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Sample records for saggital optical tomography

  1. Optical Coherence Tomography

    ... Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and MRA) Computed Tomography (CT) Scan Diagnostic Tests and Procedures Echocardiography Electrocardiogram ... Ultrasound Nuclear Stress Test Nuclear Ventriculography Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Stress ... Optical Coherence Tomography | ...

  2. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    Kun-Feng Lin; Jui-che Tsai; Ching-Cheng Chuang; Shyh-Yuan Lee; Yi-Ching Ho; Yao-Sheng Hsieh; Chia-Wei Sun

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed.

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Mogensen, Mette; Themstrup, Lotte; Banzhaf, Christina;

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has developed rapidly since its first realisation in medicine and is currently an emerging technology in the diagnosis of skin disease. OCT is an interferometric technique that detects reflected and backscattered light from tissue and is often described as the...

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides real-time two- and three-dimensional images of scattering samples with micrometer resolution. Mapping the local reflectivity, OCT visualizes the morphology of the sample, in real time or at video rate. In addition......-rate imaging is feasible, which has enabled optical microangiography, i.e., visualization of retinal and chorodial blood flow. Such label-free optical microangiography might be feasible as an adjunct modality to fluorescence-based angiography. In this review, the fundamental principles of OCT imaging and its...

  5. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Mogensen, Mette; Themstrup, Lotte; Banzhaf, Christina;

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has developed rapidly since its first realisation in medicine and is currently an emerging technology in the diagnosis of skin disease. OCT is an interferometric technique that detects reflected and backscattered light from tissue and is often described as the...... optical analogue to ultrasound. The inherent safety of the technology allows for in vivo use of OCT in patients. The main strength of OCT is the depth resolution. In dermatology, most OCT research has turned on non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and non-invasive monitoring of morphological changes in a...

  6. Optical Tomography in Combustion

    Evseev, Vadim

    The new methodology of optical infrared tomography of flames and hot gas flows was developed in the PhD project with a view to future industrial applications. In particular, the methodology for the tomographic reconstruction of an axisymmetric lab flame temperature profile was developed and tested...... in the lab using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques, including a new tomographic measurement scheme, sweeping scanning, having great potential for industrial applications with limited optical access. The results were compared to the reference point measurements on the same flame and...... infrared spectral measurements at several line-of-sights with a view to applications for tomographic measurements on full-scale industrial combustion systems. The system was successfully applied on industrial scale for simultaneous fast exhaust gas temperature measurements in the three optical ports of the...

  7. Amplified Dispersive Optical Tomography

    Goda, Keisuke; Jalali, Bahram

    2008-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be a powerful technique for studying tissue morphology in ophthalmology, cardiology, and endomicroscopy. Its performance is limited by the fundamental trade-off between the imaging sensitivity and acquisition speed -- a predicament common in virtually all imaging systems. In this paper, we circumvent this limit by using distributed Raman post-amplification of the reflection from the sample. We combine the amplification with simultaneously performed dispersive Fourier transformation, a process that maps the optical spectrum into an easily measured time-domain waveform. The Raman amplification enables measurement of weak signals which are otherwise buried in noise. It extends the depth range without sacrificing the acquisition speed or causing damage to the sample. As proof of concept, single-shot imaging with 15 dB improvement in sensitivity at an axial scan rate of 36.6 MHz is demonstrated.

  8. Interleaved optical coherence tomography.

    Lee, Hee Yoon; Sudkamp, Helge; Marvdashti, Tahereh; Ellerbee, Audrey K

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel and cost-effective technique--interleaved optical coherence tomography (iOCT)--to enhance the imaging speed of swept source OCT systems by acquiring data from multiple lateral positions simultaneously during a single wavelength sweep, using a single detector and a virtually imaged phase array (VIPA) as a multi-band demultiplexer. This technique uses spectral encoding to convert coherence length into higher imaging speed; the speed enhancement factor is independent of the source speed or center wavelength, and the effective A-scan rate scales linearly with sweep speed. The optical configuration requires only a change in the sample arm of a traditional OCT system and preserves the axial resolution and fall-off characteristic of a traditional SS-OCT using the same light source. Using 10 kHz, 20 kHz and 100 kHz sources we provide a first demonstration of image speed enhancement factors of up to 12, 6 and 10, respectively, which yield effective A-scan rates of 120 kHz, 120 kHz and 1 MHz for B-scan imaging, with a sensitivity of up to 82.5 dB. We also show that iOCT can image faster dynamics than traditional OCT B-scan imaging and is capable of 3D biological imaging. The iOCT concept suggests a new route to high-speed OCT imaging for laser developers: that is, by focusing on improving the coherence length and linewidth of existing and emerging sources. Hence, iOCT is a nice complement to ongoing research and commercial efforts to enable faster imaging through development of lasers with faster sweep rates, and offers new hope for existing sources with slow sweep rates and potential for enhancement of coherence length to compete with faster sources to achieve high-speed OCT. PMID:24216876

  9. [Optical coherence tomography].

    von Braunmühl, T

    2015-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was introduced in the 1990s in dermatology and is nowadays established as a noninvasive high-resolution technique for the in vivo evaluation of the skin. To date several studies have been successfully demonstrated the application of OCT for various dermatological questions. The main indication for OCT in the daily practice is the noninvasive diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer such as actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. OCT has also been shown to be a valuable tool in treatment monitoring and evaluation of therapeutic success of noninvasive treatment strategies like topical immune modulators or photodynamic treatment. Other potential applications for OCT include inflammatory diseases, microbial or parasitic infestations of the skin, e.g. scabies mites or onychomycosis. In recent years high-definition OCT devices have been developed that can potentially be used for the evaluation of melanocytic lesions and, due to the higher resolution, for the visualization of intrafollicular demodex mites. Furthermore different commercially available devices offer-in addition to the cross-sectional images-a fast-generated horizontal (en face) imaging mode. With respect to resolution and penetration depth the OCT technique is taking a middle position in comparison to other noninvasive imaging devices in dermatology such as sonography and reflectance confocal microscopy. PMID:25809459

  10. Second harmonic optical coherence tomography

    Jiang, Y; Wang, Y; Chen, Z; Jiang, Yi; Tomov, Ivan; Wang, Yimin; Chen, Zhongping

    2004-01-01

    Second harmonic optical coherence tomography, which uses coherence gating of second-order nonlinear optical response of biological tissues for imaging, is described and demonstrated. Femtosecond laser pulses were used to excite second harmonic waves from collagen harvested from rat tail tendon and a reference nonlinear crystal. Second harmonic interference fringe signals were detected and used for image construction. Because of the strong dependence of second harmonic generation on molecular and tissue structures, this technique offers contrast and resolution enhancement to conventional optical coherence tomography.

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography: Advanced Modeling

    Andersen, Peter E.; Thrane, Lars; Yura, Harold T.;

    2013-01-01

    Analytical and numerical models for describing and understanding the light propagation in samples imaged by optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems are presented. An analytical model for calculating the OCT signal based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle valid both for the single- and...

  12. Hyperspectral optical diffraction tomography

    Jung, JaeHwang; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a novel microscopic technique for measuring wavelength-dependent three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of the refractive indices (RIs) of microscopic samples in the visible wavelengths. Employing 3-D quantitative phase microscopy techniques with a wavelength-swept source, 3-D RI tomograms were obtained in the range of 450 - 700 nm with a spectral resolution of a few nanometers. The capability of the technique was demonstrated by measuring the hyperspectral 3-D RI tomograms of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, and hepatocytes. The results demonstrate the potential for label-free molecular specific 3-D tomography of biological samples.

  13. Anterior Segment Tomography with the Cirrus Optical Coherence Tomography

    Rodrigues, Eduardo B.; Margara Johanson; Fernando M Penha

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical acquisition method to examine biological tissues. In recent years, OCT has become an important imaging technology used in diagnosing and following macular pathologies. Further development enabled application of optical coherence tomography in evaluation of the integrity of the nerve fiber layer, optic nerve cupping, anterior chamber angle, or corneal topography. In this manuscript we overview the use of OCT in the clinical practice to enable co...

  14. Optical Microangiography Based on Optical Coherence Tomography

    Reif, Roberto; Wang, Ruikang K.

    Proper homeostasis regulation of in vivo biological systems requires microvascular blood perfusion, which is the process of delivering blood into the tissue's capillary beds. Abnormal tissue vascularization has been associated with various diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurological disorders, wounds, and inflammation. Understanding the changes in the vascular network or microangiography will have an important role in determining the causes and developing potential treatments for these diseases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive method for imaging three-dimensional biological tissues with high resolution (~10 µm) and without requiring the use of contrast agents. In this chapter we review several techniques for using OCT to determine blood flow velocities and the vessel morphology (optical microangiography). Different techniques will be discussed with a brief explanation of their limitations. Also, methods for quantifying these images are presented, as well as the depiction of several applications.

  15. Integrated diffuse optical tomography and photoacoustic tomography: phantom validations

    Li, Xiaoqi; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Ruixin; Yao, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2011-01-01

    We designed, fabricated and tested a novel imaging system that fuses diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) in a single platform. This platform takes advantages of both DOT and PAT, and can potentially provide dual-modality two dimensional functional and cellular images of the breast quantitatively. Here we describe this integrated platform along with initial tissue phantom validations.

  16. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  17. Imaging granulomatous lesions with optical coherence tomography

    Banzhaf, Christina; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2012-01-01

    To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors.......To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors....

  18. High-definition optical coherence tomography

    Boone, Marc; Norrenberg, Sarah; Jemec, Gregor;

    2013-01-01

    High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) is a non-invasive technique for morphological investigation of tissue with cellular resolution filling the imaging gap between reflectance confocal microscopy and conventional optical coherence tomography. The aim of this study is first to...

  19. Anterior Segment Tomography with the Cirrus Optical Coherence Tomography

    Eduardo B. Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT is an optical acquisition method to examine biological tissues. In recent years, OCT has become an important imaging technology used in diagnosing and following macular pathologies. Further development enabled application of optical coherence tomography in evaluation of the integrity of the nerve fiber layer, optic nerve cupping, anterior chamber angle, or corneal topography. In this manuscript we overview the use of OCT in the clinical practice to enable corneal, iris, ciliary body, and angle evaluation and diagnostics.

  20. Optical coherence tomography in dermatology

    Sattler, Elke; Kästle, Raphaela; Welzel, Julia

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive diagnostic method that offers a view into the superficial layers of the skin in vivo in real-time. An infrared broadband light source allows the investigation of skin architecture and changes up to a depth of 1 to 2 mm with a resolution between 15 and 3 μm, depending on the system used. Thus OCT enables evaluation of skin lesions, especially nonmelanoma skin cancers and inflammatory diseases, quantification of skin changes, visualization of parasitic infestations, and examination of other indications such as the investigation of nails. OCT provides a quick and useful diagnostic imaging technique for a number of clinical questions and is a valuable addition or complement to other noninvasive imaging tools such as dermoscopy, high-frequency ultrasound, and confocal laser scan microscopy.

  1. MOEMS optical delay line for optical coherence tomography

    Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical optical coherence tomography, a lab-on-chip for biomedical applications is designed, studied, fabricated and characterized. To fabricate the device standard PolyMUMPS processes is adopted. We report the utilization of electro-optic modulator for a fast scanning optical delay line for time domain optical coherence tomography. Design optimization are performed using Tanner EDA while simulations are performed using COMSOL. The paper summarizes various results and fabrication methodology adopted. The success of the device promises a future hand-held or endoscopic optical coherence tomography for biomedical applications.

  2. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in ophthalmology: introduction.

    Fujimoto, James G; Drexler, Wolfgang; Schuman, Joel S; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2009-03-01

    The Optical Society (OSA) is pleased to present this special issue of Optics Express on "Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in Ophthalmology" as part of the new Interactive Science Publishing (ISP) project. The project is being performed in collaboration with the National Library of Medicine and represents a new paradigm for the publication of digital image and large dataset information. PMID:19259239

  3. The basics of intravascular optical coherence tomography

    Roleder, Tomasz; Jąkała, Jacek; Kałuża, Grzegorz L.; Partyka, Łukasz; Proniewska, Klaudia; Pociask, Elżbieta; Zasada, Wojciech; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Gąsior, Zbigniew; Dudek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has opened new horizons for intravascular coronary imaging. It utilizes near-infrared light to provide a microscopic insight into the pathology of coronary arteries in vivo. Optical coherence tomography is also capable of identifying the chemical composition of atherosclerotic plaques and detecting traits of their vulnerability. At present it is the only tool to measure the thickness of the fibrous cap covering the lipid core of the atheroma, and thus it is ...

  4. Optical coherence tomography: Technique and applications

    Thomsen, Jakob Borup; Sander, Birgit; Mogensen, Mette;

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging modality providing real-time video rate images in two and three dimensions of biological tissues with micrometer resolution. OCT fills the gap between ultrasound and confocal microscopy, since it has a higher resolution than...

  5. Reconstructions in ultrasound modulated optical tomography

    Allmaras, Moritz

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a mathematical model for ultrasound modulated optical tomography and present a simple reconstruction scheme for recovering the spatially varying optical absorption coefficient from scanning measurements with narrowly focused ultrasound signals. Computational results for this model show that the reconstruction of sharp features of the absorption coefficient is possible. A formal linearization of the model leads to an equation with a Fredholm operator, which explains the stability observed in our numerical experiments. © de Gruyter 2011.

  6. Optical coherence tomography. Development, principles, applications

    Fercher, Adolf Friedrich [Medizinische Univ. Wien, Vienna (Austria). ZBMTP - Medizinische Physik

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a review of the development of optical coherence tomography (OCT), its principles and important applications. Basic OCT systems are described and the physical foundations of OCT signal properties and signal recording systems are reviewed. Recent examples of OCT applications in ophthalmology, cardiology, gastroenterology and dermatology outline the relevance of this advanced imaging modality in the medical field. (orig.)

  7. Optical coherence tomography in conjunction with bronchoscopy

    Rodrigues, Ascedio Jose; Takimura, Celso Kiyochi; Lemos Neto, Pedro Alves; Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi, E-mail: ascedio@gmail.com [Servico de Endoscopia Respiratoria, Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of and the potential for using optical coherence tomography in conjunction with conventional bronchoscopy in the evaluation of the airways. Methods: This was a pilot study based on an ex vivo experimental model involving three animals: one adult New Zealand rabbit and two Landrace pigs. An optical coherence tomography imaging catheter was inserted through the working channel of a flexible bronchoscope in order to reach the distal trachea of the animals. Images of the walls of the trachea were systematically taken along its entire length, from the distal to the proximal portion. Results: The imaging catheter was easily adapted to the working channel of the bronchoscope. High-resolution images of cross sections of the trachea were taken in real time, precisely delineating microstructures, such as the epithelium, submucosa, and cartilage, as well as the adventitia of the anterior and lateral tracheal walls. The corresponding layers of the epithelium, mucosa, and cartilage were clearly differentiated. The mucosa, submucosa, and trachealis muscle were clearly identified in the posterior wall. Conclusions: It is feasible to use an optical coherence tomography imaging catheter in combination with a flexible bronchoscope. Optical coherence tomography produces high resolution images that reveal the microanatomy of the trachea, including structures that are typically seen only on images produced by conventional histology. (author)

  8. Advanced modelling of optical coherence tomography systems

    Andersen, Peter E.; Thrane, L.; Yura, H.T.;

    2004-01-01

    Analytical and numerical models for describing and understanding the light propagation in samples imaged by optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems are presented. An analytical model for calculating the OCT signal based on the extended Huygens–Fresnel principle valid both for the single and...

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography for Material Characterization

    Liu, P.

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, contactless and high resolution imaging method, which allows the reconstruction of two or three dimensional depth-resolved images in turbid media. In the past 20 years, OCT has been extensively developed in the field of biomedical diagnostics, wh

  10. Real-time computed optical interferometric tomography

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Ahmad, Adeel; Adie, Steven G.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-03-01

    High-resolution tomography is of great importance to many areas of biomedical imaging, but with it comes several apparent tradeoffs such as a narrowing depth-of-field and increasing optical aberrations. Overcoming these challenges has attracted many hardware and computational solutions. Hardware solutions, though, can become bulky or expensive and computational approaches can require high computing power or large processing times. This study demonstrates memory efficient implementations of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO) - two computational approaches for overcoming the depthof- field limitation and the effect of optical aberrations in optical coherence tomography (OCT). Traditionally requiring lengthy post processing, here we report implementations of ISAM and CAO on a single GPU for real-time in vivo imaging. Real-time, camera-limited ISAM processing enabled reliable acquisition of stable data for in vivo imaging, and CAO processing on the same GPU is shown to quickly correct static aberrations. These algorithmic advances hold the promise for high-resolution volumetric imaging in time-sensitive situations as well as enabling aberrationfree cellular-level volumetric tomography.

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography for the Neurologist.

    Nolan, Rachel C; Narayana, Kannan; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J

    2015-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a relatively new technology that is now routinely and very widely used by ophthalmologists for structural documentation of the optic nerve and retina. In neuro-ophthalmology and neurology, the value of OCT is ever expanding; its role in an increasing number of conditions is being reported in parallel with the advances of the technology. Currently, as a clinical tool, OCT is particularly useful for the structural measurement of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, optic nerve head volumetric analysis, and macular anatomy. Optic neuropathies of varied etiology (particularly from multiple sclerosis) may be the most common clinical indications for neurologists to obtain OCT imaging. Documentation and follow-up of disc edema of varied etiology (papilledema and idiopathic intracranial hypertension), discriminating true disc swelling from pseudopapilledema, and differentiating optic neuropathy from maculopathy are some other examples from clinical practice. PMID:26444402

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography for Material Characterization

    Liu, P

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, contactless and high resolution imaging method, which allows the reconstruction of two or three dimensional depth-resolved images in turbid media. In the past 20 years, OCT has been extensively developed in the field of biomedical diagnostics, while OCT in the non-destructive testing (NDT) field is lagging far behind. The aim of this thesis is to use OCT as a novel NDT technique for material structure characterization and damage detection....

  13. Dynamic light scattering optical coherence tomography

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Jiang, James Y.; Zhu, Bo; Boas, David A.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce an integration of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for high-resolution 3D imaging of heterogeneous diffusion and flow. DLS analyzes fluctuations in light scattered by particles to measure diffusion or flow of the particles, and OCT uses coherence gating to collect light only scattered from a small volume for high-resolution structural imaging. Therefore, the integration of DLS and OCT enables high-resolution 3D imaging of diffusion and flow. W...

  14. Optical coherence tomography investigations of ceramic lumineers

    Fernandes, Luana O.; Graça, Natalia D. R. L.; Melo, Luciana S. A.; Silva, Claudio H. V.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    Lumineers are veneer laminates used as an alternative for aesthetic dental solutions of the highest quality, but the only current means of its performance assessment is visual inspection. The objective of this study was to use the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique working in spectral domain to analyze in vivo in a single patient, 14 lumineers 180 days after cementation. It was possible to observe images in various kinds of changes in the cementing line and the laminate. It was concluded that the OCT is an effective and promising method to clinical evaluation of the cementing line in lumineers.

  15. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  16. Adaptive wide-field optical tomography

    Venugopal, Vivek; Intes, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    We describe a wide-field optical tomography technique, which allows the measurement-guided optimization of illumination patterns for enhanced reconstruction performances. The iterative optimization of the excitation pattern aims at reducing the dynamic range in photons transmitted through biological tissue. It increases the number of measurements collected with high photon counts resulting in a dataset with improved tomographic information. Herein, this imaging technique is applied to time-resolved fluorescence molecular tomography for preclinical studies. First, the merit of this approach is tested by in silico studies in a synthetic small animal model for typical illumination patterns. Second, the applicability of this approach in tomographic imaging is validated in vitro using a small animal phantom with two fluorescent capillaries occluded by a highly absorbing inclusion. The simulation study demonstrates an improvement of signal transmitted (˜2 orders of magnitude) through the central portion of the small animal model for all patterns considered. A corresponding improvement in the signal at the emission wavelength by 1.6 orders of magnitude demonstrates the applicability of this technique for fluorescence molecular tomography. The successful discrimination and localization (˜1 mm error) of the two objects with higher resolution using the optimized patterns compared with nonoptimized illumination establishes the improvement in reconstruction performance when using this technique.

  17. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  18. Optical coherence tomography technology and applications

    Fujimoto, James

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the optical analog of ultrasound imaging and is a powerful imaging technique that enables non-invasive, in vivo, high resolution, cross-sectional imaging in biological tissue.  Between 30 to 40 Million OCT imaging procedures are performed per year in ophthalmology.  The overall market is estimated at more than 0.5 Billion USD.  A new generation OCT technology was developed, dramatically increasing resolution and speed, achieving in vivo optical biopsy, i.e. the visualization of tissue architectural morphology in situ and in real time.  Functional extensions of OCT technology enable non-invasive, depth resolved functional assessment and imaging of tissue.  The book introduces OCT technology and applications not only from an optical and technological viewpoint, but also from the biomedical and clinical perspective. This second edition is widely extended and covers significantly more topics then the first edition of this book. The chapters are written leading intern...

  19. An Optical Tomography System Using a Digital Signal Processor

    Mohd Hafiz Fazalul Rahiman; Chiam Kok Thiam; Ruzairi Abdul Rahim

    2008-01-01

    The use of a personal computer together with a Data Acquisition System (DAQ) as the processing tool in optical tomography systems has been the norm ever since the beginning of process tomography. However, advancements in silicon fabrication technology allow nowadays the fabrication of powerful Digital Signal Processors (DSP) at a reasonable cost. This allows this technology to be used in an optical tomography system since data acquisition and processing can be performed within the DSP. Thus, ...

  20. Optical tomography of the aurora and EISCAT

    H. U. Frey

    Full Text Available Tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional auroral arc emission is used to obtain vertical and horizontal distributions of the optical auroral emission. Under the given experimental conditions with a very limited angular range and a small number of observers, algebraic reconstruction methods generally yield better results than transform techniques. Different algebraic reconstruction methods are tested with an auroral arc model and the best results are obtained with an iterative least-square method adapted from emission-computed tomography. The observation geometry used during a campaign in Norway in 1995 is tested with the arc model and root-mean-square errors, to be expected under the given geometrical conditions, are calculated. Although optimum geometry was not used, root-mean-square errors of less than 2% for the images and of the order of 30% for the distribution could be obtained. The method is applied to images from real observations. The correspondence of original pictures and projections of the reconstructed volume is discussed, and emission profiles along magnetic field lines through the three-dimensionally reconstructed arc are calibrated into electron density profiles with additional EISCAT measurements. Including a background profile and the temporal changes of the electron density due to recombination, good agreement can be obtained between measured profiles and the time-sequence of calculated profiles. These profiles are used to estimate the conductivity distribution in the vicinity of the EISCAT site. While the radar can only probe the ionosphere along the radar beam, the three-dimensional tomography enables conductivity estimates in a large area around the radar site.

    Key words. Tomography · Aurora · EISCAT · Ionosphere · Conductivity

  1. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography

    Gutin, Mikhail; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an advanced method of noninvasive infrared imaging of tissues in depth. Heretofore, commercial OCT systems for 3D imaging have been designed principally for external ophthalmological examination. As explained below, such systems have been based on a one-dimensional OCT principle, and in the operation of such a system, 3D imaging is accomplished partly by means of a combination of electronic scanning along the optical (Z) axis and mechanical scanning along the two axes (X and Y) orthogonal to the optical axis. In 3D OCT, 3D imaging involves a form of electronic scanning (without mechanical scanning) along all three axes. Consequently, the need for mechanical adjustment is minimal and the mechanism used to position the OCT probe can be correspondingly more compact. A 3D OCT system also includes a probe of improved design and utilizes advanced signal- processing techniques. Improvements in performance over prior OCT systems include finer resolution, greater speed, and greater depth of field.

  2. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Theory

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, and inexpensive imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to probe tissue optical properties. Regional variations in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations as well as blood flow and oxygen consumption can be imaged by monitoring spatiotemporal variations in the absorption spectra. For brain imaging, this provides DOT unique abilities to directly measure the hemodynamic, metabolic, and neuronal responses to cells (neurons), and tissue and organ activations with high temporal resolution and good tissue penetration. DOT can be used as a stand-alone modality or can be integrated with other imaging modalities such as fMRI/MRI, PET/CT, and EEG/MEG in studying neurophysiology and pathology. This book chapter serves as an introduction to the basic theory and principles of DOT for neuroimaging. It covers the major aspects of advances in neural optical imaging including mathematics, physics, chemistry, reconstruction algorithm, instrumentation, image-guided spectroscopy, neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, and clinical applications.

  3. Optical Tomography of Polydisperse Dry Foam

    Chieco, Anthony; Feitosa, Klebert; Korda, P. T.; Roth, A. E.; Durian, D. J.

    2011-11-01

    Dry foam is a disordered packing of bubbles that distort into familiar polyhedral shapes. We have implemented a method that uses optical axial tomography to reconstruct the internal structure of a dry foam in three dimensions. The technique consists of taking a series of photographs of the dry foam against a uniformly illuminated background at successive angles. By summing the projections we create images of the cross section of the foam and analyze them to locate the Plateau borders and vertices. The vertices are then connected according to Plateau's rules to reconstruct the internal structure of the foam. Using this technique we are able to visualize a large number of bubbles of real 3D foams and obtain statistics of faces and edges. We gratefully acknowledge support from DOD-ASSURE/NSF-REU grant # DMR-0851367.

  4. Nanoparticles for enhanced contrast optical coherence tomography

    Maule, César D.; Quaresma, Pedro; Carvalho, Patrícia A.; Jorge, Pedro; Pereira, Eulália; Rosa, Carla C.

    2008-09-01

    Recently the area of bioimaging has benefited from new types of image enhancing agents such as quantum dots, carbon nanotubes and other nanoparticles. Cellular or even molecular level resolution has been achieved with different techniques during these last years (i.a. Fluorescence microscopy, PET/CT scan, AFM). Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as an imaging technique should also profit from newly developed probes. In this work we explored the tunable properties of different types of nanoparticles as contrast enhancers in OCT applications. We mainly studied the development and characteristics of metallic nanoparticles with tunable properties: gold nanoshells made of a silica core coated with a gold shell. Nanoshell and nanoparticles processing techniques are discussed, as well as their optimization for designing particles with specific absorption and scattering characteristics, and its use in OCT imaging.

  5. Optical Coherence Tomography for Tracking Canvas Deformation

    Preliminary results of the application of optical coherence tomography (OCT), in particular in its spectral mode (SOCT), to tracking of deformations in paintings on canvas caused by periodical humidity changes are presented. The setup is able to monitor the position of a chosen point at the surface of a painting with micrometre precision, simultaneously in three dimensions, every 100 seconds. This allows recording of deformations associated with crack formation. For the particular painting model examined, it was shown that the surface moves in-plane towards the corner, and bulges outwards (Z-direction) in response to a rise in humidity. Subsequent to the first humidification/drying cycle, translation in the Z-direction is decreased, whilst in-plane translations increase somewhat. It was also shown that the response of the painting on canvas begins immediately on changing the relative humidity in the surroundings.

  6. Current status of optical coherence tomography.

    Inami, Shigenobu; Wang, Zuoyan; Ming-Juan, Zhang; Takano, Masamichi; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2011-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel imaging technology based on low-coherence interferometry that use near-infrared light in real-time, and allows cross-sectional in-situ visualization of the vessel wall at the microscopic level. OCT provides 10-fold higher resolution than intravascular ultrasound which is currently the most used modality for intra-coronary imaging. OCT offers the obvious advantages when characterizing precise plaque microstructure and distinguishing various type of plaques. OCT is also being assessed for its potential role in the understanding of neointimal coverage, vascular healing and the progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vasculature after stenting on the micron scale. These unique capabilities could be helpful in guiding coronary management and interventions. Recent improvement in next generation OCT technology, such as frequency-domain OCT, will allow for a simple imaging procedure, providing more useful information and complementing other modalities on both clinical and research applications for the cardiologists. PMID:24122583

  7. Optical coherence tomography examination of hair

    Gong, Wei; Huang, Zheng; Xu, Jianshu; Yang, Hongqin; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Human hair is a keratinous tissue composed mostly of flexible keratin, which can form a complex architecture consisting of distinct compartments or units (e.g. hair bulb, inner root sheath, shaft). Variations in hair shaft morphology can reflect ethnical diversity, but may also indicate internal diseases, nutritional deficiency, or hair and scalp disorders. Hair shaft abnormalities in cross section and diameter, as well as ultramorphological characterization and follicle shapes, might be visualized non-invasively by high-speed 2D and 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT). In this study, swept source OCT (ThorLabs) was used to examine human hair. Preliminary results showed that the high-speed OCT was a suitable and promising tool for non-invasive analysis of hair conditions.

  8. Optical coherence tomography for diagnosing periodontal disease

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Everett, Matthew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.; Nathel, Howard

    1997-05-01

    We have, in this preliminary study, investigated the use of optical coherence tomography for diagnosis of periodontal disease. We took in vitro OCT images of the dental and periodontal tissues from a young pig and compared them to histological sections. These images distinguish tooth and soft tissue relationships that are important in diagnosing and assessing periodontal disease. We have imaged the attachment of gingiva to the tooth surface and located the cemento-enamel junction. This junction is an important reference point for defining attachment level in the diagnosis of periodontal disease. the boundary between enamel and dentin is also visible for most of the length of the anatomical crown, allowing quantitation of enamel thickness and character.

  9. Introduction: Advances in Optical Coherence Tomography, Photoacoustic Imaging, and Microscopy

    Li, X; Beard, P.C.; Georgakoudi, I.

    2010-01-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue, “Advances in Optical Coherence Tomography, Photoacoustic Imaging, and Microscopy,” which combines three technical areas from the 2010 Optical Society of America (OSA), Biomedical Optics (BIOMED) Topical Meeting held on 11–14 April in Miami, Florida, and includes contributions from conference attendees.

  10. EDITORIAL: Optical tomography and digital holography

    Coupland, Jeremy; Lobera, Julia

    2008-07-01

    the resolution now places a limit on the size of the object that can be recorded. Some 60 years after the pioneering work of Gabor, digital imaging and associated computer technology offers a step change in capability with which to further exploit holography. Modern image sensors are now available with almost 30 million photosensitive elements, which corresponds to a staggering 100-fold increase compared to standard television images. At the same time personal computers have been optimized for imaging and graphics applications and this allows more sophisticated algorithms to be used in the reconstruction process. Although resolution still falls short of the materials used for optical holography, the ability to process data numerically generally outweighs this drawback and presents us with a host of new opportunities. Faced with the ability to record and process holograms numerically, it is natural to ask the question 'what information is present within recordings of scattered light?'. In fact this question could be posed by anyone using light, or indeed any other wave disturbance, for measurement purposes. For the case of optical holography, Wolf published his answer in 1969 [6], showing that for the case of weak scattering (small perturbations) and plane wave illumination, the amplitude and phase of each plane wave within the scattered field are proportional to those of a periodic variation in the refractive index contrast (i.e. a Bragg grating). This Fourier decomposition of the object was published almost simultaneously by Dandliker and Weiss [7], who also provided a graphical illustration of the technique. These works are the basis of optical tomography and provide us with the link between holographic data and 3D form. Digital holographic reconstruction and optical tomography was the theme of an international workshop [8] held in Loughborough in 2007, and many of the topics debated at the workshop have become the subject of the papers in this issue. In general

  11. Ultrathin lensed fiber-optic probe for optical coherence tomography.

    Qiu, Y; Wang, Y; Belfield, K D; Liu, X

    2016-06-01

    We investigated and validated a novel method to develop ultrathin lensed fiber-optic (LFO) probes for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. We made the LFO probe by attaching a segment of no core fiber (NCF) to the distal end of a single mode fiber (SMF) and generating a curved surface at the tip of the NCF using the electric arc of a fusion splicer. The novel fabrication approach enabled us to control the length of the NCF and the radius of the fiber lens independently. By strategically choosing these two parameters, the LFO probe could achieve a broad range of working distance and depth of focus for different OCT applications. A probe with 125μm diameter and lateral resolution up to 10μm was demonstrated. The low-cost, disposable and robust LFO probe is expected to have great potential for interstitial OCT imaging. PMID:27375934

  12. Optical coherence tomography used for internal biometrics

    Chang, Shoude; Sherif, Sherif; Mao, Youxin; Flueraru, Costel

    2007-06-01

    Traditional biometric technologies used for security and person identification essentially deal with fingerprints, hand geometry and face images. However, because all these technologies use external features of human body, they can be easily fooled and tampered with by distorting, modifying or counterfeiting these features. Nowadays, internal biometrics which detects the internal ID features of an object is becoming increasingly important. Being capable of exploring under-skin structure, optical coherence tomography (OCT) system can be used as a powerful tool for internal biometrics. We have applied fiber-optic and full-field OCT systems to detect the multiple-layer 2D images and 3D profile of the fingerprints, which eventually result in a higher discrimination than the traditional 2D recognition methods. More importantly, the OCT based fingerprint recognition has the ability to easily distinguish artificial fingerprint dummies by analyzing the extracted layered surfaces. Experiments show that our OCT systems successfully detected the dummy, which was made of plasticene and was used to bypass the commercially available fingerprint scanning system with a false accept rate (FAR) of 100%.

  13. Optical coherence tomography for endodontic imaging

    van Soest, G.; Shemesh, H.; Wu, M.-K.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Wesselink, P. R.

    2008-02-01

    In root canal therapy, complications frequently arise as a result of root fracture or imperfect cleaning of fins and invaginations. To date, there is no imaging method for nondestructive in vivo evaluation of the condition of the root canal, during or after treatment. There is a clinical need for a technique to detect defects before they give rise to complications. In this study we evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to image root canal walls, and its capacity to identify complicating factors in root canal treatment. While the potential of OCT to identify caries has been explored before, endodontic imaging has not been reported. We imaged extracted lower front teeth after endodontic preparation and correlated these images to histological sections. A 3D OCT pullback scan was made with an endoscopic rotating optical fiber probe inside the root canal. All oval canals, uncleaned fins, risk zones, and one perforation that were detected by histology were also imaged by OCT. As an example of an area where OCT has clinical potential, we present a study of vertical root fracture identification with OCT.

  14. Optical Magnetic Induction Tomography of the Heart

    Marmugi, Luca; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-04-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) affects a significant fraction of the ageing population, causing a high level of morbidity and mortality. Despite its significance, the causes of AF are still not uniquely identified. This, combined with the lack of precise diagnostic and guiding tools, makes the clinical treatment of AF sub-optimal. We identify magnetic induction tomography as the most promising technique for the investigation of the causes of fibrillation and for its clinical practice. We therefore propose a novel optical instrument based on optical atomic magnetometers, fulfilling the requirements for diagnostic mapping of the heart’s conductivity. The feasibility of the device is here discussed in view of the final application. Thanks to the potential of atomic magnetometers for miniaturisation and extreme sensitivity at room temperature, a new generation of compact and non-invasive diagnostic instrumentation, with both bedside and intra-operative operation capability, is envisioned. Possible scenarios both in clinical practice and biomedical research are then discussed. The flexibility of the system makes it promising also for application in other fields, such as neurology and oncology.

  15. Optical clearing of unsectioned specimens for three-dimensional imaging via optical transmission and emission tomography

    Oldham, Mark; Sakhalkar, Harshad; Oliver, Tim; Johnson, G. Allan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Optical computed tomography (optical-CT) and optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) are new techniques that enable unprecedented high-resolution 3-D multimodal imaging of tissue structure and function. Applications include imaging macroscopic gene expression and microvasculature structure in unsectioned biological specimens up to 8 cm3. A key requisite for these imaging techniques is effective sample preparation including optical clearing, which enables light transport through the...

  16. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography (3D OCT) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Applied Science Innovations, Inc. proposes a new tool of 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) for cellular level imaging at video frame rates and dramatically...

  17. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography (3D OCT) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Applied Science Innovations, Inc. proposes to develop a new tool of 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) for cellular level imaging at video frame rates and...

  18. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  19. Complete denture analyzed by optical coherence tomography

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Todea, Carmen; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-02-01

    The complete dentures are currently made using different technologies. In order to avoid deficiencies of the prostheses made using the classical technique, several alternative systems and procedures were imagined, directly related to the material used and also to the manufacturing technology. Thus, at the present time, there are several injecting systems and technologies on the market, that use chemoplastic materials, which are heat cured (90-100°C), in dry or wet environment, or cold cured (below 60°C). There are also technologies that plasticize a hard cured material by thermoplastic processing (without any chemical changes) and then inject it into a mold. The purpose of this study was to analyze the existence of possible defects in several dental prostheses using a non invasive method, before their insertion in the mouth. Different dental prostheses, fabricated from various materials were investigated using en-face optical coherence tomography. In order to discover the defects, the scanning was made in three planes, obtaining images at different depths, from 0,01 μm to 2 mm. In several of the investigated prostheses we found defects which may cause their fracture. These defects are totally included in the prostheses material and can not be vizualised with other imagistic methods. In conclusion, en-face OCT is an important investigative tool for the dental practice.

  20. Capabilities of optical coherence tomography in laryngology

    Shakhov, Andrei; Terentjeva, Anna; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Snopova, Ludmila; Chumakov, Yuri; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Sergeev, Alexander M.

    1999-06-01

    We present first result of using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) in complex clinical studies in laryngology. Mucosa of the upper and middle portions of larynx is of special interest for OCT applications: it is clinically important, easily accessed by an endoscopic OCT probe, and possesses a well defined and rich tomographic structure. We have examined several tens of patients with abnormalities in vocal folds. The diagnosis was made based on clinical data including laryngoscopy and finally confirmed morphologically. When examining larynx mucosa, an endoscopic OCT probe has been introduced through a standard laryngoscope lumen, so that OCT imaging has been performed in parallel with visual observation. The OCT studies have demonstrated that in comparison with stratified healthy mucosa, carcinomatous regions have no tomographically differentiated structure, thus allowing one to exactly define the border of a tumor. Vocal nodules are imaged as poorly scattering regions without clear boundaries under preserved epithelium. Cysts of gland mucosa are seen with OCT as sharply delineated shadows at the depth of several hundred micrometers. We have also examined several patients with carcinoma after a course of radiation therapy and observed different changes in OCT images of adjoining epithelium corresponding to metaplasia, hyperplasia, and sclerosis.

  1. Quantitative contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography

    We have developed a model to accurately quantify the signals produced by exogenous scattering agents used for contrast-enhanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). This model predicts distinct concentration-dependent signal trends that arise from the underlying physics of OCT detection. Accordingly, we show that real scattering particles can be described as simplified ideal scatterers with modified scattering intensity and concentration. The relation between OCT signal and particle concentration is approximately linear at concentrations lower than 0.8 particle per imaging voxel. However, at higher concentrations, interference effects cause signal to increase with a square root dependence on the number of particles within a voxel. Finally, high particle concentrations cause enough light attenuation to saturate the detected signal. Predictions were validated by comparison with measured OCT signals from gold nanorods (GNRs) prepared in water at concentrations ranging over five orders of magnitude (50 fM to 5 nM). In addition, we validated that our model accurately predicts the signal responses of GNRs in highly heterogeneous scattering environments including whole blood and living animals. By enabling particle quantification, this work provides a valuable tool for current and future contrast-enhanced in vivo OCT studies. More generally, the model described herein may inform the interpretation of detected signals in modalities that rely on coherence-based detection or are susceptible to interference effects

  2. Quantitative contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography

    Winetraub, Yonatan; SoRelle, Elliott D.; Liba, Orly; de la Zerda, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a model to accurately quantify the signals produced by exogenous scattering agents used for contrast-enhanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). This model predicts distinct concentration-dependent signal trends that arise from the underlying physics of OCT detection. Accordingly, we show that real scattering particles can be described as simplified ideal scatterers with modified scattering intensity and concentration. The relation between OCT signal and particle concentration is approximately linear at concentrations lower than 0.8 particle per imaging voxel. However, at higher concentrations, interference effects cause signal to increase with a square root dependence on the number of particles within a voxel. Finally, high particle concentrations cause enough light attenuation to saturate the detected signal. Predictions were validated by comparison with measured OCT signals from gold nanorods (GNRs) prepared in water at concentrations ranging over five orders of magnitude (50 fM to 5 nM). In addition, we validated that our model accurately predicts the signal responses of GNRs in highly heterogeneous scattering environments including whole blood and living animals. By enabling particle quantification, this work provides a valuable tool for current and future contrast-enhanced in vivo OCT studies. More generally, the model described herein may inform the interpretation of detected signals in modalities that rely on coherence-based detection or are susceptible to interference effects.

  3. Quantitative contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography

    Winetraub, Yonatan; SoRelle, Elliott D. [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Biophysics Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Liba, Orly [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zerda, Adam de la [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Biophysics Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a model to accurately quantify the signals produced by exogenous scattering agents used for contrast-enhanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). This model predicts distinct concentration-dependent signal trends that arise from the underlying physics of OCT detection. Accordingly, we show that real scattering particles can be described as simplified ideal scatterers with modified scattering intensity and concentration. The relation between OCT signal and particle concentration is approximately linear at concentrations lower than 0.8 particle per imaging voxel. However, at higher concentrations, interference effects cause signal to increase with a square root dependence on the number of particles within a voxel. Finally, high particle concentrations cause enough light attenuation to saturate the detected signal. Predictions were validated by comparison with measured OCT signals from gold nanorods (GNRs) prepared in water at concentrations ranging over five orders of magnitude (50 fM to 5 nM). In addition, we validated that our model accurately predicts the signal responses of GNRs in highly heterogeneous scattering environments including whole blood and living animals. By enabling particle quantification, this work provides a valuable tool for current and future contrast-enhanced in vivo OCT studies. More generally, the model described herein may inform the interpretation of detected signals in modalities that rely on coherence-based detection or are susceptible to interference effects.

  4. Anterior Eye Imaging with Optical Coherence Tomography

    Huang, David; Li, Yan; Tang, Maolong

    The development of corneal and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology has advanced rapidly in recently years. The scan geometry and imaging wavelength are both important choices to make in designing anterior segment OCT systems. Rectangular scan geometry offers the least image distortion and is now used in most anterior OCT systems. The wavelength of OCT light source affects resolution and penetration. An optimal choice of the OCT imaging wavelength (840, 1,050, or 1,310 nm) depends on the application of interest. Newer generation Fourier-domain OCT technology can provide scan speed 100-1000 times faster than the time-domain technology. Various commercial anterior OCT systems are available on the market. A wide spectrum of diagnostic and surgical applications using anterior segment OCT had been investigated, including mapping of corneal and epithelial thicknesses, keratoconus screening, measuring corneal refractive power, corneal surgery planning and evaluation in LASIK, intracorneal ring implantation, assessment of angle closure glaucoma, anterior chamber biometry and intraocular lens implants, intraocular lens power calculation, and eye bank donor cornea screening.

  5. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography detection method

    Everett, M J; Sathyam, U S; Colston, B W; DaSilva, L B; Fried, D; Ragadio, J N; Featherstone, J D B

    1999-05-12

    This study demonstrates the potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for non-invasive in vivo detection and characterization of early, incipient caries lesions. PS-OCT generates cross-sectional images of biological tissue while measuring the effect of the tissue on the polarization state of incident light. Clear discrimination between regions of normal and demineralized enamel is first shown in PS-OCT images of bovine enamel blocks containing well-characterized artificial lesions. High-resolution, cross-sectional images of extracted human teeth are then generated that clearly discriminate between the normal and carious regions on both the smooth and occlusal surfaces. Regions of the teeth that appeared to be demineralized in the PS-OCT images were verified using histological thin sections examined under polarized light microscopy. The PS-OCT system discriminates between normal and carious regions by measuring the polarization state of the back-scattered 1310 nm light, which is affected by the state of demineralization of the enamel. Demineralization of enamel increases the scattereing coefficient, thus depolarizing the incident light. This study shows that PS-OCT has great potential for the detection, characterization, and monitoring of incipient caries lesions.

  6. Optical coherence tomography and Doppler optical coherence tomography in the gastrointestinal tract

    Eugen Osiac; Adrian S(a)ftoiu; Dan Ionut Gheonea; Ion Mandrila; Radu Angelescu

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography(OCT)is a noninvasive,high-resolution,high-potential imaging method that has recently been introduced into medical investigations.A growing number of studies have used this technique in the field of gastroenterology in order to assist classical analyses.Lately,3D-imaging and Doppler capabilities have been developed in different configurations,which make this type of investigation more attractive.This paper reviews the principles and characteristics of OCT and Doppler-OCT in connection with analyses of the detection of normal and pathological structures,and with the possibility to investigate angiogenesis in the gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Three-dimensional multifunctional optical coherence tomography for skin imaging

    Li, En; Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Kasaragod, Deepa; Sasaoka, Tomoko; Yamanari, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualizes cross-sectional microstructures of biological tissues. Recent developments of multifunctional OCT (MF-OCT) provides multiple optical contrasts which can reveal currently unknown tissue properties. In this contribution we demonstrate multifunctional OCT specially designed for dermatological investigation. And by utilizing it to measure four different body parts of in vivo human skin, three-dimensional scattering OCT, OCT angiography, polarization uniformity tomography, and local birefringence tomography images were obtained by a single scan. They respectively contrast the structure and morphology, vasculature, melanin content and collagen traits of the tissue.

  8. Optical characterization of vocal folds using optical coherence tomography

    Lüerßen, Kathrin; Lubatschowski, Holger; Radicke, Nicole; Ptok, Martin

    2006-02-01

    The current standard procedure to ensure the diagnosis, if tissue is malignant, is still an invasive one. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new non-invasive method to investigate biological tissue. In this study OCT was used on porcine and on human vocal folds. The optical penetration depth of the used radiation is up to 2 mm. Three different OCT application systems were used. The first is a high resolution OCT, which works in contact mode. It was used to examine porcine vocal folds ex vivo. Porcine vocal folds were assigned to defined areas and examined by OCT in contact mode followed by traditional histo-morphological analysis. The second OCT is fiber based. It also works in contact mode. Images of human vocal folds were done in contact mode. They were compared with a typical histo-morphological image of a human vocal fold. The third application system works in non contact to the tissue. It was integrated in a conventional laryngoscope. Human vocal folds were examined in vivo. Single layers of the vocal folds could be distinguished from each other with all used systems. Pathological alterations could be seen. Imaging is possible in real time. General anaesthesia is not necessary. OCT makes it possible to get a view under the surface of the vocal fold without being invasive.

  9. Nano-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Zam, Azhar; Leahy, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Depth resolved label-free detection of structural changes with nanoscale sensitivity is an outstanding problem in the biological and physical sciences and has significant applications in both the fundamental research and healthcare diagnostics arenas. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel label-free depth resolved sensing technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect structural changes at the nanoscale. Structural components of the 3D object, spectrally encoded in the remitted light, are transformed from the Fourier domain into each voxel of the 3D OCT image without compromising sensitivity. Spatial distribution of the nanoscale structural changes in the depth direction is visualized in just a single OCT scan. This label free approach provides new possibilities for depth resolved study of pathogenic and physiologically relevant molecules in the body with high sensitivity and specificity. It offers a powerful opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Experimental results show the ability of the approach to differentiate structural changes of 30 nm in nanosphere aggregates, located at different depths, from a single OCT scan, and structural changes less than 30 nm in time from two OCT scans. Application for visualization of the structure of human skin in vivo is also demonstrated.Depth resolved label-free detection of structural changes with nanoscale sensitivity is an outstanding problem in the biological and physical sciences and has significant applications in both the fundamental research and healthcare diagnostics arenas. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel label-free depth resolved sensing technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect structural changes at the nanoscale. Structural components of the 3D object, spectrally encoded in the remitted light, are transformed from the Fourier domain into each voxel of the 3D OCT image without compromising sensitivity. Spatial distribution of the nanoscale

  10. Coherent noise remover for optical projection tomography

    Shi, Liangliang; Dong, Di; Yang, Yujie; Wang, Jun; Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) is a 3-Dimentional (3D) imaging technique for small specimens between 1mm and 10mm in size. Due to its high resolution and whole-body imaging ability, OPT has been widely used for imaging of small specimens such as murine embryos, murine organs, zebra fish, and plant sections. During an OPT imaging experiment, the ring artifacts are very common which severely impact the image quality of OPT. A ring artifact is caused by a bad pixel on the camera, or impurities on surface of lens and index matching vessel. Here we term these noises as coherent noise because they stay in the same image region during an OPT experiment. Currently, there is still no effective method to remove coherent noises. To address this problem, we propose a novel method to suppress the coherent noises before 3D OPT reconstruction. Our method consists of two steps: 1) find bad pixel positions on a blank image without specimen by using threshold segmentation, then fix the bad pixels on the projection image by using average of their neighbor pixels, 2) remove remained coherent noises on the sinogram by using Variational Coherent noise Remover (VSNR) method. After the two steps, lots of method can be used to generate the tomographic slices from the modified sinograms. We apply our method to a mouse heart imaging with our home-made OPT system. The experimental results show that our method has a good suppression on coherent noise and greatly improves the image quality. The innovation of our method is that we remove coherent noise automatically from both projection image and sinogram and they complement each other.

  11. Three dimensional time reversal optical tomography

    Wu, Binlin; Cai, W.; Alrubaiee, M.; Xu, M.; Gayen, S. K.

    2011-03-01

    Time reversal optical tomography (TROT) approach is used to detect and locate absorptive targets embedded in a highly scattering turbid medium to assess its potential in breast cancer detection. TROT experimental arrangement uses multi-source probing and multi-detector signal acquisition and Multiple-Signal-Classification (MUSIC) algorithm for target location retrieval. Light transport from multiple sources through the intervening medium with embedded targets to the detectors is represented by a response matrix constructed using experimental data. A TR matrix is formed by multiplying the response matrix by its transpose. The eigenvectors with leading non-zero eigenvalues of the TR matrix correspond to embedded objects. The approach was used to: (a) obtain the location and spatial resolution of an absorptive target as a function of its axial position between the source and detector planes; and (b) study variation in spatial resolution of two targets at the same axial position but different lateral positions. The target(s) were glass sphere(s) of diameter ~9 mm filled with ink (absorber) embedded in a 60 mm-thick slab of Intralipid-20% suspension in water with an absorption coefficient μa ~ 0.003 mm-1 and a transport mean free path lt ~ 1 mm at 790 nm, which emulate the average values of those parameters for human breast tissue. The spatial resolution and accuracy of target location depended on axial position, and target contrast relative to the background. Both the targets could be resolved and located even when they were only 4-mm apart. The TROT approach is fast, accurate, and has the potential to be useful in breast cancer detection and localization.

  12. Carious growth monitoring with optical coherence tomography

    Freitas, A. Z.; Zezell, D. M.; Mayer, M. P. A.; Ribeiro, A. C.; Gomes, A. S. L.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography was used to monitor subsurface caries evolution process in vitro. Human tooth was used and bacteria were employed to induce caries lesions. Twenty-five human third molars, were used in this study. The teeth were cut longitudinally at mesio-distal direction; the surfaces were coated with nail varnish except for two squared windows (2x4 mm); at the cement-enamel junction. Artificial lesions were induced by a S. Mutans microbiological culture. The samples (N = 50) were divided into groups according to the demineralization time: 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 days. The culture medium, was changed each 48 hours. After the demineralization process the samples were rinsed with double-deionized water and stored in a humid environment. The OCT system was implemented with average power of 96 μW in the sample arm, providing a 23 μm of axial resolution. The images were produced with lateral scans step of 10 μm. The detection system was composed by a detector, a demodulator and a computer. With the images generated by OCT it was possible to determine the lesion depth as function of sample exposition time to microbiological culture. We observed that the depth of the lesion in the root dentine increased from 70 μm to 230 μm, depending of exposure time, and follows the bacterial population growth law. This OCT system accurately depicts hard dental tissue and it was able to detect early caries in its structure, providing a powerful contactless high resolution image of lesions.

