupled to the respiration of oxyanions of chlorine such as perchlorate or chlorate, or to the reduction of the quinone moieties of humic substances. Many pure cultures of hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobes now exist and some novel biochemical and genetic pathways have been identified. In general, a fumarate addition reaction is used as the initial activation step of the catabolic process of the corresponding monoaromatic hydrocarbon compounds. However, other reactions may alternatively be involved depending on the electron acceptor utilized or the compound being degraded. In the case of toluene, fumarate addition to the methyl group mediated by benzylsuccinate synthase appears to be the universal mechanism of activation and is now known to be utilized by anoxygenic phototrophs, nitrate-reducing, Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic cultures. Many of these biochemical pathways produce unique extracellular intermediates that can be utilized as biomarkers for the monitoring of hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic natural environments. (orig.)

  17. Hydrocarbons as markers for identifying postirradiated peanuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrocarbons produced by ?-radiation of peanuts were analyzed to determine the relationship between irradiation and production of hydrocarbons, and the use of hydrocarbons as markers for identifying postirradiated peanuts. Hydrocarbons in peanuts were determined by a sequential procedure of lipid extraction by hexane, Florisil column chromatography, and gas chromatography. Hydrocarbons C17:1, C16:2, C17:2, and C16:3 were easily detected in peanuts irradiated at 0.5 kGy or higher, but not in unirradiated ones. The hydrocarbons were minimally changed by roasting the irradiated peanuts and were not detected in unirradiated roasted peanuts

  18. From migration flows to migration systems: the case of Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Pyatkovska, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    The author of the article singles out countriesparticipants of migration systems with Ukraine as a source country and, by ranking them according to the selected indicators, makes the analysis of the formation and effectiveness of migration systems. As the result, an attempt to predict possible destination countries of future migration outflows from Ukraine is made.

  19. The International Organization for Migration in Global Migration Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Poulsen, Sofie Havn; Andersen, Lise

    2011-01-01

    This project focuses on the IOM, the notion of global governance of migration and the interaction between these two. The point of departure has been an attempt to grasp the current global approach to migration and comprehend whether, or to what degree, there is governance of migration issues taking place at a global level.

  20. International Migration of Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Junge, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We analyze emigration and return decisions of Danish couples. Our main questions are how emigration and return migration decisions depend on education, earnings, and the number and age of children. We use register data on full population from 1982 to 2006, focusing on opposite-gender couples in which the female is aged 23 to 37, and the male 25 to 39. We find that power couples in which both are highly educated are most likely to emigrate, but also most likely to return. Couples in which only the male is highly educated are more than twice as likely to emigrate as if only the female is highly edu-cated. Couples in which neither partner is highly educated are least likely to emigrate, but also have lowest return migration rates. This suggests that migration as brain circu-lation is most pronounced among the highly-educated. The probability of emigration is increasing in male earnings, but does not depend much on female earnings. Having children reduces the likelihood of emigration and the more so the older children are. Surprisingly, the return rates do not depend much on the number of children. Overall, our findings suggest that family migration patterns are still surprisingly traditional, re-sponding more to the male's job opportunities and education.

  1. Selective Migration--Again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamin, Leon J.

    1980-01-01

    Wolff has recently reinterpreted the data of Lee to indicate that Black migration from the south to Philadelphia had been selective in an IQ-relevant manner. However, Wolff's deduction from Lee's data is shown to depend entirely upon an assumption about cumulative IQ deficit in southern Black children. (Author/CTM)

  2. Practical Data Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Johny

    2012-01-01

    This book is for executives and practitioners tasked with the movement of data from old systems to a new repository. It uses a series of steps guaranteed to get the reader from an empty new system to one that is working and backed by the user population. Using this proven methodology will vastly increase the chances of a successful migration.

  3. Migration pathways in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study looked at diffusive migration through three types of deformation; the projectile pathways, hydraulic fractures of the sediments and faults, and was divided into three experimental areas: autoradiography, the determination of diffusion coefficients and electron microscopy of model projectile pathways in clay. For the autoradiography, unstressed samples were exposed to two separate isotopes, Pm-147 (a possible model for Am behaviour) and the poorly sorbed iodide-125. The results indicated that there was no enhanced migration through deformed kaolin samples nor through fractured Great Meteor East (GME) sediment, although some was evident through the projectile pathways in GME and possibly through the GME sheared samples. The scanning electron microscopy of projectile pathways in clay showed that emplacement of a projectile appeared to have no effect on the orientation of particles at distances greater than two projectile radii from the centre of a projectile pathway. It showed that the particles were not simply aligned with the direction of motion of the projectile but that, the closer to the surface of a particular pathway, the closer the particles lay to their original orientation. This finding was of interest from two points of view: i) the ease of migration of a pollutant along the pathway, and ii) possible mechanisms of hole closure. It was concluded that, provided that there is no advective migration, the transport of radionuclides through sediments containing these defects would not be significantly more rapid than in undeformed sediments. (author)

  4. Brain Migration Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, Annie

    2006-01-01

    The "brain drain/brain gain" debate has been going on for the past 40 years, with irresolvable theoretical disputes and unenforceable policy recommendations that economists commonly ascribe to the lack of reliable empirical data. The recent report of the World Bank, "International migration, remittances and the brain drain", documents the…

  5. Migration and Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoppi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    European powers imposed the nation-state on Africa through colonialism. But even after African independencies, mainstream discourses and government policies have amplified the idea that sedentariness and the state are the only acceptable mode of modernity. Migration is portrayed as a menace to the societies where the migrants wish to settle

  6. Religion, migration og integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Jørn

    2010-01-01

    Sammenhængen mellem religion og integration har de sidste år været genstand for debat. Artiklen kommer ind på begreber og sammenhænge relateret til området (migration, diaspora, assimilation, etnicitet, kultur) og ser på religionens mulige rolle som negativ eller positiv ressource i integrationsspørgsmål.

  7. Radionuclide migration in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The migration rates and mechanisms of a large suite of radionuclides in groundwater created by the disposal of low-level aqueous effluents from the Hanford N-Reactor are being characterized. These studies are developing information which can be applied to understanding and predicting the movement of radionuclides in shallow-land burial sites which may become saturated with groundwater. The movement of the various radionuclides in groundwater at the N-Reactor disposal site is being investigated as a function of their physicochemical forms. Those radionuclides most readily migrating include tritium and anionic species of 131133I, 60Co, 103106Ru, 122124125Sb, /sup 99m,99/Tc, and 99Mo. Also migrating are traces of 238239240Pu in an oxidized (V or VI) anionic form(s). Various parameters affecting the physicochemical speciation of the radionuclides, including the major and trace ions, organic constitutents, colloidal materials, and soil chemistry are being characterized to determine their relative roles in the migration processes. the data generated in this study will be extremely valuable in formulating guidelines for the operation of existing low-level waste disposal sites, in determining what long-term surveillance and maintenance needs will be required, and in determining essential requirements for remedial action. 4 tables

  8. Fall armyworm migration patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), infestations in most of North America arise from annual migrations of populations that overwinter in southern Texas and Florida. Cytochrome Oxidase I haplotype profiles within the fall armyworm corn-strain, the subgroup tha...

  9. Radionuclide migration studies in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a brief description about retention and migration parameters of radionuclides in soil, including main methods to determine the distribution coefficient (K) are given. Some of several factors that can act on the migration are also mentioned. (author)

  10. CHARACTERISTICS OF MIGRATION IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela D?N?CIC?

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study the patterns of migration in Romania. Labor migration in Romania has seen major growth after 1989. Permanent migration rapidly increased in the early years after the revolution, decreasing rapidly thereafter, due to difficulties of obtaining long term residence and work permit in the host countries. However, temporary migration has been found to evolve very dynamically, requiring economic analysis of potential externalities, whether positive or the negative of this phenomenon.

  11. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

    2011-11-29

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  12. Iodine isothermal migration behaviour in titanium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavarini, S.; Jaffrezic, H.; Martin, P.; Peaucelle, C.; Toulhoat, N.; Cardinal, S.; Moncoffre, N.; Pichon, C.; Tribet, M.

    2008-02-01

    Titanium nitride is one of the inert matrixes proposed to surround the fuel in gas cooled fast reactor (GFR) systems. These reactors will operate at high temperature and refractory materials with a high chemical stability and good mechanical properties are required. Furthermore, a total retention of the most volatile fission products, such as I, Xe or Cs, by the inert matrix is needed during the in-pile process. The isothermal migration of iodine in TiN was studied by implanting 800 keV I ++ ions in sintered samples at an ion fluence of 5 × 10 15 cm -2. Thermal treatments were performed under secondary vacuum at temperatures ranging from 1200 to 1700 °C. Iodine concentration profiles were determined by 2.5 MeV ?-particle elastic backscattering. The migration of iodine seems to be correlated with point defects created by implanted ions near the surface. The Arrhenius plot corresponding to iodine detrapping is curved with possibly two straight-line regions which could indicate either the presence of two types of traps, or a strong dependence of trap's concentration on temperature above 1500 °C. The activation energies associated with each linear region of the Arrhenius plot were found to be: Ea = 2.4 ± 0.2 eV below 1500 °C and E=11.4±0.2 eV above 1500 °C. Nitrogen evaporation from TiN surface under secondary vacuum was proposed as a contributing factor to the enhanced mobility of iodine at high temperature.

  13. FACTORS AFFECTING INTERNATIONAL LABOR MIGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ?.?. ???????

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  The article reviews the evolution of the main theories that explain the labor migration system impacts on international labor migration are shown. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of external labor migration factors in Ukraine based on the use of the basic tenets of the "push and pull factors" theory.

  14. Prediction of cold start hydrocarbon emissions of air cooled two wheeler spark ignition engines by simple fuzzy logic simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Raja Ayyanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cold start hydrocarbon emission from the increasing population of two wheelers in countries like India is one of the research issues to be addressed. This work describes the prediction of cold start hydrocarbon emissions from air cooled spark ignition engines through fuzzy logic technique. Hydrocarbon emissions were experimentally measured from test engines of different cubic capacity, at different lubricating oil temperature and at different idling speeds with and without secondary air supply in exhaust. The experimental data were used as input for modeling average hydrocarbon emissions for 180 seconds counted from cold start and warm start of gasoline bike engines. In fuzzy logic simulation, member functions were assigned for input variables (cubic capacity and idling rpm and output variables (average hydrocarbon emission for first 180 seconds at cold start and warm start. The knowledge based rules were adopted from the analyzed experimental data and separate simulations were carried out for predicting hydrocarbon emissions from engines equipped with and without secondary air supply. The simulation yielded the average hydrocarbon emissions of air cooled gasoline engine for a set of given input data with accuracy over 90%.

  15. The Dnieper-Donets Paleorift, Ukraine: deep structures and hydrocarbon accumulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekunov, A.V.; Kaluzhnaya, L.T. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. Geofiziki); Ryabchun, L.I. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. Geologicheskikh Nauk)

    1993-04-01

    Numerous deep seismic and borehole studies have been made in the Dnieper-Donets Paleorift (Ukraine), and, when combined with studies of oil- and gasfield distribution, indicate that there exists an interesting relationship between deep lithospheric structure and evolution, and the hydrocarbon potential of the Paleorift. It has been found that hydrocarbon accumulations tend to be associated with slopes in the Moho dicontinuity, where most faults are located, and also where the basement and the lower layers of sedimentary cover have been fragmented by faults. These areas are the most promising for exploration. These facts could imply an abiogenic, mantle origin for oil and gas. Alternatively, the hot mantle ascending beneath the Dnieper-Donets Paleorift may have created thermodynamic or fluid-flow conditions within the sedimentary cover which were favourable for the transformation of biogenic material into oil and gas. In this case, mantle fluid-flow along faults assisted the migration of hydrocarbons and its accumulation in traps. (author)

  16. FUNGI AND HYDROCARBONS IN THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrocarbons from various sources--anthropogenic pollution, marine seeps, marine algae, atmospheric fallout and terrestrial runoff--enter the ocean daily. These complex hydrocarbon mixtures are dispersed and degraded by abiotic and biogenic processes. Most commonly, bacteria are ...

  17. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH): ToxFAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a state: This map displays locations where Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is known to be present. On ... I get more information? ToxFAQs TM for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) ( Hidrocarburos Totales de Petróleo (TPH) ) August ...

  18. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, V.; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, A.; Hellén, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol, which affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements of aromatic hydrocarbons were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa), which is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (> 10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and pyrometallurgical industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anticyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for 1 year. Samples were collected twice a week for 2 h during daytime and 2 h during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the monthly median (mean) total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 (0.011) and 3.1 (3.2) ppb. Benzene levels did not exceed the local air quality standard limit, i.e. annual mean of 1.6 ppb. Toluene was the most abundant compound, with an annual median (mean) concentration of 0.63 (0.89) ppb. No statistically significant differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found, and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis indicated that the lack of seasonal cycles could be attributed to patterns determining the origin of the air masses sampled. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in general significantly higher in air masses that passed over anthropogenically impacted regions. Inter-compound correlations and ratios gave some indications of the possible sources of the different aromatic hydrocarbons in the source regions defined in the paper. The highest contribution of aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations to ozone formation potential was also observed in plumes passing over anthropogenically impacted regions.

  19. Locking knee after intra-articular migration of broken patella tension band wire: an extraordinary intra-articular migration via pseudarthrosis line

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lushun; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2014-01-01

    Fixation of displaced patella fractures with tension band wiring is a commonly performed technique. Broken metal wires after such surgeries are not uncommon, however, intra-articular wire migration after failure of the tension band wires in the patella is uncommon and rarely described. In this study, we report a case of locking knee symptoms secondary to the migration of a broken patella wire into the knee joint through the pseudarthrosis line.

  20. Locking knee after intra-articular migration of broken patella tension band wire: an extraordinary intra-articular migration via pseudarthrosis line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lushun; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2013-01-01

    Fixation of displaced patella fractures with tension band wiring is a commonly performed technique. Broken metal wires after such surgeries are not uncommon, however, intra-articular wire migration after failure of the tension band wires in the patella is uncommon and rarely described. In this study, we report a case of locking knee symptoms secondary to the migration of a broken patella wire into the knee joint through the pseudarthrosis line. PMID:24509227

  1. Migrations in Slovenian geography textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurij Senega?nik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Slovenia, the migrations are treated in almost all geographical textbooks for different levels of education. In the textbooks for the elementary school from the sixth to ninth grade, students acquire knowledge of the migrations by the inductive approach. Difficulty level of treatment and quantity of information are increasing by the age level. In the grammar school program a trail of gaining knowledge on migration is deductive. Most attention is dedicated to migrations in general geography textbooks. The textbooks for vocational and technical school programs deal with migrations to a lesser extent and with different approaches.

  2. Dispersal and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, C.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ringing of birds unveiled many aspects of avian migration and dispersal movements. However, there is even much more to be explored by the use of ringing and other marks. Dispersal is crucial in understanding the initial phase of migration in migrating birds as it is to understand patterns and processes of distribution and gene flow. So far, the analysis of migration was largely based on analysing spatial and temporal patters of recoveries of ringed birds. However, there are considerable biases and pitfalls in using recoveries due to spatial and temporal variation in reporting probabilities. Novel methods are required for future studies separating the confounding effects of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of recovery data and heterogeneity of the landscape as well. These novel approaches should aim a more intensive and novel use of the existing recovery data by taking advantage of, for instance, dynamic and multistate modeling, should elaborate schemes for future studies, and should also include other marks that allow a more rapid data collection, like telemetry, geolocation and global positioning systems, and chemical and molecular markers. The latter appear to be very useful in the delineating origin of birds and connectivity between breeding and non–breeding grounds. Many studies of migration are purely descriptive. However, King and Brooks (King & Brooks, 2004 examine if movement patterns of dolphins change after the introduction of a gillnet ban. Bayesian methods are an interesting approach to this problem as they provide a meaningful measure of the probability that such a change occurred rather than simple yes/no response that is often the result of classical statistical methods. However, the key difficulty of a general implementation of Bayesian methods is the complexity of the modelling —there is no general userfriendly package that is easily accessible to most scientists. Drake and Alisauskas (Drake & Alisauskas, 2004 examine the philopatric movement of geese using a classic multi–state design. Previous studies of philopaty often rely upon simple return rates —however, good mark–recapture studies do not need to assume equal detection probabilities in space and time. This is likely the most important contribution of multi–state modelling to the study of movement. As with many of these studies, the most pressing problem in the analysis is the explosion in the number of parameters and the need to choose parsimonious modelss to get good precision. Drake and Alisauska demonstrate that model choice still remains an art with a great deal of biological insight being very helpful in the task. There is still plenty of scope for novel methods to study migration. Traditionally, there has been a clear cut distinction between birds being labelled as “migrant” or “resident” on the basis of field observations and qualitative interpretations of patterns of ring–recoveries. However, there are intermediate species where only part of the population migrates (partial migrants or where different components of the population migrate to different extents (differential migrants. Siriwardena, Wernham and Baillie (Siriwardena et al., 2004 develop a novel method that produces a quantitative index of migratory tendency. The method uses distributions of ringing–to–recovery distances to classify individual species’ patterns of movement relative to those of other species. The areas between species’ cumulative distance distributions are used with multi–dimensional scaling to produce a similarity map among species. This map can be used to investigate the factors that affect the migratory strategies that species adopt, such as body size, territoriality and distribution, and in studies of their consequences for demographic parameters such as annual survival and the timing of breeding. The key assumption of the method is the similar recovery effort of species over space and time. It would be interesting to overlay maps of effort to try and remove any induced artefacts in the data. Differences in

  3. Functorial Data Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Spivak, David I.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple database definition language: that of categories and functors. A database schema is a small category and an instance is a set-valued functor on it. We show that morphisms of schemas induce three "data migration functors", which translate instances from one schema to the other in canonical ways. These functors parameterize projections, unions, and joins over all tables simultaneously and can be used in place of conjunctive and disjunctive que...

  4. Customer channel migration

    OpenAIRE

    Böhm, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Customer Channel Migration deals with the active management of a customer's channel usage behavior with the aim to increase her profitability and lifetime. Hence, the dissertation answers two distict questions: on one hand, it investigates the impact of channel use on a customer's profitability and lifetime. On the other hand, it is researched how a customer's channel usage behavior can be influenced and managed. The cumulative dissertation consists of five articles: the first article describ...

  5. Education, unemployment and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Eggert, Wolfgang; Krieger, Tim; Meier, Volker

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies a two-region model in which unemployment, education decisions and interregional migration are endogenous. The poorer region exhibits both lower wages and higher unemployment rates, and migrants to the richer region are disproportionally skilled. The brain drain from the poor to the rich region is accompanied by stronger incentives to acquire skills even for immobile workers. Regional shocks tend to affect both regions in a symmetric fashion, and skilled-biased technological...

  6. Migration of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium migration is treated as a process leading to mobilization and concentration of uranium in ore deposits. During the formation of global zonation, uranium migration contributed to the enrichment of this radioactive metal in the Earth's crust. The process of upper mantle and crust fractionation and differentiation is the first cycle of the mobilization process which led to uranium enrichment in rocks in some areas of the upper Earth's crust that could be considered as the primordial uranium provinces. Uranium migration is related to the structural history of sial Earth's crust and sial magmatism. During orogeny conditions could be created for development of progressive metamorphism and for magma generation. The latter is the best process for uranium mobilization. The effectiveness of this process depends on the composition of the primordial rocks and the intensity of the process. The importance of the magmatism for uranium mobilization is due to the magmatic differentiation. Selectively mobilized felsitic parts of the rocks migrate and form felsitic magmatic portions, which mobilize uranium. Solutions are the best uranium mobilization agents. Their generation starts with water separation from local permeable reservoirs and finishes with water dissociation from minerals during their dehydration. Such solutions could be endogenous or exogenous, depending on the igneous or sedimentary rocks which have been deformed. Some of the solutions can have mixed origin, if deformed magmatic rocks contain exogenous water in pores and cracks and endogenous water in minerals. The mobilizing ability of the solutions depends on their energy, which could derive from their chemical compositions and from physical conditions of the geological environment. The movement of the mineralized solutions can be due to steam pressure and the pressure difference between the starting and the final point of the juvenile solutions, gravity for meteoric waters, convection in geoconvection cells, and water pressure in pressured hydrogeological systems. All these types of solution movement are considered, with emphasis on the more common ones. (author). 11 refs, 5 figs

  7. En fornemmelse for migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schütze, Laura Maria

    2015-01-01

    Afhandlingen undersøger, hvordan sted, museets rolle som aktør og religion er relevante for produktionen af migration på Immigrantmuseet (2012) og i Københavns Museums udstilling At blive københavner (2010). Afhandlingen er baseret på udstillingsanalyse samt interview med relevant museumsfagligt personale. Siden slutningen af 1990erne har indvandring præget den kultur- og værdipolitiske debat i Danmark, der især har fremstillet indvandreren som 'den religiøse anden'. Indvandring har ligesom reli...

  8. Digitizing migration heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi

    2011-01-01

    Museums are increasingly digitizing their collections and making them available to the public on-line. Creating such digital resources may become means for social inclusion. For museums that acknowledge migration history and cultures of ethnic minority groups as important subjects in multiethnic societies, digitization brings new possibilities for reaching source communities. This article describes Web projects conducted at Museum Maluku in Utrecht, the Netherlands. The article focuses on the mu...

  9. International labour migration

    OpenAIRE

    Salt, John; Clarke, James; Wanner, Philippe ( Laboratoire de démographie et d'études familiales, Université de Genève, Switzerland )

    2004-01-01

    Le présent rapport décrit les grandes caractéristiques des migrations de la main-d’œuvre en Europe et les tendances observées ces dernières années. Il s’intéresse davantage aux travailleurs étrangers engagés dans un processus migratoire qu’aux populations immigrées déjà installées dans le pays d’accueil. Il examine les concepts et les définitions entourant la notion de travailleur migrant, présente brièvement les types et les sources de données, puis étudie les caractéristiques et les tendanc...

  10. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luiz Fernando, Martins; Raquel Silva, Peixoto.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the [...] reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  11. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  12. Migration and fate of ethanol-enhanced gasoline in groundwater: A modelling analysis of a field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Juliana G.; Mocanu, Marian T.; Zoby, José Luiz G.; Molson, John W.; Barker, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol use as a gasoline additive is increasing, as are the chances of groundwater contamination caused by gasoline releases involving ethanol. To evaluate the impact of ethanol on dissolved hydrocarbon plumes, a field test was performed in which three gasoline residual sources with different ethanol fractions (E0: no ethanol, E10: 10% ethanol and E95: 95% ethanol) were emplaced below the water table. Using the numerical model BIONAPL/3D, the mass discharge rates of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes and naphthalene were simulated and results compared to those obtained from sampling transects of multilevel samplers. It was shown that ethanol dissolved rapidly and migrated downgradient as a short slug. Mass discharge of the hydrocarbons from the E0 and E10 sources suggested similar first-order hydrocarbon decay rates, indicating that ethanol from E10 had no impact on hydrocarbon degradation. In contrast, the estimated hydrocarbon decay rates were significantly lower when the source was E95. For the E0 and E10 cases, the aquifer did not have enough oxygen to support complete mineralization of the hydrocarbon compounds to the extent suggested by the field-based mass discharge. Introducing a heterogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity did little to overcome this discrepancy. A better match between the numerical model and the field data was obtained assuming partial degradation of the hydrocarbons to intermediate compounds. Besides depending on the ethanol concentration, the impact of ethanol on hydrocarbon degradation appears to be highly dependent on the availability of electron acceptors.

  13. Study of migration behavior of technogenic radionuclides in the Yenisey River-Kara Sea aquatic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.; Legin, E.; Legin, V. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shishlov, A.; Savitskii, Yu. [Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Novikov, A.; Goryachenkova, T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-03-01

    For 35 years Krasnoyarsk Mining-Chemical Combine (MCC) manufactures weapon plutonium in single-pass production reactors cooled with water of the Yenisey River. Water discharge from these reactors is the major source of radioactive contamination of the Yenisey River. We have demonstrated that after putting the reactors out of operation (in late 1992) the contamination level of the Yenisey River with short-lived radionuclides considerably decreased, and now the radioactive contamination is caused essentially by Cs-137, Eu-152, Pu-239,240, Sr-90, and Am-241, whose concentration in the aqueous phase is lower than in bottom sediments and, particularly, flood-land deposits by several orders of magnitude (except for Sr-90). The flood-land deposits are classified with the most contaminated environmental objects in the territories under the impact of MCC: their radioactivity is comparable with that of low-level waste. Taking into account the considerable depth and area of the flood-land deposits, this allows their classification as a great technogenic radiation anomaly. Comparison of the maximal Cs-137 and Pu-239,240 levels in flood-land soils and bottom sediments of the Yenisey River with those in bottom sediments of the Pripyat' River and the Kiev reservoir shows that these values are close each to other. A direct correlation is found between the spatial distribution of Cs-137 on the one hand and Pu-239,240, Eu-152, and Am-241 on the other hand in the aqueous phase and bottom sediments, which is not the case for Sr-90. Data on the distribution coefficients of the indicated radionuclides between the deposits and aqueous phase (obtained with actual and model systems) and also on the radionuclide distribution throughout geochemical mobility forms suggest that the essential part of Cs, Pu, Eu, and Am migrates with fine-disperse suspended material, the transport and distribution of which is controlled by the hydrological regime of the Yenisey River. By contrast, strontium migrates as soluble species weakly sorbed by the solid phase, causing the observed low content of Sr-90 in flood-land deposits and bottom sediments of the Yenisey River. The indicated migration behavior of radionuclides is characteristic of the Yenisey Gulf and the adjacent part of the Kara Sea also. We made similar conclusions when studying the migration behavior of Cs-137, Pu-239,240, and Sr-90 in the Kiev reservoir (1987). The formation of radioactive flood-land deposits is provided by rapid deposition of suspended material in stagnant zones during periodical flood. Humus compounds contribute significantly to accumulation of radionuclides in the flood-land deposits and bottom sediments, which is supported by the observed correlation between the radionuclide (Pu, Am, Eu) and total organic carbon distributions in them. Radiochemical analysis of separate fractions showed that about 20% of Pu and Am are associated with the organic fraction: Pu is nearly equally distributed between humic and fulvic acid fractions, whereas Am is preferentially associated with the fulvic acid fraction (the most mobile fraction of humus matter). It was demonstrated in model experiments that the calcium-hydrocarbonate type of water of the Yenisey River causes suppression of formation of mobile fulvate complexes of hydrolyzable radionuclides and, therefore, their transfer into the aqueous phase. In combination with the observed very high distribution coefficients of the radionuclides and low content of their mobile geochemical forms in flood-land deposits of the Yenisey River this suggest that they cannot contribute somewhat significantly to the secondary radioactive contamination of the river water by all mechanisms except migration by mechanical transfer. (author)

  14. Study of migration behavior of technogenic radionuclides in the Yenisey River-Kara Sea aquatic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For 35 years Krasnoyarsk Mining-Chemical Combine (MCC) manufactures weapon plutonium in single-pass production reactors cooled with water of the Yenisey River. Water discharge from these reactors is the major source of radioactive contamination of the Yenisey River. We have demonstrated that after putting the reactors out of operation (in late 1992) the contamination level of the Yenisey River with short-lived radionuclides considerably decreased, and now the radioactive contamination is caused essentially by Cs-137, Eu-152, Pu-239,240, Sr-90, and Am-241, whose concentration in the aqueous phase is lower than in bottom sediments and, particularly, flood-land deposits by several orders of magnitude (except for Sr-90). The flood-land deposits are classified with the most contaminated environmental objects in the territories under the impact of MCC: their radioactivity is comparable with that of low-level waste. Taking into account the considerable depth and area of the flood-land deposits, this allows their classification as a great technogenic radiation anomaly. Comparison of the maximal Cs-137 and Pu-239,240 levels in flood-land soils and bottom sediments of the Yenisey River with those in bottom sediments of the Pripyat' River and the Kiev reservoir shows that these values are close each to other. A direct correlation is found between the spatial distribution of Cs-137 on the one hand and Pu-239,240, Eu-152, and Am-241 on the other hand in the aqueous phase and bottom sediments, which is not the case for Sr-90. Data on the distribution coefficients of the indicated radionuclides between the deposits and aqueous phase (obtained with actual and model systems) and also on the radionuclide distribution throughout geochemical mobility forms suggest that the essential part of Cs, Pu, Eu, and Am migrates with fine-disperse suspended material, the transport and distribution of which is controlled by the hydrological regime of the Yenisey River. By contrast, strontium migrates as soluble species weakly sorbed by the solid phase, causing the observed low content of Sr-90 in flood-land deposits and bottom sediments of the Yenisey River. The indicated migration behavior of radionuclides is characteristic of the Yenisey Gulf and the adjacent part of the Kara Sea also. We made similar conclusions when studying the migration behavior of Cs-137, Pu-239,240, and Sr-90 in the Kiev reservoir (1987). The formation of radioactive flood-land deposits is provided by rapid deposition of suspended material in stagnant zones during periodical flood. Humus compounds contribute significantly to accumulation of radionuclides in the flood-land deposits and bottom sediments, which is supported by the observed correlation between the radionuclide (Pu, Am, Eu) and total organic carbon distributions in them. Radiochemical analysis of separate fractions showed that about 20% of Pu and Am are associated with the organic fraction: Pu is nearly equally distributed between humic and fulvic acid fractions, whereas Am is preferentially associated with the fulvic acid fraction (the most mobile fraction of humus matter). It was demonstrated in model experiments that the calcium-hydrocarbonate type of water of the Yenisey River causes suppression of formation of mobile fulvate complexes of hydrolyzable radionuclides and, therefore, their transfer into the aqueous phase. In combination with the observed very high distribution coefficients of the radionuclides and low content of their mobile geochemical forms in flood-land deposits of the Yenisey River this suggest that they cannot contribute somewhat significantly to the secondary radioactive contamination of the river water by all mechanisms except migration by mechanical transfer. (author)

  15. Wnts induce migration and invasion of myeloma plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Ya-Wei; Walsh, Katie; Yao, Lei; Kedei, Noemi; Blumberg, Peter M; Rubin, Jeffrey S; Shaughnessy, John; Rudikoff, Stuart

    2005-09-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable form of lymphoid cancer characterized by accumulation of neoplastic plasma cells in the bone marrow cavity. Little is known about the mechanisms regulating myeloma cell movement within the bone marrow and metastasis to secondary sites. Herein, we identify multiple members of the wingless/int (Wnt) family as promoters of myeloma cell migration/invasion. Wnt-mediated migration was associated with the Wnt/RhoA pathway and did not necessitate signaling through beta-catenin. Activation of both RhoA and members of the protein kinase C (PKC) family, including PKCalpha, PKCbeta, and PKCmu, were required for induction of migration. Activated RhoA and PKCalpha, PKCbeta, and PKCmu appear to assemble in macromolecular signaling complexes that are associated with the cell membrane. These results suggest that Wnt responsiveness of myeloma plasma cells may be a significant factor in disease progression. PMID:15886323

  16. Physicians' migration in Europe: an overview of the current situation

    OpenAIRE

    Amaya Carlos; García-Pérez Miguel A; Otero Ángel

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The migration of medical professionals as a result of the expansion of the European Union is cause for concern. But there is a significant lack of information available about this phenomenon. Methods Search of secondary databases about the presence of european doctors working abroad, through two search engines in the Internet (Google and Pubmed) and a survey of professional organisations and regulators in countries of the European Union. Results The United Kingdom has more...

