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Sample records for saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes

  1. Kluyveromyces lactis maintains Saccharomyces cerevisiae intron-encoded splicing signals.

    Deshler, J O; Larson, G P; Rossi, J J

    1989-01-01

    The actin (ACT) gene from the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis was cloned, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene had a single intron 778 nucleotides in length which possessed the highly conserved splicing signals found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae introns. We demonstrated splicing of heterologous ACT transcripts in both K. lactis and S. cerevisiae.

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Bojsen, Rasmus K; Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms can be defined as multi-cellular aggregates adhering to a surface and embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM). The nonpathogenic yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, follows the common traits of microbial biofilms with cell-cell and cell-surface adhesion. S. cerevisiae is shown to...... pathways including the protein kinase A and a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Advanced genetic tools and resources have been developed for S. cerevisiae including a deletion mutant-strain collection in a biofilm-forming strain background and GFP-fusion protein collections. Furthermore, S....... cerevisiae biofilm is well applied for confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorophore tagging of proteins, DNA and RNA. These techniques can be used to uncover the molecular mechanisms for biofilm development, drug resistance and for the study of molecular interactions, cell response to environmental...

  3. AGT1, Encoding an α-Glucoside Transporter Involved in Uptake and Intracellular Accumulation of Trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Plourde-Owobi, Lucile; Durner, Sophie; Parrou, Jean-Luc; Wieczorke, Roman; Goma, Gerard; François, Jean

    1999-01-01

    The trehalose content in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be significantly manipulated by including trehalose at an appropriate level in the growth medium. Its uptake is largely dependent on the expression of AGT1, which encodes an α-glucoside transporter. The trehalose found in a tps1 mutant of trehalose synthase may therefore largely reflect its uptake from the enriched medium that was employed.

  4. Genes regulation encoding ADP/ATP carrier in yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida parapsilosis

    Genes encoding a mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida parapsilosis were investigated. AAC2 is coding for the major AAC isoform in S. cerevisiae. We suggest that AAC2 is a member of a syn-expression group of genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation proteins. Within our previous studies on the regulation of the AAC2 transcription an UAS (-393/-268) was identified that is essential for the expression of this gene. Two functional regulatory cis-elements are located within this UAS -binding sites for an ABFl factor and for HAP2/3/4/5 heteromeric complex. We examined relative contributions and mutual interactions of the ABFl and HAP2/3/4/5 factors in the activation of transcription from the UAS of the AAC2 gene. The whole UAS was dissected into smaller sub-fragments and tested for (i) the ability to form DNA-protein complexes with cellular proteins in vitro, (ii) the ability to confer heterologous expression using AAC3 gene lacking its own promoter, and (iii) the expression of AAC3-lacZ fusion instead of intact AAC3 gene. The obtained results demonstrated that: a) The whole UAS as well as sub-fragment containing only ABF1-binding site are able to form DNA-protein complexes with cellular proteins in oxygen- and heme- dependent manner. The experiments with antibody against the ABF1 showed that the ABF1 factor is one of the proteins binding to AAC2 promoter. We have been unsuccessful to prove the binding of cellular proteins to the HAP2/3/4/5-binding site. However, the presence of HAP2/3/4/5-binding site is necessary to drive a binding of cellular proteins to the ABF1-binding site in carbon source-dependent manner. b) The presence of both ABF1- and HAP2/3/4/5-binding sites and original spacing between them is necessary to confer the growth of Aaac2 mutant strain on non- fermentable carbon source when put in front of AAC3 gene introduced on centromeric vector to Aaac2 mutant strain. c) For the activation of AAC3-lacZ expression on both fermentable and non-fermentable carbon sources the only presence of two copies of HAP2/3/4/5-binding site is sufficient. However, activation of AAC3-lacZ expression by two copies of HAP2/3/4/5-binding site is very low. We can conclude that the presence of both ABF1- and HAP2/3/4/5-binding sites and original spacing between them is necessary to get strong activation of AAC2 gene. A gene homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae AAC genes coding for mitochondrial ADP/ATP carriers has been cloned from pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis. The cloned gene was sequenced and found to encode a polypeptide of 303 amino acids that shows homology with other yeast and mammal mitochondrial ADP/ATP carriers. The gene was designed CpAAC1 and was able to complement the growth phenotype of S. cerevisiae double deletion mutant (Δaac2Δaac3). The expression of the CpAAC1 gene was affected at normal aerobic conditions by the nature of carbon source used for growth. The concentration of oxygen had no effect to the expression of this gene. Hybridization experiments indicate that C. parapsilosis possesses a single gene encoding a mitochondrial ADP/ ATP carrier. (author)

  5. RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein containing a tract of 13 consecutive aspartates

    The RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for postreplication repair of UV-damaged DNA, for induced mutagenesis, and for sporulation. The authors have mapped the transcripts and determined the nucleotide sequence of the cloned RAD6 gene. The RAD6 gene encodes two transcripts of 0.98 and 0.86 kilobases which differ only in their 3' termini. The transcribed region contains an open reading frame of 516 nucleotides. The rad6-1 and rad6-3 mutant alleles, which the authors have cloned and sequenced, introduce amber and ochre nonsense mutations, respectively into the open reading frame, proving that it encodes the RAD6 protein. The RAD6 protein predicted by the nucleotide sequence is 172 amino acids long, has a molecular weight of 19,704, and contains 23.3% acidic and 11.6% basic residues. Its most striking feature is the highly acidic carboxyl terminus: 20 of the 23 terminal amino acids are acidic, including 13 consecutive aspartates. RAD6 protein thus resembles high mobility group proteins HMG-1 and HMG-2, which each contain a carboxyl-proximal tract of acidic amino acids. 48 references, 6 figures

  6. CDC19 encoding pyruvate kinase is important for high-temperature tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Benjaphokee, Suthee; Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Auesukaree, Choowong; Asvarak, Thipa; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Boonchird, Chuenchit; Harashima, Satoshi

    2012-01-15

    Use of thermotolerant strains is a promising way to reduce the cost of maintaining optimum temperatures in the fermentation process. Here we investigated genetically a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain showing a high-temperature (41C) growth (Htg(+)) phenotype and the result suggested that the Htg(+) phenotype of this Htg(+) strain is dominant and under the control of most probably six genes, designated HTG1 to HTG6. As compared with a Htg(-) strain, the Htg(+) strain showed a higher survival rate after exposure to heat shock at 48C. Moreover, the Htg(+) strain exhibited a significantly high content of trehalose when cultured at high temperature and stronger resistance to Congo Red, an agent that interferes with cell wall construction. These results suggest that a strengthened cell wall in combination with increased trehalose accumulation can support growth at high temperature. The gene CDC19, encoding pyruvate kinase, was cloned as the HTG2 gene. The CDC19 allele from the Htg(+) strain possessed five base changes in its upstream region, and two base changes resulting in silent mutations in its coding region. Interestingly, the latter base changes are probably responsible for the increased pyruvate kinase activity of the Htg(+) strain. The possible mechanism leading to this increased activity and to the Htg(+) phenotype, which may lead to the activation of energy metabolism to maintain cellular homeostasis, is discussed. PMID:21459167

  7. Expression in Escherichia coli of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCT gene encoding cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase.

    Tsukagoshi, Y; Nikawa, J; Hosaka, K; Yamashita, S

    1991-01-01

    The coding region of the CCT gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cloned into the pUC18 expression vector. The plasmid directed the synthesis of an active cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase in Escherichia coli, confirming that CCT is the structural gene for this enzyme. The enzyme produced in E. coli efficiently utilized cholinephosphate and N,N-dimethylethanolaminephosphate, but N-methylethanolamine-phosphate and ethanolaminephosphate were poor substrates. Consistently, disrup...

  8. Cloning of a cDNA encoding ATP sulfurylase from Arabidopsis thaliana by functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Leustek, T; Murillo, M; Cervantes, M

    1994-01-01

    ATP sulfurylase, the first enzyme in the sulfate assimilation pathway of plants, catalyzes the formation of adenosine phosphosulfate from ATP and sulfate. Here we report the cloning of a cDNA encoding ATP sulfurylase (APS1) from Arabidopsis thaliana. APS1 was isolated by its ability to alleviate the methionine requirement of an ATP sulfurylase mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Expression of APS1 correlated with the presence of ATP sulfurylase enzyme activity in cell extracts. APS1 is a 1748-bp cDNA with an open reading frame predicted to encode a 463-amino acid, 51,372-D protein. The predicted amino acid sequence of APS1 is similar to ATP sulfurylase of S. cerevisiae, with which it is 25% identical. Two lines of evidence indicate that APS1 encodes a chloroplast form of ATP sulfurylase. Its predicted amino-terminal sequence resembles a chloroplast transit peptide; and the APS1 polypeptide, synthesized in vitro, is capable of entering isolated intact chloroplasts. Several genomic DNA fragments that hybridize with the APS1 probe were identified. The APS1 cDNA hybridizes to three species of mRNA in leaves (1.85, 1.60, and 1.20 kb) and to a single species of mRNA in roots (1.85 kb). PMID:8058839

  9. Enhancement of Acetic Acid Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the HAA1 Gene, Encoding a Transcriptional Activator

    TANAKA, koichi; Ishii, Yukari; Ogawa, Jun; Shima, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Haa1 is a transcriptional activator required for Saccharomyces cerevisiae adaptation to weak acids. Here we show that the constitutive HAA1-overexpressing strain acquired a higher level of acetic acid tolerance. Under conditions of acetic acid stress, the intracellular level of acetic acid was significantly lower in HAA1-overexpressing cells than in the wild-type cells.

  10. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and...

  11. Fungal genomics beyond Saccharomyces cerevisiae?

    Hofmann, Gerald; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Fungi are used extensively in both fundamental research and industrial applications. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the model organism for fungal research for many years, particularly in functional genomics. However, considering the diversity within the fungal kingdom, it is obvious that the...

  12. Aerobic and anaerobic NAD+ metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Panozzo, Cristina; Nawara, Magdalena; Suski, Catherine; Kucharczyka, Roza; Skoneczny, Marek; Bécam, Anne Marie; Rytka, Joanna; Herbert, Christopher J

    2002-04-24

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the nicotinic acid moiety of NAD+ can be synthesized from tryptophan using the kynurenine pathway or incorporated directly using nicotinate phosphoribosyl transferase (NPT1). We have identified the genes that encode the enzymes of the kynurenine pathway and for BNA5 (YLR231c) and BNA6 (YFR047c) confirmed that they encode kynureninase and quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase respectively. We show that deletion of genes encoding kynurenine pathway enzymes are co-lethal with the Deltanpt1, demonstrating that no other pathway for the synthesis of nicotinic acid exists in S. cerevisiae. Also, we show that under anaerobic conditions S. cerevisiae is a nicotinic acid auxotroph. PMID:12062417

  13. Genetic and physical maps of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Cherry, J. Michael; Ball, Catherine; Weng, Shuai; Juvik, Gail; Schmidt, Rita; Adler, Caroline; Dunn, Barbara; Dwight, Selina; Riles, Linda; Mortimer, Robert K.; Botstein, David

    1997-01-01

    Genetic and physical maps for the 16 chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are presented. The genetic map is the result of 40 years of genetic analysis. The physical map was produced from the results of an international systematic sequencing effort. The data for the maps are accessible electronically from the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD: http://genome-www.stanford.edu/Saccharomyces/).

  14. Glycolipids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell

    Renuka Malhotra

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Total lipids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated by chloroform and methanol (2:1. Glycolipids were separated from total lipids by silicic acid chromatography. Glycolipid’s constituent sugars and fatty acids were analyzed by using Gas Liquid Chromatography. Galactose was the prominent sugar followed by mannose. Relative concentrations of fucose, mannose, galactose and glucose in the glycolipid were 5.3, 35.2, 55.1 and 4.2%. 16:0, 18:0, 18:1, 18:2 and 18:3 were the major fatty acids of the total glycolipids. Oleic acid was the dominating fatty acid followed by linoliec acid. They were separated into different fractions by using DEAE-Sephadex ion exchange chromatography. Glycolipids were fractionated and identified as cerebrosides, ceramide polyhexosides, sulfatides, monoglucosyldiglycerides and diglucosyldiglycerides. Ceramide polyhexosides were present in higher concentration as compared to other fractions.

  15. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Weinert, Brian Tate; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek; Schölz, Christian; Wagner, Sebastian A; Magnes, Christoph; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chuna Ram

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation...

  16. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YLL012/YEH1, YLR020/YEH2, and TGL1 genes encode a novel family of membrane-anchored lipases that are required for steryl ester hydrolysis

    Köffel, René; Tiwari, Rashi; Falquet2, Laurent; Schneiter, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Sterol homeostasis in eukaryotic cells relies on the reciprocal interconversion of free sterols and steryl esters. The formation of steryl esters is well characterized, but the mechanisms that control steryl ester mobilization upon cellular demand are less well understood. We have identified a family of three lipases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are required for efficient steryl ester mobilization. These lipases, encoded by YLL012/YEH1, YLR020/YEH2, and TGL1, are paralogues of the mammali...

  17. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic...

  18. Heterooligomeric phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains five phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) synthase-homologous genes (PRS1-5), which specify PRPP synthase subunits 1-5. Expression of the five S. cerevisiae PRS genes individually in an Escherichia coli PRPP-less strain (Deltaprs) showed that a single PRS...

  19. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  20. Mutational analysis of capping protein function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Sizonenko, G I; Karpova, T S; Gattermeir, D J; Cooper, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate physiologic functions and structural correlates for actin capping protein (CP), we analyzed site-directed mutations in CAP1 and CAP2, which encode the alpha and beta subunits of CP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in four different regions caused a loss of CP function in vivo despite the presence of mutant protein in the cells. Mutations in three regions caused a complete loss of all aspects of function, including the actin distribution, viability with sac6, and localizat...

  1. MET17 and Hydrogen Sulfide Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Spiropoulos, Apostolos; Bisson, Linda F.

    2000-01-01

    Commercial isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differ in the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) during fermentation, which has been attributed to variation in the ability to incorporate reduced sulfur into organic compounds. We transformed two commercial strains (UCD522 and UCD713) with a plasmid overexpressing the MET17 gene, which encodes the bifunctional O-acetylserine/O-acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase (OAS/OAH SHLase), to test the hypothesis that the level of activity of this enzyme lim...

  2. Mating-Type Genes and MAT Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Haber, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MAT?. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MAT?1, and MAT?2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreograp...

  3. Cloning of the STA2 and SGA genes encoding glucoamylases in yeasts and regulation of their expression by the STA10 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Pardo, José M.; Polaina Molina, Julio; Jiménez Díaz, Antonio

    1986-01-01

    The Saccharomyces STA2 and SGA genes, encoding the extracellular and intracellular sporulation-specific glucoamylase respectively, have been cloned and their transcription and regulation studied. The STA2 gene differs from the SGA gene in that it contains an extra piece of DNA, which encodes the domain for exportation of the extracellular glucoaraylase. The STA2 gene produces a single 2.85 kb transcript. Transcription of the SGA gene is initiated from two different sites, yielding two transcr...

  4. Nitrogen Catabolite Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the expression of all known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators known as Gln3, Gat1, Da180, and Deh1. This is known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). They bind to motifs in the promoter region to the consensus sequence S' GATAA 3'. Gln3...

  5. Oscillations in glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Kloster, Antonina; Olsen, Lars Folke

    Wehave investigated the glycolytic oscillations, measured as NADH autofluorescence, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a batch reactor. Specifically, we have tested the effect of cell density and a number of inhibitors or activators of ATPase activity on the amplitude of the oscillations. The...

  6. Mechanisms of Ethanol Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a superb ethanol producer, yet is also sensitive to higher ethanol concentrations especially under high gravity or very high gravity fermentation conditions. Ethanol tolerance is associated with interplay of complex networks at the genome level. Although significant eff...

  7. Tangential Ultrafiltration of Aqueous "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae" Suspensions

    Silva, Carlos M.; Neves, Patricia S.; Da Silva, Francisco A.; Xavier, Ana M. R. B.; Eusebio, M. F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental work on ultrafiltration is presented to illustrate the practical and theoretical principles of this separation technique. The laboratory exercise comprises experiments with pure water and with aqueous "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" (from commercial Baker's yeast) suspensions. With this work students detect the characteristic phenomena…

  8. Excision repair and mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    This and succeeding letters discuss the James and Kilbey (1977 and 1978) model for the initiation of u.v. mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its application to include a number of chemical mutagens. The Baranowska et al (1987) results indicating the role of DNA replication, the differing mechanisms in Escherichia coli, are all discussed. (UK)

  9. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    2010-04-01

    ...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  10. Regulation of cytokinesis in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Cassani,

    2014-01-01

    La citochinesi è quel processo regolato nel tempo e nello spazio tramite cui, dopo la segregazione dei cromosomi, le cellule eucariotiche dividono il loro citoplasma e le membrane per formare due cellule figlie indipendenti l’una dall’altra. Nel lievito gemmante Saccharomyces cerevisiae la citochinesi è promossa da vie finemente regolate che coordinano la divisione cellulare con la divisione nucleare al fine di garantire la stabilità genetica di cellule in crescita. Queste vie promuovono la c...

  11. Characterisation of microencapsulation process in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Ciamponi, Federica

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1970s there has been industrial interest in using microorganisms as microcapsules. The encapsulation of actives (e.g. flavours, drugs, perfumes) is a necessary process for pharmaceutical and food companies because the precious and often expensive ingredients must be protected from degradation and also released in a specific site or under a specific stimulus. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bakers yeast, represents a first choice microorganism for the encapsulation of active ingredients....

  12. Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Wykoff, D D; O'Shea, E K

    2001-01-01

    Cellular metabolism depends on the appropriate concentration of intracellular inorganic phosphate; however, little is known about how phosphate concentrations are sensed. The similarity of Pho84p, a high-affinity phosphate transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to the glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p has led to the hypothesis that Pho84p is an inorganic phosphate sensor. Furthermore, pho84Delta strains have defects in phosphate signaling; they constitutively express PHO5, a phosphate starvat...

  13. YNL134C from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a novel protein with aldehyde reductase activity for detoxification of furfural derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Zhao, Xianxian; Tang, Juan; Wang, Xu; Yang, Ruoheng; Zhang, Xiaoping; Gu, Yunfu; Li, Xi; Ma, Menggen

    2015-05-01

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are the two main aldehyde compounds derived from pentoses and hexoses, respectively, during lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment. These two compounds inhibit microbial growth and interfere with subsequent alcohol fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the in situ ability to detoxify furfural and HMF to the less toxic 2-furanmethanol (FM) and furan-2,5-dimethanol (FDM), respectively. Herein, we report that an uncharacterized gene, YNL134C, was highly up-regulated under furfural or HMF stress and Yap1p and Msn2/4p transcription factors likely controlled its up-regulated expression. Enzyme activity assays showed that YNL134C is an NADH-dependent aldehyde reductase, which plays a role in detoxification of furfural to FM. However, no NADH- or NADPH-dependent enzyme activity was observed for detoxification of HMF to FDM. This enzyme did not catalyse the reverse reaction of FM to furfural or FDM to HMF. Further studies showed that YNL134C is a broad-substrate aldehyde reductase, which can reduce multiple aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. Although YNL134C is grouped into the quinone oxidoreductase family, no quinone reductase activity was observed using 1,2-naphthoquinone or 9,10-phenanthrenequinone as a substrate, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is genetically distant to quinone reductases. Proteins similar to YNL134C in sequence from S. cerevisiae and other microorganisms were phylogenetically analysed. PMID:25656244

  14. Properties of partially purified endopolyphosphatase of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Lichko, L P; Kulakovskaya, T V; Kulaev, I S

    2010-11-01

    Partially purified endopolyphosphatase from cytosol of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with inactivated genes PPX1 and PPN1 encoding exopolyphosphatases was obtained with ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. The enzyme activity was estimated by decrease of polyphosphate chain length determined by PAGE. The enzyme cleaved inorganic polyphosphate without the release of orthophosphate (P(i)) and was inhibited by heparin and insensitive to fluoride. Mg2+, Mn2+, and Co2+ (1.5 mM) stimulated the activity, and Ca2+ was ineffective. The molecular mass of the endopolyphosphatase determined by gel filtration was of ~20 kDa. PMID:21314609

  15. Purification and Characterization of Put1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Wanduragala, Srimevan; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Liang, Xinwen; Becker, Donald F.

    2010-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the PUT1 and PUT2 genes are required for the conversion of proline to glutamate. The PUT1 gene encodes Put1p, a proline dehydrogenase (PRODH)1 enzyme localized in the mitochondrion. Put1p was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and shown to have a UV-visible absorption spectrum that is typical of a bound flavin cofactor. A Km value of 36 mM proline and a kcat = 27 s−1 were determined for Put1p using an artificial electron acceptor. Put1p also exhibited hi...

  16. Reconstitution of an efficient thymidine salvage pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Vernis, L.; Piskur, Jure; Diffley, J.F.X.

    2003-01-01

    as an equilibrative nucleoside transporter. By also deleting the gene encoding thymidylate synthase (CDC21) we have constructed strains that are entirely dependent upon exogenous thymidine for viability and that can grow with normal kinetics at low thymidine concentrations. Using this novel approach......The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to incorporate exogenous nucleosides into DNA. We have made a number of improvements to existing strategies to reconstitute an efficient thymidine salvage pathway in yeast. We have constructed strains that express both a nucleoside kinase as well...

  17. Investigation of autonomous cell cycle oscillation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hansen, Morten Skov

    2007-01-01

    Autonome Oscillationer i kontinuert kultivering af Saccharomyces cerevisiae Udgangspunktet for dette Ph.d. projekt var at søge at forstå, hvad der gør det muligt at opnå multiple statiske tilstande ved kontinuert kultivering af Saccharomyces cerevisiae med glukose som begrænsende substrat...

  18. TAP tagging proteins in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Román, Lorena Casado 1991

    2012-01-01

    Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) is a technique based on attaching a tag to the N- or C- terminus of target proteins. The tagged proteins can then be used for studies of protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. In this study TAP tags of Med7, Tfb3, Spt3, Spt15 and Gal80 were attached to the C-termini in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by transformation with PCR-generated DNA fragments which integrate into the yeast genome by homologous recombination. The TAP tags will facilitate func...

  19. Biosorption of americium-241 by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The biosorption of radionuclide 241Am from solution by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), and the effects of experimental conditions on the adsorption were investigated. The preliminary results showed that S. cerevisiae is a very efficient biosorbent. An average of more than 99% of the total 241Am could be removed by S. cerevisiae of 2.1 g/l (dry weight) from 241Am solutions of 17.54-4386.0 μg/l (2.22 MBq/l-555 MBq/l) with adsorption capacities of 7.45-1880.0 μg/g biomass (dry weight) (0.94 MBq/g-237.9 MBq/g). The adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 1 hour and the optimum pH ranged 1-3. No significant differences on 241Am adsorption were observed at 10-45 deg C, or in solutions containing Au3+ or Ag+, even 2000 times above 241Am concentration. The relationship between concentrations and adsorption capacities of 241Am indicated the biosorption process should be described by the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. (author)

  20. Excision repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Two approaches, the first to detect endogenous single-strand (ss) breaks in cellular DNA and the second to detect dimers after low fluences, were used to investigate events during excision repair in wild-type and radiation-sensitive strains of S. cerevisiae. With a modification of the alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation procedure of McGrath and Williams (Nature 212:534-535, 1966), ss-breaks were found to appear in yeast nuclear DNA after the uv irradiation of cells. In the haploid, wild-type strain S288C the number of ss-breaks was found first to increase to a maximum value proportional to the incident fluence and then to decrease during post-irradiation incubation in potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) at 280C. Both the maximum number observed and the length of incubation required before the number of ss-breaks again reached a minimum increased with fluence, and were decreased by photoreactivating treatment in the wild-type strain. Single-strand breaks were also detected in haploid, radiation-sensitive strains carrying mutations at rad1, rad2, rad3, and rad4, but the number of breaks was not found to decrease again as in the wild-type strain. A sensitive and quantitative technique was also developed for the detection of dimers in yeast nuclear DNA. This assay employed a dimer-specific endonuclease found in extracts of Micrococcus luteus and the sensitivity of alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation to small numbers of ss-breaks

  1. Prezygotic reproductive isolation between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus

    Greig Duncan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matings between different Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeast species produce sexually sterile hybrids, so individuals should avoid mating with other species. Any mechanism that reduces the frequency of interspecific matings will confer a selective advantage. Here we test the ability of two closely-related Saccharomyces sensu stricto species to select their own species as mates and avoid hybridisation. Results We set up mate choice tests, using five independently isolated pairs of species, in which individual germinating spores were presented with the opportunity to mate either with a germinating spore of their own species or with a germinating spore of the other species. For all five strain pairs, whether a S. cerevisiae or S. paradoxus occupies the role of "chooser" strain, the level of hybridisation that is observed between the two species is significantly lower than would be expected if mates were selected at random. We also show that, overall, S. cerevisiae exhibited a stronger own-species preference than S. paradoxus. Conclusion Prezygotic reproductive isolation is well known in higher organisms but has been largely overlooked in yeast, an important model microbe. Here we present the first report of prezygotic reproductive isolation in Saccharomyces. Prezygotic reproductive isolation may be important in yeast speciation or yeast species cohesion, and may have evolved to prevent wasted matings between different species. Whilst yeast has long been used as a genetic model system, little is known about yeast in the wild. Our work sheds light on an interesting aspect of yeast natural behaviour: their ability to avoid costly interspecific matings.

  2. PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF THE P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    We have sequenced the structural gene and flanking regions for lanosterol 14 alpha-demethylase (14DM) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An open reading frame of 530 codons encodes a 60.7-kDa protein. When this gene is disrupted by integrative transformation, the resulting strain req...

  3. Molecular cloning and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of two Aspergillus nidulans xylanase genes.

    1996-01-01

    Two Aspergillus nidulans genes, xlnA and xlnB, encoding the X22 and X24 xylanases from this fungus, respectively, have been cloned and sequenced. Their cDNAs have been expressed in a laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain under the control of a constitutive yeast promoter, resulting in the construction of recombinant xylanolytic yeast strains.

  4. Mechanisms of gene conversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    In red-white sectored colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, derived from mitotic cells grown to stationary phase and irradiated with a light dose of x-rays, all of the segregational products of gene conversion and crossing over can be ascertained. Approximately 80% of convertants are induced in G1, the remaining 20% in G2. Crossing over, in the amount of 20%, is found among G1 convertants but most of the crossovers are delayed until G2. About 20% of all sectored colonies had more than one genotype in one or the other sector, thus confirming the hypothesis that conversion also occurs in G2. The principal primary event in G2 conversion is a single DNA heteroduplex. It is suggested that the close contact that this implies carries over to G2 when crossing over and a second round of conversion occurs

  5. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Weinert, Brian Tate; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek; Schlz, Christian; Wagner, Sebastian A; Magnes, Christoph; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chuna Ram

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation...... acetylation stoichiometry and found that the vast majority of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylation had a very low stoichiometry. However, mitochondrial acetylation occurred at a significantly higher basal level than cytoplasmic acetylation, consistent with the distinct acetylation dynamics and higher...... acetyl-CoA concentration in mitochondria. High stoichiometry acetylation occurred mostly on histones, proteins present in histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase complexes, and on transcription factors. These data show that a majority of acetylation occurs at very low levels in exponentially growing...

  6. Adaption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a heterologous protein

    Krogh, Astrid Mørkeberg; Beck, Vibe; Højlund Christensen, Lars; Henriksen, Claus Maxel; Møller, Kasper; Olsson, Lisbeth

    Production of the heterologous protein, bovine aprotinin, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was shown to affect the metabolism of the host cell to various extent depending on the strain genotype. Strains with different genotypes, industrial and laboroatory, respectively, were investigated. The maximal...

  7. Probing glycolytic and membrane potential oscillations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Poulsen, Allan K.; Andersen, Ann Zahle; Brasen, Jens Christian; Scharff-Poulsen, Anne Marie; Olsen, Lars Folke

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated glycolytic oscillations under semi-anaerobic conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by means of NADH fluorescence, measurements of intracellular glucose concentration, and mitochondrial membrane potential. The glucose concentration was measured using an optical nanosensor...

  8. Expression of the rgMT gene, encoding for a rice metallothionein-like protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Shumei Jin; Dan Sun; Ji Wang; Ying Li; Xinwang Wang; Shenkui Liu

    2014-12-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich proteins of low molecular weight with many attributed functions, such as providing protection against metal toxicity, being involved in regulation of metal ions uptake that can impact plant physiology and providing protection against oxidative stress. However, the precise function of the metallothionein-like proteins such as the one coded for rgMT gene isolated from rice (Oryza sativa L.) is not completely understood. The whole genome analysis of rice (O. sativa) showed that the rgMT gene is homologue to the Os11g47809 on chromosome 11 of O. sativa sp. japonica genome. This study used the rgMT coding sequence to create transgenic lines to investigate the subcellular localization of the protein, as well as the impact of gene expression in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Arabidopsis thaliana under heavy metal ion, salt and oxidative stresses. The results indicate that the rgMT gene was expressed in the cytoplasm of transgenic cells. Yeast cells transgenic for rgMT showed vigorous growth compared to the nontransgenic controls when exposed to 7mM CuCl2, 10 mM FeCl2, 1 M NaCl, 24 mM NaHCO3 and 3.2 mM H2O2, but there was no significant difference for other stresses tested. Similarly, Arabidopsis transgenic for rgMT displayed significantly improved seed germination rates over that of the control when the seeds were stressed with 100 M CuCl2 or 1 mM H2O2. Increased biomass was observed in the presence of 100 M CuCl2, 220 M FeCl2, 3 mM Na2CO3, 5 mM NaHCO3 or 1 mM H2O2. These results indicate that the expression of the rice rgMT gene in transgenic yeast and Arabidopsis is implicated in improving their tolerance for certain salt and peroxide stressors.

  9. Study on biosorption of uranium by alginate immobilized saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has great capability of biosorption of uranium. The maxium uptake is 172.4 mg/g according to this study. To adapt to the application of the biomass in the field, the biosorption of uranium by cross-linked and alginate calcium immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae is studied. Results indicate the maxium uptake is 185.2 mg/g by formaldehyde cross-linked biomass, and it is 769.2 mg/g by alginate calcium immobilized biomass. (authors)

  10. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cadmium stress

    The intensification of industrial activity has been greatly contributing with the increase of heavy metals in the environment. Among these heavy metals, cadmium becomes a serious pervasive environmental pollutant. The cadmium is a heavy metal with no biological function, very toxic and carcinogenic at low concentrations. The toxicity of cadmium and several other metals can be mainly attributed to the multiplicity of coordination complexes and clusters that they can form. Some aspects of the cellular response to cadmium were extensively investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary site of interaction between many toxic metals and microbial cells is the plasma membrane. Plasma-membrane permeabilisation has been reported in a variety of microorganisms following cadmium exposure, and is considered one mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the yeast. In this work, using the yeast strain S. cerevisiae W303-WT, we have investigated the relationships between Cd uptake and release of cellular metal ions (K+ and Na+) using neutron activation technique. The neutron activation was an easy, rapid and suitable technique for doing these metal determinations on yeast cells; was observed the change in morphology of the strains during the process of Cd accumulation, these alterations were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) during incorporation of cadmium. (author)

  11. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cadmium stress

    Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ribeiro, Frederico Haddad; Neves, Maria Jose [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: luamatu@uol.com.br; Porto, Barbara Abranches Araujo; Amaral, Angela M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Ativacao Neutronica], e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br; Rosa, Carlos Augusto [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: carlrosa@icb.ufmg

    2009-07-01

    The intensification of industrial activity has been greatly contributing with the increase of heavy metals in the environment. Among these heavy metals, cadmium becomes a serious pervasive environmental pollutant. The cadmium is a heavy metal with no biological function, very toxic and carcinogenic at low concentrations. The toxicity of cadmium and several other metals can be mainly attributed to the multiplicity of coordination complexes and clusters that they can form. Some aspects of the cellular response to cadmium were extensively investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary site of interaction between many toxic metals and microbial cells is the plasma membrane. Plasma-membrane permeabilisation has been reported in a variety of microorganisms following cadmium exposure, and is considered one mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the yeast. In this work, using the yeast strain S. cerevisiae W303-WT, we have investigated the relationships between Cd uptake and release of cellular metal ions (K{sup +} and Na{sup +}) using neutron activation technique. The neutron activation was an easy, rapid and suitable technique for doing these metal determinations on yeast cells; was observed the change in morphology of the strains during the process of Cd accumulation, these alterations were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) during incorporation of cadmium. (author)

  12. Membrane Trafficking in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model

    Serge Feyder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM, or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC, and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway. Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway. Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  13. Applied systems biology - vanillin production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Strucko, Tomas; Eriksen, Carsten; Nielsen, J.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    biosynthesis of vanillin in baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was recently demonstrated by successfully introducing the metabolic pathway for vanillin production in yeast. Nevertheless, the amount of vanillin produced in this S. cerevisiae strain is insufficient for commercial production and improvements...

  14. The Acyl-CoA synthetases encoded within FAA1 and FAA4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae function as components of the fatty acid transport system linking import, activation, and intracellular Utilization

    Frgeman, Nils J.; Black, P N; Zhao, X D; Knudsen, J; DiRusso, C C

    2001-01-01

    Exogenous long-chain fatty acids are activated to coenzyme A derivatives prior to metabolic utilization. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activation of these compounds prior to metabolic utilization proceeds through the fatty acyl-CoA synthetases Faa1p and Faa4p. Faa1p or Faa4p are esse...

  15. Expression of the E.coli pntA and pntB genes encoding nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its effect on product formation during anaerobic glucose fermentation

    Anderlund, M.; Nissen, Torben Lauesgaard; Nielsen, Jens Bredal; Villadsen, John; Rydström, J.; Hahn-Hägerdal, B.; Kielland-Brandt, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the physiological effect of the interconversion between the NAD(H) and NADP(H) coenzyme systems in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the membrane-bound transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli. Our objective was to determine if the membrane-bound transhydrogenase could work...

  16. Genome-scale reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network

    Förster, Jochen; Famili, I.; Fu, P.; Palsson, B.O.; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    The metabolic network in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was reconstructed using currently available genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. The metabolic reactions were compartmentalized between the cytosol and the mitochondria, and transport steps between the compartments and the...... containing 1175 metabolic reactions and 584 metabolites. The number of gene functions included in the reconstructed network corresponds to similar to16% of all characterized ORFs in S. cerevisiae. Using the reconstructed network, the metabolic capabilities of S. cerevisiae were calculated and compared with...

  17. Import of alcohol oxidase into peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Distel, B.; Veenhuis, M; Tabak, H F

    1987-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to grow on methanol because it lacks the enzymes required for its metabolism. To study the possibility of whether or not the methanol oxidation pathway of Hansenula polymorpha can be transferred to S. cerevisiae, the gene coding for alcohol oxidase, a peroxisomal homo-octameric flavoprotein, was introduced into S. cerevisiae. Transformed cells contain varying amounts of alcohol oxidase depending on the plasmid used. Immunocytochemical experiments indicate th...

  18. Nucleotide sequence of the GDS1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Konopinska, A; Szczesniak, B; Boguta, M

    1995-12-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the GDS1 gene located on the right arm of chromosome XV of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The gene codes for a 522 amino acid serine-rich protein with no obvious homology to proteins in the database. GDS1 gene was isolated as the multicopy suppressor of the glycerol-deficient phenotype caused by the nam9-1 mutation in the yeast nuclear gene encoding the mitochondrial ribosomal protein homologous to S4 proteins from various organisms. Disruption-deletion of the GDS1 open reading frame leads to a partial impairment of growth on medium containing glycerol as the carbon source, indicating mitochondrial function of the gene product. PMID:8750239

  19. Biochemical and enzymological characterization of an isomaltase family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Deng, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Most enzymatic systems for sugar uptake and assimilation rely on multigene families in theyeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The IMA / MAL family has been used as a model system to study themolecular mechanisms that govern evolution of duplicated genes. The five IMA multigene familymembers encode four isomaltases sharing high sequence identity from 65% to 99%, of which IMA3and IMA4 are 100% identical to encode the same isomaltase. In this work, the functional diversity ofIMA family was further e...

  20. Snf1-Dependent and Snf1-Independent Pathways of Constitutive ADH2 Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Voronkova, Valentina; Kacherovsky, Nataly; Tachibana, Christine; Yu, Diana; Young, Elton T.

    2006-01-01

    The transcription factor Adr1 directly activates the expression of genes encoding enzymes in numerous pathways that are upregulated after the exhaustion of glucose in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ADH2, encoding the alcohol dehydrogenase isozyme required for ethanol oxidation, is a highly glucose-repressed, Adr1-dependent gene. Using a genetic screen we isolated >100 mutants in 12 complementation groups that exhibit ADR1-dependent constitutive ADH2 expression on glucose. Temperature-sen...

  1. Specific distribution of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae linker histone homolog HHO1p in the chromatin

    Freidkin, Ilya; Katcoff, Don J.

    2001-01-01

    In virtually all eukaryotic organisms, linker DNA between nucleosomes is associated with a histone termed linker histone or histone H1. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, HHO1 encodes a putative linker histone with very significant homology to histone H1. The encoded protein is expressed in the nucleus, but has not been shown to affect global chromatin structure, nor has its deletion shown any detectable phenotype. In vitro chromatin assembly experiments with recombinant HHO1p have shown that it is...

  2. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YLL012/YEH1, YLR020/YEH2, and TGL1 genes encode a novel family of membrane-anchored lipases that are required for steryl ester hydrolysis.

    Köffel, René; Tiwari, Rashi; Falquet, Laurent; Schneiter, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Sterol homeostasis in eukaryotic cells relies on the reciprocal interconversion of free sterols and steryl esters. The formation of steryl esters is well characterized, but the mechanisms that control steryl ester mobilization upon cellular demand are less well understood. We have identified a family of three lipases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are required for efficient steryl ester mobilization. These lipases, encoded by YLL012/YEH1, YLR020/YEH2, and TGL1, are paralogues of the mammalian acid lipase family, which is composed of the lysosomal acid lipase, the gastric lipase, and four novel as yet uncharacterized human open reading frames. Lipase triple-mutant yeast cells are completely blocked in steryl ester hydrolysis but do not affect the mobilization of triacylglycerols, indicating that the three lipases are required for steryl ester mobilization in vivo. Lipase single mutants mobilize steryl esters to various degrees, indicating partial functional redundancy of the three gene products. Lipase double-mutant cells in which the third lipase is expressed from the inducible GAL1 promoter have greatly reduced steady-state levels of steryl esters, indicating that overexpression of any of the three lipases is sufficient for steryl ester mobilization in vivo. The three yeast enzymes constitute a novel class of membrane-anchored lipases that differ in topology and subcellular localization. PMID:15713625

  3. Local Regulatory Variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring sequence variation that affects gene expression is an important source of phenotypic differences among individuals within a species. We and others have previously shown that such regulatory variation can occur both at the same locus as the gene whose expression it affects (local regulatory variation and elsewhere in the genome at trans-acting factors. Here we present a detailed analysis of genome-wide local regulatory variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We used genetic linkage analysis to show that nearly a quarter of all yeast genes contain local regulatory variation between two divergent strains. We measured allele-specific expression in a diploid hybrid of the two strains for 77 genes showing strong self-linkage and found that in 52%-78% of these genes, local regulatory variation acts directly in cis. We also experimentally confirmed one example in which local regulatory variation in the gene AMN1 acts in trans through a feedback loop. Genome-wide sequence analysis revealed that genes subject to local regulatory variation show increased polymorphism in the promoter regions, and that some but not all of this increase is due to polymorphisms in predicted transcription factor binding sites. Increased polymorphism was also found in the 3' untranslated regions of these genes. These findings point to the importance of cis-acting variation, but also suggest that there is a diverse set of mechanisms through which local variation can affect gene expression levels.