  13. Statistical Modeling of Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Amini, Zahra; Rabbani, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new model for retinal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images is proposed. This statistical model is based on introducing a nonlinear Gaussianization transform to convert the probability distribution function (pdf) of each OCT intra-retinal layer to a Gaussian distribution. The retina is a layered structure and in OCT each of these layers has a specific pdf which is corrupted by speckle noise, therefore a mixture model for statistical modeling of OCT images is proposed. A Normal-Laplace distribution, which is a convolution of a Laplace pdf and Gaussian noise, is proposed as the distribution of each component of this model. The reason for choosing Laplace pdf is the monotonically decaying behavior of OCT intensities in each layer for healthy cases. After fitting a mixture model to the data, each component is gaussianized and all of them are combined by Averaged Maximum A Posterior (AMAP) method. To demonstrate the ability of this method, a new contrast enhancement method based on this statistical model is proposed and tested on thirteen healthy 3D OCTs taken by the Topcon 3D OCT and five 3D OCTs from Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) patients, taken by Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT. Comparing the results with two contending techniques, the prominence of the proposed method is demonstrated both visually and numerically. Furthermore, to prove the efficacy of the proposed method for a more direct and specific purpose, an improvement in the segmentation of intra-retinal layers using the proposed contrast enhancement method as a preprocessing step, is demonstrated. PMID:26800532

  14. En-face optical coherence tomography revival

    Bradu, Adrian; Kapinchev, Konstantin; Barnes, Frederick; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    Quite recently, we introduced a novel Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) method, termed as Master Slave OCT (MS-OCT), especially to deliver en-face images. MS-OCT operates like a time domain OCT, selecting signal from a selected depth only while scanning the laser beam across the sample. Time domain OCT allows real time production of an en-face image, although relatively slowly. As a major advance, the Master Slave method allows collection of signals from any number of depths, as required by the user. MS-OCT is an OCT method that does not require resampling of data and can be used to deliver en-face images from several depths simultaneously. However, as the MS-OCT method requires important computational resources, the number of multiple depth en-face images produced in real-time is limited. Here, we demonstrate that taking advantage of the parallel processing feature of the MS-OCT technology by harnessing the capabilities of graphics processing units (GPU)s, information from 384 depth positions is acquired in one raster with real time display of 40 en-face OCT images. These exhibit comparable resolution and sensitivity to the images produced using the traditional Fourier domain based method. The GPU facilitates versatile real time selection of parameters, such as the depth positions of the 40 images out of a set of 384 depth locations, as well as their axial resolution. Here, we present in parallel with the 40 en-face OCT images of a human tooth, a confocal microscopy lookalike image, together with two B-scan OCT images along rectangular directions.

  15. Spectral/Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    de Boer, Johannes F.

    Optical coherence tomography is a low-coherence interferometric method for imaging of biological tissue [1, 2]. For more than a decade after its inception between 1988 and 1991, the dominant implementation has been time domain OCT (TD-OCT), in which the length of a reference arm is rapidly scanned. The first spectral or Fourier domain OCT (SD/FD-OCT) implementation was reported in 1995 [3]. In SD-OCT the reference arm is kept stationary, and the depth information is obtained by a Fourier transform of the spectrally resolved interference fringes in the detection arm of a Michelson interferometer. This approach has provided a significant advantage in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which despite reports as early as 1997 [4, 5] has taken about half a decade to be recognized fully by the OCT community in 2003 [6-8]. The first demonstration of SD-OCT for in vivo retinal imaging in 2002 [9] was followed by a full realization of the sensitivity advantage by video rate in vivo retinal imaging [10], including high-speed 3-D volumetric imaging [11], ultrahigh-resolution video rate imaging [12, 13], and Doppler blood flow determination in the human retina [14, 15]. The superior sensitivity of SD-OCT, combined with the lack of need for a fast mechanical scanning mechanism, has opened up the possibility of much faster scanning without loss of image quality and provided a paradigm shift from point sampling to volumetric mapping of biological tissue in vivo. The technology has been particularly promising for ophthalmology [16, 17]. In this chapter, the principles and system design considerations of SD-OCT will be discussed in more detail.

  16. Imaging Granulomatous Lesions with Optical Coherence Tomography

    Christina Banzhaf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors. Methods: Two patients with granulomas, tophi and granuloma annulare (GA, respectively, were photographed digitally, OCT-scanned and biopsied in the said order. Normal skin was OCT-scanned for comparison, but not biopsied. The OCT images from each lesion were compared with their histologic images as well as with OCT images with similar characteristics obtained from nonmelanoma skin tumors. Results: The OCT images of the tophi showed hyperreflective, rounded cloud-like structures in dermis, their upper part sharply delineated by a hyporeflective fringe. The deeper areas appeared blurred. The crystalline structures were delineated by a hyporeflective fringe. OCT images of GA showed two different structures in dermis: a hyporeflective rounded one, and one that was lobulated and wing-like. Conclusion: Granulomatous tissue surrounding urate deposits appeared as a clear hyporeflective fringe surrounding a light, hyperreflective area. The urate crystals appeared as hyperreflective areas, shielding the deeper part of dermis, meaning OCT could only visualize the upper part of the lesions. The lobulated, wing-like structure in GA may resemble diffuse GA or a dense lymphocytic infiltrate as seen on histology. The rounded structure in GA may represent an actual granuloma or either diffuse GA or a dense lymphocytic infiltrate as described above. This case suggests that OCT images granulomatous tissue as absorbent, hyporeflective areas, and urate crystals appear as reflective areas, obscuring the underlying tissue. In GA a new image shape looking like a wing has been found. The frequency, specificity and sensitivity of this new pattern in OCT imaging will require further studies.

  17. Applications of Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Xu, Zhiqiang

    A major development in biomedical imaging in the last decade has been optical coherence tomography (OCT). This technique enables microscale resolution, depth resolved imaging of the detailed morphology of transparent and nontransparent biological tissue in a noncontact and quasi-noninvasive way. In the first part of this dissertation, we will describe the development and the performance of our home-made OCT systems working with different wavelength regions based on free-space and optical fiber Michelson interferometers. The second part will focus on Doppler OCT (DOCT), an important extension of OCT, which enables the simultaneous evaluation of the structural information and of the fluid flow distribution at a localized position beneath the sample surface. Much effort has been spent during the past few years in our laboratory aimed at providing more accurate velocity measurements with an extended dynamic range. We also applied our technique in different research areas such as microfluidics and hemodynamics. Investigations on the optical properties of the biological tissues (such as absorption and scattering) corresponding to different center wavelengths, have been performed in our laboratory. We used a 10 femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser centered at about 810 nm associated with a free-space Michelson interferometer. The infrared sources were centered at about 1310 and 1560 nm with all-fiber interferometers. Comparative studies using three different sources for several in vitro biological tissues based on a graphical method illustrated how the optical properties affect the quality of the OCT images in terms of the penetration depth and backscattering intensity. We have shown the advantage of working with 810-nm emission wavelength for good backscattering amplitude and contrast, while sources emitting at 1570 nm give good penetration depth. The 1330-nm sources provide a good compromise between the two. Therefore, the choice of the source will ultimately determine the

  18. Comparative study of optic disc measurement by Copernicus optical coherence tomography and Heidelberg retinal tomography

    YANG Qing-song; YU Ya-jie; LI Shu-ning; LIU Juan; HAO Ying-juan

    2012-01-01

    Background Copernicus optical coherence tomography (SOCT) is a new,ultra high-speed and high-resolution instrument available for clinical evaluation of optic nerve.The purpose of the study was to compare the agreements between SOCT and Heidelberg retinal tomography (HRT).Methods A total of 44 healthy normal volunteers were recruited in this study.One eye in each subject was selected randomly.Agreement between SOCT and HRT-3 in measuring optic disc area was assessed using Bland-Altman plots.Relationships between measurements of optic nerve head parameter obtained by SOCT and HRT-3 were assessed by Pearson correlation.Results There was no significant difference in the average cup area (0.306 vs.0.355 mm,P=0.766),cup volume (0.158 vs.0.130 mm,P=0.106) and cup/disc ration (0.394 vs.0.349 mm,P=0.576) measured by the two instruments.However,other optic disc parameters from SOCT were significantly lower compared with HRT-3.The Bland-Altman plot revealed good agreement of cup area and cup volume measured by SOCT and HRT-3.Bad agreement of disc area,rim area,rim volume and cup/disc ratio were found between SOCT and HRT-3.The highest correlations between the two instruments were observed for cup area (r2=0.783,P=0.000) and cup/disc ratio (r2=0.669,P=0.000),whereas the lowest correlation was observed for disc area (r2=0.100,P=0.037),rim area (r2=0.275,P=0.000),cup volume (r2=0.005,P=0.391) and rim volume (r2=0.021,P=0.346).Conclusions There were poor agreements between SOCT and HRT-3 for measurement of optic nerve parameters except cup area and cup volume.Measurement results of the two instruments are not interchangeable.

  19. Learning from examples in optical tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-03-01

    An optical tomography system measures the light scattered by an object as a function of spatial coordinates and as a function of the illumination angle. The measured signals are digitally processed to produce a 3D image of the object. In this paper we describe how we can learn the shape of an object by constructing a neural network that models the optical system and training the network to match the experimentally measured data. The variables of the trained network yield the image of the unknown object at the end of training phase. [1] Ulugbek, Papadopoulos, Shoreh, Goy, Vonesh, Unser, Psaltis, "A Learning Approach to Optical Tomography" Optica, May 2015.

  20. OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN JUVENILE NEURONAL CEROID LIPOFUSCINOSIS

    Hansen, Michael S; Hove, Marianne Nørgaard; Jensen, Hanne;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report optical coherence tomography findings obtained in two patients with juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. METHODS: Two case reports. RESULTS: Two 7-year-old girls presented with decreased visual acuity, clumsiness, night blindness, and behavioral problems. Optical coherence...... tomography showed an overall reduction in thickness of the central retina, as well as the outer and the inner retinal layers. The degenerative retinal changes were the same, despite different mutations in the CLN3 gene. CONCLUSION: In these rare cases of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, optical...

  1. Functional swept source optical coherence tomography

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging modality capable of providing information about a sample structure along the three spatial dimensions with micrometer scale resolution. A new chapter opened with the development of functional OCT that provides additional information to the standard structural imaging. Among those extensions is Doppler OCT (D-OCT) that yields knowledge about the motion of the sample and/or its substructure. Its main application in biomedical imaging is the assessment of blood flow. D-OCT is therefore often associated with blood velocity measurement and recently with the visualization of the vascular network. Blood flow and vasculature are important markers of tissue health. Their assessment provides crucial information for diagnostics, treatment planning and monitoring. OCT is in a good position, as a non-invasive technique, to become an alternative to current fluorescence based techniques, allowing thereby also more frequent examination and broader screenings and, as a high resolution modality, to give insight into potential changes at the capillary level. An important challenge of in vivo imaging is patient motion that decreases the quality of acquisitions. One solution to that issue is high-speed imaging. Recently swept source OCT (SSOCT) revealed to be an efficient technology to achieve high-speed. This thesis investigates the use of swept sources for qualitative and quantitative vasculature imaging. It is presented via five journal papers that form its backbone. Prior to that, main concepts of FDOCT, D-OCT and SS systems are presented. The first paper reports a SSOCT system for skin imaging. In standard OCT systems, improving the lateral resolution comes at a cost of reduced depth of focus. This should be avoided in order to be able to assess different vascular beds in depth while keeping the speed advantage of FDOCT. Employing a Bessel beam for illumination of the sample allows circumventing this issue. The image

  2. Towards multimodal nonlinear optical tomography – experimental methodology

    All-optical microspectroscopic and tomographic tools reveal great potential for clinical dermatologic diagnostics, i.e., investigation of human skin and skin diseases. While optical-coherence tomography has been complemented by two-photon fluorescence tomography and second-harmonic generation tomography, a joint study of various nonlinear optical microspectroscopies, i.e., application of the recently developed multimodal imaging approach, to sizable human-tissue samples has not been evaluated up to now. Here, we present such multimodal approach combining different nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms for imaging, namely two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), second-harmonic generation (SHG), and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) into a joint microscopic experiment. We show the potential of imaging large skin areas and discuss the information obtained in a case study comparing normal skin and keloid tissue

  3. Spatial Fourier-decomposition optical fluorescen tomography-theoretical investigation

    Cheng Liu; Dug Young Kim; Jianqiang Zhu

    2008-01-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) optical fluorescent tomographic imaging scheme is proposed with structured illumination and spatial Fourierdomain decomposition methods for the first time. In this spatial Fourier-decomposition optical fluorescence tomography (SF-OFT), the intensity of focused excitation light from an objective lens is modulated to be a cosine function along the optical axis of the system. For a given position in a two-dimensional (2D) raster scanning process, the spatial frequency of the cosine function along the optical axis sweeps in a proper range while a series of fluorescence intensity are detected accordingly. By making an inverse discrete cosine transformation of these recorded intensity profiles, the distribution of fluorescent markers along the optical axis of a focused laser beam is obtained. A 3D optical fluorescent tomography can be achieved with this proposed SF-OFT technique with a simple 2D raster scanning process.

  4. Polarization-Sensitive Quantum Optical Coherence Tomography: Experiment

    Booth, Mark C.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin Carl

    2010-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive quantum optical coherence tomography (PS-QOCT) makes use of a Type-II twin-photon light source for carrying out optical sectioning with polarization sensitivity. A BBO nonlinear optical crystal pumped by a Ti:sapphire psec-pulsed laser is used to confirm the theoretical underpinnings of this imaging paradigm. PS-QOCT offers even-order dispersion cancellation with simultaneous access to the group-velocity dispersion characteristics of the interstitial medium between the ...

  5. The Development, Commercialization, and Impact of Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Fujimoto, James; Swanson, Eric

    2016-07-01

    This review was written for the special issue of IOVS to describe the history of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and its evolution from a nonscientific, historic perspective. Optical coherence tomography has become a standard of care in ophthalmology, providing real-time information on structure and function - diagnosing disease, evaluating progression, and assessing response to therapy, as well as helping to understand disease pathogenesis and create new therapies. Optical coherence tomography also has applications in multiple clinical specialties, fundamental research, and manufacturing. We review the early history of OCT describing how research and development evolves and the important role of multidisciplinary collaboration and expertise. Optical coherence tomography had its origin in femtosecond optics, but used optical communications technologies and required advanced engineering for early OCT prototypes, clinical feasibility studies, entrepreneurship, and corporate development in order to achieve clinical acceptance and clinical impact. Critical advances were made by early career researchers, clinician scientists, engineering experts, and business leaders, which enabled OCT to have a worldwide impact on health care. We introduce the concept of an "ecosystem" consisting of research, government funding, collaboration and competition, clinical studies, innovation, entrepreneurship and industry, and impact - all of which must work synergistically. The process that we recount is long and challenging, but it is our hope that it might inspire early career professionals in science, engineering, and medicine, and that the clinical and research community will find this review of interest. PMID:27409459

  6. Optical atomic magnetometry for magnetic induction tomography of the heart

    Deans, Cameron; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of radio-frequency optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography measurements. We demonstrate the imaging of dummy targets of varying conductivities placed in the proximity of the sensor, in an unshielded environment at room-temperature and without background subtraction. The images produced by the system accurately reproduce the characteristics of the actual objects. Furthermore, we perform finite element simulations in order to assess the potential for measuring low-conductivity biological tissues with our system. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an instrument based on optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography imaging of biological samples, in particular for mapping anomalous conductivity in the heart.

  7. Optical Magnetic Induction Tomography of the Heart

    Marmugi, L.; Renzoni, F.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) affects a significant fraction of the ageing population, causing a high level of morbidity and mortality. Despite its significance, the causes of AF are still not uniquely identified. This, combined with the lack of precise diagnostic and guiding tools, makes the clinical treatment of AF sub-optimal. We identify magnetic induction tomography as the most promising technique for the investigation of the causes of fibrillation and for its clinical practice. We therefore ...

  8. Numerical modelling and image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Gibson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The development of diffuse optical tomography as a functional imaging modality has relied largely on the use of model-based image reconstruction. The recovery of optical parameters from boundary measurements of light propagation within tissue is inherently a difficult one, because the problem is nonlinear, ill-posed and ill-conditioned. Additionally, although the measured near-infrared signals of light transmission through tissue provide high imaging contrast, the reconstructed images suffer ...

  9. Role of Optical Coherence Tomography on Corneal Surface Laser Ablation

    Ventura, Bruna V.; Moraes, Haroldo V.; Newton Kara-Junior; Santhiago, Marcony R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on reviewing the roles of optical coherence tomography (OCT) on corneal surface laser ablation procedures. OCT is an optical imaging modality that uses low-coherence interferometry to provide noninvasive cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure in vivo. There are two types of OCTs, each with transverse and axial spatial resolutions of a few micrometers: the time-domain and the fourier-domain OCTs. Both have been increasingly used by refractive surgeons and have spec...

  10. Optical coherence tomography-based freeze-drying microscopy

    Mujat, Mircea; Greco, Kristyn; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin L.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Mulhall, Phillip; Sharma, Puneet; Pikal, Michael J.; Kessler, William J.

    2011-01-01

    A new type of freeze-drying microscope based upon time-domain optical coherence tomography is presented here (OCT-FDM). The microscope allows for real-time, in situ 3D imaging of pharmaceutical formulations in vials relevant for manufacturing processes with a lateral resolution of

  11. RADIAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF AIR CONTAMINANTS USING OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING

    The paper describes the application of an optical remote-sensing (ORS) system to map air contaminants and locate fugitive emissions. Many ORD systems may utilize radial non-overlapping beam geometry and a computed tomography (CT) algorithm to map the concentrations in a plane. In...

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography: Future Trends for Imaging in Glaucoma

    Folio, Lindsey S.; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) captures a major role in clinical assessment in eye care. Innovative hardware and software improvements in the technology would further enhance its usefulness. In this review we present several promising initiatives currently in development or early phase of assessment that we expect to have a future impact on OCT.

  13. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography and microperimetry in foveal hypoplasia

    Swakshyar Saumya Pal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of foveal hypoplasia associated with ocular albinism with anatomic and functional changes by various techniques using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, microperimeter and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope is described. This case highlights the importance of microperimeter in detecting the functional abnormalities of vision and SD-OCT in identifying the retinal laminar abnormalities in foveal hypoplasia.

  14. Optical coherence tomography to monitor photodynamic therapy in pathological myopia

    Garcia-Layana, A. (Alfredo); Salinas-Alaman, A. (Ángel); Maldonado, M J; Sainz-Gomez, C. (C.); Fernandez-Hortelano, A. (A.)

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the role of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in determining choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) activity before and after photodynamic therapy (PDT) in patients with pathological myopia. METHODS: 33 patients (33 eyes) with pathological myopia and being treated with PDT were included. Every 3 months all patients were evaluated and presence or absence of leakage on fluorescein angiography, presence of intraretinal or subretinal fluid on...

  15. Imaging of dental implant osseointegration using optical coherent tomography

    Ionita, I.; Reisen, P.

    2009-02-01

    Investigation of initial implant stability with different dental implant designs is an important task to obtain good quality dental implants. Failure of a dental implant is often related to failure to osseointegrate correctly. Optical Coherent Tomography is a competitive non-invasive method of osseointegration investigation. FD-OCT with Swept Source was used to obtain 3-D image of the peri-implant tissue (soft and hard) in the case of mandible fixed screw. 1350 nm centered laser source give better images than 850 nm laser source for hard tissue imaging. Present work suggests that Optical Coherent Tomography is a proper technique to obtain the image of the contact tissue-metal screw. OCT images are useful to evaluate optical properties of bone tissues.

  16. Real-time in vivo computed optical interferometric tomography.

    Ahmad, Adeel; Shemonski, Nathan D; Adie, Steven G; Kim, Hee-Seok; Hwu, Wen-Mei W; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2013-06-01

    High-resolution real-time tomography of scattering tissues is important for many areas of medicine and biology(1-6). However, the compromise between transverse resolution and depth-of-field in addition to low sensitivity deep in tissue continue to impede progress towards cellular-level volumetric tomography. Computed imaging has the potential to solve these long-standing limitations. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM)(7-9) is a computed imaging technique enabling high-resolution volumetric tomography with spatially invariant resolution. However, its potential for clinical diagnostics remains largely untapped since full volume reconstructions required lengthy postprocessing, and the phase-stability requirements have been difficult to satisfy in vivo. Here we demonstrate how 3-D Fourier-domain resampling, in combination with high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT), can achieve high-resolution in vivo tomography. Enhanced depth sensitivity was achieved over a depth-of-field extended in real time by more than an order of magnitude. This work lays the foundation for high-speed volumetric cellular-level tomography. PMID:23956790

  17. Polarization-Sensitive Quantum Optical Coherence Tomography: Experiment

    Booth, Mark C; Teich, Malvin Carl

    2010-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive quantum optical coherence tomography (PS-QOCT) makes use of a Type-II twin-photon light source for carrying out optical sectioning with polarization sensitivity. A BBO nonlinear optical crystal pumped by a Ti:sapphire psec-pulsed laser is used to confirm the theoretical underpinnings of this imaging paradigm. PS-QOCT offers even-order dispersion cancellation with simultaneous access to the group-velocity dispersion characteristics of the interstitial medium between the reflecting surfaces of the sample.

  18. Optical computed tomography liquid calibration phantom

    Jordan, K.

    2013-06-01

    Fluorinated ethylene propylene tubing is investigated as a method of preparing a contrast-resolution phantom for quantitative characterization of optical CT scanners and hydrogel dosimeters. Two sizes of tubing were examined: 6 and 13 mm inner diameter with 0.75 and 0.5 mm wall thicknesses, respectively. Water solutions of carbon black, nanoparticles in micelles provided continuously adjustable absorption contrast. Cross-sectional slices from two phantoms scanned with two different optical CT scanners are presented. Reconstructions from these simple phantoms can be used to identify scanner artefacts and improve instrument design. These phantoms represent a more reproducible approach than casting "gel fingers" into gel phantoms for system characterization. The thinner walled tubes have fewer optical artefacts.

  19. Positron emission tomography and optical tissue imaging

    Falen, Steven W.; Hoefer, Richard A.; Majewski, Stanislaw; McKisson, John; Kross, Brian; Proffitt, James; Stolin, Alexander; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2012-05-22

    A mobile compact imaging system that combines both PET imaging and optical imaging into a single system which can be located in the operating room (OR) and provides faster feedback to determine if a tumor has been fully resected and if there are adequate surgical margins. While final confirmation is obtained from the pathology lab, such a device can reduce the total time necessary for the procedure and the number of iterations required to achieve satisfactory resection of a tumor with good margins.

  20. Computational adaptive optics for broadband optical interferometric tomography of biological tissue

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution real-time tomography of biological tissues is important for many areas of biological investigations and medical applications. Cellular level optical tomography, however, has been challenging because of the compromise between transverse imaging resolution and depth-of-field, the system and sample aberrations that may be present, and the low imaging sensitivity deep in scattering tissues. The use of computed optical imaging techniques has the potential to address several of these long-standing limitations and challenges. Two related techniques are interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO). Through three-dimensional Fourierdomain resampling, in combination with high-speed OCT, ISAM can be used to achieve high-resolution in vivo tomography with enhanced depth sensitivity over a depth-of-field extended by more than an order-of-magnitude, in realtime. Subsequently, aberration correction with CAO can be performed in a tomogram, rather than to the optical beam of a broadband optical interferometry system. Based on principles of Fourier optics, aberration correction with CAO is performed on a virtual pupil using Zernike polynomials, offering the potential to augment or even replace the more complicated and expensive adaptive optics hardware with algorithms implemented on a standard desktop computer. Interferometric tomographic reconstructions are characterized with tissue phantoms containing sub-resolution scattering particles, and in both ex vivo and in vivo biological tissue. This review will collectively establish the foundation for high-speed volumetric cellular-level optical interferometric tomography in living tissues.

  1. Diffuse optical tomography based on multiple access coding

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Yuanqing; Su, Jinshan; Xu, Fan

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has the advantages of being a non-invasive, non-radiation emitting and low-cost biological tissue imaging method, and many recent studies have employed this technology. By improving the spatial resolution and developing a new method for constantly improving the flexibility of the experimental device, the system can perform data acquisition rapidly and conveniently. We propose a method for rapid data acquisition based on multiple access coding; it can acquire data in parallel, and the system can greatly improve the temporal resolution of the data acquisition step in diffuse optical tomography thereafter. We simulate the encoding and decoding process of the source-detector pair and successfully isolate the source signal from mixed signals. The DOT image reconstruction highlight the effectiveness of the system.

  2. Analysis of multiple scattering effects in optical Doppler tomography

    Yura, H.T.; Thrane, L.; Andersen, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Doppler frequency spectrum. Thus, in the present analysis, the dependence of the mean and standard deviation of the Doppler shift on the scattering properties of the flowing medium are obtained. Taking the multiple scattering effects into account, we are able to explain previous measurements of depth......Optical Doppler tomography (ODT) combines Doppler velocimetry and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to obtain high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of particle flow velocity in scattering media such as the human retina and skin. Here, we present the results of a theoretical analysis of ODT where...... multiple scattering effects are included. The purpose of this analysis is to determine how multiple scattering affects the estimation of the depth-resolved localized flow velocity. Depth-resolved velocity estimates are obtained directly from the corresponding mean or standard deviation of the observed...

  3. Theory, developments and applications of optical coherence tomography

    In this paper, we review the developments in optical coherence tomography (OCT) for three-dimensional non-invasive imaging. A number of different OCT techniques are discussed in some detail including time-domain, frequency-domain, full-field, quantum and Doppler OCT. A theoretical treatment is given and some relevant comparisons made between various implementations. The current and potential applications of OCT are discussed, with close attention paid to biomedical imaging and its metrological issues

  4. Theory, developments and applications of optical coherence tomography

    Tomlins, P. H.; Wang, R. K.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, we review the developments in optical coherence tomography (OCT) for three-dimensional non-invasive imaging. A number of different OCT techniques are discussed in some detail including time-domain, frequency-domain, full-field, quantum and Doppler OCT. A theoretical treatment is given and some relevant comparisons made between various implementations. The current and potential applications of OCT are discussed, with close attention paid to biomedical imaging and its metrological issues.

  5. Multifocal cysticercosis with optical coherence tomography findings in a child

    Manisha Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We herein report a case with multifocal cysticercosis - sub-conjunctival cysticercus cyst, sub-retinal cysticercosis, and neurocysticercosis in a child. The optical coherence tomography (OCT findings of the sub-retinal cysticercus cyst are reported. He was treated with anti-helminthic drugs and oral prednisolone followed by surgical removal of the sub-retinal cyst. He subsequently underwent silicone oil removal with lens aspiration and intraocular lens implantation maintaining stable vision

  6. Multiple scattering in wide-field optical coherence tomography

    Karamata, Boris; Lasser, Theo

    2005-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), a well-established imaging method based on low-coherence interferometry, provides cross-sectional images of the internal structure of biological samples with a resolution in the micrometer range. OCT was successfully applied on various tissues such as for instance the retina, the skin or a tooth. In highly scattering tissues like the skin, probing depth is limited to approximately 2mm, mainly due to insufficient rejection of multiply scattered light. Presen...

  7. Optical Coherence Tomography: Clinical Applications in Medical Practice

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini; Upender K Wali; Sitara Azeem

    2013-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a success story of scientific and technological co-operation between a physicist and a clinician. The concept of cross-sectional imaging revolutionalized the applicability of OCT in the medical profession. OCT is a non-contact, topographic, biomicroscopic device that provides high resolution, cross-sectional digital images of live biological tissues in vivo and in real time. OCT is based on the property of tissues to reflect and backscatter light involvin...

  8. Dynamic diffuse optical tomography imaging of peripheral arterial disease

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Flexman, Molly; Dayal, Rajeev; Shrikhande, Gautam; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is the narrowing of arteries due to plaque accumulation in the vascular walls. This leads to insufficient blood supply to the extremities and can ultimately cause cell death. Currently available methods are ineffective in diagnosing PAD in patients with calcified arteries, such as those with diabetes. In this paper we investigate the potential of dynamic diffuse optical tomography (DDOT) as an alternative way to assess PAD in the lower extremities. DDOT is a ...

  9. Optical coherence tomography: automatic retina classification through support vector machines

    Bernardes, Rui; Serranho, Pedro; Santos, Torcato; Gonçalves, Valter; Cunha-Vaz, José

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is becoming one of the most important imaging modalities in ophthalmology due to its non-invasiveness and by allowing the visualisation the human retina structure in detail. It was recently proposed that OCT data embeds functional information from the human retina. Specifically, it was proposed that blood–retinal barrier status information is present within OCT data from the human retina. Besides this ability, the authors present data supporting the idea ...

  10. Sensitivity analysis of imaging geometries for prostate diffuse optical tomography

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic and interstitial diffuse optical tomography have been studied in clinical investigations for imaging prostate tissues, yet, there is no comprehensive comparison of how these two imaging geometries affect the quality of the reconstruction images. In this study, the effect of imaging geometry is investigated by comparing the cross-section of the Jacobian sensitivity matrix and reconstructed images for three-dimensional mathematical phantoms. Next, the effect of source-detector config...

  11. Anatomical Atlas-Guided Diffuse Optical Tomography of Brain Activation

    Custo, Anna; Boas, David A.; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Dan, Ippeita; Mesquita, Rickson; Fischl, Bruce; Grimson, W. Eric L.; Wells, Williams

    2009-01-01

    We describe a neuro imaging protocol that utilizes an anatomical atlas of the human head to guide Diffuse optical tomography of human brain activation. The protocol is demonstrated by imaging the hemodynamic response to median nerve stimulation in three healthy subjects, and comparing the images obtained using a head atlas with the images obtained using the subject-specific head anatomy. The results indicate that using the head atlas anatomy it is possible to reconstruct the location of the b...

  12. Scalable multiplexing for parallel imaging with interleaved optical coherence tomography

    Lee, Hee Yoon; Marvdashti, Tahereh; Duan, Lian; Khan, Saara A.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate highly parallel imaging with interleaved optical coherence tomography (iOCT) using an in-house-fabricated, air-spaced virtually-imaged phased array (VIPA). The air-spaced VIPA performs spectral encoding of the interferograms from multiple lateral points within a single sweep of the source and allows us to tune and balance several imaging parameters: number of multiplexed points, ranging depth, and sensitivity. In addition to a thorough discussion of the parameters and operating...

  13. Optical atomic magnetometry for magnetic induction tomography of the heart

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of radio-frequency optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography measurements. We demonstrate the imaging of dummy targets of varying conductivities placed in the proximity of the sensor, in an unshielded environment at room-temperature and without background subtraction. The images produced by the system accurately reproduce the characteristics of the actual objects. Furthermore, we perform finite element simulations in order to assess the potential for ...

  14. Quality assessment for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    LIU, SHUANG; Paranjape, Amit S.; Elmaanaoui, Badr; Dewelle, Jordan; Rylander, H. Grady; Markey, Mia K.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, a measure of glaucoma progression, can be measured in images acquired by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). The accuracy of RNFL thickness estimation, however, is affected by the quality of the OCT images. In this paper, a new parameter, signal deviation (SD), which is based on the standard deviation of the intensities in OCT images, is introduced for objective assessment of OCT image quality. Two other objective assessment paramete...

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal and Choroidal Tumors

    Say, Emil Anthony T.; Shah, Sanket U.; Ferenczy, Sandor; Shields, Carol L.

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized the field of ophthalmology since its introduction 20 years ago. Originally intended primarily for retina specialists to image the macula, it has found its role in other subspecialties that include glaucoma, cornea, and ocular oncology. In ocular oncology, OCT provides axial resolution to approximately 7 microns with cross-sectional images of the retina, delivering valuable information on the effects of intraocular tumors on the retinal arc...

  16. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying...

  17. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT: Advances in Gastrointestinal Imaging

    Tejas S. Kirtane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly evolving field of endoscopic gastrointestinal imaging, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT has found many diverse applications. We present the current status of OCT and its practical applications in imaging normal and abnormal mucosa in the esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines, and biliary and pancreatic ducts. We highlight technical aspects and principles of imaging, assess published data, and suggest future directions for OCT-guided evaluation and therapy.

  18. Submicron Resolution Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Alarousu, Erkki

    2013-11-14

    Apparatuses and systems for submicron resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) are disclosed. The system may use white light sources having wavelengths within 400-1000 nanometers, and achieve resolution below 1 .mu.m. The apparatus is aggregated into a unitary piece, and a user can connect the apparatus to a user provided controller and/or light source. The light source may be a supercontinuum source.

  19. Multiple and dependent scattering effects in Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Kalkman, J; Bykov, A. V.; Faber, D.J.; Leeuwen, van

    2010-01-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a technique to image tissue morphology and to measure flow in turbid media. In its most basic form, it is based on single (Mie) scattering. However, for highly scattering and dense media multiple and concentration dependent scattering can occur. For Intralipid solutions with varying scattering strength, the effect of multiple and dependent scattering on the OCT signal attenuation and Doppler flow is investigated. We observe a non-linear increase i...

  20. An Optical Tomography System Using a Digital Signal Processor

    Rahim, Ruzairi Abdul; Thiam, Chiam Kok; Fazalul Rahiman, Mohd Hafiz

    2008-01-01

    The use of a personal computer together with a Data Acquisition System (DAQ) as the processing tool in optical tomography systems has been the norm ever since the beginning of process tomography. However, advancements in silicon fabrication technology allow nowadays the fabrication of powerful Digital Signal Processors (DSP) at a reasonable cost. This allows this technology to be used in an optical tomography system since data acquisition and processing can be performed within the DSP. Thus, the dependency on a personal computer and a DAQ to sample and process the external signals can be reduced or even eliminated. The DSP system was customized to control the data acquisition process of 16×16 optical sensor array, arranged in parallel beam projection. The data collected was used to reconstruct the cross sectional image of the pipeline conveyor. For image display purposes, the reconstructed image was sent to a personal computer via serial communication. This allows the use of a laptop to display the tomogram image besides performing any other offline analysis.

  1. An Optical Tomography System Using a Digital Signal Processor

    Mohd. Hafiz Fazalul Rahiman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of a personal computer together with a Data Acquisition System (DAQ as the processing tool in optical tomography systems has been the norm ever since the beginning of process tomography. However, advancements in silicon fabrication technology allow nowadays the fabrication of powerful Digital Signal Processors (DSP at a reasonable cost. This allows this technology to be used in an optical tomography system since data acquisition and processing can be performed within the DSP. Thus, the dependency on a personal computer and a DAQ to sample and process the external signals can be reduced or even eliminated. The DSP system was customized to control the data acquisition process of 16x16 optical sensor array, arranged in parallel beam projection. The data collected was used to reconstruct the cross sectional image of the pipeline conveyor. For image display purposes, the reconstructed image was sent to a personal computer via serial communication. This allows the use of a laptop to display the tomogram image besides performing any other offline analysis.

  2. Optical Coherence Tomography in Pulmonary Medicine

    Murgu, Septimiu Dan; Brenner, Matthew; Chen, Zhongping; Suter, Melissa J.

    Advances in pulmonary diagnostics and therapeutics offer a major potential for optical imaging applications both in clinical practice and research settings. Complexities of pulmonary structures and function have restricted widespread OCT investigations and clinical applications, but these will likely be overcome by developments in OCT technology [1]. Some factors that have limited adaptation of OCT into the pulmonary setting in the past have been the shallow depth of penetration, resolution limitations, relatively slow access times, need to examine large surface areas with numerous branching airways, motion artifacts, as well as a need for development of practical imaging probes to reach the relevant locations in a minimally invasive way. Considerable recent engineering and analytical advances in OCT technology [2-8] have already overcome several of these obstacles and will enable much more extensive investigations into the role for structural and functional pulmonary OCT imaging [1].

  3. Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography Using Two-Phase Shifting Method

    MA Zhen-He; Ruikang K. Wang; ZHANG Fan; YAO Jian-Quan

    2005-01-01

    @@ A two-phase shifting method is introduced to eliminate the strong autocorrelation noise inherent in spectral optical coherence tomography and to mitigate the unwanted auto- and cross-coherent terms introduced by the reflections from various optical interfaces present in the system. Furthermore, this method is also able to amplify the desired signal by a factor of 2. The feasibility of such a method is demonstrated using a mirror-like object. An intact porcine cornea tissue in vitro is also used to show the potential of this method for biological imaging.

  4. The diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    Li, J. H.; Du, Y.

    2016-06-01

    We have attempted to explore the intrinsic differences in the optical properties of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and normal tissue by optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT imaging of normal tissue provided three layers of epithelium, lamina propria, and the brighter interface of basement membrane; while carcinomas disrupted the layered construction embedded in signal-poor images. The morphologies were consistent with histological findings. Sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 100%, respectively. This pilot study demonstrates that NPC could be diagnosed by visualization, which implies that OCT might be potentially used to differentiate normal from NPC tissue in the early stage as an invasive biopsy.

  5. Optical coherence tomography for process control of laser micromachining.

    Wiesner, Markus; Ihlemann, Jürgen; Müller, Heike H; Lankenau, Eva; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2010-03-01

    In situ surface imaging for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) by optical coherence tomography (OCT) before, during, and after ablative laser processing is presented. Furthermore, it is shown that the ability of in situ characterization is beneficial for samples such as optical fibers, which are difficult to handle in the standard analysis. Surface images taken by the OCT are compared with these common analysis tools such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reflected-light, and confocal microscopy. An axial resolution of approximately 126 nm for surface detection and a lateral resolution <2.5 microm are obtained and the potential of the setup to imaging structures with high aspect ratio is demonstrated. PMID:20370183

  6. First measurements with the test stand for optical beam tomography

    Wagner, Christopher; Meusel, Oliver; Ulrich, Ratzinger; Reichau, Hermine

    2011-01-01

    A test stand for optical beam tomography was developed. As a new non-destructive beam-diagnostic system for high current ion beams, the test stand will be installed in the low energy beam transport section (LEBT) of the Frankfurt Neutron Source (FRANZ) behind the chopper system. The test stand consists of a rotatable vacuum chamber with a mounted CCD camera. The maximum rotation angle amounts to 270°. In a first phase the optical beam profile measurement and 3D density reconstruction is teste...

  7. Optical spectroscopy and Doppler tomography of Cygnus X-2

    Elebert, P.; Callanan, P.J.; Torres, M. A. P.; Garcia, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    We present phase resolved optical spectroscopy and Doppler tomography of V1341 Cygni, the optical counterpart to the neutron star low mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2. We derive a radial velocity curve for the secondary star, finding a projected radial velocity semi-amplitude of K2 = 79 +/- 3 km/s, leading to a mass function of 0.51 +/- 0.06 Msun, ~30% lower than the previous estimate. We tentatively attribute the lower value of K2 (compared to that obtained by other authors) to variations in the...

  8. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for in vivo retinal imaging in mice

    Jian, Yifan; Xu, Jing; Gradowski, Martin A.; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2014-01-01

    We present wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) for in vivo small animal retinal imaging. WSAO is attractive especially for mouse retinal imaging because it simplifies optical design and eliminates the need for wavefront sensing, which is difficult in the small animal eye. GPU accelerated processing of the OCT data permitted real-time extraction of image quality metrics (intensity) for arbitrarily selected retinal layers to be optimi...

  9. Profile and Determinants of Retinal Optical Intensity in Normal Eyes with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Binyao Chen; Enting Gao; Haoyu Chen; Jianling Yang; Fei Shi; Ce Zheng; Weifang Zhu; Dehui Xiang; Xinjian Chen; Mingzhi Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the profile and determinants of retinal optical intensity in normal subjects using 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). Methods A total of 231 eyes from 231 healthy subjects ranging in age from 18 to 80 years were included and underwent a 3D OCT scan. Forty-four eyes were randomly chosen to be scanned by two operators for reproducibility analysis. Distribution of optical intensity of each layer and regions specified by the Early Treatment of Diabeti...

  10. Frequency domain optical tomography using a Monte Carlo perturbation method

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Sakamoto, Hiroki

    2016-04-01

    A frequency domain Monte Carlo method is applied to near-infrared optical tomography, where an intensity-modulated light source with a given modulation frequency is used to reconstruct optical properties. The frequency domain reconstruction technique allows for better separation between the scattering and absorption properties of inclusions, even for ill-posed inverse problems, due to cross-talk between the scattering and absorption reconstructions. The frequency domain Monte Carlo calculation for light transport in an absorbing and scattering medium has thus far been analyzed mostly for the reconstruction of optical properties in simple layered tissues. This study applies a Monte Carlo calculation algorithm, which can handle complex-valued particle weights for solving a frequency domain transport equation, to optical tomography in two-dimensional heterogeneous tissues. The Jacobian matrix that is needed to reconstruct the optical properties is obtained by a first-order "differential operator" technique, which involves less variance than the conventional "correlated sampling" technique. The numerical examples in this paper indicate that the newly proposed Monte Carlo method provides reconstructed results for the scattering and absorption coefficients that compare favorably with the results obtained from conventional deterministic or Monte Carlo methods.

  11. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography for thick tissue imaging

    Wang, Lihong V.; Zhao, Xuemei; Jacques, Steven L.

    1995-12-01

    Continuous-wave ultrasonic modulation of scattered laser light has been used to image objects in tissue-simulating turbid media for the first time. We hypothesize that the ultrasound wave focused into the turbid media modulates the laser light passing through the ultrasonic focal spot. The modulated laser light collected by a photomultiplier tube reflects the local mechanical and optical properties in the focal zone. Buried objects in 5-cm thick tissue phantoms are located with millimeter resolution by scanning and detecting alterations of the ultrasound-modulated optical signal. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography separates the conflict between signal and resolution in purely optical imaging of tissue and does not rely on ballistic or quasi-ballistic photons but on the abundant diffuse photons. The imaging resolution is determined by the focused ultrasonic wave. This technique has the potential to provide a noninvasive, nonionizing, inexpensive diagnostic tool for diseases such as breast cancer.

  12. Algorithm for localized adaptive diffuse optical tomography and its application in bioluminescence tomography

    A reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography based on diffusion theory and finite element method is described. The algorithm reconstructs the optical properties in a permissible domain or region-of-interest to reduce the number of unknowns. The algorithm can be used to reconstruct optical properties for a segmented object (where a CT-scan or MRI is available) or a non-segmented object. For the latter, an adaptive segmentation algorithm merges contiguous regions with similar optical properties thereby reducing the number of unknowns. In calculating the Jacobian matrix the algorithm uses an efficient direct method so the required time is comparable to that needed for a single forward calculation. The reconstructed optical properties using segmented, non-segmented, and adaptively segmented 3D mouse anatomy (MOBY) are used to perform bioluminescence tomography (BLT) for two simulated internal sources. The BLT results suggest that the accuracy of reconstruction of total source power obtained without the segmentation provided by an auxiliary imaging method such as x-ray CT is comparable to that obtained when using perfect segmentation. (paper)

  13. Algorithm for localized adaptive diffuse optical tomography and its application in bioluminescence tomography

    Naser, Mohamed A.; Patterson, Michael S.; Wong, John W.

    2014-04-01

    A reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography based on diffusion theory and finite element method is described. The algorithm reconstructs the optical properties in a permissible domain or region-of-interest to reduce the number of unknowns. The algorithm can be used to reconstruct optical properties for a segmented object (where a CT-scan or MRI is available) or a non-segmented object. For the latter, an adaptive segmentation algorithm merges contiguous regions with similar optical properties thereby reducing the number of unknowns. In calculating the Jacobian matrix the algorithm uses an efficient direct method so the required time is comparable to that needed for a single forward calculation. The reconstructed optical properties using segmented, non-segmented, and adaptively segmented 3D mouse anatomy (MOBY) are used to perform bioluminescence tomography (BLT) for two simulated internal sources. The BLT results suggest that the accuracy of reconstruction of total source power obtained without the segmentation provided by an auxiliary imaging method such as x-ray CT is comparable to that obtained when using perfect segmentation.

  14. Optical tomography of pigmented human skin biopsies

    Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Kaatz, Martin; Fischer, Tobias W.; Elsner, Peter; Dimitrov, Enrico; Reif, Annette; Konig, Karsten

    2004-07-01

    The novel femtosecond NIR (near infrared) laser based high resolution imaging system DermaInspect was used for non-invasive diagnostics of pigmented skin. The system provides fluorescence and SHG images of high spatial submicron resolution (3D) and 250 ps temporal resolution (4D) based on time resolved single photon counting (TCSPC). Pigmented tissue biopsies from patients with nevi and melanoma have been investigated using the tunable 80 MHz femtosecond laser MaiTai with laser wavelengths in the range of 750 - 850 nm. The autofluorescence patterns of different intratissue cell types and structures were determined. The non-linear induced autofluorescence originates from naturally endogenous fluorophores and protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, elastin, collagen, phorphyrins and melanin. In addition to autofluorescence, SHG (second harmonic generation) was used to detect dermal collagen structures. Interestingly, pigmented cells showed intense luminescence signals. Further characterization of tissue components was performed via 4D measurements of the fluorescence lifetime (x, y, z, τ). The novel multiphoton technique offers the possibility of a painless high resolution non invasive diagnostic method (optical biopsy), in particular for the early detection of skin cancer.

  15. Linear optical coherence tomography system with extended measurement range.

    Koch, Peter; Hellemanns, Volker; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2006-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sensors traditionally use scanning optical delay lines with moving parts and a single detector. OCT systems with a linear detector array (linear OCT or L-OCT) are simple and robust, but a detector with approximately 10,000 pixels is needed for an imaging depth of 2mm, which is necessary for most biomedical applications. We present a new optical setup for L-OCT with an increased measurement range. An additional grating performs a reduction of the spatial frequencies of the fringe pattern on the detector without loss in the signal-to-noise ratio, so the signal can be sampled with a minimal number of pixels. The theory for this approach is addressed and the first measurements are presented. PMID:16969410

  16. Low-cost diffuse optical tomography for the classroom

    Minagawa, Taisuke; Zirak, Peyman; Weigel, Udo M.; Kristoffersen, Anna K.; Mateos, Nicolas; Valencia, Alejandra; Durduran, Turgut

    2012-10-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an emerging imaging modality with potential applications in oncology, neurology, and other clinical areas. It allows the non-invasive probing of the tissue function using relatively inexpensive and safe instrumentation. An educational laboratory setup of a DOT system could be used to demonstrate how photons propagate through tissues, basics of medical tomography, and the concepts of multiple scattering and absorption. Here, we report a DOT setup that could be introduced to the advanced undergraduate or early graduate curriculum using inexpensive and readily available tools. The basis of the system is the LEGO Mindstorms NXT platform which controls the light sources, the detectors (photo-diodes), a mechanical 2D scanning platform, and the data acquisition. A basic tomographic reconstruction is implemented in standard numerical software, and 3D images are reconstructed. The concept was tested and developed in an educational environment that involved a high-school student and a group of post-doctoral fellows.

  17. Optimisation of post mortem cardiac computed tomography compared to optical coherence tomography and histopathology - Technical note

    Precht, Helle; Leth, Peter Mygind; Thygesen, Jesper;

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary atherosclerosis is a leading cause of mortality. New technological developments in computed tomography (CT), including dual energy, iterative reconstructions and high definition scanning, could significantly improve the non-invasive identification of atherosclerosis plaques....... Here, a new method for optimising cardiac coronary CT with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and histopathology is presented. Materials and methods: Twenty human hearts obtained from autopsies were used. A contrast agent that solidifies after cooling was injected into the coronary arteries. CT...... scanning was performed on the heart alone as well as with the heart in a chest phantom. We used eight different CT protocols and the newest CT technique to image every heart. The OCT and CT images were compared with their corresponding histological sections. A procedure for ensuring the correct alignment...

  18. CT guided diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as blood, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer detection. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at wavelengths of 650 and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements, the width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an EMCCD camera with air cooling is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we report our effort and progress on the integration of the multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  19. Optical scattering coefficient estimated by optical coherence tomography correlates with collagen content in ovarian tissue

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Wang, Xiaohong; Sanders, Melinda; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2011-01-01

    Optical scattering coefficient from ex vivo unfixed normal and malignant ovarian tissue was quantitatively extracted by fitting optical coherence tomography (OCT) A-line signals to a single scattering model. 1097 average A-line measurements at a wavelength of 1310 nm were performed at 108 sites obtained from 18 ovaries. The average scattering coefficient obtained from the normal tissue group consisted of 833 measurements from 88 sites was 2.41 mm−1 (±0.59), while the average coefficient obtai...

  20. 3D parameter reconstruction in hyperspectral diffuse optical tomography

    Saibaba, Arvind K.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Anderson, Pamela G.; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Miller, Eric L.; Fantini, Sergio; Kilmer, Misha E.

    2015-03-01

    The imaging of shape perturbation and chromophore concentration using Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) data can be mathematically described as an ill-posed and non-linear inverse problem. The reconstruction algorithm for hyperspectral data using a linearized Born model is prohibitively expensive, both in terms of computation and memory. We model the shape of the perturbation using parametric level-set approach (PaLS). We discuss novel computational strategies for reducing the computational cost based on a Krylov subspace approach for parameteric linear systems and a compression strategy for the parameter-to-observation map. We will demonstrate the validity of our approach by comparison with experiments.

  1. Optical coherence tomography for glucose monitoring in blood

    Ullah, Hafeez; Hussain, Fayyaz; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-08-01

    In this review, we have discussed the potential application of the emerging imaging modality, i.e., optical coherence tomography (OCT) for glucose monitoring in biological tissues. OCT provides monitoring of glucose diffusion in different fibrous tissues like in sclera by determining the permeability rate with acceptable accuracy both in type 1 and in type 2 diabetes. The maximum precision of glucose measurement in Intralipid suspensions, for example, with the OCT technique yields the accuracy up to 4.4 mM for 10 % Intralipid and 2.2 mM for 3 % Intralipid.

  2. Application of optical coherence tomography based microangiography for cerebral imaging

    Baran, Utku; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Requirements of in vivo rodent brain imaging are hard to satisfy using traditional technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and two-photon microscopy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging tool that can easily reach at high speeds and provide high resolution volumetric images with a relatively large field of view for rodent brain imaging. Here, we provide the overview of recent developments of functional OCT based imaging techniques for neuroscience applications on rodents. Moreover, a summary of OCT-based microangiography (OMAG) studies for stroke and traumatic brain injury cases on rodents are provided.