  17. Migration and loving

    OpenAIRE

    Gevrek, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between anti-miscegenation laws, interracial marriage and black males' geographical distribution in the U.S. during and after the Great Migration. The U.S. Supreme Court decision in the case of Loving v. Virginia in 1967, which forced the last 16 Southern states to strike down their anti-miscegenation laws, creates a unique opportunity to explore the impact of an exogenous change in a state's laws regulating interracial marriages. Analyzing the U.S. Census...

  18. Amenity migration and tourism.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoš, Michael; Kušová, Drahomíra; T?šitel, Jan

    Tábor : University of South Bohemia ?eské Bud?jovice, University of Economics Bratislava, 2005 - (Hesková, M.; Šittler, E.; Dvo?ák, V.), s. 17-21 ISBN 80-7040-766-2. [Tourism, regional development and education . Sustainable development and tourism. Tábor (CZ), 12.05.2005-13.05.2005] Grant ostatní: EU(XE) European Union/'s Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources programme:QLK5-CT-2000-01211-SPRITE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : sustainable tourism * amenity migration * regional development Subject RIV: AE - Management ; Administration

  19. Migrating the Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    The migration of Blaga’s universalist, even centralist poems from Romanian of the first third of the 20th C. into American of the first fifth of the 21st C. illustrates the uses of Pierre Joris’s nomadic methods. My translations of Blaga read well for a teenage audience whose only exposure to literature consists of Twilight series novels. While I believe my translations are true to the content of the originals, I equally believe that such a readership would have been unthinkable for the original...

  20. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, Ville; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hellen, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-11

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours 1 during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass 2 selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the 3 monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. 4 Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant 5 species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant 6 differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be attributed to patterns determining the origin of the air masses sampled. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in general significantly higher in air masses that passed over anthropocentrically impacted regions. Interspecies correlations and ratios gave some indications of the possible sources for the different aromatic hydrocarbons in the source regions defined in the paper. The highest contribution of aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations to ozone formation potential was also observed in plumes passing over anthropocentrically impacted regions.

  1. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jaars

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters, the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters, the Johannesburg–Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people, the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and pyrometallurgical industries, the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be attributed to patterns determining the origin of the air masses sampled. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in general significantly higher in air masses that passed over anthropocentrically impacted regions. Interspecies correlations and ratios gave some indications of the possible sources for the different aromatic hydrocarbons in the source regions defined in the paper. The highest contribution of aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations to ozone formation potential was also observed in plumes passing over anthropocentrically impacted regions.

  2. Experimental investigation of hydrocarbon formation and transformation under Earth's upper mantle conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolesnikov, Anton

    2010-12-15

    The theory of the abyssal abiotic petroleum origin considers oil and natural gas to be generated in the Earth's upper mantle. Hydrocarbons migrate further through the deep faults into the Earth's crust, where they can form oil and gas deposits in any kind of rock in any kind of structural position. Until recently one of the main obstacles for further development of this theory has been the lack of the data covering processes of generation and transformations of hydrocarbons. Experimental data, presented in this thesis, confirms the possibility of hydrocarbons formation from mantle inorganic compounds (water, Fe, CaCO{sub 3} or graphite) at temperature and pressure of the upper mantle (1500 K and 5 GPa). Experiments were carried out in CONAC high pressure device and multianvil apparatus BARS. Compositions of received gas mixtures were similar to natural gas. Quantity of hydrocarbons depended on the cooling regime of reaction mixture under pressure. Slow cooling favored higher quantity. We found that donor of carbon (CaCO{sub 3} or graphite) determines formation of 'dry' (methane-rich) gas or 'wet' (light hydrocarbons-rich) gas. Experiments in laser-heated diamond anvil cells showed that methane and ethane partially react under upper mantle thermobaric conditions (2-5 GPa, 1000-1500 K) to form mixture of hydrocarbons: methane, ethane, propane and n-butane - main compounds of natural gas. Similarity of final product mixture obtained from methane and ethane means thermodynamic stability of hydrocarbons in the thermobaric conditions of the upper mantle and equilibrium character of the observed processes

  3. Aggregate Fluctuations and International Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Beine, Michel; Bourgeon, Pauline; Bricongne, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Traditional theories of integration such as the optimum currency area approach attribute a prominent role to international labour mobility in coping with relative economic fluctuations between countries. However, recent studies on international migration have overlooked the role of short-run factors in explaining international migration flows. This paper aims to fill that gap. We first derive a model of optimal migration choice based on an extension of the traditional Random Utility Model. Ou...

  4. Circular Migration and Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    Newland, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the human development implications of circular migration — both where it occurs naturally and where governments work to create it. The paper discusses various conceptions and definitions of circular migration, and concludes that circular migration is not intrinsically positive or negative in relation to human development; its impact depends upon the circumstances in which it occurs, the constraints that surround it and—above all—the degree of choice that ind...

  5. Data Migration Across The Clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant Pant,; Mr.Sanjeev Thakur,

    2013-01-01

    Having an effective and efficient strategy for optimizing long distance data migration is essential for every data center. With the ever increasing demands for the IT needs of businesses it is also important for data centers to deliver data migration cost effectively especially when faced with the demands from remote office back up, outsourcing, data center movers and cloud computing. Data management and migration are important research challenges of novel Cloud environments. While moving dat...

  6. The challenges of managing migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacoli, Cecilia

    2005-10-15

    Migration and urbanisation are driven by economic growth and social change, but also by deepening inequalities. Managing migration should not be equated with curbing it, as this inevitably reduces migrants' rights. But managing population movement whilst respecting the rights of migrants and nonmigrants, supporting the contribution of migration to poverty reduction and economic growth in sending and receiving areas and reducing the human and material costs of movement means that fundamental challenges need to be addressed.

  7. Orbital Migration Models under Test

    OpenAIRE

    Kley, Willy

    2011-01-01

    Planet-disk interaction predicts a change in the orbital elements of an embedded planet. Through linear and fully hydrodynamical studies it has been found that migration is typically directed inwards. Hence, this migration process gives natural explanation for the presence of the 'hot' planets orbiting close to the parent star, and it plays a mayor role in explaining the formation of resonant planetary systems. However, standard migration models for locally isothermal disk...

  8. Palaearctic-African Bird Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwajomo, Soladoye Babatola

    2013-01-01

    Bird migration has attracted a lot of interests over past centuries and the methods used for studying this phenomenon has greatly improved in terms of availability, dimension, scale and precision. In spite of the advancements, relatively more is known about the spring migration of trans-Saharan migrants than autumn migration. Information about the behavior and interactions of migrants during the nonbreeding season in sub-Saharan Africa is also scarce for many species. Furthermore, very little is...

  9. Nuclear Migration During Retinal Development

    OpenAIRE

    Baye, Lisa M.; Link, Brian A.

    2007-01-01

    In this review we focus on the mechanisms, regulation, and cellular consequences of nuclear migration in the developing retina. In the nervous system, nuclear migration is prominent during both proliferative and post-mitotic phases of development. Interkinetic nuclear migration is the process where the nucleus oscillates from the apical to basal surfaces in proliferative neuroepithelia. Proliferative nuclear movement occurs in step with the cell cycle, with M-phase being confined to the apica...

  10. Geometric Control of Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Chen; Girish Kumar; Carlos C. Co; Chia-Chi Ho

    2013-01-01

    Morphological polarization involving changes in cell shape and redistribution of cellular signaling machinery, initiate the migration of mammalian cells. Golgi complex typically localizes in front of the nucleus, and this frontwards polarization has been proposed to be involved in directional migration. However, the sequence of events remains unresolved. Does Golgi polarization precede directional migration or vice-versa? We address this question by constraining cells to specific areas and sh...

  11. Dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Yatish T. [Norfolk State University; Gardner, Todd H. [U.S. DOE

    2014-09-25

    Developments in catalyst technology for the dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks are reviewed for methane, higher hydrocarbons and alcohols. Thermodynamics, mechanisms and the kinetics of dry reforming are also reviewed. The literature on Ni catalysts, bi-metallic Ni catalysts and the role of promoters on Ni catalysts is critically evaluated. The use of noble and transitional metal catalysts for dry reforming is discussed. The application of solid oxide and metal carbide catalysts to dry reforming is also evaluated. Finally, various mechanisms for catalyst deactivation are assessed. This review also examines the various process related issues associated with dry reforming such as its application and heat optimization. Novel approaches such as supercritical dry reforming and microwave assisted dry reforming are briefly expanded upon.

  12. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the Apollo program ended, the development of launch propulsion systems in the US has fallen drastically, with only two new booster engine developments, the SSME and the RS-68, occurring in the past few decades.1 In recent years, however, there has been an increased interest in pursuing more effective launch propulsion technologies in the U.S., exemplified by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s inclusion of Launch Propulsion Systems as the first technological area in the Space Technology Roadmaps2. One area of particular interest to both government agencies and commercial entities has been the development of hydrocarbon engines; NASA and the Air Force Research Lab3 have expressed interest in the use of hydrocarbon fuels for their respective SLS Booster and Reusable Booster System concepts, and two major commercially-developed launch vehicles SpaceX s Falcon 9 and Orbital Sciences Antares feature engines that use RP-1 kerosene fuel. Compared to engines powered by liquid hydrogen, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have a greater propellant density (usually resulting in a lighter overall engine), produce greater propulsive force, possess easier fuel handling and loading, and for reusable vehicle concepts can provide a shorter turnaround time between launches. These benefits suggest that a hydrocarbon-fueled launch vehicle would allow for a cheap and frequent means of access to space.1 However, the time and money required for the development of a new engine still presents a major challenge. Long and costly design, development, testing and evaluation (DDT&E) programs underscore the importance of identifying critical technologies and prioritizing investment efforts. Trade studies must be performed on engine concepts examining the affordability, operability, and reliability of each concept, and quantifying the impacts of proposed technologies. These studies can be performed through use of the Technology Impact Forecasting (TIF) method. The Technology Impact Forecasting method is a normative forecasting technique that allows the designer to quantify the effects of adding new technologies on a given design. This method can be used to assess and identify the necessary technological improvements needed to close the gap that exists between the current design and one that satisfies all constraints imposed on the design. The TIF methodology allows for more design knowledge to be brought to the earlier phases of the design process, making use of tools such as Quality Function Deployments, Morphological Matrices, Response Surface Methodology, and Monte Carlo Simulations.2 This increased knowledge allows for more informed decisions to be made earlier in the design process, resulting in shortened design cycle time. This paper will investigate applying the TIF method, which has been widely used in aircraft applications, to the conceptual design of a hydrocarbon rocket engine. In order to reinstate a manned presence in space, the U.S. must develop an affordable and sustainable launch capability. Hydrocarbon-fueled rockets have drawn interest from numerous major government and commercial entities because they offer a low-cost heavy-lift option that would allow for frequent launches1. However, the development of effective new hydrocarbon rockets would likely require new technologies in order to overcome certain design constraints. The use of advanced design methods, such as the TIF method, enables the designer to identify key areas in need of improvement, allowing one to dial in a proposed technology and assess its impact on the system. Through analyses such as this one, a conceptual design for a hydrocarbon-fueled vehicle that meets all imposed requirements can be achieved.

  13. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ?eff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ?eff=C-nlog ??, where n varies from 1 (solidlike friction) at very low temperatures to 0 (Newtonian liquid) at very high temperatures, following an inverse sigmoidal curve. Only the shortest chain molecules melt, whereas th...

  14. Mediterranean hydrocarbons pollution from Landsat

    OpenAIRE

    Wald, Lucien; Monget, Jean-Marie; Albuisson, Michel

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that oil spills have been viewed by Landsat . The setection of oil is mainly due to the variations of reflectance between the sea and the oil spill. This result is used in the framework of the European Project "ARCHIMEDES", lead by the Joint Research Center (Ispra, Italy), which purpose is the study of the pollution in the Mediterranean Sea. 800 Landsat images obtained from 1972 to 1975 were examined. The cumulative area covered by the hydrocarbons spread each year...

  15. Catalytic method for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Sansone, Michael J. (Summit, NJ); Slegeir, William A. R. (Hampton Bays, NY)

    1984-01-01

    A method for synthesizing hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting said gases with a slurry of a catalyst composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants.

  16. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunshan (State College, PA); Ma, Xiaoliang (State College, PA); Sprague, Michael J. (Calgary, CA); Subramani, Velu (State College, PA)

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  17. Seismic chimneys in the Southern Viking Graben - Implications for palaeo fluid migration and overpressure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, Jens; Berndt, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Detailed understanding of natural fluid migration systems is essential to minimize risks during hydrocarbon exploration and to evaluate the long-term efficiency of the subsurface storage of waste water and gas from hydrocarbon production as well as CO2. The Southern Viking Graben (SVG) hosts numerous focused fluid flow structures in the shallow (SVG hosts more than 46 large-scale vertical chimney structures, which can be divided in three categories implying different formation processes. Our analysis reveals that seal-weakening, formation-wide overpressure and the presence of free gas are required to initiate the formation of vertical fluid conduits in the SVG. The presence of numerous vertical fluid conduits implies inter-stratigraphic hydraulic connectivity, which significantly affects the migration of fluids in the subsurface. Chimney structures are important for understanding the transfer of pore pressure anomalies to the shallow parts of the basin.

  18. [Work psychopathology and migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, M

    2000-01-01

    The author analyses the correlation between work psychopathology, migration and the role of the occupational physician. Migration was studied and analysed by many clinical psychiatrists, occupational psychiatrists and sociologists, who tried to investigate the possible consequences produced by this event on the psychological equilibrium, on social life and on working activities. It is unquestionable, according to the actual knowledge, that a strict correlation exists between work and psyche, or among the uneasiness of the work, cultural belonging and a psychopathology of the work. Work psycophatology appears to be the measurement of the repercussion of a dangerous work on human mental health and, consequently, could have a role in better adapting the man to his work. Therefore, in every work situation, the risk of a somatic or psycological, or even toxicological, pathology, must not be underevaluated. In a perspective of transcultural evaluation of the "migrant" worker who has to be introduced in a work environment, the knowledge of the "unspecific" health risks of the migrant, and of the cultural differences specifying the cultural value of work, becomes fundamental. Among the symptoms that require particular attention in the evaluation of a worker, the concept of fatigue is certainly fundamental and crucial. Consequently, it is necessary to safeguard the health of "the whole worker", not only acting on the physical and chemical occupational hazards, but also considering the relational and cultural risk factors. PMID:10771762

  19. Hydrocarbon prospectivity in Western Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravelis, Angelos; Makrodimitras, George; Zelilidis, Avraam [Patras Univ. (Greece). Lab. of Sedimentology

    2012-06-15

    The geology of Western Greece is dominated by the most external zones of the Hellenide fold-and-thrust belt, namely the Pre-Apulian (or Paxoi) and Ionian zones. With Western Greece and Albania having undergone, in broad terms, similar geological histories, also the hydrocarbon potentials of both areas may be compared. Likewise, the hydrocarbon potential of Italy's Apulian Platform, adjoining in the westerly offshore, may serve as an analogue. Three basin types within Western Greece that deserve hydrocarbon exploration have been examined and are grouped, correlated to major tectonic features, namely foreland (Ionian thrusts' foreland basin), piggy-back (Ionian thrusts' back-arc basin) and strike-slip basins. Additionally, strike-slip basins are further subdivided into the basin north of the Borsh-Khardhiqit strike-slip fault and the Preveza basin, north of Cephalonia transfer fault. Their filling histories suggest the occurrence of Mesozoic carbonate plays and Oligocene/Miocene sandstone plays both for oil and gas.

  20. Source rock hydrocarbons. Present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report first presents the characteristics of conventional oil and gas system, and the classification of liquid and gaseous non conventional hydrocarbons, with the peculiar case of coal-bed methane. The authors then describe how source rock hydrocarbons are produced: production of shale oils and gases (horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing, exploitation) and of coal-bed methane and coal mine methane. In the next part, they address and discuss the environmental impact of source rock hydrocarbon production: installation footprint, water resource management, drilling fluids, fracturing fluids composition, toxicity and recycling, air pollution, induced seismicity, pollutions from other exploitation and production activities. They propose an overview of the exploitation and production of source rock gas, coal-bed gas and other non conventional gases in the world. They describe the current development and discuss their economic impacts: world oil context and trends in the USA, in Canada and other countries, impacts on the North American market, on the world oil industry, on refining industries, on the world oil balance. They analyse the economic impacts of non conventional gases: development potential, stakes for the world gas trade, consequence for gas prices, development opportunities for oil companies and for the transport sector, impact on CO2 emissions, macro-economic impact in the case of the USA

  1. Survival of Trojan-Type Companions of Neptune During Primordial Planet Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Kortenkamp, Steve; Malhotra, Renu; Michtchenko, Tatiana

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the survivability of Trojan-type companions of Neptune during primordial radial migration of the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Loss of Neptune Trojans during planetary migration is not a random diffusion process. Rather, losses occur almost exclusively during discrete episodes when Trojan particles are swept by secondary resonances associated with mean-motion commensurabilities of Uranus with Neptune. The single greatest episode of loss e...

  2. Chronic kidney disease after vesico-vaginal stone formation around a migrated intrauterine device

    OpenAIRE

    Karsmakers, R; Weis-Potters, A E; Buijs, Guido; Joustra, E B

    2010-01-01

    Although the intrauterine device (IUD) seems a reliable and relatively safe method of contraception, it may cause serious complications. A rare complication is uterus perforation. Intravesical migration and secondary calculus formation is exceptionally uncommon. The authors report on a 75-year-old woman in whom a ‘forgotten’ migrated IUD resulted in vesico-vaginal fistula formation and chronic kidney disease, 39 years after insertion.

  3. Europe: Migration and Development

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Harris, Nigel.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La actitud de los gobiernos hacia la migración -interna y externa- ha cambiado en forma radical en años recientes. Considerada anteriormente como evidencia de una descomposición crónica social y económica así como una seria amenaza para el poder gubernamental (bajo una urbanización acelerada), la mi [...] gración interna es vista actualmente como un mecanismo muy importante para la redistribución de recursos de las localidades más ricas hacia las más pobres y un medio vital para elevar el ingreso de la población de estas áreas. El mismo cambio de percepción se está presentando sobre la migración internacional. En este caso, los flujos de remesas de trabajadores que laboran en el exterior hacia sus familias en sus lugares de origen se han convertido en un componente relevante en el ingreso de divisas de un gran número de países. Al cabo de ciertas reticencias, los gobiernos ahora han venido aceptando la migración por trabajo, con el fin de facilitar y reforzar sus efectos sobre la paliación de la pobreza. Sin embargo, se presentan algunos problemas con la pérdida de los trabajadores más emprendedores y con mayor calificación en los países en desarrollo. ¿Pueden reconciliarse los intereses en juego -países en desarrollo, migrantes, países desarrollados-?. La migración temporal circulatoria con propósitos de capacitación parecería ser el mejor resultado, de tal manera que la migración se convirtiera en un medio para potenciar el capital humano de los países en desarrollo en la tarea de reducir la pobreza mundial. Existen, no obstante, muchas opciones sin inmigración para los países desarrollados, desde reformas a sus mercados laborales internos hasta la subcontratación en el exterior. La alternativa real tiene que ver con la clase de mundo que deseamos. Abstract in english Government attitudes to migration -internal and external- have changed radically in recent years. Formerly seen as evidence of chronic social and economic breakdown and major threats to government power (in accelerated urbanisation), internal migration is now seen as major mechanism for the redistri [...] bution of resources from richer to poorer localities and a vital means of raising the incomes of the poor. The same revision of view is affecting international migration. Here remittance flows from workers working abroad to their families at home have become major components in the foreign exchange earnings of a number of countries. After some reluctance, governments have come to embrace emigration for work, to facilitate and reinforce its effects on the alleviation of poverty. However, there are problems in the loss of the most enterprising and best-trained workers of developing countries. Can the interests at stake -developing countries, migrants, developed countries- be reconciled? Temporary circulatory migration for the purposes of training would seem to be the best outcome, so that migration becomes a means to enhance the human capital of developing countries for the task of reducing world poverty. There are, however, many options for developed countries without immigration - from the reform of their domestic labour markets to off-shoring. The real choice is about what sort of world we want.

  4. Grounding a theory of African migration in recent data on Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achanfuo-yeboah, D

    1993-06-01

    This article discusses the development of a single theory of migration in Africa, which accounts for social, economic, cultural, psychological, and demographic factors. Prior migration literature refers to many countries in Africa. The empirical test in this paper is based on Ghana and data for 1960, 1970, and 1984. Ghana is described as having rapid population growth and urbanization reaching 12.5 million in 1984. The economy is based on agriculture, mining, and manufacturing. Education is available for free through the secondary school level (since 1965). The general theory of migration holds that the nature, intensity, direction, and patterns of migration are shaped by social, cultural, economic, and political developments. Sociocultural developments, or nonagricultural occupations and educational resources, may influence the flow of migration to urban areas. The regression model shows that 70% of the variance in net migration is explained by education, economic activity, and population growth. Education determines the direction and intensity of migration. A unit value of education causes a change of 0.251952 in the value of net migration. Norms, values, and beliefs are affected by educational and employment opportunities and are influenced by factors such as kinship, clan, language, beliefs, and religion. Economic infrastructure, industrialization, employment opportunities, and increased wages and salaries exert a pull on migrants. During the 1960s, Ghana attracted migrants from Nigeria. During the 1970s and 1980s, the reverse occurred. Migrants tend to move based on expectations of higher wages and better employment. In a bivariate relationship, economic activity explains 62% of the variance in migration. A unit change in the value of economic activity leads to a change of 1.379382 in the value of net migration. The literature emphasizes rural-urban flows, but migration in Gwan state in Cameroon and Udo state in Nigeria reflects the prevalence of rural-to-rural migration. The study of migration in Africa must consider a multivariate approach. PMID:12179894

  5. Amenity migration as an example of the environmental migration.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoš, Michael; Kušová, Drahomíra; T?šitel, Jan

    Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008, s. 58-75. ISBN 978-1-4438-0038-9 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA403/07/0714 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : amenity migration * environmental migration * local development Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography

  6. Software Engineering Challenges of Migration Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Geetha, S.; Dr.Alagaramy

    2012-01-01

    Organisations often face the challenges of migration from legacy systems to new target systems. Such migration efforts represent a complex engineering problem. This paper describes migration planning, identifies influencing factors, outlines a set of migration planning activities and offers a set of guidelines for the migration planning

  7. Influences of environmental cues, migration history and habitat familiarity on partial migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Christian; Aarestrup, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The factors that drive partial migration in organisms are not fully understood. Roach (Rutilus rutilus), a freshwater fish, engage in partial migration where parts of populations switch between summer habitats in lakes and winter habitats in connected streams. To test if the partial migration trait is phenotypically plastic or has genetic components, we translocated roach from 2 populations with different opportunities for migration to a lake with migration opportunity, containing a local roach population. This enabled monitoring of partial migration of fish in 3 different situations: 1) previous opportunity for migration, migrating in a familiar environment (the local population); 2) previous opportunity for migration, migrating in an unfamiliar environment; and 3) no previous opportunity for seasonal migration, migrating in an unfamiliar environment. In addition, we evaluated the migration patterns of roach in the lake with migration opportunity where from group 2 fish were translocated. Directional migration in and out of the lakes was monitored using Passive Integrated Transponder technology. Translocated fish with previous migration opportunity showed migration patterns more similar to local fish than to their home lake population, and individuals translocated from the lake without migration opportunity migrated when given the opportunity, suggesting that partial migration is phenotypically plastic and triggered by lake-specific environmental cues. We found temperature to be a proximate cue for migration decisions. Individuals without previous migration opportunity migrated at a lower proportion and with different small-scale migration patterns, suggesting that also genetic components are involved in the expression of the partial migration trait.

  8. Hydrocarbon potential of Altiplano and northern Subandean, Bolivia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edman, J.D.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Lindsey, D.D.; Lowell, J.D.; Cirbian, M.; Lopez, M.

    1989-03-01

    Seismic, stratigraphic, structural, and geochemical data from the Altiplano, northern Subandean, and northern plains of Bolivia were interpreted in order to evaluate the exploration potential of each province. Identification of three possible source rock intervals, primarily the Devonian and secondarily the Permian and Cretaceous, was used as the basis for recognizing active hydrocarbon systems. For those areas containing source intervals, their analysis revealed that possible reservoir and seal units range in age from Paleozoic to Tertiary; the majority of structures, however, are Eocene or younger. With these general concepts in mind, traps were identified in all three sedimentary provinces. In the northern Altiplano, the most prospective area is along the eastern margin near a southwest and west-vergent thrust belt where hanging-wall anticlines and a warped Eocene-Oligocene(.) unconformity surface form the most likely potential traps. In the central and southern Altiplano, both thrust-related and wrench-related structures present possible exploration targets. In the northern Subandean and Beni plains north of the Isiboro-Chapare area, traps can be classified into two broad groups. First, there are a wide variety of structural traps within the northern Subandean thrust belt, the most attractive of which are footwall structures that have been shielded from surface flushing by hanging-wall strata. Second, in the plains just northeast of the thrust belt, hydrocarbons sourced from the remnant Paleozoic basin may have migrated onto the Isarsama and Madidi highs.

  9. Exploring the factors influencing the cloud computing adoption: a systematic study on cloud migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rashmi; Sahoo, Gadadhar; Mehfuz, Shabana

    2015-01-01

    Today, most of the organizations trust on their age old legacy applications, to support their business-critical systems. However, there are several critical concerns, as maintainability and scalability issues, associated with the legacy system. In this background, cloud services offer a more agile and cost effective platform, to support business applications and IT infrastructure. As the adoption of cloud services has been increasing recently and so has been the academic research in cloud migration. However, there is a genuine need of secondary study to further strengthen this research. The primary objective of this paper is to scientifically and systematically identify, categorize and compare the existing research work in the area of legacy to cloud migration. The paper has also endeavored to consolidate the research on Security issues, which is prime factor hindering the adoption of cloud through classifying the studies on secure cloud migration. SLR (Systematic Literature Review) of thirty selected papers, published from 2009 to 2014 was conducted to properly understand the nuances of the security framework. To categorize the selected studies, authors have proposed a conceptual model for cloud migration which has resulted in a resource base of existing solutions for cloud migration. This study concludes that cloud migration research is in seminal stage but simultaneously it is also evolving and maturing, with increasing participation from academics and industry alike. The paper also identifies the need for a secure migration model, which can fortify organization's trust into cloud migration and facilitate necessary tool support to automate the migration process. PMID:25977891

  10. Africa: Setting for Human Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buuba, Babacar Diop

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of African migrations can help to understand prehistoric, historical, ancient modern and contemporaneous migrations. Movements of populations were and continue to be so intense that, for some analysts, they constitute one of the dominant trends of the history and destiny of the very old continent. African and non-African states, whether…

  11. Objectivity Data Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, M; Valassi, Andrea; Lubeck, M; Geppert, D; Geppert, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    In this article we describe the migration of event data collected by the COMPASS and HARP experiments at CERN. Together these experiments have over 300TB of physics data stored in Objectivity/DB that had to be transferred to a new data management system by the end of Q1 2003 and Q2 2003 respectively. To achieve this, data needed to be processed with a rate close to 100MB/s, employing 14 tape drives and a cluster of 30 Linux servers. The new persistency solution to accommodate the data is built upon relational databases for metadata storage and standard "flat" files for the event data. The databases contain collections of 109 events and allow generic queries or direct navigational access to the data, preserving the original C++ user API. The central data repository at CERN is implemented using several Oracle9i servers on Linux and the CERN Mass Storage System CASTOR.

  12. Chandra Contaminant Migration Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; O'Dell, Steve L.

    2014-01-01

    High volatility cleans OBFs and low volatility produces a high build-up at OBF centers; only a narrow (factor of 2 or less) volatility range produces the observed spatial pattern. Simulations predict less accumulation above outer S-array CCDs; this may explain, in part, gratings/imaging C/MnL discrepancies. Simulations produce a change in center accumulation due solely to DH heater ON/OFF temperature change; but a 2nd contaminant and perhaps a change in source rate is also required. Emissivity E may depend on thickness; another model parameter. Additional physics, e.g., surface migration, is not warranted at this time. At t approx. 14 yrs, model produced 0.22 grams of contaminant, 0.085 grams remaining within ACIS cavity; 7 percent (6mg) on OBFs.

  13. Green methodologies to test hydrocarbon reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Verga; Vera Rocca

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: The definition and the economic viability of the best development strategy of a hydrocarbon reservoir mainly depend on the quantity and type of fluids and on the well productivity. Well testing, consisting in producing hydrocarbon to the surface while measuring the pressure variations induced in the reservoir, has been used for decades to determine the fluid nature and well potential. In exploration and appraisal scenarios the hydrocarbons produced during a test are flared,...