  4. Redox balancing in recombinant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Anderlund, M.

    1998-09-01

    In metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Pichia stipitis XYL1 and XYL2 genes, encoding xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively, xylitol is excreted as the major product during anaerobic xylose fermentation and only low yields of ethanol are produced. This has been interpreted as a result of the dual cofactor dependence of XR and the exclusive use of NAD{sup +} by XDH. The excretion of xylitol was completely stopped and the formation of glycerol and acetic acid were reduced in xylose utilising S. cerevisiae strains cultivated in oxygen-limited conditions by expressing lower levels of XR than of XDH. The expression level of XYL1 and XYL2 were controlled by changing the promoters and transcription directions of the genes. A new functional metabolic pathway was established when Thermus thermophilus xylA gene was expressed in S. cerevisiae. The recombinant strain was able to ferment xylose to ethanol when cultivated on a minimal medium containing xylose as only carbon source. In order to create a channeled metabolic transfer in the two first steps of the xylose metabolism, XYL1 and XYL2 were fused in-frame and expressed in S. cerevisiae. When the fusion protein, containing a linker of three amino acids, was co expressed together with native XR and XDH monomers, enzyme complexes consisting of chimeric and native subunits were formed. The total activity of these complexes exhibited 10 and 9 times higher XR and XDH activity, respectively, than the original conjugates, consisting of only chimeric subunits. This strain produced less xylitol and the xylitol yield was lower than with strains only expressing native XR and XDH monomers. In addition, more ethanol and less acetic acid were formed. A new gene encoding the cytoplasmic transhydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii was cloned. The enzyme showed high similarity to the family of pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductase. To analyse the physiological effect of transhydrogenation between the two coenzyme systems NADP(H) and NAD(H) during anaerobic growth, S. cerevisiae was transformed with a plasma membrane bound AB-transhydrogenase from E. coli and with a cytoplasmic BB-transhydrogenase from A. vinelandii. Expression of both types changed the intracellular nucleotide levels. The NADPH/NADP{sup +} ratio was reduced while the NADH/NAD{sup +} ratio was almost constant. An increased formation of 2-oxoglutarate, glycerol and acetate was observed during anaerobic glucose fermentation 206 refs, 8 figs, 3 tabs

  5. EasyCloneMulti: A Set of Vectors for Simultaneous and Multiple Genomic Integrations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Maury, Jerome; Germann, Susanne Manuela; Jacobsen, Simo Abdessamad; Jensen, Niels B.; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Herrgard, Markus; Schneider, Konstantin; Koza, Anna; Förster, Jochen; Nielsen, Jens; Borodina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used in the biotechnology industry for production of ethanol, recombinant proteins, food ingredients and other chemicals. In order to generate highly producing and stable strains, genome integration of genes encoding metabolic pathway enzymes is the preferred...

  6. An apoptotic cell cycle mutant in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Villadsen, Ingrid

    1996-01-01

    The simple eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be a useful organism for elucidating the mechanisms that govern cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. The excellent in vivo system permits a cell cycle study using temperature sensitive mutants. In addition, it is possible to study...... many genes and gene products from higher eukaryotes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because many genes and biological processes are homologous or similar in lower and in higher eukaryotes. The highly developed methods of genetics and molecular biology greatly facilitates studies of higher eukaryotic...... processes.Programmmed cell death with apoptosis plays a major role in development and homeostatis in most, if not all, animal cells. Apoptosis is a morphologically distinct form of death, that requires the activation of a highly regulated suicide program. Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a new system in...

  7. Evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient aerobic xylose consumption

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Otero, José Manuel; Van Vleet, Jennifer R. H.; Jeffries, Thomas W.; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology aims to develop robust microbial cell factories, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to produce an array of added value chemicals presently dominated by petrochemical processes. Xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose and the most prevalent pentose...... flux to biomass production. Such a platform may then be enhanced with complementary metabolic engineering strategies that couple biomass production with high value-added chemical. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulose kinase, from the native xylose...... sugar found in lignocelluloses. Significant research efforts have focused on the metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for fast and efficient xylose utilization. This study aims to metabolically engineer S. cerevisiae, such that it can consume xylose as the exclusive substrate while maximizing carbon...

  8. Switching the mode of sucrose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Miletti Luiz C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomass-directed processes. It results from elevated sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high (e.g. 20 g/L initial sugar concentrations. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase activity was engineered to transport sucrose into the cells through a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity, and the growth kinetics and biomass yields on sucrose analyzed using simple batch cultures. Results We have deleted from the genome of a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase the high-affinity sucrose-H+ symporter encoded by the AGT1 gene. This strain could still grow efficiently on sucrose due to a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity mediated by the MALx1 maltose permeases, and its further intracellular hydrolysis by cytoplasmic maltases. Although sucrose consumption by this engineered yeast strain was slower than with the parental yeast strain, the cells grew efficiently on sucrose due to an increased respiration of the carbon source. Consequently, this engineered yeast strain produced less ethanol and 1.5 to 2 times more biomass when cultivated in simple batch mode using 20 g/L sucrose as the carbon source. Conclusion Higher cell densities during batch cultures on 20 g/L sucrose were achieved by using a S. cerevisiae strain engineered in the sucrose uptake system. Such result was accomplished by effectively reducing sucrose uptake by the yeast cells, avoiding overflow metabolism, with the concomitant reduction in ethanol production. The use of this modified yeast strain in simpler batch culture mode can be a viable option to more complicated traditional sucrose-limited fed-batch cultures for biomass-directed processes of S. cerevisiae.

  9. Structure of Ynk1 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The crystal structure of Ynk1, an NDPK from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been solved at 3.1 Å resolution. Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate from nucleoside triphosphates to nucleoside diphosphates. In addition to biochemical studies, a number of crystal structures of NDPK from various organisms, including both native proteins and complexes with nucleotides or nucleotide analogues, have been determined. Here, the crystal structure of Ynk1, an NDPK from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been solved at 3.1 Å resolution. Structural analysis strongly supports the oligomerization state of this protein being hexameric rather than tetrameric

  10. Accumulation of gold using Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Authors have reported preconcentration of 152Eu, a long-lived fission product, by yeast cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gold being a precious metal is used in electroplating, hydrogenation catalyst, etc. Heterogeneous composition of samples and low concentration offers renewed interest in its selective extraction of gold using various extractants. Gold can be recovered from different solutions using various chemical reagents like amines, organophosphorus compounds, and extractants containing sulphur as donor atom, etc. In the present work, two different strains of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been used to study the preconcentration of gold at various experimental conditions

  11. Glucose- and nitrogen sensing and regulatory mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Rødkaer, Steven V; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2014-01-01

    steps and by numerous different regulators. As numerous of these regulating proteins, biochemical mechanisms, and cellular pathways are evolutionary conserved, complex biochemical information relevant to humans can be obtained by studying simple organisms. Thus, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has...... been recognized as a powerful model system to study fundamental biochemical processes. In the present review, we highlight central signaling pathways and molecular circuits conferring nitrogen- and glucose sensing in S. cerevisiae....

  12. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae bio-databank for winemaking strain selection

    Neves, J. Drumonde; Vieira, E.; Gambon, Brigitte; Valero, Eva; Gomes, Ana Catarina; Sousa, Susana; Lima, Maria Teresa; Araújo, Isabel M.; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Dequin, Sylvie; Casal, Margarida; Schuller, Dorit

    2010-01-01

    The winemaking industry faces currently an increased demand for novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that are well adapted to different wine styles and that contribute to improved aromatic characteristics. In this reasoning, the Centro de Biologia Molecular e Ambiental (CBMA) at the University of Minho gathered one of the largest bio-databanks of S. cerevisiae, obtained from winemaking environments in Portugal and France. During the harvest time of 2001 to 2009, 604 grape samples were co...

  13. Recovery of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from ethanol-induced growth inhibition.

    Walker-Caprioglio, H M; Rodriguez, R J; Parks, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Ethanol caused altered mobility of the lipophilic probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene in plasma membrane preparations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because lipids had been shown to protect yeast cells against ethanol toxicity, sterols, fatty acids, proteins, and combinations of these were tested; however, protection from growth inhibition was not seen. Ethanol-induced, prolonged lag periods and diminished growth rates in S. cerevisiae were reduced by an autoconditioning of the medium by the in...

  14. Invasive Saccharomyces cerevisiae infection: a friend turning foe?

    Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Devasahayam, Joe; Kurup, Aparna Narayana; Lacasse, Alexandre

    2014-11-01

    We report a very rare case of acute pyelonephritis in a 51-year-old female with a history of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes caused by a normally benign and a well-known human commensal organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is very often prescribed as a probiotic in modern medical practice. The causal role of S. cerevisiae was confirmed by its isolation in blood, urine, stool as well as vaginal swabs thus proving its virulent nature in suitable situations. PMID:25394448

  15. In vitro screening of probiotic properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii and food-borne Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    van der Aa Kuhle, Alis; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Jespersen, Lene

    2005-01-01

    The probiotic potential of IS Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used for production of foods or bevel-ages or isolated from such, and eight strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii, was investigated. All strains included were able to withstand pH 2.5 and 0.3% Ox-all. Adhesion to the...... nontumorigenic porcine jejunal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2) was investigated by incorporation of H-3-methionine into the yeast cells and use of liquid scintillation counting. Only few of the food-borne S. cerevisiae strains exhibited noteworthy adhesiveness with the strongest levels of adhesion (13.......6-16.8%) recorded for two isolates from blue veined cheeses. Merely 25% of the S. cerevisiae var. boulardii strains displayed good adhesive properties (16.2-28.0%). The expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1α decreased strikingly in IPEC-J2 cells exposed to a Shiga-like toxin 2e producing Escherichia coli...

  16. Two Dot1 isoforms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a result of leaky scanning by the ribosome

    Frederiks, Floor; Heynen, Guus J. J. E.; van Deventer, Sjoerd J.; Janssen, Hans; van Leeuwen, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Dot1 is a conserved histone methyltransferase that methylates histone H3 on lysine 79. We previously observed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a single DOT1 gene encodes two Dot1 protein species. Here, we show that the relative abundance of the two isoforms changed under nutrient-limiting conditions. A mutagenesis approach showed that the two Dot1 isoforms are produced from two alternative translation start sites as a result of leaky scanning by the ribosome. The leaky scanning was not affec...

  17. Interactions between yeast photolyase and nucleotide excision repair proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli.

    Sancar, G B; Smith, F W

    1989-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a DNA photolyase that catalyzes the light-dependent repair of pyrimidine dimers. In the absence of photoreactivating light, this enzyme binds to pyrimidine dimers but is unable to repair them. We have assessed the effect of bound photolyase on the dark survival of yeast cells carrying mutations in genes that eliminate either nucleotide excision repair (RAD2) or mutagenic repair (RAD18). We found that a functional PHR1 gene enhanced dark surviv...

  18. Engineering and Analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain That Uses Formaldehyde as an Auxiliary Substrate?

    Baerends, Richard J.S.; de Hulster, Erik; Geertman, Jan-Maarten A.; Daran, Jean-Marc; van Maris, Antonius J.A.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J; Pronk, Jack T

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrated that formaldehyde can be efficiently coutilized by an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that expresses Hansenula polymorpha genes encoding formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FLD1) and formate dehydrogenase (FMD), in contrast to wild-type strains. Initial chemostat experiments showed that the engineered strain coutilized formaldehyde with glucose, but these mixed-substrate cultures failed to reach steady-state conditions and did not exhibit an increased biomass yield on gluco...

  19. Regulation of cation transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the salt tolerance gene HAL3.

    Ferrando, A; Kron, S J; Rios, G; Fink, G. R.; Serrano, R

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of ion transport is essential for homeostasis as cells confront changes in their environment. The gene HAL3 encodes a novel component of this regulatory circuit in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Overexpression of HAL3 improves growth of wild-type cells exposed to toxic concentrations of sodium and lithium and suppresses the salt sensitivity conferred by mutation of the calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin. Null mutants of HAL3 display salt sensitivity. The...

  20. Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Astaxanthin Production and Oxidative Stress Tolerance▿

    Ukibe, Ken; Hashida, Keisuke; Yoshida, Nobuyuki; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The red carotenoid astaxanthin possesses higher antioxidant activity than other carotenoids and has great commercial potential for use in the aquaculture, pharmaceutical, and food industries. In this study, we produced astaxanthin in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by introducing the genes involved in astaxanthin biosynthesis of carotenogenic microorganisms. In particular, expression of genes of the red yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous encoding phytoene desaturase (crtI product)...

  1. New Plasmid System To Select for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Purine-Cytosine Permease Affinity Mutants

    Wagner, Renaud; Straub, Marie-Laure; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Potier, Serge; De Montigny, Jacky

    2001-01-01

    The FCY2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a purine-cytosine permease (PCP) that mediates the active transport of purines and cytosine. A structure-function model for this PCP has been recently proposed. In this study, we developed a plasmid-based system that generated a number of affinity-mutated alleles, enabling us to define new amino acids critical for permease function.

  2. Translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: initiation factor 4A-dependent cell-free system.

    Blum, S; Mueller, M.; Schmid, S R; Linder, P; Trachsel, H

    1989-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes TIF1 and TIF2 (translation initiation factor) encode a protein tentatively called translation initiation factor (Tif) due to the similarity of its amino acid sequence and its molecular weight to mammalian eukaryotic initiation factor 4A. To clarify whether Tif is involved in translation, we produced an affinity-purified anti-Tif antibody by using Tif isolated from a Tif-overproducing yeast strain as immunogen and an Escherichia coli strain expressing Tif f...

  3. Adjustment of Trehalose Metabolism in Wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains To Modify Ethanol Yields

    Rossouw, D.; Heyns, E. H.; Setati, M. E.; Bosch, S.; Bauer, F. F.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently produce high levels of ethanol through glycolysis has been the focus of much scientific and industrial activity. Despite the accumulated knowledge regarding glycolysis, the modification of flux through this pathway to modify ethanol yields has proved difficult. Here, we report on the systematic screening of 66 strains with deletion mutations of genes encoding enzymes involved in central carbohydrate metabolism for altered ethanol yields. ...

  4. Synthesis of Novel Lipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Heterologous Expression of an Unspecific Bacterial Acyltransferase

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Luftmann, Heinrich; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The bifunctional wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) is the key enzyme in storage lipid accumulation in the gram-negative bacterium Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ADP1, mediating wax ester, and to a lesser extent, triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae accumulates TAGs and steryl esters as storage lipids. Four genes encoding a DGAT (Dga1p), a phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (Lro1p) and two acyl-coenzyme A:sterol acyltransf...

  5. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Brian H. Carrick; Linxuan Hao; Smaldino, Philip J.; Engelke, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this,...

  6. Inositol and Phosphate Regulate GIT1 Transcription and Glycerophosphoinositol Incorporation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Almaguer, C.; Mantella, D.; Perez, E.; Patton-Vogt, J.

    2003-01-01

    Glycerophosphoinositol is produced through deacylation of the essential phospholipid phosphatidylinositol. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the glycerophosphoinositol produced is excreted from the cell but is recycled for phosphatidylinositol synthesis when inositol is limiting. To be recycled, glycerophosphoinositol enters the cell through the permease encoded by GIT1. The transport of exogenous glycerophosphoinositol through Git1p is sufficiently robust to support the growth of an inositol auxo...

  7. Spermidine or spermine is essential for the aerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Balasundaram, D; Tabor, C W; Tabor, H

    1991-01-01

    A null mutation in the SPE2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, results in cells with no detectable S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, spermidine, and spermine. This mutant has an absolute requirement for spermidine or spermine for growth; this requirement is not satisfied by putrescine. Polyamine-depleted cells show a number of microscopic abnormalities that are similar to those reported for several cell division cycle (cdc) and actin mutants. Thes...

  8. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA 5'-triphosphatase related to mRNA capping enzyme.

    Rodriguez, C R; Takagi, T; Cho, E. J.; Buratowski, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mRNA capping enzyme consists of two subunits: the RNA 5'-triphosphatase (Cet1) and the mRNA guanylyltransferase (Ceg1). Using computer homology searching, a S. cerevisiae gene was identified that encodes a protein resembling the C-terminal region of Cet1. Accordingly, we designated this gene CTL1 (capping enzyme RNAtriphosphatase-like 1). CTL1 is not essential for cell viability and no genetic or physical interactions with the capping enzyme genes were observed. T...

  9. Glucose Metabolism in gcr Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Uemura, H.; Fraenkel, D G

    1999-01-01

    A gcr2 null mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows well on glucose in spite of its lower level of glycolytic enzymes between triose phosphates and pyruvate. A quantitative analysis shows that these levels are adequate to the flux but glycerate phosphates are elevated.

  10. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for optimizing 3HP production

    Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Maury, Jerome; Oberg, Fredrik; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Forster, Jochen; Nielsen, Jens; Borodina, Irina

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One main reason for selecting Baker's yeast as host organism is that yeast has a high tolerance towards low pH in comparison to bacteria, e.g. E. coli. Hence, it lowers the consumption of base for neutralization of growth media when compared to bacteria. The preferred engineered...

  11. Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thanulov

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electron-transfer dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) iso-l-cytochrome c adsorbed on Au(lll) electrodes in aqueous phosphate buffer media. This cytochrome possesses a thiol group dos e to the protein surface (Cysl02) suitable for linking the protein to...

  12. Reconstitution of an efficient thymidine salvage pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Vernis, L.; Piskur, Jure; Diffley, J.F.X.

    2003-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to incorporate exogenous nucleosides into DNA. We have made a number of improvements to existing strategies to reconstitute an efficient thymidine salvage pathway in yeast. We have constructed strains that express both a nucleoside kinase as well...

  13. Metabolic impact of redox cofactor perturbations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hou, Jin; Lages, Nuno; Oldiges, M.; Vemuri, Goutham

    induce widespread changes in metabolism. We present a detailed analysis of the impact of perturbations in redox cofactors in the cytosol or mitochondria on glucose and energy metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to aid metabolic engineering decisions that involve cofactor engineering. We enhanced NADH...

  14. The Snf1 Protein Kinase in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Usaite, Renata

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Snf1 protein kinase is primarily known as a key component of the glucose repression regulatory cascade. The Snf1 kinase is highly conserved among eukaryotes and its mammalian homolog AMPK is responsible for energy homeostasis in cells, organs and whole bodies...

  15. Genetic Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm in Liquid Medium

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Gro Rejkjær Sørensen, Laura; Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Lisby, Michael; Folkesson, Sven Anders; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    than free-living cells. We investigated the genetic basis for yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, biofilm on solid surfaces in liquid medium by screening a comprehensive deletion mutant collection in the S1278b background and found 71 genes that were essential for biofilm development. Quantitative...

  16. Interaction between Hanseniaspora uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation.

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2015-08-01

    During wine fermentation, Saccharomyces clearly dominate over non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, and several factors could be related to this dominance. However, the main factor causing the reduction of cultivable non-Saccharomyces populations has not yet been fully established. In the present study, various single and mixed fermentations were performed to evaluate some of the factors likely responsible for the interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora uvarum. Alcoholic fermentation was performed in compartmented experimental set ups with ratios of 1:1 and 1:9 and the cultivable population of both species was followed. The cultivable H. uvarum population decreased sharply at late stages when S. cerevisiae was present in the other compartment, similarly to alcoholic fermentations in non-compartmented vessels. Thus, cell-to-cell contact did not seem to be the main cause for the lack of cultivability of H. uvarum. Other compounds related to fermentation performance (such as sugar and ethanol) and/or certain metabolites secreted by S. cerevisiae could be related to the sharp decrease in H. uvarum cultivability. When these factors were analyzed, it was confirmed that metabolites from S. cerevisiae induced lack of cultivability in H. uvarum, however ethanol and other possible compounds did not seem to induce this effect but played some role during the process. This study contributes to a new understanding of the lack of cultivability of H. uvarum populations during the late stages of wine fermentation. PMID:25956738

  17. The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XII.

    Johnston, M; Hillier, L; Riles, L; Albermann, K; André, B; Ansorge, W; Benes, V; Brückner, M; Delius, H; Dubois, E; Düsterhöft, A; Entian, K D; Floeth, M; Goffeau, A; Hebling, U; Heumann, K; Heuss-Neitzel, D; Hilbert, H; Hilger, F; Kleine, K; Kötter, P; Louis, E J; Messenguy, F; Mewes, H W; Hoheisel, J D

    1997-05-29

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the pre-eminent organism for the study of basic functions of eukaryotic cells. All of the genes of this simple eukaryotic cell have recently been revealed by an international collaborative effort to determine the complete DNA sequence of its nuclear genome. Here we describe some of the features of chromosome XII. PMID:9169871

  18. The enantioselective b-keto ester reductions by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    HASSAN TAJIK; KHALIL TABATABAEIAN; MAHMOOD SHAHBAZI

    2006-01-01

    The enantioselective yeast reduction of aromatic b-keto esters, by use of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, calcium phosphate (monobasic), magnesium sulfate and ammonium tartrate (diammonium salt) (10:1:1:50) in water at pH 7 as a buffer for 72–120 h with 45–90 % conversion to the corresponding aromatic -hydroxy esters was achieved by means of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  19. Kinetics of formation of induced mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    UV and γ-radiation mutagenic effect an various strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied by analyzing formation kinetics of induced mutants at the period of postirradiation incubation. Mechanisms of induced reverse formation was suggested. The presented analysis is considered to be differential taking account of more subtle aspects of induced mutagenesis. 8 refs.; 10 figs.; 3 tabs

  20. Improving biomass sugar utilization by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The efficient utilization of all available sugars in lignocellulosic biomass, which is more abundant than available commodity crops and starch, represents one of the most difficult technological challenges for the production of bioethanol. The well-studied yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has played a...

  1. Analysis of the RNA Content of the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    Deutch, Charles E.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an interconnected set of relatively simple laboratory experiments in which students determine the RNA content of yeast cells and use agarose gel electrophoresis to separate and analyze the major species of cellular RNA. This set of experiments focuses on RNAs from the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", a…

  2. Analysis of the RNA Content of the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    Deutch, Charles E.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an interconnected set of relatively simple laboratory experiments in which students determine the RNA content of yeast cells and use agarose gel electrophoresis to separate and analyze the major species of cellular RNA. This set of experiments focuses on RNAs from the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", a

  3. Divergence in wine characteristics produced by wild and domesticated strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hyma, Katie E.; Saerens, Sofie M; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Fay, Justin C.

    2011-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the primary species used by wine makers to convert sugar into alcohol during wine fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is found in vineyards, but is also found in association with oak trees and other natural sources. Although wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as other Saccharomyces species are also capable of wine fermentation, a genetically distinct group of S. cerevisiae strains is primarily used to produce wine, consistent with the idea t...

  4. Potential immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as heavy metal removal

    Raffar, Nur Izzati Abdul; Rahman, Nadhratul Nur Ain Abdul; Alrozi, Rasyidah; Senusi, Faraziehan; Chang, Siu Hua

    2015-05-01

    Biosorption of copper ion using treated and untreated immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae from aqueous solution was investigate in this study. S.cerevisiae has been choosing as biosorbent due to low cost, easy and continuously available from various industries. In this study, the ability of treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae in removing copper ion influence by the effect of pH solution, and initial concentration of copper ion with contact time. Besides, adsorption isotherm and kinetic model also studied. The result indicated that the copper ion uptake on treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae was increased with increasing of contact time and initial concentration of copper ion. The optimum pH for copper ion uptake on untreated and treated immobilized S.cerevisiae at 4 and 6. From the data obtained of copper ion uptake, the adsorption isotherm was fitted well by Freundlich model for treated immobilized S.cerevisiae and Langmuir model for untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae according to high correlation coefficient. Meanwhile, the pseudo second order was described as suitable model present according to high correlation coefficient. Since the application of biosorption process has been received more attention from numerous researchers as a potential process to be applied in the industry, future study will be conducted to investigate the potential of immobilized S.cerevisiae in continuous process.

  5. Glucose-based microbial production of the hormone melatonin in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Germann, Susanne Manuela; Jacobsen, Simo Abdessamad; Schneider, Konstantin; Harrison, Scott James; Jensen, Niels B.; Chen, Xiao; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Borodina, Irina; Luo, Hao; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Maury, Jerome; Förster, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    performed by complex chemical synthesis. In this study, we demonstrate microbial production of melatonin and related compounds, such as serotonin and N-acetylserotonin. We generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that comprise heterologous genes encoding one or more variants of an L-tryptophan hydroxylase...

  6. Identification of a new promoter within the tRNA gene cluster of the mitochondrial DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Backer, J S; Getz, G S

    1987-01-01

    We have identified a new promoter within the tRNA gene cluster of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA. It is located upstream of the gene encoding the leucyl tRNA. It conforms to the consensus sequence of other yeast mitochondrial promoters, ATATAAGTA. It serves as a site for the initiation of transcription in vivo and in vitro.

  7. Mutational analysis of capping protein function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Sizonenko, G I; Karpova, T S; Gattermeir, D J; Cooper, J A

    1996-01-01

    To investigate physiologic functions and structural correlates for actin capping protein (CP), we analyzed site-directed mutations in CAP1 and CAP2, which encode the alpha and beta subunits of CP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in four different regions caused a loss of CP function in vivo despite the presence of mutant protein in the cells. Mutations in three regions caused a complete loss of all aspects of function, including the actin distribution, viability with sac6, and localization of CP to actin cortical patches. Mutation of the fourth region led to partial loss of only one function-formation of actin cables. Some mutations retained function and exhibited the complete wild-type phenotype, and some mutations led to a complete loss of protein and therefore loss of function. The simplest hypothesis that can explain these results is that a single biochemical property is necessary for all in vivo functions. This biochemical property is most likely binding to actin filaments, because the nonfunctional mutant CPs no longer co-localize with actin filaments in vivo and because direct binding of CP to actin filaments has been well established by studies with purified proteins in vitro. More complex hypotheses, involving the existence of additional biochemical properties important for function, cannot be excluded by this analysis. PMID:8741835

  8. Sit4p protein phosphatase is required for sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin.

    Jablonowski, D; Butler, A. R.; Fichtner, L; Gardiner, D; Schaffrath, R; Stark, M J

    2001-01-01

    We have identified two Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes that, in high copy, confer resistance to Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin, an inhibitor that blocks cells in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle prior to budding and DNA replication. One gene (GRX3) encodes a glutaredoxin and is likely to act at the level of zymocin entry into sensitive cells, while the other encodes Sap155p, one of a family of four related proteins that function positively and interdependently with the Sit4p protein phosphatase....

  9. Evidence for Domesticated and Wild Populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is predominantly found in association with human activities, particularly the production of alcoholic beverages. S. paradoxus, the closest known relative of S. cerevisiae, is commonly found on exudates and bark of deciduous trees and in associated soils. This has lead to the idea that S. cerevisiae is a domesticated species, specialized for the fermentation of alcoholic beverages, and isolates of S. cerevisiae from other sources simply represent migrants from these fermentations. We have surveyed DNA sequence diversity at five loci in 81 strains of S. cerevisiae that were isolated from a variety of human and natural fermentations as well as sources unrelated to alcoholic beverage production, such as tree exudates and immunocompromised patients. Diversity within vineyard strains and within saké strains is low, consistent with their status as domesticated stocks. The oldest lineages and the majority of variation are found in strains from sources unrelated to wine production. We propose a model whereby two specialized breeds of S. cerevisiae have been created, one for the production of grape wine and one for the production of saké wine. We estimate that these two breeds have remained isolated from one another for thousands of years, consistent with the earliest archeological evidence for winemaking. We conclude that although there are clearly strains of S. cerevisiae specialized for the production of alcoholic beverages, these have been derived from natural populations unassociated with alcoholic beverage production, rather than the opposite.

  10. Protective effect of vitamins against trichothecene toxicity towards Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Yagen, B; Halevy, S

    1987-08-15

    Several trichothecene mycotoxins were shown to inhibit the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This effect was most pronounced with the macrocyclic trichothecenes, especially verrucarin A. Much less growth inhibition was observed with T-2 toxin. Verrucarol, diacetoxyscirpenol, acetyl T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, T-2 tetraol and neosolaniol were inactive at a concentration of 75 micrograms of toxin per disc. Incubation of S. cerevisiae with verrucarin A together with vitamins resulted in a decrease in toxicity. Pyridoxine-HCl, Ca-pantothenate, thiamine-HCl and alpha-tocopheryl acetate were amongst the most potent of the vitamins tested which reversed growth inhibition, overcoming the inhibitory potential of the toxins. PMID:3305064

  11. Understanding the 3-hydroxypropionic acid tolerance mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Juncker, Agnieszka; Hallstrom, Bjorn; Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Maury, Jerome; Nielsen, Jen; Förster, Jochen; Borodina, Irina

    sustainable alternative for production of acrylic acid from renewable feedstocks. We are establishing Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an alternative host for 3HP production. However, 3HP also inhibits yeast grow th at level well below what is desired for commercial applications. Therefore, we are aiming to...... improve 3HP tolerance in S. cerevisiae by applying adaptive evolution approach. We have generated yeast strains with sign ificantly improved capacity for tolerating 3HP when compared to the wild-type. We will present physiolo gical characterization, genome re-sequencing, and transcriptome analysis of the...

  12. Investigation of nutrient sensing in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine

    2006-01-01

    Gæren Saccharomyces cerevisiae har udviklet komplekse regulatoriske systemer til at kontrollere ekspression af de proteiner, der importerer næringsstoffer, således at disse kun bliver produceret, når der er brug for dem. Dette er tilfældet for hexose-transportører samt aminosyre-transportører (di......Gæren Saccharomyces cerevisiae har udviklet komplekse regulatoriske systemer til at kontrollere ekspression af de proteiner, der importerer næringsstoffer, således at disse kun bliver produceret, når der er brug for dem. Dette er tilfældet for hexose-transportører samt aminosyre...

  13. Construction of Killer Industrial Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hau-1 and its Fermentation Performance

    Bajaj, Bijender K.; Sharma, S.

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccha...

  14. Construction of killer industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 and its fermentation performance

    Bajaj, Bijender K.; Sharma, S.

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccha...

  15. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock

    Esmeralda Vicedo; Zofia Gasik; Yu-An Dong; Tatyana Goldberg; Burkhard Rost

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker’s yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to “ postdict ” the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm...

  16. Heterologous Expression of Syntaxin 6 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    MARTIN GTTE; ANDREA STADTBUMER

    2002-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of vesicular protein transport in eukaryotic cells are highly conserved. Members of the syntaxin family play a pivotal role in the membrane fusion process. We have expressed rat syntaxin 6 and its cytoplasmic domain in wild-type and pep12 mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to elucidate the role of the syntaxin 6-dependent vesicular trafficking step in yeast. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a punctate, Golgi-like staining pattern for syntaxin 6, which on...

  17. In Vivo Analysis of Chromosome Condensation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Vas, Amit C.J.; Andrews, Catherine A.; Kirkland Matesky, Kathryn; Clarke, Duncan J

    2007-01-01

    Although chromosome condensation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely studied, visualization of this process in vivo has not been achieved. Using Lac operator sequences integrated at two loci on the right arm of chromosome IV and a Lac repressor-GFP fusion protein, we were able to visualize linear condensation of this chromosome arm during G2/M phase. As previously determined in fixed cells, condensation in yeast required the condensin complex. Not seen after fixation of cell...

  18. Applied systems biology - vanillin production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Strucko, Tomas; Eriksen, Carsten; Nielsen, J.(Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States); Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2012-01-01

    Vanillin is the most important aroma compound based on market value, and natural vanillin is extracted from the cured seed pods of the Vanilla orchid. Most of the world’s vanillin, however, is obtained by chemical synthesis from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. As an alternative, de novo biosynthesis of vanillin in baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was recently demonstrated by successfully introducing the metabolic pathway for vanillin production in yeast. Nevertheless, the amount of...

  19. Glucose induces rapid changes in the secretome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Giardina, Bennett J.; Stanley, Bruce A.; Chiang, Hui-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein secretion is a fundamental process in all living cells. Proteins can either be secreted via the classical or non-classical pathways. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gluconeogenic enzymes are in the extracellular fraction/periplasm when cells are grown in media containing low glucose. Following a transfer of cells to high glucose media, their levels in the extracellular fraction are reduced rapidly. We hypothesized that changes in the secretome were not restricted to gluconeoge...

  20. The plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: structure, function, and biogenesis.

    van der Rest, M E; Kamminga, A H; Nakano, A.; Anraku, Y; Poolman, B; Konings, W N

    1995-01-01

    The composition of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols in the plasma membrane has a strong influence on the activity of the proteins associated or embedded in the lipid bilayer. Since most lipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are located in intracellular organelles, an extensive flux of lipids from these organelles to the plasma membrane is required. Although the pathway of protein traffic to the plasma membrane is similar to that of most of the lipids, the bulk flow o...

  1. The Plasma Membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Structure, Function, and Biogenesis

    VANDERREST, ME; KAMMINGA, AH; Nakano, A.; Anraku, Y; Poolman, B; KONINGS, WN

    1995-01-01

    The composition of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols in the plasma membrane has a strong influence on the activity of the proteins associated or embedded in the lipid bilayer. Since most lipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are located in intracellular organelles, an extensive pur of lipids fi om these organelles to the plasma membrane is required. Although the pathway of protein traffic to the plasma membrane is similar to that of most of the lipids, the bulk flow o...

  2. The enantioselective b-keto ester reductions by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    HASSAN TAJIK

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The enantioselective yeast reduction of aromatic b-keto esters, by use of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, calcium phosphate (monobasic, magnesium sulfate and ammonium tartrate (diammonium salt (10:1:1:50 in water at pH 7 as a buffer for 72–120 h with 45–90 % conversion to the corresponding aromatic -hydroxy esters was achieved by means of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  3. Radiometric prescreen for antitumor activity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain.

    Speedie, M K; Fique, D V; Blomster, R N

    1980-01-01

    After modification, a technique for radiometrically measuring bacterial growth has been applied to a mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The assay is based on inhibition of 14CO2 release from [14C]glucose, which provides an extremely sensitive measure of cellular respiratory activity and growth. The criterion for antitumor activity is the differential inhibition of wild-type and mutant (distorted cell membrane) strains of the yeast. The system was optimized for medium, time of incubati...

  4. Oligoadenylate is present in the mitochondrial RNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The authors examined Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial RNA for polyadenylate. Using hybridization to [/sup 3/H]polyuridylate as the assay for adenylate sequences, they found adenylate-rich oligonucleotides approximately 8 residues long. Longer polyadenylate was not detected. Most of the adenylate-rich sequence is associated with the large mitochondrial rRNA. The remainder is associated with the 10-12S group of transcripts

  5. Isolation and characterization of a dinucleoside triphosphatase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Brevet, A.; CHEN J; Fromant, M; Blanquet, S; Plateau, P

    1991-01-01

    An enzyme able to cleave dinucleoside triphosphates has been purified 3,750-fold from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Contrary to the enzymes previously shown to catabolize Ap4A in yeast, this enzyme is a hydrolase rather than a phosphorylase. The dinucleoside triphosphatase molecular ratio estimated by gel filtration is 55,000. Dinucleoside triphosphatase activity is strongly stimulated by the presence of divalent cations. Mn2+ displays the strongest stimulating effect, followed by Mg2+, Co2+, Cd2...

  6. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Iron Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Antonia María Romero; Sergi Puig; María Teresa Martínez-Pastor; Rosa de Llanos

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms because it participates as a redox cofactor in a wide variety of biological processes. Recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that in response to iron deficiency, an RNA-binding protein denoted Cth2 coordinates a global metabolic rearrangement that aims to optimize iron utilization. The Cth2 protein contains two Cx8Cx5Cx3H tandem zinc fingers (TZFs) that specifically bind to adenosine/uridine-rich elements within t...

  7. Biogeographical characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast by molecular methods

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Aguzzi, Irene; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Biogeography is the descriptive and explanatory study of spatial patterns and processes involved in the distribution of biodiversity. Without biogeography, it would be difficult to study the diversity of microorganisms because there would be no way to visualize patterns in variation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, “the wine yeast,” is the most important species involved in alcoholic fermentation, and in vineyard ecosystems, it follows the principle of “everything is everywhere.” Agricultural pract...

  8. Nutrient sensing and signaling in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Conrad, Michaela; Schothorst, Joep; Kankipati, Harish Nag; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a favorite organism for pioneering studies on nutrient-sensing and signaling mechanisms. Many specific nutrient responses have been elucidated in great detail. This has led to important new concepts and insight into nutrient-controlled cellular regulation. Major highlights include the central role of the Snf1 protein kinase in the glucose repression pathway, galactose induction, the discovery of a G-protein-coupled receptor system, and role of Ras i...

  9. Dynamics of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptome during bread dough fermentation

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Zhu, Bo; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Voordeckers, Karin; De Maeyer, Dries; Marchal, Kathleen; Dornez, Emmie; Courtin, Christophe; Verstrepen, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of yeast cells during industrial processes such as the production of beer, wine, and bioethanol has been extensively studied. In contrast, our knowledge about yeast physiology during solid-state processes, such as bread dough, cheese, or cocoa fermentation, remains limited. We investigated changes in the transcriptomes of three genetically distinct Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during bread dough fermentation. Our results show that regardless of the genetic background, all thr...

  10. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae toward n‐butanol production

    Swidah, Reem

    2016-01-01

    Biobutanol represents a second generation biofuel, which can be producedfrom renewable resources by microorganisms. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strainbearing the five butanol synthetic genes (hbd, adhe2, crt, ccr and ERG10) wasconstructed, where the hbd, adhe2, crt and ccr genes are derived from Clostridiumbeijerinckii, while ERG10 is a yeast gene. The genes were transformed individually onsingle cassettes, which integrated into specific chromosomal sites. The single integrantstrains were back...

  11. Effect of growth phase on phospholipid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Homann, M J; Poole, M A; Gaynor, P M; Ho, C.T.; Carman, G. M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of growth phase on the membrane-associated phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes CDP-diacylglycerol synthase, phosphatidylserine synthase, phosphatidylinositol synthase, and the phospholipid N-methyltransferases in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae was examined. Maximum activities were found in the exponential phase of cells grown in complete synthetic medium. As cells entered the stationary phase of growth, the activities of the CDP-diacylglycerol synthase, phosphatidylserine synthas...

  12. Studies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cultivation under Oscillatory Mixing Conditions

    M?ris Rikmanis; Stoyan Tzonkov; Uldis Viesturs; Andr?js B?rzi??

    2005-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated under non-aerated conditions in a 5 l laboratory bioreactor. Using the experimental data and the regression analysis method, some mathematical correlations for stirrer rotational speed oscillation frequency and the reaction of the yeast were established. It has been found that different growth parameters are influenced variously by stirrer rotational speed and stirrer rotational speed oscillation frequency. Stirring oscillations can be among the methods...

  13. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    Danuza Nogueira Moysés; Viviane Castelo Branco Reis; João Ricardo Moreira de Almeida; Lidia Maria Pepe de Moraes; Fernando Araripe Gonçalves Torres

    2016-01-01

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phospha...

  14. Genes Required for Vacuolar Acidity in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Preston, R. A.; Reinagel, P. S.; Jones, E.W.

    1992-01-01

    Mutations that cause loss of acidity in the vacuole (lysosome) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified by screening colonies labeled with the fluorescent, pH-sensitive, vacuolar labeling agent, 6-carboxyfluorescein. Thirty nine vacuolar pH (Vph(-)) mutants were identified. Four of these contained mutant alleles of the previously described PEP3, PEP5, PEP6 and PEP7 genes. The remaining mutants defined eight complementation groups of vph mutations. No alleles of the VAT2 or TFP1 genes (know...

  15. Hydrogen peroxide removal with magnetically responsive Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Šafařík, Ivo; Maděrová, Zdeňka; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 56, - (2008), s. 7925-7928. ISSN 0021-8561 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/094; GA MŠk OC 157 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : magnetic alginate beads * catalase * magnetic separation * Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells * hydrogen peroxide Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 2.562, year: 2008

  16. Cloning and heterologous expression of glycosidase genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Kuranda, M J; Robbins, P W

    1987-01-01

    Genomic clones were isolated that code for three glycosidases proposed to be involved in the catabolism of cell wall components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. alpha-Mannosidase (AMS1), exoglucanase (BGL1), and endochitinase (CTS1) genes were isolated with the aid of filter assays based on the hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl glycosides, which permitted the in situ monitoring of these glycosidase activities in yeast colonies. Uracil prototrophs resulting from transformation with a multicopy YE...

  17. Comparative Genomics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Natural Isolates for Bioenergy Production

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Rovinskiy, Nikolay; Lewis, Jeffrey A.; Sardi, Maria; Schackwitz, Wendy S.; Martin, Joel A.; Deshpande, Shweta; Daum, Christopher G.; Lipzen, Anna; Sato, Trey K.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic plant material is a viable source of biomass to produce alternative energy including ethanol and other biofuels. However, several factorsincluding toxic byproducts from biomass pretreatment and poor fermentation of xylose and other pentose sugarscurrently limit the efficiency of microbial biofuel production. To begin to understand the genetic basis of desirable traits, we characterized three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with robust growth in a pretreated lignocellulos...

  18. Influence of organic acids and organochlorinated insecticides on metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Pejin Dušanka J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to different stress factors during the production: osmotic, temperature, oxidative. The response to these stresses is the adaptive mechanism of cells. The raw materials Saccharomyces cerevisiae is produced from, contain metabolism products of present microorganisms and protective agents used during the growth of sugar beet for example the influence of acetic and butyric acid and organochlorinated insecticides, lindan and heptachlor, on the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and presented in this work. The mentioned compounds affect negatively the specific growth rate, yield, content of proteins, phosphorus, total ribonucleic acids. These compounds influence the increase of trechalose and glycogen content in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

  19. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Hana Šuranská

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines.