  3. Modeling light–tissue interaction in optical coherence tomography systems

    Andersen, Peter E.; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thrane, Lars; Tycho, Andreas; Yura, Harold T.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) performs high-resolution, cross-sectional tomographic imaging of the internal tissue microstructure by measuring backscattered or backreflected light. The scope of this chapter is to present analytical and numerical models that are able to describe light......-tissue interactions and its influence on the performance of OCT systems including multiple scattering effects in heterogeneous media. In general, these models, analytical as well as numerical, may serve as important tools for improving interpretation of OCT images and also serve as prerequisites for extraction of...

  4. Optical diffraction tomography techniques for the study of cell pathophysiology

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Shin, Seungwoo; Lee, SangYun; Yang, Su-A; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional imaging of biological cells is crucial for the investigation of cell biology, provide valuable information to reveal the mechanisms behind pathophysiology of cells and tissues. Recent advances in optical diffraction tomography (ODT) have demonstrated the potential for the study of various cells with its unique advantages of quantitative and label-free imaging capability. To provide insight on this rapidly growing field of research and to discuss its applications in biology and medicine, we present the summary of the ODT principle and highlight recent studies utilizing ODT with the emphasis on the applications to the pathophysiology of cells.

  5. Ultrasound-Modulated Optical Tomography in Reflective and Coaxial Configuration

    傅洪波; 邢达; 曾亚光; 王毅; 陈群

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography affords a very promising noninvasive imaging method for biomedical diagnosis. With this technique, an ultrasound beam is focused into a scattering medium to provide an accurate localization and, simultaneously, a modulation of laser light inside the medium. Based on the high-sensitivity detection technique, we have developed a unique reflective configuration, which was more convenient and practical than other existing configurations. Furthermore, the configuration also introduced a new scheme to improve the spatial resolution in the imaging. A phantom was imaged to validate the feasibility of the proposed configuration.

  6. Determination of optical scattering properties of highly-scattering media in optical coherence tomography images

    Levitz, D.; Thrane, L.; Frosz, Michael Henoch;

    2004-01-01

    We developed a new algorithm that fits optical coherence tomography (OCT) signals as a function of depth to a general theoretical OCT model which takes into account multiple scattering effects. With use of this algorithm, it was possible to extract both the scattering coefficient and anisotropy...

  7. Design of a multimodality breast-like phantom for combined diffuse optical tomography and ultrasound tomography (DOT-UST)

    Ghijsen, Michael; Unlu, Burcin; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2010-02-01

    The initial steps in fabricating a multimodality imaging phantom for combined diffuse optical tomography and ultrasound tomography (DOT-UST) are completed. Phantoms are intended to mimic the optical and acoustic properties of breast tissue for near infrared light and ultrasound in the vicinity of 2 MHz. So far, a prototype ultrasound tomography system has been designed and the acoustic attenuation coefficient of glass beads has been characterized. Furthermore, 8 cm diameter homogeneous cylindrical phantoms have been successfully constructed and it has been shown that an inclusion with object to background contrast of three can be comfortably detected with the prototype system.

  8. Optical tomography for measuring dose distribution in radiation therapy

    Kauppinen Matti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dosimetry is used to verify the dose magnitude with artificial samples (phantoms before giving the planned radiation therapy to the patient. Typically, dose distribution is measured only in a single point or on a two-dimensional matrix plane. New techniques of radiation therapy ensure more detailed planning of radiation dose distribution which will lead to the need of measuring the radiation dose distribution three-dimensionally. The gel dosimetry is used to indicate and determine the ionizing radiation three-dimensionally. The radiation causes changes in chemical properties of the gel. The radiation dose distribution is defined by measuring the chemical changes. A conventional method is the magnetic resonance imaging and a new possibility is optical computed tomography (optical-CT. The optical-CT is much cheaper and more practical than magnetic resonance imaging. In this project, an optical-CT based method device was built by aiming at low material costs and a simple realization. The constructed device applies the charge coupled device camera and fluorescent lamp technologies. The test results show that the opacity level of the radiated gel can be measured accurately enough. The imaging accuracy is restricted by the optical distortion, e. g. vignetting, of the lenses, the distortion of a fluorescent lamp as the light source and a noisy measuring environment.

  9. Depth-resolved imaging of colon tumor using optical coherence tomography and fluorescence laminar optical tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Tang, Qinggong; Frank, Aaron; Wang, Jianting; Chen, Chao-wei; Jin, Lily; Lin, Jon; Chan, Joanne M.; Chen, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of neoplastic changes remains a critical challenge in clinical cancer diagnosis and treatment. Many cancers arise from epithelial layers such as those of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Current standard endoscopic technology is unable to detect those subsurface lesions. Since cancer development is associated with both morphological and molecular alterations, imaging technologies that can quantitative image tissue's morphological and molecular biomarkers and assess the depth extent of a lesion in real time, without the need for tissue excision, would be a major advance in GI cancer diagnostics and therapy. In this research, we investigated the feasibility of multi-modal optical imaging including high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and depth-resolved high-sensitivity fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) for structural and molecular imaging. APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) mice model were imaged using OCT and FLOT and the correlated histopathological diagnosis was obtained. Quantitative structural (the scattering coefficient) and molecular imaging parameters (fluorescence intensity) from OCT and FLOT images were developed for multi-parametric analysis. This multi-modal imaging method has demonstrated the feasibility for more accurate diagnosis with 87.4% (87.3%) for sensitivity (specificity) which gives the most optimal diagnosis (the largest area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve). This project results in a new non-invasive multi-modal imaging platform for improved GI cancer detection, which is expected to have a major impact on detection, diagnosis, and characterization of GI cancers, as well as a wide range of epithelial cancers.

  10. Non-diffusing photochromic gel for optical computed tomography phantoms

    Jordan, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study examines photochromic response in radiation sensitive hydrogels. Genipin, crosslinked, gelatin gel can support high resolution images because the chromophores do not diffuse. A low power, 633 nm He-Ne laser was used to write lines into the gels by a photobleaching reaction. Optical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans mapped the high resolution images in 3D with 0.25 mm voxel resolution. A straight line was written into a deformed gel and then readout in its relaxed, initial shape. The curved, photo-bleached line demonstrated deformable 3D dosimetry is possible with this system to the balloon edge. High resolution, photochromic images provide key information for characterizing optical CT scanners and 3D dosimeters. Many, ionizing radiation, dosimeter materials demonstrate either a photochromic or photothermal response, allowing this approach to be widely used in quantitative 3D scanning.

  11. Performance of latex balloons for optical computed tomography

    Jordan, K.; Walsh, A.; Peng, M.; Battista, J.

    2013-06-01

    Latex balloons filled with radiation sensitive hydrogels were evaluated as 3D dosimeters with optical computed tomography (CT) readout. Custom balloons, with less than 10 cm diameters, were made from latex sheets. Commercial, 13 cm diameter, clear balloons were investigated for larger volumes. Ferrous-xylenol orange and genipin gelatin gels selected for 1 and 30 Gy experiments, respectively. The thin stretched latex membrane allowed optical imaging to within 1 mm of the interior balloon edge. Reconstructed dose distributions demonstrated valid measurements to within 2 mm of the balloon surface. The rubber membrane provides a hybrid approach to deforming hydrogels. Uniform irradiation of a deformed gel resulted in a uniform dose being measured when scanned in the relaxed, initial balloon shape. The 13 cm diameter balloons were also effective and inexpensive vessels for hydrogels due to their high clarity, thinness and mechanical strength. Latex balloons represent an inexpensive method to obtain useful information from nearly the entire dosimeter volume.

  12. Continuous focus tracking for real-time optical coherence tomography

    Cobb, Michael J.; Liu, Xiumei; Li, Xingde

    2005-07-01

    We report an approach to achieving continuous focus tracking and a depth-independent transverse resolution for real-time optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Continuous real-time focus tracking is permitted by use of a lateral-priority image acquisition sequence in which the depth-scanning rate is equivalent to the imaging frame rate. Real-time OCT imaging with continuous focus tracking is performed at 1 frame/s by reciprocal translation of a rapid lateral-scanning miniature imaging probe (e.g., an endoscope). The optical path length in the reference arm is scanned synchronously to ensure that the coherence gate coincides with the imaging beam focus. The image quality improvement is experimentally demonstrated by imaging a tissue phantom embedded with polystyrene microspheres and rabbit esophageal tissues.

  13. Optical coherence tomography a clinical and technical update

    Cunha-Vaz, José

    2012-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography represents the ultimate noninvasive  ocular imaging technique although being in the field for over two-decades. This book encompasses both medical and technical developments and recent achievements. Here, the authors cover the field of application from the anterior to the posterior ocular segments (Part I) and present a comprehensive review on the development of OCT. Important developments towards  clinical applications are covered in Part II, ranging from the adaptive optics to the integration on a slit-lamp, and passing through new structural  and functional information extraction from OCT data. The book is intended to be informative, coherent and comprehensive for both the medical and technical communities and aims at easing the communication between the two fields and bridging the gap between the two scientific communities.

  14. High-speed optical coherence tomography signal processing on GPU

    Li Xiqi; Shi Guohua; Zhang Yudong, E-mail: lixiqi@yahoo.cn [Laboratory on Adaptive Optics, Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610209 (China)

    2011-01-01

    The signal processing speed of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) has become a bottleneck in many medical applications. Recently, a time-domain interpolation method was proposed. This method not only gets a better signal-to noise ratio (SNR) but also gets a faster signal processing time for the SD-OCT than the widely used zero-padding interpolation method. Furthermore, the re-sampled data is obtained by convoluting the acquired data and the coefficients in time domain. Thus, a lot of interpolations can be performed concurrently. So, this interpolation method is suitable for parallel computing. An ultra-high optical coherence tomography signal processing can be realized by using graphics processing unit (GPU) with computer unified device architecture (CUDA). This paper will introduce the signal processing steps of SD-OCT on GPU. An experiment is performed to acquire a frame SD-OCT data (400A-linesx2048 pixel per A-line) and real-time processed the data on GPU. The results show that it can be finished in 6.208 milliseconds, which is 37 times faster than that on Central Processing Unit (CPU).

  15. Weighted filtered backprojection for quantitative fluorescence optical projection tomography

    Reconstructing images from a set of fluorescence optical projection tomography (OPT) projections is a relatively new problem. Several physical aspects of fluorescence OPT necessitate a different treatment of the inverse problem to that required for non-fluorescence tomography. Given a fluorophore within the depth of field of the imaging system, the power received by the optical system, and therefore the CCD detector, is related to the distance of the fluorophore from the objective entrance pupil. Additionally, due to the slight blurring of images of sources positioned off the focal plane, the CCD image of a fluorophore off the focal plane is lower in intensity than the CCD image of an identical fluorophore positioned on the focal plane. The filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm does not take these effects into account and so cannot be expected to yield truly quantitative results. A full model of image formation is introduced which takes into account the effects of isotropic emission and defocus. The model is used to obtain a weighting function which is used in a variation of the FBP algorithm called weighted filtered backprojection (WFBP). This new algorithm is tested with simulated data and with experimental data from a phantom consisting of fluorescent microspheres embedded in an agarose gel

  16. Weighted filtered backprojection for quantitative fluorescence optical projection tomography.

    Darrell, A; Meyer, H; Marias, K; Brady, M; Ripoll, J

    2008-07-21

    Reconstructing images from a set of fluorescence optical projection tomography (OPT) projections is a relatively new problem. Several physical aspects of fluorescence OPT necessitate a different treatment of the inverse problem to that required for non-fluorescence tomography. Given a fluorophore within the depth of field of the imaging system, the power received by the optical system, and therefore the CCD detector, is related to the distance of the fluorophore from the objective entrance pupil. Additionally, due to the slight blurring of images of sources positioned off the focal plane, the CCD image of a fluorophore off the focal plane is lower in intensity than the CCD image of an identical fluorophore positioned on the focal plane. The filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm does not take these effects into account and so cannot be expected to yield truly quantitative results. A full model of image formation is introduced which takes into account the effects of isotropic emission and defocus. The model is used to obtain a weighting function which is used in a variation of the FBP algorithm called weighted filtered backprojection (WFBP). This new algorithm is tested with simulated data and with experimental data from a phantom consisting of fluorescent microspheres embedded in an agarose gel. PMID:18583727

  17. High-speed optical coherence tomography signal processing on GPU

    The signal processing speed of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) has become a bottleneck in many medical applications. Recently, a time-domain interpolation method was proposed. This method not only gets a better signal-to noise ratio (SNR) but also gets a faster signal processing time for the SD-OCT than the widely used zero-padding interpolation method. Furthermore, the re-sampled data is obtained by convoluting the acquired data and the coefficients in time domain. Thus, a lot of interpolations can be performed concurrently. So, this interpolation method is suitable for parallel computing. An ultra-high optical coherence tomography signal processing can be realized by using graphics processing unit (GPU) with computer unified device architecture (CUDA). This paper will introduce the signal processing steps of SD-OCT on GPU. An experiment is performed to acquire a frame SD-OCT data (400A-linesx2048 pixel per A-line) and real-time processed the data on GPU. The results show that it can be finished in 6.208 milliseconds, which is 37 times faster than that on Central Processing Unit (CPU).

  18. Optical spectroscopy and Doppler tomography of Cygnus X-2

    Elebert, P; Torres, M A P; García, M R

    2009-01-01

    We present phase resolved optical spectroscopy and Doppler tomography of V1341 Cygni, the optical counterpart to the neutron star low mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2. We derive a radial velocity curve for the secondary star, finding a projected radial velocity semi-amplitude of K2 = 79 +/- 3 km/s, leading to a mass function of 0.51 +/- 0.06 Msun, ~30% lower than the previous estimate. We tentatively attribute the lower value of K2 (compared to that obtained by other authors) to variations in the X-ray irradiation of the secondary star at different epochs of observations. The limited phase coverage and/or longer timebase of previous observations may also contribute to the difference in K2. Our value for the mass function implies a primary mass of 1.5 +/- 0.3 Msun, somewhat lower than previous dynamical estimates, but consistent with the value found by analysis of type-I X-ray bursts from this system. Our Doppler tomography of the broad He II 4686 line reveals that most of the emission from this line is produced o...

  19. Optical coherence tomography demonstrating macular retinal nerve fiber thinning in advanced optic disc drusen

    Ali Hassan; Pieter Gouws

    2014-01-01

    Optic disc drusen (ODD) are extracellular proteinaceous excrescences in the optic nerve head. They enlarge over time and can cause damage to nerve fibers with resulting loss of visual field. The authors report a case of advanced ODD in which macular optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal nerve fiber thinning. A single case report of a 42-year-old woman with known ODD presented to the eye clinic with worsening field of vision which was impacting on her daily life. The patient was su...

  20. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Laut, Sophie P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  1. Large-scale optical diffraction tomography for inspection of optical plastic lenses

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Herein is presented an optical diffraction tomography (ODT) technique for measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) maps of optical plastic lenses. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used to measure multiple complex optical fields of a plastic lens immersed in RI matching oil, at various rotational orientations. From this, ODT was used to reconstruct a 3-D RI distribution of the plastic lens with unprecedented RI sensitivity (dn = 4.21 x 10^-5) and high resolution (12.8 um). As a demonstration, 3-D RI distributions of a 2-mm-diameter borosilicate sphere and a 5-mm-diameter plastic lens

  2. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography with intense acoustic bursts

    Zemp, Roger J.; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-04-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) detects ultrasonically modulated light to spatially localize multiply scattered photons in turbid media with the ultimate goal of imaging the optical properties in living subjects. A principal challenge of the technique is weak modulated signal strength. We discuss ways to push the limits of signal enhancement with intense acoustic bursts while conforming to optical and ultrasonic safety standards. A CCD-based speckle-contrast detection scheme is used to detect acoustically modulated light by measuring changes in speckle statistics between ultrasound-on and ultrasound-off states. The CCD image capture is synchronized with the ultrasound burst pulse sequence. Transient acoustic radiation force, a consequence of bursts, is seen to produce slight signal enhancement over pure ultrasonic-modulation mechanisms for bursts and CCD exposure times of the order of milliseconds. However, acoustic radiation-force-induced shear waves are launched away from the acoustic sample volume, which degrade UOT spatial resolution. By time gating the CCD camera to capture modulated light before radiation force has an opportunity to accumulate significant tissue displacement, we reduce the effects of shear-wave image degradation, while enabling very high signal-to-noise ratios. Additionally, we maintain high-resolution images representative of optical and not mechanical contrast. Signal-to-noise levels are sufficiently high so as to enable acquisition of 2D images of phantoms with one acoustic burst per pixel.

  3. Developing High-Density Diffuse Optical Tomography for Neuroimaging

    White, Brian Richard

    Clinicians who care for brain-injured patients and premature infants desire a bedside monitor of brain function. A decade ago, there was hope that optical imaging would be able to fill this role, as it combined fMRI's ability to construct cortical maps with EEG's portable, cap-based systems. However, early optical systems had poor imaging performance, and the momentum for the technique slowed. In our lab, we develop diffuse optical tomography (DOT), which is a more advanced method of performing optical imaging. My research has been to pioneer the in vivo use of DOT for advanced neuroimaging by (1) quantifying the advantages of DOT through both in silico simulation and in vivo performance metrics, (2) restoring confidence in the technique with the first retinotopic mapping of the visual cortex (a benchmark for fMRI and PET), and (3) creating concepts and methods for the clinical translation of DOT. Hospitalized patients are unable to perform complicated neurological tasks, which has motivated us to develop the first DOT methods for resting-state brain mapping with functional connectivity. Finally, in collaboration with neonatologists, I have extended these methods with proof-of-principle imaging of brain-injured premature infants. This work establishes DOT's improvements in imaging performance and readies it for multiple clinical and research roles.

  4. Optical coherence tomography findings and retinal changes after vitrectomy for optic disc pit maculopathy

    Gaurav Sanghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To study the optical coherence tomography (OCT patterns in optic disc pit maculopathy and retinal changes after vitreous surgery. Materials and Methods : Retrospective review of consecutive cases with optic disc pit maculopathy seen at two tertiary eye institutes from January 2005 to June 2009. Results : Twenty-four eyes of 23 patients are included. The presenting visual acuity ranged from 20/400 to 20/20 (median:20/80. The median age at presentation was 24 years (range, 6-57 years. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated a combination of retinoschisis and outer layer detachment (OLD in 19 (79.17% eyes, OLD only in 3 (12.5% eyes and retinoschisis only in 2 (8.33% eyes. An obvious communication (outer layer hole between the schisis and OLD was seen in 14 (73.68% of the 19 eyes with both features. Of the 21 eyes with retinoschisis, schisis was present in multiple layers in 15 (71.43% and single layer in 6 (28.57% eyes. Eleven eyes underwent pars plana vitrectomy including creation of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD, fluid-air exchange, low intensity laser photocoagulation at the temporal edge of the optic disc pit and non-expansile perfluoropropane gas (14% injection. Five (45.45% of 11 eyes undergoing vitrectomy had complete resolution and 4 (36.36% eyes had partial resolution of maculopathy. Visual acuity improved in 8 (72.72% of 11 eyes. Conclusion : Optical coherence tomography demonstrates multiple layer schisis and outer layer detachment as main features of optic disc pit maculopathy. Vitrectomy with PVD induction, laser photocoagulation and gas tamponade results in anatomical and visual improvement in most cases with optic disc pit maculopathy.

  5. Optical coherence tomography demonstrating macular retinal nerve fiber thinning in advanced optic disc drusen

    Ali Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic disc drusen (ODD are extracellular proteinaceous excrescences in the optic nerve head. They enlarge over time and can cause damage to nerve fibers with resulting loss of visual field. The authors report a case of advanced ODD in which macular optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal nerve fiber thinning. A single case report of a 42-year-old woman with known ODD presented to the eye clinic with worsening field of vision which was impacting on her daily life. The patient was subject to full ophthalmic examination as well as Goldmann visual field testing, optic disc photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT of both her optic discs and maculae. ODD although rare, can be visually devastating. No treatment is currently available however patients should be counseled about progressive nature of ODD and the potential for visual loss. OCT imaging of the maculae as well as optic discs may serve a role in monitoring the damage disc drusen cause to the eye.

  6. Optical coherence tomography demonstrating macular retinal nerve fiber thinning in advanced optic disc drusen.

    Hassan, Ali; Gouws, Pieter

    2014-05-01

    Optic disc drusen (ODD) are extracellular proteinaceous excrescences in the optic nerve head. They enlarge over time and can cause damage to nerve fibers with resulting loss of visual field. The authors report a case of advanced ODD in which macular optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal nerve fiber thinning. A single case report of a 42-year-old woman with known ODD presented to the eye clinic with worsening field of vision which was impacting on her daily life. The patient was subject to full ophthalmic examination as well as Goldmann visual field testing, optic disc photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of both her optic discs and maculae. ODD although rare, can be visually devastating. No treatment is currently available however patients should be counseled about progressive nature of ODD and the potential for visual loss. OCT imaging of the maculae as well as optic discs may serve a role in monitoring the damage disc drusen cause to the eye. PMID:25136235

  7. Experimental demonstration of an analytic method for image reconstruction in optical tomography with large data sets

    Wang, Zheng-Min; Panasyuk, George Y.; Markel, Vadim A.; Schotland, John C.

    2005-01-01

    We report the first experimental test of an analytic image reconstruction algorithm for optical tomography with large data sets. Using a continuous-wave optical tomography system with 10^8 source-detector pairs, we demonstrate the reconstruction of an absorption image of a phantom consisting of a highly-scattering medium with absorbing inhomogeneities.

  8. Metrological reliability of optical coherence tomography in biomedical applications

    Goloni, C. M.; Temporão, G. P.; Monteiro, E. C.

    2013-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been proving to be an efficient diagnostics technique for imaging in vivo tissues, an optical biopsy with important perspectives as a diagnostic tool for quantitative characterization of tissue structures. Despite its established clinical use, there is no international standard to address the specific requirements for basic safety and essential performance of OCT devices for biomedical imaging. The present work studies the parameters necessary for conformity assessment of optoelectronics equipment used in biomedical applications like Laser, Intense Pulsed Light (IPL), and OCT, targeting to identify the potential requirements to be considered in the case of a future development of a particular standard for OCT equipment. In addition to some of the particular requirements standards for laser and IPL, also applicable for metrological reliability analysis of OCT equipment, specific parameters for OCT's evaluation have been identified, considering its biomedical application. For each parameter identified, its information on the accompanying documents and/or its measurement has been recommended. Among the parameters for which the measurement requirement was recommended, including the uncertainty evaluation, the following are highlighted: optical radiation output, axial and transverse resolution, pulse duration and interval, and beam divergence.

  9. Compact piezoelectric transducer fiber scanning probe for optical coherence tomography.

    Zhang, Ning; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Ahsen, Osman O; Liang, Kaicheng; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Xue, Ping; Li, Xingde; Fujimoto, James G

    2014-01-15

    We developed a compact, optical fiber scanning piezoelectric transducer (PZT) probe for endoscopic and minimally invasive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Compared with previous forward-mount fiber designs, we present a reverse-mount design that achieves a shorter rigid length. The fiber was mounted at the proximal end of a quadruple PZT tube and scanned inside the hollow PZT tube to reduce the probe length. The fiber resonant frequency was 338 Hz using a 17-mm-long fiber. A 0.9 mm fiber deflection was achieved with a driving amplitude of 35 V. Using a GRIN lens-based optical design with a 1.3× magnification, a ∼6 μm spot was scanned over a 1.2 mm diameter field. The probe was encased in a metal hypodermic tube with a ∼25 mm rigid length and covered with a 3.2 mm outer diameter (OD) plastic sheath. Imaging was performed with a swept source OCT system based on a Fourier domain modelocked laser (FDML) light source at a 240 kHz axial scan rate and 8 μm axial resolution (in air). En face OCT imaging of skin in vivo and human colon ex vivo was demonstrated. PMID:24562102

  10. Polycapillary optics for soft X-ray imaging and tomography

    Magnetic plasmas are extended volumetric sources of X-rays, and these emissions could reveal a lot of information about the processes occurring into the plasmas. Unfortunately, the constraints posed by these toroidal devices (high neutron flux, gamma and hard-X background, extremely high radiofrequency powers, high magnetic fields, optical limitations and so on) are very severe and limit strongly the possibility to install X-ray detectors directly into or close to the machine. Soft X-ray diagnostics are meant both as tomography and imaging. We started, therefore, to investigate the feasibility of using polycapillary optics for these purposes, in collaboration between 'Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare' (INFN)- Frascati, and 'Ente per le Nuove tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente' (ENEA)-Frascati and the 'Commissariat de l'Energie Atomique' (CEA)-Cadarache. The first tests were performed in order to characterize the polycapillary lenses (convergence, divergence, efficiency, spectral dispersion, etc.) for distances much larger than the optical focal length of the lenses, both for the detector and for the source. A silicon-based C-MOS imager (Medipix 2) has been used as a detector and the micro focus X-ray tubes as point-like sources. Results of these preliminary tests are presented, and the imaging capabilities of a polycapillary lens as well.

  11. Metrological reliability of optical coherence tomography in biomedical applications

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been proving to be an efficient diagnostics technique for imaging in vivo tissues, an optical biopsy with important perspectives as a diagnostic tool for quantitative characterization of tissue structures. Despite its established clinical use, there is no international standard to address the specific requirements for basic safety and essential performance of OCT devices for biomedical imaging. The present work studies the parameters necessary for conformity assessment of optoelectronics equipment used in biomedical applications like Laser, Intense Pulsed Light (IPL), and OCT, targeting to identify the potential requirements to be considered in the case of a future development of a particular standard for OCT equipment. In addition to some of the particular requirements standards for laser and IPL, also applicable for metrological reliability analysis of OCT equipment, specific parameters for OCT's evaluation have been identified, considering its biomedical application. For each parameter identified, its information on the accompanying documents and/or its measurement has been recommended. Among the parameters for which the measurement requirement was recommended, including the uncertainty evaluation, the following are highlighted: optical radiation output, axial and transverse resolution, pulse duration and interval, and beam divergence

  12. Optical coherence tomography for embryonic imaging: a review

    Raghunathan, Raksha; Singh, Manmohan; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-05-01

    Embryogenesis is a highly complex and dynamic process, and its visualization is crucial for understanding basic physiological processes during development and for identifying and assessing possible defects, malformations, and diseases. While traditional imaging modalities, such as ultrasound biomicroscopy, micro-magnetic resonance imaging, and micro-computed tomography, have long been adapted for embryonic imaging, these techniques generally have limitations in their speed, spatial resolution, and contrast to capture processes such as cardiodynamics during embryogenesis. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging modality with micrometer-scale spatial resolution and imaging depth up to a few millimeters in tissue. OCT has bridged the gap between ultrahigh resolution imaging techniques with limited imaging depth like confocal microscopy and modalities, such as ultrasound sonography, which have deeper penetration but poorer spatial resolution. Moreover, the noninvasive nature of OCT has enabled live imaging of embryos without any external contrast agents. We review how OCT has been utilized to study developing embryos and also discuss advances in techniques used in conjunction with OCT to understand embryonic development.

  13. Evaluation of microfluidic channels with optical coherence tomography

    Czajkowski, J.; Prykäri, T.; Alarousu, E.; Lauri, J.; Myllylä, R.

    2010-11-01

    Application of time domain, ultra high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) in evaluation of microfluidic channels is demonstrated. Presented study was done using experimental UHR-OCT device based on a Kerr-lens mode locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser, a photonic crystal fibre and modified, free-space Michelson interferometer. To show potential of the technique, microfluidic chip fabricated by VTT Center for Printed Intelligence (Oulu, Finland) was measured. Ability for full volumetric reconstruction in non-contact manner enabled complete characterization of closed entity of a microfluidic channel without contamination and harm for the sample. Measurement, occurring problems, and methods of postprocessing for raw data are described. Results present completely resolved physical structure of the channel, its spatial dimensions, draft angles and evaluation of lamination quality.

  14. Digital refocusing for transverse resolution improvement in optical coherence tomography

    Based on the fact that spectral domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) data can be treated as digital holography (DH) data acquired pointwise, we develop a spectral refocusing algorithm and show its ability to shift the focal region of OCT images obtained from SD OCT data acquired with a tightly focused scanning beam. Although refocusing itself depends on the refractive index of the studied media, we propose a procedure capable of restoring images with resolution equal to the resolution in the focal plane in the whole volume even in case of unknown refractive index of the media. As the proposed refocusing method operates with phases of the 3D Fourier spectrum of the SD OCT signal, it is very sensitive to the object motion during data acquisition. Thus, we also propose phase equalization preprocessing, which allows compensating the influence of such motions

  15. Clinical Applications of Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography

    Su-Ho Lim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT was recently developed and has become a crucial tool in clinical practice. AS-OCT is a noncontact imaging device that provides the detailed structure of the anterior part of the eyes. In this review, the author will discuss the various clinical applications of AS-OCT, such as the normal findings, tear meniscus measurement, ocular surface disease (e.g., pterygium, pinguecula, and scleromalacia, architectural analysis after cataract surgery, post-LASIK keratectasia, Descemet’s membrane detachment, evaluation of corneal graft after keratoplasty, corneal deposits (corneal dystrophies and corneal verticillata, keratitis, anterior segment tumors, and glaucoma evaluation (angle assessment, morphological analysis of the filtering bleb after trabeculectomy, or glaucoma drainage device implantation surgery. The author also presents some interesting cases demonstrated via AS-OCT.

  16. Imaging of mouse embryonic eye development using optical coherence tomography

    Syed, Saba H.; Kasiraj, Alyssa; Larina, Irina V.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Congenital abnormalities are often caused by genetic disorders which alter the normal development of the eye. Embryonic eye imaging in mouse model is important for understanding of normal and abnormal eye development and can contribute to prevention and treatment of eye defects in humans. In this study, we used Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography (SS-OCT) to image eye structure in mouse embryos at 12.5 to 17.5 days post coitus (dpc). The imaging depth of the OCT allowed us to visualize the whole eye globe at these stages. Different ocular tissues including lens, cornea, eyelids, and hyaloid vasculature were visualized. These results suggest that OCT imaging is a useful tool to study embryonic eye development in the mouse model.

  17. Evaluation of microfluidic channels with optical coherence tomography

    Czajkowski, J.

    2010-06-25

    Application of time domain, ultra high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) in evaluation of microfluidic channels is demonstrated. Presented study was done using experimental UHR-OCT device based on a Kerr-lens mode locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser, a photonic crystal fibre and modified, free-space Michelson interferometer. To show potential of the technique, microfluidic chip fabricated by VTT Center for Printed Intelligence (Oulu, Finland) was measured. Ability for full volumetric reconstruction in non-contact manner enabled complete characterization of closed entity of a microfluidic channel without contamination and harm for the sample. Measurement, occurring problems, and methods of postprocessing for raw data are described. Results present completely resolved physical structure of the channel, its spatial dimensions, draft angles and evaluation of lamination quality.

  18. Study on cerebral microcirculation by Optical Doppler Tomography

    2008-01-01

    Optical Doppler Tomography (ODT) provides a novel method to measure the blood flow velocity in vessels with the diameter at micrometer scale. Rats with cranial window are used as a model, and the changes in the blood flow velocity of cerebral arterioles in sensory cortex are measured in real time with an established ODT system, under electrical stimulation and drug administration. The results show significant differences in the blood flow velocity between experimental groups and control groups, demonstrating the feasibility of ODT in the cerebral microcircula- tion study. Compared with the conventional Doppler ultrasound, ODT provides much higher spatial resolution, and thus holds a promising future in the application of the cerebral microcirculation study, especially in the observation of the blood flow velocity in micrometer scale vessels.

  19. Voxel Based Morphometry in Optical Coherence Tomography: Validation & Core Findings

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Chen, Min; Carass, Aaron; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Al-Louzi, Omar; Solomon, Sharon D.; Saidha, Shiv; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the human retina is now becoming established as an important modality for the detection and tracking of various ocular diseases. Voxel based morphometry (VBM) is a long standing neuroimaging analysis technique that allows for the exploration of the regional differences in the brain. There has been limited work done in developing registration based methods for OCT, which has hampered the advancement of VBM analyses in OCT based population studies. Following on from our recent development of an OCT registration method, we explore the potential benefits of VBM analysis in cohorts of healthy controls (HCs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Specifically, we validate the stability of VBM analysis in two pools of HCs showing no significant difference between the two populations. Additionally, we also present a retrospective study of age and sex matched HCs and relapsing remitting MS patients, demonstrating results consistent with the reported literature while providing insight into the retinal changes associated with this MS subtype.

  20. Longitudinal Imaging of Heart Development With Optical Coherence Tomography

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has great potential for deciphering the role of mechanics in normal and abnormal heart development. OCT images tissue microstructure and blood flow deep into the tissue (1–2mm) at high spatiotemporal resolutions allowing unprecedented images of the developing heart. Here, we review the advancement of OCT technology to image heart development and report some of our recent findings utilizing OCT imaging under environmental control for longitudinal imaging. Precise control of the environment is absolutely required in longitudinal studies that follow the growth of the embryo or studies comparing normal versus perturbed heart development to obtain meaningful in vivo results. These types of studies are essential to tease out the influence of cardiac dynamics on molecular expression and their role in the progression of congenital heart defects. PMID:26236147

  1. Virtual histology of the human heart using optical coherence tomography

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Moazami, Nader; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2009-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows for the visualization of micron-scale structures within nontransparent biological tissues. For the first time, we demonstrate the use of OCT in identifying components of the cardiac conduction system and other structures in the explanted human heart. Reconstructions of cardiac structures up to 2 mm below the tissue surface were achieved and validated with Masson Trichrome histology in atrial, ventricular, sinoatrial nodal, and atrioventricular nodal preparations. The high spatial resolution of OCT provides visualization of cardiac fibers within the myocardium, as well as elements of the cardiac conduction system; however, a limiting factor remains its depth penetration, demonstrated to be ~2 mm in cardiac tissues. Despite its currently limited imaging depth, the use of OCT to identify the structural determinants of both normal and abnormal function in the intact human heart is critical in its development as a potential aid to intracardiac arrhythmia diagnosis and therapy.

  2. Statistical analysis of motion contrast in optical coherence tomography angiography

    Cheng, Yuxuan; Pan, Cong; Lu, Tongtong; Hong, Tianyu; Ding, Zhihua; Li, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (Angio-OCT), mainly based on the temporal dynamics of OCT scattering signals, has found a range of potential applications in clinical and scientific researches. In this work, based on the model of random phasor sums, temporal statistics of the complex-valued OCT signals are mathematically described. Statistical distributions of the amplitude differential (AD) and complex differential (CD) Angio-OCT signals are derived. The theories are validated through the flow phantom and live animal experiments. Using the model developed in this work, the origin of the motion contrast in Angio-OCT is mathematically explained, and the implications in the improvement of motion contrast are further discussed, including threshold determination and its residual classification error, averaging method, and scanning protocol. The proposed mathematical model of Angio-OCT signals can aid in the optimal design of the system and associated algorithms.

  3. Statistical analysis of motion contrast in optical coherence tomography angiography

    Cheng, Yuxuan; Guo, Li; Pan, Cong; Lu, Tongtong; Hong, Tianyu; Ding, Zhihua; Li, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (Angio-OCT), mainly based on the temporal dynamics of OCT scattering signals, has found a range of potential applications in clinical and scientific research. Based on the model of random phasor sums, temporal statistics of the complex-valued OCT signals are mathematically described. Statistical distributions of the amplitude differential and complex differential Angio-OCT signals are derived. The theories are validated through the flow phantom and live animal experiments. Using the model developed, the origin of the motion contrast in Angio-OCT is mathematically explained, and the implications in the improvement of motion contrast are further discussed, including threshold determination and its residual classification error, averaging method, and scanning protocol. The proposed mathematical model of Angio-OCT signals can aid in the optimal design of the system and associated algorithms.

  4. Optical coherence tomography to evaluate coronary stent implantation and complications.

    Hayat, Umair; Thondapu, Vikas; Ul Haq, Muhammad Asrar; Foin, Nicolas; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Barlis, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Coronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) is now an established imaging technique in many catheterization laboratories worldwide. With its near-histological view of the vessel wall and lumen interface, it offers unprecedented imaging quality to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, plaque vulnerability, and vascular biology. Not only is OCT used to accurately detect atherosclerotic plaque and optimize stent position, but it can further characterize plaque composition, quantify stent apposition, and assess stent tissue coverage. Given that its resolution of 15 μm is well above that of angiography and intravascular ultrasound, OCT has become the invasive imaging method of choice to examine the interaction between stents and the vessel wall. This review focuses on the application of OCT to examine coronary stents, the mechanisms of stent complications, and future directions of OCT-guided intervention. PMID:26247272

  5. Scalable multiplexing for parallel imaging with interleaved optical coherence tomography.

    Lee, Hee Yoon; Marvdashti, Tahereh; Duan, Lian; Khan, Saara A; Ellerbee, Audrey K

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate highly parallel imaging with interleaved optical coherence tomography (iOCT) using an in-house-fabricated, air-spaced virtually-imaged phased array (VIPA). The air-spaced VIPA performs spectral encoding of the interferograms from multiple lateral points within a single sweep of the source and allows us to tune and balance several imaging parameters: number of multiplexed points, ranging depth, and sensitivity. In addition to a thorough discussion of the parameters and operating principles of the VIPA, we experimentally demonstrate the effect of different VIPA designs on the multiplexing potential of iOCT. Using a 200-kHz light source, we achieve an effective A-scan rate of 3.2-MHz by multiplexing 16 lateral points onto a single wavelength sweep. The improved sensitivity of this system is demonstrated for 3D imaging of biological samples such as a human finger and a fruit fly. PMID:25401031

  6. Optical coherence tomography of the epidermal sulfakrilate surface strippings

    Utz S.R.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Method of the epidermal surface biopsy (ESB with the adhesive compositions is the alter-native to the classic his-tological examination. Materials and Methods. In this study medical adhesive "Sulfacrylate" was used, small portions of which had been spread on an object glass, and then on different skin areas. To study the structural organization of the samples ESB the technique of optical coherence tomography (ОСТ was used. Results. We obtained the pictures that visualize the structural organization of the different layers of the epidermis in lichen planus, hyperkeratosis, scabies and other skin diseases. Conclusion. This technique allows non-invasive measurement of high-precision structure of different layers of the epidermis, which can be useful both for research and for the practical dermatology.

  7. Monitoring remineralization of enamel subsurface lesions by optical coherence tomography.

    Mandurah, Mona M; Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Kitasako, Yuichi; Nakashima, Syozi; Bakhsh, Turki A; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2013-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a potential clinical tool for enamel lesion monitoring. Swept-source OCT findings were compared with cross-sectional nanohardness findings of enamel. Subsurface bovine enamel lesions in three groups were subjected to (1) deionized water (control), (2) phosphoryl oligosaccharide of calcium (POs-Ca) or (3) POs-Ca with 1 ppm fluoride for 14 days. B-scans images were obtained at 1310-nm center wavelength on sound, demineralized and remineralized areas after 4, 7, and 14 days. The specimens were processed for cross-sectional nanoindentation. Reflectivity from enamel that had increased with demineralization decreased with remineralization. An OCT attenuation coefficient parameter (μt), derived based on the Beer-Lambert law as a function of backscatter signal slope, showed a strong linear regression with integrated nanohardness of all regions (pattenuation demonstrated a capability for monitoring changes of enamel lesions during remineralization. PMID:23563920

  8. Optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin and skin diseases

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini;

    2009-01-01

    , as have many diseases. The method can provide accurate measures of epidermal and nail changes in normal tissue. Skin cancer and other tumors, as well as inflammatory diseases, have been studied and good agreement found between OCT images and histopathological architecture. OCT also allows noninvasive......Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging technology based on light reflection. It provides real-time images with up to 2-mm penetration into the skin and a resolution of approximately 10 μm. It is routinely used in ophthalmology. The normal skin and its appendages have been studied...... monitoring of morphologic changes in skin diseases and may have a particular role in the monitoring of medical treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer. The technology is however still evolving and continued technological development will necessitate an ongoing evaluation of its diagnostic accuracy. Several...

  9. Molecular Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography: A Review¶

    Yang, Changhuei

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the current state of research on the use of molecular contrast agents in optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging techniques. After a brief discussion of the basic principle of OCT and the importance of incorporating molecular contrast agent usage into this imaging modality, we shall present an overview of the different molecular contrast OCT (MCOCT) methods that have been developed thus far. We will then discuss several important practical issues that define the possible range of contrast agent choice, the design criteria for engineered molecular contrast agent and the implementability of a given MCOCT method for clinical or biological applications. We will conclude by outlining a few areas of pursuit that deserve a greater degree of research and development. PMID:15588122

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography and Raman Spectroscopy of the retina

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Liu, R; Chan, J; Lane, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-16

    Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combining these imaging modalities. We present an ex vivo OCT microscope combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. The combined instrument will be used to investigate remaining technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities, such as the laser power levels needed to achieve a Raman signal above the noise level without damaging the sample.

  11. One step geometrical calibration method for optical coherence tomography

    We present a novel one-step calibration methodology for geometrical distortion correction for optical coherence tomography (OCT). A calibration standard especially designed for OCT is introduced, which consists of an array of inverse pyramidal structures. The use of multiple landmarks situated on four different height levels on the pyramids allow performing a 3D geometrical calibration. The calibration procedure itself is based on a parametric model of the OCT beam propagation. It is validated by experimental results and enables the reduction of systematic errors by more than one order of magnitude. In future, our results can improve OCT image reconstruction and interpretation for medical applications such as real time monitoring of surgery. (paper)

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal and Choroidal Tumors

    Emil Anthony T. Say

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT has revolutionized the field of ophthalmology since its introduction 20 years ago. Originally intended primarily for retina specialists to image the macula, it has found its role in other subspecialties that include glaucoma, cornea, and ocular oncology. In ocular oncology, OCT provides axial resolution to approximately 7 microns with cross-sectional images of the retina, delivering valuable information on the effects of intraocular tumors on the retinal architecture. Some effects include retinal edema, subretinal fluid, retinal atrophy, photoreceptor loss, outer retinal thinning, and retinal pigment epithelial detachment. With more advanced technology, OCT now provides imaging deeper into the choroid using a technique called enhanced depth imaging. This allows characterization of the thickness and reflective quality of small (<3 mm thick choroidal lesions including choroidal nevus and melanoma. Future improvements in image resolution and depth will allow better understanding of the mechanisms of visual loss, tumor growth, and tumor management.

  13. Radiographic, microcomputer tomography, and optical coherence tomography investigations of ceramic interfaces

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Ionita, Ciprian; Topala, Florin; Petrescu, Emanuela; Rominu, Roxana; Pop, Daniela Maria; Marsavina, Liviu; Negru, Radu; Bradu, Adrian; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2010-12-01

    Imagistic investigation of the metal-ceramic crowns and fixed partial prostheses represent a very important issue in nowadays dentistry. At this time, in dental office, it is difficult or even impossible to evaluate a metal ceramic crown or bridge before setting it in the oral cavity. The possibilities of ceramic fractures are due to small fracture lines or material defects inside the esthetic layers. Material and methods: In this study 25 metal ceramic crowns and fixed partial prostheses were investigated by radiographic method (Rx), micro computer tomography (MicroCT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) working in Time Domain, at 1300 nm. The OCT system contains two interferometers and one scanner. For each incident analysis a stuck made of 100 slices was obtain. These slices were used in order to obtain a 3D model of the ceramic interface. Results: RX and MicroCT are very powerful instruments that provide a good characterization of the dental construct. It is important to observe the reflections due to the metal infrastructure that could affect the evaluation of the metal ceramic crowns and bridges. The OCT investigations could complete the imagistic evaluation of the dental construct by offering important information when it is need it.

  14. Towards spectral-domain optical coherence tomography on a silicon chip

    Akca, B.I.; Wörhoff, K.; Nguyen, V.D.; Kalkman, J.; Leeuwen, van T.G.; Ridder, de R.M.; Pollnau, M.

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a widely used optical imaging technology, particularly in the medical field, since it can provide non-invasive, sub-micrometer resolution diagnostic images of tissue. Current OCT systems contain optical fibers and free-space optical components which make these i

  15. Foveal thickness after phacoemulsification as measured by optical coherence tomography

    Gerasimos Th Georgopoulos

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Gerasimos Th Georgopoulos, Dimitrios Papaconstantinou, Maria Niskopoulou, Marilita Moschos, Ilias Georgalas, Chrysanthi KoutsandreaGlaucoma Department, Medical School, Athens University, Athens, GreeceBackground: Despite a significant body of research, no consistency on postoperative foveal thickness as measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT, can be recorded. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of uncomplicated cataract surgery in the thickness of the retina in the foveal area during the early postoperative period.Methods: In a prospective study, 79 eyes were assessed by OCT, on day 1, and weeks 2 and 4 after uncomplicated phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in the Athens University Clinic. The outcome measure was the thickness of the retina in the foveal area.Results: The thickness of the retina preoperatively is significantly smaller (150.4 ± 18.8 (p < 0.05 than the thickness of the retina on day 1 (171.8 ± 21 and week 2 (159.7 ± 19 and returned to the initial levels on week 4 (152 ± 17.1. The estimated correlation coefficients between preoperative and postoperative thickness of the retina were significant (p < 0.05. Conversely, no association was found between postoperative visual acuity and thickness of the retina, neither between the phacoemulsification energy and retinal thickness. Operation time, although inversely related with postoperative visual acuity, was not associated with the thickness of the retina.Conclusions: Following phacoemulsification, an increase in the foveal thickness was detected in the early postoperative period, quantified and followed up by OCT. The foveal thickness returned to the preoperative level, 1 month following surgery in our study. No association was shown between intraoperative parameters and increased postoperative retinal thickness.Keywords: optical coherence tomography, phacoemulsification, retinal thickness

  16. Optical Coherence Spectro-Tomography by all-Optical Depth-Wavelength analysis

    Froehly, L; Furfaro, L; Sandoz, P; Gharbi, T; Leproux, P; Huss, G; Couderc, V; Froehly, Luc; Ouadour, Malha; Furfaro, Luca; Sandoz, Patrick; Gharbi, Tijani; Leproux, Philippe; Huss, Guillaume; Couderc, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Current spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) methods rely on a posteriori numerical calculation. We present an alternative for accessing optically the spectroscopic information in OCT, i.e. without any post-processing, by using a grating based correlation and a wavelength demultiplexing system. Conventional A-scan and spectrally resolved A-scan are directly recorded on the image sensor. Furthermore, due to the grating based system, no correlation scan is necessary. In the frame of this paper we present the principle of the system as well as first experimental results.

  17. Correlation characteristics of optical coherence tomography images of turbid media with statistically inhomogeneous optical parameters

    Noisy structure of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of turbid medium contains information about spatial variations of its optical parameters. We propose analytical model of statistical characteristics of OCT signal fluctuations from turbid medium with spatially inhomogeneous coefficients of absorption and backscattering. Analytically predicted correlation characteristics of OCT signal from spatially inhomogeneous medium are in good agreement with the results of correlation analysis of OCT images of different biological tissues. The proposed model can be efficiently applied for quantitative evaluation of statistical properties of absorption and backscattering fluctuations basing on correlation characteristics of OCT images.

  18. Optical clearing of flowing blood using dextrans with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Xu, Xiangqun; Yu, Lingfeng; Chen, Zhongping

    2008-01-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) images have been used to investigate the mechanism of optical clearing in flowing blood using dextrans. The depth reflectivity profiles from SDOCT indicate that dextrans become increasingly more effective in reducing scattering in flowing blood, except for 5 mgdl−1 of D×500, with increasing molecular weights (MW 70,000 and 500,000) and concentrations (0.6, 2, and 5 mgdl−1). Among the tested dextrans, D×500 at 2 mgdl−1 had the most significa...

  19. Optical module to extend any Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography system into a polarisation-sensitive system

    Rivet, Sylvain; Marques, Manuel J.; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    This article presents a theoretical study on an optical module (OM) that can be inserted between an object under investigation and a Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography system, transforming the latter into a polarisation-sensitive optical coherence tomography optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The module consists of two electro-optic modulators, a Faraday rotator, a linear polariser and a quarter-wave plate. A detailed description on how the module can be used to extract both the net retardance and the fast axis orientation of a linear birefringent sample is presented. This is achieved by taking two sequential measurements for different values of retardance produced by the electro-optic modulator. The module keeps measurements free from undesired polarimetric effects due to birefringence in the single-mode optical fibre and diattenuation in fibre-based couplers within OCT systems. Simulations have been carried out in order to evaluate the effects of chromatic behaviour of the components within the OM.

  20. Optical clearing for luminal organ imaging with ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography.

    Liang, Yanmei; Yuan, Wu; Mavadia-Shukla, Jessica; Li, Xingde

    2016-08-01

    The imaging depth of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in highly scattering biological tissues (such as luminal organs) is limited, particularly for OCT operating at shorter wavelength regions (such as around 800 nm). For the first time, the optical clearing effect of the mixture of liquid paraffin and glycerol on luminal organs was explored with ultrahigh-resolution spectral domain OCT at 800 nm. Ex vivo studies were performed on pig esophagus and bronchus, and guinea pig esophagus with different volume ratios of the mixture. We found that the mixture of 40% liquid paraffin had the best optical clearing effect on esophageal tissues with a short effective time of ∼ 10 min, which means the clearing effect occurs about 10 min after the application of the clearing agent. In contrast, no obvious optical clearing effect was identified on bronchus tissues. PMID:27335154

  1. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography morphology in optic disc pit associated maculopathy

    Janusz Michalewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Our purpose was to study the clinical manifestation and course of optic pit maculopathy using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD- OCT images. Materials and Methods: We used SD-OCT to examine 20 eyes of 19 patients with a macular detachment in combination with an optic. Results: We observed five different fovea appearances in regard to fluid localization. In five eyes, we recorded changes in the fluid distribution with SD-OCT. In 17/20 eyes, we noted a communication between the perineural and subretinal and/or intraretinal space at the margin of the optic disc. Conclusion: 3-dimensional SD-OCT (3D-SDOCT scans revealed a three-fold connection, between subretinal and intraretinal space, perineural space, and the vitreous cavity. Therefore, we suppose that intraretinal or subretinal fluid in optic pit maculopathy may have both a vitreous and cerebrospinal origin. A membrane, covering the optic nerve was noted in 14 cases. Even if it seems intact in some B-scans, it is not complete in others several micrometers apart. Additionally, we observed fluid accumulation below the margin of the optic disc and hyperreflective porous tissue in the optic disc excavation. Those findings do not influence the course of maculopathy.

  2. Advanced integrated spectrometer designs for miniaturized optical coherence tomography systems

    Akca, B. I.; Považay, B.; Chang, L.; Alex, A.; Wörhoff, K.; de Ridder, R. M.; Drexler, W.; Pollnau, M.

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has enabled clinical applications that revolutionized in vivo medical diagnostics. Nevertheless, its current limitations owing to cost, size, complexity, and the need for accurate alignment must be overcome by radically novel approaches. Exploiting integrated optics, the central components of a spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system can be integrated on a chip. Arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) spectrometers with their high spectral resolution and compactness are excellent candidates for on-chip SD-OCT systems. However, specific design-related issues of AWG spectrometers limit the performance of on-chip SD-OCT systems. Here we present advanced AWG designs which could overcome the limitations arising from free spectral range, polarization dependency, and curved focal plane of the AWG spectrometers. Using these advanced AWG designs in an SD-OCT system can provide not only better overall performance but also some unique aspects that a commercial system does not have. Additionally, a partially integrated OCT system comprising an AWG spectrometer and an integrated beam splitter, as well as the in vivo imaging using this system are demonstrated.