  14. Migration: the trends converge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Formerly, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the US have served as permanent destinations for immigrants, while Europe's migrants have moved to more northerly countries to work for a time and then returned home. From 1973-1975 Europe's recruitment of foreign workers virtually ended, although family reunion for those immigrants allowed in was encouraged. Problems resulting from this new settlement migration include low paying jobs for immigrant women, high unemployment, and inadequate education for immigrant children. Illegal migrants from Latin America and the Caribbean enter the US and Canada each year while illegal North African immigrants enter Italy, Spain, and Greece. North America, Australia, and Europe have all received political refugees from Asia and Latin America. Increasingly, these foreigners compete in the labor market rather than simply fill jobs the native workers do not want. All the receiving countries have similar policy priorities: 1) more effective ways for controlling and monitoring inflows and checking illegal immigration; 2) encouraging normal living patterns and accepting refugees; and 3) integrating permanent migrants into the host country. Europe's public immigration encouragement prior to the first oil shock, has left some countries with a labor force that is reluctant to return home. It is unlikely that Europe will welcome foreign labor again in this decade, since unemployment among young people and women is high and family reunion programs may still bring in many immigrants. Less immigration pattern change will probably occur in North America, Australia, and New Zealand since these countries' populations are still growing and wages are more flexible. Immigration, regulated by policy, and emigration, determined by market forces, now are working in the same direction and will likely reduce future migration flows. PMID:12267642

  15. DNAPL migration in a coastal plain aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil and ground water at the Dover Gas Light Superfund Site, a former manufactured gas plant (1859 to 1948), are contaminated with polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds. Contaminants of concern include light aromatics, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), and heavy aromatics, including naphthalene, acenaphthylene, phenanthrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Although ground-water contaminant levels are elevated near the site, only naphthalene and acenaphthylene are present within an order of magnitude of their solubility limits, indicating the possibility of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) in the subsurface. The unconfined Columbia Aquifer, which is characterized by interfingering and discontinuous sand, silt, and clay Coastal Plain deposits, overlies a clay aquitard at a depth of 60 feet. The ground water beneath the intermediate clay horizon exhibited little or no contamination, even immediately downgradient from the site. The relationship between the more permeable granular sand horizons and the less permeable interfingering clay zones controls the migration of both the aqueous-phase contamination and the DNAPL. A detailed horizontal and vertical characterization of the subsurface stratigraphy was critical to the accurate interpretation of the extent and magnitude of contamination and the identification and delineation of DNAPL zones

  16. Brine migration: a summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As defined in this report, brine migration is the movement toward a heat source of the water trapped in rock salt. This phenomenon is of interest because the disposal of heat-producing radioactive wastes can trigger brine migration. Contact between the brine and the waste packages could lead to such undesirable interactions as corrosion of the canister or even migration of the radionuclides. This report summarizes a Sandia National Laboratories program to characterize brine migration. Based on this program and on the work of others, we conclude that brine migration is not a significant problem. The quantities of water (less than 20 L/waste canister in 1000 yr) are too small for concern

  17. Anomalous dynamics of cell migration

    CERN Document Server

    Dieterich, Peter; Preuss, Roland; Schwab, Albrecht; 10.1073/pnas.0707603105

    2009-01-01

    Cell movement, for example during embryogenesis or tumor metastasis, is a complex dynamical process resulting from an intricate interplay of multiple components of the cellular migration machinery. At first sight, the paths of migrating cells resemble those of thermally driven Brownian particles. However, cell migration is an active biological process putting a characterization in terms of normal Brownian motion into question. By analyzing the trajectories of wildtype and mutated epithelial (MDCK-F) cells we show experimentally that anomalous dynamics characterizes cell migration. A superdiffusive increase of the mean squared displacement, non-Gaussian spatial probability distributions, and power-law decays of the velocity autocorrelations are the basis for this interpretation. Almost all results can be explained with a fractional Klein- Kramers equation allowing the quantitative classification of cell migration by a few parameters. Thereby it discloses the influence and relative importance of individual comp...

  18. Geometric control of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Kumar, Girish; Co, Carlos C; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Morphological polarization involving changes in cell shape and redistribution of cellular signaling machinery, initiate the migration of mammalian cells. Golgi complex typically localizes in front of the nucleus, and this frontwards polarization has been proposed to be involved in directional migration. However, the sequence of events remains unresolved. Does Golgi polarization precede directional migration or vice-versa? We address this question by constraining cells to specific areas and shapes then tracking their motile behavior and the spatio-temporal distribution of Golgi apparatus upon release. Results show that while the position of the Golgi complex depends on the cell geometry, the subcellular localization of the Golgi complex does not define the cell's leading edge. Cells constrained within elongated geometries exhibit polarized extension of lamellipodia and upon release, migrate preferentially along the long axis of the cell. Minimally constrained cells released from larger areas however, exhibit retarded migration regardless of lamellipodia protrusion activity. PMID:24089214

  19. Demetallization of hydrocarbon containing feed streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes how metals contained in a hydrocarbon containing feed stream are removed by contacting the hydrocarbon containing feed stream under suitable demetallization conditions with hydrogen and a catalyst composition comprising zirconium phosphate, cobalt phosphate and iron phosphate. The life and activity of the catalyst composition may be increased by introducing a decomposable metal compound selected from the group consisting of the metals of Group V-B, Group VI-B, Group VII-B and Group VIII of the Periodic Table into the hydrocarbon containing feed stream prior to contacting the hydrocarbon containing feed stream with the catalyst composition

  20. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Akiko; Kamimura, Tomomi; Nagasawa, Taeko [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Allied Health Sciences; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Establishment

    2003-06-01

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  1. Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

  2. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  3. Mechanistic studies on the OH-initiated atmospheric oxidation of selected aromatic hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Nehr, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    Benzene, toluene, the xylenes, and the trimethylbenzenes are among the most abundant aromatic trace constituents of the atmosphere mainly originating from anthropogenic sources. The OH-initiated atmospheric photo-oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons is the predominant removal process resulting in the formation of O3 and secondary organic aerosol. Therefore, aromatics are important trace constituents regarding air pollution in urban environments. Our understanding of aromatic photo-oxidation pro...

  4. The enrichment secondary market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will addresses two topics: the background to the present status of the enrichment secondary market and the future outlook of the secondary market in enrichment services, and the viability of the nuclear fuel brokerage industry. These two topics are inevitably connected, as most secondary market activity, not only in enrichment but also in natural uranium, has traditionally been conducted with the participation of brokers. Therefore, the author interrelates these topics

  5. Secondary Controlled Swing Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Pettersson, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the thesis has been to design and simulate different concepts of a secondary controlled swing drive for a wheel excavator. Secondary control is a known technology in the field of hydraulics that offers precise positioning as well as the possibility of energy recuperation. Secondary control is today used in certain industrial applications and is rather unemployed in mobile machinery. An excavator moves high loads in cyclic motions which are ideal conditions for energy recuperati...

  6. Secondary Surveillance Radar Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Schejbal, Vladimír; Bezoušek, Pavel; Pidani?, Jan; Chyba, Milan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with a secondary surveillance radar (SSR) array antenna, which is intended for a system combining the secondary surveillance radar antenna and the primary surveillance radar antenna. It describes the patch array elements and the synthesis for the secondary surveillance radar array, considering both elevation and azimuth patterns for sum, difference, and sidelobe-suppression beams, and suspended stripline couplers. The utilization of multilayer techniques allows the connection...

  7. Unusual liver abscess secondary to ingested foreign body: laparoscopic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, A; Lozito, R C; Prestera, A; Ialongo, P; Volpi, A; Carbotta, G; Palasciano, N

    2015-01-01

    Liver abscess is a cause of febrile abdominal pain and usually the origin of a liver abscess is ascending cholangitis, hemathological diffusion, via the portal vein or the hepatic artery, or superinfection of necrotic tissue. Solitary pyogenic abscess with no obvious systemic cause may be secondary to a local event such as the migration of an ingested foreign body. We report the case of a solitary liver abscess caused by an ingested foreign body, a fish bone, migrated through the gastric wall into the left lobe. PMID:26017106

  8. 21 CFR 573.740 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. 573.740 Section 573...Additive Listing § 573.740 Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons complying with §...

  9. 21 CFR 178.3650 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. 178.3650 Section 178...Production Aids § 178.3650 Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons may be safely used, as...

  10. Migration of dispersive GPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, M.H.; Oden, C.P.

    2004-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and dielectric and magnetic relaxation phenomena cause electromagnetic propagation to be dispersive in earth materials. Both velocity and attenuation may vary with frequency, depending on the frequency content of the propagating energy and the nature of the relaxation phenomena. A minor amount of velocity dispersion is associated with high attenuation. For this reason, measuring effects of velocity dispersion in ground penetrating radar (GPR) data is difficult. With a dispersive forward model, GPR responses to propagation through materials with known frequency-dependent properties have been created. These responses are used as test data for migration algorithms that have been modified to handle specific aspects of dispersive media. When either Stolt or Gazdag migration methods are modified to correct for just velocity dispersion, the results are little changed from standard migration. For nondispersive propagating wavefield data, like deep seismic, ensuring correct phase summation in a migration algorithm is more important than correctly handling amplitude. However, the results of migrating model responses to dispersive media with modified algorithms indicate that, in this case, correcting for frequency-dependent amplitude loss has a much greater effect on the result than correcting for proper phase summation. A modified migration is only effective when it includes attenuation recovery, performing deconvolution and migration simultaneously.

  11. Decontamination of hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes the method of treating hydrocarbon contaminated soil. It comprises forming the soil into a flowing particulate stream, forming an aqueous liquid mixture of water and treating substance that reacts with hydrocarbon to form CO2 and water, dispersing the liquid mixture into the particulate soil stream to wet the particulate, allowing the substance to react with the wetted soil particulate to thereby form CO2 and water, thereby the resultant soil is beneficially treated, the stream being freely projected to dwell at a level and then fall, and the dispersing includes spraying the liquid mixture into the projected stream at the dwell, the substance consisting of natural bacteria, and at a concentration level in the mixture of between 100 to 3,000 PPM of bacteria to water, the soil forming step including impacting the soil to reduce it to particles less than about 1 inches in cross dimension, and including forming the wetting particulate into a first layer on a surface to allow the substance to react

  12. Unsaturated medium hydrocarbons pollution evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the so called porous unsaturated medium, that's the vertical subsoil section between both the ground and water-table level, is interested by a hydrocarbons spill, the problem to evaluate the pollution becomes difficult: considering, essentially, the natural coexistence in it of two fluids, air and water, and the interactions between them. This paper reports that the problems tend to increase when a third fluid, the pollutant, immiscible with water, is introduced into the medium: a three-phases flow, which presents several analogies with the flow conditions present in an oil-reservoir, will be established. In such a situation, it would be very useful to handle the matter by the commonly used parameters in the oil reservoirs studies such as: residual saturation, relative permeability, phases mobility, to derive a first semiquantitative estimation of the pollution. The subsoil pollution form hydrocarbons agents is one of the worldwide more diffused causes of contamination: such events are generally referable to two main effects: accidental (oil pipeline breakdowns, e.g.), and continuous (underground tanks breaks, industrial plants leakages, e.g.)

  13. Hydrocarbon production with nuclear explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tremendous energy of nuclear explosives and the small dimensions of the explosive package make an ideal combination for drill-hole explosive emplacement in deep, thick hydrocarbon deposits. Potential applications exist in fracturing low permeability natural-gas and petroleum formations for stimulating production, fracturing oil shale to permit in situ retorting, and creating storage chimneys for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, petroleum, petroleum products, helium, and other fluids. Calculations show, for example, that less than 100 shots per year would be needed to stabilize the natural gas reserves to production ratio. Under the Government-industry Plowshare program, two experiments, Projects Gasbuggy and Rulison, were conducted to stimulate natural gas production from low-permeability formations. Incomplete information indicates that both were technically successful. Potential problems associated with the use of nuclear explosives for underground engineering applications are radioactive contamination, maximum yield limitations, high costs of detonating contained nuclear explosives, and adverse public opinion. Results at Project Gasbuggy and other considerations indicated that the problem of radioactive contamination was about as predicted and not an insurmountable one. Also, it was demonstrated that shots at adequate depths could be detonated without appreciable damage to existing surface and subsurface buildings, natural features, and equipment. However, costs must be reduced and the public must be better informed before these techniques can be widely used in field operations. On the basis of present knowledge, the potential of nuclear-explosive stimulation of hydrocarbon production appears good. Additional field experiments will be required to adequately explore that potential. (author)

  14. Rural Urban Migration: Their Consequence

    OpenAIRE

    Shrimant; Khan, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Urban migration is one of the most prevalent types of human movement. The study of the process of rural to urban migration and its biological effects is important for four reasons_ First, it entails movement into a habill: and an ecological niche—the city—that is evolutionally ne'e' for our species. Secondly, it is the most common type migration that has occurred in all periods of recorded history. Thirdly. It is occurring more rapidly today than ever before, especially in the least developed...

  15. Rural migration and health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Jensen, Marit Vatn

    2007-01-01

    This literature study focuses on possible links between access to health services and migration in rural areas. Why do people move to or from rural areas or why do they stay? What determines where people settle? And, in this context, do local health care services play an important or minor role, or no role at all? First, the paper reports on key findings from rural migration studies, in order to shed light on two migration trends: urbanization and counter-urbanization. Then we take a closer look...

  16. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  17. New migration needs a NEMP (a new European migration policy)

    OpenAIRE

    Straubhaar, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    In almost all European countries there is a wide and growing gap between the goals of national immigration policy and its actual outcomes. The main reason for the failure of national migration policies is the loss of effective competence to control today's migration flows on a national level. Once national governments had closed the front door of legal immigration more or less strictly, most of the entries to fortress Europe occurred through the side door (asylum seekers, refugees, family reu...

  18. Hydrocarbon fractions. Aromatic determination by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of hydrocarbon fractions by mass spectrometry using low energy electrons, for determination of aromatic hydrocarbons repartition, suitable for fraction with the following properties: boiling point up to 3200C, whithout olefine, sulfur content up to 0.1 per cent, boiling range up to 1000C, if the final temperature is 2000C, and up to 500C, if over 2000C

  19. Distribution of hydrocarbons in fractured clay soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface or near surface spills of hydrocarbons such as gasoline and diesel often occur into clay soils which are fractured and unsaturated.. The distribution and extent of contamination must be determined prior to the development of remediation methods. The movement of the free phase hydrocarbon occurs primarily by infiltration into the fractures and the initial distribution of hydrocarbon in the soil is controlled by fracture geometry. Over time; however, significant changes in the distribution of the hydrocarbon occur. The dominant mechanism for long-term re-distribution of hydrocarbons is through diffusion and adsorption of the aqueous phase hydrocarbon into the matrix between the fractures. The implication of this change in hydrocarbon distribution is that different remediation schemes must be adopted at various times after the initial spill occurred. Double reservoir diffusion testing was undertaken for samples of re-compacted clay in order to define the coefficient of molecular diffusion and adsorption which control the rate at which the re-distribution of benzene would take place. Specific experimental and analytical protocols were developed for the testing of volatile organic chemicals. Estimates were made of the rate of re-distribution of hydrocarbon between the free-phase in the fracture and the aqueous phase in the matrix for a given fracture geometry. These estimates are compared to qualitative estimates of the rate of re-distribution as observed in typical site investigations

  20. An Easy Synthesis of Two Cage Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dao Cong

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simple, three-step synthesis of two cage molecules, birdcage hydrocarbon (VIII) and its homologue, the homobirdcage hydrocarbon IX. Indicates that all products are easily purified and formed in high yields in this activity suitable for advanced undergraduate laboratory courses. (Author/JN)

  1. Contribution to radiolysis study of liquid hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with radiolysis of liquid hydrocarbons. First, the radiochemical yields of various products are correlated with the theoretical bond energies, for some hydrocarbons. Several values of scavenging parameter ?sub(S) are calculated and the methods for these determinations are criticized. In the last part, we present a new method for the calculation of electron scavenging rate constants

  2. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in women with repeated miscarriages.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerhard, I; Daniel, V; Link, S.; Monga, B; Runnebaum, B

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate a possible etiological role of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the pathogenesis of repeated miscarriages. The blood levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons [CHCs: pentachlorophenol, hexachlorocyclohexane, hexachlorobenzene, the dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) group, polychlorinated biphenyls] were determined in 89 women with repeated miscarriages, who were referred to the University Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Heidelberg for investigations bet...

  3. Psychosocial Aspects of Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Tuzcu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The incident of migration that occurs as a result of the mobility of individuals between various regions and is considered a social change process brings along various factors. Among these factors, the most important one is the culture of the new society where the immigrant begins to live and the process of adaptation with this culture. Individuals from different cultures are required to live together, cope with differences and overcome the difficulties. The process of adaptation to the new lifestyle might cause the individual to have some feelings such as loneliness, socially isolation, being alienated, being regretful and self-depreciation, and consequently experience a greater stress. Being unable to cope with stress efficiently creates risks in individuals in terms of health problems such as anxiety and depression. Healthcare professionals are required to evaluate life styles, difficulties and coping levels of immigrants in order to protect and develop their mental health. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(1.000: 56-66

  4. Migration and Capillary Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TrachetteJackson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is the most studied family of soluble secreted mediators of endothelial cell migration, survival and proliferation. VEGF exerts its function by binding to specific tyrosine kinase receptors on the cell surface and transducing the effect through downstream signaling. In order to study the influence of VEGF binding on endothelial cell motion, we develop a hybrid model of VEGF-induced angiogenesis, based on the theory of reinforced random walks. The model includes the chemotactic response of endothelial cells to angiogenic factors bound to cell-surface receptors, rather than approximating this as a function of extracellular chemical concentrations. This allows us to capture biologically observed phenomena such as activation and polarization of endothelial cells in response to VEGF gradients across their lengths, as opposed to extracellular gradients throughout the tissue. We also propose a novel and more biologically reasonable functional form for the chemotactic sensitivity of endothelial cells, which is also governed by activated cell surface receptors. This model is able to predict the threshold level of VEGF required to activate a cell to move in a directed fashion as well as an optimal VEGF concentration for motion. Model validation is achieved by comparison of simulation results directly with experimental data.

  5. Decomposition of hydrocarbon pollutants in air by gliding arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this investigation was the removal of hydrocarbons from simulators of exhaust gases (hydrocarbons + air) by a gliding arc. The presented results show that almost complete (?90%) removal of hydrocarbons was obtained. The hydrocarbons were converted to carbon oxides and H2O. The hydrocarbons conversion rate increased with increasing residence time, temperature and pressure of the operating gas, and initial concentration of hydrocarbons. The presented method can be useful for the removal of hydrocarbons from exhaust gases when the concentration of the hydrocarbons is below its lower flammable limit. (author)

  6. Migrations et relations internationales Migration and international relations. The pitfalls of managing international migration multilaterally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Thiollet

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Les migrations internationales sont aujourd’hui un des enjeux majeurs de la gouvernance globale. Elles restent pourtant l’objet de politiques régaliennes où dominent les accords bilatéraux sans que s’impose un régime de gestion multilatéral. Les migrations sont une des pierres d’achoppement du multilatéralisme et leur gestion est revendiquée par les États comme une dimension inaliénable de leur souveraineté (économique, territoriale…. Les institutions multilatérales tentent de proposer des modalités de gouvernance multilatérale des migrations comme phénomène social global. À l’Onu, le Haut commissariat aux réfugiés (Hcr s’occupe des réfugiés et l’Organisation internationale du travail (Oit des migrants en leur qualité de travailleurs. La Banque mondiale et le Fmi sont particulièrement actifs sur la question des migrations et des transferts financiers qui les accompagnent alors que l’Unicef s’intéresse aux conséquences sociales de la mobilité sur les familles dans les pays d’origine ou d’accueil. L’Organisation internationale des migrations travaille quant à elle en marge de l’Onu. L’Onu n’est pas parvenu à imposer la Convention sur les droits des migrants de 1990 et ne parvient pas à faire émerger une ligne d’action collective dans l’arène multilatérale sur la question migratoire. Pourtant, dans la sphère onusienne et au-delà, les organisations internationales négocient l’émergence d’une agence spécialisée dans les migrations. À partir de la stratégie historique du Hcr dans le champ multilatéral et d’une innovation juridique récente – le concept de « migrations mixtes » –, on décrit une des tentatives de gestion juridique de la mobilité forcée et volontaire. En 2006, le concept émerge avec l’expérience des migrations sub-sahariennes à travers la Méditerranée. On s’intéresse ici à son utilisation dans le cas de migrations depuis la corne de l’Afrique vers le Yémen. Le concept de « migrations mixtes » permet d’observer les prémisses de la remise en question de la partition entre réfugiés et migrants économiques. Cette analyse nous permet de mettre en lumière les apories contemporaines des conditions juridiques et statutaires de la mobilité et les réponses pragmatiques qui y sont apportées. À partir de sa compétence de terrain sur les populations réfugiées et d’innovation organisationnelles récentes, le Hcr se positionne dans le champ politique international comme gestionnaire potentiel de la mobilité internationale face à l’Oit ou à une agence non-onusienne comme l’Oim.Today, one of the biggest issues facing global governance is international migration. It is nevertheless dominated by national policy and bilateral agreements, and lacks a multilateral management system. Indeed, migration is one of the stumbling blocks of multilateralism, because most countries consider migration management is key to national sovereignty (in economic and territorial terms. Multilateral institutions attempt to suggest multilateral migration governance mechanisms as a global social phenomenon. At the UN, the High Commission on Refugees (UNHCR was created to deal with refugee issues, and the International Labour Organisation (ILO for migrant workers. The World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF are very active in issues affecting migrants and remittances, while UNICEF focuses on the social consequences of this mobility on families in home and host countries. The International Organisation for Migration (IOM works on the fringes of the UN. The UN was unable to impose the Convention on the Rights of Migrants in 1990, and has had difficulty in developing a joint programme of action for the multilateral management of migration. Nevertheless, on the UN level and above, international organisations are negotiating the creation of an agency specialising in migration. Using the HCR’s past multilateral strategy and a recent legal innovation – the concept of mixed migration – we descr

  7. Research in Secondary Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Martin

    Summers' annotated bibliographies of secondary reading (1963, 1964), "Review of Educational Research,""Journal of Reading," ERIC/CRIER, and "Research in Education" are listed as resources for all phases of reading. A shifting of trends in the nature and scope of research topics in secondary reading is noted, with diagnosis and treatment,…

  8. Data Migration Across The Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Pant,

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Having an effective and efficient strategy for optimizing long distance data migration is essential for every data center. With the ever increasing demands for the IT needs of businesses it is also important for data centers to deliver data migration cost effectively especially when faced with the demands from remote office back up, outsourcing, data center movers and cloud computing. Data management and migration are important research challenges of novel Cloud environments. While moving data among different geographical domains, it is important to lower the transmission cost for performance purposes. Efficient scheduling methods allow us to manage data transmissions with lower number of steps and shorter transmission time. In previous research efforts, several methods have been proposed in literature in order to manage data and minimize transmission cost for the case of Single Cluster environments. This paper Explores the issues and method of Data Migration across the Clouds

  9. The migration challenge for PAYG.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aslanyan, Gurgen

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 27, ?. 4 (2014), s. 1023-1038. ISSN 0933-1433 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : public pensions * PAYG * unskilled migration Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.109, year: 2014

  10. The migration challenge for PAYG.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aslanyan, Gurgen

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 27, ?. 4 (2014), s. 1023-1038. ISSN 0933-1433 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : public pensions * PAYG * unskilled migration Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.109, year: 2014

  11. Palaearctic-African Bird Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwajomo, Soladoye Babatola

    2013-01-01

    Bird migration has attracted a lot of interests over past centuries and the methods used for studying this phenomenon has greatly improved in terms of availability, dimension, scale and precision. In spite of the advancements, relatively more is known about the spring migration of trans-Saharan migrants than autumn migration. Information about the behavior and interactions of migrants during the nonbreeding season in sub-Saharan Africa is also scarce for many species. Furthermore, very little is known about intra-African migration. This thesis summarizes my research on the autumn migration of birds from Europe to Africa and opens up the possibility of studying intra-African migration. I have used long-term, standardized autumn ringing data from southeast Sweden to investigate patterns in biometrics, phenology and population trends as inferred from annual trapping totals. In addition, I investigated the relationship between the timing of autumn migration and climatic variations at local and spatial scale. The first three papers focused on speciesspecific analysis. In them I described the age-specific patterns in biometrics, phenology and migration strategies as well as trends in the population of the species. The papers show that adult and juvenile birds can use different migration strategies depending on time of season and prevailing conditions. Also, the fuel loads of some individuals were theoretically sufficient for a direct flight to important goal area, but whether they do so is still unknown. The fourth paper and one manuscript investigate the behavior of garden warblers Sylvia borin, during the non-breeding season in Nigeria. The first paper shows that the species also utilizes habitats south of the savannah region, presumably on its way to the final goal area. Individuals also molt their flight feathers at this location and intraspecific interactions are non-aggressive. The second manuscript investigates whether variations in the timing of migration of wader species at a stopover site in southeast Sweden is influence by local or regional climatic variables. The manuscript reveals that both factors may be important and that species breeding close to Ottenby and those breeding in the arctic may be affected by either of the two variables. In addition, breeding success is probably an important factor influencing timing of migration. The third manuscript compares the breeding possibilities between two related cuckoo species using home range estimates derived from satellite telemetry data. The influence host species availability, foraging habitats are discussed.

  12. New hydrologic model of fluid migration in deep porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrievsky, A.; Balanyuk, I.

    2009-04-01

    The authors present a new hydrological model of mantle processes that effect on formation of oil-and-gas bearing basins, fault tectonics and thermal convection. Any fluid migration is initially induced by lateral stresses in the crust and lithosphere which result from global geodynamic processes related to the mantle convection. The global processes are further transformed into regional movements in weakness zones. Model of porous media in deep fractured zones and idea of self-oscillation processes in mantle layers and fractured zones of the crust at different depths was used as the basis for developed concept. The content of these notions resides in the fact that there are conditions of dynamic balance in mantle layers originating as a result of combination and alternate actions of compaction and dilatance mechanisms. These mechanisms can be manifested in different combinations and under different conditions as well as can be complemented by other processes influencing on regime of fluid migration. They can act under condition of passive margin, ocean rift and ocean subduction zones as well as in consolidated platform and sheet. Self-oscillation regime, sub vertical direction of fluid flows, anomalously high layer pressure, and high level of anomalies of various geophysical fields are common for them. A certain class of fluid dynamic models describing consolidation of sedimentary basins, free oscillation processes slow and quick (at the final stage) fluid dynamic processes of the evolution of a sedimentary basin in subduction zones is considered for the first time. The last model of quick fluid dynamic processes reflects the process of formation of hydrocarbon deposits in the zones of collision of lithosphere plates. The results of numerical simulation and diagrams reflecting consecutive stages of the gas-fluid dynamic front propagation are assessed of the Pri-Caspian depression as the example. Calculations with this model will simultaneously be carried out for the sedimentary basins of Timan-Pechora region, Barents Sea, Volga-Ural area, etc. Hydrologic model of deep porous media and the idea of self-oscillation processes in fractured layers of the crust at different depths were used as the basis for developed concept. The content of these notions resides in the fact that there are conditions of dynamic balance in fractured layers originating as a result of combination and alternate actions of compaction and dilatance mechanisms. These mechanisms can be manifested in different combinations and under different conditions as well as can be complemented by other processes influencing on regime of fluid migration. They can act under condition of passive margin, rift and subduction zones as well as in consolidated platform and sheet. Self-oscillation regime, sub vertical direction of fluid flows, anomalously high layer pressure, and high level of anomalies of various geophysical fields are common for them. Specific manifestations of these mechanisms can vary in dependence on geological settings and geodynamic situations. In particular, periods of self-oscillations and depths of fractured layers can be various. Orientation of layers can be not only horizontal, but vertical as well, that is, self-oscillations can occur not only in deep porous media, but in faults and impaired fractured zones as well. Predominating vertical fluid migration can be accompanied by horizontal migration along crust waveguide. A set of fluid dynamic models is considered. Mathematical modeling of geodynamic and fluid dynamic processes in these zones seems very promising. Combined consideration of geodynamic and fluid dynamic aspects in a model of lithosphere plates collision enables to understand the influence of P-T conditions and shear deformations on the mechanism of hydrocarbon generation and to look after their migration and to explain these processes, but also to predict some features essential for the search and exploration of hydrocarbon fields in these regions and their classification. In terms of compaction models, multiphase filtration in a

  13. Macrostabilization of the Migration Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Burghelea; Anda Gheorghiu; Cristiana Tindeche; Anca Gheorghiu; Nicolae Mihailescu

    2014-01-01

    MacLabour migration is a present phenomenon in the European Union. This phenomenon takes over the entire European continent, but especially in the EU countries. The labor market in Europe is increasingly affected by population aging. Economic differences between European countries make workforce in developing countries to move to developed countries where they find it easier to work and receive higher remuneration than in their home countries. This article tracks labor migration from/to EU, e...

  14. Migration from and to Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    MOHAMED-ALI, Amna Omer

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a survey of the demographic aspects of migration from and to Sudan is presented. One of the main limitations in approaching migration from and to Sudan is the poor data coverage, quality and accuracy of official statistics. Emigration seems to be increasing. As to immigration patterns, Sudan has historically hosted a large number of refugees from neighboring countries and Sudan is also an important origin country for asylum seekers and refugees. The characteristics of Sudanese ...

  15. Migration and deforestation in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Darmawan, Rivayani; Klasen, Stephan; Nuryantono, Nunung

    2015-01-01

    Indonesia now has the highest deforestation rate in the world, with an average increase of about 47,600 ha per year. As a result, the nation is one of the largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the world and putting its rich biodiversity at risk. Although the literature discussing the political economy of Indonesia commercial's logging is growing, only a small amount focuses on the relationship between migration and deforestation. Migration may contribute to the forest cover change, as migra...

  16. Does Higher Education Enhance Migration?

    OpenAIRE

    Haapanen, Mika; Böckerman, Petri

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the causal impact of education on within-country migration. A major higher education reform took place in Finland in the 1990s. It gradually transformed former vocational colleges into polytechnics and expanded higher education to all regions. The reform created exogenous variation in the regional supply of higher education. Using the reform as an instrument, our estimation results show that polytechnic graduates have a 7.5 (13.7) percentage points higher migration probabi...

  17. Migration of radionuclides in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the growing amounts of low-level radioactive waste being produced from the nuclear industry and research establishments, there is considerable interest in the study of migration of radionuclides from the shallow-land burial sites. A brief description is presented about some aspect of effectiveness of soil in retarding the migration of radionuclides with special emphasis given to those environmentally critical fission and activation products, elements. (author)

  18. Diffusion induced grain boundary migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While grain boundaries and interphase boundaries provide high diffusivity paths in solids, little bulk composition change can occur at temperatures where lattice diffusion is frozen out unless the boundaries migrate. That the diffusion itself can induce boundary migration has been suspected for some time. This study reviews evidence that the effect is indeed common, and this conclusion is reinforced by additional observations on three systems

  19. Economic Shocks and Internal Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Monras, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Previous literature shows that internal migration rates are strongly procyclical. This would seem to imply that geographic relocation does not help mitigate negative local economic shocks during recessions. This paper shows that this is not the case. I document that net in-migration rates decreased in areas more affected by the Great Recession. Using various IV strategies that rely on the importance of the construction sector and the indebtedness of households before the crisis, I conclude th...

  20. European Integration and Labour Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julda Kielyte

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper studies how European integration might affect the migration of workers in the enlarged EU. Unlike the reduced-form migration models, we base our empirical analysis on the theory of economic geography à la Krugman (1991, which provides an alternative modelling of migration pull and push factors. Parameters of the theoretical model are estimated econometrically using historical migration data. Our empirical findings suggest that European integration would trigger selective migration between the countries in the enlarged EU. In the Baltics, Lithuania would gain about 7.25% of the total work force. In the Visegrád Four, the share of the mobile labour force would increase the most in Hungary, 8.35%, compared to the pre-integration state. Our predictions for the East-West migration are moderate and lower than those of reduced-form models: between 5.44% (from the Baltics and 3.61% (from the Visegrád Four would emigrate to the EU North. Because migrants not only follow market potential, but also shape the region’s market potential, the long-run agglomeration forces are sufficiently weak to make a swift emergence of a core-periphery pattern in the enlarged EU very unlikely.