  20. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines. PMID:26887243

  1. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines. PMID:26887243

  2. Growth of non-Saccharomyces yeasts affects nutrient availability for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation.

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2012-07-01

    Yeast produces numerous secondary metabolites during fermentation that impact final wine quality. Although it is widely recognized that growth of diverse non-Saccharomyces (NS) yeast can positively affect flavor complexity during Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine fermentation, the inability to control spontaneous or co-fermentation processes by NS yeast has restricted their use in winemaking. We selected two NS yeasts from our Uruguayan native collection to study NS-S. cerevisiae interactions during wine fermentation. The selected strains of Hanseniaspora vineae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima had different yeast assimilable nitrogen consumption profiles and had different effects on S. cerevisiae fermentation and growth kinetics. Studies in which we varied inoculum size and using either simultaneous or sequential inoculation of NS yeast and S. cerevisiae suggested that competition for nutrients had a significant effect on fermentation kinetics. Sluggish fermentations were more pronounced when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24h after the initial stage of fermentation with a NS strain compared to co-inoculation. Monitoring strain populations using differential WL nutrient agar medium and fermentation kinetics of mixed cultures allowed for a better understanding of strain interactions and nutrient addition effects. Limitation of nutrient availability for S. cerevisiae was shown to result in stuck fermentations as well as to reduce sensory desirability of the resulting wine. Addition of diammonium phosphate (DAP) and a vitamin mix to a defined medium allowed for a comparison of nutrient competition between strains. Addition of DAP and the vitamin mix was most effective in preventing stuck fermentations. PMID:22687186

  3. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hou, Jin; Österlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular...... stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent the......, human insulin precursor was only improved slightly and this only by high level over-expression of HSF1-R206S, supporting our previous findings that the production of this protein in S. cerevisiae is not limited by secretion. Our results provide an effective strategy to improve protein secretion and...

  4. Increasing NADH oxidation reduces overflow metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Vemuri, Goutham; Eiteman, M.A; McEwen, J.E; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Crabtree effect.’’ The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has served as an important model organism for studying the Crabtree effect. When subjected to increasing glycolytic fluxes under aerobic conditions, there is a threshold value of the glucose uptake rate at which the metabolism shifts from purely...... effect is due to limited respiratory capacity or is caused by glucose-mediated repression of respiration. When respiration in S. cerevisiae was increased by introducing a heterologous alternative oxidase, we observed reduced aerobic ethanol formation. In contrast, increasing nonrespiratory NADH oxidation...... deficiency of cytosolic NADH dehydrogenases in S. cerevisiae. These results indicate that NADH oxidase localizes in the cytosol, whereas alternative oxidase is directed to the mitochondria....

  5. Biosorption of 241Am by immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Americium-241 is one of the most serious radioactive contaminating nuclides due to its high toxicity and long half-life. The encouraging biosorption of 241Am from aqueous solutions by free Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) has been observed in our previous experiments. 241Am biosorption by immobilized S. cerevisiae and the effect of the various experimental conditions on the adsorption were investigated. The results indicated that the 241Am biosorption by immobilized S. cerevisiae is still very efficient, and immobilized S. cerevisiae can be used repeatedly or continuously. The biosorption equilibrium was achieved within 2 hours, and more than 92% of 241Am was removed by immobilized S. cerevisiae in the pH 1-4 range. No significant differences in 241Am biosorption were observed at 15-45 deg C. The immobilized S. cerevisiae, even after used repeatedly for 6 times, still could adsorb more than 90% of 241Am in solutions of 1.08 MBq/l (8.5 μg/l). At this moment, the total adsorption capacity for 241Am was more than 63.3 KBq/g globe (0.5 μg/g), but has not reached saturation yet. The 241Am left in solutions with initial concentration of 1.08 MBq/l (8.5 μg/l) was noted as low as ∼10 Bq/l (∼8.0 x 10-5 μg/l) after adsorption by the immobilized S. cerevisiae for 3 times. (author)

  6. Comprehensive Analysis of the SUL1 Promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Rich, Matthew S; Payen, Celia; Rubin, Alan F; Ong, Giang T; Sanchez, Monica R; Yachie, Nozomu; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fields, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, beneficial mutations selected during sulfate-limited growth are typically amplifications of the SUL1 gene, which encodes the high-affinity sulfate transporter, resulting in fitness increases of >35% . Cis-regulatory mutations have not been observed at this locus; however, it is not clear whether this absence is due to a low mutation rate such that these mutations do not arise, or they arise but have limited fitness effects relative to those of amplification. To address this question directly, we assayed the fitness effects of nearly all possible point mutations in a 493-base segment of the gene's promoter through mutagenesis and selection. While most mutations were either neutral or detrimental during sulfate-limited growth, eight mutations increased fitness >5% and as much as 9.4%. Combinations of these beneficial mutations increased fitness only up to 11%. Thus, in the case of SUL1, promoter mutations could not induce a fitness increase similar to that of gene amplification. Using these data, we identified functionally important regions of the SUL1 promoter and analyzed three sites that correspond to potential binding sites for the transcription factors Met32 and Cbf1 Mutations that create new Met32- or Cbf1-binding sites also increased fitness. Some mutations in the untranslated region of the SUL1 transcript decreased fitness, likely due to the formation of inhibitory upstream open reading frames. Our methodology-saturation mutagenesis, chemostat selection, and DNA sequencing to track variants-should be a broadly applicable approach. PMID:26936925

  7. Mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination and mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Full text. 1. It was confirmed that from the six DNA polymerases discovered in yeast cells, only DNA polymerases δ, ε and ζ are engaged in dark repair of lesions caused by UV-light and MMS. DNA polymerase δ is involved in the repair of both types of lesions, while DNA polymerase ε and ζ only in lesions caused by UV and MMS, respectively. Other polymerases are not involved or play only a minor role in repair. The results obtained are being prepared for publication. 2. Studies on the involvement of the three replicative DNA polymerases in mitotic gene conversion induced by mono- and bifunctional psoralens (and also by UV- light or MMS) revealed that DNA polymerases α and δ are the main polymerases responsible for induced intragenic conversion. DNA polymerase ε seems to play minor role in this process. It is possible that DNA polymerase α may also be involved in DNA repair synthesis but only in cases when the opening of new replication forks is necessary for repair. 3. Studies on the influence of mutations in the replicative and nonreplicative DNA polymerases on adaptive mutations in the cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were continued. We found that thermosensitive mutation in the POL2 gene encoding DNA polymerase ε increased the frequency of adaptive mutation in a similar manner as found earlier for DNA polymerase δ. A similar effect was observed also in strains with deletions in the MSH3 gene responsible for mismatch repair. Mutations in other DNA polymerases, including the essential DNA polymerase α and the inessential DNA polymerases β and ζ revealed no effect on this process. Analysis of DNA sequences in the revertants showed that in all cases the obtained reversions resulted from a single nucleotide deletion most often in sequences having short homopolymer tracts. The results obtained suggest that errors arising during DNA elongation and their persistence in mutants deficient in mismatch repair activity seem to be the source of the adaptive mutation appearance in studied cells. (author)

  8. The Acyl-CoA synthetases encoded within FAA1 and FAA4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae function as components of the fatty acid transport system linking import, activation, and intracellular Utilization

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Black, P N; Zhao, X D; Knudsen, J; DiRusso, C C

    2001-01-01

    Exogenous long-chain fatty acids are activated to coenzyme A derivatives prior to metabolic utilization. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activation of these compounds prior to metabolic utilization proceeds through the fatty acyl-CoA synthetases Faa1p and Faa4p. Faa1p or Faa4p are...... peroxisomal enzymes acyl-CoA oxidase (POX1) and medium-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (FAA2). These data support the hypothesis that fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (Faa1p or Faa4p) functions as a component of the fatty acid import system by linking import and activation of exogenous fatty acids to intracellular...

  9. Genetic mapping of quantitative phenotypic traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Swinnen, Steve; Thevelein, Johan M; Nevoigt, Elke

    2012-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a favorite production organism in industrial biotechnology presenting new challenges to yeast engineers in terms of introducing advantageous traits such as stress tolerances. Exploring subspecies diversity of S. cerevisiae has identified strains that bear industrially relevant phenotypic traits. Provided that the genetic basis of such phenotypic traits can be identified inverse engineering allows the targeted modification of production strains. Most phenotypic traits of interest in S. cerevisiae strains are quantitative, meaning that they are controlled by multiple genetic loci referred to as quantitative trait loci (QTL). A straightforward approach to identify the genetic basis of quantitative traits is QTL mapping which aims at the allocation of the genetic determinants to regions in the genome. The application of high-density oligonucleotide arrays and whole-genome re-sequencing to detect genetic variations between strains has facilitated the detection of large numbers of molecular markers thus allowing high-resolution QTL mapping over the entire genome. This review focuses on the basic principle and state of the art of QTL mapping in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore we discuss several approaches developed during the last decade that allow down-scaling of the regions identified by QTL mapping to the gene level. We also emphasize the particular challenges of QTL mapping in nonlaboratory strains of S. cerevisiae. PMID:22150948

  10. Expression of the Escherichia coli pntA and pntB genes, encoding nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its effect on product formation during anaerobic glucose fermentation

    Anderlund, M. [Carlsberg Lab., Copenhagen Valby (Denmark). Dept. of Yeast Genetics]|[Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Microbiology; Nissen, T.L. [Carlsberg Lab., Copenhagen Valby (Denmark). Dept. of Yeast Genetics]|[Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Biotechnology; Nielsen, J.; Villadsen, J. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Biotechnology; Rydstroem, J. [Goeteborg Univ. and Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Hahn-Haegerdal, B. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Microbiology; Kielland-Brandt, M.C. [Carlsberg Lab., Copenhagen Valby (Denmark). Dept. of Yeast Genetics

    1999-06-01

    The authors studied the physiological effect of the interconversion between the NAD(H) and NADP(H) coenzyme systems in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the membrane-bound transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli. Their objective was to determine if the membrane-bound transhydrogenase could work in reoxidation of NADH to NAD{sup +} in S. cerevisiae and thereby reduce glycerol formation during anaerobic fermentation. Membranes isolated from the recombinant strains exhibited reduction of 3-acetylpyridine-NAD{sup +} by NADPH and by NADH in the presence of NADP{sup +}, which demonstrated that an active enzyme was present. Unlike the situation in E. coli, however, most of the transhydrogenase activity was not present in the yeast plasma membrane; rather, the enzyme appeared to remain localized in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. During anaerobic glucose fermentation the authors observed an increase in the formation of 2-oxoglutarate, glycerol, and acetic acid in a strain expressing a high level of transhydrogenase, which indicated that increased NADPH consumption and NADH production occurred. The intracellular concentrations of NADH, NAD{sup +}, NADPH, and NADP{sup +} were measured in cells expressing transhydrogenase. The reduction of the NADPH pool indicated that the transhydrogenase transferred reducing equivalents from NADPH to NAD{sup +}.

  11. ATP16 Genes and Neighboring ORFs Are Duplicated on Chromosome IV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Masaharu Takeda; Hironori Fujioka; Manami Shimomura; Tadashi Mabuchi; Atsushi Minami

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence that there were two closely linked copies of the ATP16 (YDL004w) gene encoding the delta subunit of F1F0-ATPase complex on chromosome IV in laboratory strains, W303-1A, W303-1B, DC5, LL20, SEY2102, YPH499, and S288C of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We previously reported that there were 2-3 copies of ATP1 (alpha), ATP2 (beta) and ATP3 (gamma) on chromosomes II, X, and II, respectively. Homologous recombination of the ATP16 with HIS3 (YOR202w), gene walking, and long-PCR analys...

  12. Cloning and Characterization of a Sulfonate/α-Ketoglutarate Dioxygenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hogan, Deborah A.; Auchtung, Thomas A.; Hausinger, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame YLL057c is predicted to encode a gene product with 31.5% amino acid sequence identity to Escherichia coli taurine/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase and 27% identity to Ralstonia eutropha TfdA, a herbicide-degrading enzyme. Purified recombinant yeast protein is shown to be an Fe(II)-dependent sulfonate/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase. Although taurine is a poor substrate, a variety of other sulfonates are utilized, with the best natural substrates being is...

  13. The MPH1 Gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Functions in Okazaki Fragment Processing*S⃞

    Kang, Young-Hoon; Kang, Min-Jung; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Lee, Chul-Hwan; Cho, Il-Taeg; Hurwitz, Jerard; Seo, Yeon-Soo

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPH1 was first identified as a gene encoding a 3′ to 5′ DNA helicase, which when deleted leads to a mutator phenotype. In this study, we isolated MPH1 as a multicopy suppressor of the dna2K1080E helicase-negative lethal mutant. Purified Mph1 stimulated the endonuclease activities of both Fen1 and Dna2, which act faithfully in the processing of Okazaki fragments. This stimulation required neither ATP hydrolysis nor the helicase activity of Mph1....

  14. Localization of nuclear retained mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Thomsen, Rune; Libri, Domenico; Boulay, Jocelyne; Rosbash, Michael; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2003-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common conditional phenotype associated with deletion or mutation of genes encoding mRNA export factors is the rapid accumulation of mRNAs in intranuclear foci, suggested to be near transcription sites. The nuclear RNA exosome has been implicated in...... retaining RNAs in these foci; on deletion of the exosome component Rrp6p, the RNA is released. To determine the exact nuclear location of retained as well as released mRNAs, we have used mRNA export mutant strains to analyze the spatial relationship between newly synthesized heat shock mRNA, the chromosomal...

  15. Pbp1p, a Factor Interacting with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Poly(A)-Binding Protein, Regulates Polyadenylation

    MANGUS, DAVID A.; AMRANI, NADIA; Jacobson, Allan

    1998-01-01

    The poly(A) tail of an mRNA is believed to influence the initiation of translation, and the rate at which the poly(A) tail is removed is thought to determine how fast an mRNA is degraded. One key factor associated with this 3′-end structure is the poly(A)-binding protein (Pab1p) encoded by the PAB1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In an effort to learn more about the functional role of this protein, we used a two-hybrid screen to determine the factor(s) with which it interacts. We identified...

  16. Antiproliferative effects of Matricaria chamomilla on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hosseinpour Maryam

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Matricaria chamomilla plant is one of the most important plants used for the therapeutic purposes. More than 120 chemical constituents have been identified in Matricaria chamomile plant including 28 terpenoids and 36 flavonoids. This plant has a variety of therapeutic applications including the treatment of diabetes, eczema, wounds and gastrointestinal diseases. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast is a non-pathogenic organism that is used as a model for pathogenic yeasts in order to identify compounds with antifungal properties and also to identify functional mechanism of these compounds. The aim of this study is to investigate the antifungal effect of Matricaria chamomilla hydroalcoholic extract on S. cerevisiae yeast. Methods: In this study Matricaria chamomilla extract was prepared by maceration method. In order to study the extract effect on growth and survival rate of the yeast cell, the spectrophotometry and methylene blue staining methods were used. Excel and SPSS 11 softwares were used to determine amounts and to infer the difference between control and treatment samples. Results: Results obtained from spectrophotometry and analyses of methylene blue staining showed that the Matricaria chamomilla extract at the concentration of 3000 μg/ml caused a significant decrease in the yeast growth and reduced the cells survival rate up to 48% (p< 0.05. Conclusion: Results of this research confirm that the hydroalcoholic extract of Matricaria chamomilla has antiproliferative effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  17. Label-Free Proteomic Analysis of Flavohemoglobin Deleted Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Panja, Chiranjit; Setty, Rakesh K S; Vaidyanathan, Gopal; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Yeast flavohemoglobin, YHb, encoded by the nuclear gene YHB1, has been implicated in the nitrosative stress responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is still unclear how S. cerevisiae can withstand this NO level in the absence of flavohemoglobin. To better understand the physiological function of flavohemoglobin in yeast, in the present study a label-free differential proteomics study has been carried out in wild-type and YHB1 deleted strains of S. cerevisiae grown under fermentative conditions. From the analysis, 417 proteins in Y190 and 392 proteins in ?YHB1 were identified with high confidence. Interestingly, among the differentially expressed identified proteins, 40 proteins were found to be downregulated whereas 41 were found to be upregulated in ?YHB1 strain of S. cerevisiae (p value < 0.05). The differentially expressed proteins were also classified according to gene ontology (GO) terms. The most enriched and significant GO terms included nitrogen compound biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, translational regulation, and protein folding. Interactions of differentially expressed proteins were generated using Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING) database. This is the first report which offers a more complete view of the proteome changes in S. cerevisiae in the absence of flavohemoglobin. PMID:26881076

  18. Construction of killer industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 and its fermentation performance

    Bijender K. Bajaj

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 475, a killer strain. The resultant fusants were characterized for desirable fermentation characteristics. All the technologically important characteristics of distillery yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 were retained in the fusants, and in addition the killer trait was also introduced into them. Further, the killer activity was found to be stably maintained during hostile conditions of ethanol fermentations in dextrose or molasses, and even during biomass recycling.

  19. ISOTERMAS DE ADSORO DE CDMIO POR Saccharomyces cerevisiae / ISOTHERMS OF CADMIUM ADSORPTION BY Saccharomyces cerevisae

    Silvana, ALBERTINI; Leandro Francisco do, CARMO; Luiz Gonzaga do, PRADO FILHO.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de determinar as isotermas de adsoro de cdmio por Saccharomyces cerevisiae, foram utilizados os sais cloreto e nitrato de cdmio nas concentraes de 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 e 100mg L-1. A biomassa foi produzida a partir de uma cultura "starter"de Saccharomyces cerevisiae IZ 1904. Ap [...] s o contato de 16h entre o microrganismo e as solues em estudo, a biomassa foi separada por centrifugao e o teor de cdmio residual foi determinado no sobrenadante por espectrofotometria de absoro atmica. Para os dois sais empregados foi observado um acmulo crescente de cdmio nas concentraes de 5, 10, 20 e 40mg L-1. Nas concentraes de 60, 80 e 100mg L-1 foi observado que a levedura acumulou teores menores do metal, evidenciando danos na parede celular, nem sempre acompanhados de iguais danos da membrana citoplasmtica, tais alteraes da parede visualizadas por microscopia eletrnica de varredura. Abstract in english With the objective of determining the isotherms of cadmium the adsorption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chloride and nitrate salts were used in the concentrations of 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100mg L-1. The biomass was produced from a starter culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IZ 1904. After a [...] 16h contact between the microrganism and solutions of study the biomass was separated by a centrifuge and the cadmium residue content was determined at the supernatant by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry. For the two salts used a growing accumulation of cadmium was observed at concentrations of 5, 10, 20, and 40mg L-1. In the concentrations of 60, 80 and 100mg L-1 a decreasing of the accumulation of the metal was observed, evidencing damages of the cellular wall, which they're not accompanied always by damages of the citoplasmatic membrane, visualized by scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Protein expression of saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to uranium exposure

    Protein expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in the medium containing 238U (VI) and 233U (VI) was examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae of BY4743 was grown in yeast nitrogen base medium containing glucose and glycerol 2-phosphate and 238U of 0, 2.0, and 5.0 x 10-4 M or 233U of 2.5 x 10-6 M (radioactivity was higher by 350 times than 2.0 x 10-4 M 238U) and 5.0 x 10-6 M for 112 h at 30 degC. The growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was monitored by measuring OD600 at 112 h after the inoculation. Uranium concentrations in the media also were measured by radiometry using a liquid scintillation counter. The growths of the yeast grown in the above media were in the following order: control>2.5 x 10-6 M 233U>2.0 x 10-4 M 238U>5.0 x 10-6 M 233U>5.0 x 10-4 M 238U. This result indicated that not only radiological but also chemical effect of U reduced the growth of the yeast. The concentrations of U in the medium containing 238U or 233U decreased, suggesting U accumulation by the yeast cells. The 2-D gel electrophoresis analysis showed the appearance of several spots after exposure to 238U or to 233U but not in the control containing no uranium. These results show that the yeast cells exposed to U express several specific proteins. (author)

  1. Cloning and DNA sequence analysis of the glucose transporter gene2 from Iranian Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Saleh Amiri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Saccharomyces cerevisiae has 20 genes that encode hexose transporter proteins including HXT1 to HXT17, GAL2, SNF3 and RGT2. Among these gene families, seven genes (HXT1-HXT7 have important role in alcohol production. The aim of this study was the identification and isolation of HXT2 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome by PCR technique and cloning into vector containing suitable expression promoter in order to design expression vector as a basis to produce recombinant yeast by transformation.Materials and Methods: After designing specific oligonucleotides primers, fragment gene amplified by PCR. Gene HXT2 inserted into pTZ57R vector by restriction enzymes EcoRI and HindIII and T4 ligase. After transformation of pTZ57R/THXT2 into E.coli, plasmid recombinant analysis considered. The final further analysis by restriction enzymes digestion and software were evaluated.Results: HXT2 gene isolated from pTZ57R/THXT2 has correct size in agarose gel electrophoresis. Electrophoresis analysis showed that this gene has correct size on agarose gel. Software study showed that this gene encode proteins with 59.84 KDa molecular weight having 541 amino acids with isoelectric point 8.3.Conclusion: HXT2 gene by PCR optimization from saccharomyces cerevisiae was isolated and cloned into prokaryotic host. This is the first report of isolation and cloning of this gene by using genetic engineering technique in IRAN that can be used for cloning into suitable expression vector to improve alcohol fermentation yield.

  2. The Mitochondrial RNA Landscape of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Turk, Edward M.; Das, Vaijayanti; Seibert, Ryan D.; Andrulis, Erik D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that harbor a reduced genome, and expression of that genome requires regulated metabolism of its transcriptome by nuclear-encoded proteins. Despite extensive investigation, a comprehensive map of the yeast mitochondrial transcriptome has not been developed and all of the RNA-metabolizing proteins have not been identified, both of which are prerequisites to elucidating the basic RNA biology of mitochondria. Here, we present a mitochondrial transcriptome ma...

  3. Glycolipids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell

    Renuka Malhotra; Balwant Singh

    2005-01-01

    Total lipids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated by chloroform and methanol (2:1). Glycolipids were separated from total lipids by silicic acid chromatography. Glycolipids constituent sugars and fatty acids were analyzed by using Gas Liquid Chromatography. Galactose was the prominent sugar followed by mannose. Relative concentrations of fucose, mannose, galactose and glucose in the glycolipid were 5.3, 35.2, 55.1 and 4.2%. 16:0, 18:0, 18:1, 18:2 and 18:3 were the major fatty acids of t...

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae HSP70 heat shock elements are functionally distinct.

    Young, M R; Craig, E A

    1993-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae HSP70 gene SSA1 has multiple heat shock elements (HSEs). To determine the significance of each of these sequences for expression of SSA1, we analyzed expression from a set of promoters containing point mutations in each of the HSEs, individually and in pairwise combinations. Of the three HSE-like sequences, two (HSE2 and HSE3) were active promoter elements; only one, HSE2, was active under basal growth conditions. Either HSE2 or HSE3 alone was able to drive SSA1 t...

  5. Uptake and intracellular compartmentation of thorium in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Gadd, G M; White, C

    1989-01-01

    When Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultured in the presence of thorium, the element was accumulated by the cells and was visible in electron micrographs as electron dense granules. When thorium was present during exponential growth, these granules were located mainly in the vacuole, with some present in the cytosol. Where thorium was present only during the stationary phase, there appeared to be greater thorium deposition in the cell wall than during exponential growth and some vacuolar deposits were also evident. Thorium uptake by exponential-phase cells was not stimulated by glucose and was thus independent of metabolic energy. PMID:15092359

  6. Mechanistic Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kinesin Kar3*S

    Mackey, Andrew T.; Sproul, Lisa R.; Sontag, Christopher A.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Correia, John J.; Gilbert, Susan P.

    2004-01-01

    Kar3 is a minus-end-directed microtubule motor that is implicated in meiotic and mitotic spindle function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To date, the only truncated protein of Kar3 that has been reported to promote unidirectional movement in vitro is GSTKar3. This motor contains an NH2-terminal glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag followed by the Kar3 sequence that is predicted to form an extended α-helical coiled-coil. The α-helical domain leads into the neck linker and COOH-terminal motor doma...

  7. Expression of kinase-dependent glucose uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Bisson, L F; Fraenkel, D G

    1984-01-01

    There are both low- and high-affinity mechanisms for uptake of glucose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; high-affinity uptake somehow depends on the presence of hexose kinases (L. F. Bisson and D. G. Fraenkel, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 80:1730-1734, 1983; L. F. Bisson and D. G. Fraenkel, J. Bacteriol. 155:995-1000, 1983). We report here on the effect of culture conditions on the level of high-affinity uptake. The high-affinity component was low during growth in high concentrations of glucose (...

  8. Induction of polypeptides in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after ultraviolet irradiation

    Alterations in the synthesis of proteins following exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to UV light were investigated using radioactive labelling and two dimensional electrophoresis. UV-irradiation induced the synthesis of various proteins. Among them the analogue of the RecA protein of Escherichia coli (Angulo et al. 1985) and two other polypeptides (34 Kd and 35 Kd, pI 5.8) were observed in all four strains analyzed namely two DNA-repair deficient (rad−) strains : (rad6-1 and pso2-1) and their isogenic wild type RAD+ strains

  9. Magnetically altered ethanol fermentation capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Galonja-Corghill Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of static magnetic fields on ethanol production by yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST using sugar cane molasses during the fermentation in an enclosed bioreactor. Two static NdFeB magnets were attached to a cylindrical tube reactor with their opposite poles (north to south, creating 150 mT magnetic field inside the reactor. Comparable differences emerged between the results of these two experimental conditions. We found ethanol productivity to be 15% higher in the samples exposed to 150 mT magnetic field.

  10. Investigation of nutrient sensing in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Hobley, Timothy John

    2006-01-01

    Gæren Saccharomyces cerevisiae har udviklet komplekse regulatoriske systemer til at kontrollere ekspression af de proteiner, der importerer næringsstoffer, således at disse kun bliver produceret, når der er brug for dem. Dette er tilfældet for hexose-transportører samt aminosyre-transportører (disse bliver også kaldt amino acid permeases (AAPs)). Deres ekspression induceres på det transkriptionelle niveau efter at ekstracellulære næringsstoffer, henholdsvis glukose og aminosyrer, bliver detek...

  11. Nitrogen catabolite repression of asparaginase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Dunlop, P C; Meyer, G M; Roon, R J

    1980-01-01

    The biosynthesis of asparaginase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is subject to strong catabolite repression by a variety of nitrogen compounds. In the present study, asparaginase II synthesis was examined in a wild-type yeast strain and in strains carrying gdhA, gdhCR, or gdhCS mutations. The following effects were observed: (i) In the wild-type strain, the biosynthesis of asparaginase II was strongly repressed when either 10 mM ammonium sulfate or various amino acids (10 mM) served as the sou...

  12. Phenotypes of sphingolipid-dependent strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Patton, J.L.; Srinivasan, B.; Dickson, R. C.; Lester, R L

    1992-01-01

    To study sphingolipid function(s) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have investigated the effects of environmental stress on mutant (SLC) strains (R. C. Dickson, G. B. Wells, A. Schmidt, and R. L. Lester, Mol. Cell. Biol. 10:2176-2181, 1990) that either contain or lack sphingolipids, depending on whether they are cultured with a sphingolipid long-chain base. Strains lacking sphingolipid were unable to grow at low pH, at 37 degrees C, or with high salt concentrations in the medium; these environ...

  13. Radioimmunoassay for yeast killer toxin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for the K1 killer toxin from strain T158C/S14a of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Iodine 125-labelled toxin was made to a specific activity of 100 ?Ci/mg of protein. Antibody to purified toxin was prepared in rabbits using toxin cross-linked to itself. These antibodies, partially purified by 50 percent ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography, produced one precipitation band with killer toxin and bound 125I-labelled toxin in a radioimmunoassay. The antibody preparation also bound with the toxins from another K1 killer, A364A, and three chromosomal superkiller mutants derived from it. (auth)

  14. mRNA decapping enzyme from ribosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    By use of [3H]methyl-5'-capped [14C]mRNA from yeast as a substrate, a decapping enzyme activity has been detected in enzyme fractions derived from a high salt wash of ribosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The product of the decapping reaction is [3H]m7GDP. That the enzyme is not a non-specific pyrophosphatase is suggested by the finding that the diphosphate product, m7GpppA(G), and UDP-glucose are not hydrolyzed

  15. Studies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cultivation under Oscillatory Mixing Conditions

    M?ris Rikmanis

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated under non-aerated conditions in a 5 l laboratory bioreactor. Using the experimental data and the regression analysis method, some mathematical correlations for stirrer rotational speed oscillation frequency and the reaction of the yeast were established. It has been found that different growth parameters are influenced variously by stirrer rotational speed and stirrer rotational speed oscillation frequency. Stirring oscillations can be among the methods for stimulation of biotechnological processes. The obtained results can be used for designing bioreactors and optimizing working conditions.

  16. Regulation of inorganic phosphate transport systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Tamai, Y; Toh-E, A; Oshima, Y

    1985-01-01

    A kinetic study of Pi transport with 32Pi revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two systems of Pi transport, one with a low Km value (8.2 microM) for external Pi and the other with a high Km value (770 microM). The low-Km system was derepressed by Pi starvation, and the activity was expressed under the control of a genetic system which regulates the repressible acid and alkaline phosphatases. The function of the PHO2 gene, which is essential for the derepression of repressible acid phosp...

  17. Sucrose and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a relationship most sweet.

    Marques, Wesley Leoricy; Raghavendran, Vijayendran; Stambuk, Boris Ugarte; Gombert, Andreas Karoly

    2016-02-01

    Sucrose is an abundant, readily available and inexpensive substrate for industrial biotechnology processes and its use is demonstrated with much success in the production of fuel ethanol in Brazil. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which naturally evolved to efficiently consume sugars such as sucrose, is one of the most important cell factories due to its robustness, stress tolerance, genetic accessibility, simple nutrient requirements and long history as an industrial workhorse. This minireview is focused on sucrose metabolism in S. cerevisiae, a rather unexplored subject in the scientific literature. An analysis of sucrose availability in nature and yeast sugar metabolism was performed, in order to understand the molecular background that makes S. cerevisiae consume this sugar efficiently. A historical overview on the use of sucrose and S. cerevisiae by humans is also presented considering sugarcane and sugarbeet as the main sources of this carbohydrate. Physiological aspects of sucrose consumption are compared with those concerning other economically relevant sugars. Also, metabolic engineering efforts to alter sucrose catabolism are presented in a chronological manner. In spite of its extensive use in yeast-based industries, a lot of basic and applied research on sucrose metabolism is imperative, mainly in fields such as genetics, physiology and metabolic engineering. PMID:26658003

  18. Genomic expression program of Saccharomyces cerevisiae along a mixed-culture wine fermentation with Hanseniaspora guilliermondii

    Barbosa, Catarina; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Lage, Patrícia; Mira, Nuno P; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background The introduction of yeast starter cultures consisting in a blend of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeast strains is emerging for production of wines with improved complexity of flavor. The rational use of this approach is, however, dependent on knowing the impact that co-inoculation has in the physiology of S. cerevisiae. In this work the transcriptome of S. cerevisiae was monitored throughout a wine fermentation, carried out in single culture or in a consortium wit...

  19. Metabolic engineering and adaptive evolution for efficient production of D-lactic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Kwon, Eunice Y; Kim, Yong Hwan; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for microbial production of lactic acid (LA) as a monomer of biodegradable poly lactic acid (PLA). Both optical isomers, D-LA and L-LA, are required to produce stereocomplex PLA with improved properties. In this study, we developed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for efficient production of D-LA. D-LA production was achieved by expressing highly stereospecific D-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhA, LEUM_1756) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 in S. cerevisiae lacking natural LA production activity. D-LA consumption after glucose depletion was inhibited by deleting DLD1 encoding D-lactate dehydrogenase and JEN1 encoding monocarboxylate transporter. In addition, ethanol production was reduced by deleting PDC1 and ADH1 genes encoding major pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively, and glycerol production was eliminated by deleting GPD1 and GPD2 genes encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. LA tolerance of the engineered D-LA-producing strain was enhanced by adaptive evolution and overexpression of HAA1 encoding a transcriptional activator involved in weak acid stress response, resulting in effective D-LA production up to 48.9 g/L without neutralization. In a flask fed-batch fermentation under neutralizing condition, our evolved strain produced 112.0 g/L D-LA with a yield of 0.80 g/g glucose and a productivity of 2.2 g/(L · h). PMID:26596574

  20. Evaluation of cytochrome P-450 concentration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Míriam Cristina Sakuragui Matuo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used in mutagenicity tests due to the presence of a cytochrome P-450 system, capable of metabolizing promutagens to active mutagens. There are a large number of S. cerevisiae strains with varying abilities to produce cytochrome P-450. However, strain selection and ideal cultivation conditions are not well defined. We compared cytochrome P-450 levels in four different S. cerevisiae strains and evaluated the cultivation conditions necessary to obtain the highest levels. The amount of cytochrome P-450 produced by each strain varied, as did the incubation time needed to reach the maximum level. The highest cytochrome P-450 concentrations were found in media containing fermentable sugars. The NCYC 240 strain produced the highest level of cytochrome P-450 when grown in the presence of 20 % (w/v glucose. The addition of ethanol to the media also increased cytochrome P-450 synthesis in this strain. These results indicate cultivation conditions must be specific and well-established for the strain selected in order to assure high cytochrome P-450 levels and reliable mutagenicity results.Linhagens de Saccharomyces cerevisiae tem sido amplamente empregadas em testes de mutagenicidade devido à presença de um sistema citocromo P-450 capaz de metabolizar substâncias pró-mutagênicas à sua forma ativa. Devido à grande variedade de linhagens de S. cerevisiae com diferentes capacidades de produção de citocromo P-450, torna-se necessária a seleção de cepas, bem como a definição das condições ideais de cultivo. Neste trabalho, foram comparados os níveis de citocromo P-450 em quatro diferentes linhagens de S. cerevisiae e avaliadas as condições de cultivo necessárias para obtenção de altas concentrações deste sistema enzimático. O maior nível enzimático foi encontrado na linhagem NCYC 240 em presença de 20 % de glicose (p/v. A adição de etanol ao meio de cultura também produziu um aumento na síntese de citocromo P-450. Estes resultados indicam que as condições de cultivo devem ser específicas e bem definidas para a linhagem selecionada, garantindo assim elevados níveis de citocromo P-450 e, conseqüentemente, a confiabilidade nos testes de mutagenicidade.

  1. Aquaporins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast.

    Karpel, Jonathan E; Bisson, Linda F

    2006-04-01

    AQY1 and AQY2 were sequenced from five commercial and five native wine yeasts. Of these, two AQY1 alleles from UCD 522 and UCD 932 were identified that encoded three or four amino-acid changes, respectively, compared with the Sigma1278b sequence. Oocytes expressing these AQY1 alleles individually exhibited increased water permeability vs. water-injected oocytes, whereas oocytes expressing the AQY2 allele from UCD 932 did not show an increase, as expected, owing to an 11 bp deletion. Wine strains lacking Aqy1p did not show a decrease in spore fitness or enological aptitude under stressful conditions, limited nitrogen, or increased temperature. The exact role of aquaporins in wine yeasts remains unclear. PMID:16553841

  2. Key features of the two-intron Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene SUS1 contribute to its alternative splicing

    Hossain, Munshi Azad; Rodriguez, Caitlin M.; Johnson, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing allows dramatic expansion of the eukaryotic proteome and facilitates cellular response to changes in environmental conditions. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene SUS1, which encodes a protein involved in mRNA export and histone H2B deubiquitination, contains two introns; non-canonical sequences in the first intron contribute to its retention, a common form of alternative splicing in plants and fungi. Here we show that the pattern of SUS1 splicing changes in respon...

  3. On the fermentative behavior of auxotrophic strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Lucia, Paciello; Jesus, Zueco; Carmine, Landi.

    2014-09-15

    Full Text Available Background The selection of new yeast strains could lead to improvements in bioethanol production. Here, we have studied the fermentative capacity of different auxotrophic mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are routinely used as hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. It has recen [...] tly been found that these strains exhibit physiological alterations and peculiar sensitivities with respect to the parental prototrophic strains from which they derive. In this work the performance of auxotrophic S. cerevisiae CEN.PK strains was compared to the corresponding prototrophic strain, to S. cerevisiae T5bV, a strain isolated from grape must and to another auxotrophic strain, S. cerevisiae BY4741. Results The results indicate that the fermentative capacity of strains grown in 2% glucose was similar in all the strains tested. However, in 15% initial glucose, the auxotrophic strains exhibited a more than doubled ethanol yield on biomass (10 g g- 1dw) compared to the prototrophic strains (less than 5 g g- 1dw). Other tests have also evidenced that in medium depletion conditions, ethanol production continues after growth arrest. Conclusions The results highlight the capacity of auxotrophic yeast strains to produce ethanol per mass unit, in a higher amount with respect to the prototrophic ones. This leads to potential applications for auxotrophic strains of S. cerevisiae in the production of ethanol in both homogeneous and heterogeneous phases (immobilized systems). The higher ethanol yield on biomass would be advantageous in immobilized cell systems, as a reduced yeast biomass could greatly reduce the mass transfer limitations through the immobilization matrix.

  4. Characterization of an MMS sensitive mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    We have characterized a methyl methanesulfonate sensitive mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to learn more about DNA repair and mutagenesis in this organism. The mutation, designated mms3-1, also confers sensitivity to ultraviolet light and to ethyl methanesulfonate in both haploids and homozygous diploids. Its effect on ?-ray sensitivity, however, is a function of the ploidy of the cell and its effect on induced mutation is a function of both the ploidy of the cell and the nature of the inducing agent. Our major findings are discussed. Our data indicate that: (1) Saccharomyces cerevisiae has an error prone pathway for the repair of uv damage controlled by the MMS3 gene product operating in and only in, and possibly induced by conditions present only in, a/? diploids; (2) in diploids, at least, there exists at least one step in the error prone repair of uv induced damage which is different from a step in the error prone repair of EMS induced damage; (3) a/? mms3-1/mms3-1 diploids may be defective in a step common to the repair of mutagenic lesions following uv irradiation and lethal lesions following ? irradiation; and (4) there are steps in the repair of MMS induced lethal damage that are different from steps in the repair of EMS induced lethal damage

  5. A vaccine grade of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing mammalian myostatin

    Zhang Tingting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely-used system for protein expression. We previously showed that heat-killed whole recombinant yeast vaccine expressing mammalian myostatin can modulate myostatin function in mice, resulting in increase of body weight and muscle composition in these animals. Foreign DNA introduced into yeast cells can be lost soon unless cells are continuously cultured in selection media, which usually contain antibiotics. For cost and safety concerns, it is essential to optimize conditions to produce quality food and pharmaceutical products. Results We developed a simple but effective method to engineer a yeast strain stably expressing mammalian myostatin. This method utilized high-copy-number integration of myostatin gene into the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the final step, antibiotic selection marker was removed using the Cre-LoxP system to minimize any possible side-effects for animals. The resulting yeast strain can be maintained in rich culture media and stably express mammalian myostatin for two years. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast was able to induce immune response to myostatin and modulated the body weight of mice. Conclusions Establishment of such yeast strain is a step further toward transformation of yeast cells into edible vaccine to improve meat production in farm animals and treat human muscle-wasting diseases in the future.

  6. [Surface display of phytase on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient bioethanol production from corn starch].

    Xiao, Yan; Chen, Xianzhong; Shen, Wei; Yang, Haiquan; Fan, You

    2015-12-01

    Production of bioethanol using starch as raw material has become a very prominent technology. However, phytate in the raw material not only decreases ethanol production efficiency, but also increases phosphorus discharge. In this study, to decrease phytate content in an ethanol fermentationprocess, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered forheterologous expression of phytase on the cell surface. The phy gene encoding phytase gene was fused with the C-terminal-half region of α-agglutinin and then inserted downstream of the secretion signal gene, to produce a yeast surface-display expression vector pMGK-AG-phy, which was then transformed into S. cerevisiae. The recombinant yeast strain, PHY, successfully displayed phytase on the surface of cells producing 6.4 U/g wet cells and its properties were further characterized. The growthrate and ethanol production of the PHY strain were faster than the parent S. cerevisiae strain in the fermentation medium by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Moreover, the phytate concentration decreased by 91% in dry vinasse compared to the control. In summary, we constructed recombinant S. cerevisiae strain displaying phytase on the cell surface, which could effectively reduce the content of phytate, improve the utilization value of vinasse and reduce the discharge of phosphorus. The strain reported here represents a useful novel engineering platform for developing an environment-friendly system for bioethanol production from a corn substrate. PMID:27093833

  7. Integrated analysis of metabolic phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Fu Pengcheng

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important microorganism for both industrial processes and scientific research. Consequently, there have been extensive efforts to characterize its cellular processes. In order to fully understand the relationship between yeast's genome and its physiology, the stockpiles of diverse biological data sets that describe its cellular components and phenotypic behavior must be integrated at the genome-scale. Genome-scale metabolic networks have been reconstructed for several microorganisms, including S. cerevisiae, and the properties of these networks have been successfully analyzed using a variety of constraint-based methods. Phenotypic phase plane analysis is a constraint-based method which provides a global view of how optimal growth rates are affected by changes in two environmental variables such as a carbon and an oxygen uptake rate. Some applications of phenotypic phase plane analysis include the study of optimal growth rates and of network capacity and function. Results In this study, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome-scale metabolic network was used to formulate a phenotypic phase plane that displays the maximum allowable growth rate and distinct patterns of metabolic pathway utilization for all combinations of glucose and oxygen uptake rates. In silico predictions of growth rate and secretion rates and in vivo data for three separate growth conditions (aerobic glucose-limited, oxidative-fermentative, and microaerobic were concordant. Conclusions Taken together, this study examines the function and capacity of yeast's metabolic machinery and shows that the phenotypic phase plane can be used to accurately predict metabolic phenotypes and to interpret experimental data in the context of a genome-scale model.