  3. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography in equine bone

    Jacobs, J. W.; Matcher, S. J.

    2009-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to image equine bone samples. OCT and polarization sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) images of equine bone samples, before and after demineralization, are presented. Using a novel approach, taking a series of images at different angles of illumination, the polar angle and true birefringence of collagen within the tissue is determined, at one site in the sample. The images were taken before and after the bones were passed through a demineralization process. The images show an improvement in depth penetration after demineralization allowing better visualization of the internal structure of the bone and the optical orientation of the collagen. A quantitative measurement of true birefringence has been made of the bone; true birefringence was shown to be 1.9x10-3 before demineralization increasing to 2.7x10-3 after demineralization. However, determined collagen fiber orientation remains the same before and after demineralization. The study of bone is extensive within the field of tissue engineering where an understanding of the internal structures is essential. OCT in bone, and improved depth penetration through demineralization, offers a useful approach to bone analysis.

  4. Role of Optical Coherence Tomography on Corneal Surface Laser Ablation

    Bruna V. Ventura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on reviewing the roles of optical coherence tomography (OCT on corneal surface laser ablation procedures. OCT is an optical imaging modality that uses low-coherence interferometry to provide noninvasive cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure in vivo. There are two types of OCTs, each with transverse and axial spatial resolutions of a few micrometers: the time-domain and the fourier-domain OCTs. Both have been increasingly used by refractive surgeons and have specific advantages. Which of the current imaging instruments is a better choice depends on the specific application. In laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK and in excimer laser phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK, OCT can be used to assess corneal characteristics and guide treatment decisions. OCT accurately measures central corneal thickness, evaluates the regularity of LASIK flaps, and quantifies flap and residual stromal bed thickness. When evaluating the ablation depth accuracy by subtracting preoperative from postoperative measurements, OCT pachymetry correlates well with laser ablation settings. In addition, OCT can be used to provide precise information on the morphology and depth of corneal pathologic abnormalities, such as corneal degenerations, dystrophies, and opacities, correlating with histopathologic findings.

  5. Lung vasculature imaging using speckle variance optical coherence tomography

    Cua, Michelle; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Lane, Pierre M.; McWilliams, Annette; Shaipanich, Tawimas; MacAulay, Calum E.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Lam, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Architectural changes in and remodeling of the bronchial and pulmonary vasculature are important pathways in diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer. However, there is a lack of methods that can find and examine small bronchial vasculature in vivo. Structural lung airway imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) has previously been shown to be of great utility in examining bronchial lesions during lung cancer screening under the guidance of autofluorescence bronchoscopy. Using a fiber optic endoscopic OCT probe, we acquire OCT images from in vivo human subjects. The side-looking, circumferentially-scanning probe is inserted down the instrument channel of a standard bronchoscope and manually guided to the imaging location. Multiple images are collected with the probe spinning proximally at 100Hz. Due to friction, the distal end of the probe does not spin perfectly synchronous with the proximal end, resulting in non-uniform rotational distortion (NURD) of the images. First, we apply a correction algorithm to remove NURD. We then use a speckle variance algorithm to identify vasculature. The initial data show a vascaulture density in small human airways similar to what would be expected.

  6. Polarization-sensitive optical projection tomography for muscle fiber imaging.

    Fang, Mengjie; Dong, Di; Zeng, Chaoting; Liang, Xiao; Yang, Xin; Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge; Hui, Hui; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a tool used for three-dimensional imaging of millimeter-scale biological samples, with the advantage of exhibiting isotropic resolution typically in the micron range. OPT can be divided into two types: transmission OPT (tOPT) and emission OPT (eOPT). Compared with eOPT, tOPT discriminates different tissues based on their absorption coefficient, either intrinsic or after specific staining. However, it fails to distinguish muscle fibers whose absorption coefficients are similar to surrounding tissues. To circumvent this problem, in this article we demonstrate a polarization sensitive OPT system which improves the detection and 3D imaging of muscle fibers by using polarized light. We also developed image acquisition and processing protocols that, together with the system, enable the clear visualization of muscles. Experimental results show that the muscle fibers of diaphragm and stomach, difficult to be distinguished in regular tOPT, were clearly displayed in our system, proving its potential use. Moreover, polarization sensitive OPT was fused with tOPT to investigate the stomach tissue comprehensively. Future applications of polarization sensitive OPT could be imaging other fiber-like structures such as myocardium or other tissues presenting high optical anisotropy. PMID:26752330

  7. Optical coherence tomography: imaging architect for dermal microdialysis in psoriasis

    O'Connell, M.-L.; O'Connor, W.; Ramsay, B.; Guihen, E.; Ho, W. L.; Leahy, M. J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used as part of a ground breaking translational study to shed some light on one of the worlds most prevalent autoimmune diseases; psoriasis. The work successfully integrates the fields of optical imaging, biochemistry and dermatology in conducting a dermal microdialysis (DMD) trial for quantitative histamine assessment amongst a group of psoriasis sufferers. The DMD process involves temporary insertion of microscopic hollow tubes into a layer of skin to measure the levels of histamine and other important biological molecules in psoriasis. For comparison purposes, DMD catheters were implanted into healthy, peri-lesional and lesional skin regions. The catheters' entry and exit points and their precise locations in the epidermal layer of the skin were confirmed using OCT thus obtaining high resolution, wide-field images of the affected skin as well as catheter placement whilst local microdialysis enabled a tissue chemistry profile to be obtained from these three skin regions including histamine, a local immune system activator known to contribute towards itch and inflammation. Together these tools offer a synergistic approach in the clinical assessment of the disease. In addition, OCT delivered a non-invasive and rapid method for analyzing the affected skin architecture.

  8. Depth Compensated Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography via Digital Compensation

    Boroomand, Ameneh; Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Bizheva, Kostadinka; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a well-known imaging modality which allows for \\textit{in-vivo} visualization of the morphology of different biological tissues at cellular level resolutions. The overall SD-OCT imaging quality in terms of axial resolution and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) degrades with imaging depth, while the lateral resolution degrades with distance from the focal plane. This image quality degradation is due both to the design of the SD-OCT imaging system and the optical properties of the imaged object. Here, we present a novel Depth Compensated SD-OCT (DC-OCT) system that integrates a Depth Compensating Digital Signal Processing (DC-DSP) module to improve the overall imaging quality via digital compensation. The designed DC-DSP module can be integrated to any SD-OCT system and is able to simultaneously compensate for the depth-dependent loss of axial and lateral resolutions, depth-varying SNR, as well as sidelobe artifact for improved imaging quality. The integrated D...

  9. Classifying murine glomerulonephritis using optical coherence tomography and optical coherence elastography.

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Chang, Anthony; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V

    2016-08-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis caused by antiglomerular basement membrane marked by high mortality. The primary reason for this is delayed diagnosis via blood examination, urine analysis, tissue biopsy, or ultrasound and X-ray computed tomography imaging. Blood, urine, and tissue-based diagnoses can be time consuming, while ultrasound and CT imaging have relatively low spatial resolution, with reduced sensitivity. Optical coherence tomography is a noninvasive and high-resolution imaging technique that provides superior spatial resolution (micrometer scale) as compared to ultrasound and CT. Changes in tissue properties can be detected based on the optical metrics analyzed from the OCT signals, such as optical attenuation and speckle variance. Furthermore, OCT does not rely on ionizing radiation as with CT imaging. In addition to structural changes, the elasticity of the kidney can significantly change due to nephritis. In this work, OCT has been utilized to quantify the difference in tissue properties between healthy and nephritic murine kidneys. Although OCT imaging could identify the diseased tissue, its classification accuracy is clinically inadequate. By combining optical metrics with elasticity, the classification accuracy improves from 76% to 95%. These results show that OCT combined with OCE can be a powerful tool for identifying and classifying nephritis. Therefore, the OCT/OCE method could potentially be used as a minimally invasive tool for longitudinal studies during the progression and therapy of glomerulonephritis as well as complement and, perhaps, substitute highly invasive tissue biopsies. Elastic-wave propagation in mouse healthy and nephritic kidneys. PMID:26791097

  10. Root canal filling evaluation using optical coherence tomography

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin; Nica, Luminita; Ionita, Ciprian; Marcauteanu, Corina; Goguta, Luciana; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2010-04-01

    Endodontic therapy consists in cleaning and shaping the root canal system, removing organic debris and sealing the intra-canal space with permanent filling materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate various root canal fillings in order to detect material defects, the marginal adaptation at the root canal walls and to assess the quality of the apical sealing. 21 extracted single-root canal human teeth were selected for this study. We instrumented all roots using NiTi rotary instruments. All canals were enlarged with a 6% taper size 30 GT instrument, 0,5 mm from the anatomical apex. The root canals were irrigated with 5% sodium hypochlorite, followed by 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After the instrumentation was completed, the root canals were obturated using a thermoplasticizable polymer of polyesters. In order to assess the defects inside the filling material and the marginal fit to the root canal walls, the conebeam micro-computed tomography (CBμCT) was used first. After the CBμCT investigation, time domain optical coherence tomography working in en face mode (TDefOCT) was employed to evaluate the previous samples. The TDefOCT system was working at 1300 nm and was doubled by a confocal channel at 970 nm. The results obtained by CBμCT revealed no visible defects inside the root-canal fillings and at the interfaces with the root-canal walls. TDefOCT investigations permit to visualize a more complex stratificated structure at the interface filling material/dental hard tissue and in the apical region.

  11. Analysis of dental abfractions by optical coherence tomography

    Demjan, Enikö; Mărcăuţeanu, Corina; Bratu, Dorin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negruţiu, Meda; Ionita, Ciprian; Topală, Florin; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2010-02-01

    Aim and objectives. Abfraction is the pathological loss of cervical hard tooth substance caused by biomechanical overload. High horizontal occlusal forces result in large stress concentrations in the cervical region of the teeth. These stresses may be high enough to cause microfractures in the dental hard tissues, eventually resulting in the loss of cervical enamel and dentin. The present study proposes the microstructural characterization of these cervical lesions by en face optical coherence tomography (eFOCT). Material and methods: 31 extracted bicuspids were investigated using eFOCT. 24 teeth derived from patients with active bruxism and occlusal interferences; they presented deep buccal abfractions and variable degrees of occlusal pathological attrition. The other 7 bicuspids were not exposed to occlusal overload and had a normal morphology of the dental crowns. The dental samples were investigated using an eFOCT system operating at 1300 nm (B-scan at 1 Hz and C-scan mode at 2 Hz). The system has a lateral resolution better than 5 μm and a depth resolution of 9 μm in tissue. OCT images were further compared with micro - computer tomography images. Results. The eFOCT investigation of bicuspids with a normal morphology revealed a homogeneous structure of the buccal cervical enamel. The C-scan and B-scan images obtained from the occlusal overloaded bicuspids visualized the wedge-shaped loss of cervical enamel and damage in the microstructure of the underlaying dentin. The high occlusal forces produced a characteristic pattern of large cracks, which reached the tooth surface. Conclusions: eFOCT is a promising imaging method for dental abfractions and it may offer some insight on the etiological mechanism of these noncarious cervical lesions.

  12. Ceramic and polymeric dental onlays evaluated by photo-elasticity, optical coherence tomography, and micro-computed tomography

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Topala, Florin; Ionita, Ciprian; Negru, Radu; Fabriky, Mihai; Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Marsavina, Liviu; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Dental onlays are restorations used to repair rear teeth that have a mild to moderate amount of decay. They can also be used to restore teeth that are cracked or fractured if the damage is not severe enough to require a dental crown. The use of onlays requires less tooth reduction than does the use of metal fillings. This allows dentists to conserve more of a patient's natural tooth structure in the treatment process. The aims of this study are to evaluate the biomechanical comportment of the dental onlays, by using the 3D photo elasticity method and to investigate the integrity of the structures and their fitting to the dental support. For this optical coherence tomography and micro-computed tomography were employed. Both methods were used to investigate 37 dental onlays, 17 integral polymeric and 20 integral ceramic. The results permit to observe materials defects inside the ceramic or polymeric onlays situate in the biomechanically tensioned areas that could lead to fracture of the prosthetic structure. Marginal fitting problems of the onlays related to the teeth preparations were presented in order to observe the possibility of secondary cavities. The resulted images from the optical coherence tomography were verified by the micro-computed tomography. In conclusion, the optical coherence tomography can be used as a clinical method in order to evaluate the integrity of the dental ceramic and polymeric onlays and to investigate the quality of the marginal fitting to the teeth preparations.

  13. Optical tomography with structured illumination using the three-dimensional FN method

    Machida, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    One way of formulating optical tomography is to use the Born series, which is given by the Green's function for the homogeneous medium. The three-dimensional FN method is a numerical method of obtaining the specific intensity of the radiative transport equation expressed as a superposition of three-dimensional singular eigenfunctions. In this paper, we compute the Green's function for the radiative transport equation using the three-dimensional FN method without making diffusion approximation. To illustrate the present formulation of optical tomography, we consider optical tomography with structured illumination.

  14. Donor disc attachment assessment with intraoperative spectral optical coherence tomography during descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty

    Edward Wylegala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography has already been proven to be useful for pre- and post-surgical anterior eye segment assessment, especially in lamellar keratoplasty procedures. There is no evidence for intraoperative usefulness of optical coherence tomography (OCT. We present a case report of the intraoperative donor disc attachment assessment with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in case of Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK surgery combined with corneal incisions. The effectiveness of the performed corneal stab incisions was visualized directly by OCT scan analysis. OCT assisted DSAEK allows the assessment of the accuracy of the Descemet stripping and donor disc attachment.

  15. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for in vivo mouse retinal imaging

    Jian, Yifan; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-05-01

    Small animal models of retinal diseases are important to vision research, and noninvasive high resolution in vivo rodent retinal imaging is becoming an increasingly important tool used in this field. We present a custom Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) instrument for high resolution imaging of mouse retina. In order to overcome aberrations in the mouse eye, we incorporated a commercial adaptive optics system into the sample arm of the refractive FD-OCT system. Additionally, a commercially available refraction canceling lens was used to reduce lower order aberrations and specular back-reflection from the cornea. Performance of the adaptive optics (AO) system for correcting residual wavefront aberration in the mice eyes is presented. Results of AO FD-OCT images of mouse retina acquired in vivo with and without AO correction are shown as well.

  16. Ex vivo imaging of human thyroid pathology using integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. 34 thyroid gland specimens are imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology ranging from normal thyroid to benign disease/neoplasms (multinodular colloid goiter, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and follicular adenoma) and malignant thyroid tumors (papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma). Imaging is performed using an integrated OCT and OCM system, with tumor cells, can be identified from OCT and OCM images and are clearly differentiable from normal or benign thyroid tissues. With further development of needle-based imaging probes, OCT and OCM could be promising techniques to use for the screening of thyroid nodules and to improve the diagnostic specificity of fine needle aspiration evaluation.

  17. Compact MEMS-based Adaptive Optics Optical Coherence Tomography for Clinical Use

    Chen, D; Olivier, S; Jones, S; Zawadzki, R; Evans, J; Choi, S; Werner, J

    2008-02-04

    We describe a compact MEMS-based adaptive optics (AO) optical coherence tomography system with improved AO performance and ease of clinical use. A typical AO system consists of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror that measures and corrects the ocular and system aberrations. Because of the limitation on the current deformable mirror technologies, the amount of real-time ocular-aberration compensation is restricted and small in the previous AO-OCT instruments. In this instrument, we proposed to add an optical apparatus to correct the spectacle aberrations of the patients such as myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism. This eliminated the tedious process of the trial lenses in clinical imaging. Different amount of spectacle aberration compensation was achieved by motorized stages and automated with the AO computer for ease of clinical use. In addition, the compact AO-OCT was optimized to have minimum system aberrations to reduce AO registration errors and improve AO performance.

  18. Profile and Determinants of Retinal Optical Intensity in Normal Eyes with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Binyao Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the profile and determinants of retinal optical intensity in normal subjects using 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT.A total of 231 eyes from 231 healthy subjects ranging in age from 18 to 80 years were included and underwent a 3D OCT scan. Forty-four eyes were randomly chosen to be scanned by two operators for reproducibility analysis. Distribution of optical intensity of each layer and regions specified by the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS were investigated by analyzing the OCT raw data with our automatic graph-based algorithm. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed between retinal optical intensity and sex, age, height, weight, spherical equivalent (SE, axial length, image quality, disc area and rim/disc area ratio (R/D area ratio.For optical intensity measurements, the intraclass correlation coefficient of each layer ranged from 0.815 to 0.941, indicating good reproducibility. Optical intensity was lowest in the central area of retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, inner nuclear layer, outer plexiform layer and photoreceptor layer, except for the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Optical intensity was positively correlated with image quality in all retinal layers (0.5530.05. There was no relationship between retinal optical intensity and sex, height, weight, SE, axial length, disc area and R/D area ratio.There was a specific pattern of distribution of retinal optical intensity in different regions. The optical intensity was affected by image quality and age. Image quality can be used as a reference for normalization. The effect of age needs to be taken into consideration when using OCT for diagnosis.

  19. Choroidal thinning in high myopia measured by optical coherence tomography

    Ikuno Y

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Yasushi Ikuno, Satoko Fujimoto, Yukari Jo, Tomoko Asai, Kohji NishidaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, JapanPurpose: To investigate the rate of choroidal thinning in highly myopic eyes.Patients and methods: A retrospective observational study of 37 eyes of 26 subjects (nine males and 17 females, mean age 39.6 ± 7.7 years with high myopia but no pathologies who had undergone spectral domain optical coherence tomography and repeated the test 1 year later (1 ± 0.25 year at Osaka University Hospital, Osaka, Japan. Patients older than 50 years with visual acuity worse than 20/40 or with whitish chorioretinal atrophy involving the macula were excluded. Two masked raters measured the choroidal thicknesses (CTs at the foveda, 3 mm superiorly, inferiorly, temporally, and nasally on the images and averaged the values. The second examination was about 365 days after the baseline examination. The CT reduction per year (CTRPY was defined as (CT 1 year after - baseline CT/days between the two examinations × 365. The retinal thicknesses were also investigated.Results: The CTRPY at the fovea was −1.0 ± 22.0 µm (range –50.2 to 98.5 at the fovea, –6.5 ± 24.3 µm (range −65.8 to 90.2 temporally, –0.5 ± 22.3 µm (range –27.1 to 82.5 nasally, –9.7 ± 21.7 µm (range –40.1 to 60.1 superiorly, and –1.4 ± 25.5 µm (range –85.6 to 75.2 inferiorly. There were no significant differences in the CTRPY at each location (P = 0.34. The CT decreased significantly (P < 0.05 only superiorly. The superior CTRPY was negatively correlated with the axial length (P < 0.05. The retinal thickness at the fovea did not change. Stepwise analysis for CTRPY selected axial length (P = 0.04, R2 = 0.13 and age (P = 0.08, R2 = 0.21 as relevant factors.Conclusions: The highly myopic choroid might gradually thin and be affected by many factors. Location and axial length are key factors to regulate the rate of choroidal

  20. Towards spectral-domain optical coherence tomography on a silicon chip

    Akca, B. I.; Wörhoff, K; Nguyen, V. D.; Kalkman, J; van, Leeuwen, M.; Ridder, de, N.; Pollnau, M

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a widely used optical imaging technology, particularly in the medical field, since it can provide non-invasive, sub-micrometer resolution diagnostic images of tissue. Current OCT systems contain optical fibers and free-space optical components which make these instruments bulky and costly. A significant decrease in the size and cost of an OCT system is possible through the use of integrated optics, allowing for compact and low-cost OCT systems, especially...

  1. Skin optical clearing enhancement with penetration enhancer azone using spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Xu, Xiangqun; Zhu, Qiuhong

    2008-06-01

    In order to find a non-invasive way to improve the efficacy of skin optical clearing with topically applied optical clearing agents (OCA), we evaluated the effect of azone ® (epsilon-Laurocapram) as a chemical penetration enhancer on optical clearing of intact skin in vitro. Fresh porcine skin with topical application of glycerol (G) mixed with water-soluble azone (A) was investigated using near-infrared spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Light transmittance at 1276 nm increased by 41% and diffuse reflectance at 1066 nm decreased by 29% at 60 min after treatment with 40%G5%A on a spectrophotometer with an internal integrating sphere. 40% glycerol with addition of azone was a more effective optical clearing agent than 40% and 80% glycerol. 60%G/5%A led to a 2-fold increase in achievable OCT imaging depth and a 2.2-fold increase in light intensity reflected off the underneath needle surface after 60 minutes in the OCT in-depth reflectance profiles. In conclusion, skin optical clearing with the topical application of glycerol was markedly enhanced by water-soluble azone. Skin permeation enhancing effect of azone accounts probably for the skin clearing enhancement.

  2. Region-of-interest diffuse optical tomography system

    Saikia, Manob Jyoti; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using near-infrared light is a promising tool for non-invasive imaging of deep tissue. This technique is capable of quantitative reconstruction of absorption (μa) and scattering coefficient (μs) inhomogeneities in the tissue. The rationale for reconstructing the optical property map is that the absorption coefficient variation provides diagnostic information about metabolic and disease states of the tissue. The aim of DOT is to reconstruct the internal tissue cross section with good spatial resolution and contrast from noisy measurements non-invasively. We develop a region-of-interest scanning system based on DOT principles. Modulated light is injected into the phantom/tissue through one of the four light emitting diode sources. The light traversing through the tissue gets partially absorbed and scattered multiple times. The intensity and phase of the exiting light are measured using a set of photodetectors. The light transport through a tissue is diffusive in nature and is modeled using radiative transfer equation. However, a simplified model based on diffusion equation (DE) can be used if the system satisfies following conditions: (a) the optical parameter of the inhomogeneity is close to the optical property of the background, and (b) μs of the medium is much greater than μa (μs > > μa). The light transport through a highly scattering tissue satisfies both of these conditions. A discrete version of DE based on finite element method is used for solving the inverse problem. The depth of probing light inside the tissue depends on the wavelength of light, absorption, and scattering coefficients of the medium and the separation between the source and detector locations. Extensive simulation studies have been carried out and the results are validated using two sets of experimental measurements. The utility of the system can be further improved by using multiple wavelength light sources. In such a scheme, the spectroscopic

  3. Region-of-interest diffuse optical tomography system

    Saikia, Manob Jyoti; Kanhirodan, Rajan, E-mail: rajan@physics.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-01-15

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using near-infrared light is a promising tool for non-invasive imaging of deep tissue. This technique is capable of quantitative reconstruction of absorption (μ{sub a}) and scattering coefficient (μ{sub s}) inhomogeneities in the tissue. The rationale for reconstructing the optical property map is that the absorption coefficient variation provides diagnostic information about metabolic and disease states of the tissue. The aim of DOT is to reconstruct the internal tissue cross section with good spatial resolution and contrast from noisy measurements non-invasively. We develop a region-of-interest scanning system based on DOT principles. Modulated light is injected into the phantom/tissue through one of the four light emitting diode sources. The light traversing through the tissue gets partially absorbed and scattered multiple times. The intensity and phase of the exiting light are measured using a set of photodetectors. The light transport through a tissue is diffusive in nature and is modeled using radiative transfer equation. However, a simplified model based on diffusion equation (DE) can be used if the system satisfies following conditions: (a) the optical parameter of the inhomogeneity is close to the optical property of the background, and (b) μ{sub s} of the medium is much greater than μ{sub a} (μ{sub s} > > μ{sub a}). The light transport through a highly scattering tissue satisfies both of these conditions. A discrete version of DE based on finite element method is used for solving the inverse problem. The depth of probing light inside the tissue depends on the wavelength of light, absorption, and scattering coefficients of the medium and the separation between the source and detector locations. Extensive simulation studies have been carried out and the results are validated using two sets of experimental measurements. The utility of the system can be further improved by using multiple wavelength light sources. In such

  4. The use of optical coherence tomography in maxillofacial surgery

    Al-Obaidi, Mohammed; Tandon, Rahul; Tiwana, Paul

    2015-02-01

    The ever-evolving medical field continues to trend toward less invasive approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of pathological conditions. Basic sciences research has allowed for improved technologies that are translated to the clinical sciences. Similarly, advancements in imaging modalities continue to improve and their applications become more varied. As such, surgeons and pathologists are able to depend on smaller samples for tissue diagnosis of pathological disease, where once large sections of tissue were needed. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a high-resolution imaging technique, has been used extensively in different medical fields to improve diagnostic yield. Its use in dental fields, particularly in oral and maxillofacial surgery, remains limited. Our goal is to assess the use of OCT for improving soft tissue analysis and diagnosis, particularly for its applications in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Optical coherence tomography is a modality that uses an optical signal using safe near-infrared light which is reflected off the sub-surface structures. This allows for high-resolution cross-sectional images of the tissue morphology to be obtained. Ophthalmologists have been using OCT to obtain images of the retina to assess for age-related macular degeneration. More recently, OCT has been used by Interventional Cardiology to image coronary arteries, and assess plaque thickness and morphology. This technology is now being investigated in several medical fields as a form of optical biopsy, providing in situ images with high-resolution morphology of tissues. We are particularly interested in its use on epithelial tissues, and therefore performed a literature review on the use of OCT for assessing epithelium. Evaluation of histologically-diagnosed actinic keratosis, for example, was found to correlate well with the imaging discrepancies found on OCT; and the in vivo assessment of atypical keratinocytes was firmly established. Additionally

  5. Integral ceramic superstructure evaluation using time domain optical coherence tomography

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Bradu, Adrian; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherence interferometry technique that includes several technologies (and the corresponding devices and components), such as illumination and detection, interferometry, scanning, adaptive optics, microscopy and endoscopy. From its large area of applications, we consider in this paper a critical aspect in dentistry - to be investigated with a Time Domain (TD) OCT system. The clinical situation of an edentulous mandible is considered; it can be solved by inserting 2 to 6 implants. On these implants a mesostructure will be manufactured and on it a superstructure is needed. This superstructure can be integral ceramic; in this case materials defects could be trapped inside the ceramic layers and those defects could lead to fractures of the entire superstructure. In this paper we demonstrate that a TD-OCT imaging system has the potential to properly evaluate the presence of the defects inside the ceramic layers and those defects can be fixed before inserting the prosthesis inside the oral cavity. Three integral ceramic superstructures were developed by using a CAD/CAM technology. After the milling, the ceramic layers were applied on the core. All the three samples were evaluated by a TD-OCT system working at 1300 nm. For two of the superstructures evaluated, no defects were found in the most stressed areas. The third superstructure presented four ceramic defects in the mentioned areas. Because of those defects the superstructure may fracture. The integral ceramic prosthesis was send back to the dental laboratory to fix the problems related to the material defects found. Thus, TD-OCT proved to be a valuable method for diagnosing the ceramic defects inside the integral ceramic superstructures in order to prevent fractures at this level.

  6. Optical diffraction tomography: accuracy of an off-axis reconstruction

    Kostencka, Julianna; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    Optical diffraction tomography is an increasingly popular method that allows for reconstruction of three-dimensional refractive index distribution of semi-transparent samples using multiple measurements of an optical field transmitted through the sample for various illumination directions. The process of assembly of the angular measurements is usually performed with one of two methods: filtered backprojection (FBPJ) or filtered backpropagation (FBPP) tomographic reconstruction algorithm. The former approach, although conceptually very simple, provides an accurate reconstruction for the object regions located close to the plane of focus. However, since FBPJ ignores diffraction, its use for spatially extended structures is arguable. According to the theory of scattering, more precise restoration of a 3D structure shall be achieved with the FBPP algorithm, which unlike the former approach incorporates diffraction. It is believed that with this method one is allowed to obtain a high accuracy reconstruction in a large measurement volume exceeding depth of focus of an imaging system. However, some studies have suggested that a considerable improvement of the FBPP results can be achieved with prior propagation of the transmitted fields back to the centre of the object. This, supposedly, enables reduction of errors due to approximated diffraction formulas used in FBPP. In our view this finding casts doubt on quality of the FBPP reconstruction in the regions far from the rotation axis. The objective of this paper is to investigate limitation of the FBPP algorithm in terms of an off-axis reconstruction and compare its performance with the FBPJ approach. Moreover, in this work we propose some modifications to the FBPP algorithm that allow for more precise restoration of a sample structure in off-axis locations. The research is based on extensive numerical simulations supported with wave-propagation method.

  7. Investigation of murine vasodynamics by Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    Meißner, Sven; Müller, Gregor; Walther, Julia; Krüger, Alexander; Cuevas, Maximiliano; Eichhorn, Birgit; Ravens, Ursula; Morawietz, Henning; Koch, Edmund

    2007-07-01

    In vivo imaging of blood vessels obtain useful insights in characterizing the dynamics of vasoconstriction and vasodilation. Fourier domain optical Coherence Tomography (FD-OCT) imaging technique permits in vivo investigation of blood vessels in their anatomical context without preparation traumata by temporal resolved image stacks. OCT is an optical, contact less imaging technique based on Michelson interferometry of short coherent near infrared light. Particularly by the possibility of a contact-less measurement and the high axial resolution up to 10 microns OCT is superior to an investigation by ultra sound measurement. Furthermore we obtain a high time resolution of vessel dynamic measurements with the used Fourier domain OCT-system by a high A-scan rate [1,22kHz]. In this study the model of saphenous artery was chosen for analyzing function and dynamics. The arteria saphena in the mouse is a suitable blood vessel due to the small inner diameter, a sensitive response to vasoactive stimuli and an advantageous anatomically position. Male wild type mice (C57BL/6) at the age of 8 weeks were fed control or high-fat diet for 10 weeks before analyzing the vasodynamics. The blood vessel was stimulated by dermal application of potassium to induce vasoconstriction or Sodium-Nitroprusside (SNP) to induce vasodilation. The morphology of the a. saphena and vein was determined by 3D image stacks. Time series (72 seconds, 300x512 pixel per frame) of cross-sectional images were analysed using semi automatic image processing software. Time course of dynamic parameters of the vessel was measured.

  8. Cystoid macular edema diagnosed with optical coherent tomography in patients operated on from cataract

    Refers frequency of cystoid macular edema diagnosed with optical coherence tomography in patients operated on from senile cataract at 'Ramon Pando Ferrer' Cuban Institute of Ophthalmology in the period from December 2006 to February 2007

  9. Histogram Matching Extends Acceptable Signal Strength Range on Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Sigal, Ian A; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    A novel histogram matching method was developed for optical coherence tomography images to reduce the measurement variability in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness related to signal strength (SS, an image quality index) variation, and successfully extended the acceptable SS range.

  10. Retinal Imaging of Infants on Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Anand Vinekar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral domain coherence tomography (SD OCT has become an important tool in the management of pediatric retinal diseases. It is a noncontact imaging device that provides detailed assessment of the microanatomy and pathology of the infant retina with a short acquisition time allowing office examination without the requirement of anesthesia. Our understanding of the development and maturation of the infant fovea has been enhanced by SD OCT allowing an in vivo assessment that correlates with histopathology. This has helped us understand the critical correlation of foveal development with visual potential in the first year of life and beyond. In this review, we summarize the recent literature on the clinical applications of SD OCT in studying the pathoanatomy of the infant macula, its ability to detect subclinical features, and its correlation with disease and vision. Retinopathy of prematurity and macular edema have been discussed in detail. The review also summarizes the current status of SD OCT in other infant retinal conditions, imaging the optic nerve, the choroid, and the retinal nerve fibre in infants and children, and suggests future areas of research.

  11. Implementation of an Optical Coherence Tomography system for painting characterization

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a new but well established imaging technique for medical diagnosis, which can produce two- or three-dimensional images of bio-tissues with a few μm spatial resolution. Its potential as a non-invasive tool for art conservation of paintings and other objects has been realized recently. In this work, we report the implementation of two OCT systems applied to painting characterization. One system operates in the so-called spectral domain, with a central wavelength of 840 nm and axial resolution of 10 μm. The second system has its central wavelength at 1280 nm, with spatial resolution of 20 μm, and operates in the time domain. Both systems are independently controlled and have imaging software developed in-house using Lab View. Using both systems, a 15 years old acrylic portrait has been analyzed, where the paint layers, light and dark colors, and the cotton treads of the canvas could be identified. (Author)

  12. Optical coherence tomography for nondestructive evaluation of fuel rod degradation

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Buckner, Benjamin D.; Friend, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear power plants regularly inspect fuel rods to ensure safe and reliable operation. Excessive corrosion can cause fuel failures which can have significant repercussions for the plant, including impacts on plant operation, worker exposure to radiation, and the plant's INPO rating. While plants typically inspect for fuel rod corrosion using eddy current techniques, these techniques have known issues with reliability in the presence of tenacious, ferromagnetic crud layers that can deposit during operation, and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection results can often be in error by a factor of 2 or 3. For this reason, alternative measurement techniques, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), have been evaluated that are not sensitive to the ferromagnetic nature of the crud. This paper demonstrates that OCT has significant potential to characterize the thickness of crud layers that can deposit on the surfaces of fuel rods during operation. Physical trials have been performed on simulated crud samples, and the resulting data show an apparent correlation between the crud layer thickness and the OCT signal.

  13. Surface imaging of metallic material fractures using optical coherence tomography.

    Hutiu, Gheorghe; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Demian, Dorin; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-09-10

    We demonstrate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to perform topography of metallic surfaces after being subjected to ductile or brittle fracturing. Two steel samples, OL 37 and OL 52, and an antifriction Sn-Sb-Cu alloy were analyzed. Using an in-house-built swept source OCT system, height profiles were generated for the surfaces of the two samples. Based on such profiles, it can be concluded that the first two samples were subjected to ductile fracture, while the third one was subjected to brittle fracture. The OCT potential for assessing the surface state of materials after fracture was evaluated by comparing OCT images with images generated using an established method for such investigations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis of cause of fracture is essential in response to damage of machinery parts during various accidents. Currently the analysis is performed using SEM, on samples removed from the metallic parts, while OCT would allow in situ imaging using mobile units. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the OCT capability to replace SEM has been demonstrated. SEM is a more costly and time-consuming method to use in the investigation of surfaces of microstructures of metallic materials. PMID:25321671

  14. Benefits of optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin diseases

    Utz S.R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: working out the methods of visualization of information obtained during optical coherent tomography in normal skin and in series of inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods. OCS1300SS (made in Thorlabs, USA was used in which the source of emission of radiation was a super-luminiscent diode with mean wavelength of 1325 nm. 12 patients with different skin conditions and 5 virtually healthy volunteers were examined with ОСТ procedure in OPD and IPD settings. High resolution USG numerical system DUB (TPM GmbH, Germany was used for comparative USG assessment. Results. ОСТ demonstrated considerably more detailed picture of the objects scanned compared to USG investigation. Image obtained with the help of ОСТ contains vital information about sizes of macro-morphological elements, status of vascular elements and their density in different depths of the skin. Conclusion. Additional results obtained from ОСТ of the skin lesions in plane section improves attraction for ОСТ in practical dermatology.

  15. Imaging natural occlusal caries lesions with optical coherence tomography

    Douglas, Shane M.; Fried, Daniel; Darling, Cynthia L.

    2010-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to nondestructively measure the severity of demineralization in the important occlusal surfaces. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of PS-OCT and OCT methods for the measurement of the depth of natural occlusal carious lesions. Teeth were screened for potential occlusal lesions using near infrared imaging (NIR). A PS-OCT system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire polarization resolved images of the area of interest on the occlusal surface. The teeth were serial sectioned to 200 μm thickness and examined with polarized light microscopy (PLM) and Transverse Microradiography (TMR) for comparison. The lesion depth measured nondestructively with PS-OCT was compared to the lesion depth measured with PLM and TMR to assess the performance of these methods and determine if polarization sensitivity is required. The lesion depth measured using OCT correlated well with the lesion depths measured with TMR and PLM. Although polarization sensitivity provided better contrast it was not necessary to have polarization sensitivity to identify deep occlusal lesions.

  16. Optical coherence tomography for blood glucose monitoring through signal attenuation

    De Pretto, Lucas R.; Yoshimura, Tania M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; de Freitas, Anderson Z.

    2016-03-01

    Development of non-invasive techniques for glucose monitoring is crucial to improve glucose control and treatment adherence in patients with diabetes. Hereafter, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) may offer a good alternative for portable glucometers, since it uses light to probe samples. Changes in the object of interest can alter the intensity of light returning from the sample and, through it, one can estimate the sample's attenuation coefficient (μt) of light. In this work, we aimed to explore the behavior of μt of mouse's blood under increasing glucose concentrations. Different samples were prepared in four glucose concentrations using a mixture of heparinized blood, phosphate buffer saline and glucose. Blood glucose concentrations were measured with a blood glucometer, for reference. We have also prepared other samples diluting the blood in isotonic saline solution to check the effect of a higher multiple-scattering component on the ability of the technique to differentiate glucose levels based on μt. The OCT system used was a commercial Spectral Radar OCT with 930 nm central wavelength and spectral bandwidth (FWHM) of 100 nm. The system proved to be sensitive for all blood glucose concentrations tested, with good correlations with the obtained attenuation coefficients. A linear tendency was observed, with an increase in attenuation with higher values of glucose. Statistical difference was observed between all groups (pcontrol, which eliminates the use of analytes and/or test strips, as in the case with commercially available glucometers.

  17. Polarization sensitive spectroscopic optical coherence tomography for multimodal imaging

    Strąkowski, Marcin R.; Kraszewski, Maciej; Strąkowska, Paulina; Trojanowski, Michał

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive method for 3D and cross-sectional imaging of biological and non-biological objects. The OCT measurements are provided in non-contact and absolutely safe way for the tested sample. Nowadays, the OCT is widely applied in medical diagnosis especially in ophthalmology, as well as dermatology, oncology and many more. Despite of great progress in OCT measurements there are still a vast number of issues like tissue recognition or imaging contrast enhancement that have not been solved yet. Here we are going to present the polarization sensitive spectroscopic OCT system (PS-SOCT). The PS-SOCT combines the polarization sensitive analysis with time-frequency analysis. Unlike standard polarization sensitive OCT the PS-SOCT delivers spectral information about measured quantities e.g. tested object birefringence changes over the light spectra. This solution overcomes the limits of polarization sensitive analysis applied in standard PS-OCT. Based on spectral data obtained from PS-SOCT the exact value of birefringence can be calculated even for the objects that provide higher order of retardation. In this contribution the benefits of using the combination of time-frequency and polarization sensitive analysis are being expressed. Moreover, the PS-SOCT system features, as well as OCT measurement examples are presented.

  18. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    Hang-Yin Ling, Carrie; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M.; Tonks, Catherine A.; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2010-04-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment.

  19. Process monitoring of additive manufacturing by using optical tomography

    Parts fabricated by means of additive manufacturing are usually of complex shape and owing to the fabrication procedure by using selective laser melting (SLM), potential defects and inaccuracies are often very small in lateral size. Therefore, an adequate quality inspection of such parts is rather challenging, while non-destructive-techniques (NDT) are difficult to realize, but considerable efforts are necessary in order to ensure the quality of SLM-parts especially used for aerospace components. Thus, MTU Aero Engines is currently focusing on the development of an Online Process Control system which monitors and documents the complete welding process during the SLM fabrication procedure. A high-resolution camera system is used to obtain images, from which tomographic data for a 3dim analysis of SLM-parts are processed. From the analysis, structural irregularities and structural disorder resulting from any possible erroneous melting process become visible and may be allocated anywhere within the 3dim structure. Results of our optical tomography (OT) method as obtained on real defects are presented

  20. Ex vivo brain tumor analysis using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Welp, Hubert; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    A big challenge during neurosurgeries is to distinguish between healthy tissue and cancerous tissue, but currently a suitable non-invasive real time imaging modality is not available. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a potential technique for such a modality. OCT has a penetration depth of 1-2 mm and a resolution of 1-15 μm which is sufficient to illustrate structural differences between healthy tissue and brain tumor. Therefore, we investigated gray and white matter of healthy central nervous system and meningioma samples with a Spectral Domain OCT System (Thorlabs Callisto). Additional OCT images were generated after paraffin embedding and after the samples were cut into 10 μm thin slices for histological investigation with a bright field microscope. All samples were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. In all cases B-scans and 3D images were made. Furthermore, a camera image of the investigated area was made by the built-in video camera of our OCT system. For orientation, the backsides of all samples were marked with blue ink. The structural differences between healthy tissue and meningioma samples were most pronounced directly after removal. After paraffin embedding these differences diminished. A correlation between OCT en face images and microscopy images can be seen. In order to increase contrast, post processing algorithms were applied. Hence we employed Spectroscopic OCT, pattern recognition algorithms and machine learning algorithms such as k-means Clustering and Principal Component Analysis.

  1. Fixed partial dentures investigated by optical coherent tomography

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Todea, Carmen; Hughes, Mike; Tudorache, Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-02-01

    Fixed partial prostheses as integral ceramics, integral polymers, metal ceramics or metal polymers bridges, are mainly used in the frontal part of the dental arch (especially the integral bridges). They have to satisfy high stress requirements as well as esthetic. The masticatory stress may induce fractures of the bridges. These may be triggered by initial materials defects or by alterations of the technological process. The fractures of these bridges lead to functional, esthetic and phonetic disturbances which finally render the prosthetic treatment inefficient. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capability of en-face optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detection and analysis of possible fractures in several integral fixed partial dentures. The materials used were represented by several fixed partial prostheses, integral ceramics, integral polymers, metal ceramics and metal polymers bridges. In order to discover the defects, scanning was performed from incisal, vestibular, oral and cervical directions material defects such as fractures and pores were investigated using OCT. In conclusion, en-face OCT has proven as a valuable non invasive method to investigate fixed partial prostheses before their insertion in the oral cavity.

  2. Evaluation of fingerprint deformation using optical coherence tomography

    Gutierrez da Costa, Henrique S.; Maxey, Jessica R.; Silva, Luciano; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2014-02-01

    Biometric identification systems have important applications to privacy and security. The most widely used of these, print identification, is based on imaging patterns present in the fingers, hands and feet that are formed by the ridges, valleys and pores of the skin. Most modern print sensors acquire images of the finger when pressed against a sensor surface. Unfortunately, this pressure may result in deformations, characterized by changes in the sizes and relative distances of the print patterns, and such changes have been shown to negatively affect the performance of fingerprint identification algorithms. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel imaging technique that is capable of imaging the subsurface of biological tissue. Hence, OCT may be used to obtain images of subdermal skin structures from which one can extract an internal fingerprint. The internal fingerprint is very similar in structure to the commonly used external fingerprint and is of increasing interest in investigations of identify fraud. We proposed and tested metrics based on measurements calculated from external and internal fingerprints to evaluate the amount of deformation of the skin. Such metrics were used to test hypotheses about the differences of deformation between the internal and external images, variations with the type of finger and location inside the fingerprint.

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography: Clinical Applications in Medical Practice

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT is a success story of scientific and technological co-operation between a physicist and a clinician. The concept of cross-sectional imaging revolutionalized the applicability of OCT in the medical profession. OCT is a non-contact, topographic, biomicroscopic device that provides high resolution, cross-sectional digital images of live biological tissues in vivo and in real time. OCT is based on the property of tissues to reflect and backscatter light involving low-coherence interferometry. The spatial resolution of as little as 3 microns or even less has allowed us to study tissues almost at a cellular level. Overall, OCT is an invaluable adjunct in the diagnosis and follow up of many diseases of both anterior and posterior segments of the eye, primarily or secondary to systemic diseases. The digitalization and advanced software has made it possible to store and retrieve huge patient data for patient services, clinical applications and academic research. OCT has revolutionized the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, follow up and response to treatment in almost all fields of clinical practice involving primary ocular pathologies and secondary ocular manifestations in systemic diseases like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, vascular and neurological diseases, thus benefitting non-ophthalmologists as well. Systemically, OCT is proving to be a helpful tool in substantiating early diagnosis in diseases like multiple sclerosis and drug induced retinopathies by detecting early changes in morphology of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

  4. Characterization of PET preforms using spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Hosseiny, Hamid; Ferreira, Manuel João.; Martins, Teresa; Carmelo Rosa, Carla

    2013-11-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) preforms are massively produced nowadays with the purpose of producing food and beverages packaging and liquid containers. Some varieties of these preforms are produced as multilayer structures, where very thin inner film(s) act as a barrier for nutrients leakage. The knowledge of the thickness of this thin inner layer is important in the production line. The quality control of preforms production requires a fast approach and normally the thickness control is performed by destructive means out of the production line. A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) method was proposed to examine the thin layers in real time. This paper describes a nondestructive approach and all required signal processing steps to characterize the thin inner layers and also to improve the imaging speed and the signal to noise ratio. The algorithm was developed by using graphics processing unit (GPU) with computer unified device architecture (CUDA). This GPU-accelerated white light interferometry technique nondestructively assesses the samples and has high imaging speed advantage, overcoming the bottlenecks in PET performs quality control.

  5. Comparison of optical coherence tomography imaging of cataracts with histopathology

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Roach, William P.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Cox, Ann B.; Fujimoto, James G.

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) captured cataract images to subsequent histopathological examination of the lenticular opacities. OCT imaging was performed on anesthetized Rhesus monkeys, known as the delayed effects colony (DEC), with documented cataracts. These monkeys were exposed to several types of radiation during the mid and late 1960s. The radiation and age related cataracts in these animals were closely monitored using a unique grading system developed specifically for the DEC. In addition to this system, a modified version of a common cataract grading scheme for use in humans was applied. Of the original 18 monkeys imaged, lenses were collected at necropsy from seven of these animals, processed, and compared to OCT images. Results showed a direct correlation between the vertical OCT images and the cataractous lesions seen on corresponding histopathological sections of the lenses. Based on the images obtained and their corresponding documented comparison to histopathology, OCT showed tremendous potential to aid identification and characterization of cataracts. There can be artifactual problems with the images related to movement and shadows produced by opacities. However, with the advent of increased speed in imaging and multiplanar imaging, these disadvantages may easily be overcome.

  6. Determination of dental decay rates with optical coherence tomography

    We report the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect and quantify demineralization process induced by S. mutans biofilm in third molars human teeth. Artificial lesions were induced by a S. mutans microbiological culture and the samples (N = 50) were divided into groups according to the demineralization time: 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 days. The OCT system was implemented using a light source delivering an average power of 96 μW in the sample arm, and spectral characteristics allowing 23 μm of axial resolution. The images were produced with lateral scans step of 10 μm and analyzed individually. As a result of the evaluation of theses images, lesion depth was calculated as function of demineralization time. The depth of the lesion in the root dentine increased from 70 μm to 230 μm (corrected by the enamel refraction index, 1.62 @ 856 nm), depending of exposure time. The lesion depth in root dentine was correlated to demineralization time, showing that it follows a geometrical progression like a bacteria growth law

  7. Optic Coherence Tomography of Idiopathic Macular Epiretinal Membranes

    Xing Liu; Yunlan Ling; Jingjing Huang; Xiaoping Zheng

    2002-01-01

    bjectives: To study the characteristics of optical coherence tomography (OCT)inopathic macular epiretinal membranes (IMEM) and the relationship between thethickness offovea and the vision of affected eyes.Methods:A total of 67 cases (73 eyes) with clinical diagnosis of IMEM using direct,indirect ophthalmoscope, three mirror contact lens, fundus color photography or fundusfluorescein angiography (FFA)were examined with OCTResults: Epiretinal membranes (ERMs) with macular edema were found in 32 eyes,proliferative ERMs in 20 eyes, ERMs with macular pseudoholes in 14 eyes and ERMswith laminar macular holes in 7 eyes. Based on OCT, the ERMs were clearly andpartially seperated from the retinal (27 eyes, 38.36% ), the retinal thickness of thefovea was the thickest in the proliferative ERMs and the thinnest in the ERMs withlaminar macular holes. The statistical analysis showed there was a negative correlationbetween the thickness of fovea and visual acuity ( r = - 0. 454, P = 0. 000).Conclusion:There were four types of images of OCT in IMEM: ERMs with macularedema, proliferative ERMs, ERMs with macular pseudohole and ERMs with laminarmacular hole; and the thicker the fovea under the OCT, the poorer the vision acuity in the affected eyes with ERMs.

  8. Optical coherence tomography as a guide for cochlear implant surgery?

    Just, T.; Lankenau, E.; Hüttmann, G.; Pau, H. W.

    2008-02-01

    To assess the potential use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in cochlear implant surgery, OCT was applied in human temporal bones before cochleostomy. The question was whether OCT might provide information about the cochlear topography, especially about the site of the scala tympani. OCT was carried out on human temporal bone preparations, in which the cochleostomy was performed leaving the membranous labyrinth and the fluid-filled inner ear intact. A specially equipped operating microscope with integrated OCT prototype was used. Spectral-domain (SD)-OCT was used for all investigations. On all scans, OCT supplied information about inner ear structures, such as scala tympani, scala vestibuli while the membranous labyrinth was still intact. In the fresh temporal bone the scala media, basilar membrane and the Reissner's membrane were identified. This OCT study clearly documents the possibility to identify inner ear structures, especially the scala tympani without opening its enveloping membranes. These findings may have an impact on cochlear implant surgery, especially as an orientation guide to localize the scala tympani precisely before opening the fluid filled inner ear.

  9. Multi angle view of lung using optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    Golabchi, Ali; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Gouldstone, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    Lung imaging, visualization and measurement of alveolar volume has great importance in determining lung health. However, the heterogeneity of lung tissue complicates this task. In this paper multi angle Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is used to overcome this problem. One of the limitations of utilizing OCT in lung is the speckle noise and artifacts that originate from the refraction at the tissue-air interface inside the lung. Multi angle view of lung using OCT is incoherent summation of multiple angle-diverse images. Utilizing image registration of multi angle OCT scans of the lung helps reduce the speckle noise and refraction artifacts. This technique helps extract more information from the images which improves visualization and the ability to measure the geometry of alveoli. The other diculty of utilizing OCT is interpreting the images due to the low numerical aperture (NA) on the OCT. The multi angle view of the lung increases NA, which increase the imaging resolution through synthetic aperture imaging. In this paper in ated excised lung tissue and lung phantom are presented.

  10. Imaging of atherosclerotic plaques by optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    Perree, Jop; van Leeuwen, Ton G. J. M.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2000-05-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique that measures the intensity of light back scattered from sub- surface tissue structures with a very high resolution. This report describes the qualitative and quantitative correlation of OCT and histology measurements for plaque presence and thickness of caps overlying atherosclerotic plaques, respectively. Imaging of samples (n equals 12) was performed from the luminal side with 1300 nm 1 mW or 10 mW light sources, with coherence lengths of 21 and 16 micrometer, respectively. Samples were histologically processed and stained with H&E, EvG and picro-sirius red (PSR) and histological and OCT images were matched. For each sample, the presence of plaque was assessed and the minimal cap thickness was measured by means of histomorphometry and OCT. We found a sensitivity of 6/6 and a specificity of 5/6 for detection of plaques with OCT. Quantitative analysis showed a strong and significant correlation between OCT and histology cap thickness measurements (R2 equals 0.968). Thus, OCT is a sensitive method for detection of plaques, is quantitatively comparable to histology and holds promise as a high-resolution diagnostic tool for visualization of plaque cap thickness.