  1. Investigation on nuclide migration behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigated the properties of geochemical reactions and sorption of high-level radionuclides and highly-mobile radionuclides in deep geological disposal environments. We also analyzed the dissolution properties of pyro wastes and constructed databases for the geochemical reactions and sorption for the safety assessment of HLW disposal. Technologies for measuring diffusion depths of radionuclides through fracture surfaces and rock matrix were developed in KURT conditions and their diffusion properties were analyzed and evaluated. The combined reactions of radionuclide/mineral/microbe in deep disposal environments were investigated and the effects of microbe on the radionuclide migration and disposal system behaviors were evaluated. In-situ solute migration system and on-line monitoring system were installed in KURT and the migration and retardation behaviors of various solutes and their interaction with fracture-filling materials were investigated. Basic properties of KURT groundwater colloids were analyzed using various methods. In addition, in-situ colloid migration experiments through a rock fracture were carried out and the developed migration model was verified. We have participated in Colloid Formation and Migration (CFM) international joint project in GTS and obtained reliability for our research results by comparing research results each other

  2. Anomalous dynamics of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Peter; Klages, Rainer; Preuss, Roland; Schwab, Albrecht

    2008-01-15

    Cell movement--for example, during embryogenesis or tumor metastasis--is a complex dynamical process resulting from an intricate interplay of multiple components of the cellular migration machinery. At first sight, the paths of migrating cells resemble those of thermally driven Brownian particles. However, cell migration is an active biological process putting a characterization in terms of normal Brownian motion into question. By analyzing the trajectories of wild-type and mutated epithelial (transformed Madin-Darby canine kidney) cells, we show experimentally that anomalous dynamics characterizes cell migration. A superdiffusive increase of the mean squared displacement, non-Gaussian spatial probability distributions, and power-law decays of the velocity autocorrelations is the basis for this interpretation. Almost all results can be explained with a fractional Klein-Kramers equation allowing the quantitative classification of cell migration by a few parameters. Thereby, it discloses the influence and relative importance of individual components of the cellular migration apparatus to the behavior of the cell as a whole. PMID:18182493

  3. La hydrogeology en la traditional mining of hydrocarbons, mining new

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is presented from the point of view of Geosciences, an approach torelations between hydrogeology and mining activities, including those of traditional non - metal deposits of ores and rocks application (underground or open pit), the so-called ''modern mining'' (pickles) and hydrocarbons. Within the traditional mining, hydrogeology participates decisively several aspects, both those related to the feasibility of the projects, water supply for the stage of exploration and exploitation, mineraloductos ácueosand mine operations, such as environmental protection of water resources. In the ''modern mining'' groundwater acquires true character mena when it comes to the use of natural brines, and subject when they are generated by injecting water into an aquifer medium. In the case of hydrocarbons, the spectrum is broader participation at the stage of exploration and exploitation, where the hydrogeology is critical to providing water to camps and processes as well as operations secondary recovery, consumers strongly. From the perspective of environmental protection, are the main protagonists of groundwater the impacts of production, but also the phases are transportation, processing and marketing. They are used in the presentation of case examples of Argentina and Chile, some reflections on the need for an appropriate regulatory framework, especially addressed to Uruguay, and information to protect the population activity production of an unfair detriment, when mining is done responsibly

  4. Rural-Urban Migration in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, T. Paul

    The rural-urban migration pattern in Colombia during the last 25 years has resulted in a population increase in urban areas from 30 to 52 percent of the total population. This study explores the causes of internal migration. Migration rates are estimated for various groups in the population to clarify who migrates and to where. A model of…

  5. Distance and Intrastate College Student Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alm, James; Winters, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Most studies of student migration focus on "interstate" migration of college students, largely because the aggregate data typically used are limited in geographic specificity to states. However, interstate migration is only a small part of the total student migration. Public institutions generally get most of their students from within their…

  6. The financial losses from the migration of nurses from Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muula Adamson S

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The migration of health professionals trained in Africa to developed nations has compromised health systems in the African region. The financial losses from the investment in training due to the migration from the developing nations are hardly known. Methods The cost of training a health professional was estimated by including fees for primary, secondary and tertiary education. Accepted derivation of formula as used in economic analysis was used to estimate the lost investment. Results The total cost of training an enrolled nurse-midwife from primary school through nurse-midwifery training in Malawi was estimated as US$ 9,329.53. For a degree nurse-midwife, the total cost was US$ 31,726.26. For each enrolled nurse-midwife that migrates out of Malawi, the country loses between US$ 71,081.76 and US$ 7.5 million at bank interest rates of 7% and 25% per annum for 30 years respectively. For a degree nurse-midwife, the lost investment ranges from US$ 241,508 to US$ 25.6 million at 7% and 25% interest rate per annum for 30 years respectively. Conclusion Developing countries are losing significant amounts of money through lost investment of health care professionals who emigrate. There is need to quantify the amount of remittances that developing nations get in return from those who migrate.

  7. The Relationship between Ethnic Diversity and Classroom Disruption in the Context of Migration Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerman, Gert-Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between ethnic school composition and classroom disruption in secondary education in the context of migration policies. We measured classroom disruption using students' reports from 3533 schools in 20 countries provided by cross-national PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) 2009 data. We…

  8. Fate of hydrocarbons in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes concepts, uses, and limitations of state-of-the-art mathematical environment pollutant fate modeling for use in hydrocarbon fate studies and analyses of environmental quality. Terrestrial chemicals fate modeling has traditionally been performed for three distinct sub-compartments: the land surface (of watershed); the unsaturated soil (or soil) zone; and the saturated (or groundwater) zone of the region. An evaluation of the fate of inorganic compounds in soil and groundwater requires a detailed consideration of the physical, chemical, and biological processes and reactions involved, such as complexation, absorption, precipitation, oxidation-reduction, chemical speciation, and biological reactions to determine the free metal concentration in soil solutions. These processes can affect such characteristics as species solubility, availability for biological uptake, physical transport, and corrosion potential

  9. Preparation of aromatic hydrocarbon monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report explains the technique developed and used for the production of organic monocrystals, necessary for the detection of ? radiation. The Bridgman process has been used. A glass bulb containing the substance to be crystallized passes through a vertical thermo-regulated furnace maintained slightly above the fusion point of the substance. The bottom of the bulb has a conical section which ends with a thin capillary in order to obtain a single crystal nucleus. This method has been implemented to several hydrocarbons (naphthalene, anthracene, stilbene, tolan, tetraphenylethylene, tetra-phenyl-butadiene). The report describes successively: the furnaces, the process used for the filling of the bulbs, the degassing of the products, and for each compound, the details of the preparation and purification and the size of the obtained crystals. (J.S.)

  10. THE MIGRATION OF GAP-OPENING PLANETS IS NOT LOCKED TO VISCOUS DISK EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most standard descriptions of Type II migration state that massive, gap-opening planets must migrate at the viscous drift rate. This is based on the idea that the disk is separated into an inner and outer region and gas is considered unable to cross the gap. In fact, gas easily crosses the gap on horseshoe orbits, nullifying this necessary premise which would set the migration rate. In this work, it is demonstrated using highly accurate numerical calculations that the actual migration rate is dependent on disk and planet parameters, and can be significantly larger or smaller than the viscous drift rate. In the limiting case of a disk much more massive than the secondary, the migration rate saturates to a constant that is sensitive to disk parameters and is not necessarily of the order of the viscous rate. In the opposite limit of a low-mass disk, the migration rate decreases linearly with disk mass. Steady-state solutions in the low disk mass limit show no pile-up outside the secondary's orbit, and no corresponding drainage of the inner disk

  11. The Fate of Hydrocarbon Pollution in Kebnekaise, Arctic Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosqvist, G. N.; Jarjso, J.; Clason, C.; Jansson, P.; Karlin, T.

    2013-12-01

    A C-130J-30 Super Hercules plane crashed into the west-facing wall of the Kebnekaise mountain (2103 m), Arctic Sweden, on March 15th 2012. When starting from Evenes, Narvik, Norway, the aircraft had 14100 l fuel, 50 l hydraulic oil and 170 l motor oil onboard. Best estimates are that at least 12 000 l of fuel was sprayed over the mountain most of which was buried together with the wreck in a huge snow avalanche that was triggered by the impact in a NW facing cirque on Rabots glacier between ca 1600 and 2000 m. Fuel decontamination was not possible because of the extreme impact site conditions. The Hercules airplane was fueled with JET A-1 which is a hydrocarbon product in the Kerosene/Jet Fuel category consisting of sweetened kerosene and hydrotreated light distillates. The major components of all 'kerosene's' are branched- and straight-chain paraffins and naphthenes (cycloparaffins or cycloalkanes), which normally account for 70% by volume. Aromatic hydrocarbons, such as alkyl benzenes (single ring) and alkylnaphthalenes (double ring) do not exceed 25 % by volume of kerosene. The fuel also contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), but in very small volumes compared to the major components. The physical and chemical properties of each component (or block) of the hydrocarbon mixture influence its migration rate and fate. Some components of the fuel will volatilize, some are soluble in water but the vast majority are non-soluble. Although the solubility of these so called Light Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPL) in water is small they are highly toxic. We need to consider transport of the soluble components of the LNAPL in the melt-water, and transport of the non-soluble components with the melt-water system. Transport and storage can occur through and in snow (or firn), crevasses, and cavities on, in or under the glacier. Storage in, and contamination of, basal sediments, located below the glacier, or pro-glacial sediments, in front of the glacier are also possible. We have traced and determined the chemical evolution of the polluted snow and firn at the source zone during two summer melt seasons (2012 and 2013). We have estimated the transit time of polluted melt-water through the glacier by dye-trace experiments. We have assessed the potential of biodegradation by microorganisms and we monitor possible eco-hydrological effects in streams and lakes. Results will be used to estimate the full recovery time of the glacier and pro-glacial environment. This project provides a unique opportunity to formulate and test critical hypotheses regarding hydrocarbon spreading in a polar environment. We are today surprisingly unprepared to answer the basic question on how such pristine environments are influenced by hydrocarbon pollution. However, with the increasing pressures in polar environments, there is a dire need and a rare opportunity to now create such knowledge base.

  12. Gender, migration, and career trajectories in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, A

    1998-08-01

    With data from the Malaysian Family Life Survey, I use a continuous-state hazards model to study the impact of migration on the dynamics of individuals' careers. I distinguish between the effects of family migration and solo migration by gender. The results show that migration alters the career trajectory primarily by accelerating the process of occupational mobility rather than by increasing the level of occupational attainment. Further, the effect of migration on careers varies by type of migration, especially for women. Male-female differences in the outcome of family migration, however, are visible only in transitions into and out of employment. PMID:9749325

  13. Rheology and migration in colloidal and noncolloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeffrey

    2013-03-01

    Suspensions of solid particles in liquids provide a useful setting for development of continuum description of particle-laden fluids. These mixtures can be made density matched, so that the volume fraction is freely variable, and the rheology can be measured in standard rheometric apparatus. This work will describe the rheology of concentrated suspensions and its implications in continuum description of the bulk flow of the mixture; the development will focus on colloidal suspensions where Brownian motion is relevant, with the limit of strong shear taken to describe noncolloidal suspensions. The normal stress response of these suspensions will be shown to be critical to description of the migration of the particles, leading to strong concentration gradients. The normal stress differences as well as the isotropic normal stress of the particle phase, or nonequilibrium osmotic pressure, will be described and related to these migration phenomena. The implications of the normal stress differences in secondary flow generation will also be described.

  14. Teaching secondary mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Rock, David

    2013-01-01

    Solidly grounded in up-to-date research, theory and technology,?Teaching Secondary Mathematics?is a practical, student-friendly, and popular text for secondary mathematics methods courses. It provides clear and useful approaches for mathematics teachers, and shows how concepts typically found in a secondary mathematics curriculum can be taught in a positive and encouraging way. The thoroughly revised fourth edition combines this pragmatic approach with truly innovative and integrated technology content throughout. Synthesized content between the book and comprehensive companion websi

  15. Canine Secondary Glaucomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Secondary glaucomas are common in dogs, and occur due to obstruction of aqueous humor flow at the pupil, iridocorneal angle, or trabecular meshwork by numerous mechanisms. Secondary glaucoma is suspected based on examination findings, or presence of elevated IOP in an animal with a signalment inconsistent with primary glaucoma. Animals with secondary glaucoma require more diagnostic testing than animals with primary glaucoma. Management is challenging, and treatments used for primary glaucoma may be ineffective or even detrimental. Prognosis for vision and/or globe retention may be better than for primary glaucoma, particularly if underlying causes can be found and addressed promptly. PMID:26319444

  16. Migration and sustainability - compatible or contradictory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2006-01-01

    When the migration issue is discussed in a sustainability perspective, two questions are vital: 1) What is the relationship between migration and the global population growth? 2) What is the relationship between migration and consumption growth, and how does migration influence the distribution of consumption possibilities both between and within industrialized and developing countries? Based on responses to these questions, it is argued that reasonably managed migration will be compatible with ...

  17. Improved Live Migration Using Compressed Log Files

    OpenAIRE

    Rakhi k Raj #1, Getzi Jeba Leelipushpam

    2013-01-01

    Live virtual machine migration is the process of moving virtual machine from one host to other without disturbance of users. Live migration is used in the case of proactive maintenance, power management, load balancing, energy saving. This paper present and design the novel approach to reduce the total migration time and down time during live virtual machine migration by compressed log files transfer. For providing the effective and fast migration of the virtual machine log compression method...

  18. Musei del migration heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Dragoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A partire dalla seconda metà degli scorsi anni ’60, al radicale mutamento del contesto sociale, politico ed economico si è accompagnata una profonda innovazione anche culturale. La nozione antropologica di cultura contrapposta alla visione idealistica, l’inedito e forte interesse per la cultura materiale, l’enunciazione del concetto di bene culturale da parte della Commissione Franceschini, la fortuna della Public History portano ad un rivolgimento degli statuti disciplinari delle scienze storiche, che iniziano ad occuparsi di storia sociale, privilegiando le fonti informative spontanee e dando corso ad esperienze di storia orale. A tutto ciò si accompagna una notevole trasformazione delle tematiche e della funzione sociale dei musei. Questo lavoro riferisce, relativamente a questo più generale contesto, della formazione e della diffusione in ambito internazionale e italiano dei musei dedicati alla storia dell’emigrazione, dà conto delle loro possibili prospettive di utilità sociale in ordine alla integrazione degli attuali immigrati in Italia e illustra a titolo di esempio il museo recentemente allestito a Recanati.Since the second half of the 1960s of the 20th century, a profound cultural innovation was accompanied to the radical change in the social, political and economic climate. The anthropological notion of culture as opposed to idealistic vision, the unusual and strong interest in material culture, the enunciation of the concept of cultural property by the Franceschini Commission, the luck of the Public History bring a change of the disciplinary statutes of historical sciences, which begin to attend to social history, focusing on the spontaneous sources of information and initiating experiences of oral history. To all this a remarkable transformation of the themes and of the social function of museums is added. This paper illustrates, in relation to this more general context, the foundation and the dissemination of museums dedicated to the history of migration in Italy and in the world, enunciates their possible social utility for the integration of present migrants in Italy and illustrates, by way of example, the museum recently opened in Recanati.

  19. Waste Plastic Converting into Hydrocarbon Fuel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Moinuddin; Mamunor Rashid, Mohammad; Molla, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    The increased demand and high prices for energy sources are driving efforts to convert organic compounds into useful hydrocarbon fuels. Although much of this work has focused on biomass, there are strong benefits to deriving fuels from waste plastic material. Natural State Research Inc. (NSR) has invented a simple and economically viable process to decompose the hydrocarbon polymers of waste plastic into the shorter chain hydrocarbon of liquid fuel (patent pending). The method and principle of the production / process will be discussed. Initial tests with several widely used polymers indicate a high potential for commercialization.

  20. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons from a refinery spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodegradation of several crude oil wastes from an oil refinery spill, was studied. Crude oil was spilled onto soil; with time, only the higher boiling point hydrocarbons remained as residue. Samples of this highly weathered hydrocarbon mixture were suspended in water to which Finasol OSR 51 dispersant was added in order to enhance dispersion. Also, certain microorganisms and a degradation accelerator, were both added to accelerate degradation. Each compound was identified by CG/FID. Daily records were kept of the concentration of hydrocarbons, and the percent degradation. Tables showing the degradation percentages achieved by each compound of the crude left over after several days, are included. 4 refs., tabs., 1 fig

  1. The offshore hydrocarbon releases (HCR) database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following Cullen Recommendation 39 which states that: ''The regulatory body should be responsible for maintaining a database with regard to hydrocarbon leaks, spills, and ignitions in the Industry and for the benefit of Industry'', HSE Offshore Safety Division (HSE-OSD) has now been operating the Hydrocarbon Releases (HCR) Database for approximately 3 years. This paper deals with the reporting of Offshore Hydrocarbon Releases, the setting up of the HCR Database, the collection of associated equipment population data, and the main features and benefits of the database, including discussion on the latest output information. (author)

  2. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  3. Controlled-aperture wave-equation migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, L. (Lian-Jie); Fehler, Michael C.; Sun, H. (Hongchuan); Li, Z. (Zhiming)

    2003-01-01

    We present a controlled-aperture wave-equation migration method that no1 only can reduce migration artiracts due to limited recording aperlurcs and determine image weights to balance the efl'ects of limited-aperture illumination, but also can improve thc migration accuracy by reducing the slowness perturbations within thc controlled migration regions. The method consists of two steps: migration aperture scan and controlled-aperture migration. Migration apertures for a sparse distribution of shots arc determined using wave-equation migration, and those for the other shots are obtained by interpolation. During the final controlled-aperture niigration step, we can select a reference slowness in c;ontrollecl regions of the slowness model to reduce slowncss perturbations, and consequently increase the accuracy of wave-equation migration inel hods that makc use of reference slownesses. In addition, the computation in the space domain during wavefield downward continuation is needed to be conducted only within the controlled apertures and therefore, the computational cost of controlled-aperture migration step (without including migration aperture scan) is less than the corresponding uncontrolled-aperture migration. Finally, we can use the efficient split-step Fourier approach for migration-aperture scan, then use other, more accurate though more expensive, wave-equation migration methods to perform thc final controlled-apertio.ee migration to produce the most accurate image.

  4. Reconsideration of methane isotope signature as a criterion for the genesis of natural gas: influence of migration on isotopic signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed in the purpose of studying the isotopic consequences of the diffusional transport of hydrocarbon gases through sediment rocks. Linked to a numerical model, these gas diffusion experiments through as shale porous plug allowed us to correlate porosity and diffusivity of the migration medium. Significant isotopic fractionations (carbon and hydrogen) of methane, and ethane at a lesser degree were observed. This is in contradiction with the actual dogma of isotope geochemistry of natural gases which claims that no fractionation occurs during gas migration. The genetic characterization of natural gases by using the isotopic signature of methane appears as an ambiguous method. (author)

  5. Secondary extinctions of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Jedediah F; Aslan, Clare E; Rogers, Haldre S; Redford, Kent H; Maron, John L; Bronstein, Judith L; Groves, Craig R

    2014-12-01

    Extinctions beget further extinctions when species lose obligate mutualists, predators, prey, or hosts. Here, we develop a conceptual model of species and community attributes affecting secondary extinction likelihood, incorporating mechanisms that buffer organisms against partner loss. Specialized interactors, including 'cryptic specialists' with diverse but nonredundant partner assemblages, incur elevated risk. Risk is also higher for species that cannot either evolve new traits following partner loss or obtain novel partners in communities reorganizing under changing environmental conditions. Partner loss occurs alongside other anthropogenic impacts; multiple stressors can circumvent ecological buffers, enhancing secondary extinction risk. Stressors can also offset each other, reducing secondary extinction risk, a hitherto unappreciated phenomenon. This synthesis suggests improved conservation planning tactics and critical directions for research on secondary extinctions. PMID:25445878

  6. [Secondary chondrosarcoma: radiopathological correlation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano Martínez, G A; Llauger Rosselló, J

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors originating in cartilage. Chondrosarcoma is the third most common malignant bone tumor after multiple myeloma and osteosarcoma. About 75% of chondrosarcomas are primary lesions. The remaining 25% belong to special categories such as histologic variants and secondary forms. A secondary chondrosarcoma is one that appears in a pre-existing benign chondral lesion; the different types of secondary chondrosarcomas include solitary osteochondroma, multiple osteochondromatosis, enchondroma, the different types of enchondromatosis, and primary synovial chondromatosis. The incidence of this malignant transformation varies widely in function of the type of lesion. In this article, we discuss and illustrate the different types of secondary chondrosarcomas, placing special emphasis on the imaging findings that should alert to these lesions and give radiologists a key role in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of these patients. PMID:25002353

  7. SECONDARY BRAIN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Ayu Basmatika

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondary brain injury is a condision that occurs at some times after the primary impact and can be largely prevented and treated. Most brain injury ends with deadly consequences which is caused by secondary damage to the brain. Traumatic brain injured still represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals under the age of 45 years in the world. The classification of secondary brain injured is divided into extracranial and intracranial causes. The cause of extracranial such as hipoxia, hypotensi, hyponatremia, hypertermia, hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. The cause of intracranial such as extradural, subdural, intraserebral, intraventrikular, dan subarachnoid hemorrhage. Beside that secondary injury can also be caused by edema and infection. Post-traumatic cerebral injured is characterized by direct tissue damage, impaired regulation of cerebral blood flow (cerebral blood flow / CBF, and disruption of metabolism. Manifestations of secondary brain injured include increased intracranial pressure, ischemic brain damage, cerebral hypoxia and hypercarbi, as well as disruption of cerebral autoregulation. The first priority is to stabilize the patient's cervical spine injury, relieve and maintain airway, ensure adequate ventilation (breathing, and making venous access for fluid resuscitation pathways (circulation and assessing the level of awareness and disability. This steps is crucial in patients with head injured to prevent hypoxia and hypotension, which is the main cause of secondary brain injury.

  8. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  9. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Energies from the PMO Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles F.

    1979-01-01

    Details a procedure for accurately calculating the quantum mechanical energies of hydrocarbons using the perturbational molecular orbital (PMO) method, which does not require the use of a computer. (BT)

  10. MICROEMULSION FORMATION WITH MIXED CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON LIQUIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixing rules for water/chlorocarbon/anionic-surfactant systems have been studied. t was found that the behavior of chlorocarbons parallels the ideal mixing rules for hydrocarbons. he polarity of some chlorocarbons prevented a direct determination of electrolyte concentration and ...

  11. NIST Hydrocarbon Spectral Database - SRD 115

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce — This database contains the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules through September 1987. The isotopic...

  12. Using microorganisms to aid in hydrocarbon degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are threatening the potable water supply and the aquatic ecosystem. Given the right microbial inhabitant(s), a large portion of these aliphatic hydrocarbons could be biodegraded before reaching the water supply. The authors' purpose is to isolate possible oil-degrading organisms. Soil samples were taken from hydrocarbon-laden soils at petroleum terminals, a petroleum refinery waste-treatment facility, a sewage-treatment plant grease collector, a site of previous bioremediation, and various other places. Some isolates known to be good degraders were obtained from culture collection services. These samples were plated on a 10w-30 multigrade motor oil solid medium to screen for aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders. The degrading organisms were isolated, identified, and tested (CO2 evolution, BOD, and COD) to determine the most efficient degrader(s). Thirty-seven organisms were tested, and the most efficient degraders were Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter agglomerans

  13. Hydrocarbon detection utilizing neutron borehole measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates in general to neutron logging of subsurface earth formations and, in particular, to apparatus and procedures for providing indications of the presence of hydrocarbons in the pores of these formations. (U.K.)

  14. International parental migration and the psychological well-being of children in Ghana, Nigeria, and Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucato, Valentina; Cebotari, Victor; Veale, Angela; White, Allen; Grassi, Marzia; Vivet, Jeanne

    2015-05-01

    When parents migrate, leaving their children in the origin country, transnational families are formed. Transnational family studies on children who are "left behind" indicate that children suffer psychologically from parental migration. Many of the factors identified as affecting children's responses to parental migration however are not considered in child psychology and family sociology studies. This study aims to bridge these areas of knowledge by quantitatively investigating the association between transnational families and children's psychological well-being. It analyzes a survey conducted in three African countries in 2010-11 (Ghana N = 2760; Angola N = 2243; Nigeria N = 2168) amongst pupils of secondary schools. The study compares children in transnational families to those living with their parents in their country of origin. Children's psychological well-being is measured through the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses reveal that children in transnational families fare worse than their counterparts living with both parents but not in Ghana where living conditions mediate this relationship. This paper also looks at four characteristics of transnational families and finds that specific characteristics of transnational families and country contexts matter: (1) changing caregivers is associated with poorer well-being in all countries; (2) which parent migrates does not make a difference in Ghana, when mothers migrate and fathers are caregivers results in poorer well-being in Nigeria, and both mother's and father's migration result in worse outcomes in Angola; (3) the kin relationship of the caregiver is not associated with poorer well-being in Ghana and Nigeria but is in Angola; (4) children with parents who migrate internationally do not show different results than children whose parents migrate nationally in Ghana and Nigeria but in Angola international parental migration is associated with poorer psychological well-being. The study shows that broader characteristics in the population rather than parental migration per se are associated with decreased levels of well-being. PMID:25464874

  15. The Role of Remittances in Migration Decision: Evidence from Turkish Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Akkoyunlu, Sule; Siliverstovs, Boriss

    2007-01-01

    In this study we analyse the impact of workers' remittances on the decision to migrate by means of cointegration analysis. In traditional migration theories, especially in human capital models, the decision to migrate is based upon comparison of expected future incomes in the sending and the receiving countries adjusted for the cost of migration. By contrast, the new economics of labour migration suggests that the migration decision is made jointly by the migrant and his family. One important...

  16. Migration from and to Palestine from a gender perspective: results from the Migration Survey – 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Duraidi, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Migration has gained in importance in recent years due to significantly increased migration rates, in addition to the effect of migration on various population structures such as age, gender and marital status in both sending and receiving countries. This paper aims to look at the recent patterns of migration from and to the occupied Palestinian territory (oPt) in terms of size, characteristics, remittances, migration determinants, return migration, etc. To this objective, data ha...

  17. The International-Migration Network

    CERN Document Server

    Fagiolo, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies international migration from a complex-network perspective. We define the international-migration network (IMN) as the weighted-directed graph where nodes are world countries and links account for the stock of migrants originated in a given country and living in another country at a given point in time. We characterize the binary and weighted architecture of the network and its evolution over time in the period 1960-2000. We find that the IMN is organized around a modular structure characterized by a small-world pattern displaying disassortativity and high clustering, with power-law distributed weighted-network statistics. We also show that a parsimonious gravity model of migration can account for most of observed IMN topological structure. Overall, our results suggest that socio-economic, geographical and political factors are more important than local-network properties in shaping the structure of the IMN.

  18. Migrating lumbar facet joint cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of lumbar facet joint cysts (LFJCs) are located in the spinal canal, on the medial aspect of the facet joint with characteristic diagnostic features. When they migrate away from the joint of origin, they cause diagnostic problems. In a 7-year period we examined by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging five unusual cases of facet joint cysts which migrated from the facet joint of origin. Three LFJCs were identified in the right S1 foramen, one in the right L5-S1 neural foramen and one in the left erector spinae and multifidus muscles between the levels of L2-L4 spinous process. Awareness that spinal lesions identified at MRI and CT could be due to migrating facet joint cyst requires a high level of suspicion. The identification of the appositional contact of the cyst and the facet joint needs to be actively sought in the presence of degenerative facet joints. (orig.)

  19. Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornabene, T.G.

    1980-12-01

    A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

  20. Electrochemical Routes towards Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    The potential of renewable energy and possible solution to the intermittency problem of renewable energy sources like sun and wind are explained. The densest storage of energy is in the form of hydrocarbons. The most suitable method of conversion and storage within a foreseeable future is electrolysis followed by conversion into synthetic hydrocarbons, alcohols or ethers. Several types of electrolysers exist. The various types are listed together with a short description of principle and status....

  1. Synthesis and characterization of hydrocarbon sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With glucose as starting material, hydrocarbon sphere which was rich in oxygen containing functional groups was synthesized by hydrothermal carbonization process, and characterized by SEM and FTIR techniques. The results show that the size and dispersion of carbon spheres depend on many factors, including the concentration of glucose, the reaction temperature and the adulterated organic monomer. The obtained hydrocarbon spheres contain rich functional groups which can greatly improve the hydrophilicity and chemical reactivity. (authors)

  2. Hydrocarbons in biogas from household solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorkqvist, S.; Froling, M.; Harelind-Ingelsten, H.; Petersson, G. [Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteberg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Environmental Science

    1998-12-31

    The components of biogas from source-separated domestic waste were studied for the first major Swedish plant (Sobacken, Boras) in operation. Methane, carbon dioxide and C{sub 6}-C{sub 11} hydrocarbons were determined by gas chromatographic methods. The content of methane was found to be just over 70% (v/v). The major polluting hydrocarbon in the biogas was p-cymene. It may be formed by rearrangement and dehydrogenation of limonene and other monoterpenes in food waste. (author)

  3. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    MR Mehrasbi; Haghighi, B; M. Shariat; Naseri, S.; K. Naddafi

    2003-01-01

    Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (20 g/kg dw soil) was investigated in 3 media, differing in the kind of petroleum fractions. In the laboratory experiments, during 5 months, the activities of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms and dehydrogenase activity of soil was determined. Gas chromatographic analysis showed the biological decontaminations for gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture (gas oil, kerosene and furnace oil) are 60 %, 36 % and 55 %, respectively. Dehydrogenas...

  4. Monitoring of microbial hydrocarbon remediation in the soil

    OpenAIRE

    Chikere, Chioma Blaise; Gideon Chijioke OKPOKWASILI; Chikere, Blaise Ositadinma

    2011-01-01

    Bioremediation of hydrocarbon pollutants is advantageous owing to the cost-effectiveness of the technology and the ubiquity of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in the soil. Soil microbial diversity is affected by hydrocarbon perturbation, thus selective enrichment of hydrocarbon utilizers occurs. Hydrocarbons interact with the soil matrix and soil microorganisms determining the fate of the contaminants relative to their chemical nature and microbial degradative capabilities, respectively....

  5. FLUID MIGRATION HISTORY FROM ANALYSIS OF FILLING FRACTURES IN A CARBONATE FORMATION: (LOWER CRETACEOUS, MIDDLE MAGDALENA VALLEY BASIN, COLOMBIA)

    OpenAIRE

    Jairo Conde-Gómez; Luis-Carlos Mantilla-Figueroa; Juliá;n-Francisco Naranjo-Vesga; Nelson Sá;nchez-Rueda

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The integration of Conventional Petrography, SEM, Rare Earth Element geochemistry (REE) and Fluid Inclusions analysis (FI), in the fracture fillings at the Rosablanca Formation (Middle Magdalena Valley basin), make it possible to relate opening and filling events in the veins with hydrocarbon migration processes. Petrographic and SEM data indicate that the veins are fracture filling structures, with three types of textures:1) Granular aggregates of calcite (GA); 2) Elongated granular...