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae modulates gut responses to Escherichia coli in pigs

    Henri Salmon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Galliano Zanello1,2, Mustapha Berri2, Jolle Dupont3, Pierre-Yves Sizaret4, Claire Chevaleyre2, Sandrine Melo2, Romain DInca1, Eric Auclair1, Franois Meurens2, Henri Salmon2 1 Socit Industrielle Lesaffre, Lesaffre Feed Additives, Marcq-en-Baroeul, France. 2 Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA, UR1282, Infectiologie Animale et Sant Publique, F-37380, Nouzilly (Tours, France. 3 Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA, UMR85, Physiologie de la Reproduction et des Comportements, F-37380, Nouzilly (Tours, France. 4 Dpartement des microscopies, plate-forme R.I.O de microscopie lectronique, Universit Franois Rabelais, Tours, France. Henri.Salmon@tours.inra.fr Enteritis, mostly caused by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC adhering to and colonizing enterocytes in the small intestine, results in large economic losses in neonatal and post-weaning farm animals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is non-commensal and non-pathogenic yeast and some strains are used as dietary yeast or as probiotics to prevent or cure enteritis. To ascertain the role of S. cerevisiae (strain CNCM I-3856 we developed two types of studies. In in vitro studies, using two intestinal epithelial cell lines, IPI-2I (transformed and IPEC-1 (non transformed, differentiated and polarized we showed that S. cerevisiae (strain CNCM I-3856 modulate epithelial cell responses to F4+ E. coli; thus in IPI-2I cells both viable yeast and its culture supernatant decrease the expression of pro-inflammatory transcripts (TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL2 and CCL20. Similarly, in IPEC-1 cells, viable yeast decreases the pro-inflammatory transcripts (IL-6, IL-8, CCL20, CXCL2 and CXCL10 and apical secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8. Concomitantly, there was a decrease in the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation. In contrast, S. cerevisiae up-regulates mRNA levels of the anti-inflammatory PPAR-? nuclear receptor, the IL-12p35 cytokine and the CCL25 chemokine involved in gut mucosal immunity. However, S. cerevisiae failed to restore the diminished transepithelial electrical resistance in monolayer exposed to F4+ ETEC. In another hand, feeding pregnant sows with the same strain of S. cerevisiae stimulate the passive immunity to piglet with a trend to a lower incidence of non-typed E. coli diarrhea. Thus S. cerevisiae (strain CNCM I-3856 exhibits various probiotic properties, modulating diversely the gut responses to E. coli.

  9. Multiparameter analysis of apoptosis in puromycin-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Citterio, Barbara; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Ghibelli, Lina; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Battistelli, Michela; Canonico, Barbara; Rocchi, Marco B L; Teodori, Laura; Ciani, Maurizio; Piatti, Elena

    2015-08-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a typical apoptotic phenotype is induced by some stress factors such as sugars, acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, aspirin and age. Nevertheless, no data have been reported for apoptosis induced by puromycin, a damaging agent known to induce apoptosis in mammalian cells. We treated S. cerevisiae with puromycin to induce apoptosis and evaluated the percentage of dead cells by using Hoechst 33342 staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Annexin V flow cytometry (FC) analysis. Hoechst 33342 fluorescence images were processed to acquire parameters to use for multiparameter analysis [and perform a principal component analysis, (PCA)]. Cell viability was evaluated by Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) and Acridine Orange microscope fluorescence staining. The results show puromycin-induced apoptosis in S. cerevisiae, and the PCA analysis indicated that the increasing percentage of apoptotic cells delineated a well-defined graph profile. The results were supported by TEM and FC. This study gives new insights into yeast apoptosis using puromycin as inducer agent, and PCA analysis may complement molecular analysis facilitating further studies to its detection. PMID:25868793

  10. Biogeographical characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast by molecular methods.

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Aguzzi, Irene; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Biogeography is the descriptive and explanatory study of spatial patterns and processes involved in the distribution of biodiversity. Without biogeography, it would be difficult to study the diversity of microorganisms because there would be no way to visualize patterns in variation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, "the wine yeast," is the most important species involved in alcoholic fermentation, and in vineyard ecosystems, it follows the principle of "everything is everywhere." Agricultural practices such as farming (organic versus conventional) and floor management systems have selected different populations within this species that are phylogenetically distinct. In fact, recent ecological and geographic studies highlighted that unique strains are associated with particular grape varieties in specific geographical locations. These studies also highlighted that significant diversity and regional character, or 'terroir,' have been introduced into the winemaking process via this association. This diversity of wild strains preserves typicity, the high quality, and the unique flavor of wines. Recently, different molecular methods were developed to study population dynamics of S. cerevisiae strains in both vineyards and wineries. In this review, we will provide an update on the current molecular methods used to reveal the geographical distribution of S. cerevisiae wine yeast. PMID:23805132

  11. Irradiation effects on the alcohol fermentation ability of saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Irradiation effects on the alcohol fermentation ability of saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae suspensions of 1.5x108 clls/ml were exposed to single and fractionated doses of gamma irradiation, i.e. 0; 0.30; 0.60; 0.90; and 1.20 kGy in aerobic condition at dose rate of 1.63 kGy/hour. The fractionated doses were given with time interval of 15, 30 and 45 minutes. The fermentation was held at 300C for 40 hours. It is seen that an increase of alcohol production was obtained when cells were irradiated at 0.60 kGy, although the result has no significant difference statistically with control. At the dose of 1.20 kGy the alcohol fermentation ability of S. cerevisiae decreased drastically as compared to control. Irradiation using single or fractionated doses with time interval of 15-45 minutes did not influence the alcohol production. Comparing the time interval of 45 minutes at 0.60 kGy and at 1.20 kGy, it appeared that the yield of alcohol was different. (author). 17 refs.; 4 figs

  12. Biogeographical characterisation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast by molecular methods

    RosannaTofalo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogeography is the descriptive and explanatory study of spatial patterns and processes involved in the distribution of biodiversity. Without biogeography, it would be difficult to study the diversity of microorganisms because there would be no way to visualise patterns in variation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, “the wine yeast”, is the most important species involved in alcoholic fermentation, and in vineyard ecosystems, it follows the principle of “everything is everywhere”. Agricultural practices such as farming (organic versus conventional and floor management systems have selected different populations within this species that are phylogenetically distinct. In fact, recent ecological and geographic studies highlighted that unique strains are associated with particular grape varieties in specific geographical locations. These studies also highlighted that significant diversity and regional character, or ‘terroir’, have been introduced into the winemaking process via this association. This diversity of wild strains preserves typicity, the high quality and the unique flavour of wines. Recently, different molecular methods were developed to study population dynamics of S. cerevisiae strains in both vineyards and wineries. In this review, we will provide an update on the current molecular methods used to reveal the geographical distribution of S. cerevisiae wine yeast.

  13. Early manifestations of replicative aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Maksim I. Sorokin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is successfully used as a model organism to find genes responsible for lifespan control of higher organisms. As functional decline of higher eukaryotes can start as early as one quarter of the average lifespan, we asked whether S. cerevisiae can be used to model this manifestation of aging. While the average replicative lifespan of S. cerevisiae mother cells ranges between 15 and 30 division cycles, we found that resistances to certain stresses start to decrease much earlier. Looking into the mechanism, we found that knockouts of genes responsible for mitochondriato-nucleus (retrograde signaling, RTG1 or RTG3, significantly decrease the resistance of cells that generated more than four daughters, but not of the younger ones. We also found that even young mother cells frequently contain mitochondria with heterogeneous transmembrane potential and that the percentage of such cells correlates with replicative age. Together, these facts suggest that retrograde signaling starts to malfunction in relatively young cells, leading to accumulation of heterogeneous mitochondria within one cell. The latter may further contribute to a decline in stress resistances.

  14. Role of social wasps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ecology and evolution.

    Stefanini, Irene; Dapporto, Leonardo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Calabretta, Antonio; Di Paola, Monica; De Filippo, Carlotta; Viola, Roberto; Capretti, Paolo; Polsinelli, Mario; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2012-08-14

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most important model organisms and has been a valuable asset to human civilization. However, despite its extensive use in the last 9,000 y, the existence of a seasonal cycle outside human-made environments has not yet been described. We demonstrate the role of social wasps as vector and natural reservoir of S. cerevisiae during all seasons. We provide experimental evidence that queens of social wasps overwintering as adults (Vespa crabro and Polistes spp.) can harbor yeast cells from autumn to spring and transmit them to their progeny. This result is mirrored by field surveys of the genetic variability of natural strains of yeast. Microsatellites and sequences of a selected set of loci able to recapitulate the yeast strain's evolutionary history were used to compare 17 environmental wasp isolates with a collection of strains from grapes from the same region and more than 230 strains representing worldwide yeast variation. The wasp isolates fall into subclusters representing the overall ecological and industrial yeast diversity of their geographic origin. Our findings indicate that wasps are a key environmental niche for the evolution of natural S. cerevisiae populations, the dispersion of yeast cells in the environment, and the maintenance of their diversity. The close relatedness of several wasp isolates with grape and wine isolates reflects the crucial role of human activities on yeast population structure, through clonal expansion and selection of specific strains during the biotransformation of fermented foods, followed by dispersal mediated by insects and other animals. PMID:22847440

  15. Osmo-, thermo- and ethanol- tolerances of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1

    Sandrasegarampillai Balakumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1, which is a locally isolated and improved strain showed viability at 40, 45 and 50ºC and produced ethanol at 40, 43 and 45ºC. When the cells were given heat shock at 45ºC for 30min and grown at 40ºC, 100% viability was observed for 60h, and addition of 200gl-1 ethanol has led to complete cell death at 30h. Heat shock given at 45ºC (for 30min has improved the tolerance to temperature induced ethanol shock leading to 37% viability at 30h. when the cells were subjected to ethanol (200gl-1 for 30 min and osmotic shock (sorbitol 300gl-1, trehalose contents in the cells were increased. The heat shocked cells showed better viability in presence of added ethanol. Soy flour supplementation has improved the viability of S. cerevisiae S1 to 80% in presence of 100gl-1 added ethanol and to 60% in presence of 300gl-1 sorbitol. In presence of sorbitol (200gl-1 and ethanol (50gl-1 at 40ºC, 46% viability was retained by S. cerevisiae S1 at 48h and it was improved to 80% by soy flour supplementation.

  16. Protein Enrichment of Cassava Pulp Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    C. Yuangklang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine intestinal digestibility of residual components of cassava pulp solid state fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for animal feed. Three ruminally cannulated animal were used to measure in situ rumen Dry Matter (DM and Crude Protein (CP degradability characteristics of cassava pulp solid state fermentation by S. cerevisiae. Nylon bags containing 3 g (as fed basis of each feed was immersed in duplicate at each time point in the ventral rumen of each goat for 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h. Rumen feed residues from bags of 16 h incubation were used for estimation of lower gut digestibility by the technique of in vitro pepsin-pancreatin digestion. The results of the chemical analysis indicated that fermentation was slightly improved Ruminal Undegradable Protein (RUP of cassava pulp. The highest value of RUP was significantly differ (pS. cerevisiae in cassava pulp. The present results indicate that fermented cassava pulp can improve protein content and ruminal undegradable protein content.

  17. De novo synthesis of monoterpenes by Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts.

    Carrau, Francisco M; Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Farina, Laura; Gaggero, Carina; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Versini, Giuseppe; Henschke, Paul A

    2005-02-01

    This paper reports the production of monoterpenes, which elicit a floral aroma in wine, by strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Terpenes, which are typical components of the essential oils of flowers and fruits, are also present as free and glycosylated conjugates amongst the secondary metabolites of certain wine grape varieties of Vitis vinifera. Hence, when these compounds are present in wine they are considered to originate from grape and not fermentation. However, the biosynthesis of monoterpenes by S. cerevisiae in the absence of grape derived precursors is shown here to be of de novo origin in wine yeast strains. Higher concentration of assimilable nitrogen increased accumulation of linalool and citronellol. Microaerobic compared with anaerobic conditions favored terpene accumulation in the ferment. The amount of linalool produced by some strains of S. cerevisiae could be of sensory importance in wine production. These unexpected results are discussed in relation to the known sterol biosynthetic pathway and to an alternative pathway for terpene biosynthesis not previously described in yeast. PMID:15668008

  18. Histone H1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Inhibits Transcriptional Silencing

    Veron, Marie; Zou, Yanfei; Yu, Qun; Bi, Xin; Selmi, Abdelkader; Gilson, Eric; Defossez, Pierre-Antoine

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain euchromatic regions, which are transcriptionally active, and heterochromatic regions, which are repressed. These domains are separated by “barrier elements”: DNA sequences that protect euchromatic regions from encroachment by neighboring heterochromatin. To identify proteins that play a role in the function of barrier elements we have carried out a screen in S. cerevisiae. We recovered the gene HHO1, which encodes the yeast ortholog of histone H1, as a high-copy mod...

  19. Uranium removal from acidic aqueous solutions by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Candida colliculosa

    The sorption of uranium from acidic aqueous solutions (pH 4.5, Cinit = 10 to 1000 mg U/L) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Candida colliculosa was investigated using a batch technique. The U-sorption onto Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Debaryomyces hansenii followed a Langmuir, while that onto Kluyveromyces marxianus and Candida colliculosa a Freundlich isotherm. The results demonstrated that all investigated biomasses could effectively remove uranium from acidic aqueous solutions. From all sorbents, Saccharomyces cerevisiae appeared to be the most effective with a maximum sorption capacity of 127.7 mg U/g dry biomass. (author)

  20. Mam33 promotes cytochrome c oxidase subunit I translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria.

    Roloff, Gabrielle A; Henry, Michael F

    2015-08-15

    Three mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, Cox1, Cox2, and Cox3, comprise the core of the cytochrome c oxidase complex. Gene-specific translational activators ensure that these respiratory chain subunits are synthesized at the correct location and in stoichiometric ratios to prevent unassembled protein products from generating free oxygen radicals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nuclear-encoded proteins Mss51 and Pet309 specifically activate mitochondrial translation of the largest subunit, Cox1. Here we report that Mam33 is a third COX1 translational activator in yeast mitochondria. Mam33 is required for cells to adapt efficiently from fermentation to respiration. In the absence of Mam33, Cox1 translation is impaired, and cells poorly adapt to respiratory conditions because they lack basal fermentative levels of Cox1. PMID:26108620

  1. Mam33 promotes cytochrome c oxidase subunit I translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria

    Roloff, Gabrielle A.; Henry, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Three mitochondrial DNAencoded proteins, Cox1, Cox2, and Cox3, comprise the core of the cytochrome c oxidase complex. Gene-specific translational activators ensure that these respiratory chain subunits are synthesized at the correct location and in stoichiometric ratios to prevent unassembled protein products from generating free oxygen radicals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nuclear-encoded proteins Mss51 and Pet309 specifically activate mitochondrial translation of the largest subunit, Cox1. Here we report that Mam33 is a third COX1 translational activator in yeast mitochondria. Mam33 is required for cells to adapt efficiently from fermentation to respiration. In the absence of Mam33, Cox1 translation is impaired, and cells poorly adapt to respiratory conditions because they lack basal fermentative levels of Cox1. PMID:26108620

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under different nitrogen sources.

    Zhao, Shaohui; Zhao, Xinrui; Zou, Huijun; Fu, Jianwei; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-04-14

    In cultures containing multiple sources of nitrogen, Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a sequential use of nitrogen sources through a mechanism known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). To identify proteins differentially expressed due to NCR, proteomic analysis of S. cerevisiae S288C under different nitrogen source conditions was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), revealing 169 candidate protein spots. Among these 169 protein spots, 121 were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins were closely associated with four main biological processes through Gene Ontology (GO) categorical analysis. The identification of the potential proteins and cellular processes related to NCR offer a global overview of changes elicited by different nitrogen sources, providing clues into how yeast adapt to different nutritional conditions. Moreover, by comparing our proteomic data with corresponding mRNA data, proteins regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level could be distinguished. Biological significance In S. cerevisiae, different nitrogen sources provide different growth characteristics and generate different metabolites. The nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) process plays an important role for S. cerevisiae in the ordinal utilization of different nitrogen sources. NCR process can result in significant shift of global metabolic networks. Previous works on NCR primarily focused on transcriptomic level. The results obtained in this study provided a global atlas of the proteome changes triggered by different nitrogen sources and would facilitate the understanding of mechanisms for how yeast could adapt to different nutritional conditions. PMID:24530623

  3. Genetic Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm in Liquid Medium

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Gro Rejkjær Sørensen, Laura; Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Lisby, Michael; Folkesson, Sven Anders; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm-forming microorganisms switch between two forms: free-living planktonic and sessile multicellular. Sessile communities of yeast biofilms in liquid medium provide a primitive example of multicellularity and are clinically important because biofilms tend to have other growth characteristics...... than free-living cells. We investigated the genetic basis for yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, biofilm on solid surfaces in liquid medium by screening a comprehensive deletion mutant collection in the S1278b background and found 71 genes that were essential for biofilm development. Quantitative...... functioned specifically in biofilm and mat formation. In a tpk3 mutant, transcription of FLO11 was induced three-fold compared with wild-type, but biofilm development and cell–cell adhesion was absent, suggesting that Tpk3p regulates FLO11 positive posttranscriptionally and negative transcriptionally. The...

  4. ACTIVITY OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE ENZYME IN YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Blažena Lavová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS with reactive nitrogen species (RNS are known to play dual role in biological systems, they can be harmful or beneficial to living systems. ROS can be important mediators of damage to cell structures, including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids termed as oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzymes protect the organism against the oxidative damage caused by active oxygen forms. The role of superoxide dismutase (SOD is to accelerate the dismutation of the toxic superoxide radical, produced during oxidative energy processes, to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In this study, SOD activity of three yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined. It was found that SOD activity was the highest (23.7 U.mg-1 protein in strain 612 after 28 hours of cultivation. The lowest SOD activity from all tested strains was found after 56 hours of cultivation of strain Gyöng (0.7 U.mg-1 protein.

  5. Replication of avocado sunblotch viroid in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Delan-Forino, Clmentine; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Torchet, Claire

    2011-04-01

    Viroids are the smallest known pathogenic agents. They are noncoding, single-stranded, closed-circular, "naked" RNAs, which replicate through RNA-RNA transcription. Viroids of the Avsunviroidae family possess a hammerhead ribozyme in their sequence, allowing self-cleavage during their replication. To date, viroids have only been detected in plant cells. Here, we investigate the replication of Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd) of the Avsunviroidae family in a nonconventional host, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that ASBVd RNA strands of both polarities are able to self-cleave and to replicate in a unicellular eukaryote cell. We show that the viroid monomeric RNA is destabilized by the nuclear 3' and the cytoplasmic 5' RNA degradation pathways. For the first time, our results provide evidence that viroids can replicate in other organisms than plants and that yeast contains all of the essential cellular elements for the replication of ASBVd. PMID:21270165

  6. Replication of Avocado Sunblotch Viroid in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae?

    Delan-Forino, Clmentine; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Torchet, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Viroids are the smallest known pathogenic agents. They are noncoding, single-stranded, closed-circular, naked RNAs, which replicate through RNA-RNA transcription. Viroids of the Avsunviroidae family possess a hammerhead ribozyme in their sequence, allowing self-cleavage during their replication. To date, viroids have only been detected in plant cells. Here, we investigate the replication of Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd) of the Avsunviroidae family in a nonconventional host, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that ASBVd RNA strands of both polarities are able to self-cleave and to replicate in a unicellular eukaryote cell. We show that the viroid monomeric RNA is destabilized by the nuclear 3? and the cytoplasmic 5? RNA degradation pathways. For the first time, our results provide evidence that viroids can replicate in other organisms than plants and that yeast contains all of the essential cellular elements for the replication of ASBVd. PMID:21270165

  7. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  8. Brazilian propolis protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress

    Rafael A. de, S; Frederico A.V. de, Castro; Elis C.A., Eleutherio; Raquel M. de, Souza; Joaquim F.M. da, Silva; Marcos D., Pereira.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a natural product widely used for humans. Due to its complex composition, a number of applications (antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anesthetic, cytostatic and antioxidant) have been attributed to this substance. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model we investigated the me [...] chanisms underlying the antioxidant effect of propolis from Guarapari against oxidative stress. Submitting a wild type (BY4741) and antioxidant deficient strains (ctt1?, sod1?, gsh1?, gtt1? and gtt2?) either to 15 mM menadione or to 2 mM hydrogen peroxide during 60 min, we observed that all strains, except the mutant sod1?, acquired tolerance when previously treated with 25 g/mL of alcoholic propolis extract. Such a treatment reduced the levels of ROS generation and of lipid peroxidation, after oxidative stress. The increase in Cu/Zn-Sod activity by propolis suggests that the protection might be acting synergistically with Cu/Zn-Sod.

  9. Brazilian propolis protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress

    Rafael A. de S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a natural product widely used for humans. Due to its complex composition, a number of applications (antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anesthetic, cytostatic and antioxidant have been attributed to this substance. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model we investigated the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effect of propolis from Guarapari against oxidative stress. Submitting a wild type (BY4741 and antioxidant deficient strains (ctt1?, sod1?, gsh1?, gtt1? and gtt2? either to 15 mM menadione or to 2 mM hydrogen peroxide during 60 min, we observed that all strains, except the mutant sod1?, acquired tolerance when previously treated with 25 g/mL of alcoholic propolis extract. Such a treatment reduced the levels of ROS generation and of lipid peroxidation, after oxidative stress. The increase in Cu/Zn-Sod activity by propolis suggests that the protection might be acting synergistically with Cu/Zn-Sod.

  10. Higher-order structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin

    We have developed a method for partially purifying chromatin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) to a level suitable for studies of its higher-order folding. This has required the use of yeast strains that are free of the ubiquitous yeast killer virus. Results from dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction show that the yeast chromatin undergoes a cation-dependent folding into 30-nm filaments that resemble those characteristic of higher-cell chromatin; moreover, the packing of nucleosomes within the yeast 30-nm filaments is similar to that of higher cells. These results imply that yeast has a protein or protein domain that serves the role of the histone H 1 found in higher cells; physical and genetic studies of the yeast activity could help elucidate the structure and function of H 1. Images of the yeast 30-nm filaments can be used to test crossed-linker models for 30-nm filament structure

  11. Mutations in Ran system affected telomere silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The Ran GTPase system regulates the direction and timing of several cellular events, such as nuclear-cytosolic transport, centrosome formation, and nuclear envelope assembly in telophase. To gain insight into the Ran system's involvement in chromatin formation, we investigated gene silencing at the telomere in several mutants of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which had defects in genes involved in the Ran system. A mutation of the RanGAP gene, rna1-1, caused reduced silencing at the telomere, and partial disruption of the nuclear Ran binding factor, yrb2-Δ2, increased this silencing. The reduced telomere silencing in rna1-1 cells was suppressed by a high dosage of the SIR3 gene or the SIT4 gene. Furthermore, hyperphosphorylated Sir3 protein accumulated in the rna1-1 mutant. These results suggest that RanGAP is required for the heterochromatin structure at the telomere in budding yeast

  12. Pyrimidine-specific cleavage by an endoribonuclease of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    An endoribonuclease with pyrimidine cleavage site specificity was isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 6 to 7 and did not require a divalent cation. It was inhibited by 5 x 10-5 M hetidium bromide, although it appeared to be single strand specific. The enzyme gave a limited cleavage of yeast mRNA and rRNA, yielding products that were terminated with pyrimidine nucleoside 2',3'-cyclic phosphate. The bonds between pyrimidine and A residues constituted more than 90% of the scission sites when the average product size was 50 nucloetides. Homopolyribonucleotides were cleaved poorly. Poly(A,U) was cleaved rapidly, and analysis of the products of poly(A,U) hydrolysis showed a very stringent cleavage of U-A bonds

  13. Adaptive answer to low ionizing radiation doses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The aim of this work is to verify the existence of the adaptive response phenomenon induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in living cells. It is known that low doses of ionizing radiation, called conditioning doses, may induce resistance in exposed organisms to higher doses, called challenging doses, which are applied after a period of time. The involved mechanisms in this phenomenon, called Adaptive Response, are diverse and complex. Among them, the most important are the activation of DNA-repair enzymes and nuclear recombination process. As the 'target' sample, it was utilized a 'wild type' strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aqueous suspension. Adaptive Response was verified in a wide range of challenging doses. Conditioning doses, inductors of radio-resistance, were (0.44±0.03) Gy and the waiting time between them and challenging doses was 2 hours at room temperature.(author)

  14. Brazilian propolis protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress.

    de S, Rafael A; de Castro, Frederico A V; Eleutherio, Elis C A; de Souza, Raquel M; da Silva, Joaquim F M; Pereira, Marcos D

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product widely used for humans. Due to its complex composition, a number of applications (antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anesthetic, cytostatic and antioxidant) have been attributed to this substance. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model we investigated the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effect of propolis from Guarapari against oxidative stress. Submitting a wild type (BY4741) and antioxidant deficient strains (ctt1?, sod1?, gsh1?, gtt1? and gtt2?) either to 15 mM menadione or to 2 mM hydrogen peroxide during 60 min, we observed that all strains, except the mutant sod1?, acquired tolerance when previously treated with 25 ?g/mL of alcoholic propolis extract. Such a treatment reduced the levels of ROS generation and of lipid peroxidation, after oxidative stress. The increase in Cu/Zn-Sod activity by propolis suggests that the protection might be acting synergistically with Cu/Zn-Sod. PMID:24516431

  15. Structural properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein complex network

    Ramezanpour, A; Karimipour, V

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that protein complexes rather than individual proteins are the functional units of the cell. A first step in the understanding of integration and coordination of these cellular functions is a comprehensive study of the structural features of the network of connections between these complexes. We use the recently obtained data based on tandem-affinity purification (TAP) and mass spectrometry, to study the structural features of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein complex network. We find striking similarities and differences between the structural properties of the networks of proteins and protein complexes. The network of complexes is still a small world network with scale free distributions for many of its properties (e.g. connectivity and size of complexes). However in contrast to the protein network, we find no correlations between the degrees of neighbouring complexes. There is also no correlation between the size of neighbouring complexes. Finally we propose a simple evolut...

  16. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    Shibata, M.; Torigoe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takizawa, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Ono, F.

    2014-05-01

    Our studies on the tolerance of plants and animals against very high pressure of several GPa have been extended to a smaller sized fungus, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate, and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar. It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for longer than 12 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is a little weaker than that of tardigrades.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a potential biosorbent for biosorption of uranium.

    PROF. RAJESH DHANKHAR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper projects the potential of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in biosorbing U (VI ion on nonliving biomass of specie in batch system with respect to pH, Biosorbent dose, Initial metal concentration, Contact time and Particle size. From the batch studies, it was found that the fungal biomass exhibited the optimum Uranium uptake at pH 5 and 100 μm particle size, adsorbent dose of 10g/L and initial metal concentration of 100mg/L. Maximum uptake was observed after the Contact time of 75 minutes. Sorption isotherms were interpreted interms of Langmuir and Freundlich models. Equilibrium data fitted well to Langmuir model and Uptake kinetic followed pseudo-second order model. Base treatment was found to enhance the metal removal ability of untreated biomass. The mechanism of process was gained by FTIR and SEM. IR spectra analysis revealed that Carbonyl and amino groups have played important role in U (VI biosorption.

  18. Phenotypic effects of membrane protein overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Meln, Karin; Blomberg, Anders; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-01

    Large-scale protein overexpression phenotype screens provide an important complement to the more common gene knockout screens. Here, we have targeted the so far poorly understood Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome and report growth phenotypes for a strain collection overexpressing 600 C-terminally tagged integral membrane proteins grown both under normal and three different stress conditions. Although overexpression of most membrane proteins reduce the growth rate in synthetic defined medium, we identify a large number of proteins that, when overexpressed, confer specific resistance to various stress conditions. Our data suggest that regulation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis and the Na+/K+ homeostasis system constitute major downstream targets of the yeast PKA/RAS pathway and point to a possible connection between the early secretory pathway and the cells' response to oxidative stress. We also have quantified the expression levels for >550 membrane proteins, facilitating the choice of well expressing proteins for future functional and structural studies. caffeine | paraquat | salt tolerance | yeast

  19. A comparison between sugar consumption and ethanol production in wort by immobilized Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, Saccharomyces Ludwigii and Saccharomyces Rouxii on BrewerS Spent Grain

    Mohammadi, Aniseh; Razavi, Seyyed Hadi; Mousavi, Seyyed Mohammad; Rezaei, Karamatollah

    2011-01-01

    The immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DSM 70424, Saccharomyces ludwigii DSM 3447 and Saccharomyces rouxii DSM 2531 on brewers spent grain and then ethanol production and sugar consumption of these immobilized yeasts were investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the abilities of these three immobilized yeasts for producing alcohol for brewing at two temperatures (7 and 12 C) using two different sugar levels (one at original level supplied in the brewery and one with 2....

  20. "A comparison between sugar consumption and ethanol production in wort by immobilized Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, Saccharomyces Ludwigii and Saccharomyces Rouxii on Brewer's Spent Grain"

    Aniseh Mohammadi; Seyyed Hadi Razavi; Seyyed Mohammad Mousavi; Karamatollah Rezaei

    2011-01-01

    The immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DSM 70424, Saccharomyces ludwigii DSM 3447 and Saccharomyces rouxii DSM 2531 on brewer's spent grain and then ethanol production and sugar consumption of these immobilized yeasts were investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the abilities of these three immobilized yeasts for producing alcohol for brewing at two temperatures (7 and 12 C) using two different sugar levels (one at original level supplied in the brewery and one with 2....

  1. Global mapping of DNA conformational flexibility on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Menconi, Giulia; Bedini, Andrea; Barale, Roberto; Sbrana, Isabella

    2015-04-01

    In this study we provide the first comprehensive map of DNA conformational flexibility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae complete genome. Flexibility plays a key role in DNA supercoiling and DNA/protein binding, regulating DNA transcription, replication or repair. Specific interest in flexibility analysis concerns its relationship with human genome instability. Enrichment in flexible sequences has been detected in unstable regions of human genome defined fragile sites, where genes map and carry frequent deletions and rearrangements in cancer. Flexible sequences have been suggested to be the determinants of fragile gene proneness to breakage; however, their actual role and properties remain elusive. Our in silico analysis carried out genome-wide via the StabFlex algorithm, shows the conserved presence of highly flexible regions in budding yeast genome as well as in genomes of other Saccharomyces sensu stricto species. Flexibile peaks in S. cerevisiae identify 175 ORFs mapping on their 3'UTR, a region affecting mRNA translation, localization and stability. (TA)n repeats of different extension shape the central structure of peaks and co-localize with polyadenylation efficiency element (EE) signals. ORFs with flexible peaks share common features. Transcripts are characterized by decreased half-life: this is considered peculiar of genes involved in regulatory systems with high turnover; consistently, their function affects biological processes such as cell cycle regulation or stress response. Our findings support the functional importance of flexibility peaks, suggesting that the flexible sequence may be derived by an expansion of canonical TAYRTA polyadenylation efficiency element. The flexible (TA)n repeat amplification could be the outcome of an evolutionary neofunctionalization leading to a differential 3'-end processing and expression regulation in genes with peculiar function. Our study provides a new support to the functional role of flexibility in genomes and a strategy for its characterization inside human fragile sites. PMID:25860149

  2. Electrochemical Probing of in Vivo 5-Hydroxymethyl Furfural Reduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Kostesha, Natalie; Almeida, J.R.M.; Heiskanen, Arto; Gorwa-Grauslund, M.F.; Hahn-Hagerdal, B.; Emnéus, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    In this work, mediated amperometry was used to evaluate whether differences in intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) level could be observed between a genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, engineered for NADPH dependent 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde...

  3. Directed Evolution towards Increased Isoprenoid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Carlsen, Simon; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    absorbs light within the visible range resulting in the red color of lycopene. This feature is the cause for the orange/red phenotype of S. cerevisiae strains transformed with the genes encoding lycopene and enables visual screening of yeast colonies, by searching for colonies with more intense red colony...... production can easily be scaled to meet current demands and it is also an environmental benign production method compared to organic synthesis. Thus it would be attractive to engineer a microorganism to produce high amounts of IPP and other immediate prenyl precursors such as geranyl pyrophosphate, farnesyl...... population of S. cerevisiae clones will afterwards be screened using the isoprenoid molecule lycopene as a model compound, hereby enabling the isolation of phenotypes producing higher amounts of isoprenoid. The property making lycopene ideal for screening is its system of 11 conjugated double bonds, which...

  4. DNA sequence and functional analysis of homologous ARS elements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. carlsbergensis.

    Theis, J F; Yang, C.; Schaefer, C B; Newlon, C S

    1999-01-01

    ARS elements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the cis-acting sequences required for the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication. Comparisons of the DNA sequences of unrelated ARS elements from different regions of the genome have revealed no significant DNA sequence conservation. We have compared the sequences of seven pairs of homologous ARS elements from two Saccharomyces species, S. cerevisiae and S. carlsbergensis. In all but one case, the ARS308-ARS308(carl) pair, significant blocks of ...

  5. Optimization of feeding strategy for the ergosterol production by yeasts saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Mojmir Rychtera; Josef Cermak; Jaroslav Votruba; Jan Nahlik; Karel Melzoch; Christopher A. Kent; Estela Escalante, Waldir D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective of this study was to optimize ergosterol production by yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the use of computer controlled feeding of cultivation medium. Baker´s yeasts strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally modified and selected as mutant D7 was further applied in an industrial scale and also in this investigation. Composition of cultivation medium was optimized with the use of a modified Rosenbrock´s method with regard to following components: glucose, yeast extract, ...

  6. Repair of UV-damaged incoming plasmid DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    A whole-cell transformation assay was used for the repair of UV-damaged plasma DNA in highly-transformable haploid strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae having different repair capabilities. The experiments described demonstrate that three epistasis groups (Friedberg 1988) are involved in the repair of UV-incoming DNA and that the repair processes act less efficiently on incoming DNA than they do on chromosomal DNA. The implications of these findings for UV repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed. (author)

  7. Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Krauter, Paula A. W.; Krauter, Gordon W.

    2002-01-01

    A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

  8. Reciprocal translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed by nonhomologous end joining.

    Yu, Xin; Gabriel, Abram

    2004-02-01

    Reciprocal translocations are common in cancer cells, but their creation is poorly understood. We have developed an assay system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study reciprocal translocation formation in the absence of homology. We induce two specific double-strand breaks (DSBs) simultaneously on separate chromosomes with HO endonuclease and analyze the subsequent chromosomal rearrangements among surviving cells. Under these conditions, reciprocal translocations via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) occur at frequencies of approximately 2-7 x 10(-5)/cell exposed to the DSBs. Yku80p is a component of the cell's NHEJ machinery. In its absence, reciprocal translocations still occur, but the junctions are associated with deletions and extended overlapping sequences. After induction of a single DSB, translocations and inversions are recovered in wild-type and rad52 strains. In these rearrangements, a nonrandom assortment of sites have fused to the DSB, and their junctions show typical signs of NHEJ. The sites tend to be between open reading frames or within Ty1 LTRs. In some cases the translocation partner is formed by a break at a cryptic HO recognition site. Our results demonstrate that NHEJ-mediated reciprocal translocations can form in S. cerevisiae as a consequence of DSB repair. PMID:15020464

  9. The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV.

    Jacq, C; Alt-Mörbe, J; Andre, B; Arnold, W; Bahr, A; Ballesta, J P; Bargues, M; Baron, L; Becker, A; Biteau, N; Blöcker, H; Blugeon, C; Boskovic, J; Brandt, P; Brückner, M; Buitrago, M J; Coster, F; Delaveau, T; del Rey, F; Dujon, B; Eide, L G; Garcia-Cantalejo, J M; Goffeau, A; Gomez-Peris, A; Zaccaria, P

    1997-05-29

    The complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV has been determined. Apart from chromosome XII, which contains the 1-2 Mb rDNA cluster, chromosome IV is the longest S. cerevisiae chromosome. It was split into three parts, which were sequenced by a consortium from the European Community, the Sanger Centre, and groups from St Louis and Stanford in the United States. The sequence of 1,531,974 base pairs contains 796 predicted or known genes, 318 (39.9%) of which have been previously identified. Of the 478 new genes, 225 (28.3%) are homologous to previously identified genes and 253 (32%) have unknown functions or correspond to spurious open reading frames (ORFs). On average there is one gene approximately every two kilobases. Superimposed on alternating regional variations in G+C composition, there is a large central domain with a lower G+C content that contains all the yeast transposon (Ty) elements and most of the tRNA genes. Chromosome IV shares with chromosomes II, V, XII, XIII and XV some long clustered duplications which partly explain its origin. PMID:9169867

  10. Metabolomic approach for improving ethanol stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Ohta, Erika; Nakayama, Yasumune; Mukai, Yukio; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for brewing and ethanol production. The ethanol sensitivity of yeast cells is still a serious problem during ethanol fermentation, and a variety of genetic approaches (e.g., random mutant screening under selective pressure of ethanol) have been developed to improve ethanol tolerance. In this study, we developed a strategy for improving ethanol tolerance of yeast cells based on metabolomics as a high-resolution quantitative phenotypic analysis. We performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to identify and quantify 36 compounds on 14 mutant strains including knockout strains for transcription factor and metabolic enzyme genes. A strong relation between metabolome of these mutants and their ethanol tolerance was observed. Data mining of the metabolomic analysis showed that several compounds (such as trehalose, valine, inositol and proline) contributed highly to ethanol tolerance. Our approach successfully detected well-known ethanol stress related metabolites such as trehalose and proline thus, to further prove our strategy, we focused on valine and inositol as the most promising target metabolites in our study. Our results show that simultaneous deletion of LEU4 and LEU9 (leading to accumulation of valine) or INM1 and INM2 (leading to reduction of inositol) significantly enhanced ethanol tolerance. This study shows the potential of the metabolomic approach to identify target genes for strain improvement of S. cerevisiae with higher ethanol tolerance. PMID:26344121

  11. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol. PMID:25545362

  12. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for itaconic acid production.

    Blazeck, John; Miller, Jarrett; Pan, Anny; Gengler, Jon; Holden, Clinton; Jamoussi, Mariam; Alper, Hal S

    2014-10-01

    Renewable alternatives for petroleum-derived chemicals are achievable through biosynthetic production. Here, we utilize Saccharomyces cerevisiae to enable the synthesis of itaconic acid, a molecule with diverse applications as a petrochemical replacement. We first optimize pathway expression within S. cerevisiae through the use of a hybrid promoter. Next, we utilize sequential, in silico computational genome-scanning to identify beneficial genetic perturbations that are metabolically distant from the itaconic acid synthesis pathway. In this manner, we successfully identify three non-obvious genetic targets (?ade3 ?bna2 ?tes1) that successively improve itaconic acid titer. We establish that focused manipulations of upstream pathway enzymes (localized refactoring) and enzyme re-localization to both mitochondria and cytosol fail to improve itaconic acid titers. Finally, we establish a higher cell density fermentation that ultimately achieves itaconic acid titer of 168 mg/L, a sevenfold improvement over initial conditions. This work represents an attempt to increase itaconic acid production in yeast and demonstrates the successful utilization of computationally guided genetic manipulation to increase metabolic capacity. PMID:24997118

  13. High level secretion of cellobiohydrolases by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Ahlgren Simon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main technological impediment to widespread utilization of lignocellulose for the production of fuels and chemicals is the lack of low-cost technologies to overcome its recalcitrance. Organisms that hydrolyze lignocellulose and produce a valuable product such as ethanol at a high rate and titer could significantly reduce the costs of biomass conversion technologies, and will allow separate conversion steps to be combined in a consolidated bioprocess (CBP. Development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for CBP requires the high level secretion of cellulases, particularly cellobiohydrolases. Results We expressed various cellobiohydrolases to identify enzymes that were efficiently secreted by S. cerevisiae. For enhanced cellulose hydrolysis, we engineered bimodular derivatives of a well secreted enzyme that naturally lacks the carbohydrate-binding module, and constructed strains expressing combinations of cbh1 and cbh2 genes. Though there was significant variability in the enzyme levels produced, up to approximately 0.3 g/L CBH1 and approximately 1 g/L CBH2 could be produced in high cell density fermentations. Furthermore, we could show activation of the unfolded protein response as a result of cellobiohydrolase production. Finally, we report fermentation of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel™ to ethanol by CBH-producing S. cerevisiae strains with the addition of beta-glucosidase. Conclusions Gene or protein specific features and compatibility with the host are important for efficient cellobiohydrolase secretion in yeast. The present work demonstrated that production of both CBH1 and CBH2 could be improved to levels where the barrier to CBH sufficiency in the hydrolysis of cellulose was overcome.