  11. Simulations of an Optical Tactile Sensor Based on Computer Tomography

    Ohka, Masahiro; Sawamoto, Yasuhiro; Zhu, Ning

    In order to create a robotic tactile sensor of thin shape, a new optical tactile sensor is developed by applying a CT (Computer Tomography) algorithm. The present tactile sensor is comprised of infrared emitting diode arrays, receiving phototransistor arrays and a transparent acrylic plate and a black rubber sheet with projections. Infrared rays emitted from the diode array are directed into one end of the plate and their intensity distribution is measured by the phototransistor array mounted on the other end. If the CT algorithm is directly applied to the tactile sensor, there are two shortcomings: the shape of the sensing area is limited to a circular region and there is a long calculation time. Thus, a new CT algorithm oriented to tactile sensing is proposed for overcoming these problems. In the present algorithm, a square sensing area is divided into an N-by-N array and algebraic equations are derived from the relationship between the input and output light intensities on the assumed light projections. Several reconstruction methods are considered for obtaining pressure values caused in the squares. In the present study, the ART (Algebraic Reconstruction Technique) and LU decomposition methods were employed, and these methods were compared to select the best reconstruction method. In a series of simulations, it was found that the LU decomposition method held an advantage for the present type of tactile sensor because of its robustness against disturbance and short calculation time.

  12. Heartbeat OCT: in vivo intravascular megahertz-optical coherence tomography.

    Wang, Tianshi; Pfeiffer, Tom; Regar, Evelyn; Wieser, Wolfgang; van Beusekom, Heleen; Lancee, Charles T; Springeling, Geert; Krabbendam, Ilona; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Huber, Robert; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac motion artifacts, non-uniform rotational distortion and undersampling affect the image quality and the diagnostic impact of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). In this study we demonstrate how these limitations of IV-OCT can be addressed by using an imaging system that we called "Heartbeat OCT", combining a fast Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser, fast pullback, and a micromotor actuated catheter, designed to examine a coronary vessel in less than one cardiac cycle. We acquired in vivo data sets of two coronary arteries in a porcine heart with both Heartbeat OCT, working at 2.88 MHz A-line rate, 4000 frames/s and 100 mm/s pullback speed, and with a commercial system. The in vivo results show that Heartbeat OCT provides faithfully rendered, motion-artifact free, fully sampled vessel wall architecture, unlike the conventional IV-OCT data. We present the Heartbeat OCT system in full technical detail and discuss the steps needed for clinical translation of the technology. PMID:26713214

  13. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  14. Optical coherence tomography use in the diagnosis of enamel defects

    Al-Azri, Khalifa; Melita, Lucia N.; Strange, Adam P.; Festy, Frederic; Al-Jawad, Maisoon; Cook, Richard; Parekh, Susan; Bozec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) affects the permanent incisors and molars, whose undermineralized matrix is evidenced by lesions ranging from white to yellow/brown opacities to crumbling enamel lesions incapable of withstanding normal occlusal forces and function. Diagnosing the condition involves clinical and radiographic examination of these teeth, with known limitations in determining the depth extent of the enamel defects in particular. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging hard and soft tissue imaging technique, which was investigated as a new potential diagnostic method in dentistry. A comparison between the diagnostic potential of the conventional methods and OCT was conducted. Compared to conventional imaging methods, OCT gave more information on the structure of the enamel defects as well as the depth extent of the defects into the enamel structure. Different types of enamel defects were compared, each type presenting a unique identifiable pattern when imaged using OCT. Additionally, advanced methods of OCT image analysis including backscattered light intensity profile analysis and enface reconstruction were performed. Both methods confirmed the potential of OCT in enamel defects diagnosis. In conclusion, OCT imaging enabled the identification of the type of enamel defect and the determination of the extent of the enamel defects in MIH with the advantage of being a radiation free diagnostic technique.

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of Miscellaneous Retinal Disease.

    Pierro, Luisa; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Rabiolo, Alessandro; Introini, Ugo; Querques, Giuseppe; Bandello, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we illustrate different clinical scenarios using swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA, Triton, Topcon, Inc., Tokyo, Japan). The instrument is based on a long wavelength scanning light (1,050 nm) that can better penetrate the deeper ocular layers, such as the choroid and sclera. Our aim was to show how OCTA can be used to study the eye vascular network in a novel and innovative fashion. We have demonstrated that a specific disease can involve one or more layers; conversely, the same layer may be affected by different ocular pathologies. Moreover, we would like to stress that knowledge of disease pathophysiology is fundamental, and thus, we have focused our attention on the layer(s) most involved in each pathological condition. In some miscellaneous cases, the swept-source OCTA findings have corroborated with conventional imaging data (i.e. fundus photography, B-scan ultrasonography, fluorangiography and indocyanine green angiography), thus leading us to the proper diagnosis. PMID:27023316

  16. An efficient method for model refinement in diffuse optical tomography

    Zirak, A. R.; Khademi, M.

    2007-11-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a non-linear, ill-posed, boundary value and optimization problem which necessitates regularization. Also, Bayesian methods are suitable owing to measurements data are sparse and correlated. In such problems which are solved with iterative methods, for stabilization and better convergence, the solution space must be small. These constraints subject to extensive and overdetermined system of equations which model retrieving criteria specially total least squares (TLS) must to refine model error. Using TLS is limited to linear systems which is not achievable when applying traditional Bayesian methods. This paper presents an efficient method for model refinement using regularized total least squares (RTLS) for treating on linearized DOT problem, having maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator and Tikhonov regulator. This is done with combination Bayesian and regularization tools as preconditioner matrices, applying them to equations and then using RTLS to the resulting linear equations. The preconditioning matrixes are guided by patient specific information as well as a priori knowledge gained from the training set. Simulation results illustrate that proposed method improves the image reconstruction performance and localize the abnormally well.

  17. Marginal integrity evaluation of dental composite using optical coherence tomography

    Stan, Adrian-Tudor; Cojocariu, Andreea-Codruta; Antal, Anca Adriana; Topala, Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    In clinical dental practice it is often difficult or even impossible to distinguish and control interfacial adhesive defects from adhesive restorations using visual inspection or other traditional diagnostic methods. Nonetheless, non-invasive biomedical imaging methods like Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) may provide a better view in this diagnostic outline. The aim of this study is to explore evaluations of the marginal adaptation of class I resin composites restorations using Time Domain (TD) OCT. Posterior human teeth have been chosen for this study. The teeth were stored in 0.9% physiological saline solution prior to use. A classical round-shaped class I cavity was prepared and cavities were restored with Charisma Diamond composite by Heraeus Kulzer and using a system of etch and rinse boding. The specimens were subjected to water storage and then to thermo-cycling. Three dimensional (3-D) scans of the restoration were obtained using a TD-OCT system centered at a 1300 nm wavelength. Open marginal adaptation at the interfaces and gaps inside the composite resins materials were identified using the proposed method. In conclusion, OCT has numerous advantages which justify its use for in vitro, as well as for in vivo studies. It can therefore be considered for non-invasive and fast detection of gaps at the restoration interface.

  18. Process monitoring of additive manufacturing by using optical tomography

    Zenzinger, Guenter; Bamberg, Joachim; Ladewig, Alexander; Hess, Thomas; Henkel, Benjamin; Satzger, Wilhelm

    2015-03-01

    Parts fabricated by means of additive manufacturing are usually of complex shape and owing to the fabrication procedure by using selective laser melting (SLM), potential defects and inaccuracies are often very small in lateral size. Therefore, an adequate quality inspection of such parts is rather challenging, while non-destructive-techniques (NDT) are difficult to realize, but considerable efforts are necessary in order to ensure the quality of SLM-parts especially used for aerospace components. Thus, MTU Aero Engines is currently focusing on the development of an Online Process Control system which monitors and documents the complete welding process during the SLM fabrication procedure. A high-resolution camera system is used to obtain images, from which tomographic data for a 3dim analysis of SLM-parts are processed. From the analysis, structural irregularities and structural disorder resulting from any possible erroneous melting process become visible and may be allocated anywhere within the 3dim structure. Results of our optical tomography (OT) method as obtained on real defects are presented.

  19. Process monitoring of additive manufacturing by using optical tomography

    Zenzinger, Guenter, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Bamberg, Joachim, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Ladewig, Alexander, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Hess, Thomas, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Henkel, Benjamin, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Satzger, Wilhelm, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de [MTU Aero Engines AG, Dachauerstrasse 665, 80995 Munich (Germany)

    2015-03-31

    Parts fabricated by means of additive manufacturing are usually of complex shape and owing to the fabrication procedure by using selective laser melting (SLM), potential defects and inaccuracies are often very small in lateral size. Therefore, an adequate quality inspection of such parts is rather challenging, while non-destructive-techniques (NDT) are difficult to realize, but considerable efforts are necessary in order to ensure the quality of SLM-parts especially used for aerospace components. Thus, MTU Aero Engines is currently focusing on the development of an Online Process Control system which monitors and documents the complete welding process during the SLM fabrication procedure. A high-resolution camera system is used to obtain images, from which tomographic data for a 3dim analysis of SLM-parts are processed. From the analysis, structural irregularities and structural disorder resulting from any possible erroneous melting process become visible and may be allocated anywhere within the 3dim structure. Results of our optical tomography (OT) method as obtained on real defects are presented.

  20. Application of optical coherence tomography attenuation imaging for quantification of optical properties in medulloblastoma

    Vuong, Barry; Skowron, Patryk; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kyan, Matthew; Garzia, Livia; Genis, Helen; Sun, Cuiru; Taylor, Michael D.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2015-03-01

    The hemodynamic environment is known to play a crucial role in the progression, rupture, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Currently there is difficulty assessing and measuring blood flow profiles in vivo. An emerging high resolution imaging modality known as split spectrum Doppler optical coherence tomography (ssDOCT) has demonstrated the capability to quantify hemodynamic patterns as well as arterial microstructural changes. In this study, we present a novel in vitro method to acquire precise blood flow patterns within a patient- specific aneurysm silicone flow models using ssDOCT imaging. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were generated to verify ssDOCT results.

  1. Comparison of Choroidal Thickness in Patients with Diabetes by Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Lee, Hyo Kyung; Lim, Ji Won; Shin, Min Cheol

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate choroidal thickness in diabetes patients using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Methods We examined 203 eyes of 203 diabetic participants and 48 eyes of 48 healthy controls. The choroidal thickness at the foveal lesion was measured by enhanced-depth imaging optical coherence tomography. The participants were grouped according to diabetic retinopathy grade: no diabetic change, mild-to-moderate or severe non-proliferative, or proliferative diabetic retinopathy. ...

  2. Optical Coherence Tomography as an Auxiliary Tool for the Screening of Radiation-Related Caries

    de Oliveira Mota, Cláudia Cristina Brainer; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino; Maia, Ana Marly Araújo; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leonidas; de Abreu Alves, Fábio; Leão, Jair Carneiro; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; Goes, Mário; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological alterations of radiation-related caries using optical coherence tomography. Methods: Thirty-six extracted teeth from 11 patients who had undergone radiotherapy were sectioned in the sagittal axis in the center of the carious lesion, and 100 μm thick sections were obtained from each specimen. One sample from each tooth was investigated by an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system, and the results were compared with histologi...

  3. Optical coherence tomography imaging during percutaneous coronary intervention impacts physician decision-making: ILUMIEN I study

    Wijns, William; Shite, Junya; Jones, Michael R; Lee, Stephen W.-L.; Price, Matthew J.; Fabbiocchi, Franco; Barbato, Emanuele; Akasaka, Takashi; Bezerra, Hiram; Holmes, David

    2015-01-01

    Aims ILUMIEN I is the largest prospective, non-randomized, observational study of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedural practice in patients undergoing intra-procedural pre- and post-PCI fractional flow reserve (FFR) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). We report on the impact of OCT on physician decision-making and the association with post-PCI FFR values and early clinical events. Methods and results Optical coherence tomography and documentary FFR were performed pre- and p...

  4. An evaluation of meniscal collagenous structure using optical projection tomography

    The collagenous structure of menisci is a complex network of circumferentially oriented fascicles and interwoven radially oriented tie-fibres. To date, examination of this micro- architecture has been limited to two-dimensional imaging techniques. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the three-dimensional imaging technique; optical projection tomography (OPT), to visualize the collagenous structure of the meniscus. If successful, this technique would be the first to visualize the macroscopic orientation of collagen fascicles in 3-D in the meniscus and could further refine load bearing mechanisms in the tissue. OPT is an imaging technique capable of imaging samples on the meso-scale (1-10 mm) at a micro-scale resolution. The technique, similar to computed tomography, takes two-dimensional images of objects from incremental angles around the object and reconstructs them using a back projection algorithm to determine three-dimensional structure. Bovine meniscal samples were imaged from four locations (outer main body, femoral surface, tibial surface and inner main body) to determine the variation in collagen orientation throughout the tissue. Bovine stifles (n = 2) were obtained from a local abattoir and the menisci carefully dissected. Menisci were fixed in methanol and subsequently cut using a custom cutting jig (n = 4 samples per meniscus). Samples were then mounted in agarose, dehydrated in methanol and subsequently cleared using benzyl alcohol benzyl benzoate (BABB) and imaged using OPT. Results indicate circumferential, radial and oblique collagenous orientations at the contact surfaces and in the inner third of the main body of the meniscus. Imaging identified fascicles ranging from 80-420 μm in diameter. Transition zones where fascicles were found to have a woven or braided appearance were also identified. The outer-third of the main body was composed of fascicles oriented predominantly in the circumferential direction. Blood vessels were

  5. Optical coherence tomography: Monte Carlo simulation and improvement by optical amplification

    Tycho, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    An advanced novel Monte Carlo simulation model of the detection process of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system is presented. For the first time it is shown analytically that the applicability of the incoherent Monte Carlo approach to model the heterodyne detection process of an OCT system...... distribution of the light from the sample and the reference beam. To adequately estimate the intensity distributions, a novel method of modeling a focused Gaussian beam using Monte Carlo simulation is developed. This method is then combined with the derived expression for the OCT signal into a new Monte Carlo...... flexibility of Monte Carlo simulations, this new model is demonstrated to be excellent as a numerical phantom, i.e., as a substitute for otherwise difficult experiments. Finally, a new model of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of an OCT system with optical amplification of the light reflected from the sample...

  6. Automatic segmentation of the optic nerve head for deformation measurements in video rate optical coherence tomography

    Hidalgo-Aguirre, Maribel; Gitelman, Julian; Lesk, Mark Richard; Costantino, Santiago

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has become a standard diagnostic tool in ophthalmology, providing essential information associated with various eye diseases. In order to investigate the dynamics of the ocular fundus, we present a simple and accurate automated algorithm to segment the inner limiting membrane in video-rate optic nerve head spectral domain (SD) OCT images. The method is based on morphological operations including a two-step contrast enhancement technique, proving to be very robust when dealing with low signal-to-noise ratio images and pathological eyes. An analysis algorithm was also developed to measure neuroretinal tissue deformation from the segmented retinal profiles. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated, and deformation results are presented for healthy and glaucomatous eyes.

  7. Optical coherence tomography using the Niris system in otolaryngology

    Rubinstein, Marc; Armstrong, William B.; Djalilian, Hamid R.; Crumley, Roger L.; Kim, Jason H.; Nguyen, Quoc A.; Foulad, Allen I.; Ghasri, Pedram E.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: To determine the feasibility and accuracy of the Niris Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) system in imaging of the mucosal abnormalities of the head and neck. The Niris system is the first commercially available OCT device for applications outside ophthalmology. Methods: We obtained OCT images of benign, premalignant and malignant lesions throughout the head and neck, using the Niris OCT imaging system (Imalux, Cleveland, OH). This imaging system has a tissue penetration depth of approximately 1-2mm, a scanning range of 2mm and a spatial depth resolution of approximately 10-20μm. Imaging was performed in the outpatient setting and in the operating room using a flexible probe. Results: High-resolution cross-sectional images from the oral cavity, nasal cavity, ears and larynx showed distinct layers and structures such as mucosa layer, basal membrane and lamina propria, were clearly identified. In the pathology images disruption of the basal membrane was clearly shown. Device set-up took approximately 5 minutes and the image acquisition was rapid. The system can be operated by the person performing the exam. Conclusions: The Niris system is non invasive and easy to incorporate into the operating room and the clinic. It requires minimal set-up and requires only one person to operate. The unique ability of the OCT offers high-resolution images showing the microanatomy of different sites. OCT imaging with the Niris device potentially offers an efficient, quick and reliable imaging modality in guiding surgical biopsies, intra-operative decision making, and therapeutic options for different otolaryngologic pathologies and premalignant disease.

  8. Optical coherence tomography for blood glucose monitoring through signal attenuation

    De Pretto, Lucas R.; Yoshimura, Tania M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; de Freitas, Anderson Z.

    2016-03-01

    Development of non-invasive techniques for glucose monitoring is crucial to improve glucose control and treatment adherence in patients with diabetes. Hereafter, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) may offer a good alternative for portable glucometers, since it uses light to probe samples. Changes in the object of interest can alter the intensity of light returning from the sample and, through it, one can estimate the sample's attenuation coefficient (μt) of light. In this work, we aimed to explore the behavior of μt of mouse's blood under increasing glucose concentrations. Different samples were prepared in four glucose concentrations using a mixture of heparinized blood, phosphate buffer saline and glucose. Blood glucose concentrations were measured with a blood glucometer, for reference. We have also prepared other samples diluting the blood in isotonic saline solution to check the effect of a higher multiple-scattering component on the ability of the technique to differentiate glucose levels based on μt. The OCT system used was a commercial Spectral Radar OCT with 930 nm central wavelength and spectral bandwidth (FWHM) of 100 nm. The system proved to be sensitive for all blood glucose concentrations tested, with good correlations with the obtained attenuation coefficients. A linear tendency was observed, with an increase in attenuation with higher values of glucose. Statistical difference was observed between all groups (p<0.001). This work opens the possibility towards a non-invasive diagnostic modality using OCT for glycemic control, which eliminates the use of analytes and/or test strips, as in the case with commercially available glucometers.

  9. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of macula in myopia.

    Choovuthayakorn, Janejit; Laowong, Taksaorn; Watanachai, Nawat; Patikulsila, Direk; Chaikitmongkol, Voraporn

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the associations between regional macular thickness and gender, age, axial length, and degree of myopia in young and middle-aged healthy myopic eyes. One hundred and seventy-one subjects with -0.5 diopters of myopia or worse underwent prospective macular thickness measurement by Spectralis spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Subjects' mean age was 32.40 ± 8.25 years (range 18 to 49 years), with 45 % being male. The mean degree of myopia was -4.57 ± 3.52 diopters, with a mean axial length of 25.09 ± 1.67 mm. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significantly thicker central (mean 9.13 µm thicker) and inner subfields (mean 8.55 µm thicker) in males (P values were <0.001 and 0.002, respectively). In addition, in both genders, for each millimeter of increased axial length, the central subfield thickness increased by 2.11 µm, the inner subfield decreased by 2.25 µm, and the outer subfield decreased by 3.62 µm (P values were 0.010, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively). Factors including gender and axial length affect baseline regional macular thickness in young and middle-age myopic subjects. The central subfield and inner subfield were affected by both gender and axial length, while the outer subfield was affected only by axial length. The macular thickness of myopic subjects with macular disease should be interpreted in light of these factors. PMID:26290135

  10. Validation of optical coherence tomography in vivo using cryostat histology

    Gambichler, T [Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr. 56, 44791 Bochum (Germany); Moussa, G [Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr. 56, 44791 Bochum (Germany); Regeniter, P [Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr. 56, 44791 Bochum (Germany); Kasseck, C [Ruhr Center of Excellence for Medical Engineering (KMR) Bochum (Germany); Hofmann, M R [Ruhr Center of Excellence for Medical Engineering (KMR) Bochum (Germany); Bechara, F G [Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr. 56, 44791 Bochum (Germany); Sand, M [Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr. 56, 44791 Bochum (Germany); Altmeyer, P [Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr. 56, 44791 Bochum (Germany); Hoffmann, K [Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr. 56, 44791 Bochum (Germany)

    2007-03-07

    We aimed to validate for the first time optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements of epidermal thickness (ET) using cryopreparation for histology. OCT assessments of ET were performed on healthy skin using the algorithms as follows: first, peak-to-valley analysis of the A-scan (ET-OCT-V), second, line-traced image analysis of the B-scan (ET-OCT-IA). Histology was performed using cryostat sections which were also evaluated using the image analysis (ET-Histo). We selected 114 samples, including B-scans and corresponding histology, for method comparison between ET-OCT-IA and ET-Histo. Forty-two A-scans were available for method comparison between ET-OCT-V and ET-Histo. Bland and Altman plots revealed a marked bias with wide 95% limits of agreement for ET-OCT-V versus ET-Histo. Comparison of ET-OCT-IA versus ET-Histo revealed only a slight bias and narrow 95% limits of agreement. A-scan analysis for ET determination is linked to significant limitations and lacks agreement with histology. By contrast, we observed satisfactory agreement between ET-OCT-IA and ET-Histo indicating that both methods can be utilized interchangeably. OCT using the line-traced image analysis of the B-scan appears to be a valid and relatively practicable method for the determination of ET in vivo. Furthermore, the comparisons with the in vivo OCT profiles demonstrate that cryostat sectioning provides a better preservation of relative and absolute dimensions of skin layers than paraffin embedding. (note)

  11. Evaluation of caries-affected dentin with optical coherence tomography

    Cynthia Soares de Azevedo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of demineralization of artificially induced caries-affected human dentin by an in vitro microbiological method. The occlusal surfaces of 6 human molar teeth were abraded until a flat surface was obtained, and the enamel was removed to expose the occlusal dentin surface. These teeth were sectioned in 12 halves in the vestibular-lingual direction and divided into 3 groups according to the period length of the microbiological essay (n = 4: G1, 7 days; G2, 14 days; and G3, 21 days. The surfaces of all specimens were protected by an acid-resistant nail varnish, except for a window where the caries lesion was induced by a Streptoccocus mutans biofilm in a batch-culture model supplemented with 5% sucrose. The specimens were then analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT with a super-luminescent light diode (Λ = 930 nm with 6.0-µm lateral and longitudinal resolution (in the air. Qualitative and quantitative results (images and average dentin demineralization, respectively were obtained. The mean demineralization depths were (µm 235 ± 31.4, 279 ± 14, and 271 ± 8.3 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In addition, no significant change was observed in the lesion mean depth from 7 days of cariogenic challenge on. In conclusion, OCT was shown to be an efficient and non-invasive method to detect the depths of lesions caused by demineralization. Further, a seven-day demineralization time was considered sufficient for caries-affected dentin to be obtained.

  12. Evaluation of caries-affected dentin with optical coherence tomography.

    Azevedo, Cynthia Soares de; Trung, Luciana Cardoso Espejo; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti; Freitas, Anderson Zanardi de; Matos, Adriana Bona

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of demineralization of artificially induced caries-affected human dentin by an in vitro microbiological method. The occlusal surfaces of 6 human molar teeth were abraded until a flat surface was obtained, and the enamel was removed to expose the occlusal dentin surface. These teeth were sectioned in 12 halves in the vestibular-lingual direction and divided into 3 groups according to the period length of the microbiological essay (n = 4): G1, 7 days; G2, 14 days; and G3, 21 days. The surfaces of all specimens were protected by an acid-resistant nail varnish, except for a window where the caries lesion was induced by a Streptoccocus mutans biofilm in a batch-culture model supplemented with 5% sucrose. The specimens were then analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) with a super-luminescent light diode (Λ = 930 nm) with 6.0-µm lateral and longitudinal resolution (in the air). Qualitative and quantitative results (images and average dentin demineralization, respectively) were obtained. The mean demineralization depths were (µm) 235 ± 31.4, 279 ± 14, and 271 ± 8.3 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In addition, no significant change was observed in the lesion mean depth from 7 days of cariogenic challenge on. In conclusion, OCT was shown to be an efficient and non-invasive method to detect the depths of lesions caused by demineralization. Further, a seven-day demineralization time was considered sufficient for caries-affected dentin to be obtained. PMID:22031053

  13. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography

    Valente, Maurizio; Krstajic, Nikola; Biella, Gabriele E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1) accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord), and 2) identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3) check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma) for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention. PMID:27050096

  14. Optic axis determination by fibre-based polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Lu Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K; Matcher, Stephen J, E-mail: z.lu@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: s.j.matcher@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kroto Research Institute, University of Sheffield, North Campus, Broad Lane, Sheffield, S3 7HQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-21

    We describe a fibre-based variable-incidence angle (VIA) polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography (PS-SS-OCT) system to determine the 3D optical axis of birefringent biological tissues. Single-plane VIA-PS-OCT is also explored which requires measurement of the absolute fast-axis orientation. A state-of-the-art PS-SS-OCT system with some improvements both in hardware and software was used to determine the apparent optical birefringence of equine tendon for a number of different illumination directions. Polar and azimuthal angles of cut equine tendon were produced by the VIA method and compared with the nominal values. A quarter waveplate (QWP) and equine tendon were used as test targets to validate the fast-axis measurements using the system. Polar and azimuthal angles of cut equine tendon broadly agreed with the expected values within about 8% of the nominal values. A theoretical and experimental analysis of the effect of the sample arm fibre on determination of optical axis orientation using a proposed definition based on the orientation of the eigenpolarization ellipse experimentally confirms that this algorithm only works correctly for special settings of the sample arm fibre. A proposed algorithm based on the angle between Stokes vectors on the Poincare sphere is confirmed to work for all settings of the sample arm fibre. A calibration procedure is proposed to remove the sign ambiguity of the measured orientation and was confirmed experimentally by using the QWP.

  15. Ex vivo imaging of human thyroid pathology using integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. 34 thyroid gland specimens are imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology ranging from normal thyroid to benign disease/neoplasms (multinodular colloid goiter, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and follicular adenoma) and malignant thyroid tumors (papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma). Imaging is performed using an integrated OCT and OCM system, with <4 μm axial resolution (OCT and OCM), and 14 μm (OCT) and <2 μm (OCM) transverse resolution. The system allows seamless switching between low and high magnifications in a way similar to traditional microscopy. Good correspondence is observed between optical images and histological sections. Characteristic features that suggest malignant lesions, such as complex papillary architecture, microfollicules, psammomatous calcifications, or replacement of normal follicular architecture with sheets/nests of tumor cells, can be identified from OCT and OCM images and are clearly differentiable from normal or benign thyroid tissues. With further development of needle-based imaging probes, OCT and OCM could be promising techniques to use for the screening of thyroid nodules and to improve the diagnostic specificity of fine needle aspiration evaluation.

  16. Optic axis determination by fibre-based polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2011-02-01

    We describe a fibre-based variable-incidence angle (VIA) polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography (PS-SS-OCT) system to determine the 3D optical axis of birefringent biological tissues. Single-plane VIA-PS-OCT is also explored which requires measurement of the absolute fast-axis orientation. A state-of-the-art PS-SS-OCT system with some improvements both in hardware and software was used to determine the apparent optical birefringence of equine tendon for a number of different illumination directions. Polar and azimuthal angles of cut equine tendon were produced by the VIA method and compared with the nominal values. A quarter waveplate (QWP) and equine tendon were used as test targets to validate the fast-axis measurements using the system. Polar and azimuthal angles of cut equine tendon broadly agreed with the expected values within about 8% of the nominal values. A theoretical and experimental analysis of the effect of the sample arm fibre on determination of optical axis orientation using a proposed definition based on the orientation of the eigenpolarization ellipse experimentally confirms that this algorithm only works correctly for special settings of the sample arm fibre. A proposed algorithm based on the angle between Stokes vectors on the Poincaré sphere is confirmed to work for all settings of the sample arm fibre. A calibration procedure is proposed to remove the sign ambiguity of the measured orientation and was confirmed experimentally by using the QWP.

  17. Optic axis determination by fiber-based polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a fiber-based variable-incidence-angle (VIA) polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography (PS-SS-OCT) system to determine the 3-D optical axis of birefringent biological tissues. Single-plane VIAPS- OCT is also explored which requires measurement of the absolute fast-axis orientation. A state-of-the-art PS-SS-OCT system with some improvements both in hardware and software was used to determine the apparent optical birefringence of equine tendon for a number of different illumination directions. Polar and azimuthal angles of cut equine tendon were produced by VIA method and compared with the nominal values. A quarter waveplate (QWP) and equine tendon were used as test targets to validate the fast-axis measurements using the system. Polar and azimuthal angles of cut equine tendon broadly agreed with the expected values within about 8% of the nominal values. A theoretical and experimental analysis of the effect of the sample arm fiber on determination of optical axis orientation using a proposed definition based on the orientation of the eigenpolarization ellipse experimentally confirms that this algorithm only works correctly for special settings of the sample arm fiber. A proposed algorithm based on the angle between Stokes vectors on the Poincaré sphere is confirmed to work for all settings of the sample arm fiber. A calibration procedure is proposed to remove the sign ambiguity of the measured orientation and was confirmed experimentally by using the QWP.

  18. Keratometric index obtained by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Yanjun Hua

    Full Text Available To determine the keratometric indices calculated based on parameters obtained by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT.The ratio of anterior corneal curvature to posterior corneal curvature (Ratio and keratometric index (N were calculated within central 3 mm zone with the RTVue FD-OCT (RTVue, Optovue, Inc. in 186 untreated eyes, 60 post-LASIK/PRK eyes, and 39 keratoconus eyes. The total corneal powers were calculated using different keratometric indices: Kcal based on the mean calculated keratometric index, K1.3315 calculated by the keratometric index of 1.3315, and K1.3375 calculated by the keratometric index of 1.3375. In addition, the total corneal powers based on Gaussian optics formula (Kactual were calculated.The means for Ratio in untreated controls, post-LASIK/PRK group and keratoconus group were 1.176 ± 0.022 (95% confidence interval (CI, 1.172-1.179, 1.314 ± 0.042 (95%CI, 1.303-1.325 and 1.229 ± 0.118 (95%CI, 1.191-1.267, respectively. And the mean calculated keratometric index in untreated controls, post-LASIK/PRK group and keratoconus group were 1.3299 ± 0.00085 (95%CI, 1.3272-1.3308, 1.3242 ± 0.00171 (95%CI, 1.3238-1.3246 and 1.3277 ± 0.0046 (95%CI, 1.3263-1.3292, respectively. All the parameters were normally distributed. The differences between Kcal and Kactual, K1.3315 and Kactual, and K1.3375 and Kactual were 0.00 ± 0.11 D, 0.21 ± 0.11 D and 0.99 ± 0.12 D, respectively, in untreated controls; -0.01 ± 0.20 D, 0.85 ± 0.18 D and 1.56 ± 0.16 D, respectively, in post-LASIK/PRK group; and 0.03 ± 0.67 D, 0.56 ± 0.70 D and 1.40 ± 0.76 D, respectively, in keratoconus group.The calculated keratometric index is negatively related to the ratio of anterior corneal curvature to posterior corneal curvature in untreated, post-LASIK/PRK, and keratoconus eyes, respectively. Using the calculated keratometric index may improve the prediction accuracies of total corneal powers in untreated controls, but not in post

  19. Imaging a full set of optical scattering properties of biological tissue by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    Yi, Ji; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    We here develop a method to measure and image the full optical scattering properties by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (ISOCT). Tissue is modelled as a medium with continuous refractive index (RI) fluctuation and such a fluctuation is described by the RI correlation functions. Under the first-order Born approximation, the forward model is established for ISOCT. By measuring optical quantities of tissue including the scattering power (SP) of the OCT spectrum, the reflection...

  20. Development and Application of Multifunctional Optical Coherence Tomography

    Zhi, Zhongwei

    Microcirculation refers to the functions of capillaries and the neighboring lymphatic vessels. It plays a vital role in the pathophysiology of disorders in many clinical areas including cardiology, dermatology, neurology and ophthalmology, and so forth. It is crucial to develop imaging technologies that can provide both qualitative and quantitative information as to how microcirculation responds to certain injury and/or disease, and its treatment. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technique for high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of specimens, with many applications in clinical medicine. Current state-of-the-art OCT systems operate in the Fourier domain, using either a broadband light source with a spectrometer, known as spectral domain OCT (SDOCT), or a rapidly tunable laser, known as swept source OCT (SSOCT). The current Fourier domain OCT systems have dramatically improvement in sensitivity, resolution and speed compared to time domain OCT. In addition to the improvement in the OCT system hardware, different methods for functional measurements of tissue beds have been developed and demonstrated. This includes but not limited to, i) Phase-resolved Doppler OCT for quantifying the blood flow, ii) OCT angiography for visualization of microvasculature, iii) Polarization sensitive OCT for measuring the intrinsic optical property/ birefringence of tissue, iv) spectroscopic OCT for measuring blood oxygenation, etc. Functional OCT can provide important clinical information that is not available in the typical intensity based structural OCT images. Among these functional OCT modalities, Doppler OCT and OCT angiography attract great interests as they show high capability for in vivo study of microvascular pathology. By analyzing the Doppler effect of a flowing particle on light frequency, Doppler OCT allows the quantification of the blood flow speed and blood flow rate. The most popular approach for Doppler OCT is achieved through

  1. Chip Based Common-path Swept-source Optical Coherence Tomography Device

    Chang, Lantian

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging technique which provides three-dimensional images with micrometer-resolution. OCT has been extensively used for disease diagnostics, treatment planning, and surgical guidance. Currently, most of the OCT systems are based on discrete free-space

  2. Agreement of angle closure assessments between gonioscopy, anterior segment optical coherence tomography and spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Elton; Lik; Tong; Tay; Vernon; Khet; Yau; Yong; Boon; Ang; Lim; Stelson; Sia; Elizabeth; Poh; Ying; Wong; Leonard; Wei; Leon; Yip

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine angle closure agreements between gonioscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography(AS-OCT), as well as gonioscopy and spectral domain OCT(SD-OCT). A secondary objective was to quantify inter-observer agreements of AS-OCT and SD-OCT assessments.METHODS: Seventeen consecutive subjects(33 eyes)were recruited from the study hospital’s Glaucoma clinic.Gonioscopy was performed by a glaucomatologist masked to OCT results. OCT images were read independently by 2 other glaucomatologists masked to gonioscopy findings as well as each other’s analyses of OCT images.RESULTS: Totally 84.8% and 45.5% of scleral spurs were visualized in AS-OCT and SD-OCT images respectively(P <0.01). The agreement for angle closure between AS-OCT and gonioscopy was fair at k =0.31(95% confidence interval, CI: 0.03-0.59) and k =0.35(95%CI: 0.07-0.63) for reader 1 and 2 respectively. The agreement for angle closure between SD-OCT and gonioscopy was fair at k =0.21(95% CI: 0.07-0.49) and slight at k =0.17(95% CI: 0.08-0.42) for reader 1 and 2 respectively. The inter-reader agreement for angle closure in AS-OCT images was moderate at 0.51(95% CI: 0.13-0.88). The inter-reader agreement for angle closure in SD-OCT images was slight at 0.18(95% CI: 0.08-0.45).CONCLUSION: Significant proportion of scleral spurs were not visualised with SD-OCT imaging resulting in weaker inter-reader agreements. Identifying other angle landmarks in SD-OCT images will allow more consistent angle closure assessments. Gonioscopy and OCT imaging do not always agree in angle closure assessments but have their own advantages, and should be used together and not exclusively.

  3. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Attenburrow, Don P.; Winlove, C. Peter; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography images of equine articular cartilage are presented. Measurements were made on intact joint surfaces. Significant (e.g. × 2) variations in the intrinsic birefringence were found over spatial scales of a few millimetres, even on samples taken from young (18 month) animals that appeared visually homogeneous. A comparison of data obtained on a control tissue (equine flexor tendon) further suggests that significant variations in the orientation of the collagen fibres relative to the plane of the joint surface exist. Images of visually damaged cartilage tissue show characteristic features both in terms of the distribution of optical scatterers and of the birefringent components.

  4. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Optical coherence tomography and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography images of equine articular cartilage are presented. Measurements were made on intact joint surfaces. Significant (e.g. x 2) variations in the intrinsic birefringence were found over spatial scales of a few millimetres, even on samples taken from young (18 month) animals that appeared visually homogeneous. A comparison of data obtained on a control tissue (equine flexor tendon) further suggests that significant variations in the orientation of the collagen fibres relative to the plane of the joint surface exist. Images of visually damaged cartilage tissue show characteristic features both in terms of the distribution of optical scatterers and of the birefringent components

  5. Optical scattering coefficient estimated by optical coherence tomography correlates with collagen content in ovarian tissue

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Wang, Xiaohong; Sanders, Melinda; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2011-09-01

    Optical scattering coefficient from ex vivo unfixed normal and malignant ovarian tissue was quantitatively extracted by fitting optical coherence tomography (OCT) A-line signals to a single scattering model. 1097 average A-line measurements at a wavelength of 1310 nm were performed at 108 sites obtained from 18 ovaries. The average scattering coefficient obtained from the normal tissue group consisted of 833 measurements from 88 sites was 2.41 mm-1 (+/-0.59), while the average coefficient obtained from the malignant tissue group consisted of 264 measurements from 20 sites was 1.55 mm-1 (+/-0.46). The malignant ovarian tissue showed significant lower scattering than the normal group (p Sirius Red. The average collagen area fraction (CAF) obtained from the normal tissue group was 48.4% (+/-12.3%), while the average CAF obtained from the malignant tissue group was 11.4% (+/-4.7%). A statistical significance of the collagen content was found between the two groups (p < 0.001). These results demonstrated that quantitative measurements of optical scattering coefficient from OCT images could be a potential powerful method for ovarian cancer detection.

  6. Repeatability and reproducibility of optic nerve head perfusion measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Bojikian, Karine D.; Xin, Chen; Wen, Joanne C.; Gupta, Divakar; Zhang, Qinqin; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Chen, Philip P.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) has increasingly become a clinically useful technique in ophthalmic imaging. We evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of blood perfusion in the optic nerve head (ONH) measured using optical microangiography (OMAG)-based OCTA. Ten eyes from 10 healthy volunteers are recruited and scanned three times with a 68-kHz Cirrus HD-OCT 5000-based OMAG prototype system (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Dublin, California) centered at the ONH involving two separate visits within six weeks. Vascular images are generated with OMAG processing by detecting the differences in OCT signals between consecutive B-scans acquired at the same retina location. ONH perfusion is quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux within the ONH for the prelaminar, lamina cribrosa, and the full ONH. Coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) are used to evaluate intravisit and intervisit repeatability, and interobserver reproducibility. ONH perfusion measurements show high repeatability [CV≤3.7% (intravisit) and ≤5.2% (intervisit)] and interobserver reproducibility (ICC≤0.966) in all three layers by three metrics. OCTA provides a noninvasive method to visualize and quantify ONH perfusion in human eyes with excellent repeatability and reproducibility, which may add additional insight into ONH perfusion in clinical practice.

  7. Optical imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography

    Cânjǎu, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Duma, Virgil; Mǎnescu, Adrian; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2013-06-01

    The efforts aimed at early diagnosis of oral cancer should be prioritized towards developing a new screening instrument, based on optical coherence tomography (OCT), to be used directly intraorally, able to perform a fast, real time, 3D and non-invasive diagnosis of oral malignancies. The first step in this direction would be to optimize the OCT image interpretation of oral tissues. Therefore we propose plastination as a tissue preparation method that better preserves three-dimensional structure for study by new optical imaging techniques. The OCT and the synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (micro-CT) were employed for tissue sample analyze. For validating the OCT results we used the gold standard diagnostic procedure for any suspicious lesion - histopathology. This is a preliminary study of comparing features provided by OCT and Micro-CT. In the conditions of the present study, OCT proves to be a highly promising imaging modality. The use of x-ray based topographic imaging of small biological samples has been limited by the low intrinsic x-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissue and the lack of established contrast agents. Plastination can be used to enhance optical imagies of oral soft tissue samples.

  8. Optical coherence tomography in patients undergoing cataract surgery

    Carlos Augusto Moreira Neto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To assess the ability of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT to diagnose macular changes pre- and post-cataract surgery and to identify changes in central foveal thickness (CFT relative to age, sex, and presence of concomitant ophthalmic pathologies, for a period of 6 months post-surgery.Methods:A prospective study of patients evaluated by SD-OCT within 5 h before surgery at 7, 30, 60, 90, and 180 days post-op, with respect to CFT and presence of maculopathy.Results:Ninety-eight eyes of 98 patients were evaluated, with the following mean results: age = 71.4 years, pre-op VA = 0.27 logMAR, and final VA = 0.73 logMAR. There were 21 eyes in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and 10 eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD, three with epiretinal membrane, and four with glaucoma. Sixty eyes had no other ophthalmic-related pathologies (NOO, and had a mean pre-op CFT of 222 μm, which progressively increased up to the 60thday post-op, reaching a mean of 227.2 μm. No pseudophakic cystoid macular edema was observed. The mean CFT was statistically significantly different (p<0.001 between NOO and diabetic patients from 30 days post-op. Four eyes presented with preoperative diagnosis of AMD as measured by ophthalmoscopy. After completion of the OCT, which was performed within 5 h before surgery, six additional patients were found to have AMD. Of the 98 total eyes, 10 were diagnosed with maculopathy only by OCT exam. Binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy (BIO was unable to detect such changes.Conclusion:OCT diagnosed preoperative maculopathies in 21.4% of the patients, and was more effective than BIO (11.2%. OCT showed a progressive increase in CFT in diabetics up to 180 days post-operatively, as well as greater CFT in male patients and patients older than 70 years.

  9. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT): Imaging the Visual Pathway as a Model for Neurodegeneration

    Galetta, Kristin M.; Peter A Calabresi; Frohman, Elliot M.; Balcer, Laura J.

    2011-01-01

    Axonal and neuronal degeneration are important features of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurologic disorders that affect the anterior visual pathway. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive technique that allows imaging of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), a structure which is principally composed of ganglion cell axons that form the optic nerves, chiasm, and optic tracts. Since retinal axons are nonmyelinated until they penetrate the lamina cribrosa, the RNFL is an idea...

  11. The Impact of Multifocal Intraocular Lens in Retinal Imaging with Optical Coherence Tomography

    Dias-Santos, A; Costa, L; Lemos, V; Anjos, R.; Vicente, A.(IFPA, Dep. AGO, Université de Liège, Bat B5, Sart-Tilman, B-4000, Liège 1, Belgium); Ferreira, J; Cunha, JP

    2015-01-01

    Multifocal intraocular lenses (MF IOLs) have concentric optical zones with different dioptric power, enabling patients to have good visual acuity at multiple focal points. However, several optical limitations have been attributed to this particular design. The purpose of this study is to access the effect of MF IOLs design on the accuracy of retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT). Cross-sectional study conducted at the Refractive Surgery Department of Central Lisbon Hospital Center. Twent...

  12. Functional imaging in bulk tissue specimens using optical emission tomography: fluorescence preservation during optical clearing

    Optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) is a technique for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of fluorescent probes in biological tissue specimens with high contrast and spatial resolution. In optical-ECT, functional information can be imaged by (i) systemic application of functional labels (e.g. fluorophore labelled proteins) and/or (ii) endogenous expression of fluorescent reporter proteins (e.g. red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP)) in vivo. An essential prerequisite for optical-ECT is optical clearing, a procedure where tissue specimens are made transparent to light by sequential perfusion with fixing, dehydrating and clearing agents. In this study, we investigate clearing protocols involving a selection of common fixing (4% buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA), methanol and ethanol), dehydrating (methanol and ethanol) and clearing agents (methyl salicylate and benzyl-alcohol-benzyl-benzoate (BABB)) in order to determine a 'fluorescence friendly' clearing procedure. Cell culture experiments were employed to optimize the sequence of chemical treatments that best preserve fluorescence. Texas red (TxRed), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), RFP and GFP were tested as fluorophores and fluorescent reporter proteins of interest. Fluorescent and control cells were imaged on a microscope using a DSred2 and FITC filter set. The most promising clearing protocols of cell culture experiments were applied to whole xenograft tumour specimens, to test their effectiveness in large unsectioned samples. Fluorescence of TxRed/FITC fluorophores was not found to be significantly affected by any of the test clearing protocols. RFP and GFP fluorescence, however, was found to be significantly greater when cell fixation was in ethanol. Fixation in either PFA or methanol resulted in diminished fluorescence. After ethanol fixation, the RFP and GFP fluorescence proved remarkably robust to subsequent exposure to either methyl salicylate or BABB

  13. Computational adaptive optics for broadband interferometric tomography of tissues and cells

    Adie, Steven G.; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) can shape aberrated optical wavefronts to physically restore the constructive interference needed for high-resolution imaging. With access to the complex optical field, however, many functions of optical hardware can be achieved computationally, including focusing and the compensation of optical aberrations to restore the constructive interference required for diffraction-limited imaging performance. Holography, which employs interferometric detection of the complex optical field, was developed based on this connection between hardware and computational image formation, although this link has only recently been exploited for 3D tomographic imaging in scattering biological tissues. This talk will present the underlying imaging science behind computational image formation with optical coherence tomography (OCT) -- a beam-scanned version of broadband digital holography. Analogous to hardware AO (HAO), we demonstrate computational adaptive optics (CAO) and optimization of the computed pupil correction in 'sensorless mode' (Zernike polynomial corrections with feedback from image metrics) or with the use of 'guide-stars' in the sample. We discuss the concept of an 'isotomic volume' as the volumetric extension of the 'isoplanatic patch' introduced in astronomical AO. Recent CAO results and ongoing work is highlighted to point to the potential biomedical impact of computed broadband interferometric tomography. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of HAO vs. CAO for the effective shaping of optical wavefronts, and highlight opportunities for hybrid approaches that synergistically combine the unique advantages of hardware and computational methods for rapid volumetric tomography with cellular resolution.

  14. Mechanisms of Very Late Drug-Eluting Stent Thrombosis Assessed by Optical Coherence Tomography

    Taniwaki, Masanori; Radu, Maria D; Zaugg, Serge; Amabile, Nicolas; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Yamaji, Kyohei; Jørgensen, Erik; Kelbæk, Henning; Pilgrim, Thomas; Caussin, Christophe; Zanchin, Thomas; Veugeois, Aurelie; Abildgaard, Ulrik; Jüni, Peter; Cook, Stephane; Koskinas, Konstantinos C; Windecker, Stephan; Räber, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathomechanisms underlying very late stent thrombosis (VLST) after implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) are incompletely understood. Using optical coherence tomography, we investigated potential causes of this adverse event. METHODS AND RESULTS: Between August 2010 and December...... 2014, 64 patients were investigated at the time point of VLST as part of an international optical coherence tomography registry. Optical coherence tomography pullbacks were performed after restoration of flow and analyzed at 0.4 mm. A total of 38 early- and 20 newer-generation drug-eluting stents were...... malapposed struts with thrombus were consistent among early- and newer-generation drug-eluting stents. CONCLUSIONS: The leading associated findings in VLST patients in descending order were malapposition, neoatherosclerosis, uncovered struts, and stent underexpansion without differences between patients...

  15. Current and future potential of retinal optical coherence tomography in multiple sclerosis with and without optic neuritis.

    Balk, Lisanne J; Petzold, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disorder characterized by inflammation and neuroaxonal degeneration. The latter is held responsible for the irreversible disability in patients with MS. The eye is a unique window into the brain. With the advent of optical coherence tomography, accurate quantification of retinal layer thickness has become feasible. Neuroaxonal degeneration affecting the retinal layers is structurally and functionally related to pathology in the visual pathways, which is most severe following MS optic neuritis. This is relevant to recognize because MS optic neuritis may mask the subtle thinning of retinal layers associated with global CNS atrophy, which is also related to more global loss of neurological function. Taken together, optical coherence tomography stands at the brink of becoming a validated imaging biomarker for monitoring neurodegeneration in MS and to provide end points for clinical trials. PMID:24832034

  16. Development of CCD-based optical computed tomography and comparison with single-beam optical CT scanner

    This study reports on the development of CCD-based optical computed tomography (CT) CT-s2. A commercially available 10× fast optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUSTM-10X, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) was used for comparison. NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter was used to validate the performance of CT-s2. The gamma pass rate can reach 96.00% when using a 3% dose difference and 3 mm dose-to-agreement criteria. The results of CT-s2 are as good as those of the single-beam optical-CT scanner, but the scanning time of CT-s2 is only one-tenth of that of the single-beam optical-CT scanner

  17. Achromatic registration of quadrature components of the optical spectrum in spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    We have thoroughly investigated the method of simultaneous reception of spectral components with the achromatised quadrature phase shift between two portions of a reference wave, designed for the effective suppression of the 'mirror' artefact in the resulting image obtained by means of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). We have developed and experimentally tested a phase-shifting element consisting of a beam divider, which splits the reference optical beam into the two beams, and of delay lines being individual for each beam, which create a mutual phase difference of π/2 in the double pass of the reference beam. The phase shift achromatism over a wide spectral range is achieved by using in the delay lines the individual elements with different dispersion characteristics. The ranges of admissible adjustment parameters of the achromatised delay line are estimated for exact and inexact conformity of the geometric characteristics of its components to those calculated. A possibility of simultaneous recording of the close-to-quadrature spectral components with a single linear photodetector element is experimentally confirmed. The suppression of the artefact mirror peak in the OCT-signal by an additional 9 dB relative to the level of its suppression is experimentally achieved when the air delay line is used. Two-dimensional images of the surface positioned at an angle to the axis of the probe beam are obtained with the correction of the 'mirror' artefact while maintaining the dynamic range of the image. (laser biophotonics)

  18. Adaptive optics-assisted optical coherence tomography for imaging of patients with age related macular degeneration

    Sudo, Kenta; Cense, Barry

    2013-03-01

    We developed an optical coherence tomography (OCT) prototype with a sample arm that uses a 3.4 mm beam, which is considerably larger than the 1.2 to 1.5 mm beam that is used in commercialized OCT systems. The system is equipped with adaptive optics (AO), and to distinguish it from traditional AO-OCT systems with a larger 6 mm beam we have coined this concept AO-assisted OCT. Compared to commercialized OCT systems, the 3.4 mm aperture combined with AO improves light collection efficiency and imaging lateral resolution. In this paper, the performance of the AOa-OCT system was compared to a standard OCT system and demonstrated for imaging of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Measurements were performed on the retinas of three human volunteers with healthy eyes and on one eye of a patient diagnosed with AMD. The AO-assisted OCT system imaged retinal structures of healthy human eyes and a patient eye affected by AMD with higher lateral resolution and a 9° by 9° field of view. This combination of a large isoplanatic patch and high lateral resolution can be expected to fill a gap between standard OCT with a 1.2 mm beam and conventional AO-OCT with a 6 mm beam and a 1.5° by 1.5° isoplanatic patch.