  6. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation of contaminated Arctic sites has been proposed as the logistically and economically most favorable solution despite the known technical difficulties. The difficulties involve the inhibition of pollutants removal by biodegradation below freezing temperatures and the relative slowness of the process to remove enough hydrocarbon pollutants during the above-freezing summer months. Despite these formidable drawbacks, biodegradation of hydrocarbon contaminants is possible even in below-zero temperatures, especially if indigenous psychrophilic and psychrotropic micro-organism are used. This paper reports results of a study involving several hydrocarbon-degrading psychrotropic bacteria and suggests bioaugmentation with specific cold-adapted organisms and/or biostimulation with commercial fertilizers for enhancing degradation of specific contaminants in soils from northern Canada. An evaluation of the biodegradation potential of hydrocarbon contaminated soils in the high Arctic suggested that the contaminated soils contained sufficient numbers of cold-adapted hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and that the addition of fertilizer was sufficient to enhance the level of hydrocarbon degradation at low ambient summer temperatures. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  7. Rural migration in southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosser, D.; Soden, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    This study reviews the history of migration in two rural counties in Southern Nevada. It is part of a larger study about the impact of a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository on in- and out-migration patterns in the state. The historical record suggests a boom and bust economic cycle has predominated in the region for the past century creating conditions that should be taken into account by decision makers when ascertaining the long-term impacts of the proposed repository.

  8. Rural migration in southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reviews the history of migration in two rural counties in Southern Nevada. It is part of a larger study about the impact of a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository on, in and out-migration patterns in the state. The historical record suggests a boom and bust economic cycle has predominated in the region for the past century creating conditions that should be taken into account, by decision makers, when ascertaining the long-term impacts of the proposed repository

  9. Migration and the Wage Curve:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brücker, Herbert; Jahn, Elke J.

    2008-01-01

      Based on a wage curve approach we examine the labor market effects of migration in Germany. The wage curve relies on the assumption that wages respond to a change in the unemployment rate, albeit imperfectly. This allows one to derive the wage and employment effects of migration simultaneously in a general equilibrium framework. For the empirical analysis we employ the IABS, a two percent sample of the German labor force. We find that the elasticity of the wage curve is particularly high for y...

  10. Women’s football migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Sine

    2011-01-01

    What is intriguing about women’s football as a cultural phenomenon is that unlike men’s football the finances and media interest for the game are sparse. Nevertheless we have found that migration of female football players is growing steadily and women’s football is becoming global in nature. The question is then what drives this globalization process? According to our study of women’s football migration into Scandinavia, one of the centers of women’s football, transnational networks play a cruc...

  11. The migration transition in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, L L

    1996-01-01

    "Exploring the unique experience of migration transition in Malaysia, this paper identifies the turning points in relation to the level and nature of economic and labor market developments in Malaysia. Examining the development dynamics that mark the passage from exporting labor to depending on foreign labor, the paper concludes that such dynamics are influenced not only by economic but also sociocultural, demographic and policy factors. Several lessons from the Malaysian experience are drawn at the end to be utilized by other countries that still have to reach the turning points of the migration transition." PMID:12320775

  12. Automation of Flexible Migration Workflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk von Suchodoletz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Many digital preservation scenarios are based on the migration strategy, which itself is heavily tool-dependent. For popular, well-defined and often open file formats – e.g., digital images, such as PNG, GIF, JPEG – a wide range of tools exist. Migration workflows become more difficult with proprietary formats, as used by the several text processing applications becoming available in the last two decades. If a certain file format can not be rendered with actual software, emulation of the original environment remains a valid option. For instance, with the original Lotus AmiPro or Word Perfect, it is not a problem to save an object of this type in ASCII text or Rich Text Format. In specific environments, it is even possible to send the file to a virtual printer, thereby producing a PDF as a migration output. Such manual migration tasks typically involve human interaction, which may be feasible for a small number of objects, but not for larger batches of files.We propose a novel approach using a software-operated VNC abstraction layer in order to replace humans with machine interaction. Emulators or virtualization tools equipped with a VNC interface are very well suited for this approach. But screen, keyboard and mouse interaction is just part of the setup. Furthermore, digital objects need to be transferred into the original environment in order to be extracted after processing. Nevertheless, the complexity of the new generation of migration services is quickly rising; a preservation workflow is now comprised not only of the migration tool itself, but of a complete software and virtual hardware stack with recorded workflows linked to every supported migration scenario. Thus the requirements of OAIS management must include proper software archiving, emulator selection, system image and recording handling. The concept of view-paths could help either to automatically determine the proper pre-configured virtual environment or to set up system images for certain migration workflows. View-paths may rise in demand, as the generation of PDF output files from Word Perfect input could be cached as pre-fabricated emulator system images. The current groundwork provides several possible optimizations, such as using the automation features of the original environments.

  13. Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for the production of hydrocarbon fuels with high selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghong; Cheng, Kang; Kang, Jincan; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Ye

    2014-05-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a key reaction in the utilization of non-petroleum carbon resources, such as methane (natural gas, shale gas, and biogas), coal, and biomass, for the sustainable production of clean liquid fuels from synthesis gas. Selectivity control is one of the biggest challenges in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. This Minireview focuses on the development of new catalysts with controllable product selectivities. Recent attempts to increase the selectivity to C5+ hydrocarbons by preparing catalysts with well-defined active phases or with new supports or by optimizing the interaction between the promoter and the active phase are briefly highlighted. Advances in developing bifunctional catalysts capable of catalyzing both CO hydrogenation to heavier hydrocarbons and hydrocracking/isomerization of heavier hydrocarbons are critically reviewed. It is demonstrated that the control of the secondary hydrocracking reactions by using core-shell nanostructures or solid-acid materials, such as mesoporous zeolites and carbon nanotubes with acid functional groups, is an effective strategy to tune the product selectivity of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Very promising selectivities to gasoline- and diesel-range hydrocarbons have been attained over some bifunctional catalysts. PMID:24339240

  14. Depth migration and de-migration for 3-D migration velocity analysis; Migration profondeur et demigration pour l'analyse de vitesse de migration 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assouline, F.

    2001-07-01

    3-D seismic imaging of complex geologic structures requires the use of pre-stack imaging techniques, the post-stack ones being unsuitable in that case. Indeed, pre-stack depth migration is a technique which allows to image accurately complex structures provided that we have at our disposal a subsurface velocity model accurate enough. The determination of this velocity model is thus a key element for seismic imaging, and to this end, migration velocity analysis methods have met considerable interest. The SMART method is a specific migration velocity analysis method: the singularity of this method is that it does not rely on any restrictive assumptions on the complexity of the velocity model to determine. The SMART method uses a detour through the pre-stack depth migrated domain for extracting multi-offset kinematic information hardly accessible in the time domain. Once achieved the interpretation of the pre-stack depth migrated seismic data, a kinematic de-migration technique of the interpreted events enables to obtain a consistent kinematic database (i.e. reflection travel-times). Then, the inversion of these travel-times, by means of reflection tomography, allows the determination of an accurate velocity model. To be able to really image geologic structures for which the 3-D feature is predominant, we have studied the implementation of migration velocity analysis in 3-D in the context of the SMART method, and more generally, we have developed techniques allowing to overcome the intrinsic difficulties in the 3-D aspects of seismic imaging. Indeed, although formally the SMART method can be directly applied to the case of 3-D complex structures, the feasibility of its implementation requires to choose well the imaging domain. Once this choice done, it is also necessary to conceive a method allowing, via the associated de-migration, to obtain the reflection travel-times. We first consider the offset domain which constitutes, still today, the strategy most usually used for the application of migration velocity analysis. We are interested in particular in an important problem: the influence of irregularities in seismic acquisition on the quality of the depth migrated images. Indeed, 3-D seismic acquisitions show irregularities which are characterized by offset variations as well as a non uniform spatial sampling of the data. To overcome the first kind of irregularities, we propose to introduce the concept of migration by offset class in which are migrated all seismic traces that belong to a given offset class, and we show that such a migration relies on a sound theoretical basis whenever the offset varies smoothly with the midpoint coordinate. These theoretical considerations are validated experimentally: offset classes constructed so that the offset varies slowly with the midpoint coordinate allow to obtain the required imaging quality for migration velocity analysis. The influence, on the quality of the migrated images, of a non uniform spatial sampling of the data is, as for it, much more important than the one linked to offset variations: the computation of the superposition of migrated images associated with each midpoint requires the use of a genuine numerical integration formula. We study quadrature formulas based on polynomial interpolation procedures of the function to be integrated. We recommend to use the Hermite interpolation based numerical integration formula if we are primarily interested in amplitude variations in the case of gently dipping layers, and the Lagrange interpolation based numerical integration formula for the imaging of structures involving some complexity. Moreover, the implementation of these schemes of interpolation consists of a preprocessing of the data and does not really increase the CPU time required for running the migration itself. Of course, these approaches require that the distribution of midpoints is dense enough so as to take correctly into account the variations of the function to be integrated. However, the imaging in the offset domain turns out to be with difficulty viable, becau

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaghebeur, D; de Wulf, E; Ravelingien, M C; Janssens, G

    1983-12-15

    A study on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in rainwater was carried out over periods of at least one year at two locations in Belgium with different environments. Maximum amounts and concentrations of PAH were reached during the winter period, mainly due to household heating. This influence was also reflected in the relative proportions of the six PAH measured. For comparable periods the amounts of PAH were almost proportional to the quantity of rain. With the available data, and as most of the rainfall is coming from the same wind direction, it was not feasible to localise possible pollution sources based upon the distribution of PAH over the different windsectors, nor was it possible to identify significant differences for both sampling locations due to their different surroundings, indicating that the rain plays an important role in the transport and distribution of pollutants over a wide area. Between about 100 and 170 micrograms m-2 PAH and 2 to 3 g m-2 of total organic carbon content (TOC) per year were deposited by the rain, corresponding to mean concentrations of about 140 ngl-1 of PAH and 2.9 mgl-1 of TOC. PMID:6665554

  16. Deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Doney, Kirstin D; Mori, Tamami; Onaka, Takashi; Tielens, A G G M

    2015-01-01

    The amount of deuterium locked up in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has to date been an uncertain value. We present a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic survey of HII regions in the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) obtained with AKARI, which aims to search for features indicative of deuterated PAHs (PAD or Dn-PAH) to better constrain the D/H ratio of PAHs. Fifty-three HII regions were observed in the NIR (2.5-5 {\\mu}m), using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the AKARI satellite. Through comparison of the observed spectra with a theoretical model of deuterated PAH vibrational modes, the aromatic and (a)symmetric aliphatic C-D stretch modes were identified. We see emission features between 4.4-4.8 {\\mu}m, which could be unambiguously attributed to deuterated PAHs in only six of the observed sources, all of which are located in the Milky Way. In all cases, the aromatic C-D stretching feature is weaker than the aliphatic C-D stretching feature, and, in the case o...

  17. Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The author reports the application of supersonic jet flash pyrolysis to the specific preparation of a range of organic radicals, biradicals, and carbenes in a skimmed molecular beam. Each species was produced cleanly and specifically, with little or no secondary reactions by the thermal dissociation of appropriately designed and synthesized organic precursors. Photoelectron spectra of the three isomeric C{sub 3}H{sub 2} carbenes, ortho-benzyne, and the {alpha},3-dehydrotoluene biradical, were used to establish adiabatic ionization potentials for use in thermochemical determinations.

  18. Petroleum Migration, Filling and Biological Degradation in Mesozoic Reservoirs in the Northern North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horstad, I.

    1995-12-31

    This thesis comprises five papers the first of which discusses the distribution of petroleum within the Gullfaks Field and applies conventional geochemical techniques to characterize the petroleum distribution within a single field. The paper also shows how understanding geochemical heterogeneities in the petroleum fluids helped to build a better geological model of the development of the Gullfaks Field. Based on this work an improved filling model was proposed for the Gullfaks Field. The second paper discusses the biological degradation of the hydrocarbons within the Gullfaks Field, and shows how several samples from neighbouring fields were analyzed to confirm the filling model of the field. It also demonstrates how the quantification of biological degradation of hydrocarbons in the reservoir places constraints on acceptable models of the geological development of the Tampen Spur Area. The third paper discusses the source vs. sink problems of petroleum migration in the North Sea. The fourth paper is a regional study of the petroleum migration within the Tampen Spur area and proposes a regional migration model. The fifth paper is a detailed reservoir geochemical study of the giant Troll Field on the Horda Platform and proposes a revised filling model for the field. 224 refs., 86 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Improved carbon migration modelling with the ERO code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoey, Olivier, E-mail: ovhoey@sckcen.be [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Kirschner, Andreas; Björkas, Carolina; Borodin, Dmitry [Institute for Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Wilhelm-Johnen-Strasse, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Matveev, Dmitry [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Institute for Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Wilhelm-Johnen-Strasse, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Uytdenhouwen, Inge [Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Van Oost, Guido [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2013-07-15

    Material migration is a crucial issue in thermonuclear fusion devices. To study carbon migration, {sup 13}CH{sub 4} has been injected through a polished graphite roof-like test limiter in the TEXTOR scrape-off layer. The interpretation of the experimental {sup 13}C deposition patterns on the roof limiter surface has been done with the ERO impurity transport code. To reproduce the very low experimental {sup 13}C deposition efficiencies with ERO, an enhanced re-erosion mechanism for re-deposited carbon had to be assumed in previous studies. However, erosion by hydrogenic species produced during dissociation of injected {sup 13}CH{sub 4} was not taken into account by ERO in these studies. This additional erosion could maybe explain the very low experimental {sup 13}C deposition efficiencies. Therefore, it is now taken into account in ERO. Also more realistic physical sputtering yields and hydrocarbon reflection probabilities have been implemented in ERO. The simulations with these improvements included clearly confirm the need for enhanced re-erosion of re-deposited carbon.

  20. Geochemical Variations in Hydrocarbon Components Distribution in a Prograding Deltaic Sequence: A Case Study of the Baram Delta, Offshore Sarawak Basin, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ben-Awuah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies on hydrocarbon distribution have evolved from basic reservoir characterization to complex studies today involving the interactions between oil components and clay minerals and sequential extraction studies on hydrocarbon extracts in reservoir rocks. Findings from such studies include the discovery of variations in oil fractions in reservoirs such as adsorbed oil and free oil. The theory that first oil charge preferentially interacts with clay minerals occurring in pores and as coatings in reservoirs was also proposed by some researchers. Despite, all these studies some aspects of variations in the composition of hydrocarbons in reservoir rocks still need to be investigated further. This study has been carried out particularly because the qualitative and quantitative composition of aromatic and aliphatic components of hydrocarbons in terms of the presence and quantities of hydrocarbon functional groups and how they relate to hydrocarbon migration have not been exhaustively discussed. This study uses Ultra-Violet visible light (UV-vis and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR to characterize variations in hydrocarbon distribution in reservoir quality sandstones from three fields namely BD01, BD02 and BD03 in the Baram Delta, offshore Sarawak and to deduce how these variations relate to differential migration patterns in hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon extraction was done in the ultra vilolet visible (UV-vis experiment using 0.1M sodium pyrophosphate as solvent whereas in the Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR, the experiment was done on very fine powdered samples of the sandstones. Results from both the UV-vis and FTIR experiments indicate a dominance of aromatic functional groups in the samples. Most of the samples have E4/E6 ratio of more than 1 which indicates a high degree of aromacity. The BD01 field sandstones with a maximum porosity of 32% has the highest average E4/E6 ratio of 1.21, followed by the BD02 field sandstones with a maximum porosity of 29% and average E4/E6 ratio of 1.19 and the BD03 field with a maximum porosity of 20% and an average E4/E6 ratio of 1.09. The dominance of aromatics in the samples is interpreted as a possible indication of episodes of migration of aliphatics in the past leaving the aromatics behind with the variations in E4/E6 ratio reflecting the micro heterogeneities in the samples.

  1. Vertical fluxes of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fluxes were measured in time series sediment trap samples at 200 m and at 1000 m depths in the open Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, from December 2000 to July 2002. Averaged fluxes of n-alkanes, UCM and T-PAH35 were 2.96 ± 2.60 ?g m-2 d-1, 64 ± 60 ?g m-2 d-1 and 0.68 ± 0.59 ?g m-2 d-1, respectively. Molecular compositions of both hydrocarbon classes showed a contamination in petrogenic hydrocarbons well above the background levels of such an open site, whereas pyrolytic hydrocarbons stand in the range of other open Mediterranean locations. Fluxes displayed ample interannual and seasonal variabilities, mainly related to mass flux variation while concentration evolutions trigger secondary changes in pollutant fluxes. High lithogenic flux events exported particles with a larger pollutant load than biogenic particles formed during the spring bloom and during the summer. Sinking hydrocarbons were efficiently transported from 200 m to 1000 m. - Highlights: ? PAH composition, plots of diagnostic PAH ratios and the UCM abundance indicate that non aromatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in sinking particles in the Ligurian Sea were mainly of petrogenic origin. ? Fluxes of T-PAH35, n-alkanes and UCM transported downward at 200 m during the year 2001 were 269, 1218 and 26 910 mg m-2 yr-1, respectively. ? Vertical fluxes of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons displayed ample seasonal and inter-annual variabilities, mainly related to mass flux variation. Concentration variation triggered smaller changes in pollutant fluxes. ? High fluxes of lithogenic particles occurring from early January to early March 2001 transported about 45% of the annual vertical export of contaminants. In April-May, high fluxes of biogenic particles also transported a significant fraction of pollutants, despite the dilution of petrogenic and pyrolytic PAHs by biogenic material. - Vertical fluxes of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in the Ligurian Sea show ample seasonal and inter-annual variability and are controlled by mass flux dynamics.

  2. Clocks, cryptochromes and Monarch migrations

    OpenAIRE

    Kyriacou, Charalambos P.

    2009-01-01

    The annual migration of the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) from eastern North America to central Mexico is one of nature's most inspiring spectacles. Recent studies including one in BMC Biology, have begun to dissect the molecular and neurogenetic basis for this most complex behavior.

  3. Lymphocyte migration studies in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the author outlines what is known of the migration and recirculation of the lymphocyte in man and animals. He then attempts to demonstrate how a better grasp of these phenomena may contribute to an understanding of the pathophysiology of human diseases such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, Hodgkin's, and other diseases

  4. Liquid chromatography in migration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid chromatography ahs been suggested as a facile experimental technique to determine important physico-chemical properties, as permeability, porosity, dispersion-, diffusion-, and sorption charcteristics for geological material as chalk samples. The feasibility of the trechnique as a rapid method to evaluate the possible influence of changes in ground water composition on the migration behavior of radionuclides has been demonstrated

  5. Tritium migration in tritiated anisole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies have been reported of reactions involving the phenyl cation as an intermediate where the results obtained are most easily explained in terms of 1,2 hydrogen shifts in the intermediate ion. Our purpose here is to present an alternative interpretation, supported by MINDO/3 calculations, that avoids the implied conclusion that the barrier to hydrogen migration is in fact small

  6. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  7. Secondary differential operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusyatnikova, V. N.; Vinogradov, A. M.; Umaguzhin, V. A.

    Let ? be an arbitrary sustem of partial (non-linear differential equations. Higher infinitesimal sysmmetries of ? may be interpreted as vector fields on the «manifoldå Sol ? of all local solution of this system. The paper deals with construction of differential operators of arbitrary orders on Sol ?. These approaches to construction of the theory of these operators, geometric and functional are presented, and their equivalence is proved when ? is the trivial equation. Coincidence of «extrinsicå and «intrinsicå geometric secondary operator is proved for an arbitrary system ?. It is shown that each geometric secondary operator may be approximated by a sum of compositions of evolution differentiations with any possible accuracy, a description of geometric secondary operators in local coordinates is algo given. These results are obtained by studying the geometry of finite jets and infinitely prolonged equations.

  8. Hydrocarbon potential of the Lower Amaranth M Pool, Waskada Field, southwest Manitoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasinski, D.R.; Last, W.M. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Geological Science; Martiniuk, C.D. [Manitoba Industry, Economic Development and Mines, Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Petroleum Branch

    2005-07-01

    The major hydrocarbon producer of Manitoba's Waskada Field is the Lower Amaranth Member of the Jurassic Amaranth, the oldest Mesozoic unit in the northeastern portion of the Williston Basin. Reservoir facies occur as sandy intervals on logs, and are complexly interbedded intertidal sandstones and siltstones. Thickness of the Lower Member is controlled by the paleotopography of the underlying Paleozoic erosional surface. Hydrocarbon production in the Waskada Amaranth began in 1980 with the recompletion of a former Mississippian producer. In the mid-1990s, the Waskada Field expanded eastward into the Goodlands area, with the development of the Lower Amaranth M pool. Developed original oil in place (OOIP) is calculated to be 9.8 million bbl, with 6.7 per cent primary recovery. However, net pay data from the M pool shows that the current pool boundaries do not accurately represent the absolute pool limits. Extent of the pool is defined by a diagenetically controlled permeability pinchout, where reduced permeability allows water migration, while simultaneously retarding oil migration. Total potential of the M pool has yet to be reached. Two development targets have been identified adjacent to the current M pool boundaries based on reservoir facies thickness, net pay, and production data. Development of these areas would expand the pool boundaries by 632 ha, increasing M pool total OOIP to 28.5 million bbl, leaving an undeveloped 18.7 million bbl.

  9. Hydrogen abstraction by fluorine atoms under conditions of thermal initiation: hydrocarbons and fluorinated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modified nuclear recoil techniques have been used to obtain accurate relative bimolecular rate coefficients for thermally induced hydrogen abstraction reactions by atomic fluorine. New results are reported for 12 hydrocarbons and partially fluorinated hydrocarbons studied at 3030K. (U.S.)

  10. Remote sensing and monitoring the experiments of diesel and JP-5 fuel migrations in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a large-scale three-dimensional experimental study of JP-5 and diesel fuel migration in sand and soil carried out at a laboratory site in the Mojave desert, California. The CATLAS, a computerized hydrocarbon vapor monitoring system, scanned 56 MOS hydrocarbon vapor sensors installed in a 14 ft x 12 ft x 10 ft test chamber. The results were stored and transferred via two modems through telephone lines to the computer in the main office on a daily basis. Data processing and trend analysis were performed by the computer and trips to the site were made only when found necessary from an analysis of the data. Three tests featuring the movements of diesel fuel in sand, diesel fuel in soil and JP-5 fuel in sand were conducted. Each test lasted for approximately 30 days. Temporal vapor concentration contour maps at different elevations inside the chamber were generated

  11. Hydrocarbon level detection with nanosecond laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosecond laser induced breakdown in liquid is used as a technique to detect hydrocarbon levels in water. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was focused to generate optical breakdown associated with shock wave generation. The shock wave was propagated at the speed of sound in the medium after travelling 1 ?s outward from the center of optical breakdown. Different amplitudes of sound were traced with the aid of an ultrasonic probe. The optical properties of the hydrocarbon solution were quantified via fundamental refractive index measurement (the Snell law). A continuous mode diode pumped solid state laser with second harmonic generation was used as the illumination light source. A CCD video camera with Matrox version 4.2 software was utilized to analyze the recording image. Option line analysis was performed to analyze the intensity of optical breakdown at different input energies. Gray level analysis was also conducted on the scattering light after passing through the hydrocarbon solution at different concentrations. The hydrocarbon solution comprised impurities or particles that varied according to the concentration. The average of the gray level is assumed to present the size of the particle. Inherently, as the acoustic wave propagates outward, it transports the mass (particles or impurities) and impacts on the ultrasonic probe. As a result a higher concentration of hydrocarbons reveals a larger amplitude of sound waves. This phenomenon is identified as a finger print for hydrocarbon levels between 100 and 1000 ppm. The transient detection, without complicated sampling preparation and no hazardous chemical involvement, makes laser ablation a promising technique to detect in situ hydrocarbon levels in water. (paper)

  12. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AngelaSherry

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5-nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene and xylenes were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12-nC34 and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 µmol CH4/g sediment/day with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12-nC34. For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 µmol CH4/g sediment/day. This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers.

  13. Hydrocarbons in carbonate rocks of the Neoproterozoic Alto Paraguay basin, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Afonso C.R. [Fundacao Univ. do Amazonas, Manaus (Brazil). Dept. de Geociencias; Kerkis, Alexei; Hidalgo, Renata L. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Programa de Pos-graduacao em Geologia Sedimentar; Riccomini, Claudio; Fairchild, Thomas R. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias]. E-mail: acrnogue@usp.br

    2001-09-01

    Full text of publication follows: A singular occurrence of hydrocarbons (bitumen) was found in Neo proterozoic carbonate rocks of the Araras Formation (Alto Paraguay basin) in the Terconi quarry (Mirassol d'Oeste, Mato Grosso, Brazil). The bitumen occurs in a transgressive carbonate succession overlying Varanger tillites, that consists of two facies associations: (1) lagoon complex, with pink parallel-laminated dolomicrites and fenestral stromatolitic biostromite, and (2) tidal-flat complex, represented by terrigenous gray micrites and pseudosparites, with parallel lamination, asymmetric ripple marks, tepee breccia, planar stromatolites and evaporites. When fresh, the bitumen is compact and vitreous, filling fractures, stylolites and dissolution cavities, generally associated with calcite cement and euhedral dolomite crystals. Microscopic examination shows the bitumen filling pores of primary (fenestral) and secondary (moldic and intragranular) origins. As the first record of hydrocarbon in Neoproterozoic rocks of the Paraguay Belt, this occurrence opens a new perspective for the evaluation of oil potential in Precambrian rocks of Central Brazil. (author)

  14. Partial migration in fishes: causes and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, B.B.; Hulthén, K.

    2012-01-01

    Partial migration, where only some individuals from a population migrate, has been widely reported in a diverse range of animals. In this paper, what is known about the causes and consequences of partial migration in fishes is reviewed. Firstly, the ultimate and proximate drivers of partial migration are reflected upon: what ecological factors can shape the evolution of migratory dimorphism? How is partial migration maintained over evolutionary timescales? What proximate mechanisms determine whether an individual is migratory or remains resident? Following this, the consequences of partial migration are considered, in an ecological and evolutionary context, and also in an applied sense. Here it is argued that understanding the concept of partial migration is crucial for fisheries and ecosystem managers, and can provide information for conservation strategies. The review concludes with a reflection on the future opportunities in this field, and the avenues of research that are likely to be fruitful to shed light on the enduring puzzle of partial migration in fishes

  15. Mediterranean Migrations: Regionalisms Versus Globalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Baldwin-Eduards

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper challenges the claim of globalisation as a cause ofimmigration into Southern Europe and, on an empirical basis, identifies regionalisation as being the primary issue, along with networked migratory patterns. However, the changing patterns of immigration do present challenges to both state and society. It is argued here that recent policy responses in Portugal, Italy and Spain have been inconsistent and irrational – reflecting more the ‘securitisation’ of migration than European reality. Earlier policy innovations are identified, by country and date: most of these have now been abandoned. It is suggested that all of Southern Europe has converged onto a statist, restrictionist model of immigration control that was formerly held only by Greece. The principal characteristics of this model are outlined, along with a migration flowchart and indicative data for migrant flows and sub-flows in Italy and Spain. In the final section, I try to show that the needs of the economy cannot be predicted, immigration cannot becontrolled in the manner currently being enforced across Southern Europe, and attempts to do so will damage rather than improve economic productivity and growth. The concept of an accomodating immigration policy is advanced, whereby the state tries to manage the needs of both employers and potential migrants. Six guidelines for policy development are suggested – most of which have alreadybeen successfully carried out in the European Union. These are the following: migration in order to find a job; circular cross-border migration; EU level negotiation of readmission agreements; the need for a variety of migration-for-employment schemes; legal residence should not depend upon continuity of employment; and discreet legalisation will still be needed in Southern Europe.

  16. Cell and tissue mechanics in cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, Janina R.; Fabry, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Migrating cells generate traction forces to counteract the movement-resisting forces arising from cell-internal stresses and matrix adhesions. In the case of collective migration in a cell colony, or in the case of 3-dimensional migration through connective tissue, movement-resisting forces arise also from external stresses. Although the deformation of a stiffer cell or matrix causes larger movement-resisting forces, at the same time a larger stiffness can also promote cell migration due to a...

  17. Is deportation a form of forced migration?

    OpenAIRE

    Gibney, MJ

    2013-01-01

    In this article I explore why, despite the fact that it seems to represent the epitome of forced migration, deportation (the quotidian practice of lawful expulsion) is generally ignored by forced migration scholars. My key claim is that deportation is implicitly deemed a legitimate form of forced migration. Forced migration is not simply a descriptive term; it is also typically an evaluative one. Deportation is treated differently because it does not violate the key principles of a liberal-st...

  18. Capitalist development and internal migration in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akor, R I; Mou, D

    1986-12-01

    The authors analyze internal migration trends in Nigeria by examining individual household strategies and how they have adapted to structural changes brought about by colonial rule and capitalist development. The first section of this article describes the structural changes that started the process of labor migration. The second section deals with post-independence industrialization and the consequent rural-urban migration. The final section analyzes the consequences of these migration patterns for urban growth and rural productivity. PMID:12280787

  19. Migration and rural opportunities in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adepoju, A

    1984-01-01

    This study is concerned with migration to rural areas in Nigeria. The author examines the rural economic structures, social systems, and demographic features affecting such migration. These features are compared for migrants and nonmigrants in the cash cropping and subsistence cropping areas of southwestern Nigeria. The results suggest that rural migration in southwestern Nigeria is mainly urban-rural migration of a colonizing type. Data for the study are from a survey of 1,782 households in 12 villages. PMID:12339440

  20. Migration and mental health: An interface

    OpenAIRE

    Virupaksha, H. G.; Kumar, Ashok; Nirmala, Bergai Parthsarathy

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a universal phenomenon, which existed with the subsistence of the human beings on earth. People migrate from one place to another for several reasons, but the goal or main reason behind changing the residence would be improving their living conditions or to escape from debts and poverty. Migration is also a social phenomenon which influences human life and the environment around. Hence, migration has a great impact on any geographical area and it is known as one of the three basi...

  1. Risk-taking in unauthorised migration

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Carretero, María

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses the dynamics of high-risk unauthorised migration. First, it explores how new routes develop in relation to policies that seek to curtail unauthorised migration. Second, it analyses how aspiring migrants justify taking certain risks to migrate by negotiating risk information in relation to their life circumstances and considering the symbolic value of specific forms of migration. Finally and, in relation to the previous, the thesis discusses whether policies that seek to ...

  2. Random versus directionally persistent cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Doyle, Andrew D.; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2009-01-01

    Directional migration is an important component of cell motility. Although the basic mechanisms of random cell movement are well characterized, no single model explains the complex regulation of directional migration. Multiple factors operate at each step of cell migration to stabilize lamellipodia and maintain directional migration. Factors such as topography of the extracellular matrix, the cellular polarity machinery, receptor signalling, integrin trafficking and co-receptors, and actin–my...