  14. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

    Myers Samuel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of "second generation" biofuels that have better properties than ethanol. Results and conclusion Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

    Steen, EricJ.; Chan, Rossana; Prasad, Nilu; Myers, Samuel; Petzold, Christopher; Redding, Alyssa; Ouellet, Mario; Keasling, JayD.

    2008-11-25

    BackgroundIncreasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of ?second generation? biofuels that have better properties than ethanol.Results& ConclusionsSaccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha) were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB) did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  16. Invertase SUC2 Is the Key Hydrolase for Inulin Degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Wang, Shi-An; Li, Fu-Li

    2013-01-01

    Specific Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were recently found to be capable of efficiently utilizing inulin, but genetic mechanisms of inulin hydrolysis in yeast remain unknown. Here we report functional characteristics of invertase SUC2 from strain JZ1C and demonstrate that SUC2 is the key enzyme responsible for inulin metabolism in S. cerevisiae.

  17. ISOLATION OF A CYTOCHROME P-450 STRUCTURAL GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    We have transformed a Saccharomyces cerevisiae host with an S. cerevisiae genomic library contained in the shuttle vector YEp24 and screened the resultant transformants for resistance to ketoconazole (Kc), an inhibitor of the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) enzyme lanosterol 14-demethyl...

  18. Functional co-operation between the nuclei of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mitochondria from other yeast species

    Spirek, M.; Horvath, A.; Piskur, Jure; Sulo, P.

    2000-01-01

    We elaborated a simple method that allows the transfer of mitochondria from collection yeasts to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Protoplasts prepared from different yeasts were fused to the protoplasts of the ade2-1, ura3-52, kar1-1, rho (0) strain of S. cerevisiae and were selected for respiring cybri...

  19. ISOTERMAS DE ADSORÇÃO DE CÁDMIO POR Saccharomyces cerevisiae ISOTHERMS OF CADMIUM ADSORPTION BY Saccharomyces cerevisae

    Silvana ALBERTINI; Leandro Francisco do CARMO; Luiz Gonzaga do PRADO FILHO

    2001-01-01

    Com o objetivo de determinar as isotermas de adsorção de cádmio por Saccharomyces cerevisiae, foram utilizados os sais cloreto e nitrato de cádmio nas concentrações de 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 e 100mg L-1. A biomassa foi produzida a partir de uma cultura "starter"de Saccharomyces cerevisiae IZ 1904. Após o contato de 16h entre o microrganismo e as soluções em estudo, a biomassa foi separada por centrifugação e o teor de cádmio residual foi determinado no sobrenadante por espectrofotometria de ab...

  20. L-Histidine Inhibits Biofilm Formation and FLO11-Associated Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Flor Yeasts

    Marc Bou Zeidan; Giacomo Zara; Carlo Viti; Francesca Decorosi; Ilaria Mannazzu; Marilena Budroni; Luciana Giovannetti; Severino Zara

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of FLO11 which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling FLO11 alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce FLO11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and ...

  1. Four genes responsible for a position effect on expression from HML and HMR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Mating type interconversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs by transposition of copies of the a or α mating type cassettes from inactive loci, HML and HMR, to an active locus, MAT. The lack of expression of the a and α genes at the silent loci results from repression by trans-acting regulators encoded by SIR (Silent Information Regulator) genes. In this paper the authors present evidence for the existence of four SIR genes. Inactivation of any of these genes leads to expression of cassettes at both HML and HMR. Unusual complementation properties are observed for a number of sir mutations. Specifically, some recessive mutations in different genes fail to complement. The correspondence between SIR1, SIR2, SIR3, SIR4 and other genes with similar roles (MAR, CMT, STE8 and STE9) is presented

  2. Killer toxin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y500-4L active against Fleischmann and Itaiquara commercial brands of yeast

    Soares Giselle A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y500-4L, previously selected from the must of alcohol producing plants and showing high fermentative and killer capacities, was characterized according to the interactions between the yeasts and examined for curing and detection of dsRNA plasmids, which code for the killer character. The killer yeast S. cerevisiae Y500-4L showed considerable killer activity against the Fleischmann and Itaiquara commercial brands of yeast and also against the standard killer yeasts K2 (S. diastaticus NCYC 713, K4 (Candida glabrata NCYC 388 and K11 (Torulopsis glabrata ATCC 15126. However S. cerevisiae Y500-4L showed sensitivity to the killer toxin produced by the standard killer yeasts K8 (Hansenula anomala NCYC 435, K9 (Hansenula mrakii NCYC 500, K10 (Kluyveromyces drosophilarum NCYC 575 and K11 (Torulopsis glabrata ATCC 15126. No M-dsRNA plasmid was detected in the S. cerevisiae Y500-4L strain and these results suggest that the genetic basis for toxin production is encoded by chromosomal DNA. The strain S. cerevisiae Y500-4L was more resistant to the loss of the phenotype killer with cycloheximide and incubation at elevated temperatures (40oC than the standard killer yeast S. cerevisiae K1.

  3. Septins localize to microtubules during nutritional limitation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Vzquez de Aldana Carlos R

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient limitation stimulates diploid cells to undergo DNA replication and meiosis, followed by the formation of four haploid spores. Septins are a family of proteins that assemble a ring structure at the mother-daughter neck during vegetative growth, where they control cytokinesis. In sporulating cells, the septin ring disassembles and septins relocalize to the prospore membrane. Results Here, we demonstrate that nutrient limitation triggers a change in the localization of at least two vegetative septins (Cdc10 and Cdc11 from the bud neck to the microtubules. The association of Cdc10 and Cdc11 with microtubules persists into meiosis, and they are found associated with the meiotic spindle until the end of meiosis II. In addition, the meiosis-specific septin Spr28 displays similar behavior, suggesting that this is a common feature of septins. Septin association to microtubules is a consequence of the nutrient limitation signal, since it is also observed when haploid cells are incubated in sporulation medium and when haploid or diploid cells are grown in medium containing non-fermentable carbon sources. Moreover, during meiosis II, when the nascent prospore membrane is formed, septins moved from the microtubules to this membrane. Proper organization of the septins on the membrane requires the sporulation-specific septins Spr3 and Spr28. Conclusion Nutrient limitation in S. cerevisiae triggers the sporulation process, but it also induces the disassembly of the septin bud neck ring and relocalization of the septin subunits to the nucleus. Septins remain associated with microtubules during the meiotic divisions and later, during spore morphogenesis, they are detected associated to the nascent prospore membranes surrounding each nuclear lobe. Septin association to microtubules also occurs during growth in non-fermentable carbon sources.

  4. Characterization and gene expression profiles of thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates from Thai fruits.

    Auesukaree, Choowong; Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Saenpayavai, Pornpon; Asvarak, Thipa; Benjaphokee, Suthee; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Harashima, Satoshi; Boonchird, Chuenchit

    2012-08-01

    For industrial applications, fermentation of ethanol at high temperature offers advantages such as reduction in cooling costs, reduced risk of microbial contamination and higher efficiency of fermentation processes including saccharification and continuous ethanol stripping. Three thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates (C3723, C3751 and C3867) from Thai fruits were capable of growing and producing 38 g/L ethanol up to 41C. Based on genetic analyses, these isolates were prototrophic and homothallic, with dominant homothallic and thermotolerant phenotypes. After short-term (30 min) and long-term (12 h) exposure at 37C, expression levels increased for the heat stress-response genes HSP26, SSA4, HSP82, and HSP104 encoding the heat shock proteins small HSP, HSP70, HSP90 and the HSP100 family, respectively. In isolates C3723 and C3867, expression was significantly higher than that in reference isolates W303 and TISTR5606 for TPS1 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, NTH1 encoding neutral trehalase and GSY1 encoding glycogen synthase. The results suggested that continuous high expression of heat stress-response genes was important for the long-term, heat stress tolerance of these thermotolerant isolates. PMID:22579450

  5. Bioflavour production from orange peel hydrolysate using immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Lalou, Sofia; Mantzouridou, Fani; Paraskevopoulou, Adamantini; Bugarski, Branko; Levic, Steva; Nedovic, Victor

    2013-11-01

    The rising trend of bioflavour synthesis by microorganisms is hindered by the high manufacturing costs, partially attributed to the cost of the starting material. To overcome this limitation, in the present study, dilute-acid hydrolysate of orange peel was employed as a low-cost, rich in fermentable sugars substrate for the production of flavour-active compounds by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. With this purpose, the use of immobilized cell technology to protect cells against the various inhibitory compounds present in the hydrolysate was evaluated with regard to yeast viability, carbon and nitrogen consumption and cell ability to produce flavour active compounds. For cell immobilization the encapsulation in Ca alginate beads was used. The results were compared with those obtained using free-cell system. Based on the data obtained immobilized cells showed better growth performance and increased ability for de novo synthesis of volatile esters of "fruity" aroma (phenylethyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, octanoate, decanoate and dodecanoate) than those of free cells. The potential for in situ production of new formulations containing flavour-active compounds derive from yeast cells and also from essential oil of orange peel (limonene, ?-terpineol) was demonstrated by the fact that bioflavour mixture was found to accumulate within the beads. Furthermore, the ability of the immobilized yeast to perform efficiently repeated batch fermentations of orange peel hydrolysate for bioflavour production was successfully maintained after six consecutive cycles of a total period of 240 h. PMID:23995224

  6. Genomic Analysis of ATP Efflux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Theodore W. Peters

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP plays an important role as a primary molecule for the transfer of chemical energy to drive biological processes. ATP also functions as an extracellular signaling molecule in a diverse array of eukaryotic taxa in a conserved process known as purinergic signaling. Given the important roles of extracellular ATP in cell signaling, we sought to comprehensively elucidate the pathways and mechanisms governing ATP efflux from eukaryotic cells. Here, we present results of a genomic analysis of ATP efflux from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring extracellular ATP levels in cultures of 4609 deletion mutants. This screen revealed key cellular processes that regulate extracellular ATP levels, including mitochondrial translation and vesicle sorting in the late endosome, indicating that ATP production and transport through vesicles are required for efflux. We also observed evidence for altered ATP efflux in strains deleted for genes involved in amino acid signaling, and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the retrograde signaling pathway potentiates amino acid signaling to promote mitochondrial respiration. This study advances our understanding of the mechanism of ATP secretion in eukaryotes and implicates TOR complex 1 (TORC1 and nutrient signaling pathways in the regulation of ATP efflux. These results will facilitate analysis of ATP efflux mechanisms in higher eukaryotes.

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Effects on Pollen: Archaeological Implications

    Crystal A. Dozier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pollen is the reproductive agent of flowering plants; palynology is utilized by archaeologists because sporopollenin, a major component in the exine of pollen grains, is resistant to decay and morphologically distinctive. Wine, beer, and mead have been identified in the archaeological record by palynological assessment due to indicator species or due to a pollen profile similar to that recovered from honey, a common source of sugar in a variety of fermented beverages. While most palynologists have assumed that pollen grains are resistant to alcoholic fermentation, a recent study in food science implies that pollen is a yeast nutrient because pollen-enriched meads produce more alcohol. The experiment presented here explores the potential distortion of the pollen record through fermentation by brewing a traditional, pollen-rich mead with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this experiment, the pollen grains did not undergo any discernible morphological changes nor were distorted in the pollen profile. Any nutrition that the yeast garners from the pollen therefore leaves sporopollenin intact. These results support palynological research on residues of alcoholic beverages and confirms that the fermentation process does not distort the pollen profile of the original substance. The paper concludes with the potential and limits of palynological study to assess fermentation within the archaeological record.

  8. Heterologous Expression of Syntaxin 6 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    MARTIN GÖTTE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms of vesicular protein transport in eukaryotic cells are highly conserved. Members of the syntaxin family play a pivotal role in the membrane fusion process. We have expressed rat syntaxin 6 and its cytoplasmic domain in wild-type and pep12 mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to elucidate the role of the syntaxin 6-dependent vesicular trafficking step in yeast. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a punctate, Golgi-like staining pattern for syntaxin 6, which only partially overlapped with Pep12p in wild-type yeast cells. In contrast to Pep12p, syntaxin 6 was not mislocalized to the vacuole upon expression from 2 micron vectors, which might be attributed to conserved sorting and retention signals. Syntaxin 6 was not capable of complementing the sorting and maturation defects of the vacuolar hydrolase CPY in pep12 null mutants. No dominant negative effects of either syntaxin 6 or syntaxin 6deltaC overexpression on CPY sorting and maturation were observed in wild-type yeast cells. We conclude that syntaxin 6 and Pep12p do not act at the same vesicular trafficking step(s in yeast and higher eukaryotes

  9. Nutritional and environmental factors in ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Wong, H.; Wilke, C.R.; Blanch, H.W.

    1983-05-01

    Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, a basic study of the nutritional and environmental factors in ethanol fermentation was carried out to provide fundamental and practical bases for design of fermentation media and culture conditions. The requirements for all active medium components need to be determined in order to establish balanced media, which are important to reduce raw materials costs and to minimize inhibition from buildup of excess feed components in recycle processes with selective ethanol removal. Pulse injection of nutrients into continuous cultures was an effective method for screening active nutrients. In a systematic sensitivity analysis the effect of feed concentration of these individual nutrients was then determined and allowed formulation of media optimal with respect to the major fermentation parameters. Biotin, pantothenate, myo-inositol, potassium and phosphates appeared to stimulate growth preferentially to ethanol production. In contrast, thiamine and pyridoxine appeared to enhance specific ethanol productivity. The effect of ammonium sulfate depended on concentration. A conceptual model was proposed to relate the effects of these nutrients to biochemical pathways and functions. With these data and model the minimum cost combination of raw materials to achieve a medium of well defined components can be determined with a linear program. This computer program shows that many growth factors and minerals can be added to media more economically as pure components than as fractions of complex factors. 225 references, 61 figures, 54 tables.

  10. In vivo Reconstitution of Algal Triacylglycerol Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hung, Chun-Hsien; Kanehara, Kazue; Nakamura, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    The current fascination with algal biofuel production stems from a high lipid biosynthetic capacity and little conflict with land plant cultivation. However, the mechanisms which enable algae to accumulate massive oil remain elusive. An enzyme for triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CrDGTT2, can produce a large amount of TAG when expressed in yeast or higher plants, suggesting a unique ability of CrDGTT2 to enhance oil production in a heterologous system. Here, we performed metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by taking advantage of CrDGTT2. We suppressed membrane phospholipid biosynthesis at the log phase by mutating OPI3, enhanced TAG biosynthetic pathway at the stationary phase by overexpressing PAH1 and CrDGTT2, and suppressed TAG hydrolysis on growth resumption from the stationary phase by knocking out DGK1. The resulting engineered yeast cells accumulated about 70-fold of TAG compared with wild type cells. Moreover, TAG production was sustainable. Our results demonstrated the enhanced and sustainable TAG production in the yeast synthetic platform.

  11. Water-Transfer Slows Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Cohen, Aviv; Weindling, Esther; Rabinovich, Efrat; Nachman, Iftach; Fuchs, Shai; Chuartzman, Silvia; Gal, Lihi; Schuldiner, Maya; Bar-Nun, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    Transferring Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to water is known to extend their lifespan. However, it is unclear whether this lifespan extension is due to slowing the aging process or merely keeping old yeast alive. Here we show that in water-transferred yeast, the toxicity of polyQ proteins is decreased and the aging biomarker 47Q aggregates at a reduced rate and to a lesser extent. These beneficial effects of water-transfer could not be reproduced by diluting the growth medium and depended on de novo protein synthesis and proteasomes levels. Interestingly, we found that upon water-transfer 27 proteins are downregulated, 4 proteins are upregulated and 81 proteins change their intracellular localization, hinting at an active genetic program enabling the lifespan extension. Furthermore, the aging-related deterioration of the heat shock response (HSR), the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD), was largely prevented in water-transferred yeast, as the activities of these proteostatic network pathways remained nearly as robust as in young yeast. The characteristics of young yeast that are actively maintained upon water-transfer indicate that the extended lifespan is the outcome of slowing the rate of the aging process. PMID:26862897

  12. Redundant Regulation of Cdk1 Tyrosine Dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Kennedy, Erin K; Dysart, Michael; Lianga, Noel; Williams, Elizabeth C; Pilon, Sophie; Dor, Carole; Deneault, Jean-Sebastien; Rudner, Adam D

    2016-03-01

    Cdk1 activity drives both mitotic entry and the metaphase-to-anaphase transition in all eukaryotes. The kinase Wee1 and the phosphatase Cdc25 regulate the mitotic activity of Cdk1 by the reversible phosphorylation of a conserved tyrosine residue. Mutation of cdc25 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe blocks Cdk1 dephosphorylation and causes cell cycle arrest. In contrast, deletion of MIH1, the cdc25 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is viable. Although Cdk1-Y19 phosphorylation is elevated during mitosis in mih1? cells, Cdk1 is dephosphorylated as cells progress into G1, suggesting that additional phosphatases regulate Cdk1 dephosphorylation. Here we show that the phosphatase Ptp1 also regulates Cdk1 dephosphorylation in vivo and can directly dephosphorylate Cdk1 in vitro. Using a novel in vivo phosphatase assay, we also show that PP2A bound to Rts1, the budding yeast B56-regulatory subunit, regulates dephosphorylation of Cdk1 independently of a function regulating Swe1, Mih1, or Ptp1, suggesting that PP2A(Rts1) either directly dephosphorylates Cdk1-Y19 or regulates an unidentified phosphatase. PMID:26715668

  13. Structural and Functional Analysis of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Mob1

    Mrkobrada,S.; Boucher, L.; Tyers, D.; Sicheri, F.

    2006-01-01

    The Mob proteins function as activator subunits for the Dbf2/Dbf20 family of protein kinases. Human and Xenopus Mob1 protein structures corresponding to the most conserved C-terminal core, but lacking the variable N-terminal region, have been reported and provide a framework for understanding the mechanism of Dbf2/Dbf20 regulation. Here, we report the 2.0 {angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mob1 containing both the conserved C-terminal core and the variable N-terminal region. Within the N-terminal region, three novel structural elements are observed; namely, an {alpha}-helix denoted H0, a strand-like element denoted S0 and a short {beta} strand denoted S-1. Helix H0 associates in an intermolecular manner with a second Mob1 molecule to form a Mob1 homodimer. Strand S0 binds to the core domain in an intramolecular manner across a putative Dbf2 binding site mapped by Mob1 temperature-sensitive alleles and NMR binding experiments. In vivo functional analysis demonstrates that Mob1 mutants that target helix H0 or its reciprocal binding site are biologically compromised. The N-terminal region of Mob1 thus contains structural elements that are functionally important.

  14. Biosynthesis of diphthamide in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Inactivation of EF-2 by diphtheria toxin requires the presence of a posttranslationally synthesized amino acid residue, diphthamide. The present work was undertaken to study the biosynthetic mechanism of diphthamide synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to gain better understanding of the biological roles of this unique amino acid residue. Thirty-one haploid ADP-ribosylation-negative mutants, comprising 5 complementation groups, were obtained. One of these mutants contains a toxin-resistant form of EF-2 which can be converted to a toxin-sensitive form through the methylation reaction catalyzed by a S-AdoMet:EF-2 methyltransferase enzyme which is present in other yeast strains. The [3He]methylated residue in the EF-2 modified by the methyltransferase in the presence of S-Ado-L-[3H-methyl]-Met has been analyzed chromatographically following both acid and enzymatic hydrolysis. At the conclusion of the reaction, all of the radiolabel was recovered as diphthine (the unamidated form of diphthamide). The authors conclude that the S-AdoMet:EF-2-methyltransferase is specific for the addition of at least the last two of the three methyl groups present in diphthine

  15. Effects of low X-ray doses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with different capacities for repair of radiation damage (RAD, rad18, and rad52) have been tested for their colony forming ability (CFA) and growth rates after application of small X-ray doses from 3.8 mGy to 40 Gy. There was no reproducible increase in CFA observable after application of doses between 3.8 mGy and 4.7 Gy.X-ray doses of 40 Gy causing an inactivation of CFA from 90% to 50%, depending on the repair capacity of the strains used, caused a reduced increase in optical density during 2 h buffer treatment in comparison to unirradiated cells. This reduction however, is reversible as soon as the cells are transferred into nutrient medium. One hour after transfer into growh medium the portions of cells with large buds (Gs and M phase) and cells with small buds (S phase) are drastically different in irradiated cells from those obtained in unirradiated cells. The time necessary for separation of mother and daughter cells is prolonged by X-ray irradiation and the formation of new buds is retarded. (orig.)

  16. MAP kinase pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Gustin, M. C.; Albertyn, J.; Alexander, M.; Davenport, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A cascade of three protein kinases known as a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is commonly found as part of the signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Almost two decades of genetic and biochemical experimentation plus the recently completed DNA sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome have revealed just five functionally distinct MAPK cascades in this yeast. Sexual conjugation, cell growth, and adaptation to stress, for example, all require MAPK-mediated cellular responses. A primary function of these cascades appears to be the regulation of gene expression in response to extracellular signals or as part of specific developmental processes. In addition, the MAPK cascades often appear to regulate the cell cycle and vice versa. Despite the success of the gene hunter era in revealing these pathways, there are still many significant gaps in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for activation of these cascades and how the cascades regulate cell function. For example, comparison of different yeast signaling pathways reveals a surprising variety of different types of upstream signaling proteins that function to activate a MAPK cascade, yet how the upstream proteins actually activate the cascade remains unclear. We also know that the yeast MAPK pathways regulate each other and interact with other signaling pathways to produce a coordinated pattern of gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms of this cross talk are poorly understood. This review is therefore an attempt to present the current knowledge of MAPK pathways in yeast and some directions for future research in this area.

  17. The chromosomal constitution of wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Bakalinsky, A T; Snow, R

    1990-01-01

    A general procedure is described for determining the chromosomal constitution of industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on analysis of segregation frequencies for input markers among random spore progeny of industrial-laboratory strain hybrids. The multiply auxotrophic haploid testers used carried a dominant erythromycin-resistance marker, allowing hybrids to be selected in mass matings with spores produced by the wild-type industrial strains. Analysis of a number of independent crosses between the haploid testers and an unselected population of spores of each wine strain distinguished between disomic, trisomic and tetrasomic chromosomal complements in the parents. Possible explanations for a significant class of aberrant segregation frequencies are discussed. Results of the analysis indicate that UCD Enology 522 (Montrachet) is diploid and possibly trisomic for chromosome VII; 522X is diploid; UCD Enology 505 (California Champagne) is disomic for chromosome XVI, trisomic for chromosomes I, II, III, VI, VIII, IX, X, XII, XV, tetrasomic for chromosomes IV, XI, XIII, XIV and either trisomic or tetrasomic for chromosomes V and VII; and that UCD Enology 595 (Pasteur Champagne) is disomic for chromosomes I, II, III, IX, XVI, trisomic for chromosomes IV, VI, X, XII, XIV, XV, tetrasomic for chromosomes V, VIII, XI, XIII and either disomic or tetrasomic for chromosome VII. PMID:2220073

  18. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Iron Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; de Llanos, Rosa; Romero, Antonia María; Puig, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms because it participates as a redox cofactor in a wide variety of biological processes. Recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that in response to iron deficiency, an RNA-binding protein denoted Cth2 coordinates a global metabolic rearrangement that aims to optimize iron utilization. The Cth2 protein contains two Cx8Cx5Cx3H tandem zinc fingers (TZFs) that specifically bind to adenosine/uridine-rich elements within the 3′ untranslated region of many mRNAs to promote their degradation. The Cth2 protein shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Once inside the nucleus, Cth2 binds target mRNAs and stimulates alternative 3′ end processing. A Cth2/mRNA-containing complex is required for export to the cytoplasm, where the mRNA is degraded by the 5′ to 3′ degradation pathway. This post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism limits iron utilization in nonessential pathways and activates essential iron-dependent enzymes such as ribonucleotide reductase, which is required for DNA synthesis and repair. Recent findings indicate that the TZF-containing tristetraprolin protein also functions in modulating human iron homeostasis. Elevated iron concentrations can also be detrimental for cells. The Rnt1 RNase III exonuclease protects cells from excess iron by promoting the degradation of a subset of the Fe acquisition system when iron levels rise. PMID:23903042

  19. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Iron Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Antonia María Romero

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms because it participates as a redox cofactor in a wide variety of biological processes. Recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that in response to iron deficiency, an RNA-binding protein denoted Cth2 coordinates a global metabolic rearrangement that aims to optimize iron utilization. The Cth2 protein contains two Cx8Cx5Cx3H tandem zinc fingers (TZFs that specifically bind to adenosine/uridine-rich elements within the 3' untranslated region of many mRNAs to promote their degradation. The Cth2 protein shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Once inside the nucleus, Cth2 binds target mRNAs and stimulates alternative 3' end processing. A Cth2/mRNA-containing complex is required for export to the cytoplasm, where the mRNA is degraded by the 5' to 3' degradation pathway. This post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism limits iron utilization in nonessential pathways and activates essential iron-dependent enzymes such as ribonucleotide reductase, which is required for DNA synthesis and repair. Recent findings indicate that the TZF-containing tristetraprolin protein also functions in modulating human iron homeostasis. Elevated iron concentrations can also be detrimental for cells. The Rnt1 RNase III exonuclease protects cells from excess iron by promoting the degradation of a subset of the Fe acquisition system when iron levels rise.

  20. Novel regulatory properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arp4.

    Steinboeck, Ferdinand; Krupanska, Ludmila; Bogusch, Alexandra; Kaufmann, Alexius; Heidenreich, Erich

    2006-04-01

    ARP4, an essential gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, codes for a nuclear actin-related protein. Arp4 is a subunit of several chromatin-modifying complexes and is known to be involved in the transcriptional regulation in yeast. We used a mutant strain with a single amino acid substitution (G161D) in the conserved actin fold domain to investigate the influence of Arp4 on stress and nitrogen catabolite repression genes. The deficiency of functional Arp4 caused a highly increased sensitivity towards nitrogen starvation and to the macrolide antibiotic rapamycin. We show the changes of mRNA levels of selected genes under these conditions. The upregulation of stress genes as a consequence of treatment with rapamycin was largely Msn2p/Msn4p-dependent. The sensitivity towards rapamycin indicates a participation of Arp4 in the regulation of the TOR pathway. Consistently, arp4G161D cells exhibited an affected cell cycle. Long-term cultivation, which leads to a G1 arrest in wild-type cells, provoked arrest in G2/M (more than 60%) in the mutant strain. The same effect was observed upon treatment with rapamycin, indicating an unexpected relationship of Arp4 to TOR-mediated cell cycle arrest. PMID:16672275

  1. Nutrient sensing and signaling in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Conrad, Michaela; Schothorst, Joep; Kankipati, Harish Nag; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-03-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a favorite organism for pioneering studies on nutrient-sensing and signaling mechanisms. Many specific nutrient responses have been elucidated in great detail. This has led to important new concepts and insight into nutrient-controlled cellular regulation. Major highlights include the central role of the Snf1 protein kinase in the glucose repression pathway, galactose induction, the discovery of a G-protein-coupled receptor system, and role of Ras in glucose-induced cAMP signaling, the role of the protein synthesis initiation machinery in general control of nitrogen metabolism, the cyclin-controlled protein kinase Pho85 in phosphate regulation, nitrogen catabolite repression and the nitrogen-sensing target of rapamycin pathway, and the discovery of transporter-like proteins acting as nutrient sensors. In addition, a number of cellular targets, like carbohydrate stores, stress tolerance, and ribosomal gene expression, are controlled by the presence of multiple nutrients. The protein kinase A signaling pathway plays a major role in this general nutrient response. It has led to the discovery of nutrient transceptors (transporter receptors) as nutrient sensors. Major shortcomings in our knowledge are the relationship between rapid and steady-state nutrient signaling, the role of metabolic intermediates in intracellular nutrient sensing, and the identity of the nutrient sensors controlling cellular growth. PMID:24483210

  2. Dynamics of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptome during bread dough fermentation.

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Zhu, Bo; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Voordeckers, Karin; De Maeyer, Dries; Marchal, Kathleen; Dornez, Emmie; Courtin, Christophe M; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2013-12-01

    The behavior of yeast cells during industrial processes such as the production of beer, wine, and bioethanol has been extensively studied. In contrast, our knowledge about yeast physiology during solid-state processes, such as bread dough, cheese, or cocoa fermentation, remains limited. We investigated changes in the transcriptomes of three genetically distinct Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during bread dough fermentation. Our results show that regardless of the genetic background, all three strains exhibit similar changes in expression patterns. At the onset of fermentation, expression of glucose-regulated genes changes dramatically, and the osmotic stress response is activated. The middle fermentation phase is characterized by the induction of genes involved in amino acid metabolism. Finally, at the latest time point, cells suffer from nutrient depletion and activate pathways associated with starvation and stress responses. Further analysis shows that genes regulated by the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, the major pathway involved in the response to osmotic stress and glycerol homeostasis, are among the most differentially expressed genes at the onset of fermentation. More importantly, deletion of HOG1 and other genes of this pathway significantly reduces the fermentation capacity. Together, our results demonstrate that cells embedded in a solid matrix such as bread dough suffer severe osmotic stress and that a proper induction of the HOG pathway is critical for optimal fermentation. PMID:24056467

  3. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to improve 1-hexadecanol production.

    Feng, Xueyang; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Fatty alcohols are important components of a vast array of surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce 1-hexadecanol by expressing a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (FAR) from barn owl (Tyto alba). In order to improve fatty alcohol production, we have manipulated both the structural genes and the regulatory genes in yeast lipid metabolism. The acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (ACC1) was over-expressed, which improved 1-hexadecanol production by 56% (from 45mg/L to 71mg/L). Knocking out the negative regulator of the INO1 gene in phospholipid metabolism, RPD3, further enhanced 1-hexadecanol production by 98% (from 71mg/L to 140mg/L). The cytosolic acetyl-CoA supply was next engineered by expressing a heterologous ATP-dependent citrate lyase, which increased the production of 1-hexadecanol by an additional 136% (from 140mg/L to 330mg/L). Through fed-batch fermentation using resting cells, over 1.1g/L 1-hexadecanol can be produced in glucose minimal medium, which represents the highest titer reported in yeast to date. PMID:25466225

  4. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26927067

  5. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    Danuza Nogueira Moysés

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review.

  6. Global landscape of protein complexes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Krogan, Nevan J; Cagney, Gerard; Yu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Gouqing; Guo, Xinghua; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Li, Joyce; Pu, Shuye; Datta, Nira; Tikuisis, Aaron P; Punna, Thanuja; Peregrín-Alvarez, José M; Shales, Michael; Zhang, Xin; Davey, Michael; Robinson, Mark D; Paccanaro, Alberto; Bray, James E; Sheung, Anthony; Beattie, Bryan; Richards, Dawn P; Canadien, Veronica; Lalev, Atanas; Mena, Frank; Wong, Peter; Starostine, Andrei; Canete, Myra M; Vlasblom, James; Wu, Samuel; Orsi, Chris; Collins, Sean R; Chandran, Shamanta; Haw, Robin; Rilstone, Jennifer J; Gandi, Kiran; Thompson, Natalie J; Musso, Gabe; St Onge, Peter; Ghanny, Shaun; Lam, Mandy H Y; Butland, Gareth; Altaf-Ul, Amin M; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Shilatifard, Ali; O'Shea, Erin; Weissman, Jonathan S; Ingles, C James; Hughes, Timothy R; Parkinson, John; Gerstein, Mark; Wodak, Shoshana J; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack F

    2006-03-30

    Identification of protein-protein interactions often provides insight into protein function, and many cellular processes are performed by stable protein complexes. We used tandem affinity purification to process 4,562 different tagged proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each preparation was analysed by both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to increase coverage and accuracy. Machine learning was used to integrate the mass spectrometry scores and assign probabilities to the protein-protein interactions. Among 4,087 different proteins identified with high confidence by mass spectrometry from 2,357 successful purifications, our core data set (median precision of 0.69) comprises 7,123 protein-protein interactions involving 2,708 proteins. A Markov clustering algorithm organized these interactions into 547 protein complexes averaging 4.9 subunits per complex, about half of them absent from the MIPS database, as well as 429 additional interactions between pairs of complexes. The data (all of which are available online) will help future studies on individual proteins as well as functional genomics and systems biology. PMID:16554755

  7. BIOTECHNOLOGICAL PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL BY SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE, USING DIFFERENT SUBSTRATES

    Vijaya S. Gulalkayi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research efforts are needed to design and improve the process, which would produce sustainable and economically feasible transportation fuel. The present investigation was undertaken to determine the availability of carbohydrates in hydrolysates derived from different substrates Acacia arabica, Delbergia sisso, Peltophorum Pterocarpur and Perkia biglobosa pods, in the production of ethanol. The enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrates has yielded the significant amount of reducing sugar from the substrates by comparing the effect of enzymes on hydrolysis. The Acacia arabica pods has showed the higher production of reducing sugars when treated with 4% a-amylase whereas Peltophorum pterocarpum has produced lowest yield of reducing sugar at 4% a-amylase enzyme. The optimum temperature required for the activity of a-amylase enzyme in the production of reducing sugars using different substrates were revealed that at 30oC the Acacia arabica has yielded maximum sugars whereas the Perkia biglobosa has showed the minimum yield of reducing sugar. The optimum period of enzyme activity in the production of reducing sugars using different substrates was indicted that the Acacia arabica has showed the maximum yield of reducing sugars during the incubation period of 24 hours whereas minimum yield was observed in Perkia biglobosa. The optimum incubation period of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the production of ethanol has showed that the seven days of incubation has yielded maximum amount of ethanol using the substrate Acacia arabica.

  8. Towards a genome-wide transcriptogram: the Saccharomyces cerevisiae case.

    Rybarczyk-Filho, Jos Luiz; Castro, Mauro A A; Dalmolin, Rodrigo J S; Moreira, Jos C F; Brunnet, Leonardo G; de Almeida, Rita M C

    2011-04-01

    Analysis of genome-wide expression data poses a challenge to extract relevant information. The usual approaches compare cellular expression levels relative to a pre-established control and genes are clustered based on the correlation of their expression levels. This implies that cluster definitions are dependent on the cellular metabolic state, eventually varying from one experiment to another. We present here a computational method that order genes on a line and clusters genes by the probability that their products interact. Protein-protein association information can be obtained from large data bases as STRING. The genome organization obtained this way is independent from specific experiments, and defines functional modules that are associated with gene ontology terms. The starting point is a gene list and a matrix specifying interactions. Considering the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, we projected on the ordering gene expression data, producing plots of transcription levels for two different experiments, whose data are available at Gene Expression Omnibus database. These plots discriminate metabolic cellular states, point to additional conclusions, and may be regarded as the first versions of 'transcriptograms'. This method is useful for extracting information from cell stimuli/responses experiments, and may be applied with diagnostic purposes to different organisms. PMID:21169199

  9. mRNA quality control pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Satarupa Das; Biswadip Das

    2013-09-01

    Efficient production of translation-competent mRNAs involves processing and modification events both in the nucleus and cytoplasm which require a number of complex machineries at both co-transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Mutations in the genomic sequence sometimes result in the formation of mutant non-functional defective messages. In addition, the enormous amounts of complexities involved in the biogenesis of mRNPs in the nucleus very often leads to the formation of aberrant and faulty messages along with their functional counterpart. Subsequent translation of these mutant and defective populations of messenger RNAs could possibly result in the unfaithful transmission of genetic information and thus is considered a threat to the survival of the cell. To prevent this possibility, mRNA quality control systems have evolved both in the nucleus and cytoplasm in eukaryotes to scrutinize various stages of mRNP biogenesis and translation. In this review, we will focus on the physiological role of some of these mRNA quality control systems in the simplest model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  10. Fermentao de trealose e glicognio endgenos em Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation of endogenous trehalose and glycogen by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    L.V. FERREIRA

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As linhagens PE-2 e VR-1 de Saccharomyces cerevisiae foram submetidas fermentao das reservas endgenas na temperatura de 40oC. No intervalo de 0 a 24 horas foram recolhidas as amostras para a determinao de etanol, nitrognio no fermento e no vinho, bem como os carboidratos de reserva (trealose e glicognio e a viabilidade celular. A trealose foi esgotada durante 24 horas. Os teores de glicognio sofreram muitas oscilaes ao longo do tempo, entre a mobilizao e a sntese e embora no esgotado, deve ter contribudo significativamente para a formao de lcool na suspenso. Foi observada a relao proporcional entre a mobilizao de trealose e a queda da viabilidade celular. No transcorrer da fermentao das reservas de carboidratos houve aumento nos teores de nitrognio no fermento at 6 e 8 horas, sendo tal incremento afetado pela linhagem de levedura. No prosseguimento da fermentao ocorreu a autlise celular, que foi percebida pelo aumento brusco de nitrognio no vinho (de 200 para 1500mg/L e pela queda da viabilidade celular. O ganho alcanado com a fermentao endgena foi de 40 e 68 litros de lcool por tonelada de levedura seca com incremento de 25 e 27% de protena no fermento para as linhagens PE-2 e VR-1, respectivamente. Este resultado tem reflexos positivos quando da comercializao da levedura seca como protena microbiana.Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (PE-2 and VR-1 were subjected to fermentation of its carbohidrate reserve (Trehalose and glycogen at 40oC. During a 24 hours interval samples were collected for determination of ethanol, yeast and wine nitrogen, yeast trehalose, glycogen and cell viability. Trehalose was completely exhausted after 24 hours. Glycogen was not completely consumed, but probably contributes for ethanol formation. As trehalose is consumed yeast cell viability decreases, while yeast nitrogen content increase, reaching a maximum between 6 and 8 hours, depending on the yeast strain. If yeast is maintained under prolonged stressing conditions, cell autolysis occurs and nitrogen is lost to the medium, increasing from 200 to 1500mg/L. Such endogenous fermentation allows a production of 40 to 68L of ethanol per ton of dry yeast, with yeast nitrogen increasing of 25 and 27% for PE-2 and VR-1, respectively.

  11. Intrachromosomal movement of genetically marked Saccharomyces cerevisiae transposons by gene conversion.

    Roeder, G. S.; Smith, M.; Lambie, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the movement of a genetically marked Saccharomyces cerevisiae transposon. Ty912(URA3), to new sites in the S. cerevisiae genome. Ty912 is an element present at the HIS4 locus in the his4-912 mutant. To detect movement of Ty912, this element has been genetically marked with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene. Movement of Ty912(URA3) occurs by recombination between the marked element and homologous Ty elements elsewhere in the S. cerevisiae genome. Ty912(URA3) recombines mos...

  12. Regulation of Lactobacillus plantarum contamination on the carbohydrate and energy related metabolisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during bioethanol fermentation.

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Lin, Xiang-Hua; Li, Hao

    2015-11-01

    During the industrial bioethanol fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are often stressed by bacterial contaminants, especially lactic acid bacteria. Generally, lactic acid bacteria contamination can inhibit S. cerevisiae cell growth through secreting lactic acid and competing with yeast cells for micronutrients and living space. However, whether are there still any other influences of lactic acid bacteria on yeast or not? In this study, Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 was co-cultivated with S. cerevisiae S288c to mimic the L. plantarum contamination in industrial bioethanol fermentation. The contaminative L. plantarum-associated expression changes of genes involved in carbohydrate and energy related metabolisms in S. cerevisiae cells were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate the influence of L. plantarum on carbon source utilization and energy related metabolism in yeast cells during bioethanol fermentation. Contaminative L. plantarum influenced the expression of most of genes which are responsible for encoding key enzymes involved in glucose related metabolisms in S. cerevisiae. Specific for, contaminated L. plantarum inhibited EMP pathway but promoted TCA cycle, glyoxylate cycle, HMP, glycerol synthesis pathway, and redox pathway in S. cerevisiae cells. In the presence of L. plantarum, the carbon flux in S. cerevisiae cells was redistributed from fermentation to respiratory and more reducing power was produced to deal with the excess NADH. Moreover, L. plantarum contamination might confer higher ethanol tolerance to yeast cells through promoting accumulation of glycerol. These results also highlighted our knowledge about relationship between contaminative lactic acid bacteria and S. cerevisiae during bioethanol fermentation. PMID:26279142

  13. Functional domains of a positive regulatory protein, PHO4, for transcriptional control of the phosphatase regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Ogawa, N.; Oshima, Y

    1990-01-01

    The PHO4 gene encodes a positive regulatory factor involved in regulating transcription of various genes in the phosphatase regulon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Besides its own coding region, the 1.8-kilobase PHO4 transcript contains a coding region for a mitochondrial protein which does not appear to be translated. Four functional domains were found in the PHO4 protein, which consists of 312 amino acid (aa) residues as deduced from the open reading frame of PHO4. A gel retardation assay with...