  19. Diagnostic ability of Barrett's index to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy using multidetector computed tomography

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a muscular index (Barrett's Index), calculated with multidetector computed tomography, to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy in patients with Graves' orbitopathy. Methods: Thirty-six patients with Graves' orbitopathy were prospectively studied and submitted to neuro-ophthalmic evaluation and multidetector computed tomography scans of the orbits. Orbits were divided into two groups: those with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy. Barrett's index was calculated as the percentage of the orbit occupied by muscles. Sensitivity and specificity were determined for several index values. Results: Sixty-four orbits (19 with and 45 without dysthyroid optic neuropathy) met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean Barrett's index values (±SD) were 64.47% ± 6.06% and 49.44% ± 10.94% in the groups with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy, respectively (p60% should be carefully examined and followed for the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy. (author)

  20. Spatially resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of colorectal and pancreatic field carcinogenesis observed by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    Yi, Ji; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Nikhil N Mutyal; Azarin, Samira Michelle; Horcher, Elizabeth; Goldberg, Michael J.; Bianchi, Laura K.; Bajaj, Shailesh; Hemant K. Roy; Backman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Field carcinogenesis is the initial stage of cancer progression. Understanding field carcinogenesis is valuable for both cancer biology and clinical medicine. Here, we used inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography to study colorectal cancer (CRC) and pancreatic cancer (PC) field carcinogenesis. Depth-resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of the mucosa were quantified from histologically normal rectal biopsies from patients with and without colon adenomas ( n = 85...

  1. Coronary optical coherence tomography: minimally invasive virtual histology as part of targeted post-mortem computed tomography angiography.

    Adlam, David; Joseph, Shiju; Robinson, Claire; Rousseau, Clement; Barber, Jade; Biggs, Mike; Morgan, Bruno; Rutty, Guy

    2013-09-01

    Social, cultural and practical barriers to conventional invasive autopsy have led to considerable interest in the development of minimally invasive radiological techniques as an alternative to the invasive autopsy for determining the cause of death. Critical to accurate diagnosis in this context is detailed examination of coronary anatomy and pathology. Current computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging approaches have significantly advanced minimally invasive autopsy practice but have limited spatial resolution. This prohibits assessment at a microscopic level, meaning that histological assessment is still required for detailed analysis of, for example, coronary plaque rupture or dissection. Coronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used in the living during percutaneous coronary interventions to provide high-resolution coronary imaging, but this technique for obtaining virtual histology has not, to date, been translated into minimally invasive autopsy practice. We present a first description of minimally invasive post-mortem coronary OCT and discuss the potential for this technique to advance current practice. PMID:23455719

  2. Fingerprint imaging from the inside of a finger with full-field optical coherence tomography

    Auksorius, Egidijus; Boccara, A. Claude

    2015-01-01

    Imaging below fingertip surface might be a useful alternative to the traditional fingerprint sensing since the internal finger features are more reliable than the external ones. One of the most promising subsurface imaging technique is optical coherence tomography (OCT), which, however, has to acquire 3-D data even when a single en face image is required. This makes OCT inherently slow for en face imaging and produce unnecessary large data sets. Here we demonstrate that full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) can be used to produce en face images of sweat pores and internal fingerprints, which can be used for the identification purposes. PMID:26601009

  3. Wavelet-domain de-noising of optical coherent tomography data for biomedical applications

    Optical coherent tomography (OCT) is a rapidly developing method of fundamental and applied research. Detection and processing of OCT images is a very important problem of applied physics and optical signal processing. In the present paper we are demonstrating the ability for effective wavelet-domain de-noising of OCT images. We are realizing an algorithm for wavelet-domain de-noising of OCT data and implementing it for the purpose of studying test samples and for in vivo nail tomography. High de-noising efficiency with no significant losses of information about the internal sample structure is observed

  4. Self optical motion-tracking for endoscopic optical coherence tomography probe using micro-beamsplitter probe

    Li, Jiawen; Zhang, Jun; Chou, Lidek; Wang, Alex; Jing, Joseph; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-03-01

    Long range optical coherence tomography (OCT), with its high speed, high resolution, non-ionized properties and cross-sectional imaging capability, is suitable for upper airway lumen imaging. To render 2D OCT datasets to true 3D anatomy, additional tools are usually applied, such as X-ray guidance or a magnetic sensor. X-ray increases ionizing radiation. A magnetic sensor either increases probe size or requires an additional pull-back of the tracking sensor through the body cavity. In order to overcome these limitations, we present a novel tracking method using a 1.5 mm×1.5mm, 90/10-ratio micro-beamsplitter: 10% light through the beam-splitter is used for motion tracking and 90% light is used for regular OCT imaging and motion tracking. Two signals corresponding to these two split-beams that pass through different optical path length delays are obtained by the detector simultaneously. Using the two split beams' returned signals from the same marker line, the 2D inclination angle of each step is computed. By calculating the 2D inclination angle of each step and then connecting the translational displacements of each step, we can obtain the 2D motion trajectory of the probe. With two marker lines on the probe sheath, 3D inclination angles can be determined and then used for 3D trajectory reconstruction. We tested the accuracy of trajectory reconstruction using the probe and demonstrated the feasibility of the design for structure reconstruction of a biological sample using a porcine trachea specimen. This optical-tracking probe has the potential to be made as small as an outer diameter of 1.0mm, which is ideal for upper airway imaging.

  5. Optical coherence tomography of the optic nerve head detects acute changes in intracranial pressure.

    Anand, Aashish; Pass, Anastas; Urfy, Mian Z; Tang, Rosa; Cajavilca, Christian; Calvillo, Eusebia; Suarez, Jose I; Venkatasubba Rao, Chethan P; Bershad, Eric M

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to determine if there are measurable objective changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) immediately after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage in a prospective case-series of five patients undergoing a clinically indicated lumbar puncture (LP) for diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. A Cirrus high-definition optical coherence tomography machine (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA, USA) was used to acquire images in the lateral decubitus position. Optic disc cube and high-definition line raster scans centered on the ONH were obtained immediately before and after draining CSF, while the patient maintained the lateral decubitus position. Measured parameters included retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, peripapillary retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch's membrane (RPE/BM) angulation, transverse neural canal diameter (NCD) and the highest vertical point of the internal limiting membrane from the transverse diameter (papillary height). The mean (±standard deviation) opening and closing CSF pressures were 34.3±11.8 and 11.6±3.3cmH2O, respectively. Mean RNFL thickness (pre LP: 196±105μm; post LP: 164±77μm, p=0.1) and transverse NCD (pre LP: 1985±559μm; post LP: 1590±228μm, p=2.0) decreased in all subjects, but with non-significant trends. The RPE/BM angle (mean change: 5.8±2.0degrees, p=0.003) decreased in all subjects. A decrease in papillary height was seen in three of five subjects (mean: pre LP: 976±275μm; post LP: 938±300μm, p=0.9). Our results show a measurable, objective change in the ONH after acute lowering of the lumbar CSF pressure, suggesting a direct link between the lumbar subarachnoid space and ONH regions, and its potential as a non-invasive method for monitoring intracranial pressures. PMID:26898579

  6. Optical coherence tomography in papilledema and pseudopapilledema with and without optic nerve head drusen

    Shikha Talwar Bassi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings of the optic disc and the peripapillary retina of patients with a true papilledema and pseudopapilledema with and without optic nerve head drusen (ONHD. Study Design: Retrospective Case Control Study. Subjects and Methods: Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (PPRNFL thickness as depicted by SD-OCT of 94 eyes of 66 patients with papilledema (30 eyes, pseudopapiledema (31 eyes, and normal controls (33 eyes was analyzed. The mean RNFL thickness, total retinal thickness (TRT at a superior and inferior edge of the disc and the quadrant wise topography of increased RNFL were compared in all three groups. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC were calculated for all the parameters. Results: The median RNFL thickness was 185.4 (129.5-349.3 μm, 122.3 (109-156.3 μm and 91.62 ± 7 μm in papilledema, pseudopapilledema, and controls, respectively. Papilledema group had thicker PPRNFL in all quadrants except temporal quadrant. TRT was thicker in papilledema and pseudopapilledema compared to controls. ONHD could be directly visualized as high reflective clumps in the sub-retinal space or the RNFL in 30 eyes. Increased RNFL thickness in all four quadrants was noted 43.3% in papilledema and 9.7% in pseudopapilledema. Normal RNFL thickness in all four quadrants was noted in 0% in papilledema and 32.3% in pseudopapilledema. Nasal RNFL had the highest AROC (0.792 indicating high diagnostic ability to differentiate papilledema from pseudopapilledema. Conclusion: SD-OCT can be used as a tool to differentiate between papilledema and pseudopapilledema.

  7. Size of the optic nerve in computed tomography

    Recently, the measurement of optic nerve diameter from CT images has become of great interest. For measuring the optic nerve diameter, the method of Neuro-Ocular index is advocated by Magadure, 1978. But it is very difficult to support this method, because no relationship exists between the ocular diameter and the optic nerve diameter. In order to measure the optic nerve diameter directly by CT image, we examined several Window Level and Window Width settings and print out tables. Results are as follows, 1) Width 400 and all Level settings, all optic nerves appear thick. 2) Width 100, 75, 50 and Level 0 settings show optic nerves thin. 3) Optic nerve looks thick by Width of 100, 75, 50 and Level of -50 settings. 4) By the Level set of CT value of optic nerve in each case and Width set 75 or 50, optic images show nearly the correct diameter. 5) The midpoint of CT value of optic nerve obtained from print out tables are 8 to -22 and the the average is -10. (author)

  8. Correlative Cryo-electron Tomography and Optical Microscopy of Cells

    Zhang, Peijun

    2013-01-01

    The biological processes occurring in a cell are complex and dynamic, and to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, both temporal and spatial information is required. While cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) provides three-dimensional (3D) still pictures of near-native state cells and organelles at molecular resolution, fluorescence light microscopy (fLM) offers movies of dynamic cellular processes in living cells. Combining and integratin...

  9. Design and implementation of an optical simulation environment for bioluminescent tomography studies

    LI Hui; TIAN Jie; LUO Jie; L(U) Yujie; CONG Wenxiang; WANG Ge

    2007-01-01

    As a challenging task for bioluminescent tomography simulation, a virtual optical environment is needed to solve the forward problem accurately, that is, to achieve a high precision for bioluminescent signal synthesis on the external body surface of a small animal. The molecular optical simulation environment named MOSE is implemented using the C + + programming language and the OpenGL techniques, including a user-friendly interface with interactive tools facilitating users' operations. The accuracy of the virtual optical environment is verified by error analysis of mesh simplification and comparison between MOSE results and experimental data. This virtual optical environment is accurate, flexible and efficient to simulate the photon propagation in complicated tissues, which has a great potential to become a software platform for bioluminescent tomography studies and other molecular imaging applications.

  10. Systematic calibration of an integrated x-ray and optical tomography system for preclinical radiation research

    Yang, Yidong, E-mail: yidongyang@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33136 (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Wong, John W. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Eslami, Sohrab; Iordachita, Iulian I. [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Patterson, Michael S. [Juravinski Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S4K1 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guided small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) has been developed for focal tumor irradiation, allowing laboratory researchers to test basic biological hypotheses that can modify radiotherapy outcomes in ways that were not feasible previously. CBCT provides excellent bone to soft tissue contrast, but is incapable of differentiating tumors from surrounding soft tissue. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT), in contrast, allows direct visualization of even subpalpable tumors and quantitative evaluation of tumor response. Integration of BLT with CBCT offers complementary image information, with CBCT delineating anatomic structures and BLT differentiating luminescent tumors. This study is to develop a systematic method to calibrate an integrated CBCT and BLT imaging system which can be adopted onboard the SARRP to guide focal tumor irradiation. Methods: The integrated imaging system consists of CBCT, diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and BLT. The anatomy acquired from CBCT and optical properties acquired from DOT serve as a priori information for the subsequent BLT reconstruction. Phantoms were designed and procedures were developed to calibrate the CBCT, DOT/BLT, and the entire integrated system. Geometrical calibration was performed to calibrate the CBCT system. Flat field correction was performed to correct the nonuniform response of the optical imaging system. Absolute emittance calibration was performed to convert the camera readout to the emittance at the phantom or animal surface, which enabled the direct reconstruction of the bioluminescence source strength. Phantom and mouse imaging were performed to validate the calibration. Results: All calibration procedures were successfully performed. Both CBCT of a thin wire and a euthanized mouse revealed no spatial artifact, validating the accuracy of the CBCT calibration. The absolute emittance calibration was validated with a 650 nm laser source, resulting in a 3

  11. Systematic calibration of an integrated x-ray and optical tomography system for preclinical radiation research

    Purpose: The cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guided small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) has been developed for focal tumor irradiation, allowing laboratory researchers to test basic biological hypotheses that can modify radiotherapy outcomes in ways that were not feasible previously. CBCT provides excellent bone to soft tissue contrast, but is incapable of differentiating tumors from surrounding soft tissue. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT), in contrast, allows direct visualization of even subpalpable tumors and quantitative evaluation of tumor response. Integration of BLT with CBCT offers complementary image information, with CBCT delineating anatomic structures and BLT differentiating luminescent tumors. This study is to develop a systematic method to calibrate an integrated CBCT and BLT imaging system which can be adopted onboard the SARRP to guide focal tumor irradiation. Methods: The integrated imaging system consists of CBCT, diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and BLT. The anatomy acquired from CBCT and optical properties acquired from DOT serve as a priori information for the subsequent BLT reconstruction. Phantoms were designed and procedures were developed to calibrate the CBCT, DOT/BLT, and the entire integrated system. Geometrical calibration was performed to calibrate the CBCT system. Flat field correction was performed to correct the nonuniform response of the optical imaging system. Absolute emittance calibration was performed to convert the camera readout to the emittance at the phantom or animal surface, which enabled the direct reconstruction of the bioluminescence source strength. Phantom and mouse imaging were performed to validate the calibration. Results: All calibration procedures were successfully performed. Both CBCT of a thin wire and a euthanized mouse revealed no spatial artifact, validating the accuracy of the CBCT calibration. The absolute emittance calibration was validated with a 650 nm laser source, resulting in a 3

  12. Ultrahigh-speed ultrahigh-resolution adaptive optics: optical coherence tomography system for in-vivo small animal retinal imaging

    Jian, Yifan; Xu, Jing; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-03-01

    Small animal models of human retinal diseases are a critical component of vision research. In this report, we present an ultrahigh-resolution ultrahigh-speed adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) system for small animal retinal imaging (mouse, fish, etc.). We adapted our imaging system to different types of small animals in accordance with the optical properties of their eyes. Results of AO-OCT images of small animal retinas acquired with AO correction are presented. Cellular structures including nerve fiber bundles, capillary networks and detailed double-cone photoreceptors are visualized.

  13. In-situ monitoring of surface post-processing in large aperture fused silica optics with Optical Coherence Tomography

    Guss, G M; Bass, I l; Hackel, R P; Mailhiot, C; Demos, S G

    2008-02-08

    Optical Coherence Tomography is explored as a method to image laser-damage sites located on the surface of large aperture fused silica optics during post-processing via CO{sub 2} laser ablation. The signal analysis for image acquisition was adapted to meet the sensitivity requirements for this application. A long-working distance geometry was employed to allow imaging through the opposite surface of the 5-cm thick optic. The experimental results demonstrate the potential of OCT for remote monitoring of transparent material processing applications.

  14. Measurement of tissue optical properties with optical coherence tomography: Implication for noninvasive blood glucose concentration monitoring

    Larin, Kirill V.

    Approximately 14 million people in the USA and more than 140 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes mellitus. The current glucose sensing technique involves a finger puncture several times a day to obtain a droplet of blood for analysis. There have been enormous efforts by many scientific groups and companies to quantify glucose concentration noninvasively using different optical techniques. However, these techniques face limitations associated with low sensitivity, accuracy, and insufficient specificity of glucose concentrations over a physiological range. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a new technology, is being applied for noninvasive imaging in tissues with high resolution. OCT utilizes sensitive detection of photons coherently scattered from tissue. The high resolution of this technique allows for exceptionally accurate measurement of tissue scattering from a specific layer of skin compared with other optical techniques and, therefore, may provide noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration with high accuracy. In this dissertation work I experimentally and theoretically investigate feasibility of noninvasive, real-time, sensitive, and specific monitoring of blood glucose concentration using an OCT-based biosensor. The studies were performed in scattering media with stable optical properties (aqueous suspensions of polystyrene microspheres and milk), animals (New Zealand white rabbits and Yucatan micropigs), and normal subjects (during oral glucose tolerance tests). The results of these studies demonstrated: (1) capability of the OCT technique to detect changes in scattering coefficient with the accuracy of about 1.5%; (2) a sharp and linear decrease of the OCT signal slope in the dermis with the increase of blood glucose concentration; (3) the change in the OCT signal slope measured during bolus glucose injection experiments (characterized by a sharp increase of blood glucose concentration) is higher than that measured in

  15. Cerebral blood flow imaged with ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence angiography and Doppler tomography

    Ren, Hugang; Du, Congwu; Pan, Yingtian

    2012-01-01

    Speckle contrast based optical coherence angiography (OCA) and optical coherence Doppler tomography (ODT) have been applied to image cerebral blood flow previously. However, the contrast mechanisms of these two methods are not fully studied. Here, we present both flow phantom and in vivo animal experiments using ultrahigh-resolution OCA (μOCA) and ODT (μODT) to investigate the flow sensitivity differences between these two methods. Our results show that the high sensitivity of μOCA for visual...

  16. Detection of retinal blood vessel changes in multiple sclerosis with optical coherence tomography

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Motl, Robert W.; Moss, Heather E.; Pula, John H.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Although retinal vasculitis is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it is not known if MS is associated with quantitative abnormalities in retinal blood vessels (BVs). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is suitable for examining the integrity of the anterior visual pathways in MS. In this paper we have compared the size and number of retinal blood vessels in patients with MS, with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON), and control subjects from the cross-sectional retinal images from OCT...

  17. Advanced 3D-reconstruction of biological specimen monitored by non-invasive optical tomography

    Imaging of intricate and delicate subcellular structures along with reliable 3D-reconstruction of cells and tissues may be achieved on the basis of confocal laser scanning microscopy (optical tomography) provided that certain criteria such as proper loading of fluorescent dyes, image acquisition under defined electro-optical conditions, suitable image pre- and postprocessing, etc., are taken into account prior to volume- or surface-rendering for 3D-visualization. (author)

  18. Noninvasive Evaluation of Nuclear Morphometry in Breast Lesions Using Multispectral Diffuse Optical Tomography

    Mohammad Reza Hajihashemi; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Al-Quran, Samer Z.; Huabei Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer and the main cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. There are limitations associated with the existing clinical tools for breast cancer detection and alternative modalities for early detection and classification of breast cancer are urgently needed. Here we describe an optical imaging technique, called multispectral diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and demonstrate its ability of non-invasively evaluating nuclear morphometry for differenti...

  19. Extracting structural features of rat sciatic nerve using polarization-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Islam, M. S.; de Oliveira, M. C.; Wang, Y.; Henry, F.P.; Randolph, M.A.; Park, B. H.; Boer

    2012-01-01

    We present spectral domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (SD PS-OCT) imaging of peripheral nerves. Structural and polarization-sensitive OCT imaging of uninjured rat sciatic nerves was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. OCT and its functional extension, PS-OCT, were used to image sciatic nerve structure with clear delineation of the nerve boundaries to muscle and adipose tissues. A long-known optical effect, bands of Fontana, was also observed. Postprocessi...

  20. Interstitial diffuse optical tomography using an adjoint model with linear sources

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2008-01-01

    An improved interstitial diffuse optical tomography (iDOT) system has been developed to characterize the optical properties of prostate gland during the photodynamic therapy (PDT). Multiple cylindrical light diffusers with different lengths (instead of point sources used in an earlier version) and isotropic detectors are introduced interstitially in the prostate gland in-vivo. During the data acquisition, linear sources and detectors are stepping into prostate sequentially controlled by a mot...

  1. A comparison of methods using optical coherence tomography to detect demineralized regions in teeth

    Sowa, Michael G; Popescu, Dan P.; Friesen, Jeri R.; Mark D. Hewko; Choo-Smith, Lin-P’ing

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a three- dimensional optical imaging technique that can be used to identify areas of early caries formation in dental enamel. The OCT signal at 850 nm back-reflected from sound enamel is attenuated stronger than the signal back-reflected from demineralized regions. To quantify this observation, the OCT signal as a function of depth into the enamel (also known as the A-scan intensity), the histogram of the A-scan intensities and three sum...

  2. Fiber-Based Polarization Diversity Detection for Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    Hamid Pahlevaninezhad; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Lucas Cahill; Stephen Lam; Calum MacAulay; Pierre Lane

    2014-01-01

    We present a new fiber-based polarization diversity detection (PDD) scheme for polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT). This implementation uses a new custom miniaturized polarization-maintaining fiber coupler with single mode (SM) fiber inputs and polarization maintaining (PM) fiber outputs. The SM fiber inputs obviate matching the optical lengths of the two orthogonal OCT polarization channels prior to interference while the PM fiber outputs ensure defined orthogonal axe...

  3. Homodyne tomography characterization and nonlocality of a dual-mode optical qubit

    Babichev, S. A.; Appel, J.; Lvovsky, A. I.

    2003-01-01

    A single photon, delocalized over two optical modes, is characterized by means of quantum homodyne tomography. The reconstructed four-dimensional density matrix extends over the entire Hilbert space and thus reveals, for the first time, complete information about the dual-rail optical quantum bit as a state of the electromagnetic field. The experimental data violate the Bell inequality albeit with a loophole similar to the detection loophole in photon counting experiments.

  4. The Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Changes Evaluated by Optical Coherence Tomography After Phacoemulsification Surgery

    Cumali Değirmenci; Filiz Afrashi; Serhad Nalçacı; Suzan Güven Yılmaz

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT) before and after cataract surgery. Materials and Methods: In our study, we included 44 eyes of 44 patients who underwent uncomplicated cataract surgery and had no preexisting pathology involving the retina, optic nerve, or cornea. All patients were scanned by OCT for RNFL measurements 1 day before and 1 month after cataract surgery. The grading of cataract was based on the ...

  5. Measurement of cerebral microvascular compliance in a model of atherosclerosis with optical coherence tomography

    Baraghis, E.; Bolduc, V.; Lefebvre, J.; Srinivasan, V. J.; Boudoux, C.; THORIN, E.; Lesage, F.

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has recently been used to produce 3D angiography of microvasculature and blood flow maps of large vessels in the rodent brain in-vivo. However, use of this optical method for the study of cerebrovascular disease has not been fully explored. Recent developments in neurodegenerative diseases has linked common cardiovascular risk factors to neurodegenerative risk factors hinting at a vascular hypothesis for the development of the latter. Tools for studying cere...

  6. Imaging human retinal pigment epithelium cells using adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2016-03-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, but are often compromised in ageing and major ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, and while biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. We present a novel method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) equipped with adaptive optics (AO) that overcomes the associated technical obstacles. The method takes advantage of the 3D resolution of AO-OCT, but more critically sub-cellular segmentation and registration that permit organelle motility to be used as a novel contrast mechanism. With this method, we successfully visualized RPE cells and characterized their 3D reflectance profile in every subject and retinal location (3° and 7° temporal to the fovea) imaged to date. We have quantified RPE packing geometry in terms of cell density, cone-to-RPE ratio, and number of nearest neighbors using Voronoi and power spectra analyses. RPE cell density (cells/mm2) showed no significant difference between 3° (4,892+/-691) and 7° (4,780+/-354). In contrast, cone-to- RPE ratio was significantly higher at 3° (3.88+/-0.52:1) than 7° (2.31+/- 0.23:1). Voronoi analysis also showed most RPE cells have six nearest neighbors, which was significantly larger than the next two most prevalent associations: five and seven. Averaged across the five subjects, prevalence of cells with six neighbors was 51.4+/-3.58% at 3°, and 54.58+/-3.01% at 7°. These results are consistent with histology and in vivo studies using other imaging modalities.

  7. Optical Coherence Tomography and Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy

    Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Andersen, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    The Special Section on Selected Topics in Biophotonics: Optical Coherence Tomography and Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy comprises two invited review papers and several contributed papers from the summer school Biophotonics ’13, as well as contributed papers within...

  8. Design and testing of prototype handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography.

    Demian, Dorin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Cernat, Ramona; Topala, Florin Ionel; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-08-01

    Three simple and low-cost configurations of handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography have been developed. Their design and testing for dentistry applications are presented. The first two configurations were built exclusively from available off-the-shelf optomechanical components, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the first designs of this type. The third configuration includes these components in an optimized and ergonomic probe. All the designs are presented in detail to allow for their duplication in any laboratory with a minimum effort, for applications that range from educational to high-end clinical investigations. Requirements that have to be fulfilled to achieve configurations which are reliable, ergonomic-for clinical environments, and easy to build are presented. While a range of applications is possible for the prototypes developed, in this study the handheld probes are tested ex vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system built in-house, for dental constructs. A previous testing with a swept source optical coherence tomography system has also been performed both in vivo and ex vivo for ear, nose, and throat-in a medical environment. The applications use the capability of optical coherence tomography to achieve real-time, high-resolution, non-contact, and non-destructive interferometric investigations with micrometer resolutions and millimeter penetration depth inside the sample. In this study, testing the quality of the material of one of the most used types of dental prosthesis, metalo-ceramic is thus demonstrated. PMID:25107512

  9. Studies of dynamic processes in biomedicine by high-speed spectral optical coherence tomography

    Wojtkowski, M.; Kowalczyk, A.

    2007-02-01

    This contribution demonstrates potential of Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT) for studies of dynamic processes in biomedicine occurring at various time scales. Several examples from ophthalmology, optometry, surgery, neurology are given to illustrate the extension of SOCT beyond pure morphological investigations.

  10. Clinical experiences with optical coherence tomography in epithelial (pre)malignancies

    Wessels, Ronni

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the potential of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to differentiate between normal tissue and (pre)malignant tissue in epithelial cancers. It can be divided in research performed in the genital area and the field of melanoma. Chapter 2 describes the principles of the OCT-tec

  11. Simultaneous dual wavelength eye-tracked ultrahigh resolution retinal and choroidal optical coherence tomography

    Unterhuber, A.; Povaay, B.; Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Duelk, M.; Le, T.; Petersen, Paul Michael; Velez, C.; Esmaeelpour, M.; Andersen, Peter E.; Drexler, W.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an optical coherence tomography device that simultaneously combines different novel ultrabroad bandwidth light sources centered in the 800 and 1060 nm regions, operating at 66 kHz depth scan rate, and a confocal laser scanning ophthalmoscope-based eye tracker to permit motion...... eye segment or eyes with increased choroidal thickness....

  12. Imaging actinic keratosis by high-definition optical coherence tomography. Histomorphologic correlation

    Boone, Marc A L M; Norrenberg, Sarah; Jemec, Gregor B E;

    2013-01-01

    With the continued development of non-invasive therapies for actinic keratosis such as PDT and immune therapies, the non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring become increasingly relevant. High-definition optical coherence tomography is a high-resolution imaging tool, with micrometre resolution in bo...

  13. Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography for Blood Glucose Monitoring in Human Subjects

    Solanki, Jitendra; Sen, Pratima; Andrews, Joseph Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A device based on Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography is developed to monitor blood glucose levels in human subjects. The device was initially tested with tissue phantom. The measurements with human subjects for various glucose concentration levels are found to be linearly dependent on the degree of circular polarization obtainable from the PS-OCT.

  14. SIMULATION STUDY FOR GASEOUS FLUXES FROM AN AREA SOURCE USING COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING

    The paper presents a new approach to quantifying emissions from fugitive gaseous air pollution sources. Computed tomography (CT) and path-integrated optical remote sensing (PI-ORS) concentration data are combined in a new field beam geometry. Path-integrated concentrations are ...

  15. Combined dynamic and static optical tomography for prediction of treatment outcome in breast cancer patients

    Gunther, Jacqueline; Lim, Emerson; Kim, Hyun Keol; Flexman, Molly; Zweck, Lukas; Arora, Sindhiya; Refice, Susan; Brown, Mindy; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2015-07-01

    We explored evidence that a combination of dynamic and static diffuse optical tomography can be used to predict treatment response in patients undergoing neo adjuvant chemotherapy. Both blood chromophore concentrations and hemodynamic signatures were measured over the 5-month course of treatment.

  16. In vivo Imaging of Sarcoptes scabiei Infestation Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    Banzhaf, Christina Alette; Themstrup, Lotte; Ring, Hans Christian; Welzel, Julia; Mogensen, Mette; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sarcoptes scabiei can be visualized with different imaging tools. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) may have the potential to describe the changes in skin morphology due to scabies infestation and visualize the parasite. METHODS: Five patients from the Departments of Dermatology...

  17. An Efficient Approach for Optical Radiative Transfer Tomography using the Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinates Method

    Levis, Aviad; Aides, Amit; Davis, Anthony B

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a method to preform optical tomography, using 3D radiative transfer as the forward model. We use an iterative approach predicated on the Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinates Method (SHDOM) to solve the optimization problem in a scalable manner. We illustrate with an application in remote sensing of a cloudy atmosphere.

  18. The utility of three-dimensional optical projection tomography in nerve injection injury imaging

    Cvetko, E.; Čapek, Martin; Damjanovska, M.; Reina, M. A.; Eržen, I.; Stopar-Pintarič, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 8 (2015), s. 939-947. ISSN 0003-2409 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-12412S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : optical projection tomography * 3D nerve visualization * nerve disruption Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.382, year: 2014

  19. The ability of optical coherence tomography to characterize the root canal walls

    Shemesh, Hagay; Van Soest, Gijs; Wu, Min-Kai; Van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.; Wesselink, Paul R.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the complexity of root canal systems is imperative to ensure successful root canal therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system in imaging root canal walls after endodontic preparation and to correlate these im

  20. Optical coherence tomography imaging of psoriasis vulgaris: correlation with histology and disease severity

    Morsy, Hanan; Kamp, Søren; Thrane, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal thickness (ET) has been suggested as a surrogate measure of psoriasis severity. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a recent imaging technology that provides real-time skin images to a depth of 1.8 mm with a micrometre resolution. OCT may provide an accurate in vivo measure of ET. It ...

  1. Imaging of basal cell carcinoma by high-definition optical coherence tomography

    Boone, M A L M; Norrenberg, S; Jemec, G B E;

    2012-01-01

    With the continued development of noninvasive therapies for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) such as photodynamic therapy and immune therapies, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring become increasingly relevant. High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) is a high-resolution imaging tool, with...

  2. Relation between quantum tomography and optical Fresnel transform

    Fan, Hong-yi; Hu, Li-yun

    2008-01-01

    Corresponding to optical Fresnel transformation characteristic of ray transfer matrix elements (A;B;C;D); AD-BC = 1, there exists Fresnel operator F(A;B;C;D) in quantum optics, we show that under the Fresnel transformation the pure position density |x>_rs,rs__rs,rs_ is just the wave function of its Fresnel transformed state F|phi>, i.e. rs_= . Similarly, we find F|p>_rs,rs_

  3. Smart optical coherence tomography for ultra-deep imaging through highly scattering media

    Badon, Amaury; Lerosey, Geoffroy; Boccara, Albert C; Fink, Mathias; Aubry, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Multiple scattering of waves in disordered media is a nightmare whether it be for detection or imaging purposes. The best approach so far to get rid of multiple scattering is optical coherence tomography. It basically combines confocal microscopy and coherence time-gating to discriminate ballistic photons from a predominant multiple scattering background. Nevertheless, the imaging depth range remains limited to 1 mm at best in human soft tissues. Here we propose a matrix approach of optical imaging to push back this fundamental limit. By combining a matrix discrimination of ballistic waves and iterative time-reversal, we show both theoretically and experimentally an extension of the imaging-depth limit by at least a factor two compared to optical coherence tomography. In particular, the reported experiment demonstrates imaging through a strongly scattering layer from which only one reflected photon over 1000 billion is ballistic. This approach opens a new route towards ultra-deep tissue imaging.

  4. In vitro birefringence imaging with spectral domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Qiang Gong; Chuanmao Fan; Fan Zhang; Jianquan Yao

    2008-01-01

    Spectral domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (SDPS-OCT) is a depth-resolved polarization-sensitive interferometry which integrates polarization optics into spectral domain optical co-herence tomography (SD-OCT). This configuration can obtain birefringence information of samples and improve the imaging speed. In this paper, horizontally polarized light is used to replace natural light of the source. Then, right-rotated circularly polarized light is the incident sample light. To obtain two orthogonal components of the polarized interferogram, the reflected light of the reference arm is set to be 45° linearly polarized light. These two components are acquired by two spectrometers synchronously. The system was employed to achieve 12.8-#m axial resolution and 4.36-#m transverse resolution. We have imaged in vitro chicken tendon and muscle tissues with these system.

  5. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography for dense turbid media

    Wang, Lihong V.; Zhao, Xuemei; Jacques, Steven L.

    1996-04-01

    Continuous-wave ultrasonic modulation of scattered laser light has been used to image objects in tissue-simulating turbid media for the first time. We hypothesized that the ultrasound wave focused into the turbid media modulates the laser light passing through the ultrasonic focal zone. The modulated laser light collected by a photomultiplier tube reflects the local mechanical and optical properties in the focal zone. Buried objects in 5-cm thick tissue phantoms (absorption coefficient (mu) $a) equals 0.1 cm-1, reduced scattering coefficient (mu) s' equals 10 cm-1) were located with millimeter resolution by scanning and detecting alterations of the ultrasound-modulated optical signal.

  6. Extraction of optical scattering parameters and attenuation compensation in optical coherence tomography images of multi-layered tissue structures

    Thrane, Lars; Frosz, Michael Henoch; Tycho, Andreas;

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed analytical optical coherence tomography (OCT) model [Thrane et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 484 (2000)] allows the extraction of optical scattering parameters from OCT images, thereby permitting attenuation compensation in those images. By expanding this theoretical model, we...... have developed a new method for extracting optical scattering parameters from multilayered tissue structures in vivo. To verify this, we used a Monte Carlo (MC) OCT model as a numerical phantom to simulate the OCT signal for het-erogeneous multilayered tissue. Excellent agreement between the extracted...... values of the optical scattering properties of the different layers and the corresponding input reference values of the MC simulation was obtained, which demonstrates the feasibility of the method for in vivo applications. This is to our knowledge the first time such verification has been obtained, and...

  7. Imaging a full set of optical scattering properties of biological tissue by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.

    Yi, Ji; Backman, Vadim

    2012-11-01

    We here develop a method to measure and image the full optical scattering properties by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (ISOCT). Tissue is modelled as a medium with continuous refractive index (RI) fluctuation and such a fluctuation is described by the RI correlation functions. Under the first-order Born approximation, the forward model is established for ISOCT. By measuring optical quantities of tissue including the scattering power of the OCT spectrum, the reflection albedo α defined as the ratio of scattering coefficient μ(s), and the backscattering coefficient μ(b), we are able to inversely deduce the RI correlation function and image the full set of optical scattering properties. PMID:23114323

  8. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Simple Retina Pigment Epithelium Hamartoma

    Melis Palamar Onay

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To report the spectral-domain optical coherence tomographic findings in a case of a simple hamartoma of the retinal pigment epithelium. A 55-year-old female patient with simple hamartoma of the retinal pigment epithelium was evaluated with ultrasonography and spectraldomain optic coherence tomography. The patient was found to have a pitch-black lesion measuring one-half of the disk diameter, located at about 1 disk diameter temporal to the foveola. B-mode ultrasonogram revealed a 0.8-mm thick retinal lesion with high internal reflectivity which was consistent with simple hamartoma of the retinal pigment epithelium. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated an elevated lesion extending from the retinal layer toward the vitreous. The high resolution of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography allows detailed observation of the retinal pigment epithelium hamartomas and is useful in the differential diagnosis and management of pigmented fundus lesions. (Turk J Oph thal mol 2012; 42: 157-8

  9. In vivo imaging of zebrafish from embryo to adult stage with optical projection tomography

    Bassi, Andrea; Fieramonti, Luca; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; De Silvestri, Sandro; Cerullo, Giulio; Foglia, Efrem; Cotelli, Franco

    2013-02-01

    Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) is a three dimensional imaging technique that is particularly suitable for studying millimeter sized biological samples and organisms. Similarly to x-ray computed tomography, OPT is based on the acquisition of a sequence of images taken through the sample at many angles (projections). Assuming the linearity of the optical absorption process, the projections are combined to reconstruct the 3-D volume of the sample, typically using a filtered back-projection algorithm. OPT has been applied to in-vivo imaging of zebrafish (Danio rerio). The instrument and the protocol for in vivo imaging of zebrafish embryos and juvenile specimens are described. Light scattering remains a challenge for in vivo OPT, especially when samples at the upper size limit, like zebrafish at the adult stage, are under study. We describe Time-Gated Optical Projection Tomography (TGOPT), a technique able to reconstruct adult zebrafish internal structures by counteracting the scattering effects through a fast time-gate. The time gating mechanism is based on non-linear optical upconversion of an infrared ultrashort laser pulse and allows the detection of quasi-ballistic photons within a 100 fs temporal gate. This results in a strong improvement in contrast and resolution with respect to conventional OPT. Artifacts in the reconstructed images are reduced as well. We show that TGOPT is suited for imaging the skeletal system and nervous structures of adult zebrafish.

  10. Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO): A performance study

    Tatulli, E

    2013-01-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the on-axis performance of Adaptive Optics systems using a given number of guide stars of arbitrary altitude, distributed at arbitrary angular positions in the sky. The expressions of the residual error are given for cases of both continuous and discrete turbulent atmospheric profiles. Assuming Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing with circular apertures, we demonstrate that the error is formally described by integrals of products of three Bessel functions. We compare the performance of Adaptive Optics correction when using natural, Sodium or Rayleigh laser guide stars. For small diameter class telescopes (~5m), we show that a few number of Rayleigh beacons can provide similar performance to that of a single Sodium laser, for a lower overall cost of the instrument. For bigger apertures, using Rayleigh stars may not be such a suitable alternative because of the too severe cone effect that drastically degrades the quality of the correction.

  11. Quantum Process Tomography of an Optically-Controlled Kerr Non-linearity

    Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Figueroa, Eden

    2015-01-01

    Any optical quantum information processing machine would be comprised of fully-characterized constituent devices for both single state manipulations and tasks involving the interaction between multiple quantum optical states. Ideally for the latter, would be an apparatus capable of deterministic optical phase shifts that operate on input quantum states with the action mediated solely by auxiliary signal fields. Here we present the complete experimental characterization of a system designed for optically controlled phase shifts acting on single-photon level probe coherent states. Our setup is based on a warm vapor of rubidium atoms under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency with its dispersion properties modified through the use of an optically triggered N-type Kerr non-linearity. We fully characterize the performance of our device by sending in a set of input probe states and measuring the corresponding output via balanced homodyne tomography and subsequently performing the technique of ...

  12. Nonquadratic penalization improves near-infrared diffuse optical tomography

    Jagannath, Ravi Prasad K; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K

    2013-01-01

    A new approach that can easily incorporate any generic penalty function into the diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction is introduced to show the utility of nonquadratic penalty functions. The penalty functions that were used include quadratic (l(2)), absolute (l(1)), Cauchy, and Geman-McClure. The regularization parameter in each of these cases was obtained automatically by using the generalized cross-validation method. The reconstruction results were systematically compared with e...

  13. Simultaneous x-rays/optical tomography of small animals

    Da Silva, A.; Leabad, M.; Bordy, T.; Dinten, J.-M.; Peltié, P.; Rizo, P.

    2007-03-01

    A small animal multimodality tomographer dedicated to the co-registration of fluorescence optical signal and X-rays measurements has been developed in our laboratory. The purpose of such a system is to offer the possibility to get in vivo anatomical and functional information at once. Moreover, anatomical measurements can be used as a regularization factor in order to get the reconstructions of the biodistribution of fluorochromes more accurate and to speed up the treatment. The optical system is basically composed with a CW laser (Krypton, 752 nm) for an optimal excitation of Alexa-Fluor 750 fluorochromes, and a CCD camera coupled with a combination of filters for the fluorescence detection. The animal is placed inside a transparent tube filled with an index matching fluid. In order to perform multiple views of fluorescence data acquisitions, the cylinder is fixed to a rotating stage. The excitation beam is brought to the cylinder via two mirrors mounted on translation plates allowing a vertical scan. The optical data acquisitions are performed with a high sensitivity CCD camera. The X-ray generator and the X-ray detector have been placed perpendicularly to the optical chain. A first study on phantoms was conducted to evaluate the feasibility, to test the linearity and the reproducibility, and to fix the parameters for the co-registration. These test experiments were reproduced by considering mice in the oesophagus of which thin glass tubes containing fluorochromes were inserted. Finally, the performance of the system was evaluated in vivo on mice bearing tumours in the lungs, tagged with Transferin-AlexaFluor 750.

  14. Nondestructive observation of teeth post core-space using optical coherence tomography: comparison with microcomputed tomography and live images

    Minamino, Takuya; Mine, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Mariko; Sugawa, Yoshihiko; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Higashi, Mami; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Ohmi, Masato; Awazu, Kunio; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-10-01

    No previous reports have observed inside the root canal using both optical coherence tomography (OCT) and x-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) for the same sample. The purpose of this study was to clarify both OCT and μCT image properties from observations of the same root canal after resin core build-up treatment. As OCT allows real-time observation of samples, gap formation may be able to be shown in real time. A dual-cure, one-step, self-etch adhesive system bonding agent, and dual-cure resin composite core material were used in root canals in accordance with instructions from the manufacturer. The resulting OCT images were superior for identifying gap formation at the interface, while μCT images were better to grasp the tooth form. Continuous tomographic images from real-time OCT observation allowed successful construction of a video of the resin core build-up procedure. After 10 to 12 s of light curing, a gap with a clear new signal occurred at the root-core material interface, proceeding from the coronal side (6 mm from the cemento-enamel junction) to the apical side of the root.

  15. Image reconstruction for optical tomography using photon density waves

    Khalaf, R

    1999-08-01

    Diagnostic imaging makes use of different kinds of radiation. A recent type of imaging using near-infrared light is thought to be a safer and less-expensive method of in-vivo imaging. Near infra-red light can penetrate biological tissue to certain depths. The problem of using near infrared light for imaging, is that the scattering of the photons dominates absorption, causing difficulties in the reconstruction model on which biomedical optical imaging depends crucially. The aim of this thesis is to develop and investigate the performance of a reconstruction algorithm in the frequency domain which allows fast and efficient reconstruction of the image of a limb, or an optical phantom. The forward problem of the propagation of photons inside biological tissue is modelled using the Diffusion Approximation theory solved by the finite element method. Values of DC intensity, phase shift and modulation depth at the boundary as functions of the diffusion and absorption coefficients are given. The inverse model is formulated as a nonlinear least-squares optimisation problem. The Truncated Newton method with Trust region is used to determine the optical properties. Reverse differentiation is used to calculate the error function because of its speed advantage over forward differentiation. A sensitivity analysis is performed to investigate the simultaneous reconstruction of the diffusion and absorption coefficients. The use of a combined error function of DC intensity, phase and modulation prove to be the most successful at recovering the optical parameters. The ability to distinguish between object size and size of optical parameter is also investigated. Contrast, mean and standard deviation are used as measures of the performance of the reconstruction algorithm. A Tikhonov regularisation method was used to improve ill-conditioning and behaviour in the presence of noise. An investigation of the optimal regularisation parameter is undertaken with the addition of noise to the

  16. Image reconstruction for optical tomography using photon density waves

    Diagnostic imaging makes use of different kinds of radiation. A recent type of imaging using near-infrared light is thought to be a safer and less-expensive method of in-vivo imaging. Near infra-red light can penetrate biological tissue to certain depths. The problem of using near infrared light for imaging, is that the scattering of the photons dominates absorption, causing difficulties in the reconstruction model on which biomedical optical imaging depends crucially. The aim of this thesis is to develop and investigate the performance of a reconstruction algorithm in the frequency domain which allows fast and efficient reconstruction of the image of a limb, or an optical phantom. The forward problem of the propagation of photons inside biological tissue is modelled using the Diffusion Approximation theory solved by the finite element method. Values of DC intensity, phase shift and modulation depth at the boundary as functions of the diffusion and absorption coefficients are given. The inverse model is formulated as a nonlinear least-squares optimisation problem. The Truncated Newton method with Trust region is used to determine the optical properties. Reverse differentiation is used to calculate the error function because of its speed advantage over forward differentiation. A sensitivity analysis is performed to investigate the simultaneous reconstruction of the diffusion and absorption coefficients. The use of a combined error function of DC intensity, phase and modulation prove to be the most successful at recovering the optical parameters. The ability to distinguish between object size and size of optical parameter is also investigated. Contrast, mean and standard deviation are used as measures of the performance of the reconstruction algorithm. A Tikhonov regularisation method was used to improve ill-conditioning and behaviour in the presence of noise. An investigation of the optimal regularisation parameter is undertaken with the addition of noise to the

  17. Quantum Process Tomography of an Optically-Controlled Kerr Non-linearity

    Kupchak, Connor; Rind, Samuel; Jordaan, Bertus; Figueroa, Eden

    2015-11-01

    Any optical quantum information processing machine would be comprised of fully-characterized constituent devices for both single state manipulations and tasks involving the interaction between multiple quantum optical states. Ideally for the latter, would be an apparatus capable of deterministic optical phase shifts that operate on input quantum states with the action mediated solely by auxiliary signal fields. Here we present the complete experimental characterization of a system designed for optically controlled phase shifts acting on single-photon level probe coherent states. Our setup is based on a warm vapor of rubidium atoms under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency with its dispersion properties modified through the use of an optically triggered N-type Kerr non-linearity. We fully characterize the performance of our device by sending in a set of input probe states and measuring the corresponding output via time-domain homodyne tomography and subsequently performing the technique of coherent state quantum process tomography. This method provides us with the precise knowledge of how our optical phase shift will modify any arbitrary input quantum state engineered in the mode of the reconstruction.

  18. Block matching 3D random noise filtering for absorption optical projection tomography

    Fumene Feruglio, P; Vinegoni, C; Weissleder, R [Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Gros, J [Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston MA 02115 (United States); Sbarbati, A, E-mail: cvinegoni@mgh.harvard.ed [Department of Morphological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2010-09-21

    Absorption and emission optical projection tomography (OPT), alternatively referred to as optical computed tomography (optical-CT) and optical-emission computed tomography (optical-ECT), are recently developed three-dimensional imaging techniques with value for developmental biology and ex vivo gene expression studies. The techniques' principles are similar to the ones used for x-ray computed tomography and are based on the approximation of negligible light scattering in optically cleared samples. The optical clearing is achieved by a chemical procedure which aims at substituting the cellular fluids within the sample with a cell membranes' index matching solution. Once cleared the sample presents very low scattering and is then illuminated with a light collimated beam whose intensity is captured in transillumination mode by a CCD camera. Different projection images of the sample are subsequently obtained over a 360{sup 0} full rotation, and a standard backprojection algorithm can be used in a similar fashion as for x-ray tomography in order to obtain absorption maps. Because not all biological samples present significant absorption contrast, it is not always possible to obtain projections with a good signal-to-noise ratio, a condition necessary to achieve high-quality tomographic reconstructions. Such is the case for example, for early stage's embryos. In this work we demonstrate how, through the use of a random noise removal algorithm, the image quality of the reconstructions can be considerably improved even when the noise is strongly present in the acquired projections. Specifically, we implemented a block matching 3D (BM3D) filter applying it separately on each acquired transillumination projection before performing a complete three-dimensional tomographical reconstruction. To test the efficiency of the adopted filtering scheme, a phantom and a real biological sample were processed. In both cases, the BM3D filter led to a signal-to-noise ratio

  19. Sound field reconstruction using acousto-optic tomography

    Torras Rosell, Antoni; Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Jacobsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    When sound propagates through a medium, it results in pressure fluctuations that change the instantaneous density of the medium. Under such circumstances, the refractive index that characterizes the propagation of light is not constant, but influenced by the acoustic field. This kind of interaction...... governing the acousto-optic effect in air, and demonstrates that it can be measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer in the audible frequency range. The tomographic reconstruction is tested by means of computer simulations and measurements. The main features observed in the simulations are also recognized in...

  20. 4D in vivo imaging of subpleural lung parenchyma by swept source optical coherence tomography

    Meissner, S.; Tabuchi, A.; Mertens, M.; Homann, H.; Walther, J.; Kuebler, W. M.; Koch, E.

    2009-07-01

    In this feasibility study we present a method for 4D imaging of healthy and injured subpleural lung tissue in a mouse model. We used triggered swept source optical coherence tomography with an A-scan frequency of 20 kHz to image murine subpleural alveoli during the ventilation cycle. The data acquisition was gated to the pulmonary airway pressure to take one B-scan in each ventilation cycle for different pressure levels. The acquired B-scans were combined offline to one C-scan for each pressure level. Due to the high acquisition rate of the used optical coherence tomography system, we are also able to perform OCT Doppler imaging of the alveolar arterioles. We demonstrated that OCT is a useful tool to investigate the alveolar dynamics in spatial dimensions and to analyze the alveolar blood flow by using Doppler OCT.

  1. Optical coherence tomography and pathological myopia: an update of the literature.

    Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria; Pierro, Luisa; Gagliardi, Marco; Bandello, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an updated review of the last clinical entities in pathological myopia proposed by means of new generation optical coherence tomography (OCT), including enhanced depth imaging (EDI-OCT) and swept source OCT (SS-OCT). PubMed and Google engine search were carried out using the terms "pathological myopia" associated with "coherence tomography," "enhanced depth imaging," and "swept source OCT." Latest publications up to Jan 2015 about myopia-related complications, including open-angle chronic glaucoma, peripapillary retinal changes, acquired macular diseases, and choroidal neovascularization, have been reviewed. New OCT technologies have led to a greater insight in pathophysiology of high-grade myopia. However, further investigation is needed in order to prevent irreversible visual loss and optic nerve damage. PMID:26265324

  2. Phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography for in vivo breast imaging: a two-step method

    We present a two-step reconstruction method that can qualitatively and quantitatively improve the reconstruction of tissue refractive index (RI) distribution by phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography (PCDOT). In this two-step method, we first recover the distribution of tissue absorption and scattering coefficients by conventional diffuse optical tomography to obtain the geometrical information of lesions, allowing the incorporation of geometrical information as a priori in the PCDOT reconstruction using a locally refined mesh. The method is validated by a series of phantom experiments and evaluated using in vivo data from 42 human subjects. The results demonstrate clear contrast of RI between the lesion and the surroundings, making the image interpretation straightforward. The sensitivity and specificity from these 42 cases are both 81% when RI is used as an imaging parameter for distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions.