  3. Migration of forgotten stent into renal pelvis

    OpenAIRE

    Giridhar, Venkatesh; Natarajan, Kumaresan; Hegde, Padmaraj

    2011-01-01

    Stent migration is a well recognized complication of forgotten stents, but migration into the renal pelvis is rarely documented. We present a case of migration and coiling of a forgotten stent in the renal pelvis, and discuss briefly, the etiological factors for the phenomenon and associated problems in management.

  4. Migration on Wings Aerodynamics and Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kantha, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    This book is an effort to explore the technical aspects associated with bird flight and migration on wings. After a short introduction on the birds migration, the book reviews the aerodynamics and Energetics of Flight and presents the calculation of the Migration Range. In addition, the authors explains aerodynamics of the formation flight and finally introduces great flight diagrams.

  5. File: non conventional hydrocarbons - Between concerns and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first article proposes an overview of gas and oil resources with respect to their geological context. The authors address the origins of hydrocarbons, their underground migration and possible trapping, thus scanning the whole spectrum of conventional and non conventional resources. A second article, signed by representatives of companies working on shale gas in Europe as well as in the USA, examines whether the development of shale gases, if it ever emerges in Europe, will be the same as it is in the USA. They notably outline differences regarding several legal aspects on land property and on the environment. Based on a study on shale supply chain which identified costs, needed skills, existing capabilities, and recommendations for closing identified gaps, the third article discusses the perspective and opportunity of a possible development of shale gas in the UK. The fourth article discusses the impacts of the exploitation of source rock oils and gases on the American and World economies, and the fifth one discusses the perspectives for the petrochemicals and refining industries in a context of development of shale gases and oils in the USA, of an over-capacity situation for the refining industry, of decline of the European oil product market, and of competition with new polymer production capacities (notably in the Middle East where ethane extracted from natural gas is available in large quantities and at very low prices)

  6. Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrocarbons on Hierarchical HZSM-5 Zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-12-15

    This study reports synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of the nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolite with high mesoporosity produced via a solvent evaporation procedure. Further, this study compares hierarchical zeolites with conventional HZSM-5 zeolite with similar Si/Al ratios for the ethanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion process. The catalytic performance of the hierarchical and conventional zeolites was evaluated using a fixed-bed reactor at 360 °C, 300 psig, and a weight hourly space velocity of 7.9 h-1. For the low Si/Al ratio zeolite (~40), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical HZSM-5 was approximately 2 times greater than the conventional HZSM-5 despite its coking amount deposited 1.6 times higher than conventional HZSM-5. For the high Si/Al ratio zeolite (~140), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical zeolite was approximately 5 times greater than the conventional zeolite and the amount of coking deposited was 2.1 times higher. Correlation was observed between catalyst life time, porosity, and the crystal size of the zeolite. The nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolites containing mesoporosity demonstrated improved catalyst life-time compared to the conventional catalyst due to faster removal of products, shorter diffusion path length, and the migration of the coke deposits to the external surface from the pore structure.

  7. Migration of radionuclides in the soil-crop-food product system and assessment of agricultural countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on dynamics of redistribution of radionuclides through of profile of the different soils on uncultivated agricultural lands of Belarus during the 1986-1995 period show that vertical migration occurs with low rate. In arable soils the radionuclides are distributed in comparatively uniform way through the whole depth of the 25-30 cm cultivated layer. Investigations on migration of radionuclides with wind erosion on the drained series of wet sandy and peat soils and water erosion on sloping lands show that one should take into consideration the secondary contamination of soils while forecasting a possible accumulation of radionuclides in farm products

  8. Emissions of hydrocarbons from combustion of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluations and measurements of emissions of hydrocarbons from power plants with a capacity exceeding 1 MW using biofuels (wood fuels and peat) have been studied in order to identify and quantify the emissions of incompletely combusted hydrocarbons. The influence of the type of fuel and the combustion technology applied were also studied, using literature references. The report summarizes monitoring results from a number of plants using biofuels. The reported emissions from the different plants can not be compared as they are relatively few and the test results have been obtained under various conditions using different methods of testing and analysis. The methods used are often poorly documented in the studied reports. Few investigations of emissions of hydrocarbons from plants in the range of 1 to 10 MW have been carried out. The plant and the technology used are important factors determining the amount and type of emissions of hydrocarbons. Larger temporary emissions can occur during start up, operational disturbances or when using fuel of inhomogeneous quality. In order to minimize the emissions the combustion process must be efficiently controlled, and a fuel of a hohogeneous quality must be used. The report also summarizes sampling and analysis methods used for monitoring emissions of hydrocarbons. (29 refs., 17 figs.)

  9. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  10. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon exposure: an ecological impact ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Andrew; Truskewycz, Adam

    2013-07-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) represent a fraction of petroleum hydrocarbons and are currently one of the foremost sources of generating energy in today's contemporary society. However, evidence highlighted in this review show that PAH pollution, as a result of oil spills, hazardous PAH-contaminated working environments and technologies which do not efficiently utilise fuels, as well as natural sources of emissions (e.g. forest fires) may have significant health implications for all taxa. The extent of damage to organisms from PAH exposure is dependent on numerous factors including degree and type of PAH exposure, nature of the environment contaminated (i.e. terrestrial or aquatic), the ability of an organism to relocate to pristine environments, type and sensitivity of organism to specific hydrocarbon fractions and ability of the organism to metabolise different PAH fractions. The review highlights the fact that studies on the potential damage of PAHs should be carried out using mixtures of hydrocarbons as opposed to individual hydrocarbon fractions due to the scarcity of individual fractions being a sole contaminant. Furthermore, potential damage of PAH-contaminated sites should be assessed using an entire ecological impact outlook of the affected area. PMID:23529398

  11. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil environments was reviewed via a literature survey and discussions with workers in relevant disciplines. The impacts of hydrocarbons on soil are discussed along with a range of methods available to assist in their decomposition by soil microorganisms. The range of petroleum-based materials considered includes conventional and synthetic crude oils, refined oils, sludges, asphalts and bitumens, drilling mud residues, creosote tars, and some pesticides. The degradability of hydrocarbons largely depends upon their aqueous solubility and their adsorption on soil surfaces and, therefore, is related to their molecular structures. The ease of decomposition decreases with increasing complexity of structure, in the order aliphatics > aromatics > heterocyclics and asphaltenes (most recalcitrant). Most soils contain an adequate population of microorganisms and hence bioaugmentation may only be needed in special circumstances. Decomposition is fastest in soils where the hydrocarbon loading rate, aeration, nutrition, moisture, and pH are all optimized. At spill sites there is little control over the application rate, although containment measures can assist in either limiting contamination or distributing it more evenly. The enhancement of bioremediation is discussed in light of all these factors. Other techniques such as enhanced aeration, hydrocarbon decomposition by anaerobic processes, surfactants, and burning are also discussed. 211 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs

  12. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowell, M.J.; Ashworth, J.; Qureshi, A.A.

    1992-12-01

    The bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil environments was reviewed via a literature survey and discussions with workers in relevant disciplines. The impacts of hydrocarbons on soil are discussed along with a range of methods available to assist in their decomposition by soil microorganisms. The range of petroleum-based materials considered includes conventional and synthetic crude oils, refined oils, sludges, asphalts and bitumens, drilling mud residues, creosote tars, and some pesticides. The degradability of hydrocarbons largely depends upon their aqueous solubility and their adsorption on soil surfaces and, therefore, is related to their molecular structures. The ease of decomposition decreases with increasing complexity of structure, in the order aliphatics > aromatics > heterocyclics and asphaltenes (most recalcitrant). Most soils contain an adequate population of microorganisms and hence bioaugmentation may only be needed in special circumstances. Decomposition is fastest in soils where the hydrocarbon loading rate, aeration, nutrition, moisture, and pH are all optimized. At spill sites there is little control over the application rate, although containment measures can assist in either limiting contamination or distributing it more evenly. The enhancement of bioremediation is discussed in light of all these factors. Other techniques such as enhanced aeration, hydrocarbon decomposition by anaerobic processes, surfactants, and burning are also discussed. 211 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Hydrogenative decomposition device for hydrocarbon oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vessel for decomposition according to the present invention comprises a water decomposition vessel disposed around a storage portion of a radioactive material container to which water for decomposition is injected, a gas separation column for separating hydrogen gas generated by decomposition of water, and a reaction vessel having a gas mixture fluid of hydrocarbon oil and hydrogen gas disposed around the storage portion, and from which hydrocarbon product is taken out. Radiation rays from radioactive materials stored in both of the water decomposition vessel and the reaction vessel are absorbed by water and hydrocarbon oil at the periphery thereof. Water is partially decomposed into oxygen gas and hydrogen gas by irradiation of radiation rays, and hydrogen gas is separated and sent to the reaction vessel. A portion of molecular chains of the hydrocarbon oil is splitted by irradiation of radiation rays to reduce molecular weight, and hydrocarbon products in a stable state are obtained by hydrogenation. Hydrogen is formed using radioactive wastes as an energy source and the quality of heavy crude oils can be improved. (T.M.)

  14. Worldwide overview of hydrocarbons and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication presents and comments data regarding the share of hydrocarbons in the world energy consumption, hydrocarbon trade flows, the new situation created by the emergence of shale hydrocarbons and the consequences for the world economy, and possible risks. The authors first comment the evolution of energy consumption and outline that the objectives of CO2 and greenhouse gas emission will not be reached (these emissions increased in 2012 and in 2013). They indicate the emission situation in the USA and Japan, and notice that the objectives defined by the IEA are quite different from those defined by the EU. They analyse the evolutions by distinguishing different periods: 2005-2008 as a reference period, 2008-2012 as a period of change, and the current period as a period of flow inversion. Then, the authors propose two different scenarios of evolution of economic and energy policies. The evolution of hydrocarbon demand is commented, and the levels of reserves (oil, conventional gas, coal, nuclear fuels) are discussed. The market evolution is also discussed, not only from an economic point of view, but also in relationship with geopolitics. The authors notably outline that the energy price is different from one country to the other, discuss the issue of hydrocarbon refining, the role of CO2 tax

  15. Suicide among Secondary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coder, Tamara L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated incidence of adolescent suicide in Kansas and assessed prevention guidelines and services dealing with adolescent suicide, and perceived needs of Kansas secondary school counselors in the area of teenage suicide. Findings from 484 school counselors indicated increase in suicide rates with age and need for suicide prevention programing…

  16. Secondary coolant purification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention combines the attributes of volatile chemical addition, continuous blowdown, and full flow condensate demineralization. During normal plant operation (defined as no primary to secondary leakage) condensate from the condenser is pumped through a full flow condensate demineralizer system by the condensate pumps. Volatile chemical additions are made. Dissolved and suspended solids are removed in the condensate polishers by ion exchange and/or filtration. At the same time a continuous blowdown of approximately 1 percent of the main steaming rate of the steam generators is maintained. Radiation detectors monitor the secondary coolant. If these monitors indicate no primary to secondary leakage, the blowdown is cooled and returned directly to the condensate pump discharge. If one of the radiation monitors should indicate a primary to secondary leak, when the temperature of the effluent exiting from the blowdown heat exchanger is compatible with the resin specifications of the ion exchangers, the bypass valve causes the blowdown flow to pass through the blowdown ion exchangers

  17. [Postrubella secondary pigmentary retinopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicu, C; Damian, C; Glavici, M

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents the case of an 11 years-old child with secondary pigmentary retinopathy, atrial septal defect, facial dysmorphia with mandibular hypoplasia: all these malformations are part of the congenital rubeola syndrome. The patient has a twin brother presenting similar manifestations, but having a different expressivity. PMID:8338828

  18. Nanoparticles migration in fractured rocks and affects on contaminant migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missana, Tiziana; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel; Alonso, Ursula

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, the transport behavior of artificial (gold and latex) and natural (smectite clay) colloids, within a planar fracture in crystalline rock, was analyzed. In order to better understand the effects of colloid size, shape and surface charge on nanoparticle migration and especially on filtration processes on natural rock surfaces, different clay colloids and oxide nanoparticles were selected and their transport studied as a function of the residence time. In all the cases, (a fraction of) the nanoparticles travelled in the fracture as fast as or faster than water (with a retardation factor, Rf ? 1) and the observed Rf, was related to the Taylor dispersion coefficient, accounting for colloid size, water velocity and fracture width. However, under most of the cases, in contrast to the behavior of a conservative tracer, colloids recovery was much lower than 100 %. Differences in recovery between different nanoparticles, under similar residence times, were analyzed. In order to evaluate the possible consequences, on contaminant migration, of the presence of nanoparticles in the system, transport tests were carried out with both colloids and sorbing radionuclides. The overall capacity for colloids of enhancing radionuclide migration in crystalline rock fractures is discussed. Acknowledgments: The research leading to these results received funding from EU FP7/2007-2011 grant agreement Nº 295487 (BELBAR, Bentonite Erosion: effects on the Long term performance of the engineered Barrier and Radionuclide Transport) and by the Spanish Government under the project NANOBAG (CTM2011-2797).

  19. Geochemistry of oil in fluid inclusions in a middle Proterozoic igneous intrusion: implications for the source of hydrocarbons in crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutkiewicz, A. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). School of Geosciences; Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). Inst. of Marine Science; Volk, H.; George, S.C. [CSIRO Petroleum, North Ryde, NSW (Australia); Ridley, J. [Macquarie Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    2004-08-01

    The ca. 1280 Ma dolerite sill within the Mesoproterozoic Roper Group in the Roper Superbasin, Australia, contains evidence for at least two episodes of hydrocarbon migration represented, respectively, by solid bitumen with a ketone-rich extract, and a mixture of a high maturity gas-condensate and a lower maturity oil within oil-bearing fluid inclusions. The ketone isomers are formed by flash pyrolysis of kerogen during the intrusion of the dolerite sill [Org.Geochem. 21(1994) 829] and represent the first and oldest phase of hydrocarbon migration. The gas condensate and oil were subsequently trapped as a mixture within fluid inclusions at diagenetic temperatures and pressures of around 110 {sup o}C and 250 bars, significantly after cooling of the sill and likely during the Neoproterozoic reactivation of the Roper Superbasin. Either (1) these fluids migrated together and mixed in the reservoir or (2) an earlier oil charge was flushed by a later condensate charge and the oil-condensate mixture was trapped within single fluid inclusions. Oil inclusions occur chiefly within albitised zones of labradorite laths within the dolerite matrix, and within transcrystalline microfractures cutting vein calcite and rarely vein quartz. Oil inclusions trapped in the vein calcite are accompanied by hypersaline Ca/Mg brines. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of oil extracted from inclusions within the dolerite matrix shows that the oil is non-biodegraded and was therefore trapped relatively quickly within the host minerals. Trace amounts of biomarkers indicate that the inclusion oil is of a biogenic origin and excludes any abiotic processes that are apparent sources of hydrocarbons in many crystalline rocks. Monomethylalkanes, pentacyclic terpanes chiefly comprising hopanes and diahopanes, and very low concentrations of steranes and diasteranes indicate input from cyanobacterial organic matter with a minor contribution from eukaryotes. The hydrocarbons are likely derived from Proterozoic source rocks such as the directly overlying Velkerri Formation and/or the underlying Barney Creek Formation from the McArthur Group. The study has implications for the source of hydrocarbons in non-sedimentary rocks and suggests that fluid inclusions can be used not only to distinguish between biogenic and abiogenic sources of hydrocarbons but also to provide critical information about the composition of the biomass, fluid migration events, and conditions under which hydrocarbons in different geological settings are trapped. (author)

  20. Self-selection patterns in Mexico-U.S. migration: the role of migration networks

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, D.; Rapoport, H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the role of migration networks in determining self-selection patterns of Mexico-U.S. migration. We first present a simple theoretical framework showing how such networks impact on migration incentives at different education levels and, consequently, how they are likely to affect the expected skill composition of migration. Using survey data from Mexico, we then show that the probability of migration is increasing with education in communities with low migran...

  1. Influences of environmental cues, migration history and habitat familiarity on partial migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Christian; Aarestrup, Kim; Baktoft, Henrik; Brodersen, Jakob; Brönmark, Christer; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Nielsen, Tine; Nilsson, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The factors that drive partial migration in organisms are not fully understood. Roach (Rutilus rutilus), a freshwater fish, engage in partial migration where parts of populations switch between summer habitats in lakes and winter habitats in connected streams. To test if the partial migration trait is phenotypically plastic or has genetic components, we translocated roach from 2 populations with different opportunities for migration to a lake with migration opportunity, containing a local roach ...

  2. Influences of environmental cues, migration history and habitat familiarity on partial migration

    OpenAIRE

    Skov, Christian; Aarestrup, Kim; Baktoft, Henrik; Brodersen, Jakob; Brönmark, Christer; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Nielsen, Tine; Nilsson, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The factors that drive partial migration in organisms are not fully understood. Roach (Rutilus rutilus), a freshwater fish, engage in partial migration where parts of populations switch between summer habitats in lakes and winter habitats in connected streams. To test if the partial migration trait is phenotypically plastic or has genetic components, we translocated roach from 2 populations with different opportunities for migration to a lake with migration opportunity, containing a local roa...

  3. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Protects Lungs from Cockroach Allergen-Induced Inflammation by Modulating Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhou, Yufeng; Qiu, Lipeng; Do, Danh C; Zhao, Yilin; Cui, Zhuang; Wang, Heng; Liu, Xiaopeng; Saradna, Arjun; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei; Gao, Peisong

    2015-12-15

    Exposure to cockroach allergen leads to allergic sensitization and increased risk of developing asthma. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a receptor for many common environmental contaminants, can sense not only environmental pollutants but also microbial insults. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells with the capacity to modulate immune responses. In this study, we investigated whether AhR can sense cockroach allergens and modulate allergen-induced lung inflammation through MSCs. We found that cockroach allergen-treated AhR-deficient (AhR(-/-)) mice showed exacerbation of lung inflammation when compared with wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an AhR agonist, significantly suppressed allergen-induced mouse lung inflammation. MSCs were significantly reduced in cockroach allergen-challenged AhR(-/-) mice as compared with WT mice, but increased in cockroach allergen-challenged WT mice when treated with TCDD. Moreover, MSCs express AhR, and AhR signaling can be activated by cockroach allergen with increased expression of its downstream genes cyp1a1 and cyp1b1. Furthermore, we tracked the migration of i.v.-injected GFP(+) MSCs and found that cockroach allergen-challenged AhR(-/-) mice displayed less migration of MSCs to the lungs compared with WT. The AhR-mediated MSC migration was further verified by an in vitro Transwell migration assay. Epithelial conditioned medium prepared from cockroach extract-challenged epithelial cells significantly induced MSC migration, which was further enhanced by TCDD. The administration of MSCs significantly attenuated cockroach allergen-induced inflammation, which was abolished by TGF-?1-neutralizing Ab. These results suggest that AhR plays an important role in protecting lungs from allergen-induced inflammation by modulating MSC recruitment and their immune-suppressive activity. PMID:26561548

  4. Direct electroreduction of CO2 into hydrocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lot of methods exist to directly reduce carbon dioxide into hydrocarbons: the photoelectrochemical process is certainly the most interesting, essentially due to the similarities with photosynthesis. As the human activities produce a great quantity of CO2, this one can then be considered as an infinite source of carbon. The products of this reaction are identical to those obtained during a Fischer-Tropsch reaction, that is to say hydrocarbons, alcohols and carboxylic acids. These works deal with the electrochemical reduction of CO2 in standard conditions of temperature and pressure. The photochemical part has been replaced by a current generator as electrons source and a KHCO3 aqueous solution as protons source. The first catalytic results clearly show that it is possible to reduce CO2 into light hydrocarbons, typically from C1 to C9. (O.M.)

  5. Graphane: a two-dimensional hydrocarbon

    CERN Document Server

    Sofo, J O; Barber, G D; Sofo, Jorge O.; Chaudhari, Ajay S.; Barber, Greg D.

    2006-01-01

    We predict the stability of a new extended two-dimensional hydrocarbon on the basis of first-principles total energy calculations. The compound that we call graphane is a fully saturated hydrocarbon derived from a single graphene sheet with formula CH. All of the carbon atoms are in sp3 hybridization forming a hexagonal network and the hydrogen atoms are bonded to carbon on both sides of the plane in an alternating manner. Graphane is predicted to be stable with a binding energy comparable to other hydrocarbons such as benzene, cyclohexane, and polyethylene. We discuss possible routes for synthesizing graphane and potential applications as a hydrogen storage material and in two dimensional electronics.

  6. Hydrocarbon origins: an old theory is resuscitated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trollope, F.

    1988-07-27

    This paper is a summary of a talk by Thomas Gold on a project being undertaken in Sweden to drill for hydrocarbons in a meteorite impact crater. The drilling was conducted to test the theory that hydrocarbons have an abiogenic origin. Small volumes of gas were found, and pentane became particularly prominent in the deeper part of the well where its abundance exceeded that of methane some twentyfold. At a depth of 6 km the drill bit became stuck in the hole, and 60 kg of heavy oil-containing sludge was recovered. Biological markers in the oil were said to match those encountered in both the oil shale and shallow oils in near-surface beds in the crater. The deep hydrocarbon theories of Dr. Gold were received better by the non-experts attending the talk, than by the geological community.

  7. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  8. EVALUATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS ELUTION FROM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Piekutin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents studies on oil removal from soil by means of water elution with a help of shaking out the contaminants from the soil. The tests were performed on simulated soil samples contaminated with a mixture of petroleum hydrocarbons. The study consisted in recording the time influence and the number of elution cycles to remove contaminants from the soil. The samples were then subject to the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene. Due to adding various concentrations of petroleum into particular soil samples and applying different shaking times, it was possible to find out the impact of petroleum content and sample shaking duration on the course and possibility of petroleum substances removal by means of elution process.

  9. Multiple atmospheric noble gas components in hydrocarbon reservoirs: a study of the Northwest Shelf, Delaware Basin, SE New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, B. M.; Torgersen, T.; van Soest, M. C.

    2002-09-01

    The Northwest Shelf of the Delaware Basin, SE New Mexico is the site of several large and productive oil and gas fields. The most productive reservoirs are located in the late Pennsylvanian Morrow and early Permian Abo formations. Production from the latter more important play is predominately from fluvial Abo red beds of the Pecos Slope Field. The oxidizing conditions implied by the reddish color of the formation require an external hydrocarbon source. To test the existing migration model for the region and constrain the location of potential hydrocarbon sources, we measured the elemental and isotopic composition of noble gases produced along with the hydrocarbons. We found the hydrocarbons to be highly enriched in radiogenic 4He, 40*Ar and nucleogenic 21*Ne [F( 4He) = 44,000-250,000; 40Ar/ 36Ar = 400-3145; 21Ne/ 22Ne = 0.044-0.071]. The greatest enrichments occur in the Pecos Slope gas fields. The hydrocarbons also contain three independent nonradiogenic noble gas components each with an atmospheric isotopic composition. One component is most likely air-saturated water (ASW). The second component is enriched in the heavy noble gases [F( 130Xe) > 8.5] and is derived from the hydrocarbon sources. The third component is enriched in Ne [F( 20Ne) > 0.8] that we believe is degassed from sources within the reservoirs. This component is correlated with but decoupled from the dominant source of radiogenic 4He and 40*Ar. Very high concentrations of 4He (up to ˜1% by volume) in the Pecos slope reservoirs require a source external to the reservoirs, such as the underlying Precambrian basement granites and sedimentary equivalents. Structural buckles cutting through the Pecos field may act as high flux vertical pathways for the radiogenic 4He. If the hydrocarbons in the Pecos slope fields have migrated northward from the deeper Delaware Basin, as suggested by compositional trends, then perhaps the buckles also play an important role in the distribution and filling of the Pecos slope reservoirs.

  10. Water and contaminant movement: migration barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration barriers are used in shallow land burial facilities to slow or stop the movement of water and contaminants and are discussed here as a single component embedded in a complex environmental system. Analytical solutions to solute transport equations are used to approximate the behavior of migration barriers and to derive design criteria for control of subsurface water and contaminant migration. Various types of migration barriers are compared and design recommendations are made for shallow land burial trench caps and liners. Needed improvements and suggested field experiments for future designs of migration barriers are then discussed relative to the management of low-level radioactive wastes

  11. Basinward migration of rift-border faults: Implications for facies distributions and preservation potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, Chris; Cohen, Harvey A.; Akyüz, H. Serdar; Barka, Aykut

    1995-01-01

    Basinward migration of half-graben footwall margins occurs throughout the active Aegean extensional province and has significant implications for facies distributions and preservation potential in synrift fills worldwide. Recognition of this phenomenon is particularly important for predicting the preservation and distribution of hydrocarbon reservoirs in rift basins. Using an example from the Gediz graben of western Turkey, it is shown that basinward migration of footwall margins exhumes proximal facies of lateral sedimentary systems, severely limiting their preservation potential and providing a ready source of easily erodible material. This in turn leads to the generation of extensive footwall-derived depositional systems, which frequently displace axial drainage systems toward the hanging-wall dip slope.

  12. Nuclide-migration field experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdal, B.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Johnstone, J.K.; Erickson, K.L.; Friedman, A.M.; Fried, S.; Hines, J.J.

    1981-03-01

    When considering groundwater flow and radionuclide retention in the complex flow systems that can occur in geologic formations, one has a serious problem in determining if laboratory studies are being performed under conditions appropriate to natural systems. This document is the project plan for a program designed to begin to address these problems. The project is being carried out jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Argonne National Laboratory. The work has three principal objectives: (1) to develop the experimental, instrumental, and safety techniques necessary to conduct controlled, small-scale radionuclide migration field experiments, including those involving actinides; (2) to use these techniques to define radionuclide migration through rock by performing generic, at-depth experiments under closely monitored conditions; and (3) to determine whether available lithologic, geochemical, and hydrologic properties together with existing or developing transport models are sufficient and appropriate to describe real field conditions.

  13. Colloid migration in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retention of radionuclides for long periods near waste repositories depends upon multiple barriers, one of which is adsorption to immobile solid surfaces. Since small particles and colloidal matter have high adsorption capacities per unit mass and can be mobile in subsurface flows, colloidal transport of waste components requires analysis. Theories for predicting colloid migration through porous media have been developed in the filtration literature. In this paper the authors review the applicability of filtration theories for predicting particle and colloid transport. Emphasis is on suspended matter much smaller than pore sizes, where physical and chemical forces control migration rather than size-dependent physical straining. In general, experimentally verifiable theories exist for particle filtration by clean media when repulsive coulombic forces are masked, and a sensitivity analysis is possible on particle and media properties and fluid flow rate

  14. Physicists' Forced Migrations under Hitler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerchen, Alan

    2011-03-01

    When the Nazis came to power in early 1933 they initiated formal and informal measures that forced Jews and political opponents from public institutions such as universities. Some physicists retired and others went into industry, but most emigrated. International communication and contact made emigration a viable option despite the desperate economic times in the Great Depression. Another wave of emigrations followed the annexation of Austria in 1938. Individual cases as well as general patterns of migration and adaptation to new environments will be examined in this presentation. One important result of the forced migrations was that many of the physicists expelled under Hitler played important roles in strengthening physics elsewhere, often on the Allied side in World War II.

  15. MIGRATION OF ORACLE HR DATABASE

    CERN Multimedia

    ais.support@cern.ch

    2001-01-01

    Restricted services from 3 to 7 November 2001 Due to the migration of the Oracle HR application to the Web, some services which rely on the application's availability may be disturbed from Friday 2 November at 17:30 until Thursday 8 November at 08:30. Amongst those services: HR Division: records office, recruitment, claims and benefits. FI Division: personnel accounting, advances and claims. ST Division: registration office (access cards). SPL Division: external firm staff records. EP Division: users' office. Experiments' secretariats: PIE, Greybook. Divisional secretariats: externals, internal addresses. All information concerning this migration is available at: http://ais.cern.ch We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you in advance for your understanding.

  16. Migration towards Windows 2000/XP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation deals with interesting technical solutions used in the project 'Migration towards Windows 2000/XP', which was introduced by the company AITEN, Plc for companies SE Plc, SEPS Plc and TEKO, Plc in the period 2002 and 2003. The contents of the project was migration of about 100 servers and more than 4 000 PC to the Windows 2000 and XP environs. The result of the project is a unified and documented system in the field of file, print and small application servers and PC. It has enabled to increase the system reliability and availability, to decrease the total costs for administration and operation and to establish the steady environs for users of the applications. (author)

  17. Velocity Dependence of Friction of Confined Hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.

    2010-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon “polymer” solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional shear stress for both cases. In our simulations, the polymer films are very thin (?3 nm), and the solid walls are connected to a thermostat at a short distance from the polymer slab. Under these circumstances we find that frictional heating effects are not important, and the effective temperature in the polymer film is always close to the thermostat temperature. In the first setup (a), for hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 1400 carbon atoms, the shear stresses are nearly independent of molecular length, but for the shortest hydrocarbon C20H42 the frictional shear stress is lower. In all cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer (case b) the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant increases (abruptly) with increasing sliding velocity (from 6 to 7 layers), leading to a decrease of the friction. Before and after the layering transition, the frictional shear stresses are nearly proportional to the logarithm of sliding velocity. For the longest hydrocarbon (1400 C atoms) the friction shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity.

  18. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallgren, Paul

    2009-03-30

    Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of environmental parameters on bioremediation is important in designing a bioremediation system to reduce petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in impacted soils.

  19. Migration and Transnationalism : Pacific Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Tupai Francis, Steve; Lee, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Pacific Islanders have engaged in transnational practices since their first settlement of the many islands in the region. As they moved beyond the Pacific and settled in nations such as New Zealand, the U.S. and Australia these practices intensified and over time have profoundly shaped both home and diasporic communities. This edited volume begins with a detailed account of this history and the key issues in Pacific migration and transnationalism today. The papers that follow present a range ...

  20. Stem cells origin and migration

    OpenAIRE

    E Montiel-Eulefi; Montiel, JF

    2012-01-01

    Generation, migration and distribution of stem cells throughout the body are a major process in the generation of morphological divergence and evolution in different species of vertebrates. Progenitor cells pass through different compartments during embryonic development and the exposition to different tissue environments stimulates the activation of specific differentiation programs. In this chapter we discuss the origin of different migratory cell populations, such as embryonic stem cells, ...

  1. Agglomeration, Migration and Tax Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Hafner, Kurt A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on tax competition and international migration in R&D sectors as agglomeration forces and trade restrictions are present. Economic integration forces industrialized countries to adapt their tax rates in order to keep their industrial status quo. Unlike the often discussed "race to the bottom" result, taxes are increased and the provision of public goods is maintained. It is also proven that taxes that redistribute between mobile and immobile labor lead to a tax burden that ...

  2. International Migration, Remittances and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan Mahmud; Md. Abdus Sabur; Sharmin Tamanna

    2009-01-01

    The increasing remittance flows to the labor sending developing countries in recent years have generated huge optimism in the contemporary development discourse about the possibility of development at the grassroots levels which has been an overwhelming challenge for the development actors for decades. However, the realization of such potential proves difficult due to a lack of common understanding of the phenomenon of labor migration and its causes and consequences. This study focuses on the...