  14. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of PHO8 expression by PHO regulatory genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Kaneko, Y; Tamai, Y; Toh-E, A; Oshima, Y

    1985-01-01

    A DNA fragment bearing the PHO8 gene, which encodes repressible alkaline phosphatase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was cloned. Northern hybridizations with the PHO8 DNA as probe indicated that the PHO8 transcript is 1.8 kilobases in length and is more abundant in cells grown in low-phosphate medium than in high-phosphate medium. The pho9 mutant, whose phenotype is defective in the activity of repressible alkaline phosphatase, produced as much of the PHO8 transcript as did the PHO9+ cells. Henc...

  15. The hexokinase 2-dependent glucose signal transduction pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Moreno, Fernando; Herrero, Pilar

    2002-03-01

    Sugars, predominantly glucose, evoke a variety of responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These responses are elicited through a complex network of regulatory mechanisms that transduce the signal of presence of external glucose to their final intracellular targets. The HXK2 gene, encoding hexokinase 2 (Hxk2), the enzyme that initiates glucose metabolism, is highly expressed during growth in glucose and plays a pivotal role in the control of the expression of numerous genes, including itself. The mechanism of this autocontrol of expression is not completely understood. Hxk2 is found both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of S. cerevisiae; the nuclear localization is dependent on the presence of a stretch of amino acids located from lysine-6 to methionine-15. Although serine-14, within this stretch, can be phosphorylated in the absence of glucose, it is still unsettled whether this phosphorylation plays a role in the cellular localization of Hxk2. The elucidation of the mechanism of transport of Hxk2 to and from the nucleus, the influence of the oligomeric state of the protein on the nuclear transport and the fine mechanism of regulation of transcription of HXK2 are among the important unanswered questions in relation with the regulatory role of Hxk2. PMID:12007644

  16. SNG1--a new gene involved in nitrosoguanidine resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Grey, M; Pich, C T; Haase, E; Brendel, M

    1995-04-01

    We have molecularly characterized the SNG1 gene that confers hyper-resistance to the mutagen N-methyl-N'nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae when overexpressed on a multi-copy plasmid. This hyper-resistance to MNNG is not due to depletion of glutathione pools since multi-copy SNG1 containing yeast transformants contain at least wild type levels of glutathione; DNA repair seems unaffected in these transformants as the multi-copy SNG1-mediated MNNG hyper-resistance is also seen in DNA repair mutants belonging to each of the three epistasis groups of yeast repair mutants. It could be shown that SNG1 is not under control of the YAP1 encoded transcription activator that controls expression of at least two genes involved in MNNG metabolism in yeast. sng1 null mutants are viable but exhibit only slight sensitivity to MNNG, indicating that SNG1 does not encode a protein involved in a major detoxification step of this mutagen. Sequencing of the HYR-mediating passenger DNA revealed that SNG1 encodes a 547 a polypeptide containing seven transmembrane-spanning regions that may be membrane-bound. Comparison of the DNA sequence with established gene databanks revealed that SNG1 is a novel yeast gene. PMID:7753113

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae translational activator Cbs1p is associated with translationally active mitochondrial ribosomes.

    Krause-Buchholz, Udo; Schöbel, Karina; Lauffer, Susann; Rödel, Gerhard

    2005-05-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mitochondrial translation of most, if not all, mitochondrially encoded genes is regulated by an individual set of gene-specific activators. Translation of the COB mRNA encoding cytochrome b requires the function of two nuclearly encoded proteins, Cbs1p and Cbs2p. Genetic data revealed that the 5'-untranslated region of COB mRNA is the target of both proteins. Recently, we provided evidence for an interaction of Cbs2p with mitochondrial ribosomes. We demonstrate here by means of blue native gel electrophoresis, density gradient centrifugation and tandem affinity purification that a portion of Cbs1p is also associated with mitochondrial ribosomes. In addition, we demonstrate that the amount of ribosome-associated Cbs1p is elevated in the presence of chloramphenicol, which is known to stall ribosomes on mRNAs. In the presence of puromycin, which strips off the mRNA and nascent protein chains from ribosomes, Cbs1p is no longer associated with ribosomes. Our data indicate that the observed interaction is mediated by ribosome-bound mRNA, thus restricting the association to ribosomes actively translating cytochrome b. PMID:15927884

  18. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast on Tibia Bone Characteristics in Rabbits

    Ilker Arican

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of feeding different levels of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on tibial bone characteristics of the New Zealand rabbits was studied. An experiment of 85 days duration was conducted with male 5-6 weeks old rabbits. There were 3 dietary treatments each consisting of 7 rabbits in each. The treatments were containing 0 (control, 2 and 4 g kg-1 yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae in their diet, respectively. At the end of the experiment the right tibia of rabbits were dissected from the surrounding tissues and used for bone force and stress measurements. Results show that there is no effect of feeding with different level of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast on body weight, tibia weight and length, bone force and stress values of tibia of the rabbits.

  19. Compositions and methods for modeling Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    2012-01-01

    The invention provides an in silica model for determining a S. cerevisiae physiological function. The model includes a data structure relating a plurality of S. cerevisiae reactants to a plurality of S. cerevisiae reactions, a constraint set for the plurality of S. cerevisiae reactions, and...... commands for determining a distribution of flux through the reactions that is predictive of a S. cerevisiae physiological function. A model of the invention can further include a gene database containing information characterizing the associated gene or genes. The invention further provides methods for...... making an in silica S. cerevisiae model and methods for determining a S. cerevisiae physiological function using a model of the invention. The invention provides an in silica model for determining a S. cerevisiae physiological function. The model includes a data structure relating a plurality of S...

  20. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in grape varieties of the São Francisco Valley

    Camila M.P.B.S. de Ponzzes-Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this work was to characterise indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the naturally fermented juice of grape varieties Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, Tempranillo, Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo used in the São Francisco River Valley, northeastern Brazil. In this study, 155 S. cerevisiae and 60 non-Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated and identified using physiological tests and sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Among the non-Saccharomyces species, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was the most common species, followed by Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Kloeckera apis, P. manshurica, C. orthopsilosis and C. zemplinina. The population counts of these yeasts ranged among 1.0 to 19 x 10(5 cfu/mL. A total of 155 isolates of S. cerevisiae were compared by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, and five molecular mitochondrial DNA restriction profiles were detected. Indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes of the São Francisco Valley can be further tested as potential starters for wine production.

  1. Initiation of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations preventing initiation.

    Calvert, G R; Dawes, I W

    1984-03-01

    Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are unable to initiate sporulation, but can continue vegetative growth under conditions in which the wild-type strain sporulates, have been isolated and characterized. The mutations arose spontaneously as suppressors of the spd1 mutations, restoring the ability of spd1 mutants to grow on glycerol, and also spontaneously in cultures of a wild-type diploid strain undergoing sporulation in continuous culture. The mutations all conferred asporogeny, and were recessive in this respect to the wild-type, but dominant in acting as suppressors of the spd1 mutation. They fell into three complementation groups which corresponded to three unlinked loci, designated spo50, spo51 and spo53. None of these mutations was closely linked to the other initiation mutations defined by the spd1, spd3, spd4, cdc25, cdc28 loci, nor to the cell size control mutations whi1 and whi2. Loose linkage was detected between spd1 and spo53, and spo50, spd3 and spo53 were linked to their respective centromeres. The spo50, spo51 and spo53 mutations are not nonsense suppressors. Mutations in all three genes conferred similar highly pleiotropic phenotypes including: asporogeny; dominant suppression of both spd1 and spd3 mutations; aberrant cell morphology and viability loss on starvation; constitutive ability to reduce tetrazolium (which is subject to carbon source repression in the wild-type); and complete repression of the synthesis of several polypeptides that are subject to carbon source repression in the wild-type strain and derepressed in spd1 mutants derepressed for sporulation. A diploid strain homozygous for the spo50 mutation did not undergo either premeiotic DNA replication or meiotic recombination when transferred to sporulation media. PMID:6374029

  2. Genetic basis of arsenite and cadmium tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Dawes Ian W

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic and cadmium are widely distributed in nature and pose serious threats to the environment and human health. Exposure to these nonessential toxic metals may result in a variety of human diseases including cancer. However, arsenic and cadmium toxicity targets and the cellular systems contributing to tolerance acquisition are not fully known. Results To gain insight into metal action and cellular tolerance mechanisms, we carried out genome-wide screening of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid and homozygous diploid deletion mutant collections and scored for reduced growth in the presence of arsenite or cadmium. Processes found to be required for tolerance to both metals included sulphur and glutathione biosynthesis, environmental sensing, mRNA synthesis and transcription, and vacuolar/endosomal transport and sorting. We also identified metal-specific defence processes. Arsenite-specific defence functions were related to cell cycle regulation, lipid and fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, and the cytoskeleton whereas cadmium-specific defence functions were mainly related to sugar/carbohydrate metabolism, and metal-ion homeostasis and transport. Molecular evidence indicated that the cytoskeleton is targeted by arsenite and that phosphorylation of the Snf1p kinase is required for cadmium tolerance. Conclusion This study has pin-pointed core functions that protect cells from arsenite and cadmium toxicity. It also emphasizes the existence of both common and specific defence systems. Since many of the yeast genes that confer tolerance to these agents have homologues in humans, similar biological processes may act in yeast and humans to prevent metal toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  3. Mating-type Gene Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Haber, James E

    2015-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two alternative mating types designated MATa and MAT?. These are distinguished by about 700 bp of unique sequences, Ya or Y?, including divergent promoter sequences and part of the open reading frames of genes that regulate mating phenotype. Homothallic budding yeast, carrying an active HO endonuclease gene, HO, can switch mating type through a recombination process known as gene conversion, in which a site-specific double-strand break (DSB) created immediately adjacent to the Y region results in replacement of the Y sequences with a copy of the opposite mating type information, which is harbored in one of two heterochromatic donor loci, HML? or HMRa. HO gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that only half of the cells in a lineage switch to the opposite MAT allele, thus promoting conjugation and diploid formation. Study of the silencing of these loci has provided a great deal of information about the role of the Sir2 histone deacetylase and its associated Sir3 and Sir4 proteins in creating heterochromatic regions. MAT switching has been examined in great detail to learn about the steps in homologous recombination. MAT switching is remarkably directional, with MATa recombining preferentially with HML? and MAT? using HMRa. Donor preference is controlled by a cis-acting recombination enhancer located near HML. RE is turned off in MAT? cells but in MATa binds multiple copies of the Fkh1 transcription factor whose forkhead-associated phosphothreonine binding domain localizes at the DSB, bringing HML into conjunction with MATa. PMID:26104712

  4. Capturing of the monoterpene olefin limonene produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Jongedijk, Esmer; Cankar, Katarina; Ranzijn, Jorn; van der Krol, Sander; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Monoterpene olefins such as limonene are plant compounds with applications as flavouring and fragrance agents, as solvents and potentially also in polymer and fuel chemistry. We engineered baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to express a (-)-limonene synthase from Perilla frutescens and a (+)-limonene synthase from Citrus limon. Both proteins were expressed either with their native plastid targeting signal or in a truncated form in which the plastidial sorting signal was removed. The yeast host strain for expression was AE9 K197G, which expresses a mutant Erg20 enzyme. This enzyme catalyses the formation of geranyl diphosphate, which is the precursor for monoterpenes. Several methods were tested to capture limonene produced by the yeast. Extraction from the culture medium by pentane, or by the addition of CaCl2 followed by solid-phase micro-extraction, did not lead to detectable limonene, indicating that limonene is rapidly lost from the culture medium. Volatile terpenes such as limonene may also be trapped in a dodecane phase added to the medium during fermentation. This method resulted in recovery of 0.028?mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.060?mg/l (-)-limonene in strains using the truncated Citrus and Perilla synthases, respectively. Trapping the headspace during culture of the limonene synthase-expressing strains resulted in higher titres, at 0.12?mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.49?mg/l (-)-limonene. These results show that the volatile properties of the olefins produced require specific methods for efficient recovery of these molecules from biotechnological production systems. PMID:25164098

  5. Purification and characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial elongation factor Tu.

    Rosenthal, L P; Bodley, J W

    1987-08-15

    Yeast mitochondrial elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) was purified 200-fold from a mitochondrial extract of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to yield a single polypeptide of Mr = approximately 47,000. The factor was detected by complementation with Escherichia coli elongation factor G and ribosomes in an in vitro phenylalanine polymerization reaction. Mitochondrial EF-Tu, like E. coli EF-Tu, catalyzes the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to ribosomes and possesses an intrinsic GTP hydrolyzing activity which can be activated either by kirromycin or by ribosomes. Kinetic and binding analyses of the interactions of mitochondrial EF-Tu with guanine nucleotides yielded affinity constants for GTP and GDP of approximately 5 and 25 microM, respectively. The corresponding affinity constants for the E. coli factor are approximately 0.3 and 0.003 microM, respectively. In keeping with these observations, we found that purified mitochondrial EF-Tu, unlike E. coli EF-Tu, does not contain endogenously bound nucleotide and is not stabilized by GDP. In addition, we have been unable to detect a functional counterpart to E. coli EF-Ts in extracts of yeast mitochondria and E. coli EF-Ts did not detectably stimulate amino acid polymerization with mitochondrial EF-Tu or enhance the binding of guanine nucleotides to the factor. We conclude that while yeast mitochondrial EF-Tu is functionally analogous to and interchangeable with E. coli EF-Tu, its affinity for guanine nucleotides and interaction with EF-Ts are quite different from those of E. coli EF-Tu. PMID:3301847

  6. Predicting functional upstream open reading frames in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Kristiansson Erik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some upstream open reading frames (uORFs regulate gene expression (i.e., they are functional and can play key roles in keeping organisms healthy. However, how uORFs are involved in gene regulation is not yet fully understood. In order to get a complete view of how uORFs are involved in gene regulation, it is expected that a large number of experimentally verified functional uORFs are needed. Unfortunately, wet-experiments to verify that uORFs are functional are expensive. Results In this paper, a new computational approach to predicting functional uORFs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. Our approach is based on inductive logic programming and makes use of a novel combination of knowledge about biological conservation, Gene Ontology annotations and genes' responses to different conditions. Our method results in a set of simple and informative hypotheses with an estimated sensitivity of 76%. The hypotheses predict 301 further genes to have 398 novel functional uORFs. Three (RPC11, TPK1, and FOL1 of these 301 genes have been hypothesised, following wet-experiments, by a related study to have functional uORFs. A comparison with another related study suggests that eleven of the predicted functional uORFs from genes LDB17, HEM3, CIN8, BCK2, PMC1, FAS1, APP1, ACC1, CKA2, SUR1, and ATH1 are strong candidates for wet-lab experimental studies. Conclusions Learning based prediction of functional uORFs can be done with a high sensitivity. The predictions made in this study can serve as a list of candidates for subsequent wet-lab verification and might help to elucidate the regulatory roles of uORFs.

  7. Vba4p, a vacuolar membrane protein, is involved in the drug resistance and vacuolar morphology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Pongcharoen, Pongsanat; Kawahara, Rieko; Yasuda, Mayu; Yamasaki, Takashi; Akiyama, Koichi; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-02-01

    In the vacuolar basic amino acid (VBA) transporter family of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, VBA4 encodes a vacuolar membrane protein with 14 putative transmembrane helices. Transport experiments with isolated vacuolar membrane vesicles and estimation of the amino acid contents in vacuoles showed that Vba4p is not likely involved in the transport of amino acids. We found that the vba4? cells, as well as vba1? and vba2? cells, showed increased susceptibility to several drugs, particularly to azoles. Although disruption of the VBA4 gene did not affect the salt tolerance of the cells, vacuolar fragmentation observed under high salt conditions was less prominent in vba4? cells than in wild type, vba1?, and vba2? cells. Vba4p differs from Vba1p and Vba2p as a vacuolar transporter but is important for the drug resistance and vacuolar morphology of S. cerevisiae. PMID:26325352

  8. Accumulation and chemical states of radiocesium by fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yu, Qianqian

    2014-05-01

    After accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the fall-out radiocesium was deposited on the ground. Filamentous fungus is known to accumulate radiocesium in environment, even though many minerals are involved in soil. These facts suggest that fungus affect the migration behavior of radiocesium in the environment. However, accumulation mechanism of radiocesium by fungus is not understood. In the present study, accumulation and chemical states change of Cs by unicellular fungus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied to elucidate the role of microorganisms in the migration of radiocesium in the environment. Two different experimental conditions were employed; one is the accumulation experiments of radiocesium by S. cerevisiae from the agar medium containing 137Cs and a mineral of zeolite, vermiculite, smectite, mica, or illite. The other is the experiments using stable cesium to examine the chemical states change of Cs. In the former experiment, the cells were grown on membrane filter of 0.45 μm installed on the agar medium. After the grown cells were weighed, radioactivity in the cells was measured by an autoradiography technique. The mineral weight contents were changed from 0.1% to 1% of the medium. In the latter experiment, the cells were grown in the medium containing stable Cs between 1 mM and 10mM. The Cs accumulated cells were analyzed by SEM-EDS and EXAFS. The adsorption experiments of cesium by the cells under resting condition were also conducted to test the effect of cells metabolic activity. Without mineral in the medium, cells of S. cerevisiae accumulated 1.5x103 Bq/g from the medium containing 137Cs of 2.6x102 Bq/g. When mineral was added in the medium, concentration of 137Cs in the cells decreased. The concentration of 137Cs in the cells from the medium containing different minerals were in the following order; smectite, illite, mica > vermiculite > zeolite. This order was nearly the same as the inverse of distribution coefficient of mineral for 137Cs in the medium solution. The concentration of 137Cs in the cells lowered in the medium containing higher mineral content. These results indicate that radiocesium was competively accumulated in the cells with minerals in the soil. Higher concentration of stable Cs was accumulated in the cells in the metabolically active condition than in the resting cells condition. XAFS analyses showed that the k3-weighted extended-XAFS functions and the radial structural function of Cs accumulated by the cells in the metabolically active condition were similar to those in the resting condition, indicating that chemical states of the accumulated Cs were nearly the same between both conditions. These results indicate that the fungus accumulates radiocesium by competitively with minerals in the soils, and performs higher retardation of the migration of Cs in the metabolically active condition than the resting one. A part of this study is the results of "Multidisciplinary investigation on radiocesium fate and transport for safety assessment for interim storage and disposal of heterogeneous waste" carried out under the Initiatives for Atomic Energy Basic and Generic Strategic Research by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  9. ISOTERMAS DE ADSORÇÃO DE CÁDMIO POR Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Silvana ALBERTINI; Leandro Francisco do CARMO; Luiz Gonzaga do PRADO FILHO

    2001-01-01

    Com o objetivo de determinar as isotermas de adsorção de cádmio por Saccharomyces cerevisiae, foram utilizados os sais cloreto e nitrato de cádmio nas concentrações de 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 e 100mg L-1. A biomassa foi produzida a partir de uma cultura "starter"de Saccharomyces cerevisiae IZ 1904. Após o contato de 16h entre o microrganismo e as soluções em estudo, a biomassa foi separada por centrifugação e o teor de cádmio residual foi determinado no sobrenadante por espectrofotometria de ab...

  10. Characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts exhibiting rough colonies and pseudohyphal morphology with respect to alcoholic fermentation

    Vanda Renata Reis; Ana Paula Guarnieri Bassi; Jessica Carolina Gomes da Silva; Sandra Regina Ceccato-Antonini

    2013-01-01

    Among the native yeasts found in alcoholic fermentation, rough colonies associated with pseudohyphal morphology belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae are very common and undesirable during the process. The aim of this work was to perform morphological and physiological characterisations of S. cerevisiae strains that exhibited rough and smooth colonies in an attempt to identify alternatives that could contribute to the management of rough colony yeasts in alcoholic fermentation. Ch...

  11. A collection of indigenous saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from appellations of origin in Portugal and France

    Vieira, E.; Neves, J. Drumonde; Gambon, Brigitte; Valero, Eva; Gomes, Ana Catarina; Sousa, Susana; Lima, Maria Teresa; Araújo, Isabel M.; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Dequin, Sylvie; Casal, Margarida; Schuller, Dorit

    2010-01-01

    The model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae stands today at the forefront of molecular biology and functional analysis in genetics and genomics. However, understanding of the ecological, evolutionary and population genetic features that shaped the biology of this species is underscored by a wealth of knowledge on molecular and cellular biology obtained from a very limited number of laboratory strains. In this reasoning, we constituted one of the largest bio-databanks of S. cerevisiae that wer...

  12. Rapid Identification and Enumeration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells in Wine by Real-Time PCR

    Martorell, P.; Querol, A.; Fernández-Espinar, M T

    2005-01-01

    Despite the beneficial role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the food industry for food and beverage production, it is able to cause spoilage in wines. We have developed a real-time PCR method to directly detect and quantify this yeast species in wine samples to provide winemakers with a rapid and sensitive method to detect and prevent wine spoilage. Specific primers were designed for S. cerevisiae using the sequence information obtained from a cloned random amplified polymorphic DNA band that ...

  13. Vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae show alterations in protein phosphorylation and growth control.

    Kanik-Ennulat, C.; Neff, N.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes two spontaneous vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with constitutive alterations in protein phosphorylation, growth control, and sporulation. Vanadate has been shown by a number of studies to be an efficient competitor of phosphate in biochemical reactions, especially those that involve phosphoproteins as intermediates or substrates. Resistance to toxic concentrations of vanadate can arise in S. cerevisiae by both recessive and dominant spontaneous muta...

  14. Introduction of flocculation into industrial yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae saké, by protoplast fusion

    Lima, Nelson; Moreira, C; Teixeira, J. A.; Mota, M.

    1995-01-01

    Protoplast fusion was applied to obtain intraspecific fusion in yeast strains in order to overcome restrictions imposed by the natural mating system. Acriflavine was used to construct petite mutants from non-flocculent industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae saké strain. UV radiation was used to construct ura- mutants from a respiratory competent and highly flocculent S. cerevisiae NCYC869 strain. Fusion products were selected by complementation on minimal medium. The frequency of appearance of p...

  15. The use of genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the wine industry

    Schuller, Dorit; Casal, Margarida

    2005-01-01

    During the last decades, science and food technology have contributed at an accelerated rate to the introduction of new products to satisfy nutritional, socio-economic and quality requirements. With the emergence of modern molecular genetics, the industrial importance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, continuously extended. The demand for suitable genetically modified (GM) S. cerevisiae strains for the biofuel, bakery and beverage industries or for the production of biotechnological products (e.g....

  16. Role of Nitrogen and Carbon Transport, Regulation, and Metabolism Genes for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Survival In Vivo†

    Kingsbury, Joanne M.; Goldstein, Alan L.; McCusker, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is both an emerging opportunistic pathogen and a close relative of pathogenic Candida species. To better understand the ecology of fungal infection, we investigated the importance of pathways involved in uptake, metabolism, and biosynthesis of nitrogen and carbon compounds for survival of a clinical S. cerevisiae strain in a murine host. Potential nitrogen sources in vivo include ammonium, urea, and amino acids, while potential carbon sources include glucose, lactate,...

  17. Aminoacid metabolism and the production of wine aroma compounds by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Arajo, Leandro Dias

    2012-01-01

    Os produtos do metabolismo de aminocidos por leveduras Saccharomyces cerevisiae durante a fermentao alcolica tm um impacto relevante no perfil sensorial de vinhos. Com o objetivo de estudar a influncia da composio de aminocidos do meio na formao da base do aroma tpico de vinho, meios sintticos contendo diferentes compostos nitrogenados foram fermentados por S. cerevisiae. Em um primeiro experimento, cinco meios de composies distintas quanto fonte de azoto foram testados, send...

  18. Optimization of maize starch fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae using pervaporation / Sinethemba Aubrey Nongauza.

    Nongauza, Sinethemba Aubrey

    2010-01-01

    Due to the depletion of petroleum reserves and environmental concerns, bioethanol has been identified as an alternative fuel to petrol. Bioethanol is a fuel of bio-origin derived from renewable biomass. Starch and sugar containing materials are the primary sources of carbon for bioethanol production. Starch is firstly hydrolysed into simple sugars which are later fermented to bioethanol using Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae). The fermentation of sugars to bioethanol is however limited...

  19. L-Carnosine Affects the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a Metabolism-Dependent Manner

    Cartwright, Stephanie P.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Hipkiss, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    The dipeptide L-carnosine (?-alanyl-L-histidine) has been described as enigmatic: it inhibits growth of cancer cells but delays senescence in cultured human fibroblasts and extends the lifespan of male fruit flies. In an attempt to understand these observations, the effects of L-carnosine on the model eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were examined on account of its unique metabolic properties; S. cerevisiae can respire aerobically, but like some tumor cells, it can also exhibit a metaboli...

  20. Coordinate regulation of phospholipid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: pleiotropically constitutive opi1 mutant.

    Klig, L S; Homann, M J; Carman, G. M.; Henry, S A

    1985-01-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae opi1 mutant, which excretes inositol and is constitutive for the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-1-phosphate synthase (M. Greenberg, P. Goldwasser, and S. Henry, Mol. Gen. Genet. 186:157-163, 1982), was examined and compared to that of a wild-type strain. In wild-type S. cerevisiae, the phospholipid composition and the relative rates of synthesis of individual phospholipids change in response to the availability of exogenous supplies of sol...

  1. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Biotin Biosynthesis Gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Wu, Hong; Ito, Kiyoshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells generally cannot synthesize biotin, a vitamin required for many carboxylation reactions. Although sake yeasts, which are used for Japanese sake brewing, are classified as S. cerevisiae, they do not require biotin for their growth. In this study, we identified a novel open reading frame (ORF) in the genome of one strain of sake yeast that we speculated to be involved in biotin synthesis. Homologs of this gene are widely distributed in the genomes of sake ye...

  2. Effects of cyclohexane, an industrial solvent, on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on isolated yeast mitochondria

    Uribe, S.; Rangel, P.; Espinola, G.; Aguirre, G. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico))

    1990-07-01

    Little information on the effects of cyclohexane at the cellular or subcellular level is available. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cyclohexane inhibited respiration and diverse energy-dependent processes. In mitochondria isolated from S. cerevisiae, oxygen uptake and ATP synthesis were inhibited, although ATPase activity was not affected. Cyclohexane effects were similar to those reported for beta-pinene and limonene, suggesting that the cyclohexane ring in these monoterpenes may be a determinant for their biological activities.

  3. Adjustment of trehalose metabolism in wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to modify ethanol yields.

    Rossouw, D; Heyns, E H; Setati, M E; Bosch, S; Bauer, F F

    2013-09-01

    The ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently produce high levels of ethanol through glycolysis has been the focus of much scientific and industrial activity. Despite the accumulated knowledge regarding glycolysis, the modification of flux through this pathway to modify ethanol yields has proved difficult. Here, we report on the systematic screening of 66 strains with deletion mutations of genes encoding enzymes involved in central carbohydrate metabolism for altered ethanol yields. Five of these strains showing the most prominent changes in carbon flux were selected for further investigation. The genes were representative of trehalose biosynthesis (TPS1, encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase), central glycolysis (TDH3, encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (ZWF1, encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (ACO1 and ACO2, encoding aconitase isoforms 1 and 2). Two strains exhibited lower ethanol yields than the wild type (tps1Δ and tdh3Δ), while the remaining three showed higher ethanol yields. To validate these findings in an industrial yeast strain, the TPS1 gene was selected as a good candidate for genetic modification to alter flux to ethanol during alcoholic fermentation in wine. Using low-strength promoters active at different stages of fermentation, the expression of the TPS1 gene was slightly upregulated, resulting in a decrease in ethanol production and an increase in trehalose biosynthesis during fermentation. Thus, the mutant screening approach was successful in terms of identifying target genes for genetic modification in commercial yeast strains with the aim of producing lower-ethanol wines. PMID:23793638

  4. Metabolic phenotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with altered trehalose 6-phosphate dynamics.

    Walther, Thomas; Mtimet, Narjes; Alkim, Ceren; Vax, Amlie; Loret, Marie-Odile; Ullah, Azmat; Gancedo, Carlos; Smits, Gertien J; Franois, Jean Marie

    2013-09-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, synthesis of T6P (trehalose 6-phosphate) is essential for growth on most fermentable carbon sources. In the present study, the metabolic response to glucose was analysed in mutants with different capacities to accumulate T6P. A mutant carrying a deletion in the T6P synthase encoding gene, TPS1, which had no measurable T6P, exhibited impaired ethanol production, showed diminished plasma membrane H?-ATPase activation, and became rapidly depleted of nearly all adenine nucleotides which were irreversibly converted into inosine. Deletion of the AMP deaminase encoding gene, AMD1, in the tps1 strain prevented inosine formation, but did not rescue energy balance or growth on glucose. Neither the 90%-reduced T6P content observed in a tps1 mutant expressing the Tps1 protein from Yarrowia lipolytica, nor the hyperaccumulation of T6P in the tps2 mutant had significant effects on fermentation rates, growth on fermentable carbon sources or plasma membrane H?-ATPase activation. However, intracellular metabolite dynamics and pH homoeostasis were strongly affected by changes in T6P concentrations. Hyperaccumulation of T6P in the tps2 mutant caused an increase in cytosolic pH and strongly reduced growth rates on non-fermentable carbon sources, emphasizing the crucial role of the trehalose pathway in the regulation of respiratory and fermentative metabolism. PMID:23763276

  5. Expression of GUT1, which encodes glycerol kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is controlled by the positive regulators Adr1p, Ino2p and Ino4p and the negative regulator Opi1p in a carbon source-dependent fashion.

    Grauslund, M; Lopes, J. M.; Rnnow, B

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycerol utilization is mediated by two enzymes, glycerol kinase (Gut1p) and mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gut2p). The carbon source regulation of GUT1 was studied using promoter-reporter gene fusions. The promoter activity was lowest during growth on glucose and highest on the non-fermentable carbon sources, glycerol, ethanol, lactate, acetate and oleic acid. Mutational analysis of the GUT1 promoter region showed that two upstream activation se...

  6. Links between replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A hypersensitive requirement for homologous recombination in the absence of Rad27 activity

    Debrauwère, Hélène; Loeillet, Sophie; Lin, Waka; Lopes, Judith; NICOLAS, ALAIN

    2001-01-01

    The RAD27 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a 5′-3′ flap exo/endonuclease, which plays an important role during DNA replication for Okazaki fragment maturation. Genetic studies have shown that RAD27 is not essential for growth, although rad27Δ mutants are temperature sensitive. Moreover, they exhibit increased sensitivity to alkylating agents, enhanced spontaneous recombination, and repetitive DNA instability. The conditional lethality conferred by the rad27Δ mutation indicates that ot...

  7. The HOG pathway controls osmotic regulation of transcription via the stress response element (STRE) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTT1 gene.

    Schüller, C.; Brewster, J L; Alexander, M. R.; Gustin, M C; Ruis, H

    1994-01-01

    The HOG signal pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is defined by the PBS2 and HOG1 genes encoding members of the MAP kinase kinase and of the MAP kinase family, respectively. Mutations in this pathway (deletions of PBS2 or HOG1, or point mutations in HOG1) almost completely abolish the induction of transcription by osmotic stress that is mediated by stress response elements (STREs). We have demonstrated previously that STREs also mediate induction of transcription by heat shock, nit...

  8. Syringomycin E Inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Requirement for Biosynthesis of Sphingolipids with Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acids and Mannose- and Phosphoinositol-Containing Head Groups†

    Stock, Stephen D.; Hama, Hiroko; Radding, Jeffrey A.; Young, Debra A.; Takemoto, Jon Y

    2000-01-01

    Syringomycin E is an antifungal cyclic lipodepsinonapeptide that inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by interaction with the plasma membrane. A screen conducted to find the yeast genes necessary for its fungicidal action identified two novel syringomycin E response genes, SYR3 and SYR4. A syr3 mutant allele was complemented by ELO2 and ELO3. These genes encode enzymes that catalyze the elongation of sphingolipid very long chain fatty acids. Tetrad analysis showed that SYR3 was ELO...

  9. Quantifying the individual effects of ethanol and temperature on the fitness advantage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Salvadó, Z; Arroyo-López, F N; Barrio, E; Querol, A; Guillamón, J M

    2011-09-01

    The presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in grape berries and fresh musts is usually very low. However, as fermentation progresses, the population levels of this species considerably increase. In this study, we use the concept of fitness advantage to measure how increasing ethanol concentrations (0-25%) and temperature values (4-46 °C) in wine fermentations affects competition between S. cerevisiae and several non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Hanseniaspora uvarum, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Candida zemplinina, Pichia fermentans and Kluyveromyces marxianus). We used a mathematical approach to model the hypothetical time needed for S. cerevisiae to impose itself on a mixed population of the non-Saccharomyces species described above. This approach also took into consideration the influence of environmental factors and the initial population levels of S. cerevisiae (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0%). Our results suggest that Saccharomyces niche construction via ethanol production does not provide a clear ecological advantage (at least not until the ethanol concentration exceeds 9%), whereas a temperature rise (above 15 °C) does give S. cerevisiae a considerable advantage. The initial frequency of S. cerevisiae considerably influences the time it needs to impose itself (until it reaches a final frequency of 99% in the mixed culture), the lowest time values being found at the highest initial frequency. In light of these results, the application of low temperatures in the wine industry could favor the growth and survival of non-Saccharomyces species for a longer period of time. PMID:21645814

  10. Production of miltiradiene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Dai, Zhubo; Liu, Yi; Huang, Luqi; Zhang, Xueli

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic engineering of microorganisms is an alternative and attractive route for production of valuable terpenoids that are usually extracted from plant sources. Tanshinones are the bioactive components of Salvia miltiorrhizha Bunge, which is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine widely used for treatment of many cardiovascular diseases. As a step toward microbial production of tanshinones, copalyl diphosphate (CPP) synthase, and normal CPP kaurene synthase-like genes, which convert the universal diterpenoid precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to miltiradiene (an important intermediate of the tanshinones synthetic pathway), was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in production of 4.2?mg/L miltiradiene. Improving supplies of isoprenoid precursors was then investigated for increasing miltiradiene production. Although over-expression of a truncated 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR) and a mutated global regulatory factor (upc2.1) gene did improve supply of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), production of miltiradiene was not increased while large amounts of squalene (78?mg/L) were accumulated. In contrast, miltiradiene production increased to 8.8?mg/L by improving supply of GGPP through over-expression of a fusion gene of FPP synthase (ERG20) and endogenous GGPP synthase (BTS1) together with a heterologous GGPP synthase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius (SaGGPS). Auxotrophic markers in the episomal plasmids were then replaced by antibiotic markers, so that engineered yeast strains could use rich medium to obtain better cell growth while keeping plasmid stabilities. Over-expressing ERG20-BTS1 and SaGGPS genes increased miltiradiene production from 5.4 to 28.2?mg/L. Combinatorial over-expression of tHMGR-upc2.1 and ERG20-BTS1-SaGGPS genes had a synergetic effects on miltiradiene production, increasing titer to 61.8?mg/L. Finally, fed-batch fermentation was performed, and 488?mg/L miltiradiene was produced. The yeast strains engineered in this work provide a basis for creating an alternative way for production of tanshinones in place of extraction from plant sources. PMID:22566191

  11. Low doses effects of ionizing radiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The exposure of living cells to low doses of ionizing radiation induce in response the activation of cellular protection mechanisms against subsequent larger doses of radiation. This cellular adaptive response may vary depending on radiation intensity and time of exposure, and also on the testing probes used whether they were mammalian cells, yeast, bacteria and other organisms or cell types. The mechanisms involved are the genome activation, followed by DNA repair enzymes synthesis. Due to the prompt cell response, the cell cycle can be delayed, and the secondary detoxification of free radicals and/or activation of membrane bound receptors may proceed. All these phenomena are submitted to intense scientific research nowadays, and their elucidation will depend on the complexity of the organism under study. In the present work, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (gamma rays) over a suspension of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was studied, mainly in respect to survival rate and radio-adaptive response. At first, the yeast surviving curve was assessed towards increasing doses, and an estimation of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) was made. The irradiation tests were performed at LINAC (electrons Linear Accelerator) where electron energy reached approximately 2.65 MeV, and gamma-radiation was produced for bremsstrahlung process over an aluminium screen target. A series of experiments of conditioning doses was performed and an increment surviving fraction was observed when the dose was 2.3 Gy and a interval time between this and a higher dose (challenging dose) of 27 Gy was 90 minutes. A value of 58 ± 4 Gy was estimated for LD50, at a dose rate of 0.44 ± 0.03 Gy/min These quantities must be optimized. Besides data obtained over yeast survival, an unusual increasing amount of tiny yeast colonies appeared on the agar plates after incubation, and this number increased as increasing the time exposure. Preliminary results indicate these colonies as 'petite' (mutants with mt DNA damage). (author)

  12. Implementation of communication-mediating domains for non-ribosomal peptide production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Siewers, Verena; San-Bento, Rita; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has in several cases been proven to be a suitable host for the production of natural products and was recently exploited for the production of non-ribosomal peptides. Synthesis of non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) is mediated by NRP synthetases (NRPSs), modular enzymes, which...

  13. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce feruloyl esterase for the release of ferulic acid from switchgrass

    The Aspergillus niger ferulic acid esterase gene (faeA) was cloned into Saccharomyces cerevisiae via a yeast expression vector, resulting in efficient expression and secretion of the enzyme in the medium. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange and hydrophobic interactio...

  14. Optimization of ordered plasmid assembly by gap repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Pedersen, Mette Louise; Krogh, Berit Olsen; Lisby, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Combinatorial genetic libraries are powerful tools for diversifying and optimizing biomolecules. The process of library assembly is a major limiting factor for library complexity and quality. Gap repair by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can facilitate in vivo assembly of DNA...

  15. Mapping Condition-Dependent Regulation of Lipid Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Jewett, Michael Christopher; Workman, Christopher; Nookaew, Intawat; Pizarro, Francisco A; Agosin, Eduardo; Hellgren, Lars; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    levels, and lipid levels are currently lacking. Here, we map condition-dependent regulation controlling lipid metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring 5636 mRNAs, 50 metabolites, 97 lipids, and 57 13C-reaction fluxes in yeast using a three-factor full-factorial design. Correlation analysis...

  16. Molecular Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm Development

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz

    In this study, I sought to identify genes regulating the global molecular program for development of sessile multicellular communities, also known as biofilm, of the eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Yeast biofilm has a clinical interest, as biofilms can cause chronic...

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 and W303-1A laboratory strains differ in salt tolerance

    Petrezsélyová, Silvia; Zahrádka, Jaromír; Sychrová, Hana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 114, 2-3 (2010), s. 144-150. ISSN 1878-6146 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC531; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/0354 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Saccharomyces cerevisiae * salt tolerance * potassium homeostasis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  18. Glucose-induced monoubiquitination of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae galactose transporter is sufficient to signal its internalization

    Horák, Jaroslav; Wolf, D. H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 10 (2001), s. 3083-3088. ISSN 0021-9193 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/98/0475; GA AV ČR IAA5011005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Saccharomyces cerevisiae Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.984, year: 2001

  19. The aspartic proteinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae folds its own inhibitor into a helix

    Li, M; Phylip, L H; Lees, W E; Winther, Jakob R.; Dunn, B M; Wlodawer, A; Kay, J; Gustchina, A

    2000-01-01

    Aspartic proteinase A from yeast is specifically and potently inhibited by a small protein called IA3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although this inhibitor consists of 68 residues, we show that the inhibitory activity resides within the N-terminal half of the molecule. Structures solved at 2.2 and...

  20. Growth-rate regulated genes have profound impact on interpretation of transcriptome profiling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Regenberg, Birgitte; Grotkjaer, Thomas; Winther, Ole; Fausbøll, Anders; Akesson, Mats; Bro, Christoffer; Hansen, Lars Kai; Brunak, Søren; Nielsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Growth rate is central to the development of cells in all organisms. However, little is known about the impact of changing growth rates. We used continuous cultures to control growth rate and studied the transcriptional program of the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with generation time...

  1. Global LC/MS Metabolomics Profiling of Calcium Stressed and Immunosuppressant Drug Treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Stefan Jenkins; Fischer, Steven M; Lily Chen; Sana, Theodore R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that calcium stressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae, challenged with immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and Cyclosporin A, responds with comprehensive gene expression changes and attenuation of the generalized calcium stress response. Here, we describe a global metabolomics workflow for investigating the utility of tracking corresponding phenotypic changes. This was achieved by efficiently analyzing relative abundance differences between intracellular metabolite pools from w...