  3. Theoretical limit of spatial resolution in diffuse optical tomography using a perturbation model

    Konovalov, A B; Vlasov, V V [E.I. Zababakhin All-Russian Scientific-Research Institute of Technical Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Centre, Snezhinsk, Chelyabinsk region (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-28

    We have assessed the limit of spatial resolution of timedomain diffuse optical tomography (DOT) based on a perturbation reconstruction model. From the viewpoint of the structure reconstruction accuracy, three different approaches to solving the inverse DOT problem are compared. The first approach involves reconstruction of diffuse tomograms from straight lines, the second – from average curvilinear trajectories of photons and the third – from total banana-shaped distributions of photon trajectories. In order to obtain estimates of resolution, we have derived analytical expressions for the point spread function and modulation transfer function, as well as have performed a numerical experiment on reconstruction of rectangular scattering objects with circular absorbing inhomogeneities. It is shown that in passing from reconstruction from straight lines to reconstruction using distributions of photon trajectories we can improve resolution by almost an order of magnitude and exceed the accuracy of reconstruction of multi-step algorithms used in DOT. (optical tomography)

  4. Recent advances in clinical application of optical coherence tomography of human skin

    Gambichler T

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Thilo Gambichler, Azem Pljakic, Lutz SchmitzDepartment of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, GermanyAbstract: Optical coherence tomography (OCT is an emerging noninvasive imaging method that uses infrared light and interferometric techniques. The method has become increasingly popular in skin research as well as daily dermatology practice. In the present brief review, we focused on recent (2009–2014 OCT studies on the human skin, which included a reasonable sample size and statistics. Twenty-five papers were selected and briefly described OCT of epidermal thickness, skin appendages, wound healing, extracellular matrix and skin fibrosis, vascular malformations, and skin tumors such as basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratoses, and malignant melanoma.Keywords: optical coherence tomography, dermatology, skin imaging, interferometry, histology

  5. Optical coherence tomography of the retinal response to ultrashort laser pulses

    Toth, Cynthia A.; Narayan, Drew G.; Roach, William P.; Birngruber, Reginald; Boppart, Stephen A.; Hee, Michael R.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Cain, Clarence P.; Noojin, Gary D.; Fujimoto, James G.

    1997-06-01

    Purpose: to assess the early in vivo evolution of tissue response and wound healing from ultrashort pulsed laser retinal lesions by correlating the cross sectional morphology from sequential optical coherence tomography with histopathologic sectioning. Methods: single ultrashort laser pulses were placed in the Macacca mulatta retina and evaluated by cross-section optical coherence tomography (OCT). These images were compared at selected time-points with corresponding histological sections. Results: OCT was able to detect the acute tissue injury from laser delivery and the evolution of the healing response over 8 days after laser delivery. These OCT images correlated well with histopathologic findings. Conclusion: analysis of the extent of initial laser lesions and the type of healing response can be performed in serial sequence with OCT providing new insight into the healing response form laser injury. This information correlates well with microscopic data.

  6. Early detection of tooth wear by en-face optical coherence tomography

    Mărcăuteanu, Corina; Negrutiu, Meda; Sinescu, Cosmin; Demjan, Eniko; Hughes, Mike; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-02-01

    Excessive dental wear (pathological attrition and/or abfractions) is a frequent complication in bruxing patients. The parafunction causes heavy occlusal loads. The aim of this study is the early detection and monitoring of occlusal overload in bruxing patients. En-face optical coherence tomography was used for investigating and imaging of several extracted tooth, with a normal morphology, derived from patients with active bruxism and from subjects without parafunction. We found a characteristic pattern of enamel cracks in patients with first degree bruxism and with a normal tooth morphology. We conclude that the en-face optical coherence tomography is a promising non-invasive alternative technique for the early detection of occlusal overload, before it becomes clinically evident as tooth wear.

  7. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography imaging by affine-motion image registration

    Alonso-Caneiro, David; Read, Scott A.; Collins, Michael J.

    2011-11-01

    Signal-degrading speckle is one factor that can reduce the quality of optical coherence tomography images. We demonstrate the use of a hierarchical model-based motion estimation processing scheme based on an affine-motion model to reduce speckle in optical coherence tomography imaging, by image registration and the averaging of multiple B-scans. The proposed technique is evaluated against other methods available in the literature. The results from a set of retinal images show the benefit of the proposed technique, which provides an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio of the square root of the number of averaged images, leading to clearer visual information in the averaged image. The benefits of the proposed technique are also explored in the case of ocular anterior segment imaging.

  8. Quantitative analysis of the Stratus optical coherence tomography fast macular thickness map reports

    Domalpally Amitha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cross sectional optical coherence tomography images have an important role in evaluating retinal diseases. The reports generated by the Stratus fast macular thickness scan protocol are useful for both clinical and research purposes. The centerpoint thickness is an important outcome measure for many therapeutic trials related to macular disease. The data is susceptible to artifacts such as decentration and boundary line errors and could be potentially erroneous. An understanding of how the data is generated is essential before utilizing the data. This article describes the interpretation of the fast macular thickness map report, assessment of the quality of an optical coherence tomography image and identification of the artifacts that could influence the numeric data.

  9. New developments in frequency domain optical tomography. Part I: Forward model and gradient computation

    This two part study introduces new developments in frequency domain optical tomography to take into account the collimated source direction in the computation of both the forward and the adjoint models. The solution method is based on the least square finite element method associated to the discrete ordinates method where no empirical stabilization is needed. In this first part of the study, the solution method of the forward model is highlighted with an easy handling of complex boundary condition through a penalization method. Gradient computation from an adjoint method is developed rigorously in a continuous manner through a lagrangian formalism for the deduction of the adjoint equation and the gradient of the objective function. The proposed formulation can be easily generalized to stationary and time domain optical tomography by keeping the same expressions.

  10. Phase-sensitive multiple reference optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Dsouza, Roshan I.; Subhash, Hrebesh; Neuhaus, Kai; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Multiple reference OCT (MR-OCT) is a recently developed novel time-domain OCT platform based on a miniature reference arm optical delay, which utilizes a single miniature actuator and a partial mirror to generate recirculating optical delay for extended axial-scan range. MR-OCT technology promises to fit into a robust and cost-effective design, compatible with integration into consumer-level devices for addressing wide applications in mobile healthcare and biometry applications. Using conventional intensity based OCT processing techniques, the high-resolution structural imaging capability of MR-OCT has been recently demonstrated for various applications including in vivo human samples. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of implementing phase based processing with MR-OCT for various functional applications such as Doppler imaging and sensing of blood vessels, and for tissue vibrography applications. The MR-OCT system operates at 1310nm with a spatial resolution of ~26 µm and an axial scan rate of 600Hz. Initial studies show a displacement-sensitivity of ~20 nm to ~120 nm for the first 1 to 9 orders of reflections, respectively with a mirror as test-sample. The corresponding minimum resolvable velocity for these orders are ~2.3 µm/sec and ~15 µm/sec respectively. Data from a chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model will be shown to demonstrate the feasibility of MR-OCT for imaging in-vivo blood flow.

  11. Optic Disc Perfusion in Primary Open Angle and Normal Tension Glaucoma Eyes Using Optical Coherence Tomography-Based Microangiography

    Wen, Joanne C.; Zhang, Qinqin; Xin, Chen; Gupta, Divakar; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Chen, Philip P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate optic disc perfusion differences in normal, primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and normal tension glaucoma (NTG) eyes using optical microangiography (OMAG) based optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography technique. Design Cross-sectional, observational study. Subjects Twenty-eight normal, 30 POAG, and 31 NTG subjects. Methods One eye from each subject was scanned with a 68 kHz Cirrus HD-OCT 5,000-based OMAG prototype system centered at the optic nerve head (ONH) (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA). Microvascular images were generated from the OMAG dataset by detecting the differences in OCT signal between consecutive B-scans. The pre-laminar layer (preLC) was isolated by a semi-automatic segmentation program. Main Outcome Measures Optic disc perfusion, quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux (flux normalized by the vessel area) within the ONH. Results Glaucomatous eyes had significantly lower optic disc perfusion in preLC in all three perfusion metrics (p<0.0001) compared to normal eyes. The visual field (VF) mean deviation (MD) and pattern standard deviation (PSD) were similar between the POAG and NTG groups, and no differences in optic disc perfusion were observed between POAG and NTG. Univariate analysis revealed significant correlation between optic disc perfusion and VF MD, VF PSD, and rim area in both POAG and NTG groups (p≤0.0288). However, normalized optic disc perfusion was correlated with some structural measures (retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and ONH cup/disc ratio) only in POAG eyes. Conclusions Optic disc perfusion detected with OMAG was significantly reduced in POAG and NTG groups compared to normal controls, but no difference was seen between POAG and NTG groups with similar levels of VF damage. Disc perfusion was significantly correlated with VF MD, VF PSD, and rim area in glaucomatous eyes. Vascular changes at the optic disc as measured using OMAG may provide useful information for

  12. Optic Disc Perfusion in Primary Open Angle and Normal Tension Glaucoma Eyes Using Optical Coherence Tomography-Based Microangiography.

    Karine D Bojikian

    Full Text Available To investigate optic disc perfusion differences in normal, primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, and normal tension glaucoma (NTG eyes using optical microangiography (OMAG based optical coherence tomography (OCT angiography technique.Cross-sectional, observational study.Twenty-eight normal, 30 POAG, and 31 NTG subjects.One eye from each subject was scanned with a 68 kHz Cirrus HD-OCT 5,000-based OMAG prototype system centered at the optic nerve head (ONH (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA. Microvascular images were generated from the OMAG dataset by detecting the differences in OCT signal between consecutive B-scans. The pre-laminar layer (preLC was isolated by a semi-automatic segmentation program.Optic disc perfusion, quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux (flux normalized by the vessel area within the ONH.Glaucomatous eyes had significantly lower optic disc perfusion in preLC in all three perfusion metrics (p<0.0001 compared to normal eyes. The visual field (VF mean deviation (MD and pattern standard deviation (PSD were similar between the POAG and NTG groups, and no differences in optic disc perfusion were observed between POAG and NTG. Univariate analysis revealed significant correlation between optic disc perfusion and VF MD, VF PSD, and rim area in both POAG and NTG groups (p≤0.0288. However, normalized optic disc perfusion was correlated with some structural measures (retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and ONH cup/disc ratio only in POAG eyes.Optic disc perfusion detected with OMAG was significantly reduced in POAG and NTG groups compared to normal controls, but no difference was seen between POAG and NTG groups with similar levels of VF damage. Disc perfusion was significantly correlated with VF MD, VF PSD, and rim area in glaucomatous eyes. Vascular changes at the optic disc as measured using OMAG may provide useful information for diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma.

  13. Evaluation of the macular architecture of patients operated on from macula-off rhegmatogenous retinal detachment using optical coherence tomography

    With the support of optical coherence tomography, to evaluate the macular condition of the patients operated on from rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, with detached macula, who underwent buckling surgery and pars plana vitrectomy

  14. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy—thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture phy...

  15. Analysis of Normal Peripapillary Choroidal Thickness via Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Ho, Joseph; Branchini, Lauren; Regatieri, Caio; Krishnan, Chandrasekharan; Fujimoto, James G.; Jay S Duker

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the normal peripapillary choroidal thickness utilizing a commercial spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) device and determine the intergrader reproducibility of this method. Design Retrospective, noncomparative, noninterventional case series. Participants Thirty-six eyes of 36 normal patients seen at the New England Eye Center between April and September 2010. Methods All patients underwent high-definition scanning with the Cirrus HD-OCT. ...

  16. Towards using spectral domain optical coherence tomography for dental wear monitoring

    Mǎrcǎuteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that fast spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging systems have the potential to monitor the evolution of pathological dental wear. On 10 caries free teeth, four levels of artificially defects similar to those observed in the clinic were created. After every level of induced defect, OCT scanning was performed. B-scans were acquired and 3D reconstructions were generated.

  17. Near-infrared optical coherence tomography for the inspection of fiber composites

    Liu, P; Yao, L.; Groves, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging method, which allows the econstruction of three dimensional depth-resolved images with microscale resolution. Originally developed for biomedical diagnostics, nowadays it also shows a high potential for applications in the field of non-destructive testing (NDT). This work demonstrates how OCT could help to investigate the delamination growth in fiber composites. A customized OCT system was built with a near-infrared light source wit...

  18. Intraoperative Changes in Idiopathic Macular Holes by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Hayashi, Atsushi; Yagou, Takaaki; Nakamura, Tomoko; Fujita, Kazuya; Oka, Miyako; Fuchizawa, Chiharu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine anatomical changes in idiopathic macular holes during surgery using handheld spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Five eyes of 5 patients who underwent surgery for the repair of idiopathic macular holes were examined. The surgery included standard 25-gauge, 3-port pars plana vitrectomy, removal of the internal limiting membrane (ILM), fluid-air exchange, and 20% sulfur hexafluoride tamponade. Intraoperative SD-OCT images of the macular holes were o...

  19. Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography Using the RESCAN 700: Preliminary Results in Collagen Crosslinking

    Natasha Pahuja; Rohit Shetty; Chaitra Jayadev; Rudy Nuijts; Bharath Hedge; Vishal Arora

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the penetration of riboflavin using a microscope-integrated real time spectral domain optical coherence tomography (ZEISS OPMI LUMERA 700 and ZEISS RESCAN 700) in keratoconus patients undergoing accelerated collagen crosslinking (ACXL) between epithelium on (epi-on) and epithelium off (epi-off). Methods. Intraoperative images were obtained during each of the procedures. Seven keratoconus patients underwent epi-on ACXL and four underwent epi-off ACXL. A software tool was de...

  20. Macular Thickness and Volume Parameters Measured Using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) for Evaluation of Glaucoma Patients

    Barišić, Freja; Jurin Sičaja, Ana; Malenica Ravlić, Maja; Novak-Lauš, Katia; Iveković, Renata; Mandić, Zdravko

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate macular thickness parameters in glaucoma patients and to compare them to normal subjects using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). This prospective, observational study included 20 primary open angle glaucoma patients (POAG) and 20 healthy subjects in control group. Exclusion criteria were diabetes and other macular pathology, like age-related macular degeneration, macular oedema, central serous retinopathy and high myopia >4.00 dsph. OCT imag...

  1. Reproducibility of Scleral Spur Identification and Angle Measurements Using Fourier Domain Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography

    Ricardo J. Cumba; Sunita Radhakrishnan; Nicholas P. Bell; Kundandeep S. Nagi; Alice Z. Chuang; Lin, Shan C.; Mankiewicz, Kimberly A.; Feldman, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate intraobserver and interobserver agreement in locating the scleral spur landmark (SSL) and anterior chamber angle measurements obtained using Fourier Domain Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography (ASOCT) images. Methods. Two independent, masked observers (SR and AZC) identified SSLs on ASOCT images from 31 eyes with open and nonopen angles. A third independent reader, NPB, adjudicated SSL placement if identifications differed by more than 80  μ m. Nine months later,...

  2. New insight into rheology and flow properties of complex fluids with Doppler optical coherence tomography

    JuhaSalmela

    2014-01-01

    Flow properties of complex fluids such as colloidal suspensions, polymer solutions, fiber suspensions and blood have a vital function in many technological applications and biological systems. Yet, the basic knowledge on their properties is inadequate for many practical purposes. One important reason for this has been the lack of effective experimental methods that would allow detailed study of the flow behavior of especially opaque multi-phase fluids. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an...

  3. Optical coherence tomography fast versus regular macular thickness mapping in diabetic retinopathy

    Ceklic, Lala; Maar, Noemi; Neubauer, Aljoscha Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate if absolute values and reproducibility of thickness maps obtained from 2 optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanning protocols, regular high-resolution and fast low-density mode, differ in patients with diabetic macular edema. Methods: A total of 26 consecutive patients undergoing fluorescein angiography and Stratus OCT scanning for the evaluation of diabetic macular edema at the Departments of Ophthalmology in Munich and Vienna were incl...

  4. Optical coherence tomography based microangiography: A tool good for dermatology applications (Conference Presentation)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Baran, Utku; Choi, Woo J.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) based microangiography (OMAG) is a new imaging technique enabling the visualization of blood flow within microcirculatory tissue beds in vivo with high resolution. In this talk, the concept and advantages of OMAG will be discussed and its potential clinical applications in the dermatology will be shown, demonstrating its usefulness in the clinical monitoring and therapeutic treatment of various skin pathologies, e.g. acne, port wine stain and wound healing.

  5. Assessment and in vivo scoring of murine experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis using optical coherence tomography

    Chu, C J; Herrmann, P.; Carvalho, L. S.; Liyanage, S. E.; Bainbridge, J. W.; Ali, R. R.; Dick, A. D.; Luhmann, U. F.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in clinical imaging and grading our understanding of retinal immune responses and their morphological correlates in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU), has been hindered by the requirement for post-mortem histology. To date, monitoring changes occurring during EAU disease progression and evaluating the effect of therapeutic intervention in real time has not been possible. We wanted to establish whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) could detect intraretinal chan...

  6. Repeated, noninvasive, high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of zebrafish embryos

    Kagemann, Larry; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Zou, Jian; Charukamnoetkanok, Puwat; Wollstein, Gadi; Townsend, Kelly A.; Gabriele, Michelle L.; Bahary, Nathan; Wei, Xiangyun; Fujimoto, James G.; Schuman, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate a new imaging method for high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for small animal developmental imaging. Methods Wildtype zebrafish that were 24, 48, 72, and 120 h post fertilization (hpf) and nok gene mutant (48 hpf) embryos were imaged in vivo. Three additional embryos were imaged twice, once at 72 hpf and again at 120 hpf. Images of the developing eye, brain, heart, whole body, proximal yolk sac, distal yolk sac, and tail were acquired. ...

  7. Clinical cross-polarization optical coherence tomography assessment of subsurface enamel below dental resin composite restorations

    Lenton, Patricia; Rudney, Joel; Fok, Alex; Jones, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    A newly designed intraoral swept source cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) imaging system was used to examine the integrity of the subsurface enamel below resin composite restorations placed in primary teeth. CP-OCT analysis was performed using images obtained from resin composite restoration in 62 (n=62) pediatric subjects. Clinical examination was performed by a single examiner prior to CP-OCT imaging and analysis. CP-OCT images are presented using a unique combined in...

  8. Cross-validation of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Adie, Steven G.; Marks, Daniel L.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Carney, P. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Computationally reconstructed interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy is coregistered with optical coherence tomography (OCT) focal plane data to provide quantitative cross validation with OCT. This is accomplished through a qualitative comparison of images and a quantitative analysis of the width of the point-spread function in simulation and experiment. The width of the ISAM point-spread function is seen to be independent of depth, in contrast to OCT.

  9. Cross-validation of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy and optical coherence tomography.

    Ralston, Tyler S; Adie, Steven G; Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A; Carney, P Scott

    2010-05-15

    Computationally reconstructed interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy is coregistered with optical coherence tomography (OCT) focal plane data to provide quantitative cross validation with OCT. This is accomplished through a qualitative comparison of images and a quantitative analysis of the width of the point-spread function in simulation and experiment. The width of the ISAM point-spread function is seen to be independent of depth, in contrast to OCT. PMID:20479849

  10. Clinical Monitoring of Early Caries Lesions using Cross Polarization Optical Coherence Tomography

    Fried, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Pelzner, Roger B.

    2013-01-01

    New methods are needed for the nondestructive measurement of tooth demineralization and remineralization and to monitor the progression of incipient caries lesions (tooth decay) for effective nonsurgical intervention and to evaluate the performance of anti-caries treatments such as chemical treatments or laser irradiation. Studies have shown that optical coherence tomography (OCT) has great potential to fulfill this role, since it can be used to measure the depth and severity of early lesions...

  11. Nondestructive Assessment of Early Tooth Demineralization Using Cross-Polarization Optical Coherence Tomography

    Kang, Hobin; Jiao, Jian J.; Lee, Chulsung; Le, Michael H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    New methods are needed for the nondestructive measurement of tooth demineralization and remineralization to monitor the progression of incipient caries lesions (tooth decay) for effective nonsurgical intervention and to evaluate the performance of anticaries treatments such as chemical treatments or laser irradiation. Studies have shown that optical coherence tomography (OCT) has great potential to fulfill this role since it can be used to measure the depth and severity of early lesions with ...

  12. Macular Findings Obtained by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the macular findings obtained with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) in infants with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Materials and Methods. The macular SD OCT images of 190 premature infants were analyzed. Data regarding central foveal thickness (CFT), cystoid macular edema (CME), and cyst grading were compared. The relationships of CFT with gestational age and birth weight were investigated. Results. The results were obtained from 358 eyes of 179 inf...

  13. Modelling the normal retinal nerve fibre layer thickness as measured by Stratus optical coherence tomography.

    Hougaard, Jesper; Ostenfeld, Carl; Heijl, Anders; Bengtsson, Boel

    2006-01-01

    Background: The variation in retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFLT) as measured by Stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) in healthy subjects may be reduced when the effect on RNFLT measurements of factors other than disease is corrected for, and this may improve the diagnostic accuracy in glaucoma. With this perspective we evaluated the isolated and combined effects of factors potentially affecting the Stratus OCT RNFLT measurements in healthy subjects. Methods: We included 178 heal...

  14. Full-field optical coherence tomography for the analysis of fresh unstained human lobectomy specimens

    Manu Jain; Navneet Narula; Bekheit Salamoon; Shevchuk, Maria M.; Amit Aggarwal; Nasser Altorki; Brendon Stiles; Claude Boccara; Sushmita Mukherjee

    2013-01-01

    Background: Full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) is a real-time imaging technique that generates high-resolution three-dimensional tomographic images from unprocessed and unstained tissues. Lack of tissue processing and associated artifacts, along with the ability to generate large-field images quickly, warrants its exploration as an alternative diagnostic tool. Materials and Methods: One section each from the tumor and from adjacent non-neoplastic tissue was collected from 13 huma...

  15. Using optical coherence tomography to quantify biofilm structure and mass transfer in combination with mathematical modeling

    Li, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of biofilm structure on the carriers used in moving bed biofilm reactor was investigated by means of optical coherence tomography and biofilm image analysis. A method was developed by combining biofilm imaging and mathematical modeling to study the mass transfer characteristics in the vicinity of biofilm surface. The method was further used to examine the effect of the deposition of organic particle at biofilm surface on the mass transfer from bulk liquid into biofilms.

  16. Repeatability of Perimacular Ganglion Cell Complex Analysis with Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Ng, Dorothy S. K.; Preeti Gupta; Yih Chung Tham; Chye Fong Peck; Tien Yin Wong; Mohammad Kamran Ikram; Cheung, Carol Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the repeatability of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to measure macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses and compare retinal ganglion cell parameters between algorithms. Methods. Ninety-two nonglaucomatous eyes from 92 participants underwent macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thickness measurement using OCT-HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm and these measurements were repeated for 34 subjects. All subjects also had macular ganglion cell-in...

  17. Comparison of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Ultrasonic Pachymetry for Assessment of Central Corneal Thickness

    G. Ertuğrul Mirza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine if there is a difference in central corneal thickness (CCT) measurements obtained by Cirrus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and ultrasonic pachymetry in healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: The study included 50 healthy consecutively selected individuals without ocular or systemic disease. CCT was first measured using OCT, and then using ultrasonic pachymetry. Results: Mean age of the participants was ...

  18. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in the Diagnosis and Management of Vitreoretinal Interface Pathologies

    Yoreh Barak; Ihnen, Mark A.; Shlomit Schaal

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) has enhanced Vitreoretinal Interface (VRI) imaging considerably and facilitated the diagnosis, followup, prognosis determination, and management of VRI-associated pathologies. HR-OCT became a common practical tool seen in almost every ophthalmology practice. Knowledge of SD-OCT image interpretation and recognition of pathologies are required for all ophthalmologists. This paper methodically reviews the normal aging proc...

  19. Evaluation of the Lower Punctum Parameters and Morphology Using Spectral Domain Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography

    Allam, Riham S. H. M.; Ahmed, Rania A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To study features of the lower punctum in normal subjects using spectral domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (SD AS-OCT). Methods. Observational cross-sectional study that included 147 punctae (76 subjects). Punctae were evaluated clinically for appearance, position, and size. AS-OCT was used to evaluate the punctal shape, contents, and junction with the vertical canaliculus. Inner and outer diameters as well as depth were measured. Results. 24 males and 52 females (...

  20. Principal-component-analysis-based estimation of blood flow velocities using optical coherence tomography intensity signals

    Mohan, Nishant; Vakoc, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    The intensity signal in optical coherence tomography contains information about the translational velocity of scatterers, and can be used to quantify blood flow. We apply principal component analysis to efficiently extract this information. We also study use of nonuniform temporal sampling of the intensity signal to increase the range of quantifiable flow velocities. We demonstrate this technique in simulation, phantom and in vivo blood flow measurements, and highlight its potential to enable...

  1. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography of melanin provides intrinsic contrast based on depolarization

    Baumann, Bernhard; Baumann, Stefan O.; Konegger, Thomas; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Schlanitz, Ferdinand; Schütze, Christopher; Sattmann, Harald; Litschauer, Marco; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2012-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is a functional extension of OCT. In addition to imaging based on tissue reflectivity, PS-OCT also enables depth-resolved mapping of sample polarization properties such as phase-retardation, birefringent axis orientation, Stokes vectors, and degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU). In this study, PS-OCT was used to investigate the polarization properties of melanin. In-vitro measurements in samples with varying melanin concentratio...

  2. Morphologic Characteristics of the Outer Retina in Cone Dystrophy on Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Cho, Soo Chang; Woo, Se Joon; Park, Kyu Hyung; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the morphologic changes in the outer retina of patients with cone dystrophy, using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods The medical records of 15 cone dystrophy patients examined from January 2007 to January 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent ophthalmic evaluation including best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), color vision testing, fundus examination, full-field standard electroretinography (ERG), multifocal (mf) ERG, an...

  3. High resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of Alström Syndrome

    Vingolo, EM; S.; Salvatore; Grenga, PL; Maffei, P.; Milan, G.; Marshall, JD

    2010-01-01

    Alström syndrome (ALMS1) is a multisystemic disorder characterized by cone–rod dystrophy, hearing loss, obesity, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dilated cardiomyopathy, and progressive hepatic and renal dysfunction.The cone-rod retinal dystrophy usually develops within a few weeks after birth. We examined a young boy with Alstrom by means of microperimetry MP-1 and optical coherence tomography (OCT) Spectral Domain.

  4. Pathogenesis of the dry eye syndrome observed by optical coherence tomography in vitro

    Kray, Oya; Lenz, Markus; Spöler, Felix; Kray, Stefan; Kurz, Heinrich

    2011-06-01

    Three dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) is introduced as a valuable tool to analyze the pathogenesis of corneal diseases. Here, OCT in combination with a novel in vitro model for the dry eye syndrome enables an improved understanding of the underlying damaging process of the ocular surface. En-face OCT projections indicate a deep structural damage of the epithelium and anterior stroma by osmotic forces.

  5. Virtual Averaging Making Nonframe-Averaged Optical Coherence Tomography Images Comparable to Frame-Averaged Images

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Developing a novel image enhancement method so that nonframe-averaged optical coherence tomography (OCT) images become comparable to active eye-tracking frame-averaged OCT images. Methods Twenty-one eyes of 21 healthy volunteers were scanned with noneye-tracking nonframe-averaged OCT device and active eye-tracking frame-averaged OCT device. Virtual averaging was applied to nonframe-averaged images with voxel resampling and adding amplitude deviation with 15-time repetitions. Signal-to...

  6. Quantitative phase reconstruction for orthogonal-scanning differential phase-contrast optical coherence tomography

    Heise, Bettina; 10.1364/OL.34.001306

    2011-01-01

    We present differential phase-contrast optical coherence tomography (DPC-OCT) with two transversally separated probing beams to sense phase gradients in various directions by employing a rotatable Wollaston prism. In combination with a two-dimensional mathe- matical reconstruction algorithm based on a regularized shape from shading (SfS) method accurate quantitative phase maps can be determined from a set of two orthogonal en-face DPC-OCT images, as exemplified on various technical samples.

  7. Velocity Variation Assessment of Red Blood Cell Aggregation with Spectral Domain Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    Xu, Xiangqun; Yu, Lingfeng; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    We propose spectral domain Doppler optical coherence tomography (SD-D-OCT) to qualitatively measure red blood cell aggregation. Variance/standard deviation (SD) of the Doppler frequency spectrum in Doppler variance imaging of flowing blood under shearing conditions was developed as a new aggregation index. In in vitro microchannel-flow experiments, porcine blood at various hematocrits with aggregation characteristics induced by dextran 500 or at the presence of plasma fibrinogen was measured ...

  8. Precise measurement of volume of eccrine sweat gland in mental sweating by optical coherence tomography

    Sugawa, Yoshihiko; Fukuda, Akihiro; Ohmi, Masato

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated dynamic analysis of the physiological function of eccrine sweat glands underneath skin surface by optical coherence tomography (OCT). In this paper, we propose a method for extraction of the specific eccrine sweat gland by means of the connected component extraction process and the adaptive threshold method, where the en face OCT images are constructed by the swept-source OCT. In the experiment, we demonstrate precise measurement of the volume of the sweat gland in response to the external stimulus.

  9. High-resolution optical coherence tomography visualization of LASIK flap displacement

    Salaroli, Camila Haydée Rosas; Li, Yan; Huang, David

    2009-01-01

    Uneventful myopic laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) was performed in both eyes of a 33-year-old woman. Two weeks after LASIK, examination of the left eye revealed flap striae radiating inferonasally from the superior hinge. The flap was relifted and repositioned to remove the irregular astigmatism and reduce the striae. Before the flap was relifted, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) showed the gap at the temporal flap, which had not been detected by biomicroscopy. After ...

  10. Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography based Smart Handheld Vitreoretinal Microsurgical Tool for Tremor Suppression

    Song, Cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Kang, Jin U.

    2012-01-01

    Microsurgeons require the ability to make precise and stable maneuvers in order to achieve surgical objectives and to minimize surgical risks during freehand microsurgical procedures. This work presents a novel common path swept source optical coherence tomography based smart surgical tool that suppresses hand tremor. It allows enhanced tool tip stabilization, more accurate targeting and may lower surgical risk. Here the one dimensional motion tremor of a surgeon’s hand is assessed by the sur...

  11. X-ray tomography for structural analysis of microstructured and multimaterial optical fibers and preforms.

    Sandoghchi, S R; Jasion, G T; Wheeler, N V; Jain, S; Lian, Z; Wooler, J P; Boardman, R P; Baddela, N; Chen, Y; Hayes, J; Fokoua, E Numkam; Bradley, T; Gray, D R; Mousavi, S M; Petrovich, M; Poletti, F; Richardson, D J

    2014-10-20

    Specialty optical fibers, in particular microstructured and multi-material optical fibers, have complex geometry in terms of structure and/or material composition. Their fabrication, although rapidly developing, is still at a very early stage of development compared with conventional optical fibers. Structural characterization of these fibers during every step of their multi-stage fabrication process is paramount to optimize the fiber-drawing process. The complexity of these fibers restricts the use of conventional refractometry and microscopy techniques to determine their structural and material composition. Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first nondestructive structural and material investigation of specialty optical fibers using X-ray computed tomography (CT) methods, not achievable using other techniques. Recent advances in X-ray CT techniques allow the examination of optical fibers and their preforms with sub-micron resolution while preserving the specimen for onward processing and use. In this work, we study some of the most challenging specialty optical fibers and their preforms. We analyze a hollow core photonic band gap fiber and its preforms, and bond quality at the joint between two fusion-spliced hollow core fibers. Additionally, we studied a multi-element optical fiber and a metal incorporated dual suspended-core optical fiber. The application of X-ray CT can be extended to almost all optical fiber types, preforms and devices. PMID:25401650

  12. Tomography

    Tomography is a non-intrusive imaging technique being developed at CRNL as an industrial tool for generating quantitative cross-sectional density maps of objects. Of most interest is tomography's ability to: distinguish features within complex geometries where other NDT techniques fail because of the complexity of the geometry; detect/locate small density changes/defects within objects, e.g. void fraction measurements within thick-walled vessels, shrink cavities in castings, etc.; provide quantitative data that can be used in analyses, e.g. of complex processes, or fracture mechanics; and provide objective quantitative data that can be used for (computer-based) quality assurance decisions, thereby reducing and in some cases eliminating the present subjectivity often encountered in NDT. The CRNL program is reviewed and examples are presented to illustrate the potential and the limitations of the technology

  13. Utilization of Optical Coherence Tomography in the Evaluation of Cherry Hemangiomas.

    Aldahan, Adam S; Mlacker, Stephanie; Shah, Vidhi V; Chen, Lucy L; Nouri, Keyvan; Grichnik, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cherry hemangiomas are common vascular proliferative lesions that can be concerning from a cosmetic perspective. Laser therapy is often used to eradicate cherry hemangiomas, but some lesions require multiple treatments or do not resolve at all. The suboptimal response to laser treatment may be due to limitations in penetration depth by vascular lasers such as the pulsed dye laser. Optical coherence tomography is a low-energy, light-based imaging device that can evaluate the depth and extent of vascular lesions such as cherry hemangiomas by allowing visualization of tissue structure and blood vessel architecture, which cannot be appreciated by clinical or dermatoscopic examination alone. We present optical coherence tomography images of a cherry hemangioma to demonstrate the precision and resolution of this imaging modality. Optical coherence tomography provides valuable information that has the potential to predict response to laser therapy without unnecessary attempts. Future prospective studies will determine its value for this purpose. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(6):713-714. PMID:27272077

  14. Characteristics of polyacrylamide gel with THPC and Turnbull Blue gel dosimeters evaluated using optical tomography

    Pilařová (Vávrů), Kateřina; Kozubíková, Petra; Šolc, Jaroslav; Spěváček, Václav

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare characteristics of radiochromic gel - Turnbull Blue gel (TB gel) with polymer gel - polyacrylamide gel and tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (PAGAT) using optical tomography. Both types of gels were examined in terms of dose sensitivity, dose response linearity and background value of spectrophotometric absorbance. The calibration curve was obtained for 60Co irradiation performed on Gammacell 220 at predefined gamma dose levels between 0 and 140 Gy for TBG and 0-15 Gy for PAGAT. To measure relative dose distributions from stereotactic irradiation, dosimeters were irradiated on Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. The cylindrical glass housings filled with gel were attached to the stereotactic frame. They were exposed with single shot and 16 mm collimator by 65 Gy to a 50% prescription isodose for TB gel and 4 Gy to a 50% prescription isodose for PAGAT. Evaluations of dosimeters were performed on an UV-vis Spectrophotometer Helios β and an optical cone beam homemade tomography scanner with a 16-bit astronomy CCD camera with a set of color filters. The advantages and potential disadvantages for both types of gel dosimeters were summarized. Dose distribution in central slice and measured profiles of 16 mm shot shows excellent correspondence with treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan® for both PAGAT and Turnbull Blue gels. Gel dosimeters are suitable for steep dose gradient verification. An optical tomography evaluation method is successful. Dose response characteristics of TB gel and PAGAT gel are presented.

  15. Optical coherence tomography: a potential tool to predict premature rupture of fetal membranes.

    Micili, Serap C; Valter, Markus; Oflaz, Hakan; Ozogul, Candan; Linder, Peter; Föckler, Nicole; Artmann, Gerhard M; Digel, Ilya; Artmann, Aysegul T

    2013-04-01

    A fundamental question addressed in this study was the feasibility of preterm birth prediction based on a noncontact investigation of fetal membranes in situ. Although the phenomena of preterm birth and the premature rupture of the fetal membrane are well known, currently, there are no diagnostic tools for their prediction. The aim of this study was to assess whether optical coherence tomography could be used for clinical investigations of high-risk pregnancies. The thickness of fetal membranes was measured in parallel by optical coherence tomography and histological techniques for the following types of birth: normal births, preterm births without premature ruptures and births at full term with premature rupture of membrane. Our study revealed that the membrane thickness correlates with the birth type. Normal births membranes were statistically significantly thicker than those belonging to the other two groups. Thus, in spite of almost equal duration of gestation of the normal births and the births at full term with premature rupture, the corresponding membrane thicknesses differed. This difference is possibly related to previously reported water accumulation in the membranes. The optical coherence tomography results were encouraging, suggesting that this technology could be used in future to predict and distinguish between different kinds of births. PMID:23637215

  16. Characteristics of polyacrylamide gel with THPC and Turnbull Blue gel dosimeters evaluated using optical tomography

    The purpose of this study was to compare characteristics of radiochromic gel – Turnbull Blue gel (TB gel) with polymer gel – polyacrylamide gel and tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (PAGAT) using optical tomography. Both types of gels were examined in terms of dose sensitivity, dose response linearity and background value of spectrophotometric absorbance. The calibration curve was obtained for 60Co irradiation performed on Gammacell 220 at predefined gamma dose levels between 0 and 140 Gy for TBG and 0–15 Gy for PAGAT. To measure relative dose distributions from stereotactic irradiation, dosimeters were irradiated on Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. The cylindrical glass housings filled with gel were attached to the stereotactic frame. They were exposed with single shot and 16 mm collimator by 65 Gy to a 50% prescription isodose for TB gel and 4 Gy to a 50% prescription isodose for PAGAT. Evaluations of dosimeters were performed on an UV–vis Spectrophotometer Helios β and an optical cone beam homemade tomography scanner with a 16-bit astronomy CCD camera with a set of color filters. The advantages and potential disadvantages for both types of gel dosimeters were summarized. Dose distribution in central slice and measured profiles of 16 mm shot shows excellent correspondence with treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan® for both PAGAT and Turnbull Blue gels. - highlights: • Gel dosimeters are suitable for steep dose gradient verification. • An optical tomography evaluation method is successful. • Dose response characteristics of TB gel and PAGAT gel are presented

  17. Integrated adaptive optics optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope system for simultaneous cellular resolution in vivo retinal imaging

    Zawadzki, RJ; Jones, SM; Pilli, S; Balderas-Mata, S; Kim, DY; Olivier, SS; Werner, JS

    2011-01-01

    We describe an ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) retinal imaging system that combines adaptive optics Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) with an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) to allow simultaneous data acquisition by the two modalities. The AO-SLO subsystem was integrated into the previously described AO-UHR OCT instrument with minimal changes to the latter. This was done in order to ensure optimal performance and image quality of the AO- UHR OCT. In this d...

  18. Versatile Wideband Balanced Detector for Quantum Optical Homodyne Tomography

    Kumar, Ranjeet; MacRae, Andrew; Cairns, E; Huntington, E H; Lvovsky, A I

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive theory and an easy to follow method for the design and construction of a wideband homodyne detector for time-domain quantum measurements. We show how one can evaluate the performance of a detector in a specific time-domain experiment based on electronic spectral characteristic of that detector. We then present and characterize a high-performance detector constructed using inexpensive, commercially available components such as low-noise high-speed operational amplifiers and high-bandwidth photodiodes. Our detector shows linear behavior up to a level of over 13 dB clearance between shot noise and electronic noise, in the range from DC to 100 MHz. The detector can be used for measuring quantum optical field quadratures both in the continuous-wave and pulsed regimes with pulse repetition rates up to about 250 MHz.

  19. Nonquadratic penalization improves near-infrared diffuse optical tomography.

    Jagannath, Ravi Prasad K; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K

    2013-08-01

    A new approach that can easily incorporate any generic penalty function into the diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction is introduced to show the utility of nonquadratic penalty functions. The penalty functions that were used include quadratic (ℓ2), absolute (ℓ1), Cauchy, and Geman-McClure. The regularization parameter in each of these cases was obtained automatically by using the generalized cross-validation method. The reconstruction results were systematically compared with each other via utilization of quantitative metrics, such as relative error and Pearson correlation. The reconstruction results indicate that, while the quadratic penalty may be able to provide better separation between two closely spaced targets, its contrast recovery capability is limited, and the sparseness promoting penalties, such as ℓ1, Cauchy, and Geman-McClure have better utility in reconstructing high-contrast and complex-shaped targets, with the Geman-McClure penalty being the most optimal one. PMID:24323209

  20. Imaging of collagen deposition disorders using optical coherence tomography

    Ring, H C; Mogensen, M; Hussain, A A;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Collagen deposition disorders such as hypertrophic scars, keloids and scleroderma can be associated with significant stigma and embarrassment. These disorders often constitute considerable impairment to quality of life, with treatment posing to be a substantial challenge. Optical...... with ordinary scars, hypertrophic scars, keloid scarring, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and localized or systemic scleroderma were recruited for this pilot study. Affected tissue and adjacent healthy skin were scanned using OCT and digitally photographed. Density measurements were performed in ImageJ on OCT...... images from scleroderma patients, both systemic and morphea (10 patients), keloid patients (10 patients) and healthy skin adjacent to keloids (10 patients). RESULTS: OCT images of scarring diseases showed varying degrees of disruption to the skin architecture. OCT characteristics were identified for each...

  1. Time resolved optical tomography of the human forearm

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Schweiger, Martin; Dehghani, Hamid; Schmidt, Florian E. W.; Delpy, David T.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2001-04-01

    A 32-channel time-resolved optical imaging instrument has been developed principally to study functional parameters of the new-born infant brain. As a prelude to studies on infants, the device and image reconstruction methodology have been evaluated on the adult human forearm. Cross-sectional images were generated using time-resolved measurements of transmitted light at two wavelengths. All data were acquired using a fully automated computer-controlled protocol. Images representing the internal scattering and absorbing properties of the arm are presented, as well as images that reveal physiological changes during a simple finger flexion exercise. The results presented in this paper represent the first simultaneous tomographic reconstruction of the internal scattering and absorbing properties of a clinical subject using purely temporal data, with additional co-registered difference images showing repeatable absorption changes at two wavelengths in response to exercise.

  2. Multiple Object Adaptive Optics: Mixed NGS/LGS tomography

    Morris, Tim; Gendron, Eric; Basden, Alastair; Martin, Olivier; Osborn, James; Henry, David; Hubert, Zoltan; Sivo, Gaetano; Gratadour, Damien; Chemla, Fanny; Sevin, Arnaud; Cohen, Matthieu; Younger, Eddy; Vidal, Fabrice; Wilson, Richard; Batterley, Tim; Bitenc, Urban; Reeves, Andrew; Bharmal, Nazim; Raynaud, Henri-François; Kulcsar, Caroline; Conan, Jean-Marc; Guzman, Dani; De Cos Juez, Javier; Huet, Jean-Michel; Perret, Denis; Dickson, Colin; Atkinson, David; Baillie, Tom; Longmore, Andy; Todd, Stephen; Talbot, Gordon; Morris, Simon; Myers, Richard; Rousset, Gérard

    2013-12-01

    Open-loop adaptive optics has been successfully demonstrated on-sky by several groups, including the fully tomographic MOAO demonstration made using CANARY. MOAO instrumentation such as RAVEN will deliver the first astronomical science and other planned instruments aim to extend both open-loop AO performance and the number of corrected fields. Many of these planned systems rely on the use of tomographic open-loop LGS wavefront sensing. Here we present results from the combined NGS/LGS tomographic CANARY system and then compare the NGS- and LGS-based tomographic system performance. We identify the major system performance drivers, and highlight some potential routes for further exploitation of open-loop tomographic AO.

  3. Normalized-constraint algorithm for minimizing inter-parameter crosstalk in DC optical tomography

    Pei, Yaling; Graber, Harry L.; Barbour, Randall L.

    2001-07-01

    In this report, we present a method for reducing the inter-coefficient crosstalk problem in optical tomography. The method described is an extension of a previously reported normalized difference method that evaluates relative detector values, and employs a weight matrix scaling technique together with a constrained CGD method for image reconstruction. Results from numerical and experimental studies using DC measurement data demonstrate that the approach can effectively isolate absorption and scattering heterogeneities, even for complex combinations of perturbations in optical properties. The significance of these results in light of recent theoretical findings is discussed

  4. Towards multimodal detection of melanoma thickness based on optical coherence tomography and optoacoustics

    Rahlves, M.; Varkentin, A.; Stritzel, J.; Blumenröther, E.; Mazurenka, M.; Wollweber, M.; Roth, B.

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma skin cancer has one of the highest mortality rates of all types of cancer if not detected at an early stage. The survival rate is highly dependent on its penetration depth, which is commonly determined by histopathology. In this work, we aim at combining optical coherence tomography and optoacoustic as a non-invasive all-optical method to measure the penetration depth of melanoma. We present our recent achievements to setup a handheld multimodal device and also results from first in vivo measurements on healthy and cancerous skin tissue, which are compared to measurements obtained by ultrasound and histopathology.

  5. Dimensional quality control of Ti-Ni dental file by optical coordinate metrology and computed tomography

    Yagüe-Fabra, J.A.; Tosello, Guido; Ontiveros, S.;

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic dental files usually present complex 3D geometries, which make the complete measurement of the component very challenging with conventional micro metrology tools. Computed Tomography (CT) can represent a suitable alternative solution to micro metrology tools based on optical and tactile...... techniques. However, the establishment of CT systems traceability when measuring 3D complex geometries is still an open issue. In this work, to verify the quality of the CT dimensional measurements, the dental file has been measured both with a μCT system and an optical CMM (OCMM). The uncertainty...

  6. Nanometer resolution optical coherence tomography using broad bandwidth XUV and soft x-ray radiation

    Silvio Fuchs; Christian Rödel; Alexander Blinne; Ulf Zastrau; Martin Wünsche; Vinzenz Hilbert; Leif Glaser; Jens Viefhaus; Eugene Frumker; Paul Corkum; Eckhart Förster; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive technique for cross-sectional imaging. It is particularly advantageous for applications where conventional microscopy is not able to image deeper layers of samples in a reasonable time, e.g. in fast moving, deeper lying structures. However, at infrared and optical wavelengths, which are commonly used, the axial resolution of OCT is limited to about 1 μm, even if the bandwidth of the light covers a wide spectral range. Here, we present extre...

  7. Speckle decorrelation in Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography made by heterodyne holography

    Gross, M

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) is a technique that images optical contrast deep inside scattering media. Heterodyne holography is a promising tool able to detect the UOT tagged photons with high efficiency. In this work, we describe theoretically the detection of the tagged photon in heterodyne holography based UOT, show how to filter the untagged photon discuss, and discuss the effect of speckle decorrelation. We show that optimal detection sensitivity can obtain, if the frame exposure time is of the order of the decorrelation time.

  8. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Simple Retina Pigment Epithelium Hamartoma

    Melis Palamar Onay; Ayşe Yağcı

    2012-01-01

    To report the spectral-domain optical coherence tomographic findings in a case of a simple hamartoma of the retinal pigment epithelium. A 55-year-old female patient with simple hamartoma of the retinal pigment epithelium was evaluated with ultrasonography and spectraldomain optic coherence tomography. The patient was found to have a pitch-black lesion measuring one-half of the disk diameter, located at about 1 disk diameter temporal to the foveola. B-mode ultrasonogram revealed a 0.8...

  9. In-vivo retinal imaging by optical coherence tomography using an RSOD-based phase modulator

    Ling WANG; Zhi-hua DING; Guo-hua SHI; Yu-dong ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Fourier-domain rapid scanning optical delay line (RSOD) was introduced for phase modulation and depth scanning in a time-domain optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT) system. Investigation of parameter optimization of RSOD was conducted.Experiments for RSOD characterization at different parameters of the groove pitch, focal length, galvomirror size, etc. were performed. By implementing the optimized RSOD in our established TD-OCT system with a broadband light source centered at 840 nm with 50 nm bandwidth, in vivo retina imaging of a rabbit was presented, demonstrating the feasibility of high-quality TD-OCT imaging using an RSOD-based phase modulator.

  10. A signal separation technique for sub-cellular imaging using dynamic optical coherence tomography

    Ammari, Habib; Shi, Cong

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at imaging the dynamics of metabolic activity of cells. Using dynamic optical coherence tomography, we introduce a new multi-particle dynamical model to simulate the movements of the collagen and the cell metabolic activity and develop an efficient signal separation technique for sub-cellular imaging. We perform a singular-value decomposition of the dynamic optical images to isolate the intensity of the metabolic activity. We prove that the largest eigenvalue of the associated Casorati matrix corresponds to the collagen. We present several numerical simulations to illustrate and validate our approach.

  11. Hyperspectral and multispectral bioluminescence optical tomography for small animal imaging

    For bioluminescence imaging studies in small animals, it is important to be able to accurately localize the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the underlying bioluminescent source. The spectrum of light produced by the source that escapes the subject varies with the depth of the emission source because of the wavelength-dependence of the optical properties of tissue. Consequently, multispectral or hyperspectral data acquisition should help in the 3D localization of deep sources. In this paper, we describe a framework for fully 3D bioluminescence tomographic image acquisition and reconstruction that exploits spectral information. We describe regularized tomographic reconstruction techniques that use semi-infinite slab or FEM-based diffusion approximations of photon transport through turbid media. Singular value decomposition analysis was used for data dimensionality reduction and to illustrate the advantage of using hyperspectral rather than achromatic data. Simulation studies in an atlas-mouse geometry indicated that sub-millimeter resolution may be attainable given accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the animal. A fixed arrangement of mirrors and a single CCD camera were used for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral imaging data over most of the surface of the animal. Phantom studies conducted using this system demonstrated our ability to accurately localize deep point-like sources and show that a resolution of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mm can be achieved. We also include an in vivo study of a mouse with a brain tumour expressing firefly luciferase. Co-registration of the reconstructed 3D bioluminescent image with magnetic resonance images indicated good anatomical localization of the tumour

  12. Diagnostic ability of barrett's index to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy using multidetector computed tomography

    Mário L. R. Monteiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a muscular index (Barrett's Index, calculated with multidetector computed tomography, to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy in patients with Graves' orbitopathy. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with Graves' orbitopathy were prospectively studied and submitted to neuro-ophthalmic evaluation and multidetector computed tomography scans of the orbits. Orbits were divided into two groups: those with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy. Barrett's index was calculated as the percentage of the orbit occupied by muscles. Sensitivity and specificity were determined for several index values. RESULTS: Sixty-four orbits (19 with and 45 without dysthyroid optic neuropathy met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean Barrett's index values (± SD were 64.47% ± 6.06% and 49.44% ± 10.94%in the groups with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy, respectively (p60% should be carefully examined and followed for the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

  13. Improvement of fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography with improved optical filtering and accurate model-based reconstruction algorithms

    Lu, Yujie; Zhu, Banghe; Darne, Chinmay; Tan, I.-Chih; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of preclinical fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography (FEOT) is to provide three-dimensional fluorophore distribution for a myriad of drug and disease discovery studies in small animals. Effective measurements, as well as fast and robust image reconstruction, are necessary for extensive applications. Compared to bioluminescence tomography (BLT), FEOT may result in improved image quality through higher detected photon count rates. However, background signals that arise from excitation illumination affect the reconstruction quality, especially when tissue fluorophore concentration is low and/or fluorescent target is located deeply in tissues. We show that near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging with an optimized filter configuration significantly reduces the background noise. Model-based reconstruction with a high-order approximation to the radiative transfer equation further improves the reconstruction quality compared to the diffusion approximation. Improvements in FEOT are demonstrated experimentally using a mouse-shaped phantom with targets of pico- and subpico-mole NIR fluorescent dye.