  3. Incentives and disincentives: international migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwati, J N

    1984-01-01

    International migration is largely controlled by disincentives, or quotas, on immigration rather than checks on emigrations. Societies generally feel they have a right to exclude others from their boundaries, but they also usually feel that they do not have a right to control emigration. The single-planetary approach holds that people have the right to live wherever they like on the planet, and the cosmopolitan-utilitarian approach believes the same for reasons of world efficiency. The current feeling that societies have the right to exclude others may be explained best by territoriality in human animals. People also believe that their culture will be diluted if too many outsiders enter. In many cases, immigration systems cannot really control immigration, as in the cases of long landlocked borders between the US and Mexico and between Bangladesh and Assam. Immigration systems also contain legal loopholes. For example, in the US it is easier to get a student visa and convert to immigrant status than to gain immigrant status directly. Loopholes lead to plugs, which lead in turn to more loopholes. An upsurge in requests for political asylum followed increased restrictions on immigration in Western Europe. The US has investigated foreign aid and foreign investments to Mexico and Haiti to curb the flow of illegal migrants. The author suggests that foreign investments may lead to more migration because of the creation of a new proletariat used to the ways of developed countries. An estimate of what would happen if all immigration control were removed worldwide concludes that efficiency and income distribution would improve worldwide. Most migration from developing to developed countries currently consists of the migration of skilled professionals, the brain drain. The author proposes a tax on these professionals to be paid to the country of origin to compensate them for the loss in education and training. The author summarizes the differences between the West German gastarbeiter system of recruiting workers abroad and the US system of quotas, which favors families and refugees. PMID:12313736

  4. Economic Shocs and Internal Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Monras, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Previous literature shows that internal migration rates are strongly procyclical. This would seem to imply that geographic relocation does not help mitigate negative local economic shocks during recessions. This paper shows that this is not the case. I document that net in-migrationrates decreased in areas more affected by the Great Recession. Using various IV strategies that rely on the importance of the construction sector and the indebtedness of households before the crisis, I conclude tha...

  5. Model for far field migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transport model of radionuclide migration in fissured rock is presented. It includes advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the fissures and sorption in the rock blocks. 1 and 2D analytical and 3D numerical solutions of the model have been developed. A large number of calculations for the approximate range of variation of the input parameters have been performed. A large impact of hydrodynamic dispersion and micropore diffusion on the amount of radioactive material reaching the biosphere is found

  6. CARIM - Proceedings on Irregular Migration

    OpenAIRE

    CARIM; LE BRAS, Hervé; AWAD, Ibrahim

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a summary (in English and French) of the main findings on irregular migration into and through the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean (SEM) countries derived from a Meeting between Policy Makers and Experts, which was held in Florence (26 - 27 January 2009). It also includes two keynote speeches given during the Meeting. The Meeting between Policy Makers and Experts was the concluding event of a CARIM research project as the result of which more than 30 papers, which are ...

  7. Internal Migration in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Groppo, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    For people in rural areas of developing countries, finding a better paying job or better education is often only possible by moving - migrating - somewhere else. Moreover, agricultural production, generally the main economic activity in rural areas of developing countries, is risky, affected by droughts and floods. Due to poverty and the limited availability of crop insurance, rural households often rely on distant family members to provide money for buying food, starting a business or mainta...

  8. The Governance of Migration Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, Gordon H.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I examine high-income country motives for restricting immigration. Abundant evidence suggests that allowing labor to move from low-income to high-income countries would yield substantial gains in global income. Yet, most high-income countries impose strict limits on labor inflows and set their admission policies unilaterally. A core principle underlying the World Trade Organization is reciprocity in tariff setting. When it comes to migration from poor to rich cou...

  9. Catalyst for the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boteanu, S.; Ivanus, G.; Pop, E.; Pop, G.; Tomi, P.

    1982-11-30

    A catalyst is claimed for the catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons to olefins and diolefins at temperatures in the range of 600/sup 0/-750/sup 0/C and pressures of 0.1 to 20 atmospheres. It is a bifunctional synthetic modified mordenite zeolite of the formula (Yh.Zm.Una) O.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/SiO/sub 2/ wherein M is Cu, Ag or Co/2 and u+y+z approach or equal 2. Good yields of ethylene and propylene are obtained from hydrocarbon feedstocks having boiling points up to 550/sup 0/C.

  10. Plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The series of experiments studying the plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons was carried out. The dynamic plasma-liquid system based on a low-power rotating gliding arc with solid electrodes was used for the investigation of liquid hydrocarbons reforming process. Conversion was done via partial oxidation. A part of oxidant flow was activated by the discharge. Synthesis-gas composition was analysed by means of mass-spectrometry and gas-chromatography. A standard boiler, which operates on natural gas and LPG, was used for the burning of synthesis-gas

  11. Volatilisation of aromatic hydrocarbons from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, B.; Christensen, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The non-steady-state fluxes of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in the laboratory from the surface of soils contaminated with coal tar Four soil samples from a former gasworks site were used for the experiments. The fluxes were quantified for 11 selected compounds, 4 mono- and 7 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, for a period of up to 8 or 16 days. The concentrations of the selected compounds in the soils were between 0.2 and 3,100 mu g/g. The study included the experimental determination of t...

  12. Tracing The Largest Seasonal Migration on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xianwen; Mao, Wenli; Hu, Zhigang; Gu, Li

    2014-01-01

    It is estimated that over 3.6 billion passengers are travelling during the Chinese Spring Festival travel season. They leave their working cities and return their hometowns to enjoy annual family time, and back to cities after the holiday. In this study, with the massive location-based data collected from millions of smartphone users, we propose a novel method to trace the migration flow and explore the migration patterns of Chinese people. From the temporal perspective, we explore the migration trend over time during a 34-days period, about half a month before and after the Spring Festival. From the spatial perspective, the migration directions and routes are estimated and quantified, and the migration flow is visualized. The spatial range of influence of developed regions could be reflected with the destinations of migration, the migration destinations and originations have obvious characteristic of geographical proximity.

  13. Improved Live Migration Using Compressed Log Files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi k Raj #1, Getzi Jeba Leelipushpam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Live virtual machine migration is the process of moving virtual machine from one host to other without disturbance of users. Live migration is used in the case of proactive maintenance, power management, load balancing, energy saving. This paper present and design the novel approach to reduce the total migration time and down time during live virtual machine migration by compressed log files transfer. For providing the effective and fast migration of the virtual machine log compression method uses Huffman encoding and to make the migration effective we use the parallel multithreading technique. This method also consumes the less bandwidth during the time of migration and provide more security to the data.

  14. Type I Planetary Migration with MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Laughlin, G; Adams, F; Laughlin, Gregory; Steinacker, Adriane; Adams, Fred

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines how type I planet migration is affected by the presence of turbulent density fluctuations in the circumstellar disk. For type I migration, the planet does not clear a gap in the disk and its secular motion is driven by torques generated by the wakes it creates in the surrounding disk fluid. MHD turbulence creates additional density perturbations that gravitationally interact with the planet and can dominate the torques produced by the migration mechanism itself. This paper shows that conventional type I migration can be readily overwhelmed by turbulent perturbations and hence the usual description of type I migration should be modified in locations where the magnetorotational instability is active. In general, the migrating planet does not follow a smooth inward trned, but rather exhibits a random walk through phase space. Our main conclusion is that MHD turbulence will alter the time scales for type I planet migration and -- because of chaos -- requires the time scales to be described by ...

  15. ILLEGAL MIGRATION-CONCEPTUAL DELIMITATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTINA FLORINA POPESCU (PANAIT

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Illegal migration is a mobile phenomenon, which ignores national borders, a threat that originates outside the community and extends to Western societies. This phenomenon is becoming larger and irregular migrants are often in a precarious situation and exposed to the criminals involved in various manifestations of organized crime. The future risk factors of the illegal migration are the demographic bomb, because the population is decreasing in European countries and increasing rapidly in poorer countries, droughts, floods, deforestation, that cause conflicts between climate refugees , extreme poverty, totalitarian regimes, epidemics, can trigger millions of people, the elderly and the working population imbalance which leads to the permanent import of immigrants To combat this phenomenon, states must engage and cooperate with each other. Measures taken by states must balance their integration policy for immigrants, legally residents and asylum policy to comply with international conventions. Also, states must adopt anti-immigrant policies, consisting of subordination visa policy to the interests of international security and exchange of information and, not least, to continue the Schengen process, as a value of humanitarian law applied in the field. The aim of the research is to characterize this dangerous phenomenon for the society and the goal is to identify strategies to combat illegal migration.

  16. SUPER-ECCENTRIC MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socrates, Aristotle; Katz, Boaz; Dong Subo; Tremaine, Scott [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e = 0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e > 0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is a-dot {proportional_to}a{sup 1/2} and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/d log a{proportional_to}a{sup 1/2}. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  17. Perfluorinated hydrocarbons used as Ps inhibitors in non-polar solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfluorinated cyclic and linear hydrocarbons appear to be weak Ps inhibitors when used as additives in non-polar solvents. Both types of compounds give rise to a minimum in the o-Ps yield at low solute concentrations. However, the linear solutes, as distinguished from the cyclic ones, also give rise to a second minimum in the o-Ps yield at high concentrations of the solute. The first minimum is due to the formation of molecular anions, upon attachment of spur electrons, which can undergo secondary reactions with fast moving positrons. The second minimum cannot be explained with the present state of knowledge of the interaction between electrons and perfluorocarbons. (Auth.)

  18. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water: The perspectives of history and hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Bioremediation, the use of microbial degradation processes to detoxify environmental contamination, was first applied to petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water systems in the early 1970s. Since that time, these technologies have evolved in some ways that were clearly anticipated early investigators, and in other ways that were not foreseen. The expectation that adding oxidants and nutrients to contaminated aquifers would enhance biodegradation, for example, has been born out subsequent experience. Many of the technologies now in common use such as air sparging, hydrogen peroxide addition, nitrate addition, and bioslurping, are conceptually similar to the first bioremediation systems put into operation. More unexpected, however, were the considerable technical problems associated with delivering oxidants and nutrients to heterogeneous ground water systems. Experience has shown that the success of engineered bioremediation systems depends largely on how effectively directions and rates of ground water flow can be controlled, and thus how efficiently oxidants and nutrients can be delivered to contaminated aquifer sediments. The early expectation that injecting laboratory-selected or genetically engineered cultures of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria into aquifers would be a useful bioremediation technology has not been born out subsequent experience. Rather, it appears that petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are ubiquitous in ground water systems and that bacterial addition is usually unnecessary. Perhaps the technology that was least anticipated early investigators was the development of intrinsic bioremediation. Experience has shown that natural attenuation mechanisms - biodegradation, dilution, and sorption - limit the migration of contaminants to some degree in all ground water systems. Intrinsic bioremediation is the deliberate use of natural attenuation processes to treat contaminated ground water to specified concentration levels at predetermined points in the aquifer. In current practice, intrinsic bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons requires a systematic assessment to show that ambient natural attenuation mechanisms are efficient enough to meet regulatory requirements and a monitoring program to verify that performance requirements are met in the future.

  19. Molecular carbon isotopic evidence for the origin of geothermal hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13C measurements of geothermal hydrocarbon mixtures containing most abundantly methane, ethane, propane and benzene are reported. Using the data possible mechanisms to explain the origin of these hydrocarbons are considered. (U.K.)

  20. 40 CFR 52.1486 - Control strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...false Control strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone. 52.1486 Section 52.1486 Protection...1486 Control strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone. (a) The requirements of subpart...maintenance of the national standard for ozone in the Las Vegas Intrastate...

  1. Secondary School Advisors as Mentors and Secondary Attachment Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryzin, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The teacher-student relationship is vital to student outcomes in secondary school. Unfortunately, the transition from elementary to secondary school is associated with a decrease in the quality or supportiveness of this relationship. In response, some secondary schools implement advisory programs, in which a teacher/advisor meets periodically with…

  2. Dynamics of secondary forests

    OpenAIRE

    M. van Breugel

    2007-01-01

    The succession of tropical secondary forests on abandoned agricultural fields has been studied since long, most often by comparing stands of different age since abandonment. These so-called chronosequence studies have yielded much insight in general patterns of succession and the constraints and conditions that affect the course of succession (shortly reviewed in chapter 1). Successional dynamics, however, are inferred rather than directly monitored in such studies; i.e. direction and rates o...

  3. Secondary aortoduodenal fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Girolamo Geraci, Franco Pisello, Francesco Li Volsi, Tiziana Facella, Lina Platia, Giuseppe Modica, Carmelo Sciumè

    2008-01-01

    Aorto-duodenal fistulae (ADF) are the most frequent aorto-enteric fistulae (80%), presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We report the first case of a man with a secondary aorto-duodenal fistula presenting with a history of persistent occlusive syndrome. A 59-year old man who underwent an aortic-bi-femoral bypass 5 years ago, presented with dyspepsia and biliary vomiting. Computed tomography scan showed in the third duodenal segment the presence of inflammatory tissue with air bubbl...

  4. Syn-Rift Systems of East Godavari Sub Basin: Its Evolution and Hydrocarbon Prospectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, J., Jr.; Zaman, B.

    2014-12-01

    Krishna Godavari (K.G.) basin is a passive margin basin developed along the Eastern coast of India. This basin has a polyhistoric evolution with multiple rift systems. Rift basin exploration has provided the oil and gas industry with almost one third of discovered global hydrocarbon resources. Understanding synrift sequences, their evolution, depositional styles and hydrocarbon prospectivity has become important with recent discovery of the wells, G-4-6,YS-AF and KG-8 in the K.G. offshore basin. The East Godavari subbasin is a hydrocarbon producing basin from synrift and pre-rift sediments, and hence this was selected as the study area for this research. The study has been carried out by utilizing data of around 58 wells (w1-w58) drilled in the study area 25 of which are hydrocarbon bearing with organic thickness varying from 200 m to 600 m. Age data generated by palaentology and palynology studies have been utilized for calibration of key well logs to differentiate between formations within prerift and synrift sediments. The electrologs of wells like resistivity, gamma ray, neutron, density and sonic logs have been utilized for correlation of different formations in all the drilled wells. The individual thicknesses of sand, shale and coal in the formations have been calculated and tabulated. For Golapalli formation, the isopach and isolith maps were generated which revealed that there were four depocentres with input from the north direction. Schematic geological cross sections were prepared using the well data and seismic data to understand the facies variation across the basin. The sedimentological and petrophysical analysis reports and electro log suites were referred to decipher the environment of deposition, the reservoir characteristics, and play types. The geochemical reports [w4 (Tmax)= 455-468 °C; w1 (Tmax) = 467-514 °C; w4(VRO)= 0.65-0.85; w1(VRO)= 0.83-1.13] revealed the source facies, its maturation and migration timings i.e. the petroleum systems. It was concluded these fluvial channel systems constitute the main hydrocarbon play for the Mandapeta and Gollapalli formations and these channel systems if found at a structurally advantageous positions should prove to be good hydrocarbon targets.

  5. Phase II Interim Report - Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage Detection Methods on the Fort Peck Reservation, Northeast Montana; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following work was performed: (1) collected reconnaissance micro-magnetic data and background field data for Area 1, (2) identified and collected soil sample data in three anomalous regions of Area 1, (3) sampled soils in Northwest Poplar Oil Field, (4) graphed, mapped, and interpreted all data areas listed above, (5) registered for the AAPG Penrose Conference on Hydrocarbon Seepage Mechanisms and Migration (postponed from 9/16/01 until 4/7/02 in Vancouver, B.C.). Results include the identification and confirmation of an oil and gas prospect in the northwest part of Area 1 and the verification of a potential shallow gas prospect in the West Poplar Area. Correlation of hydrocarbon micro-seepage to TM tonal anomalies needs further data analysis

  6. [Contamination and ecological risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediment in karst underground river].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Jia-Cheng; Sun, Yu-Chuan; Shi, Yang; Liang, Zuo-Bing

    2015-03-01

    In order to understand pollution characteristics and ecological risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediment from Laolongdong underground river, the concentration and composition of 16 priority PAHs were analyzed. The results showed that the total concentrations of PAHs ranged from 58.2 to 3 598 ng x g(-1), and most of the values were between 100 and 5 000 ng x g(-1). It means that sediments in the river were moderately and heavily polluted by PAHs. The PAH composition were dominated by 2-4 rings (accounted for 75.1%) compounds in Laolongdong, while 4-6 rings PAHs accounted for 56.6% in Xiannvdong. Sediments in Laolongdong mainly came from the transportation of the upstream water and surface soil. 2 - 3 rings PAHs had higher transport capability with farther migration distance, while 4-6 rings PAHs had lower transport capability and shorter migration distance in the conduit, because 4-6 rings PAHs could be easily absorbed by sediments. The result of ecological assessment of PAHs showed that the ecological risk level in Laolongdong was low, leading to little negative ecological impact. However, the level in Xiannvdong was high. Once PAHs migrated from upstream to downstream, it would result in ecological threat for the downstream area. PMID:25929051

  7. An integrative review of the role of remittances in international nurse migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Squires A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Allison Squires,1 Angela Amico2 1College of Nursing, 2Global Institute of Public Health, New York University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: This review seeks to understand the role of remittances in international nurse migration within the context of three theories of international migration: equilibrium approaches, social networks, and globalization. To analyze the phenomenon, an integrative review of the literature was conducted. Search terms sought articles discussing, either directly or indirectly, remittances and international nurse migration. The initial search returned 369 articles, and further screening decreased the total to 65. Full text screening reduced the final number for the analysis to 48. A directed content analysis structured the analytic approach by examining how authors discussed remittances in the content and context of the paper. The final analysis showed the majority of papers were policy analyses (five; opinion papers, reviews, or editorials that indirectly discussed remittances (27; or were qualitative and quantitative studies (16, either with primary data collection (14 or secondary data analyses (two. Overall, a nurse’s individual motivation for sending remittances home stemmed from familial factors but was never a primary driver of migration. Domestic labor market factors were more likely to drive nurses to migrate. The nurse’s country of origin also was a factor in the remittance dynamic. The identity of the author of the paper played a role in how they discussed remittances in the context of international nurse migration. The three theories of migration helped explain various aspects of the role of remittances in international nursing migration. While the phenomenon has changed since the 2008 global economic crisis and the passing of the World Health Organization’s Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel in 2010, future research around the role of remittances needs to consider the confluence of gender, social, political, labor market, and economic dynamics, and not just view the phenomenon from an individual lens. Keywords: nursing, health care worker, remittance

  8. Migration timing and its determinants for nocturnal migratory birds during autumn migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Sorte, Frank A; Hochachka, Wesley M; Farnsworth, Andrew; Sheldon, Daniel; Fink, Daniel; Geevarghese, Jeffrey; Winner, Kevin; Van Doren, Benjamin M; Kelling, Steve

    2015-09-01

    Migration is a common strategy used by birds that breed in seasonal environments, and multiple environmental and biological factors determine the timing of migration. How these factors operate in combination during autumn migration, which is considered to be under weaker time constraints relative to spring migration, is not clear. Here, we examine the patterns and determinants of migration timing for nocturnal migrants during autumn migration in the north-eastern USA using nocturnal reflectivity data from 12 weather surveillance radar stations and modelled diurnal probability of occurrence for 142 species of nocturnal migrants. We first model the capacity of seasonal atmospheric conditions (wind and precipitation) and ecological productivity (vegetation greenness) to predict autumn migration intensity. We then test predictions, formulated under optimal migration theory, on how migration timing should be related to assemblage-level estimates of body size and total migration distance within the context of dietary guild (insectivore and omnivore) and level of dietary plasticity during autumn migration. Our results indicate seasonal declines in ecological productivity delineate the beginning and end of peak migration, whose intensity is best predicted by the velocity of winds at migration altitudes. Insectivorous migrants departed earlier in the season and, consistent with our predictions, large-bodied and long-distance insectivorous migrants departed the earliest. Contrary to our predictions, large-bodied and some long-distance omnivorous migrants departed later in the season, patterns that were replicated in part by insectivorous migrants that displayed dietary plasticity during autumn migration. Our findings indicate migration timing in the region is dictated by optimality strategies, modified based on the breadth and flexibility of migrant's foraging diets, with declining ecological productivity defining possible resource thresholds during which migration occurs when winds at migration altitudes are mild. These observations provide the basis to assess how avian migration strategies may be affected by adjustments in seasonal patterns of atmospheric circulation and ecological productivity that may occur under global climate change. PMID:25850460

  9. Transformations of aromatic hydrocarbons over zeolites.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voláková, Martina; Žilková, Nad?žda; ?ejka, Ji?í

    2008-01-01

    Ro?. 34, 5-7 (2008), s. 439-454. ISSN 0922-6168 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA203/05/0197; GA AV ?R 1QS400400560; GA AV ?R KJB4040402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : aromatic hydrocarbons * zeolites * alkylation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.514, year: 2008

  10. Source identification of hydrocarbons following environmental releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholz, D.A. [ALS Environmental, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Methods of identifying the sources of hydrocarbon contaminations were discussed in this PowerPoint presentation. Laboratories analyze for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) by obtaining chromatograms of observed products. However, many petroleum products provide similar chromatograms. Several independent lines of evidence are needed for the purposes of accurate determination in legal applications. A case study of a lube oil plant spill was used to demonstrate the inconclusiveness of chromatograms and the need to determine petroleum biomarkers. Terpane, sterane, triaromatic sterane, isoprenoid, and alkylcyclohexane analyses were conducted to differentiate between the hydrocarbon samples. The analysis methods are being used with various soil, water, and crab species samples from the BP oil spill. Oil found at the different sites must be directly related to the spill. However, there are 3858 oil and gas platforms currently operating in the Gulf of Mexico. Ratios of biomarkers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are being developed to generate weight of evidence. A critical difference analysis was also presented. tabs., figs.

  11. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil

    OpenAIRE

    Kupka Daniel

    1997-01-01

    The abilities of microorganisms to mineralize a wide range of pollutants are well known. Biological processes for the removal of crude oil hydrocarbons from environment are attractive because they consume less energy than conventional physico-chemical processes and offer possibilities for recycling chemicals in the framework of integrated system.

  12. Hydrocarbons in Argentina: networks, territories, integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argentinean hydrocarbons networks have lived a huge reorganizing the structure, after the State reform in the 90's. Activities deregulation and the privatization of YPF and Gas del Estado forced the sector re-concentration, since then dominated by foreign companies, leaded by Repsol YPF. The hydrocarbons federalization contributed to the weakening and un-capitalization loss of wealth of the State. These changes resulted in an increase of the hydrocarbons production allowing to achieve the self-supply. Nevertheless, the expansion of internal networks has not been large enough to ensure the coverage of new requirements. Besides, several infrastructures have been built up to join external markets. National networks are connected to those of near neighboring countries. This integration is an opportunity for the 'South Cone' countries to enhance their potentials. In the country, hydrocarbons territories undergo the reorganizing the structure effects (unemployment, loss of territorial identity, etc). With many difficulties and very different possibilities, those territories, like Comodoro Rivadavia, Ensenada et and Bahia Blanca, look for their re-invention. (author)

  13. Radiation Chemistry of Organic Liquids: Saturated Hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Shkrob, Ilya A.; Sauer, Jr., Myran C.; Trifunac, Alexander D.

    2004-01-01

    In this review (124 refs), several problems in radiolysis of saturated hydrocarbons are examined. Special attention is paid to the chemistry of radical cations, high-mobility holes, excited state and spur dynamics, magnetic field and spin effects, and optically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  14. Task 8: Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Our studies focus on the stratigraphy of Late Devonian to early Pennsylvanian rocks at the NTS, because these are the best potential hydrocarbon source rocks in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. In the last year, our stratigraphic studies have broadened to include the regional context for both the Chainman and the Eleana formations. New age data based on biostratigraphy constrain the age ranges of both Chainman and Eleana; accurate and reliable ages are essential for regional correlation and for regional paleogeographic reconstructions. Source rock analyses throughout the Chainman establish whether these rocks contained adequate organic material to generate hydrocarbons. Maturation analyses of samples from the Chainman determine whether the temperature history has been suitable for the generation of liquid hydrocarbons. Structural studies are aimed at defining the deformation histories and present position of the different packages of Devonian - Pennsylvanian rocks. This report summarizes new results of our structural, stratigraphic and hydrocarbon source rock potential studies at the Nevada Test Site and vicinity. Stratigraphy is considered first, with the Chainman Shale and Eleana Formation discussed separately. New biostratigraphic results are included in this section. New results from our structural studies are summarized next, followed by source rock and maturation analyses of the Chainman Shale. Directions for future work are included where appropriate.

  15. Site characterization and petroleum hydrocarbon plume mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravishankar, K. [Harding Lawson Associates, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a case study of site characterization and hydrocarbon contamination plume mapping/delineation in a gas processing plant in southern Mexico. The paper describes innovative and cost-effective use of passive (non-intrusive) and active (intrusive) techniques, including the use of compound-specific analytical methods for site characterization. The techniques used, on a demonstrative basis, include geophysical, geochemical, and borehole drilling. Geochemical techniques used to delineate the horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the site include soil gas surveys. The borehole drilling technique used to assess the vertical extent of contamination and confirm geophysical and geochemical data combines conventional hollow-stem auguring with direct push-probe using Geoprobe. Compound-specific analytical methods, such as hydrocarbon fingerprinting and a modified method for gasoline range organics, demonstrate the inherent merit and need for such analyses to properly characterize a site, while revealing the limitations of noncompound-specific total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. The results indicate that the techniques used in tandem can properly delineate the nature and extent of contamination at a site; often supplement or complement data, while reducing the risk of errors and omissions during the assessment phase; and provide data constructively to focus site-specific remediation efforts. 7 figs.

  16. Taxation on mining and hydrocarbon investments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz De La Vega Rengifo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article comments the most important aspects of the tax treatment applicable to investments of mining and oil and gas industry. The document highlights the relevant tax topics of the general tax legislation(Income Tax Law and the special legislation of both industries (General Mining Law and Hydrocarbons Organic Law.

  17. Field investigation with regard to the impermeability of clay formations. Helium-4 soil gas surveys in sedimentary basins as a tentative study of secondary permeability in clayey sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with a tentative study for the detection of the secondary permeability in clayey formations conducted in several sedimentary basins in Central Italy, by means of geochemical methods. The main purposes are: to try a geochemical method, based on the distribution of deep origin gases in soil gas (4He and 222Rn), to detect buried fault systems and to study the permeability of clay as a potential migration pathway for nuclides of radioactive waste deposits; to verify the effectiveness of this method for the selection of suitable sites for radwaste disposal. This research programme consists in a collaboration between ENEA and the University of Rome within the communitarian programme for the disposal of high level and long-live radwaste. Investigations concerned sedimentary basins filled by sand-clay formations 1000-2000 meters thick and characterized by different tectonic: Era and Chiani-Paglia Valleys (Tuscany and North Latium), structural trenches due to extensive tectonics along the tyrrhenian edge, and Vasto region, a basin in the 'Adriatic foretrench', characterized by compressive tectonics. The investigated areas are near or directly correspond to geothermal fields or to hydrocarbon reservoirs supplying gases which may migrate upward along fractures. Almost 4000 soil gas samples were collected in the three surveyed areas; the sampling density was of about 1.5 points / km2, normally used in the regional scale surveys. The obtained results show that the observed helium anomalies are distributed or elongated according to the main tectonic features of the substratum (fault systems, fractures, deep structures); the magnitude of anomalies seems to correlate with the nature of the deep gas reservoir (i.e. oil in Vasto), geothermal reservoir in the Paglia valley. These observations seem to confirm that the presence of deep origin gases in soils is controlled by tectonics. Clay thickness does not significantly control the uprising of deep gases: in fact a few meters of unfractured clay can constitute an efficient barrier even with regard to the migration of the most mobile element (He). 38 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Analysis of hydrocarbons generated in coalbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Steven John M.

    This dissertation describes kinetic calculations using literature data to predict formation rates and product yields of oil and gas at typical low-temperature conditions in coalbeds. These data indicate that gas formation rates from hydrocarbon thermolysis are too low to have generated commercial quantities of natural gas, assuming bulk first-order kinetics. Acid-mineral-catalyzed cracking, transition-metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis of liquid hydrocarbons, and catalyzed CO2 hydrogenation form gas at high rates. The gaseous product compositions for these reactions are nearly the same as those for typical natural coalbed gases, while those from thermal and catalytic cracking are more representative of atypical coalbed gases. Three Argonne Premium Coals (Upper-Freeport, Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton) were extracted with benzene in both Soxhlet and elevated pressure extraction (EPE) systems. The extracts were compared on the basis of dry mass yield and hydrocarbon profiles obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The dry mass yields for the Upper-Freeport coal gave consistent results by both methods, while the yields from the Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton coals were greater by the EPE method. EPE required ˜90 vol. % less solvent compared to Soxhlet extraction. Single-ion-chromatograms of the Soxhlet extracts all exhibited bimodal distributions, while those of the EPE extracts did not. Hydrocarbons analyzed from Greater Green River Basin samples indicate that the natural oils in the basin originated from the coal seams. Analysis of artificially produced oil indicates that hydrous pyrolysis mimics generation of C15+ n-alkanes, but significant variations were found in the branched alkane, low-molecular-weight n-alkanes, and high-molecular-weight aromatic hydrocarbon distributions.

  19. Green Methodologies to Test Hydrocarbon Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Verga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The definition and the economic viability of the best development strategy of a hydrocarbon reservoir mainly depend on the quantity and type of fluids and on the well productivity. Well testing, consisting in producing hydrocarbon to the surface while measuring the pressure variations induced in the reservoir, has been used for decades to determine the fluid nature and well potential. In exploration and appraisal scenarios the hydrocarbons produced during a test are flared, contributing to the emissions of greenhouse gases. Approach: Due to more stringent environmental regulations and a general need for reduced operating expenses, the current industry drivers in today?s formation evaluation methodologies demand short, safe, cost-effective and environmentally friendly test procedures, especially when conventional tests are prohibitively expensive, logistically not feasible or no surface emissions are allowed. Different methods have been proposed or resuscitated in the last years, such as wireline formation tests, closed chamber tests, production/reinjection tests and injection tests, as viable alternatives to conventional well testing. Results: While various short-term tests, test procedures and interpretation methods are apparently available for conducting successful tests without hydrocarbon production at the surface, clarity is lacking for specific applications of these techniques. An attempt to clarify advantages and limitations of each methodology, particularly with respect to the main testing target is pursued in this study. Specific insight is provided on injection testing, which is one of the most promising methodology to replace traditional well testing in reservoir characterization, except for the possibility to sample the formation fluids. Conclusion/Recommendations: Not a single one method but a combination of more methodologies, in particular injection testing and wireline formation testing, is the most promising strategy to achieve all the targets of a conventional well testing with no surface hydrocarbon production, increased safety during operations and reduction of the testing costs

  20. Airborne Geophysical Surveys Applied to Hydrocarbon Resource Development Environmental Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. D.; Ball, L. B.; Finn, C.; Kass, A.; Thamke, J.