  2. Physical evidence for a Saccharomyces cerevisiae transposable element which carries the his4C gene.

    de Bruijn, F; Greer, H

    1981-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae transposable element which carries the his4C structural gene and which is capable of transposition, excision, and mutator activity is described. Physical evidence is presented for transposition of the his4C deoxyribonucleic acid sequences to a new location in the genome and for precise excision of these transposed deoxyribonucleic acid sequences in spontaneous his4C- segregants.

  3. Modulation of the acute phase response in feedlot steers supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    This study was designed to determine the effect of supplementing feedlot steers with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-1079 (SC) on the acute phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Steers (n = 18; 266 ± 4 kilograms body weight) were separated into three treatment groups (n = 6/treatm...

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae of palm wine-enhanced ethanol production by using mutagens

    The newly isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae of palm wine produced enhanced amounts of ethanol when cells were UV-irradiated and treated with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. A further increase of ethanol was observed in yeast extract, peptone, dextrose medium fortified with yeast extract, skimmed milk and soya flour. (author). 9 refs

  5. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Fernanda Gaensly; Geraldo Picheth; Debora Brand; Tania M. B. Bonfim

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended.

  6. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Fernanda Gaensly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended.

  7. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Gaensly, Fernanda; Picheth, Geraldo; Brand, Debora; Bonfim, Tania M B

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended. PMID:25242932

  8. Investigation of the effect of water exposed to nonequilibrium contact plasma onto saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast

    S. Mykolenko; D. Stepanskiy; Tishchenko, A; O. Pivovarov

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Additional treatment of water by nonequilibrium contact plasma allows improving consumer characteristics of bakery goods considerably. Determination of the effect of plasma-chemically activated water on morphological, cultural and physiological properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast is important from the technological point of view. Materials and Methods. Experimental investigations were carried out in the condi...

  9. Protective Role of Mitochondrial Superoxide Dismutase against High Osmolarity, Heat and Metalloid Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Dziadkowiec, D.; Krasowska, A.; Liebner, A.; Sigler, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 2 (2007), s. 120-126. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : saccharomyces cerevisiae * mitochondrial mn-sod * protein Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.989, year: 2007

  10. High-efficiency transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells by bacterial minicell protoplast fusion.

    Gyuris, J; Duda, E G

    1986-01-01

    After a new transformation procedure, 10% of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were found to contain transforming DNA sequences. We used direct transfer of plasmid molecules by fusing bacterial minicell protoplasts to yeast protoplasts. Since the procedure significantly reduces the toxic effect of procaryotic protoplasm on the eucaryotic organism, it might be generally applicable in other systems in which transformation is inefficient or impossible.

  11. Invert sugar formation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells encapsulated in magnetically responsive alginate microparticles

    Šafařík, Ivo; Maděrová, Zdeňka; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 321, - (2009), s. 1478-1481. ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/094; GA MŠk(CZ) OC 157 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : magnetic alginate microbeads * Saccharomyces cerevisiae * invertase Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.204, year: 2009

  12. Effects of low-frequency magnetic fields on the viability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Novák, Jan; Strašák, Luděk; Fojt, Lukáš; Slaninová, I.; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2007), s. 115-121. ISSN 1567-5394 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4004404; GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS5004107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : low-frequency electromagnetic field * yeast * Saccharomyces cerevisiae Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.992, year: 2007

  13. LACTIC ACID PRODUCTION BY SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE EXPRESSING A RHIZOPUS ORYZAE LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE GENE

    This work demonstrates the first example of a fungal LDH expressed in yeast. A L(+)-lactate dehydrogenase gene, ldhA, from the filamentous fungus Rhizopus oryzae was modified to be expressed under control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adhl promoter and terminator, then placed in a 2 micron contai...

  14. Enzymes of phosphoinositide synthesis in secretory vesicles destined for the plasma membrane in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Kinney, A J; Carman, G M

    1990-01-01

    CDP-diacylglycerol synthase, phosphatidylinositol synthase, and phosphatidylinositol kinase activities were associated with post-Golgi apparatus secretory vesicles destined for the plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These results suggest that the plasma membrane is capable of synthesizing both CDP-diacylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol as well as phosphorylating phosphatidylinositol.

  15. Chromosomal integration of recombinant alpha-amylase and glucoamylase genes in saccharomyces cerevisiae for starch conversion

    Recombinant constructs of barley '-amylase and Lentinula edodes glucoamylase genes were integrated into the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The insertion was confirmed by PCR amplification of the gene sequence in the chromosomes. The expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE of the enzymes puri...

  16. Large-scale evaluation of in silico gene deletions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Förster, Jochen; Famili, Iman; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A large-scale in silico evaluation of gene deletions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was conducted using a genome-scale reconstructed metabolic model. The effect of 599 single gene deletions on cell viability was simulated in silico and compared to published experimental results. In 526 cases (87.8%)...

  17. Phospholipid synthesis and lipid composition of subcellular membranes in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Zinser, E; Sperka-Gottlieb, C D; Fasch, E V; Kohlwein, S. D.; Paltauf, F; Daum, G.

    1991-01-01

    Subcellular membranes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including mitochondria, microsomes, plasma membranes, secretory vesicles, vacuoles, nuclear membranes, peroxisomes, and lipid particles, were isolated by improved procedures and analyzed for their lipid composition and their capacity to synthesize phospholipids and to catalyze sterol delta 24-methylation. The microsomal fraction is heterogeneous in terms of density and classical microsomal marker proteins and also with respect to the distribu...

  18. Mating ability during chemically induced G1 arrest of cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Bedard, D P; Li, A W; Singer, R. A.; Johnston, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    Diploid formation by haploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was tested during and after treatment with chemical agents which bring about arrest at the cell cycle regulatory step "start." All compounds, except sinefungin, allowed efficient mating. During sinefungin treatment, zygote formation, but not karyogamy, was affected.

  19. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of citrus peel waste by Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce ethanol

    The effects of limonene concentration, enzyme loading, and pH on ethanol production from simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of citrus peel waste by Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied at 37 C. Prior to SSF, citrus peel waste underwent a steam explosion process combined with fla...

  20. Implementation of Sliding Mode Controller with Boundary Layer for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fed-batch Cultivation

    Stoyan Tzonkov

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available An implementation of sliding mode control for yeast fed-batch cultivation is presented in this paper. Developed controller has been implemented on two real fed-batch cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The controller successfully stabilizes the process and shows a very good performance at high input disturbances.

  1. Functional States Recognition System for Fed-batch Cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Pencheva T.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Free software for entering and documenting data EpiData is here used for design of a system for functional states recognition during a fermentation process. The identification of the current process state is based on the predetermined rules, rendering specific metabolic mechanisms. Developed system is further applied for a fed-batch cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  2. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Fernanda, Gaensly; Geraldo, Picheth; Debora, Brand; Tania M.B., Bonfim.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, an [...] d compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended.

  3. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae for consolidated bioprocessing in starch and biomass conversion

    The conversion of starch or biomass to biofuel is a two-stage process involving enzymatic treatment, followed by yeast fermentation. An alternative route would be to consolidate the process by engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of both saccharification and fermentation. An approach was d...

  4. Fermentation performance and intracellular metabolite patterns in laboratory and industrial xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Zaldivar, Jesus; Borges, A.; Johansson, B.; Smits, Hans Peter; Villas-Boas, S.G.; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    Heterologous genes for xylose utilization were introduced into an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain A, with the aim of producing fuel ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks. Two transformants, A4 and A6, were evaluated by comparing the performance in 4-1 anaerobic batch cultivations to...

  5. Polycistronic expression of a β-carotene biosynthetic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae coupled to β-ionone production.

    Beekwilder, Jules; van Rossum, Harmen M; Koopman, Frank; Sonntag, Frank; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens; Hall, Robert D; Bosch, Dirk; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2014-12-20

    The flavour and fragrance compound β-ionone, which naturally occurs in raspberry and many other fruits and flowers, is currently produced by synthetic chemistry. This study describes a synthetic biology approach for β-ionone production from glucose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is partially based on polycistronic expression. Experiments with model proteins showed that the T2A sequence of the Thosea asigna virus mediated efficient production of individual proteins from a single transcript in S. cerevisiae. Subsequently, three β-carotene biosynthesis genes from the carotenoid-producing ascomycete Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (crtI, crtE and crtYB) were expressed in S. cerevisiae from a single polycistronic construct. In this construct, the individual crt proteins were separated by T2A sequences. Production of the individual proteins from the polycistronic construct was confirmed by Western blot analysis and by measuring the production of β-carotene. To enable β-ionone production, a carotenoid-cleavage dioxygenase from raspberry (RiCCD1) was co-expressed in the β-carotene producing strain. In glucose-grown cultures with a second phase of dodecane, β-ionone and geranylacetone accumulated in the organic phase. Thus, by introducing a polycistronic construct encoding a fungal carotenoid pathway and an expression cassette encoding a plant dioxygenase, a novel microbial production system has been established for a fruit flavour compound. PMID:24486029

  6. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    Karhumaa Kaisa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. Results The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase. Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. Conclusions Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media gave a substantial improvement in isobutanol production for the reference strain, but not for the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain. This result implies that other constraints besides the enzyme activities for the supply of 2-ketoisovalerate may become bottlenecks for isobutanol production after ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 have been overexpressed, which most probably includes the valine inhibition to Ilv2.

  7. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the deve...... and the advances in yeast strain engineering will stimulate development of novel yeast-based processes for chemicals production.......Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the...... development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology...

  8. KONSTRUKSI MUTAN PROTEIN FOSFATASE ptc2D Saccharomyces cerevisiae DENGAN METODE PENGGANTIAN GEN TARGET DENGAN POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR

    Hermansyah

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to studi genes function of eukarotic cells such as study of gene encoding protein phosphatase PTC2. Novel phenotypic caused by mutated gene is an important step to study function of gene. In this study constructed mutant of PTC2 gene encoding protein phosphatase. Method that used in this construction was replacement of target gene (PTC2 with auxotroph marker Candida albicans HIS3 by Polymer Chain Reaction (PCR or called by PCR-mediated disruption. Mutant colonies which grew in selective medium SC without histidine were confirmed by PCR amplification. By using 1% Agarose gel electrophoresis the result showed that size of ptc2D::CgHIS3 transformant was 3.52 kb while wild type strain was 2.9 kb, indicated that ptc2D::CgHIS3 has integrated on chromosome V replacing PTC2 wild type.

  9. Heterologous expression and characterization of bacterial 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Carlsen, Simon; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran; Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Zhou, Kang; Phon, Too Heng; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Eliasson Lantz, Anna; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of a biosynthetic pathway between evolutionary distant organisms can create a metabolic shunt capable of bypassing the native regulation of the host organism, hereby improving the production of secondary metabolite precursor molecules for important natural products. Here, we report the...... engineering of Escherichia coli genes encoding the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway into the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the characterization of intermediate metabolites synthesized by the MEP pathway in yeast. Our UPLC-MS analysis of the MEP pathway metabolites from engineered...... yeast showed that the pathway is active until the synthesis of 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate, but appears to lack functionality of the last two steps of the MEP pathway, catalyzed by the [4Fe–4S] iron sulfur cluster proteins encoded by ispG and ispH. In order to functionalize the last two...

  10. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Brian H. Carrick

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant “CelTag” DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies.

  11. Isolation and characterization of saccharomyces cerevisiae RFA1 gene mutations which confer ultraviolet light sensitivity

    Replication protein A (RPA) has been identified as an essential factor of SV40 DNA replication in vitro and is involved in DNA replication, recombination, nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair, and checkpoint control. It is a heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA binding protein consisting of 70-, 34-, and 14-kDa subunits and highly conserved among eukaryotes, In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ultraviolet light (UV) sensitive mutations on RFA1 gene which encodes the largest subunit of RPA have been isolated. UV sensitivity could be caused by the defect of several mechanisms, including NER, recombinational repair, and checkpoint control. However, it is unclear which mechanism is defective by each mutation. To investigate it, mutations which confer UV sensitivity on S. cerevisiae RFA1 gene were searched using plasmid shuffling method. Two mutations (36+60 and t6) were isolated and m51 mutation, previously reported by Umezu et al., was added to further analysis. The strain carrying each rfa1 allele showed not only UV sensitivity but also methyl methane sulfonate sensitivity. By the epistasis with rad14, rad52, and rad6 mutations, all mutations were epistatic to RAD52, not to RAD14 or RAD6. UV sensitivity of each rfa1 strain was partially suppressed by over-expression of RAD52 gene. Partial suppression for UV sensitivity by over-expression of each rfa1 gene was also seen in m51 and t6 strains. The amount of RPA was predominantly reduced in m51 and t6 strains. Taken together, these rfa1 gene mutations cause the defect of recombinational repair. The defect in m51 and t6 strains is mainly caused by the reduction of RPA, while the defect in 36+60 strain is caused by other reasons. (author)

  12. Morphological change and enhanced pigment production of monascus when cocultured with saccharomyces cerevisiae or aspergillus oryzae

    Shin; Kim; Kim; Ju

    1998-09-01

    When a Monascus isolate, a producer of Monascus pigments, was cocultured with either Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Aspergillus oryzae in a solid sucrose medium, there were significant morphological changes in Monascus culture. Cocultures exhibited cell mass increases of 2 times and pigment yield increases of 30 to 40 times compared to monocultures of Monascus. However, enhanced cell growth, an increase in pigment production, and morphological change did not occur in coculture with Bacillus cereus. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was more effective at enhancing pigment production than Asp. oryzae. Enhanced cell growth and increased pigment production occurred only in conjunction with morphological changes. Culture filtrates of S. cerevisiae were also effective in inducing morphology change in Monascus, similar to culture broths of S. cerevisiae. The hydrolytic enzymes produced by S. cerevisiae, such as amylase, and chitinase, are thought to be the effectors. The commercial enzymes alpha-amylase and protease from Asp. oryzae both caused a morphological change in Monascus and were effective in enhancing pigment production. However, lysozyme, alpha-amylase and protease from Bacillus species, protease from Staphylococcus, and chitinase from Streptomyces were not effective. The hydrolytic enzymes which cause a morphological change of Monascus culture and enhancement of pigment production are thought to be capable of degrading Monascus cell walls. An approximate 10-fold increase in pigment production was observed in liquid cocultures with S. cerevisiae. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10099374

  13. Sporulation in soil as an overwinter survival strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Knight, Sarah J; Goddard, Matthew R

    2016-02-01

    Due to its commercial value and status as a research model there is an extensive body of knowledge concerning Saccharomyces cerevisiae's cell biology and genetics. Investigations into S. cerevisiae's ecology are comparatively lacking, and are mostly focused on the behaviour of this species in high sugar, fruit-based environments; however, fruit is ephemeral, and presumably, S. cerevisiae has evolved a strategy to survive when this niche is not available. Among other places, S. cerevisiae has been isolated from soil which, in contrast to fruit, is a permanent habitat. We hypothesize that S. cerevisiae employs a life history strategy targeted at self-preservation rather than growth outside of the fruit niche, and resides in forest niches, such as soil, in a dormant and resistant sporulated state, returning to fruit via vectors such as insects. One crucial aspect of this hypothesis is that S. cerevisiae must be able to sporulate in the 'forest' environment. Here, we provide the first evidence for a natural environment (soil) where S. cerevisiae sporulates. While there are further aspects of this hypothesis that require experimental verification, this is the first step towards an inclusive understanding of the more cryptic aspects of S. cerevisiae's ecology. PMID:26568201

  14. Two Dot1 isoforms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a result of leaky scanning by the ribosome

    Frederiks, Floor; Heynen, Guus J. J. E.; van Deventer, Sjoerd J.; Janssen, Hans; van Leeuwen, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Dot1 is a conserved histone methyltransferase that methylates histone H3 on lysine 79. We previously observed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a single DOT1 gene encodes two Dot1 protein species. Here, we show that the relative abundance of the two isoforms changed under nutrient-limiting conditions. A mutagenesis approach showed that the two Dot1 isoforms are produced from two alternative translation start sites as a result of leaky scanning by the ribosome. The leaky scanning was not affected by the 5′- or 3′-untranslated regions of DOT1, indicating that translation initiation is determined by the DOT1 coding sequence. Construction of yeast strains expressing either one of the isoforms showed that both were sufficient for Dot1’s role in global H3K79 methylation and telomeric gene silencing. However, the absence of the long isoform of Dot1 altered the resistance of yeast cells to the chitin-binding drug Calcofluor White, suggesting that the two Dot1 isoforms have a differential function in cell wall biogenesis. PMID:19778927

  15. Structural insights into the substrate tunnel of Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbonic anhydrase Nce103

    Chen Yuxing

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The carbonic anhydrases (CAs are involved in inorganic carbon utilization. They have been classified into six evolutionary and structural families: ?-, ?-, ?-, ?-, ?-, ?- CAs, with ?-CAs present in higher plants, algae and prokaryotes. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a single copy of ?-CA Nce103/YNL036W. Results We determined the crystal structure of Nce103 in complex with a substrate analog at 2.04 resolution. It assembles as a homodimer, with the active site located at the interface between two monomers. At the bottom of the substrate pocket, a zinc ion is coordinated by the three highly conserved residues Cys57, His112 and Cys115 in addition to a water molecule. Residues Asp59, Arg61, Gly111, Leu102, Val80, Phe75 and Phe97 form a tunnel to the bottom of the active site which is occupied by a molecule of the substrate analog acetate. Activity assays of full length and two truncated versions of Nce103 indicated that the N-terminal arm is indispensable. Conclusion The quaternary structure of Nce103 resembles the typical plant type ?-CAs of known structure, with an N-terminal arm indispensable for the enzymatic activity. Comparative structure analysis enables us to draw a possible tunnel for the substrate to access the active site which is located at the bottom of a funnel-shaped substrate pocket.

  16. Glucose-based microbial production of the hormone melatonin in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Germann, Susanne M; Baallal Jacobsen, Simo A; Schneider, Konstantin; Harrison, Scott J; Jensen, Niels B; Chen, Xiao; Stahlhut, Steen G; Borodina, Irina; Luo, Hao; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Maury, Jérôme; Forster, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    Melatonin is a natural mammalian hormone that plays an important role in regulating the circadian cycle in humans. It is a clinically effective drug exhibiting positive effects as a sleep aid and a powerful antioxidant used as a dietary supplement. Commercial melatonin production is predominantly performed by complex chemical synthesis. In this study, we demonstrate microbial production of melatonin and related compounds, such as serotonin and N-acetylserotonin. We generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that comprise heterologous genes encoding one or more variants of an L-tryptophan hydroxylase, a 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan decarboxylase, a serotonin acetyltransferase, an acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase, and means for providing the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin via heterologous biosynthesis and recycling pathways. We thereby achieved de novo melatonin biosynthesis from glucose. We furthermore accomplished increased product titers by altering expression levels of selected pathway enzymes and boosting co-factor supply. The final yeast strain produced melatonin at a titer of 14.50 ± 0.57 mg L(-1) in a 76h fermentation using simulated fed-batch medium with glucose as sole carbon source. Our study lays the basis for further developing a yeast cell factory for biological production of melatonin. PMID:26710256

  17. Comprehensive X-Ray Structural Studies of the Quinolinate Phosphoribosyl Transferase (BNA6) From Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    di Luccio, E.; Wilson, D.K.

    2009-05-14

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a 32 kDa enzyme encoded by the BNA6 gene in yeast and catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide from quinolinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). QAPRTase plays a key role in the tryptophan degradation pathway via kynurenine, leading to the de novo biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} and clearing the neurotoxin quinolinate. To improve our understanding of the specificity of the eukaryotic enzyme and the course of events associated with catalysis, we have determined the crystal structures of the apo and singly bound forms with the substrates quinolinate and PRPP. This reveals that the enzyme folds in a manner similar to that of various prokaryotic forms which are {approx}30% identical in sequence. In addition, the structure of the Michaelis complex is approximated by PRPP and the quinolinate analogue phthalate bound to the active site. These results allow insight into the kinetic mechanism of QAPRTase and provide an understanding of structural diversity in the active site of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae enzyme when compared to prokaryotic homologues.

  18. Comprehensive X-ray structural studies of the quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase (BNA6) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    di Luccio, Eric; Wilson, David K

    2008-04-01

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a 32 kDa enzyme encoded by the BNA6 gene in yeast and catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide from quinolinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). QAPRTase plays a key role in the tryptophan degradation pathway via kynurenine, leading to the de novo biosynthesis of NAD (+) and clearing the neurotoxin quinolinate. To improve our understanding of the specificity of the eukaryotic enzyme and the course of events associated with catalysis, we have determined the crystal structures of the apo and singly bound forms with the substrates quinolinate and PRPP. This reveals that the enzyme folds in a manner similar to that of various prokaryotic forms which are approximately 30% identical in sequence. In addition, the structure of the Michaelis complex is approximated by PRPP and the quinolinate analogue phthalate bound to the active site. These results allow insight into the kinetic mechanism of QAPRTase and provide an understanding of structural diversity in the active site of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae enzyme when compared to prokaryotic homologues. PMID:18321072

  19. Quantitative modeling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FLR1 regulatory network using an S-system formalism.

    Calada, Dulce; Vinga, Susana; Freitas, Ana T; Oliveira, Arlindo L

    2011-10-01

    In this study we address the problem of finding a quantitative mathematical model for the genetic network regulating the stress response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the agricultural fungicide mancozeb. An S-system formalism was used to model the interactions of a five-gene network encoding four transcription factors (Yap1, Yrr1, Rpn4 and Pdr3) regulating the transcriptional activation of the FLR1 gene. Parameter estimation was accomplished by decoupling the resulting system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations into a larger nonlinear algebraic system, and using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to fit the models predictions to experimental data. The introduction of constraints in the model, related to the putative topology of the network, was explored. The results show that forcing the network connectivity to adhere to this topology did not lead to better results than the ones obtained using an unrestricted network topology. Overall, the modeling approach obtained partial success when trained on the nonmutant datasets, although further work is required if one wishes to obtain more accurate prediction of the time courses. PMID:21976379

  20. Homologous Recombination Repair Within the rDNA Array in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    M. Motovali-Bashi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination repair starts with Double-strand Breaks (DSBs followed by crossing-over and recombination. The expected frequency of meiotic chromosomal exchange in the region of chromosome XII encoding ribosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is 3.5 to 5 events per cell per meiosis. However interchromosomal meiotic recombination in the rDNA gene is very rare, suggesting repression of DSB and crossing-over. On the other hand, mitotic events such as intrachromosomal recombination producing 3 μm rDNA circles (which accumulate with cellular age and unequal sister chromatid exchanges appear to be quite common. This study looked at the rDNA breakage in the strain ORD 1181, a rad50S mutant with SK1 background, which does a relatively fast and near synchronous meiosis. The fine analysis of the rDNA array was performed using restriction endonuclease enzymes that do not cleave within the rDNA array. The results suggest that there are at least two hot regions for chromosome breakage within the rDNA array. According to our previous studies we suggest that the DSB hot regions are in one homologue. However, there is possibility that other homologue is involving in DSB too.

  1. Physiological Effects of GLT1 Modulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Growing on Different Nitrogen Sources.

    Brambilla, Marco; Adamo, Giusy Manuela; Frascotti, Gianni; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2016-02-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most employed cell factories for the production of bioproducts. Although monomeric hexose sugars constitute the preferential carbon source, this yeast can grow on a wide variety of nitrogen sources that are catabolized through central nitrogen metabolism (CNM). To evaluate the effects of internal perturbations on nitrogen utilization, we characterized strains deleted or overexpressed in GLT1, encoding for one of the key enzymes of the CNM node, the glutamate synthase. These strains, together with the parental strain as control, have been cultivated in minimal medium formulated with ammonium sulfate, glutamate, or glutamine as nitrogen source. Growth kinetics, together with the determination of protein content, viability, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation at the single cell level, revealed that GLT1 modulations do not significantly influence the cellular physiology, whereas the nitrogen source does. As important exceptions, GLT1 deletion negatively affected the scavenging activity of glutamate against ROS accumulation, when cells were treated with H2O2, whereas Glt1p overproduction led to lower viability in glutamine medium. Overall, this confirms the robustness of the CNM node against internal perturbations, but, at the same time, highlights its plasticity in respect to the environment. Considering that side-stream protein-rich waste materials are emerging as substrates to be used in an integrated biorefinery, these results underline the importance of preliminarily evaluating the best nitrogen source not only for media formulation, but also for the overall economics of the process. PMID:26528537

  2. Effect of 21 different nitrogen sources on global gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Godard, Patrice; Urrestarazu, Antonio; Vissers, Stéphan; Kontos, Kevin; Bontempi, Gianluca; van Helden, Jacques; André, Bruno

    2007-04-01

    We compared the transcriptomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells growing under steady-state conditions on 21 unique sources of nitrogen. We found 506 genes differentially regulated by nitrogen and estimated the activation degrees of all identified nitrogen-responding transcriptional controls according to the nitrogen source. One main group of nitrogenous compounds supports fast growth and a highly active nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) control. Catabolism of these compounds typically yields carbon derivatives directly assimilable by a cell's metabolism. Another group of nitrogen compounds supports slower growth, is associated with excretion by cells of nonmetabolizable carbon compounds such as fusel oils, and is characterized by activation of the general control of amino acid biosynthesis (GAAC). Furthermore, NCR and GAAC appear interlinked, since expression of the GCN4 gene encoding the transcription factor that mediates GAAC is subject to NCR. We also observed that several transcriptional-regulation systems are active under a wider range of nitrogen supply conditions than anticipated. Other transcriptional-regulation systems acting on genes not involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., the pleiotropic-drug resistance and the unfolded-protein response systems, also respond to nitrogen. We have completed the lists of target genes of several nitrogen-sensitive regulons and have used sequence comparison tools to propose functions for about 20 orphan genes. Similar studies conducted for other nutrients should provide a more complete view of alternative metabolic pathways in yeast and contribute to the attribution of functions to many other orphan genes. PMID:17308034

  3. Dominance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation processes

    Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Winemaking, brewing and baking are some of the oldest biotechnological processes. In all of them, alcoholic fermentation is the main biotransformation and Saccharomyces cerevisiae the primary microorganism. Although a wide variety of microbial species may participate in alcoholic fermentation and...... contribute to the sensory properties of end-products, the yeast S. cerevisiae invariably dominates the final stages of fermentation. The ability of S. cerevisiae to outcompete other microbial species during alcoholic fermentation processes, such as winemaking, has traditionally been ascribed to its high...... fermentative power and capacity to withstand the harsh environmental conditions, i.e. high levels of ethanol and organic acids, low pH values, scarce oxygen availability and depletion of certain nutrients. However, in recent years, several studies have raised evidence that S. cerevisiae, beyond its remarkable...

  4. Systems Biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Physiology and its DNA Damage Response

    Fazio, Alessandro

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model organism in biology, being widely used in fundamental research, the first eukaryotic organism to be fully sequenced and the platform for the development of many genomics techniques. Therefore, it is not surprising that S. cerevisiae has also been widely...... used in the field of systems biology during the last decade. This thesis investigates S. cerevisiae growth physiology and DNA damage response by using a systems biology approach. Elucidation of the relationship between growth rate and gene expression is important to understand the mechanisms regulating...... cell growth. In order to study this relationship, we have grown S. cerevisiae cells in chemostat at defined growth rates and measured the transcriptional response. We have applied a complex experimental design, involving three factors: specific growth rate, oxygen availability and nutrient limitation...

  5. Microbial cells as biosorbents for heavy metals: accumulation of Uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Uranium accumulated extracellularly on the surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The rate and extent of accumulation were subject to environmental parameters, such as pH, temperature, and interference by certain anions and cations. Uranium accumulation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred intracellularly and was extremely rapid (<10 s), and no response to environmental parameters could be detected. Metabolism was not required for metal uptake by either organism. Cell-bound uranium reached a concentration of 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight, but only 32% of the S. cerevisiae cells and 44% of the P. aeruginosa cells within a given population possessed visible uranium deposits when examined by electron microscopy. Rates of uranium uptake by S. cerevisiae were increased by chemical pretreatment of the cells. Uranium could be removed chemically from S. cerevisiae cells, and the cells could then be reused as a biosorbent

  6. Opportunistic Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Potential Risk Sold in Food Products

    Prez-Torrado, Roberto; Querol, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, fungal infections have emerged as an important health problem associated with more people who present deficiencies in the immune system, such as HIV or transplanted patients. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the emerging fungal pathogens with a unique characteristic: its presence in many food products. S. cerevisiae has an impeccably good food safety record compared to other microorganisms like virus, bacteria and some filamentous fungi. However, humans unknowingly and inadvertently ingest large viable populations of S. cerevisiae (home-brewed beer or dietary supplements that contain yeast). In the last few years, researchers have studied the nature of S. cerevisiae strains and the molecular mechanisms related to infections. Here we review the last advance made in this emerging pathogen and we discuss the implication of using this species in food products.

  7. Automated Yeast Mating Protocol Using Open Reading Frames from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome to Improve Yeast Strains for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Engineering the industrial ethanologen Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars from lignocellulosic biomass is critical for commercializing cellulosic fuel ethanol production. Approaches to engineer pentose-fermenting yeasts have required expression of additional genes. We implemented a...

  8. Multiple gene mediated aldehyde reduction is a mechanism of in situ detoxification of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Furfural and HMF (5-hydroxymethylfurfural) are representative inhibitors to ethanologenic yeast generated from biomass pretreatment using dilute acid hydrolysis. Few yeast strains tolerant to inhibitors are available. We have developed tolerant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced bio...

  9. "A comparison between sugar consumption and ethanol production in wort by immobilized Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, Saccharomyces Ludwigii and Saccharomyces Rouxii on Brewer'S Spent Grain".

    Mohammadi, Aniseh; Razavi, Seyyed Hadi; Mousavi, Seyyed Mohammad; Rezaei, Karamatollah

    2011-04-01

    The immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DSM 70424, Saccharomyces ludwigii DSM 3447 and Saccharomyces rouxii DSM 2531 on brewer's spent grain and then ethanol production and sugar consumption of these immobilized yeasts were investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the abilities of these three immobilized yeasts for producing alcohol for brewing at two temperatures (7 and 12 C) using two different sugar levels (one at original level supplied in the brewery and one with 2.5% (w/v), added glucose to the wort). Increasing both parameters resulted in higher alcohol production by all the yeasts studied. At 7 C and with original wort density the ethanol content at the end of fermentation was 2.7% (v/v) for S. cerevisiae, 1.7% for S. ludwigii and 2.0% for S. rouxii. After the addition of 2.5% (w/v) glucose at the same temperature (7 C), the alcohol production was increased to 4.1, 2.8 and 4.1%, respectively. Similar improvements were observed when the fermentation was carried out at 12 C with/without the addition of glucose to the wort. However, temperature indicated greater influence on S. ludwigii than did on S. rouxii and S. cerevisiae. The immobilization as carried out in this study impacted both S. ludwigii and S. rouxii in a way that they could consume maltose under certain conditions. PMID:24031672

  10. "A comparison between sugar consumption and ethanol production in wort by immobilized Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, Saccharomyces Ludwigii and Saccharomyces Rouxii on Brewer's Spent Grain"

    Aniseh Mohammadi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DSM 70424, Saccharomyces ludwigii DSM 3447 and Saccharomyces rouxii DSM 2531 on brewer's spent grain and then ethanol production and sugar consumption of these immobilized yeasts were investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the abilities of these three immobilized yeasts for producing alcohol for brewing at two temperatures (7 and 12 C using two different sugar levels (one at original level supplied in the brewery and one with 2.5% (w/v, added glucose to the wort. Increasing both parameters resulted in higher alcohol production by all the yeasts studied. At 7 C and with original wort density the ethanol content at the end of fermentation was 2.7% (v/v for S. cerevisiae, 1.7% for S. ludwigii and 2.0% for S. rouxii. After the addition of 2.5% (w/v glucose at the same temperature (7 C, the alcohol production was increased to 4.1, 2.8 and 4.1%, respectively. Similar improvements were observed when the fermentation was carried out at 12 C with/without the addition of glucose to the wort. However, temperature indicated greater influence on S. ludwigii than did on S. rouxii and S. cerevisiae. The immobilization as carried out in this study impacted both S. ludwigii and S. rouxii in a way that they could consume maltose under certain conditions.

  11. A mutation in PLC1, a candidate phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causes aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation.

    Payne, W E; Fitzgerald-Hayes, M

    1993-01-01

    We identified a putative Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) gene, PLC1, which encodes a protein most similar to the delta class of PI-PLC enzymes. The PLC1 gene was isolated during a study of yeast strains that exhibit defects in chromosome segregation. plc1-1 cells showed a 10-fold increase in aberrant chromosome segregation compared with the wild type. Molecular analysis revealed that PLC1 encodes a predicted protein of 101 kDa with appr...

  12. Kinetic Activity of Commercial Native Linamarase (CNLIN) and Engineered <&beta-glucosidase) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Cassava Linamarin

    Julius Kwagh-Har Ikya; Charles Chukwuma Ariahu; James Ortese Ayatse

    2014-01-01

    The ability of Commercial Native Linamarase (CNLIN) and Engineered Linamarase (GELIN) extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hydrolyse cassava linamarin was challenged. CNLIN acting as control was used together with GELIN extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to evaluate the kinetic data for test enzymes at pH 3.5, 6.8 and 10.5, respectively and ambient temperature (35°C). Data obtained from the varying activity versus substrate concentrations were fitted with the Michaelis-Menten plots a...

  13. Effects of Yeast (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae) Feed Supplement on Milk Production and its Composition in Tunisian Holstein Friesian Cows

    Maamouri O.; Selmi H.; M’hamdi N.

    2014-01-01

    A 105-day feed trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of probiotic feed supplement containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae on milk yield and its composition in Holstein Friesian cows. The trial was conducted in the region of Sidi Bouzid in the west of Tunisia. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been investigated on eight Holstein Friesian cows randomly divided into two groups of four animals on the basis of age, body weight, average milk yield, and lactation number. The first group was ...

  14. Transcriptome-Based Characterization of Interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in Lactose-Grown Chemostat Cocultures

    Mendes, F.; Sieuwerts, S.; De Hulster, E.; Almering, M.J.; Luttik, M.A.; Pronk, J T; Smid, E. J.; Bron, P.A.; Daran-Lapujade, P

    2013-01-01

    Mixed populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and lactic acid bacteria occur in many dairy, food, and beverage fermentations, but knowledge about their interactions is incomplete. In the present study, interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, two microorganisms that co-occur in kefir fermentations, were studied during anaerobic growth on lactose. By combining physiological and transcriptome analysis of the two strains in the cocultu...

  15. Transcriptional responses to glucose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains lacking a functional protein kinase A

    Livas Daniela

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pattern of gene transcripts in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strongly affected by the presence of glucose. An increased activity of protein kinase A (PKA, triggered by a rise in the intracellular concentration of cAMP, can account for many of the effects of glucose on transcription. In S. cerevisiae three genes, TPK1, TPK2, and TPK3, encode catalytic subunits of PKA. The lack of viability of tpk1 tpk2 tpk3 triple mutants may be suppressed by mutations such as yak1 or msn2/msn4. To investigate the requirement for PKA in glucose control of gene expression, we have compared the effects of glucose on global transcription in a wild-type strain and in two strains devoid of PKA activity, tpk1 tpk2 tpk3 yak1 and tpk1 tpk2 tpk3 msn2 msn4. Results We have identified different classes of genes that can be induced -or repressed- by glucose in the absence of PKA. Representative examples are genes required for glucose utilization and genes involved in the metabolism of other carbon sources, respectively. Among the genes responding to glucose in strains devoid of PKA some are also controlled by a redundant signalling pathway involving PKA activation, while others are not affected when PKA is activated through an increase in cAMP concentration. On the other hand, among genes that do not respond to glucose in the absence of PKA, some give a full response to increased cAMP levels, even in the absence of glucose, while others appear to require the cooperation of different signalling pathways. We show also that, for a number of genes controlled by glucose through a PKA-dependent pathway, the changes in mRNA levels are transient. We found that, in cells grown in gluconeogenic conditions, expression of a small number of genes, mainly connected with the response to stress, is reduced in the strains lacking PKA. Conclusions In S. cerevisiae, the transcriptional responses to glucose are triggered by a variety of pathways, alone or in combination, in which PKA is often involved. Redundant signalling pathways confer a greater robustness to the response to glucose, while cooperative pathways provide a greater flexibility.

  16. Analysis of HIV-1 Vpr determinants responsible for cell growth arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Yao Xiao-Jian

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 genome encodes a well-conserved accessory gene product, Vpr, that serves multiple functions in the retroviral life cycle, including the enhancement of viral replication in nondividing macrophages, the induction of G2 cell-cycle arrest, and the modulation of HIV-1-induced apoptosis. We previously reported the genetic selection of a panel of di-tryptophan (W-containing peptides capable of interacting with HIV-1 Vpr and inhibiting its cytostatic activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Yao, X.-J., J. Lemay, N. Rougeau, M. Clément, S. Kurtz, P. Belhumeur, and E. A. Cohen, J. Biol. Chem. v. 277, p. 48816–48826, 2002. In this study, we performed a mutagenic analysis of Vpr to identify sequence and/or structural determinants implicated in the interaction with di-W-containing peptides and assessed the effect of mutations on Vpr-induced cytostatic activity in S. cerevisiae. Results Our data clearly shows that integrity of N-terminal α-helix I (17–33 and α-helix III (53–83 is crucial for Vpr interaction with di-W-containing peptides as well as for the protein-induced cytostatic effect in budding yeast. Interestingly, several Vpr mutants, mainly in the N- and C-terminal domains, which were previously reported to be defective for cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis in human cells, still displayed a cytostatic activity in S. cerevisiae and remained sensitive to the inhibitory effect of di-W-containing peptides. Conclusions Vpr-induced growth arrest in budding yeast can be effectively inhibited by GST-fused di-W peptide through a specific interaction of di-W peptide with Vpr functional domain, which includes α-helix I (17–33 and α-helix III (53–83. Furthermore, the mechanism(s underlying Vpr-induced cytostatic effect in budding yeast are likely to be distinct from those implicated in cell-cycle alteration and apoptosis in human cells.

  17. Surface display of a bifunctional glutathione synthetase on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for converting chicken feather hydrolysate into glutathione.

    Qiu, Zhiqi; Tan, Hongming; Zhou, Shining; Cao, Lixiang

    2014-08-01

    The low economic profits of feather recycling lead that the large amount of feathers is currently discarded in China. To convert feather hydrolysates into GSH with high values, surface display of the bifunctional glutathione synthetase encoded by gcsgs from Streptococcus thermophilus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the potential in glutathione (GSH) production from feather hydrolysates were studied. The surface-displayed GCSGS could be used to convert feather hydrolysates into GSH. Results showed that 10 g/l of feather was converted into 321.8 mg/l GSH by the Trichoderma atroviride F6 and surface-displayed GCSGS in the study. Compared with production of intracellular GSH by S. cerevisiae from amino acids or feather hydrolysate, the concentration of GSH in the study was higher, and purification of GSH was more feasible. Due to the glycolytic pathway, the S. cerevisiae was used to generate ATP and cheap feather hydrolysate as precursors, the process for GSH production based on surface-displayed GCSGS is cheap and feasible. The process showed the potential to convert feather hydrolysates into GSH on an industrial scale. PMID:24706360

  18. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated metabolic engineering for enhanced fatty acids production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2015-04-01

    Targeted engineering of microbial genomes holds much promise for diverse biotechnological applications. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 systems are capable of efficiently editing microbial genomes, including that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we demonstrate the use of TALENs to edit the genome of S.cerevisiae with the aim of inducing the overproduction of fatty acids. Heterodimeric TALENs were designed to simultaneously edit the FAA1 and FAA4 genes encoding acyl-CoA synthetases in S.cerevisiae. Functional yeast double knockouts generated using these TALENs over-produce large amounts of free fatty acids into the cell. This study demonstrates the use of TALENs for targeted engineering of yeast and demonstrates that this technology can be used to stimulate the enhanced production of free fatty acids, which are potential substrates for biofuel production. This proof-of-principle study extends the utility of TALENs as excellent genome editing tools and highlights their potential use for metabolic engineering of yeast and other organisms, such as microalgae and plants, for biofuel production. © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan.