  14. A small animal time-resolved optical tomography platform using wide-field excitation

    Venugopal, Vivek

    Small animal imaging plays a critical role in present day biomedical research by filling an important gap in the translation of research from the bench to the bedside. Optical techniques constitute an emerging imaging modality which have tremendous potential in preclinical applications. Optical imaging methods are capable of non-invasive assessment of the functional and molecular characteristics of biological tissue. The three-dimensional optical imaging technique, referred to as diffuse optical tomography, provides an approach for the whole-body imaging of small animal models and can provide volumetric maps of tissue functional parameters (e.g. blood volume, oxygen saturation etc.) and/or provide 3D localization and quantification of fluorescence-based molecular markers in vivo. However, the complex mathematical reconstruction problem associated with optical tomography and the cumbersome instrumental designs limits its adoption as a high-throughput quantitative whole-body imaging modality in current biomedical research. The development of new optical imaging paradigms is thus necessary for a wide-acceptance of this new technology. In this thesis, the design, development, characterization and optimization of a small animal optical tomography system is discussed. Specifically, the platform combines a highly sensitive time-resolved imaging paradigm with multi-spectral excitation capability and CCD-based detection to provide a system capable of generating spatially, spectrally and temporally dense measurement datasets. The acquisition of such data sets however can take long and translate to often unrealistic acquisition times when using the classical point source based excitation scheme. The novel approach in the design of this platform is the adoption of a wide-field excitation scheme which employs extended excitation sources and in the process allows an estimated ten-fold reduction in the acquisition time. The work described herein details the design of the imaging

  15. A laminar optical tomography system for the early cervical cancer diagnosis

    Cui, Shanshan; Jia, Mengyu; Chen, Xueying; Meng, Wei; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan

    2014-03-01

    Laminar optical tomography (LOT) is a new mesoscopic functional optical imaging technique, which is an extension of a confocal microscope and diffuse optical tomography to acquire both the coaxial and off-axis scattered light at the same time. In this paper, a LOT system with a larger detection area aiming at the in vivo detection of early cervical cancer is developed. The field of view of our system is 10 mm x 10 mm. In order to improve the image quality of the system, two methods were performed: the correction of image distortion and the restriction of returning light. The performance of the system with aperture stop was assessed by liquid phantom experiments. Comparing with the Monte Carlo simulation, the measurement results show that the average relative errors of eight different source-detector distances corresponding to 4 source points are lower than the errors of the system taking the frame of objective lens as the aperture stop by 5.7%, 4.8%, 6.1%, 6.1% respectively. Moreover, the experiment based on the phantom with specified structure and optical parameters to simulate the cervix demonstrates that the system perform well for the cervix measurement.

  16. Optical tomography with the discontinuous Galerkin formulation of the radiative transfer equation in frequency domain

    Optical tomography is an inverse method of probing semi-transparent media with the help of light sources. The reconstruction of the optical properties usually employs finite volumes or continuous finite elements formulations of light transport as a forward model for the predictions. In a previous study, we have introduced a generalization of the inversion approach with finite elements formulations by using an integral form of the objective function. The novelty is that the surfaces of the detectors are taken into account in the reconstruction and compatibility is obtained for all finite element formulations. This present paper illustrates this new approach by developing a Discontinuous Galerkin formulation as a forward model for an optical tomography application in the frequency domain framework. Numerical tests are performed to gauge the accuracy of the method in recovering optical properties distribution with a gradient-based algorithm where the adjoint method is used to fastly compute the objective function gradient. It is seen that the reconstruction is accurate and can be affected by noise on the measurements as expected. Filtering of the gradient at each iteration of the reconstruction is used to cope with the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem and to improves the quality and accuracy of the reconstruction.

  17. Nanometer resolution optical coherence tomography using broad bandwidth XUV and soft x-ray radiation.

    Fuchs, Silvio; Rödel, Christian; Blinne, Alexander; Zastrau, Ulf; Wünsche, Martin; Hilbert, Vinzenz; Glaser, Leif; Viefhaus, Jens; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul; Förster, Eckhart; Paulus, Gerhard G

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive technique for cross-sectional imaging. It is particularly advantageous for applications where conventional microscopy is not able to image deeper layers of samples in a reasonable time, e.g. in fast moving, deeper lying structures. However, at infrared and optical wavelengths, which are commonly used, the axial resolution of OCT is limited to about 1 μm, even if the bandwidth of the light covers a wide spectral range. Here, we present extreme ultraviolet coherence tomography (XCT) and thus introduce a new technique for non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of nanometer structures. XCT exploits the nanometerscale coherence lengths corresponding to the spectral transmission windows of, e.g., silicon samples. The axial resolution of coherence tomography is thus improved from micrometers to a few nanometers. Tomographic imaging with an axial resolution better than 18 nm is demonstrated for layer-type nanostructures buried in a silicon substrate. Using wavelengths in the water transmission window, nanometer-scale layers of platinum are retrieved with a resolution better than 8 nm. XCT as a nondestructive method for sub-surface tomographic imaging holds promise for several applications in semiconductor metrology and imaging in the water window. PMID:26860894

  18. Nanometer resolution optical coherence tomography using broad bandwidth XUV and soft x-ray radiation

    Fuchs, Silvio; Rödel, Christian; Blinne, Alexander; Zastrau, Ulf; Wünsche, Martin; Hilbert, Vinzenz; Glaser, Leif; Viefhaus, Jens; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul; Förster, Eckhart; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive technique for cross-sectional imaging. It is particularly advantageous for applications where conventional microscopy is not able to image deeper layers of samples in a reasonable time, e.g. in fast moving, deeper lying structures. However, at infrared and optical wavelengths, which are commonly used, the axial resolution of OCT is limited to about 1 μm, even if the bandwidth of the light covers a wide spectral range. Here, we present extreme ultraviolet coherence tomography (XCT) and thus introduce a new technique for non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of nanometer structures. XCT exploits the nanometerscale coherence lengths corresponding to the spectral transmission windows of, e.g., silicon samples. The axial resolution of coherence tomography is thus improved from micrometers to a few nanometers. Tomographic imaging with an axial resolution better than 18 nm is demonstrated for layer-type nanostructures buried in a silicon substrate. Using wavelengths in the water transmission window, nanometer-scale layers of platinum are retrieved with a resolution better than 8 nm. XCT as a nondestructive method for sub-surface tomographic imaging holds promise for several applications in semiconductor metrology and imaging in the water window.

  19. Fiber-Based Polarization Diversity Detection for Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    Hamid Pahlevaninezhad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new fiber-based polarization diversity detection (PDD scheme for polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT. This implementation uses a new custom miniaturized polarization-maintaining fiber coupler with single mode (SM fiber inputs and polarization maintaining (PM fiber outputs. The SM fiber inputs obviate matching the optical lengths of the two orthogonal OCT polarization channels prior to interference while the PM fiber outputs ensure defined orthogonal axes after interference. Advantages of this detection scheme over those with bulk optics PDD include lower cost, easier miniaturization, and more relaxed alignment and handling issues. We incorporate this PDD scheme into a galvanometer-scanned OCT system to demonstrate system calibration and PSOCT imaging of an achromatic quarter-wave plate, fingernail in vivo, and chicken breast, salmon, cow leg, and basa fish muscle samples ex vivo.

  20. Optical tomography of the breast using a multi-channel time-resolved imager

    A time-resolved optical tomography system has been used to generate cross-sectional images of the human breast. Images are reconstructed using an iterative, nonlinear algorithm and measurements of mean photon flight time relative to those acquired on a homogeneous reference phantom. Thirty-eight studies have been performed on three healthy volunteers and 21 patients with a variety of breast lesions including cancer. We have successfully detected 17 out of 19 lesions, and shown that optical images of the healthy breast of the same volunteer display a heterogeneity which is repeatable over a period of months. However, results also indicate that the lack of accurate quantitation of optical parameters and limited morphological information limits the ability to characterize different types of lesions and distinguish benign from malignant tissues. Drawbacks of our current methodology and plans for overcoming them are discussed

  1. Evaluation of dental enamel caries assessment using Quantitative Light Induced Fluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Maia, Ana Marly Araújo; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; de L Campello, Sergio; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; Karlsson, Lena

    2016-06-01

    An in vitro study of morphological alterations between sound dental structure and artificially induced white spot lesions in human teeth, was performed through the loss of fluorescence by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) and the alterations of the light attenuation coefficient by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). To analyze the OCT images using a commercially available system, a special algorithm was applied, whereas the QLF images were analyzed using the software available in the commercial system employed. When analyzing the sound region against white spot lesions region by QLF, a reduction in the fluorescence intensity was observed, whilst an increase of light attenuation by the OCT system occurred. Comparison of the percentage of alteration between optical properties of sound and artificial enamel caries regions showed that OCT processed images through the attenuation of light enhanced the tooth optical alterations more than fluorescence detected by QLF System. QLF versus OCT imaging of enamel caries: a photonics assessment. PMID:26351155

  2. Approximate Marginalization of Absorption and Scattering in Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography

    Mozumder, Meghdoot; Arridge, Simon; Kaipio, Jari P; d'Andrea, Cosimo; Kolehmainen, Ville

    2015-01-01

    In fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT), the reconstruction of the fluorophore concentration inside the target body is usually carried out using a normalized Born approximation model where the measured fluorescent emission data is scaled by measured excitation data. One of the benefits of the model is that it can tolerate inaccuracy in the absorption and scattering distributions that are used in the construction of the forward model to some extent. In this paper, we employ the recently proposed Bayesian approximation error approach to fDOT for compensating for the modeling errors caused by the inaccurately known optical properties of the target in combination with the normalized Born approximation model. The approach is evaluated using a simulated test case with different amount of error in the optical properties. The results show that the Bayesian approximation error approach improves the tolerance of fDOT imaging against modeling errors caused by inaccurately known absorption and scattering of the...

  3. Miniature probe integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and ultrasound imaging: proof-of-concept.

    Dai, Xianjin; Xi, Lei; Duan, Can; Yang, Hao; Xie, Huikai; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-06-15

    In this Letter, we present a novel tri-modal miniature side-view probe, through which optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and pulse-echo ultrasound (US) images can be coaxially acquired and displayed simultaneously. The probe consists of a common optical path for OR-PAM (light delivery) and OCT (light delivery/detection), and a 40-MHz unfocused ultrasound transducer for OR-PAM (photoacoustic detection) and US (ultrasound transmission/receiving) with an overall diameter of 2 mm. Combining OR-PAM, OCT, and US would provide complementary information including optical absorption (OR-PAM), optical back-scattering (OCT), and deep tissue structures (US) about biological tissue. Based on an integrated imaging system consisting of OR-PAM, time-domain OCT, and US, phantom images and in vivo images of rat ear were acquired to demonstrate the capabilities of the integrated tri-modality imaging probe. The probe yields a lateral resolution of 13.6 μm for OR-PAM and OCT, and an axial resolution of 43 μm for OR-PAM and US. Currently, for a scanning area of 1 ×1  mm, it took ∼25  min to acquire data for tri-modal volumetric imaging. PMID:26076296

  4. High-speed upper-airway imaging using full-range optical coherence tomography

    Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Loy, Anthony Chin; Wong, Brian J. F.; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-11-01

    Obstruction in the upper airway can often cause reductions in breathing or gas exchange efficiency and lead to rest disorders such as sleep apnea. Imaging diagnosis of the obstruction region has been accomplished using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However CT requires the use of ionizing radiation, and MRI typically requires sedation of the patient to prevent motion artifacts. Long-range optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images with high resolution and without the use of ionizing radiation. In this paper, we present work on the development of a long-range OCT endoscopic probe with 1.2 mm OD and 20 mm working distance used in conjunction with a modified Fourier domain swept source OCT system to acquire structural and anatomical datasets of the human airway. Imaging from the bottom of the larynx to the end of the nasal cavity is completed within 40 s.

  5. Spontaneous Coronary Dissection: “Live Flash” Optical Coherence Tomography Guided Angioplasty

    Bento, Angela Pimenta; Fernandes, Renato Gil dos Santos Pinto; Neves, David Cintra Henriques Silva; Patrício, Lino Manuel Ribeiro; de Aguiar, José Eduardo Chambel

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence tomography (OCT) is a light-based imaging modality which shows tremendous potential in the setting of coronary imaging. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an infrequent cause of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The diagnosis of SCAD is made mainly with invasive coronary angiography, although adjunctive imaging modalities such as computed tomography angiography, IVUS, and OCT may increase the diagnostic yield. The authors describe a clinical case of a young woman admitted with the diagnosis of ACS. The ACS was caused by SCAD detected in the coronary angiography and the angioplasty was guided by OCT. OCT use in the setting of SCAD has been already described and the true innovation in this case was this unique use of OCT. The guidance of angioplasty with live and short images was very useful as it allowed clearly identifying the position of the guidewires at any given moment without the use of prohibitive amounts of contrast. PMID:26989520

  6. Tri-band spectroscopic optical coherence tomography based on optical parametric amplification for lipid and vessel visualization

    Yu, Luoqin; Kang, Jiqiang; Jinata, Chandra; Wang, Xie; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Kin Tak; Lee, Nikki P.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2015-12-01

    A tri-band spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) system has been implemented for visualization of lipid and blood vessel distribution. The tri-band swept source, which covers output spectrum in 1.3, 1.5, and 1.6 μm wavelength windows, is based on a dual-band Fourier domain mode-locked laser and a fiber optical parametric amplifier. This tri-band SOCT can further differentiate materials, e.g., lipid and artery, qualitatively by contrasting attenuation coefficients difference within any two of these bands. Furthermore, ex vivo imaging of both porcine artery with artificial lipid plaque phantom and mice with coronary artery disease were demonstrated to showcase the capability of our SOCT.

  7. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4D refractive index tomography of cells

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information about the values and gradient of RI tomograms.

  8. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4-D refractive index tomography of cells

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information abou...

  9. Experimental study of z resolution in acousto-optical coherence tomography using random phase jumps on ultrasound and light

    Lesaffre, Max; Ramaz, François; Gross, Michel; 10.1364/AO.52.000949

    2013-01-01

    Acousto-Optical Coherence Tomography (AOCT) is a variant of Acousto Optic Imaging (also called Ultrasound modulated Optical Tomography) that makes possible to get resolution along the ultrasound propagation axis $z$. We present here new AOCT experimental results, and we study how the $z$ resolution depends on time step between phase jumps $T_\\phi$, or on the correlation length $\\Delta z$. By working at low resolution, we perform a quantitative comparison of the $z$ measurements with the theoretical Point Spread Function (PSF). We present also images recorded with different $z$ resolution, and we qualitatively show how the image quality varies with $T_\\phi$, or $\\Delta z$.

  10. Concurrent diffuse optical tomography, spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2000-12-01

    Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) in the Near Infrared NIR offers the potential to perform non-invasive three- dimensional quantified imaging of large-organs in vivo. The technique targets tissue intrinsic chromophores such as oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin and the uptake of optical contrast agents. This work considers the DOT application in studying the vascularization, hemoglobin saturation and Indocyanine Green (ICG) uptake of breast tumors in-vivo as measures of angiogenesis, blood vessel permeability and oxygen delivery and consumption. To realize this work an optical tomographer based on the single-photon-counting time- correlated technique was coupled to a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner. All patients entered the study were also scheduled for biopsy; hence histopathological information was also available as the ``Gold Standard'' for the diagnostic performance. The feasibility of Diffuse Optical Tomography to image tissue in-vivo is demonstrated by direct comparison of contrast-enhanced MRI and DOT images obtained from the same breast under identical geometrical and physiological conditions. Additionally, the effect of tissue optical background heterogeneity on the imaging performance is studied using simulations. We also present optimization schemes that yield superior reconstruction and spectroscopic capacity when probing the intrinsic and extrinsic contrast of highly heterogeneous optical media. The simultaneous examination also pioneers a hybrid diagnostic modality where MRI and image-guided localized diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) information are concurrently available. The approach employs the MR structural and functional information as a-priori knowledge and thus improves the quantification ability of the optical method. We have employed DOS and localized DOS to quantify optical properties of tissue in two and three wavelengths and obtain functional properties of malignant, benign and normal breast lesions. Generally, cancers exhibited higher

  11. Quantification of biofilm thickness using a swept source based optical coherence tomography system

    Ratheesh Kumar, M.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Seah, L. K.; Shearwood, C.

    2015-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, non-contact optical measurement and imaging technique that relies on low coherence interferometry. Apart from bio-imaging applications, the applicability of OCT can be extended to metrological investigations because of the inherent capability of optical interferometry to perform precise measurement with high sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of OCT for the measurement of the refractive index and thickness of bacterial biofilm structures grown in a flow cell. In OCT, the depth profiles are constructed by measuring the magnitude and time delay of back reflected light from the scattering sites by means of optical interferometry. The optical distance between scattering points can be obtained by measuring the separation between the point spread functions (PSF) at the respective points in the A-scan data. The refractive index of the biofilm is calculated by measuring the apparent shift in the position of the PSF corresponding to a reference surface, caused by the biofilm growth. In our experiment, the base layer of the flow cell is used as the reference surface. It is observed that the calculated refractive index of the biofilm is close to that of water, and agrees well with the previously reported value. Finally, the physical thickness of the biofilm is calculated by dividing the optical path length by the calculated value of refractive index.

  12. Three-dimensional imaging of intracochlear tissue by scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT)

    Tinne, N.; Nolte, L.; Antonopoulos, G. C.; Schulze, J.; Andrade, J.; Heisterkamp, A.; Meyer, H.; Warnecke, A.; Majdani, O.; Ripken, T.

    2016-02-01

    The presented study focuses on the application of scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) for non-destructive visualization of anatomical structures inside the human cochlea ex vivo. SLOT is a laser-based highly efficient microscopy technique, which allows for tomographic imaging of the internal structure of transparent large-scale specimens (up to 1 cm3). Thus, in the field of otology this technique is best convenient for an ex vivo study of the inner ear anatomy. For this purpose, the preparation before imaging comprises mechanically assisted decalcification, dehydration as well as optical clearing of the cochlea samples. Here, we demonstrate results of SLOT visualizing hard and soft tissue structures of the human cochlea with an optical resolution in the micrometer range using absorption and autofluorescence as contrast mechanisms. Furthermore, we compare our results with the method of X-ray micro tomography (micro-CT, μCT) as clinical gold standard which is based only on absorption. In general, SLOT can provide the advantage of covering all contrast mechanisms known from other light microscopy techniques, such as fluorescence or scattering. For this reason, a protocol for antibody staining has been developed, which additionally enables selective mapping of cellular structures within the cochlea. Thus, we present results of SLOT imaging rodent cochleae showing specific anatomical structures such as hair cells and neurofilament via fluorescence. In conclusion, the presented study has shown that SLOT is an ideally suited tool in the field of otology for in toto visualization of the inner ear microstructure.

  13. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects

  14. Visible light optical coherence tomography measure retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation (Conference Presentation)

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-03-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. The rMRO2 was calculated by concurrent measurement of blood flow and blood oxygen saturation (sO2). Blood flow was calculated by the principle of Doppler optical coherence tomography, where the phase shift between two closely spaced A-lines measures the axial velocity. The distinct optical absorption spectra of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin provided the contrast for sO2 measurement, combined with the spectroscopic analysis of vis-OCT signal within the blood vessels. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28+/-0.08 μL/min (p<0.001), and 0.20+/-0.04 μL/min (p<0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation (CC).

  15. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    Nadhira, Vebi, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Kurniadi, Deddy, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Juliastuti, E., E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Sutiswan, Adeline, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id [Instrumentation and Control Research Group, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10 40132 Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  16. Prospectively electrocardiogram-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition coronary computed tomography angiography for assessment of biodegradable vascular scaffold expansion: Comparison with optical coherence tomography

    BVS polymeric struts are transparent to the light so that the vessel wall contour can be easily visualized using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Therefore OCT represents a unique tool for both the evaluation of the resorption process and for the assessment of acute BVS mechanical failure. Similarly, the metal-free struts allow unrestricted coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), thus this non invasive method might become the gold standard for a non invasive assessment of BVS. In this case we show the ability of CCTA, performed with a low X-Ray dose, to provide a good evaluation of scaffold expansion. The quantitative measurements were in agreement with those obtained with OCT

  17. Neurofibromatosis: an update of ophthalmic characteristics and applications of optical coherence tomography

    Abdolrahimzadeh B

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Barmak Abdolrahimzadeh,1 Domenica Carmen Piraino,2 Giorgio Albanese,2 Filippo Cruciani,2 Siavash Rahimi3 1Polimed Beltramelli Medical Center, Rome, Italy; 2Section of Ophthalmology, Department of Sense Organs, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy; 3Pathology Centre, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, UK Abstract: Neurofibromatosis (NF is a multisystem disorder and tumor predisposition syndrome caused by genetic mutation on chromosome 17-17q11.2 in NF type 1 (NF1, and on chromosome 22-22q12.2 in NF type 2. The disorder is characterized by considerable heterogeneity of clinical expression. NF1 is the form with the most characteristic ocular manifestations. Lisch nodules of the iris are among the well-known diagnostic criteria for the disease. Glaucoma and associated globe enlargement have been described in a significant proportion of patients with NF1 and orbital–facial involvement. Optic nerve glioma may cause strabismus and proptosis, and palpebral neurofibroma may reach considerable size and occasionally show malignant transformation. Near infrared reflectance has greatly contributed to enhancing our knowledge on choroidal alterations in NF1. Indeed, some authors have proposed to include these among the diagnostic criteria. Optical coherence tomography has given new insight on retinal alterations and is a noninvasive tool in the management of optic nerve gliomas in children. Ocular manifestations in NF type 2 can range from early-onset cataracts in up to 80% of cases to optic nerve hamartomas and combined pigment epithelial and retinal hamartomas. Keywords: neurofibromatosis, ophthalmic, optical coherence tomography, infrared reflectance, choroideal nodules, Lisch nodules

  18. Microfluidic volumetric flow determination using optical coherence tomography speckle: An autocorrelation approach

    De Pretto, Lucas R.; Nogueira, Gesse E. C.; Freitas, Anderson Z.

    2016-04-01

    Functional modalities of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) based on speckle analysis are emerging in the literature. We propose a simple approach to the autocorrelation of OCT signal to enable volumetric flow rate differentiation, based on decorrelation time. Our results show that this technique could distinguish flows separated by 3 μl/min, limited by the acquisition speed of the system. We further perform a B-scan of gradient flow inside a microchannel, enabling the visualization of the drag effect on the walls.

  19. Fibres reinforced dentures investigated with en-face optical coherence tomography

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Goguta, Luciana; Rominu, Mihai; Negru, Radu; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    The complete dentures are currently made using different technologies. In order to avoid deficiencies of the prostheses made using the classical technique, several alternative procedures have been devised. In order to enhance the mechanical strength, complete denture bases are reinforced with fibres. Their material and structure vary wildly, which makes the investigation difficult. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is evaluated as a possible non-invasive technique to assess the biomechanical behaviour of the reinforcing fibres. OCT images demonstrate structural defects between fibres and the acrylic material in all dentures bases investigated. We conclude that OCT can successfully be used as a noninvasive analysis method.

  20. Visualizing biofilm formation in endotracheal tubes using endoscopic three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    Heidari, Andrew E.; Moghaddam, Samer; Troung, Kimberly K.; Chou, Lidek; Genberg, Carl; Brenner, Matthew; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm formation has been linked to ventilator-associated pneumonia, which is a prevalent infection in hospital intensive care units. Currently, there is no rapid diagnostic tool to assess the degree of biofilm formation or cellular biofilm composition. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally invasive, nonionizing imaging modality that can be used to provide high-resolution cross-sectional images. Biofilm deposited in critical care patients' endotracheal tubes was analyzed in vitro. This study demonstrates that OCT could potentially be used as a diagnostic tool to analyze and assess the degree of biofilm formation and extent of airway obstruction caused by biofilm in endotracheal tubes.

  1. Correlation between intraretinal changes in diabetic macular oedema seen in fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography

    Soliman, W.; Sander, B.; Hasler, P.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To study the relationship between intraretinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA) findings in eyes with diabetic macular oedema (DMO). Methods: We carried out a retrospective observational case series. Thirty eyes with previously untreated DMO underwent FA...... and OCT. The same ETDRS template was overlaid on the FA images in order to compare OCT and FA. Transfoveal linear high-resolution OCT scans (at the 0- and 90-degree meridians) and FA pictures were compared according to the ETDRS rings. Results: Six distinct patterns of intraretinal changes in OCT...

  2. Reproducibility and Agreement Between 2 Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Devices for Anterior Chamber Angle Measurements

    Marion, Kenneth M.; Maram, Jyotsna; Pan, Xiaojing; Dastiridou, Anna; Zhang, ZhouYuan; Ho, Alex; Francis, Brian A; Sadda, Srinivas R.; Chopra, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare anterior chamber angle parameters based on the location of Schwalbe line (SL) from 2 spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) instruments and to measure their reproducibility. Methods: Forty-two eyes from 21 normal, healthy participants underwent imaging of the inferior irido-corneal angle with the Spectralis and Cirrus SD-OCT under tightly controlled low-light conditions. SL-angle opening distance (SL-AOD) and SL-trabecular iris space area (SL-TISA) were meas...

  3. Ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser and photonic crystal fiber

    XUE Ping; James G FUJIMOTO

    2008-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) with ultrahigh axial resolution was achieved by the super-contin- uum generated by coupling femtosecond pulses from a commercial Ti :sapphire laser into an air-silica microstructure fiber. The visible spectrum of the super-continuum from 450 to 700 nm centered at 540 nm can be generated. A free-space axial OCT resolution of 0.64 IJm was achieved. The sensitivity of OCT system was 108 dB with incident light power 3 mW at sample, only 7dB below the theoretical limit. Subcellular OCT imaging was also demonstrated, showing great potential for biomedical application.

  4. Differential absorption optical coherence tomography with strong absorption contrast agents of gold nanorods

    Ming WEI; Jun QIAN; Qiuqiang ZHAN; Fuhong CAI; Arash GHARIBI; Sailing HE

    2009-01-01

    Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods (GNRs) are demonstrated as strong absorption contrast agents for optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT imaging of tissue phantoms doped with GNRs of different resonant wavelengths and concentrations is studied. To utilize the high absorption property of GNRs, a differential absorp-tion OCT imaging is introduced to retrieve the absorption information of GNRs from conventional backscattered signals. It is shown that the contrast of the OCT image can be enhanced significantly when the plasmon resonant wavelength of the GNRs matches the central wavelength of the OCT source.

  5. Dynamic diffuse optical tomography for assessing changes of breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Gunther, Jacqueline E.; Lim, Emerson; Kim, Hyun Keol; Brown, Mindy; Refice, Susan; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a dynamic diffuse optical tomography imaging system that is capable of 3D imaging of both breasts simultaneously. In an ongoing study subjects receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy are imaged at 6 time points throughout their 5-month treatment. At each time point the subjects preform a breath hold to observe the hemodynamic effects in the breasts. For each session the percent change of various hemodynamic parameters during the breath hold is determined. Preliminary results from show statistically significant differences in washout rates and deoxyhemoglobin changes at the 2-week imaging point between subjects that respond and do not respond to treatment.

  6. Recent advances in clinical application of optical coherence tomography of human skin

    Gambichler, Thilo; Pljakic, Azem; Schmitz, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging noninvasive imaging method that uses infrared light and interferometric techniques. The method has become increasingly popular in skin research as well as daily dermatology practice. In the present brief review, we focused on recent (2009–2014) OCT studies on the human skin, which included a reasonable sample size and statistics. Twenty-five papers were selected and briefly described OCT of epidermal thickness, skin appendages, wound healing, extracellular matrix and skin fibrosis, vascular malformations, and skin tumors such as basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratoses, and malignant melanoma. PMID:26185462

  7. Full-color skin imaging using RGB LED and floating lens in optical coherence tomography

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Chen, Xin-Chang

    2010-01-01

    The cosmetic industry has witnessed significant growth in recent years. Conventional hand-held skin cameras allow for 2D inspection of the skin surface. This paper proposes a new model for full-color 3D imaging of the skin tissue using fiber-based optical coherence tomography (OCT). Compared to laser or LD sources, RGB LED was found more suitable and thus chosen in the low-coherence interferometry due to its wider bandwidth. A floating objective lens was used to confocalize the R, G and B ima...

  8. Wavelet and model-based spectral analysis of color doppler optical coherence tomography

    Choma, Michael A.; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2006-07-01

    Color doppler optical coherence tomography (CD-OCT) uses time-frequency analysis (TFA) to extract motion-induced Doppler shifted in the interferometric OCT signal. In this paper, the performance of three TFAs are compared in a scattering flow phantom and in in vivo human retina: the short-time Fourier transform, the Morlet-wavelet transform, and the short-time MUSIC transform (STMT). The STMT is a new TFA that incorporates the MUSIC eigenfrequency estimator in a generalized short-time framework. The Morlet transform excels at identifying blood vessels, while the STMT is the most accurate predictor of Doppler shift frequency.

  9. Optical coherence tomography following percutaneous coronary intervention with Excimer laser coronary atherectomy

    Rawlins, John, E-mail: john.rawlins@doctors.net.uk; Talwar, Suneel; Green, Mark; O’Kane, Peter

    2014-01-15

    The indications for Excimer laser coronary atherectomy (ELCA) have been refined in modern interventional practice. With the expanding role for optical coherence tomography (OCT) providing high-resolution intra-coronary imaging, this article examines the appearance of the coronary lumen after ELCA. Each indication for ELCA is discussed and illustrated with a clinical case, followed by detailed analysis of the OCT imaging pre and post ELCA. The aim of the article is to provide information to interventional cardiologists to facilitate decision making during PCI, when ELCA has been used as part of the interventional strategy.

  10. An elegant technique for ex vivo imaging in experimental research—Optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    Tschernig, T.; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini;

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an elegant technology for imaging of tissues and organs and has been established for clinical use for around a decade. Thus, it is used in vivo but can also serve as a valuable ex vivo imaging tool in experimental research. Here, a brief overview is given with...... a focus on an ex vivo application of OCT. Image and video examples of freshly obtained murine lungs are included. The main advantage of OCT for ex vivo analysis is the non-contact, non-invasive, and non-destructive fast acquisition of a three-dimensional data set with micrometer-resolution....

  11. Occlusal overload investigations by noninvasive technology: fluorescence microscopy and en-face optical coherence tomography

    Marcauteanu, Corina; Negrutiu, Meda; Sinescu, Cosmin; Demjan, Enikö; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study is the early detection and monitoring of occlusal overload in bruxing patients. En-Face Optical coherence tomography (eF-OCT) and fluorescence microscopy (FM) were used for the imaging of several anterior teeth extracted from patients with light active bruxism. We found a characteristic pattern of enamel cracks, that reached the tooth surface. We concluded that the combination of the en-Face OCT and FM is a promising non-invasive alternative technique for reliable monitoring of occlusal overload.

  12. Fast retinal layer segmentation of spectral domain optical coherence tomography images

    Zhang, Tianqiao; Song, Zhangjun; Wang, Xiaogang; Zheng, Huimin; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-09-01

    An approach to segment macular layer thicknesses from spectral domain optical coherence tomography has been proposed. The main contribution is to decrease computational costs while maintaining high accuracy via exploring Kalman filtering, customized active contour, and curve smoothing. Validation on 21 normal volumes shows that 8 layer boundaries could be segmented within 5.8 s with an average layer boundary error macular degeneration cases to yield similar or significantly better accuracy and is 37 times faster. The proposed method could be a potential tool to clinically quantify the retinal layer boundaries.

  13. Ultra-Fast Displaying Spectral Domain Optical Doppler Tomography System Using a Graphics Processing Unit

    Jeong-Yeon Kim; Changho Lee; Hyosang Jeong; Unsang Jung; Nam Hyun Cho; Jeehyun Kim

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultrafast displaying Spectral Domain Optical Doppler Tomography system using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computing. The calculation of FFT and the Doppler frequency shift is accelerated by the GPU. Our system can display processed OCT and ODT images simultaneously in real time at 120 fps for 1,024 pixels × 512 lateral A-scans. The computing time for the Doppler information was dependent on the size of the moving average window, but with a window size of 32 pixels the ODT ...

  14. State-of-the-art in retinal optical coherence tomography image analysis

    Baghaie, Ahmadreza; Yu, Zeyun; D’Souza, Roshan M.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging modality that has been widely used in the field of biomedical imaging. In the recent past, it has found uses as a diagnostic tool in dermatology, cardiology, and ophthalmology. In this paper we focus on its applications in the field of ophthalmology and retinal imaging. OCT is able to non-invasively produce cross-sectional volumetric images of the tissues which can be used for analysis of tissue structure and properties. Due to the und...

  15. Three-Dimensional Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Data Analysis for Glaucoma Detection

    Xu, Juan; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Folio, Lindsey S.; Nadler, Zach; Kagemann, Larry; SCHUMAN, JOEL S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a new three-dimensional (3D) spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) data analysis method using a machine learning technique based on variable-size super pixel segmentation that efficiently utilizes full 3D dataset to improve the discrimination between early glaucomatous and healthy eyes. Methods 192 eyes of 96 subjects (44 healthy, 59 glaucoma suspect and 89 glaucomatous eyes) were scanned with SD-OCT. Each SD-OCT cube dataset was first converted into 2D feat...

  16. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography features of multiple subfoveal retinal pigment epithelial tears after intravitreal bevacizumab

    Chalam Kakarla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE tear has been described to occur spontaneously, after laser photocoagulation and in recent times, after intravitreal injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF agents. In the latter case, the rapid contraction of the choroidal vascular membrane underneath a serous RPE detachment is believed to be the underlying cause. Preservation of good visual acuity after the occurrence of RPE tear with continued use of intravitreal VEGF agents has been reported. In this case report, we describe the occurrence of multiple RPE tears with the use of intravitreal bevacizumab and also correlate the preservation of visual acuity with features seen on spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

  17. New Imaging Methods in Eye Tumors - Ultrasound Biomicroscopy, Optic Coherence Tomography, and Fundus Autofluorescence

    Ahmet Murat Sarıcı

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Several ancillary tests could be used in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of complications of eye tumors. Among those, ultrasound biomicroscopy has a particular role in the evaluation of anterior segment tumors. Optic coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence have values in determining the architecture of posterior segment tumors and the effects of tumors on the adjacent structures. However, it should be noted that those tests have a meaning when they are evaluated together with the clinical features of the lesions. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: Supplement 66-70

  18. Length-adaptive graph search for automatic segmentation of pathological features in optical coherence tomography images

    Keller, Brenton; Cunefare, David; Grewal, Dilraj S.; Mahmoud, Tamer H.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a metric in graph search and demonstrate its application for segmenting retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of macular pathology. Our proposed "adjusted mean arc length" (AMAL) metric is an adaptation of the lowest mean arc length search technique for automated OCT segmentation. We compare this method to Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, which we utilized previously in our popular graph theory and dynamic programming segmentation technique. As an illustrative example, we show that AMAL-based length-adaptive segmentation outperforms the shortest path in delineating the retina/vitreous boundary of patients with full-thickness macular holes when compared with expert manual grading.

  19. Precise measurement of instantaneous volume of eccrine sweat gland in mental sweating by optical coherence tomography

    Sugawa, Yoshihiko; Fukuda, Akihiro; Ohmi, Masato

    2015-03-01

    We have demonstrated dynamic analysis of the physiological function of eccrine sweat glands underneath skin surface by optical coherence tomography (OCT). We propose a method for extraction of the target eccrine sweat gland by use of the connected component extraction process and the adaptive threshold method, where the en-face OCT images are constructed by the SS-OCT. Furthermore, we demonstrate precise measurement of instantaneous volume of the sweat gland in response to the external stimulus. The dynamic change of instantaneous volume of eccrine sweat gland in mental sweating is performed by this method during the period of 300 sec with the frame intervals of 3.23 sec.

  20. Monitoring the gingival regeneration after aesthetic surgery with optical coherence tomography

    Fernandes, Luana O.; Graça, Natalia D. R. L.; Melo, Luciana S. A.; Silva, Claudio H. V.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to use the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique working in spectral domain (Swept Source OCT at 1325 nm, Thorlabs, New Jersey, USA) to monitor the tissue repair in patients undergoing periodontal plastic surgery. The evaluations were done over a period of 60 days. It was observed that 15 days after periodontal surgery the gum was still in different healing process as compared to the observation after 60 days. Thus it is clear that, despite some technical limitations, the OCT is an efficient method in the evaluation of regeneration gingival.

  1. In vivo deep tissue imaging using wavefront shaping optical coherence tomography.

    Yu, Hyeonseung; Lee, Peter; Lee, KyeoReh; Jang, Jaeduck; Lim, Jaeguyn; Jang, Wooyoung; Jeong, Yong; Park, YongKeun

    2016-10-01

    Multiple light scattering in tissue limits the penetration of optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Here, we present in vivo OCT imaging of a live mouse using wavefront shaping (WS) to enhance the penetration depth. A digital micromirror device was used in a spectral-domain OCT system for complex WS of an incident beam which resulted in the optimal delivery of light energy into deep tissue. Ex vivo imaging of chicken breasts and mouse ear tissues showed enhancements in the strength of the image signals and the penetration depth, and in vivo imaging of the tail of a live mouse provided a multilayered structure inside the tissue. PMID:26895566

  2. How histological features of basal cell carcinomas influence image quality in optical coherence tomography

    Mogensen, Mette; Nürnberg, Birgit M.; Thrane, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to diagnose and measure the depth of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in skin, but some lesions appear blurred in OCT images. The aim of this study is to identify histological characteristics of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) that correlate with good...... quality OCT images of the same lesions. A total of 34 patients with BCC were OCT scanned. The influence of histology parameters (e.g. inflammation, sun damage of skin, carcinoma cell size) on OCT image quality was studied by comparing 15 BCC lesions easily identified compared to 19 BCC lesions that...

  3. The early-stage diagnosis of albinic embryos by applying optical coherence tomography

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Yu-Yen; Cai, Jyun-Jhang; Chang, Chung-Hao

    2013-09-01

    Albinism is a kind of congenital disease of abnormal metabolism. Poecilia reticulata (guppy fish) is chosen as the model to study the development of albinic embryos as it is albinic, ovoviviparous and with short life period. This study proposed an imaging method for penetrative embryo investigation using optical coherence tomography. By imaging through guppy mother’s reproduction purse, we found the embryo’s eyes were the early-developed albinism features. As human’s ocular albinism typically appear at about four weeks old, it is the time to determine if an embryo will grow into an albino.

  4. In-vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2000-04-01

    Noninvasive quantitation of blood flow in the retinal micro circulation may elucidate the progression and treatment of ocular disorders including diabetic retinopathy, age-related degeneration, and glaucoma. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography was recently introduced as a technique allowing simultaneous micron-scale resolution cross-sectional imaging of tissue micro structure and blood flow in the human retina. Here, time-resolved imaging of dynamics of blood flow profiles was performed to measure cardiac pulsatility within retinal vessels. Retinal pulsatility has been shown to decrease throughout the progression of diabetic retinopathy.

  5. Dynamic light scattering by flowing Brownian particles measured with optical coherence tomography: impact of the optical system

    Popov, Ivan; Vitkin, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The study of flowing Brownian particles finds numerous biomedical applications, ranging from blood flow analysis to diffusion research. A mathematical model for the correlation function of laser radiation scattered by flowing Brownian particles measured with fiber-based optical coherence tomography (OCT), which accounts for the effects of sample arm optics, is presented. It is shown that the parameters of an OCT optical system of any complexity can be taken into account by using the ABCD ray tracing matrix approach. Specifically, the impact of any optical system can be characterized by the changes in the effective beam radius, which replaces the Gaussian beam radius in the existing mathematical models of scattered radiation. It is shown that the validity of the developed ABCD matrix formalism is governed by the condition that the source coherence length is much smaller than the Rayleigh range in the sample. The predictions of the developed model are compared with previously published theories and with experimental data and agree well with the latter.

  6. Tomography

    Tomography images of a body are constructed by placing a plurality of surface electrodes at spaced intervals on the body, causing currents to flow in the body (e.g. by applying a potential between each pair of electrodes in turn, or by induction), and measuring the potential between pairs of electrodes, calculating the potential expected in each case on the assumption that the body consists of a medium of uniform impedance, plotting the isopotentials corresponding to the calculated results to create a uniform image of the body, obtaining the ratio between the measured potential and the calculated potential in each case, and modifying the image in accordance with the respective ratios by increasing the assumed impedance along an isopotential in proportion to a ratio greater than unity or decreasing the assumed impedance in proportion to a ratio less than unity. The modified impedances along the isopotentials for each pair of electrodes are superimposed. The calculations are carried out using a computer and the plotting is carried out by a visual display unit and/or a print-out unit. (author)

  7. Perbandingan Gambaran Optic Nerve Head Dengan Optical Coherence Tomography Dan Foto Fundus Pada Penderita Suspek Glaukoma Di Rsup.H.Adam Malik Medan

    Hajar, Siti

    2016-01-01

    Pendahuluan dan Tujuan. Perubahan struktur yang tampak pada ONH (Optic Nerve Head) dan RNFL (Retinal Nerve fiber layer) telah dilaporkan mendahului perkembangan kehilangan lapang pandangan pada glaukoma. Deteksi kerusakan ONH dan RNFL selanjutnya menjadi sangat penting untuk diagnosa awal glaukoma pada pasien suspek. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk membandingkan penilaian parameter optic nerve head dengan fundus kamera dan optical coherence tomography (OCT) pada pasien suspek glaukoma. ...

  8. Novel electro-optical coupling technique for magnetic resonance-compatible positron emission tomography detectors.

    Olcott, Peter D; Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs. PMID:19397853

  9. Optical coherence tomography evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer in longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis

    Frederico C. Moura

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare optical coherence tomography (OCT measurements on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL of healthy controls and patients with longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM without previous optic neuritis. METHOD: Twenty-six eyes from 26 patients with LETM and 26 control eyes were subjected to automated perimetry and OCT for comparison of RNFL measurements. RESULTS: The mean deviation values from perimetry were significantly lower in patients with LETM than in controls (p<0.0001. RNFL measurements in the nasal quadrant and in the 3-o'clock segment were significantly smaller in LETM eyes than in controls. (p=0.04 and p=0.006, respectively. No significantly differences in other RNFL measurements were found. CONCLUSION: Patients with LETM may present localized RNFL loss, particularly on the nasal side of the optic disc, associated with slight visual field defects, even in the absence of previous episodes of optic neuritis. These findings emphasize the fact that patients with LETM may experience attacks of subclinical optic nerve damage.

  10. Doppler optical coherence microscopy and tomography applied to inner ear mechanics

    Page, Scott; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Freeman, Dennis M.

    2015-12-01

    While it is clear that cochlear traveling waves underlie the extraordinary sensitivity, frequency selectivity, and dynamic range of mammalian hearing, the underlying micromechanical mechanisms remain unresolved. Recent advances in low coherence measurement techniques show promise over traditional laser Doppler vibrometry and video microscopy, which are limited by low reflectivities of cochlear structures and restricted optical access. Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) and Doppler optical coherence microscopy (DOCM) both utilize a broadband source to limit constructive interference of scattered light to a small axial depth called a coherence gate. The coherence gate can be swept axially to image and measure sub-nanometer motions of cochlear structures throughout the cochlear partition. The coherence gate of DOCT is generally narrower than the confocal gate of the focusing optics, enabling increased axial resolution (typically 15 μm) within optical sections of the cochlear partition. DOCM, frequently implemented in the time domain, centers the coherence gate on the focal plane, achieving enhanced lateral and axial resolution when the confocal gate is narrower than the coherence gate. We compare these two complementary systems and demonstrate their utility in studying cellular and micromechanical mechanisms involved in mammalian hearing.

  11. Doppler optical coherence microscopy and tomography applied to inner ear mechanics

    While it is clear that cochlear traveling waves underlie the extraordinary sensitivity, frequency selectivity, and dynamic range of mammalian hearing, the underlying micromechanical mechanisms remain unresolved. Recent advances in low coherence measurement techniques show promise over traditional laser Doppler vibrometry and video microscopy, which are limited by low reflectivities of cochlear structures and restricted optical access. Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) and Doppler optical coherence microscopy (DOCM) both utilize a broadband source to limit constructive interference of scattered light to a small axial depth called a coherence gate. The coherence gate can be swept axially to image and measure sub-nanometer motions of cochlear structures throughout the cochlear partition. The coherence gate of DOCT is generally narrower than the confocal gate of the focusing optics, enabling increased axial resolution (typically 15 μm) within optical sections of the cochlear partition. DOCM, frequently implemented in the time domain, centers the coherence gate on the focal plane, achieving enhanced lateral and axial resolution when the confocal gate is narrower than the coherence gate. We compare these two complementary systems and demonstrate their utility in studying cellular and micromechanical mechanisms involved in mammalian hearing

  12. Doppler optical coherence microscopy and tomography applied to inner ear mechanics

    Page, Scott; Freeman, Dennis M. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Ghaffari, Roozbeh [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-12-31

    While it is clear that cochlear traveling waves underlie the extraordinary sensitivity, frequency selectivity, and dynamic range of mammalian hearing, the underlying micromechanical mechanisms remain unresolved. Recent advances in low coherence measurement techniques show promise over traditional laser Doppler vibrometry and video microscopy, which are limited by low reflectivities of cochlear structures and restricted optical access. Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) and Doppler optical coherence microscopy (DOCM) both utilize a broadband source to limit constructive interference of scattered light to a small axial depth called a coherence gate. The coherence gate can be swept axially to image and measure sub-nanometer motions of cochlear structures throughout the cochlear partition. The coherence gate of DOCT is generally narrower than the confocal gate of the focusing optics, enabling increased axial resolution (typically 15 μm) within optical sections of the cochlear partition. DOCM, frequently implemented in the time domain, centers the coherence gate on the focal plane, achieving enhanced lateral and axial resolution when the confocal gate is narrower than the coherence gate. We compare these two complementary systems and demonstrate their utility in studying cellular and micromechanical mechanisms involved in mammalian hearing.

  13. Validation of two-dimensional and three-dimensional measurements of subpleural alveolar size parameters by optical coherence tomography

    Unglert, Carolin I.; Warger, William C.; Hostens, Jeroen; Namati, Eman; Birngruber, Reginald; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been increasingly used for imaging pulmonary alveoli. Only a few studies, however, have quantified individual alveolar areas, and the validity of alveolar volumes represented within OCT images has not been shown. To validate quantitative measurements of alveoli from OCT images, we compared the cross-sectional area, perimeter, volume, and surface area of matched subpleural alveoli from microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and OCT images of fixed air-filled...

  14. A Near-Infrared Optical Tomography System Based on Photomultiplier Tube

    Jing Bai

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT is a rapidly growing discipline in recent years. It plays an important role in many fields, such as detecting breast cancer and monitoring the cerebra oxygenation. In this paper, a relatively simple, inexpensive, and conveniently used DOT system is presented in detail, in which only one photomultiplier tube is employed as the detector and an optical multiplexer is used to alter the detector channels. The 32-channel imager is consisted of 16-launch fibers and 16-detector fibers bundles, which works in the near-infrared (NIR spectral range under continuous-wave (CW model. The entire imaging system can work highly automatically and harmoniously. Experiments based on the proposed imaging system were performed, and the desired results can be obtained. The experimental results suggested that the proposed imaging instrumentation is effective.

  15. Functional imaging and assessment of the glucose diffusion rate in epithelial tissues in optical coherence tomography

    Functional imaging, monitoring and quantitative description of glucose diffusion in epithelial and underlying stromal tissues in vivo and controlling of the optical properties of tissues are extremely important for many biomedical applications including the development of noninvasive or minimally invasive glucose sensors as well as for therapy and diagnostics of various diseases, such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Recent progress in the development of a noninvasive molecular diffusion biosensor based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. The diffusion of glucose was studied in several epithelial tissues both in vitro and in vivo. Because OCT provides depth-resolved imaging of tissues with high in-depth resolution, the glucose diffusion is described not only as a function of time but also as a function of depth. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  16. Characterization of ink-jet printed RGB color filters with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Czajkowski, J.; Vilmi, P.; Lauri, J.; Sliz, R.; Fabritius, T.; Myllylä, R.

    2012-09-01

    We present the use of sub-micron resolution optical coherence tomography (SMR SD-OCT) in volumetric characterization of ink- jet printed color filters, aimed for electronic paper display (EPD). The device used in the study is based on supercontinuum light source, Michelson interferometer centered at 600 nm and employs 400-800 nm spectral region. Spectra are acquired at a continuous rate of 140,000 per second. Color filter array of 143 μm x 141 μm sized and 6 rtm deep ink pools was studied. The volumetric OCT reconstruction was done using the experimental SMR SD-OCT device and a commercial SD-OCT imaging system. The ink layer in the pools was estimated to be 2μm thin. The optical profilometer was used for reference measurements.

  17. Broadband Fourier domain mode-locked laser for optical coherence tomography at 1060 nm

    Marschall, Sebastian; Klein, Thomas; Wieser, Wolfgang;

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the 1060nm range is interesting for in vivo imaging of the human posterior eye segment (retina, choroid, sclera) due to low absorption in water and deep penetration into the tissue. Rapidly tunable light sources, such as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers......, enable acquisition of densely sampled three-dimensional datasets covering a wide field of view. However, semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs)-the typical laser gain media for swept sources-for the 1060nm band could until recently only provide relatively low output power and bandwidth. We have...... implemented an FDML laser using a new SOA featuring broad gain bandwidth and high output power. The output spectrum coincides with the wavelength range of minimal water absorption, making the light source ideal for OCT imaging of the posterior eye segment. With a moderate SOA current (270 mA) we achieve up...

  18. Wide-field optical coherence tomography angiography enabled by two repeated measurements of B-scans.

    Wang, Ruikang K; Zhang, Anqi; Choi, Woo June; Zhang, Qinqin; Chen, Chieh-Li; Miller, Andrew; Gregori, Giovanni; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2016-05-15

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) has increasingly become clinically important, particularly in ophthalmology. However, the field of view (FOV) for current OCTA imaging is severely limited due to A-scan rates that can be afforded by current clinical systems and, more importantly, the requirement of a repeated scanning protocol. This Letter evaluates the possibility of using only two repeated B-scans for OCTA for the purpose of an increased FOV. The effect of repeated numbers on the OCTA result is discussed through experiments on an animal model in vivo and evaluated using quantitative metrics for image quality. Demonstrated through in vivo imaging of a pathological human eye, we show that optical microangiography-based OCTA with two repeated B-scans can provide wide-field angiography up to 12×12  mm with clinically acceptable image quality. PMID:27176995

  19. Single mode fiber based polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography using a swept laser source

    We report the development of a near real time single mode fiber-optic based polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) setup utilizing a swept source. The setup has a polarization modulator (PM) and polarizer in a sample arm to serve as a polarization state generator and analyzer. Since only intensity information is used to retrieve the polarization parameters of the sample, the problem of phase jitters present in the swept source is avoided. Further, the use of polarization elements after the sample arm fiber makes the approach insensitive to the random birefringence of fibers. The swept source based PSOCT (SS-PSOCT) setup was calibrated by carrying out measurements on a quarter-wave plate whose fast axis orientation was rotated from 0° to 360° in steps of 10°. The setup has been used for imaging birefringence of mice tail tendon, thigh muscle ex vivo and human nail fold in vivo

  20. Classical realization of dispersion-canceled, artifact-free, and background-free optical coherence tomography

    Ogawa, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Quantum-optical coherence tomography (Q-OCT) provides a dispersion-canceled axial-imaging method, but its practical use is limited by the weakness of the light source and by artifacts in the images. A recent study using chirped-pulse interferometry (CPI) has demonstrated dispersion-canceled and artifact-free OCT with a classical system; however, unwanted background signals still remain after removing the artifacts. Here, we propose a classical optical method that realizes dispersion-canceled, artifact-free, and background-free OCT. We employ a time-reversed system for Q-OCT with transform-limited input laser pulses to achieve dispersion-canceled OCT with a classical system. We have also introduced a subtraction method to remove artifacts and background signals. With these methods, we experimentally demonstrated dispersion-canceled, artifact-free, and background-free axial imaging of a coverglass and cross-sectional imaging of the surface of a coin.