    2014-12-01

    Application of airborne geophysical surveys ranges in scale from detailed site scale such as locating abandoned well casing and saline water plumes to landscape scale for mapping hydrogeologic frameworks pertinent to ground water and tectonic settings relevant to studies of induced seismicity. These topics are important in understanding possible effects of hydrocarbon development on the environment. In addition airborne geophysical surveys can be used in establishing baseline "snapshots", to provide information in beneficial uses of produced waters, and in mapping ground water resources for use in well development. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has conducted airborne geophysical surveys over more than 20 years for applications in energy resource environmental studies. A majority of these surveys are airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys to map subsurface electrical conductivity related to plumes of saline waters and more recently to map hydrogeologic frameworks for ground water and plume migration. AEM surveys have been used in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to characterize the near surface geologic framework for siting produced water disposal ponds and for beneficial utilization in subsurface drip irrigation. A recent AEM survey at the Fort Peck Reservation, Montana, was used to map both shallow plumes from brine pits and surface infrastructure sources and a deeper concealed saline water plume from a failed injection well. Other reported applications have been to map areas geologically favorable for shallow gas that could influence drilling location and design. Airborne magnetic methods have been used to image the location of undocumented abandoned well casings which can serve as conduits to the near surface for coproduced waters. They have also been used in conjunction with geologic framework studies to understand the possible relationships between tectonic features and induced earthquakes in the Raton Basin. Airborne gravity as well as developing deeper mapping AEM surveys could also be effectively used in mapping tectonic features. Airborne radiometric methods have not been routinely used in hydrocarbon environmental studies but might be useful in understanding the surficial distribution of deposits related to naturally occurring radioactive materials.

  1. Upward Migration of Distal Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Catheter into the Heart: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Jong Yun; Kim, Jae Min; Cho, Dong Charn; Kim, Choong Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is commonly and effectively used to treat hydrocephalus. Intracardiac migration of the shunt catheter is a rare complication. A 68-year-old woman underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting for hydrocephalus secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage due to anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture. Two weeks after the shunt surgery, she had suffered from the abdominal pain. Plain chest x-rays, computed tomography, and echocardiography revealed the distal catheter w...

  2. Unknown syndrome: Hirschsprung's disease, microcephaly, and iris coloboma: a new syndrome of defective neuronal migration.

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, J A; Markiewicz, M.; Kumar, D.; Brett, E. M.

    1988-01-01

    We describe three children with Hirschsprung's disease and microcephaly, two of whom also have an iris coloboma. Two of the children, one with a coloboma and one without, are from the same consanguineous pedigree. The third case is unrelated and was identified by the matching program of the London Dysmorphology Database. This is the first report of this combination of features which are considered to be secondary to defective neuronal migration. An autosomal recessive mode of inheritance is p...

  3. Migration and segregation phenomena of a silicone additive in a multilayer organic coating

    OpenAIRE

    Hinder, SJ; Lowe, C; Maxted, JT; Watts, JE

    2005-01-01

    The migration and segregation of a minor silicone containing additive in a multilayer, organic coating system has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The silicone containing additive employed was the most compatible thermally stable, polyester modified poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) flow agent. A polyester/polyurethane (PU) based primer and a poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVdF) based topcoat on an aluminium ...

  4. Time-resolved characterization of primary and secondary particle emissions of a modern gasoline passenger car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, P.; Timonen, H.; Saukko, E.; Kuuluvainen, H.; Saarikoski, S.; Aakko-Saksa, P.; Murtonen, T.; Dal Maso, M.; Ahlberg, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Brune, W. H.; Hillamo, R.; Keskinen, J.; Rönkkö, T.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in traffic systems and vehicle emission reduction technologies significantly affect traffic-related emissions in urban areas. In many densely populated areas the amount of traffic is increasing, keeping the emission level high or even increasing. To understand the health effects of traffic related emissions, both primary and secondary particles that are formed in the atmosphere from gaseous exhaust emissions need to be characterized. In this study we used a comprehensive set of measurements to characterize both primary and secondary particulate emissions of a modern gasoline passenger car. Our aerosol particle study covers the whole process chain in emission formation, from the engine to the atmosphere, and takes into account also differences in driving patterns. We observed that in mass terms, the amount of secondary particles was 13 times higher than the amount of primary particles. The formation, composition, number, and mass of secondary particles was significantly affected by driving patterns and engine conditions. The highest gaseous and particulate emissions were observed at the beginning of the test cycle when the performance of the engine and the catalyst was below optimal. The key parameter for secondary particle formation was the amount of gaseous hydrocarbons in primary emissions; however, also the primary particle population had an influence. Thus, in order to enhance human health and wellbeing in urban areas, our study strongly indicates that in future legislation, special attention should be directed into the reduction of gaseous hydrocarbons.

  5. Time-resolved characterization of primary and secondary particle emissions of a modern gasoline passenger car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Karjalainen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in traffic systems and vehicle emission reduction technologies significantly affect traffic-related emissions in urban areas. In many densely populated areas the amount of traffic is increasing, keeping the emission level high or even increasing. To understand the health effects of traffic related emissions, both primary and secondary particles that are formed in the atmosphere from gaseous exhaust emissions need to be characterized. In this study we used a comprehensive set of measurements to characterize both primary and secondary particulate emissions of a modern gasoline passenger car. Our aerosol particle study covers the whole process chain in emission formation, from the engine to the atmosphere, and takes into account also differences in driving patterns. We observed that in mass terms, the amount of secondary particles was 13 times higher than the amount of primary particles. The formation, composition, number, and mass of secondary particles was significantly affected by driving patterns and engine conditions. The highest gaseous and particulate emissions were observed at the beginning of the test cycle when the performance of the engine and the catalyst was below optimal. The key parameter for secondary particle formation was the amount of gaseous hydrocarbons in primary emissions; however, also the primary particle population had an influence. Thus, in order to enhance human health and wellbeing in urban areas, our study strongly indicates that in future legislation, special attention should be directed into the reduction of gaseous hydrocarbons.

  6. Escaping famine through seasonal migration

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, Gharad; Chowdhury, Shyamal; Mubarak, Ahmed Mushfiq

    2013-01-01

    Hunger during pre-harvest lean seasons is widespread in the agrarian areas of Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. We randomly assign an $8.50 incentive to households in rural Bangladesh to out-migrate during the lean season. The incentive induces 22% of households to send a seasonal migrant, their consumption at the origin increases significantly, and treated households are 8-10 percentage points more likely to remigrate 1 and 3 years after the incentive is removed. These facts can be explained qual...

  7. Migrating Applications to IPv6

    CERN Document Server

    York, Dan

    2011-01-01

    If IPv6 is to be adopted on a large scale, the applications running on desktop systems, laptops, and even mobile devices need to work just as well with this protocol as they do with IPv4. This concise book takes you beyond the network layer and helps you explore the issues you need to address if you are to successfully migrate your apps to IPv6. It's ideal for application developers, system/network architects, product managers, and others involved in moving your network to IPv6. Explore changes you need to make in your application's user interfaceMake sure your application is retrieving corre

  8. Potential Development of Hydrocarbon in Basement Reservoirs In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sunarjanto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i3.165Basement rocks, in particular igneous and metamorphic rocks are known to have porosity and permeability which should not be ignored. Primary porosity of basement rocks occurs as the result of rock formation. The porosity increases by the presence of cracks occurring as the result of tectonic processes (secondary porosity. Various efforts have been carried out to explore hydrocarbon in basement rocks. Some oil and gas fields proved that the basement rocks are as reservoirs which so far have provided oil and gas in significant amount. A review using previous research data, new data, and observation of igneous rocks in some fields has been done to see the development of exploration and basement reservoirs in Indonesia. A review on terminology of basement rock up till the identification of oil and gas exploration in basement rocks need to be based on the latest technology. An environmental approach is suggested to be applied as an alternative in analyzing the policy on oil and gas exploration development, especially in basement reservoirs.

  9. Object migration in federated database systems

    OpenAIRE

    Radeke, Elke; Scholl, Marc H.

    1994-01-01

    Existing federated database systems (FDBS) provide uniform access to multiple heterogeneous DBS, but do not enable objects to move across the DBSwhile retaining global identity. To fulfill this requirement of industrial users, we incorporate into FDBS a flexible object migration mechanism to move or duplicate objects from one component database system to another. We present different capabilities for "what" and "how" to migrate and consider the migration of both single objects and whole objec...

  10. Irregular Migration : A case study of Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Karandaeva, Ekaterina

    2011-01-01

    One of the concerns of the current study is to analyse empirically and theoretically the economic and political causes of irregular migration to Italy in order to proceed with the critical estimation of the national, international and partly supranational migration policies. Since several theories will be applied during the study it will enable me to fully describe the phenomena of the irregular migration and modern enslavement of the irregular immigrants on Italian territory. I will disregar...

  11. Service Migration Protocol for NFC Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Anders; Schwefel, Hans-Peter; Martin, Miquel

    2010-01-01

    In future ubiquitous communication environments, users expect to move freely while continuously interacting with the available applications through a variety of devices. Interactive applications will therefore need to support migration, which means to follow users and adapt to the changing context of use while preserving state. This paper focuses on the scenario of migration between two devices in which the actual migration procedure is executed over near-field communication (NFC) ad-hoc links. ...

  12. Service Migration Protocol for NFC Links

    OpenAIRE

    Nickelsen A.; Martin M.; Schwefel H.-P.

    2010-01-01

    In future ubiquitous communication environments, users expect to move freely while continuously interacting with the available applications through a variety of devices. Interactive applications will therefore need to support migration, which means to follow users and adapt to the changing context of use while preserving state. This paper focuses on the scenario of migration between two devices in which the actual migration procedure is executed over near-field communication (NFC) ad-hoc link...

  13. Saving Planetary Systems: Dead Zones & Planetary Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumura, Soko; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Thommes, Edward W.

    2006-01-01

    The tidal interaction between a disk and a planet leads to the planet's migration. A long-standing question regarding this mechanism is how to stop the migration before planets plunge into their central stars. In this paper, we propose a new, simple mechanism to significantly slow down planet migration, and test the possibility by using a hybrid numerical integrator to simulate the disk-planet interaction. The key component of the scenario is the role of low viscosity region...

  14. Green Light for Nocturnally Migrating Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Wernand, Marcel R.; Maurice A. H. Donners; Han de Vries; Bruno J. Ens; Hanneke Poot; Joop M. Marquenie

    2008-01-01

    The nighttime sky is increasingly illuminated by artificial light sources. Although this ecological light pollution is damaging ecosystems throughout the world, the topic has received relatively little attention. Many nocturnally migrating birds die or lose a large amount of their energy reserves during migration as a result of encountering artificial light sources. This happens, for instance, in the North Sea, where large numbers of nocturnally migrating birds are attracted to the many offsh...

  15. Migrating Fish Bone a Deep Neck Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Wei Yang; Tsung-Ming Chen; Tai-An Chen

    2005-01-01

    Deep neck infections are not uncommon; however, a migrating fish bone is seldom acause of a deep neck abscess. Fish bones are a sharp foreign body and can penetrate theoropharynx or esophagus. However, this rarely occurs. We report a case of deep neckabscess resulting from the intracorporeal migration of a fish bone. Initial radiography andesophagoscopy of the neck were both negative; migration of the bone was ultimately documentedby computed tomography. Surgical exploration was performed via...

  16. Migration, Poverty Reduction Strategies and Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Richard; Sward, Jon

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the specific question of how Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) address migration and its potential to enhance human development at the national level. Based on a review of PRSPs completed since 1999, it argues that migration often remains poorly recognised or analysed in poorer countries in terms of its impacts on poverty reduction, whilst attitudes towards migration in these countries are often highly negative and/or based on limited evidence, esp...

  17. An Econophysics Model for the Migration Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Gheorghiu, Anca

    2012-01-01

    Knowing and modelling the migration phenomena and especially the social and economic consequences have a theoretical and practical importance, being related to their consequences for development, economic progress (or as appropriate, regression), environmental influences etc. One of the causes of migration, especially of the interregional and why not intercontinental, is that resources are unevenly distributed, and from the human perspective there are differences in culture, education, mentality, collective aspirations etc. This study proposes a new econophysics model for the migration phenomena.

  18. Seasonal migration and early childhood development

    OpenAIRE

    Macours, Karen; Vakis, Renos

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides unique evidence of the positive consequences of seasonal migration for investments in early childhood development. We analyse migration in a poor shockprone border region in rural Nicaragua where it offers one of the main household income diversification and risk coping strategies. IV estimates show, somewhat surprisingly, that mother's migration has a positive effect on early cognitive development. We attribute these findings to changes in income and to the intrahousehold...

  19. The Planets Approach to Migration Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Eld; van Wijk, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the Planets approach to migration tool development. The approach consists of enhancing existing migration tools rather than developing tools from scratch. This pragmatic approach is based on the Planets view of the current situation for migration tools and two claims. The first claim is that the market will cover the required tools for commonly used formats. The second claim is that in the long term less tools will be required due to growing use of archiving standard formats...

  20. Migration of Cells in a Social Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savas; Johnston, Darius M.; Bruus, Henrik; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. While this is essential for the basic processes of life such as embryonic development, wound healing and unregulated migration furthermore is implicated in diseases such as cancer, the influence of neighboring cells on the individual remains poorly understood. Previous work on isolated cells has revealed a stereotypical migratory behavior, however many aspects of the migration characteristics of cells in popula...

  1. Spring Bird Migration Phenology in Eilat, Israel

    OpenAIRE

    Reuven Yosef; Mikhail Markovets

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the mean date of first captures and median arrival dates of spring migration for 34 species of birds at Eilat, Israel, revealed that the earlier a species migrates through Eilat, the greater is the inter-annual variation in the total time of its passage. Birds arrive during spring migration in Eilat in four structured and independent waves. The annual fluctuation in the initial arrival dates (initial capture dates) and median dates (median date of all captures), not including reca...

  2. Internal migration and growth in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Etzo, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    The analysis focuses on the impact of interregional migration flows on regional growth rates during the period 1983-2002. A first important result is that migration did affect regional growth rates in Italy. Moreover, the results from the analysis of the two sub-periods, 1983-1992 and 1993-2002, show that the different trends of migration flows during the two decades and their differences in human capital content did affect regional growth in different ways. Both net migration rate and gross ...

  3. A vascular perspective on neuronal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Marta; Kirchmaier, Bettina C; Acker-Palmer, Amparo

    2015-11-01

    During CNS development and adult neurogenesis, immature neurons travel from the germinal zones towards their final destination using cellular substrates for their migration. Classically, radial glia and neuronal axons have been shown to act as physical scaffolds to support neuroblast locomotion in processes known as gliophilic and neurophilic migration, respectively (Hatten, 1999; Marin and Rubenstein, 2003; Rakic, 2003). In adulthood, long distance neuronal migration occurs in a glial-independent manner since radial glia cells differentiate into astrocytes after birth. A series of studies highlight a novel mode of neuronal migration that uses blood vessels as scaffolds, the so-called vasophilic migration. This migration mode allows neuroblast navigation in physiological and also pathological conditions, such as neuronal precursor migration after ischemic stroke or cerebral invasion of glioma tumor cells. Here we review the current knowledge about how vessels pave the path for migrating neurons and how trophic factors derived by glio-vascular structures guide neuronal migration both during physiological as well as pathological processes. PMID:26192337

  4. Demographic situation and population migration problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problem of the Chernobyl accident effect on the population migration in controlled areas of the Ukraine, Belarus and in Russian Federation. Comparison of the data on migration for 1990 and for 1995 has shown considerable growth of the intensity of efflux of rural population at most Ukrainian areas affected due to the Chernobyl accident. Negative migration growth in urban settlements of these regions is marked. Decrease in rural resident migration is observed. Migrant current in Russia is twice increased. Main regions of North-West, Central, North-Caucasus ones in Russia and Donetsk-Dnieper river in the Ukraine. 6 tabs

  5. Colloid migration in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retention of radionuclides for long periods near waste repositories depends upon multiple barriers, one of which is adsorption to immobile solid surfaces. Since small particles and colloidal matter have high adsorption capacities per unit mass and can be mobile in subsurface flows, colloidal transport of waste components requires analysis. Theories for predicting colloid migration through porous media have been developed in the filtration literature. The applicability of filtration theories for predicting particle and colloid transport. Emphasis is on suspended matter much smaller than pore sizes, where physical and chemical forces control migration rather than size dependent physical straining. In general, experimentally verifiable theories exist for particle filtration by clean media, and a sensitivity analysis is possible on particle and media properties and fluid flow rate. When particle aggregates accumulate within pores, media permeability decreases, resulting in flow field alteration and possible radionuclide isolation. An analysis of the limited experimental data available indicates that present theories cannot predict long-term colloid transport when permeability reduction occurs. The coupling of colloid attachment processes and the hydrologic flow processes requires more extensive laboratory field research than has currently been carried out. An emphasis on the fundamental mechanisms is necessary to enhance long-term predictability

  6. Secondary victims of rape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte MØlgaard; Bak, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    Rape is often a very traumatic experience, which affects not only the primary victim (PV) but also his/her significant others. Studies on secondary victims of rape are few and have almost exclusively studied male partners of female rape victims. This study examined the impact of rape on 107 secondary victims, including family members, partners, and friends of male and female rape victims. We found that many respondents found it difficult to support the PV and that their relationship with the PV was often affected by the assault. Furthermore, the sample showed significant levels of traumatization, and it was estimated that approximately one quarter of the respondents suffered from posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD). Degree of traumatization was associated with a more recent assault, higher efforts to support the PV, recurrent thoughts about having been able to prevent the assault, a lack of social support for the respondent, and feeling let down by others. The respondents were generally interested in friend-, family-, and partner-focused interventions, particularly in receiving education about how best to support a rape victim

  7. Secondary aortoduodenal fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Geraci, Franco Pisello, Francesco Li Volsi, Tiziana Facella, Lina Platia, Giuseppe Modica, Carmelo Sciumè

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aorto-duodenal fistulae (ADF are the most frequent aorto-enteric fistulae (80%, presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We report the first case of a man with a secondary aorto-duodenal fistula presenting with a history of persistent occlusive syndrome. A 59-year old man who underwent an aortic-bi-femoral bypass 5 years ago, presented with dyspepsia and biliary vomiting. Computed tomography scan showed in the third duodenal segment the presence of inflammatory tissue with air bubbles between the duodenum and prosthesis, adherent to the duodenum. The patient was submitted to surgery, during which the prosthesis was detached from the duodenum, the intestine failed to close and a gastrojejunal anastomosis was performed. The post-operative course was simple, secondary ADF was a complication (0.3%-2% of aortic surgery. Mechanical erosion of the prosthetic material into the bowel was due to the lack of interposed retroperitoneal tissue or the excessive pulsation of redundantly placed grafts or septic procedures. The third or fourth duodenal segment was most frequently involved. Diagnosis of ADF was difficult. Surgical treatment is always recommended by explorative laparotomy. ADF must be suspected whenever a patient with aortic prosthesis has digestive bleeding or unexplained obstructive syndrome. Rarely the clinical picture of ADF is subtle presenting as an obstructive syndrome and in these cases the principal goal is to effectively relieve the mechanical bowel obstruction.

  8. Secondary aortoduodenal fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Girolamo; Pisello, Franco; Volsi, Francesco Li; Facella, Tiziana; Platia, Lina; Modica, Giuseppe; Sciumè, Carmelo

    2008-01-01

    Aorto-duodenal fistulae (ADF) are the most frequent aorto-enteric fistulae (80%), presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We report the first case of a man with a secondary aorto-duodenal fistula presenting with a history of persistent occlusive syndrome. A 59-year old man who underwent an aortic-bi-femoral bypass 5 years ago, presented with dyspepsia and biliary vomiting. Computed tomography scan showed in the third duodenal segment the presence of inflammatory tissue with air bubbles between the duodenum and prosthesis, adherent to the duodenum. The patient was submitted to surgery, during which the prosthesis was detached from the duodenum, the intestine failed to close and a gastrojejunal anastomosis was performed. The post-operative course was simple, secondary ADF was a complication (0.3%-2%) of aortic surgery. Mechanical erosion of the prosthetic material into the bowel was due to the lack of interposed retroperitoneal tissue or the excessive pulsation of redundantly placed grafts or septic procedures. The third or fourth duodenal segment was most frequently involved. Diagnosis of ADF was difficult. Surgical treatment is always recommended by explorative laparotomy. ADF must be suspected whenever a patient with aortic prosthesis has digestive bleeding or unexplained obstructive syndrome. Rarely the clinical picture of ADF is subtle presenting as an obstructive syndrome and in these cases the principal goal is to effectively relieve the mechanical bowel obstruction. PMID:18200675

  9. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Copenhaver, Sally C. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

  10. Spring crane Grus grus migration through Gallocanta, Spain. I. Daily variations in migration volume

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso López, Juan C.; Alonso López, Javier A.; Cantos, Francisco J.; Bautista, Luis M.

    1990-01-01

    The relations between numbers of Common Cranes Grus grus departing on spring migration and weather, progress of season and course of migration were studied at Gallocanta, NE Spain during February-March 1984 and 1985. Rain, cloudiness and strong headwinds were important factors inhibiting migration. Most cranes migrated in association with the southwestern sector of a high or in the warm sector of a low. Given these fair weather conditions, the number of birds departing was mainly correlated w...

  11. How migration motives change over migration distance: evidence on variation across socioeconomic and demographic groups

    OpenAIRE

    Niedomysl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Migration researchers have long known that peoples’ motives for changing their place of residence vary over migration distance. Typically, short-distance moves are regarded as motivated by housing considerations and longer-distance moves primarily by employment considerations. While this notion forms an important basis for the existing understanding of migration, little empirical work has examined that relationship in more detail. This paper explores how migration motives ...

  12. Gender and Migration in Africa: Female Ethiopian Migration in Post-2008 Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Faiz Omar Mohammad Jamie

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the relatively new phenomenon of female migration in Africa. Towards that end the paper examines contemporary trends of labor migration drawing examples from Asia and other parts of the world for the sake of comparison. The paper also reviews some theoretical and methodological aspects applied in current research on migration particularly in the endeavor to conceptualize female (labor) migration. To further understand the phenomenon the paper makes special focus on the cu...

  13. Managing migration in the IOM’s World migration report 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Campillo Carrete, B.; Gasper, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    The 2008 World Migration Report from the International Organization for Migration is an enormous document that reflects efforts led by business sectors and some sections of governments in rich countries to move away from policy agendas overwhelmingly focused on restriction of international migration, towards a somewhat more open global economic order, and to build acceptance of substantial in-migration to match market demand. This paper illustrates use of methods of discours...

  14. Recovery Migration After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Spatial Concentration and Intensification in the Migration System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Katherine J; Fussell, Elizabeth; DeWaard, Jack

    2015-08-01

    Changes in the human migration systems of the Gulf of Mexico coastline counties affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita provide an example of how climate change may affect coastal populations. Crude climate change models predict a mass migration of "climate refugees," but an emerging literature on environmental migration suggests that most migration will be short-distance and short-duration within existing migration systems, with implications for the population recovery of disaster-stricken places. In this research, we derive a series of hypotheses on recovery migration predicting how the migration system of hurricane-affected coastline counties in the Gulf of Mexico was likely to have changed between the pre-disaster and the recovery periods. We test these hypotheses using data from the Internal Revenue Service on annual county-level migration flows, comparing the recovery period migration system (2007-2009) with the pre-disaster period (1999-2004). By observing county-to-county ties and flows, we find that recovery migration was strong: the migration system of the disaster-affected coastline counties became more spatially concentrated, while flows within it intensified and became more urbanized. Our analysis demonstrates how migration systems are likely to be affected by the more intense and frequent storms anticipated by climate change scenarios, with implications for the population recovery of disaster-affected places. PMID:26084982

  15. Reflection tomography from pre-stack migrated images; Tomographie de reflexion a partir des images migrees avant addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, F.

    1996-10-29

    The application of reflection tomography to data from complex geological structures is very interesting in the hydrocarbons exploration. Indeed, it contributes to localize the hydrocarbons potential traps. The used reflection tomography method is faced with two major difficulties. Travel time picking is difficult or impossible in seismic time sections. The processing of multiple arrival travel times needs an adequate formulation of reflection tomography. In order to solve the first problem, we adopt the approach of the SMART (Sequential Migration Aided Reflection Tomography) method which is an original method for the implementation of migration velocity analysis. The velocity model is automatically calculated by reflection tomography. The kinematic data set for reflection tomography is constructed from pre-stack depth-migrated images that are interpreted in the chosen migration configuration. For the implementation of the SMART method in the common-offset domain, we propose an original formulation of reflection tomography that takes multiple arrival travel times, which are calculated from common-offset migrated images, into account. In this new formulation, we look for a model such that a modelling, which consists in shooting in this model from the source locations with some ray parameters at the source, matches some emergence conditions: for each offset, the rays emerge at the receiver locations (given by the offset) with the same travel times and the same travel time slopes as observed in the associated common-offset section. These conditions constitute the kinematic data set for tomographic inversion. The common-offset travel time slope is the difference between the ray parameter at the receiver and the ray parameter at the source. Therefore, the ray parameter at the source is an unknown and has to be determined together with the model parameters during inversion. (author)

  16. On the radiolysis of ethylene ices by energetic electrons and implications to the extraterrestrial hydrocarbon chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Li [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Maity, Surajit; Abplanalp, Matt; Turner, Andrew; Kaiser, Ralf I., E-mail: ralfk@hawaii.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    The chemical processing of ethylene ices (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) by energetic electrons was investigated at 11 K to simulate the energy transfer processes and synthesis of new molecules induced by secondary electrons generated in the track of galactic cosmic ray particles. A combination of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (solid state) and quadrupole mass spectrometry (gas phase) resulted in the identification of six hydrocarbon molecules: methane (CH{sub 4}), the C2 species acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}), ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}), the ethyl radical (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}), and—for the very first time in ethylene irradiation experiments—the C4 hydrocarbons 1-butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}) and n-butane (C{sub 4}H{sub 10}). By tracing the temporal evolution of the newly formed molecules spectroscopically online and in situ, we were also able to fit the kinetic profiles with a system of coupled differential equations, eventually providing mechanistic information, reaction pathways, and rate constants on the radiolysis of ethylene ices and the inherent formation of smaller (C1) and more complex (C2, C4) hydrocarbons involving carbon-hydrogen bond ruptures, atomic hydrogen addition processes, and radical-radical recombination pathways. We also discuss the implications of these results on the hydrocarbon chemistry on Titan's surface and on ice-coated, methane-bearing interstellar grains as present in cold molecular clouds such as TMC-1.

  17. Co-processing of standard gas oil and biocrude oil to hydrocarbon fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major obstacle in thermochemical biomass conversion to hydrocarbon fuels using pyrolysis has been the high oxygen content and the poor stability of the product oils, which cause them to solidify during secondary processing. We have developed a fractional catalytic pyrolysis process to convert biomass feedstocks into a product termed “biocrude oils” (stable biomass pyrolysis oils) which are distinct from unstable conventional pyrolysis oils. The biocrude oils are stable, low viscosity liquids that are storable at ambient conditions without any significant increases in viscosity; distillable at both atmospheric pressure and under vacuum without char or solid formation. About 15 wt% biocrude oils containing 20–25% oxygen were blended with 85 wt% standard gas oil and co-cracked in an Advanced Catalyst Evaluation (ACE™) unit using fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts to produce hydrocarbon fuels that contain negligible amount of oxygen. For the same conversion of 70% for both the standard gas oil and the biocrude oil/gas oil blends, the product gasoline yield was 44 wt%, light cycle oil (LCO) 17 wt%, heavy cycle oil (HCO) 13 wt%, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) 16 wt%. However, the coke yield for the standard gas oil was 7.06 wt% compared to 6.64–6.81 wt% for the blends. There appeared to be hydrogen transfer from the cracking of the standard gas oil to the biocrude oil which subsequently eliminated the oxygen in the fuel without external hydrogen addition. We have demonstrated for the first time that biomass pyrolysis oils can be successfully converted into hydrocarbons without hydrogenation pretreatment. -- Highlights: ? The co-processed product had less than 1% oxygen content and contained biocarbons determined by 14C analysis. ? The co-processing did not affect the yields of gasoline, LCO, and HCO. ? First demonstration of direct conversion of pyrolysis oils into drop-in hydrocarbon fuels.

  18. Vena cava filter migration: an unappreciated complication. About four cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélénotti, Pauline; Sarlon-Bartoli, Gabrielle; Bartoli, Michel-Alain; Benyamine, Audrey; Thevenin, Benjamin; Muller, Cyril; Serratrice, Jacques; Magnan, Pierre-Edouard; Weiller, Pierre-Jean

    2011-11-01

    Inferior vena cava filter placement is performed to prevent pulmonary risk secondary to deep venous thrombosis. Indications for this treatment are limited to patients experiencing recurrences under well-managed anticoagulant treatment or presenting with contraindication to anticoagulant treatment. Nowadays, as these clinical situations are rare, this device is less and less used, all the more since, for several years now, thrombosis, fracture, or infectious complications as well as filter migration have been reported. Filter migrations are responsible for atypical and varied clinical presentations likely to defer diagnosis. To treat them, the filter is extracted, which is very risky in patients with a thromboembolic history. In our center, during a period of 14 years, we retrospectively collected and studied partial or complete vena cava filter migration cases that had been treated by extraction. We are reporting four very different clinical cases and, more specifically, the second published case of migration to a renal vein, which mimicked a systemic disease. Because of its very atypical clinical presentations, cava filter migration is an unappreciated and certainly underdiagnosed complication. However, this complication must not question cava filter placement when it is justified. In contrast, it prompts early filter extraction or long-term radiological surveillance. PMID:22023951

  19. Analysis and migration of phthalates in infant food packed in recycled paperboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Sonja; Balski, Matthias; Koch, Matthias; Nehls, Irene

    2009-11-25

    The contamination of infant food with substances from its packaging due to migration processes is still a problem. Most recently, great attention was paid to the migration of epoxidized soybean oil (ESBO) and phthalates from twist-off closures into baby food packed in glass jars. Besides, packaging made of recycled fiber materials such as paper and paperboard were found to be the source of contaminants in dry and powdery foodstuffs such as sugar, rice, and maize flour. In this study 20 infant food samples packed in recycled paperboard containers were tested for phthalates and diisopropyl naphthalenes (DIPN), known incorporated substances in recycled paper. Furthermore, the barrier function of different secondary packaging materials (paper and aluminum-coated foil) was investigated. The highest contents of phthalates (mainly diisobutyl phthalate, DiBP) and DIPN in infant food samples were found for those foods packed in inner bags made of paper. Migration experiments were performed under authentic conditions to evaluate possible transfer mechanism (gas phase, direct contact) of phthalate esters into foodstuff. It is shown that paper does not provide an appropriate barrier against migration of semipolar compounds such as phthalates. The air space itself otherwise effectively prevents migration of the less volatile phthalates under the applied conditions. PMID:19877638

  20. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.