  19. Local isolate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as biocompetitive agent of Aspergillus flavus

    Eni Kusumaningtyas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus is a toxigenic fungus that contaminates feed and influences the animal health. Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used as a biocompetitive agent to control the contamination. The ability of local isolate of S. cerevisiae as a biocompetitive agent for A. flavus was evaluated. A. flavus (30ml was swept on Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA, while S. cerevisiae was swept on its left and right. Plates were incubated at 28oC for nine days. Lytic activity of S. cerevisiae was detected by pouring its suspension on the centre of the cross streaks of A. flavus. Plates were incubated at 28oC for five days. Growth inhibition of A. flavus by S. cerevisiae was determined by mixing the two fungi on Potato dextrose broth and incubated at 28oC for 24 hours. Total colony of A. flavus were then observed at incubation time of 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours by pour plates method on the SDA plates and incubated on 28oC for two days. Growth of hyphae of A. flavus sweep were inhibited with the swept of S. cerevisiae. The width of A. flavus colony treated with S. cerevisiae is narrower (3,02 cm than that of control ( 4,60 cm. The growth of A. flavus was also inhibited on the centre of cross streak where the S. cerevisiae poured. S. cerevisiae gradually reduced the colony number of A. flavus in the mixed culture of broth fungi ie. 14 x 103 CFU/ml while colony number of control is 80 x 103 CFU/ml. Results showed that S. cerevisiae could be used as biocompetitive agent of A. flavus.

  20. Display of wasp venom allergens on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Borodina, Irina; Jensen, B. M.; Søndergaard, Ib; Poulsen, Lars Kærgaard

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae preserve their native allergenic properties and whether the yeast native surface glycoproteins interfere with IgE binding. We chose to use the major allergens from the common wasp Vespula vulgaris venom: phospholipase A1, hyaluronidase and antigen 5 as the model. Results: The proteins...... non-modified S. cerevisiae cells did not cause any unspecific reaction in FACS or histamine release assay despite the expression of high-mannose oligosaccharides. In perspective the yeast surface display may be used for allergen discovery from cDNA libraries and possibly for sublingual immunotherapy...

  1. Industrial Systems Biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Enables Novel Succinic Acid Cell Factory

    Otero, José Manuel; Cimini, Donatella; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Poulsen, Simon Guldberg; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, the preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol), and a robust commerically compatible scaffold to be exploitted for diverse chemical production. Succinic acid is a highly sought...... genetic targets for either over-expression or interruption of succinate producing or consuming pathways, respectively, do not lead to increased succinate. Rather, we demonstrate how systems biology tools coupled with directed evolution and selection allows non-intuitive, rapid and substantial re......-direction of carbon fluxes in S. cerevisiae, and hence show proof of concept that this is a potentially attractive cell factory for over-producing different platform chemicals....

  2. Next-generation sequencing of Okazaki fragments extracted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Yanga, Wenchao; Lib, Xinhui

    2013-08-01

    Genome-wide Okazaki fragment distribution can differentiate the discontinuous from the semi-discontinuous DNA replication model. Here, we investigated the genome-wide Okazaki fragment distribution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288C. We improved the method based upon lambda exonuclease digestion to purify Okazaki fragments from S288C yeast cells, followed by Illumina sequencing. The distribution of Okazaki fragments around confirmed replication origins, including two highly efficient replication origins, supported the discontinuous DNA replication model. In S. cerevisiae mitochondria, Okazaki fragments were overrepresented in the transcribed regions, indicating the interplay between transcription and DNA replication. PMID:23792162

  3. Engineering the oxygen sensing regulation results in an enhanced recombinant human hemoglobin production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Martínez, José L.; Liu, Lifang; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    engineering also allowed the generation of different genetically modified organisms for the production of recombinant human hemoglobin. Several studies have showed very promising results using the bacterium Escherichia coli as a production platform, reporting hemoglobin titers above 5% of the total cell...... generation of a set of plasmids to produce functional human hemoglobin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with final titers of active hemoglobin exceeding 4% of the total cell protein. In this study, we propose a strategy for further engineering S. cerevisiae by altering the oxygen sensing pathway by deleting the...

  4. Bioconversion of lactose/whey to fructose diphosphate with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Compagno, C.; Tura, A.; Ranzi, B.M.; Martegani, E. (Univ. di Milano (Italy))

    1993-07-01

    Genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that express Escherichia coli [beta]-galactosidase gene are able to bioconvert lactose or whey into fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP). High FDP yields from whey were obtained with an appropriate ratio between cell concentration and inorganic phosphate. The biomass of transformed cells can be obtained from different carbon sources, according to the expression vector bearing the lacZ gene. The authors showed that whey can be used as the carbon source for S. cerevisiae growth and as the substrate for bioconversion to fructose diphosphate.

  5. Sensitivity to Lovastatin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Deleted for Pleiotropic Drug Resistance (PDR) Genes

    Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The use of statins is well established in human therapy, and model organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae are commonly used in studies of drug action at molecular and cellular levels. The investigation of the resistance mechanisms towards statins may suggest new approaches to improve therapy...... based on the use of statins. We investigated the susceptibility to lovastatin of S. cerevisiae strains deleted for PDR genes, responsible for exporting hydrophobic and amphi-philic drugs, such as lovastatin. Strains deleted for the genes tested, PDR1, PDR3, PDR5 and SNQ2, exhibited remarkably different...

  6. Improved ethanol production from whey Saccharomyces cerevisiae using permeabilized cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus

    Rosenberg, M. [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Biochemical Technology; Tomaska, M. [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Biochemical Technology; Kanuch, J. [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Biochemical Technology; Sturdik, E. [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Biochemical Technology

    1995-12-31

    Permeabilized cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus CCY eSY2 were tested as the source of lactase in the ethanol fermentation of concentrated deproteinized whey (65-70 g/l lactose) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCY 10-13-14. Rapid lactose hydrolysis by small amounts of permeabilized cells following the fermentation of released glucose and galactose by S. cerevisiae resulted in a twofold enhancement of the overall volumetric productivity (1.03 g/lxh), compared to the fermentation in which the lactose was directly fermented by K. marxianus. (orig.)

  7. Germination of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ascospores without trehalose mobilization as revealed by in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Donnini, C; Puglisi, P P; Vecli, A.; Marmiroli, N.

    1988-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae ascospores germinate in the presence of acetate without any detectable trehalose degradation, as revealed by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by a standard colorimetric assay. The results presented here substantiate the hypothesis that in S. cerevisiae trehalose supplies energy during dormancy of the spores and not during the germination process.

  8. ISOTERMAS DE ADSORÇÃO DE CÁDMIO POR Saccharomyces cerevisiae ISOTHERMS OF CADMIUM ADSORPTION BY Saccharomyces cerevisae

    Silvana ALBERTINI

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de determinar as isotermas de adsorção de cádmio por Saccharomyces cerevisiae, foram utilizados os sais cloreto e nitrato de cádmio nas concentrações de 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 e 100mg L-1. A biomassa foi produzida a partir de uma cultura "starter"de Saccharomyces cerevisiae IZ 1904. Após o contato de 16h entre o microrganismo e as soluções em estudo, a biomassa foi separada por centrifugação e o teor de cádmio residual foi determinado no sobrenadante por espectrofotometria de absorção atômica. Para os dois sais empregados foi observado um acúmulo crescente de cádmio nas concentrações de 5, 10, 20 e 40mg L-1. Nas concentrações de 60, 80 e 100mg L-1 foi observado que a levedura acumulou teores menores do metal, evidenciando danos na parede celular, nem sempre acompanhados de iguais danos da membrana citoplasmática, tais alterações da parede visualizadas por microscopia eletrônica de varredura.With the objective of determining the isotherms of cadmium the adsorption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chloride and nitrate salts were used in the concentrations of 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100mg L-1. The biomass was produced from a starter culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IZ 1904. After a 16h contact between the microrganism and solutions of study the biomass was separated by a centrifuge and the cadmium residue content was determined at the supernatant by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry. For the two salts used a growing accumulation of cadmium was observed at concentrations of 5, 10, 20, and 40mg L-1. In the concentrations of 60, 80 and 100mg L-1 a decreasing of the accumulation of the metal was observed, evidencing damages of the cellular wall, which they're not accompanied always by damages of the citoplasmatic membrane, visualized by scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Produksi bioethanol dari jerami padi (Oryza sativa melalui hidrolisis asan dan fermentasi dengan Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SRI KUSUMASTUTI HAYUNINGTYAS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hayuningtyas SK, Sunarto, Sari SLA. 2013. The production of bioethanol from rice straw (Oryza sativa by acid hydrolysis and fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bioteknologi 11: 1-4. Bioethanol is one of the alternative fuels that are considered more environmentally friendly. Bioethanol can be obtained from material that contains cellulose, such as rice straw. This study aimed to determine the optimum fermentation time to product bioethanol from rice straw hydrolysis and measured of bioethanol product from rice straw by acid hydrolysis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation. The results showed that rice straw hydrolysis by sulfuric acid catalyst produced higher reducing sugar: 21.7 g/100 g rice straw. The optimum fermentation time was 5 days which produced of 8.96% bioethanol.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae con deficiencia en el mecanismo de reparación del ADN

    Jaime Niño

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ciento treinta y ocho extractos obtenidos de plantas pertenecientes a las familias botánicas Asteraceae, Euphorbiaceae, Melastomataceae, Podocarpaceae, Rubiaceae y Solanaceae recolectadas en reservas naturales de la Ecorregión del Eje Cafetero (EEC fueron evaluadas contra cepas de la levadura Saccharomyces cerevisiae RS 322N, R52Y y RS 321 por el método de difusión en agar, con el propósito de identificar nuevos extractos bioactivos que dañen el ADN y/o que inhiban las topoisomerasas I o II. Los extractos metanólicos de las especies pertenecientes a la familia Solanaceae: Browallia speciosa, Cestrum olivaceum y Solanum brevifolium mostraron selectividad para el ensayo de la levadura Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutada, presentando actividad como inhibidor de la topoisomerasa I. Adicionalmente, el extracto de diclorometano de Solanum deflexiflorum perteneciente a la misma familia presentó actividad inhibidora de la topoisomerasa II.

  11. A comprehensive web resource on RNA helicases from the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Linder, P; Gasteiger, E; Bairoch, A

    2000-04-01

    Members of the RNA helicase protein family are defined by several motifs that have been widely conserved during evolution. They are found in all organisms-from bacteria to humans-and many viruses. The minimum number of RNA helicases present within a eukaryotic cell can be predicted from the complete sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Recent progress in the functional analysis of various family members has confirmed the significance of RNA helicases for most cellular RNA metabolic processes. We have assembled a web resource that focuses on RNA helicases from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It includes descriptions of RNA helicases and their functions, links to sequence- and yeast-specific databases, an extensive list of references, and links to non-yeast helicase web resources. PMID:10790687

  12. The Reacquisition of Biotin Prototrophy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Involved Horizontal Gene Transfer, Gene Duplication and Gene Clustering

    Hall, Charles; Dietrich, Fred S

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of biotin, a vitamin required for many carboxylation reactions, is a variable trait in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many S. cerevisiae strains, including common laboratory strains, contain only a partial biotin synthesis pathway. We here report the identification of the first step necessary for the biotin synthesis pathway in S. cerevisiae. The biotin auxotroph strain S288c was able to grow on media lacking biotin when BIO1 and the known biotin synthesis gene BIO6 were introduced t...

  13. High-level production of beta-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by successive transformation with carotenogenic genes from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    Verwaal, Rene; WANG Jing; Meijnen, Jean-Paul; Visser, Hans; Sandmann, Gerhard; Van Den Berg, Johan A; van Ooyen, Albert J. J.

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether Saccharomyces cerevisiae can serve as a host for efficient carotenoid and especially beta-carotene production, carotenogenic genes from the carotenoid-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were introduced and overexpressed. in S. cerevisiae. Because overexpression of these genes from an episomal expression vector resulted in unstable strains, the genes were integrated into genomic DNA to yield stable, carotenoid-producing S. cerevisiae cells. Furthermore, caroteno...

  14. Polyhydroxyfullerene Binds Cadmium Ions and Alleviates Metal-Induced Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Pradhan, Arunava; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Seena, Sahadevan; Pascoal, Cláudia; Cássio, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    The water-soluble polyhydroxyfullerene (PHF) is a functionalized carbon nanomaterial with several industrial and commercial applications. There have been controversial reports on the toxicity and/or antioxidant properties of fullerenes and their derivatives. Conversely, metals have been recognized as toxic mainly due to their ability to induce oxidative stress in living organisms. We investigated the interactive effects of PHF and cadmium ions (Cd) on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae ...

  15. Effects of furfural on the respiratory metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostats,

    Sarvari Horvath, I; Franzén, C J; Taherzadeh, M J; Niklasson, C; Lidén, Gunnar

    2003-01-01

    Effects of furfural on the aerobic metabolism of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by performing chemostat experiments, and the kinetics of furfural conversion was analyzed by performing dynamic experiments. Furfural, an important inhibitor present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, was shown to have an inhibitory effect on yeast cells growing respiratively which was much greater than the inhibitory effect previously observed for anaerobically growing yeast cells. The residual fur...

  16. Biosynthesis of phosphoinositol-containing sphingolipids from phosphatidylinositol by a membrane preparation from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Becker, G W; Lester, R L

    1980-01-01

    Incubation of membranes prepared from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with [32P]phosphatidyl[3H]inositol resulted in the transfer of both labels to two products which were characterized as two species of inositolphosphoceramide, differing in the ceramide portion of the molecule. The products were characterized on the basis of stability in mild alkali, mobility on silica gel-impregnated paper, chromatography on silicic acid columns, and release of inositol phosphate upon base hydrolysis. The reaction...

  17. Dominant negative rat DNA polymerase beta mutants interfere with base excision repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Clairmont, C A; Sweasy, J B

    1996-01-01

    DNA polymerase beta is one of the smallest known eukaryotic DNA polymerases. This polymerase has been very well characterized in vitro, but its functional role in vivo has yet to be determined. Using a novel competition assay in Escherichia coli, we isolated two DNA polymerase beta dominant negative mutants. When we overexpressed the dominant negative mutant proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cells became sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate. Interestingly, overexpression of the same p...

  18. Regulated expression of endonuclease EcoRI in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: nuclear entry and biological consequences.

    Barnes, G; RINE, J.

    1985-01-01

    In an investigation to determine how proteins are localized within the nucleus of a cell, we demonstrate that the restriction endonuclease EcoRI is able to enter and function within the nucleus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae when this prokaryotic protein is synthesized in vivo. The EcoRI endonuclease was produced in yeast under the transcriptional control of a regulated yeast promoter by ligating a DNA fragment containing only coding sequences for the endonuclease to the promoter element of the ...

  19. Properties of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mtDNA segment conferring high-frequency yeast transformation.

    Hyman, B.C.; Cramer, J H; Rownd, R H

    1982-01-01

    The bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a facultative anaerobe, tolerant to mutations in its mitochondrial genome. Individual cytoplasmic petite mutants retain genetic information derived from any portion of the parenteral mtDNA, prompting questions concerning distribution of the DNA replication origin(s) on the yeast mitochondrial genome. The experiments described in this paper were designated to test the possibility of using high-frequency yeast transformation as a selection for yeast...

  20. Altered Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Heterologous Expression of Basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa SOD2 Gene

    Snia C. Melo; Regineide X. Santos; Ana C. Melgao; Pereira, Alanna C. F.; Cristina Pungartnik; Martin Brendel

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous expression of a putative manganese superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2) of the basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa complemented the phenotypes of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sod2? mutant. Sequence analysis of the cloned M. perniciosa cDNA revealed an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a 176 amino acid polypeptide with the typical metal-binding motifs of a SOD2 gene, named MpSOD2. Phylogenetic comparison with known manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs) located the protein of M....

  1. Specific Genetic Interactions Between Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Proteins and B-Type Cyclins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Ikui, Amy E.; Cross, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    The B-type cyclin Clb5 is involved primarily in control of DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We conducted a synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis, testing for synthetic lethality between the clb5 deletion and a selected 87 deletions related to diverse aspects of cell cycle control based on GO annotations. Deletion of the spindle checkpoint genes BUB1 and BUB3 caused synthetic lethality with clb5. The spindle checkpoint monitors the attachment of spindles to the kinetochore or spin...

  2. Cellular and mitochondrial respiration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells of different age

    Hlousková, J.; Volejníková, A.; Sigler, Karel; Pichová, Alena

    Smolenice : Springer, 2009, s. 92-92. ISSN 1336-4839. [Annual Conference on Yeasts /37./. Smolenice (SK), 13.05.2009-15.05.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/07/0339; GA MŠk 1M0570; GA MŠk ME 938 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Saccharomyces cerevisiae Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  3. Mutagenic Inverted Repeats Assisted Genome Engineering (MIRAGE) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: deletion of gal7.

    Nair, Nikhil U; Zhao, Huimin

    2012-01-01

    MIRAGE is a unique in vivo genome editing technique that exploits the inherent instability of inverted repeats (palindromes) in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome. As a technique able to quickly create deletions as well as precise point mutations, it is valuable in applications that require creation of designer strains of this yeast. In particular, it has various potential applications in metabolic engineering, systems biology, synthetic biology, and molecular genetics. PMID:22144353

  4. Investigation of Arsenic-Stressed Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Bioassay in Homeopathic Basic Research

    Tim Jäger; Claudia Scherr; Ursula Wolf; Meinhard Simon; Peter Heusser; Stephan Baumgartner

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the response of arsenic-stressed yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) towards homeopathically potentized Arsenicum album, a duckweed nosode, and gibberellic acid. The three test substances were applied in five potency levels (17x, 18x, 24x, 28x, 30x) and compared to controls (unsuccussed and succussed water) with respect to influencing specific growth parameters. Five independent experiments were evaluated for each test substance. Additionally, five water control experimen...

  5. Exploiting cell metabolism for biocatalytic whole-cell transamination by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Weber, Nora; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie; Carlquist, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The potential of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for biocatalytic whole-cell transamination was investigated using the kinetic resolution of racemic 1-phenylethylamine (1-PEA) to (R)-1-PEA as a model reaction. As native yeast do not possess any ?-transaminase activity for the reaction, a recombinant yeast biocatalyst was constructed by overexpressing the gene coding for vanillin aminotransferase from Capsicum chinense. The yeast-based biocatalyst could use glucose as the sole co-substrate for the su...

  6. Biodiversity of a Natural Population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora uvarum from Aglianico del Vulture

    Paraggio, Margherita

    2004-01-01

    A total of 140 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora uvarum, isolated from grapes and musts in the Basilicata region in Italy, were differentiated on the basis of fermentation behaviour and production of secondary compounds in Aglianico del Vulture must. A significant natural biodiversity of the strains was determined. In particular, within each species, the strains were differentiated for the fermentative activity and for the production of secondary compounds. Great strain va...

  7. The ARS309 chromosomal replicator of Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on an exceptional ARS consensus sequence

    Theis, James F.; Newlon, Carol S.

    1997-01-01

    Autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) elements, which function as the cis-acting chromosomal replicators in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, depend upon an essential copy of the 11-bp ARS consensus sequence (ACS) for activity. Analysis of the chromosome III replicator ARS309 unexpectedly revealed that its essential ACS differs from the canonical ACS at two positions. One of the changes observed in ARS309 inactivates other ARS elements. This atypical ACS binds ...

  8. Breaking phylogenetic barriers for fine and bulk chemical products in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Codazzi,

    2011-01-01

    Industrial biotechnologies allow today to obtain both fine and bulk chemicals and yeasts as cell factories can produce many products belonging to both field (Branduardi et al., 2008, Porro and Branduardi, 2009). Among yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae still represents the microorganism of election to develop such cell factories. As regard bioethanol production, yeasts utilization is well established for its natural fermentation ability, but new generation biofuels require ...

  9. The Hog1 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Mediates a Hypoxic Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hickman, Mark J.; Spatt, Dan; Winston, Fred

    2011-01-01

    We have studied hypoxic induction of transcription by studying the seripauperin (PAU) genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous studies showed that PAU induction requires the depletion of heme and is dependent upon the transcription factor Upc2. We have now identified additional factors required for PAU induction during hypoxia, including Hog1, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) whose signaling pathway originates at the membrane. Our results have led to a model in which heme and ergo...

  10. Sequential injection kinetic flow assay for monitoring glycerol in a sugar fermentation process by saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Hueso Domínguez, Karina B.; Tóth, Ildikó V.; Souto, M. Renata S.; Mendes, Filipa; García De María, Cándido; Vasconcelos, Isabel; Rangel, António O. S. S.

    2010-01-01

    A sequential injection system to monitor glycerol in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation process was developed. The method relies on the rate of formation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in its reduced form (NADH, measured spectrophotometrically at 340 nm) from the reaction of glycerol with NAD+ cofactor, catalysed by the enzyme glycerol dehydrogenase present in solution. This procedure enables the determination of glycerol between 0.046 and 0.46 g/l, (corresponding to yeast ferment...

  11. A Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae FG Nucleoporin Mutant Collection for Use in Nuclear Pore Complex Functional Experiments

    Adams, Rebecca L.; Terry, Laura J.; Wente, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    FG nucleoporins (Nups) are the class of proteins that both generate the permeability barrier and mediate selective transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The FG Nup family has 11 members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the study of mutants lacking different FG domains has been instrumental in testing transport models. To continue analyzing the distinct functional roles of FG Nups in vivo, additional robust genetic tools are required. Here, we describe a novel collection of S. cere...

  12. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for increased bioconversion of lignocellulose to ethanol

    Jun, He; Jiayi, Cai

    2012-01-01

    The absence of pentose-utilizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an obstacle for efficiently converting lignocellulosic materials to ethanol. In the present study, the genes coding xylose reductase (XYL1) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2) from Pichia stipitis were successfully engineered into S. cerevisae. As compared to the control transformant, engineering of XYL1 and XYL2 into yeasts significantly increased the microbial biomass (8.1 vs. 3.4g/L), xylose consumption rate (0.15 vs. 0....

  13. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies as predictors of inflammatory bowel disease

    Israeli, E.; Grotto, I; Gilburd, B.; Balicer, R D; Goldin, E.; Wiik, A; Shoenfeld, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Several antibodies have been reported in the sera of patients with Crohns disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The most commonly described are anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan antibodies (ASCA) in CD and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (pANCA) in UC. Familial clustering of these antibodies has been described, suggesting they might be genetic markers. Our aim was to investigate the presence of these antibodies before the emergence of overt clinica...

  14. Susceptibility of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and lactic acid bacteria from the alcohol industry to several antimicrobial compounds

    Oliva-Neto Pedro de; Yokoya Fumio

    2001-01-01

    The antimicrobial effect of several products including commercial formulations currently used in sugar and alcohol factories was determined by adapted MIC (Minimal Inhibitory Concentration) test on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on natural contaminants Lactobacillus fermentum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The MIC test by macrodilution broth method was adapted by formulating of the culture medium with cane juice closely simulating industrial alcoholic fermentation must. Acid penicillin V (MIC 0...

  15. Evaluation of stress tolerance and fermentative behavior of indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Cíntia Lacerda Ramos; Whasley Ferreira Duarte; Ana Luiza Freire; Disney Ribeiro Dias; Elis Cristina Araújo Eleutherio; Rosane Freitas Schwan

    2013-01-01

    Sixty six indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were evaluated in stressful conditions (temperature, osmolarity, sulphite and ethanol tolerance) and also ability to flocculate. Eighteen strains showed tolerant characteristics to these stressful conditions, growing at 42 °C, in 0.04% sulphite, 1 mol L−1 NaCl and 12% ethanol. No flocculent characteristics were observed. These strains were evaluated according to their fermentative performance in sugar cane juice. The conversion factors of ...

  16. Phosphorylation of centromeric histone H3 variant regulates chromosome segregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Boeckmann, Lars; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Au, Wei-Chun; Prashant K. Mishra; Choy, John S.; Dawson, Anthony R.; Szeto, May Y.; Waybright, Timothy J.; Heger, Christopher; McAndrew, Christopher; Goldsmith, Paul K.; VEENSTRA, TIMOTHY D.; Baker, Richard E.; Basrai, Munira A.

    2013-01-01

    The centromeric histone H3 variant (CenH3) is essential for chromosome segregation in eukaryotes. We identify posttranslational modifications of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CenH3, Cse4. Functional characterization of cse4 phosphorylation mutants shows growth and chromosome segregation defects when combined with kinetochore mutants okp1 and ame1. Using a phosphoserine-specific antibody, we show that the association of phosphorylated Cse4 with centromeres increases in response to defective microtu...

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a sporulation-specific temporal pattern of transcript accumulation.

    Kaback, D B; Feldberg, L R

    1985-01-01

    Cultures of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are heterozygous for the mating type (MATa/MAT alpha) undergo synchronous meiosis and spore formation when starved for nitrogen and supplied with a nonfermentable carbon source such as acetate. Haploid and homozygous MAT alpha/MAT alpha and MATa/MATa diploid cells incubated under the same conditions fail to undergo meiosis and are asporogenous. It has not yet been firmly established that gene expression during sporulation is controlled at th...

  18. Biosynthesis of isoprenoids, polyunsaturated fatty acids and flavonoids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Koffas Mattheos AG; Yan Yajun; Chemler Joseph A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Industrial biotechnology employs the controlled use of microorganisms for the production of synthetic chemicals or simple biomass that can further be used in a diverse array of applications that span the pharmaceutical, chemical and nutraceutical industries. Recent advances in metagenomics and in the incorporation of entire biosynthetic pathways into Saccharomyces cerevisiae have greatly expanded both the fitness and the repertoire of biochemicals that can be synthesized from this po...

  19. The Influence of Different Factors on Manganese Incorporation into Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Vesna Stehlik-Tomas; Jasna Mrv?i?; Damir Stanzer

    2009-01-01

    Yeast biomass as well as biomass enriched with trace minerals have been demonstrated to be useful in improving animal health and growth performance. In this work, process for the production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae biomass enriched with manganese, a microelement with antioxidant properties in the form of high bioavailable Mn-protein complex, has been studied. The influences of media composition, Mn2+ concentration and Mn salt were investigated in shaken cultures. The change of biomass and ...

  20. The phosphoinositol sphingolipids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are highly localized in the plasma membrane.

    Patton, J L; Lester, R L

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the vital function(s) of the phosphoinositol-containing sphingolipids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we measured their intracellular distribution and found these lipids to be highly localized in the plasma membrane. Sphingolipids were assayed in organelles which had been uniformly labeled with [3H]inositol or 32P and by chemical measurements of alkali-stable lipid P, of long chain bases, and of very long chain fatty acids. We have developed an improved method for the preparation ...

  1. Lipid-mediated glycosylation of endogenous proteins in isolated plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Welten-Verstegen, G W; Boer, P; Steyn-Parvé, E P

    1980-01-01

    A highly purified plasma membrane fraction from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was obtained by centrifugation on discontinuous sucrose and Urografin gradients. This plasma membrane fraction was capable of glycosylating endogenous proteins. It is shown that glycolipids play an intermediate role in these glycosylation reactions; with uridine 5'-diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine as sugar donor the intermediate lipids possessed stability towards alkali and chromatographic mobilities similar to polyprenyl...

  2. Copper toxicity towards Saccharomyces cerevisiae: dependence on plasma membrane fatty acid composition.

    Avery, S. V.; Howlett, N G; Radice, S

    1996-01-01

    One major mechanism of copper toxicity towards microorganisms is disruption of plasma membrane integrity. In this study, the influence of plasma membrane fatty acid composition on the susceptibility of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Cu2+ toxicity was investigated. Microbial fatty acid composition is highly variable, depending on both intrinsic and environmental factors. Manipulation was achieved in this study by growth in fatty acid-supplemented medium. Whereas cells grown under standard conditi...

  3. Repair of Intermediate Structures Produced at DNA Interstrand Cross-Links in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    McHugh, Peter J.; Sones, William R.; Hartley, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Bifunctional alkylating agents and other drugs which produce DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are among the most effective antitumor agents in clinical use. In contrast to agents which produce bulky adducts on only one strand of the DNA, the cellular mechanisms which act to eliminate DNA ICLs are still poorly understood, although nucleotide excision repair is known to play a crucial role in an early repair step. Using haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains disrupted for genes central to t...

  4. Effects of Ethanol and Other Alkanols on Transport of Acetic Acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Casal, Margarida; Cardoso, Helena; Leo, Ceclia

    1998-01-01

    In glucose-grown cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IGC 4072, acetic acid enters only by simple diffusion of the undissociated acid. In these cells, ethanol and other alkanols enhanced the passive influx of labelled acetic acid. The influx of the acid followed first-order kinetics with a rate constant that increased exponentially with the alcohol concentration, and an exponential enhancement constant for each alkanol was estimated. The intracellular concentration of labelled acetic acid was al...

  5. Population Genomics of Intron Splicing in 38 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome Sequences

    Skelly, Daniel A.; Ronald, James; Connelly, Caitlin F.; Akey, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Introns are a ubiquitous feature of eukaryotic genomes, and the dynamics of intron evolution between species has been extensively studied. However, comparatively few analyses have focused on the evolutionary forces shaping patterns of intron variation within species. To better understand the population genetic characteristics of introns, we performed an extensive population genetics analysis on key intron splice sequences obtained from 38 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As expected, we f...

  6. The Dynamics of Diverse Segmental Amplifications in Populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adapting to Strong Selection

    Payen, Celia; Di Rienzi, Sara C.; Ong, Giang T.; Pogachar, Jamie L.; Sanchez, Joseph C.; Sunshine, Anna B.; Raghuraman, M.K.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Dunham, Maitreya J.

    2013-01-01

    Population adaptation to strong selection can occur through the sequential or parallel accumulation of competing beneficial mutations. The dynamics, diversity, and rate of fixation of beneficial mutations within and between populations are still poorly understood. To study how the mutational landscape varies across populations during adaptation, we performed experimental evolution on seven parallel populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae continuously cultured in limiting sulfate medium. By co...

  7. Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Insights from the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Catarina Pimentel; Liliana Batista-Nascimento; Claudina Rodrigues-Pousada; Menezes, Regina A

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases are the two most common causes of dementia in aged population. Both are protein-misfolding diseases characterized by the presence of protein deposits in the brain. Despite growing evidence suggesting that oxidative stress is critical to neuronal death, its precise role in disease etiology and progression has not yet been fully understood. Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae shares conserved biological processes with all eukaryotic cells, inclu...

  8. Monitoring of intracellular calcium in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with an apoaequorin cDNA expression system.

    Nakajima-Shimada, J; Iida, H.; Tsuji, F.I.; Anraku, Y

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for measuring cytosolic free Ca2+ and its time-dependent changes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using the luminescent protein aequorin as a Ca(2+)-specific indicator. This method with intact yeast cells is labeled "in vivo" to distinguish it from methods with cell extracts, labeled "in vitro." A plasmid in which the apoaequorin cDNA was joined downstream from the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter was constructed and introduced into yeast ce...

  9. THE EFFECT OF PHOSPHATE ACCUMULATION ON METAL ION HOMEOSTASIS IN SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Rosenfeld, Leah; Reddi, Amit R.; Leung, Edison; Aranda, Kimberly; Jensen, Laran T.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2010-01-01

    Much of what is currently understood about the cell biology of metals involves their interactions with proteins. By comparison, little is known about metal interactions with intracellular inorganic compounds such as phosphate. Here we examined the role of phosphate in metal metabolism in vivo by genetically perturbing the phosphate content of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Yeast pho80 mutants cannot sense phosphate and have lost control of phosphate uptake, storage and metabolism. We report ...

  10. Effects of Ty insertions on HIS4 transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Silverman, S J; Fink, G R

    1984-01-01

    Insertion of two different Ty elements into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS4 regulatory region eliminates transcription of HIS4. Transcription can be restored by genetic rearrangements involving the Ty element inserted at HIS4. Several deletions, an inversion, a translocation, and a gene conversion are capable of restoring HIS4 transcription. Some of the rearrangements result in new transcriptional initiation sites. One type of revertant of his4-912 results from recombination between the del...

  11. FERMENTATION, MEDIA OPTIMIZATION STUDIES FOR COENZYME Q10 PRODUCTION BY Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Narendra Kumar S; Puspha Agrawal; Sujata A S; Bhavana B K

    2012-01-01

    To establish the fermentation process for CoQ10 production by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae with subsequent bioprocess media optimization studies. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a vitamin-like nutrient that plays a vital role in cellular energy production. Coenzyme Q10, apart from playing an important role in electron transfer for ATP synthesis, also acts as antioxidant. Therefore it is preferred as a potential therapeutic supplement to many critical diseases besides being used as dietary supplemen...

  12. The Mode of Action of Silver and Silver Halides Nanoparticles against Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells

    A. A. Kudrinskiy; A. Yu. Ivanov; Kulakovskaya, E. V.; Klimov, A I; P. M. Zherebin; D. V. Khodarev; Anh-Tuan Le; Le Thi Tam; Lisichkin, G. V.; Yu. A. Krutyakov

    2014-01-01

    Silver and silver halides nanoparticles (NPs) (Ag, AgCl, AgBr, and AgI) capped with two different stabilizers (sodium citrate and nonionic surfactant Tween 80) were obtained via sodium borohydride reduction of silver nitrate in an aqueous solution. The effect of the biocidal action of as-prepared synthesized materials against yeast cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae was compared to the effect produced by silver nitrate and studied through the measurement of cell loss and kinetics of K+ efflux fro...

  13. Proximity Effect among Cellulose-Degrading Enzymes Displayed on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Surface

    Bae, Jungu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Proximity effect is a form of synergistic effect exhibited when cellulases work within a short distance from each other, and this effect can be a key factor in enhancing saccharification efficiency. In this study, we evaluated the proximity effect between 3 cellulose-degrading enzymes displayed on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface, that is, endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, and β-glucosidase. We constructed 2 kinds of arming yeasts through genome integration: ALL-yeast, which simultan...

  14. Requirement for ESP1 in the nuclear division of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    McGrew, J T; Goetsch, L; Byers, B.; Baum, P

    1992-01-01

    Mutations in the ESP1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae disrupt normal cell-cycle control and cause many cells in a mutant population to accumulate extra spindle pole bodies. To determine the stage at which the esp1 gene product becomes essential for normal cell-cycle progression, synchronous cultures of ESP1 mutant cells were exposed to the nonpermissive temperature for various periods of time. The mutant cells retained viability until the onset of mitosis, when their viability dropped marked...

  15. "Superkiller" mutations suppress chromosomal mutations affecting double-stranded RNA killer plasmid replication in saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Toh-e, A.; Wickner, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying a 1.5 x 10(6)-dalton double-stranded RNA genome in virus-like particles (killer plasmid) secrete a protein toxin that kills strains not carrying this plasmid. At least 28 chromosomal genes (mak genes) are required to maintain or replicate this plasmid. Recessive mutations in any of four other chromosomal genes (ski for superkiller) result in enhanced toxin production. We report that many ski- mak- double mutants are able to maintain the killer plasmid...

  16. Photoreactivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells after irradiation with 25 MeV electrons

    Significant photoreactivation was noted in radio- and UV-sensitive rad-mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to 25 MeV electrons. In order to make the photoreactivable damage be manifest anoxic conditions of irradiation should be chosen as optimal ones. It was shown that the low oxygen effect was partially associated with the photoreactivable damage involved in the lethal effect of ionizing radiation

  17. The effect of millimeter waves at the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during heliogeophysical disturbances

    Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Babaeva, Milena I.

    2013-02-01

    The isolated and combined effect of heliogeophysical factors and low intensive electromagnetic radiation of millimeter diapason at the metachromasia reaction of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. It was established that longterm influence of EMR 65 GHz induced changes in the response of cells towards heliogeomagnetic disturbance. On our opinion millimeter waves may reduce the effect of heliogeophysical factors on living organisms because of destabilization of the intracellular water structure.

  18. Analysis of Plasmid Deletion Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The article is dedicated to the research of plasmid system YCpL2 with help of quantitative analysis of deletion formation. The cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were irradiated by γ-ray with the flux of 0.7 Gy/min and energy of 1.3 MeV as well as heavy ion beam 11B with energy 32 MeV/n. The deletion of plasmid DNA has been analyzed by genetic and restriction analysis

  19. Glucose, Nitrogen, and Phosphate Repletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Common Transcriptional Responses to Different Nutrient Signals

    Conway, Michael K.; Grunwald, Douglas; Heideman, Warren

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae are able to control growth in response to changes in nutrient availability. The limitation for single macronutrients, including nitrogen (N) and phosphate (P), produces stable arrest in G1/G0. Restoration of the limiting nutrient quickly restores growth. It has been shown that glucose (G) depletion/repletion very rapidly alters the levels of more than 2000 transcripts by at least 2-fold, a large portion of which are involved with either protein production in growth or...

  20. EFFECT OF NITROGEN SOURCES ON THE PRODUCTION OF INVERTASE BY YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE 3090

    Suresh P. Kamble; Jyotsna C. Borate

    2012-01-01

    Invertase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is high cost enzyme and primarily used in the confectionary industry. For large scale production of the enzyme, feasible synthetic medium with appropriate supplemented nutrients are required. The effect of carbon source on invertase production is well known, but little is known about the effect of different nitrogen source. The aim of the present study is to see the effect of different nitrogen sources on the production of invertase in submerged ferment...

  1. Hyperosmotic stress induces metacaspase - and mitochondria - dependent apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Silva, Rui D.; Sotoca, Roberto; Johansson, Björn; Ludovico, Paula; Sansonetty, Filipe; Silva, Manuel T; Peinado, José M.; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2005-01-01

    During the last years, several reports described an apoptosis-like programmed cell death process in yeast in response to different environmental aggressions. Here, evidence is presented that hyperosmotic stress induces in Saccharomyces cerevisiae a cell death process accompanied by morphological and biochemical indicators of apoptotic programmed cell death, namely chromatin condensation along the nuclear envelope, mitochondrial swelling and reduction of cristae number, production of reactive ...

  2. Investigation of the effect of water exposed to nonequilibrium contact plasma onto saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast

    S. Mykolenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Additional treatment of water by nonequilibrium contact plasma allows improving consumer characteristics of bakery goods considerably. Determination of the effect of plasma-chemically activated water on morphological, cultural and physiological properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast is important from the technological point of view. Materials and Methods. Experimental investigations were carried out in the conditions of bacteriological laboratory by seeding the culture of yeasts of ТМ “Lvivski” and “Kryvorizki” on Sabouraud dense liquid nutrient media. The quantity of viable cells of microorganisms was determined by the method of Gould sector seeds. Morphology of the yeast was investigated by phase-contrast microscopy. Biotechnological properties of yeasts were determined on Giss media. Results. The paper establishes the effect of water exposed to nonequilibrium contact plasma on the sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and shows absence of suppressive action of treated water with regard to cultural properties of microorganisms. The experiments prove that with the use of plasma-chemically activated water morphological characteristics and biochemical properties of bakery yeasts produced by Lviv and Kryvyi Rig yeast plants are preserved. Culturing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast on the nutrient media prepared with the use of water exposed to nonequilibrium contact plasm resulted in 6,5–15 times’ increase in quantity of viable microorganisms compared with the control on the mains drinking water. Conclusions. Physiological properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast improved owing to use water exposed to nonequilibrium contact plasma. Results of investigations are recommended for using in yeast production and bread making.

  3. Robust Metabolic Responses to Varied Carbon Sources in Natural and Laboratory Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Van Voorhies, Wayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding factors that regulate the metabolism and growth of an organism is of fundamental biologic interest. This study compared the influence of two different carbon substrates, dextrose and galactose, on the metabolic and growth rates of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast metabolic and growth rates varied widely depending on the metabolic substrate supplied. The metabolic and growth rates of a yeast strain maintained under long-term laboratory conditions was compared to strain i...

  4. Ethanol from Whey: Continuous Fermentation with a Catabolite Repression-Resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutant

    Terrell, Scott L.; Bernard, Alain; Bailey, Richard B.

    1984-01-01

    An alternative method for the conversion of cheese whey lactose into ethanol has been demonstrated. With the help of continuous-culture technology, a catabolite repression-resistant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae completely fermented equimolar mixtures of glucose and galactose into ethanol. The first step in this process was a computer-controlled fed-batch operation based on the carbon dioxide evolution rate of the culture. In the absence of inhibitory ethanol concentrations, this step al...

  5. In silico design of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for production of industrial compounds derived from TCA cycle

    H. Lopes; Silva, P.(Instituto de Fsica de Cantabria(IFCA), CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain); Patil, Kiran R; Rocha, I.

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most widely used cell factories in industrial biotechnology. However, the development of optimized yeast strains for the production of novel compounds is a costly and time-consuming process, mainly due to the unavailability of suitable chassis cells. This work was developed under the scope of the ERA-IB DeYeastLibrary project and aimed to design in silico pre-optimized strains capable of overproducing organic acids originating from the TCA cycle, based o...

  6. Identification of Proteins Whose Synthesis Is Modulated During the Cell Cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Lörincz, Attila T.; Miller, Mark J.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu; Geiduschek, E. Peter

    1982-01-01

    We examined the synthesis and turnover of individual proteins in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle. Proteins were pulse-labeled with radioactive isotope (35S or 14C) in cells at discrete cycle stages and then resolved on two-dimensional gels and analyzed by a semiautomatic procedure for quantitating gel electropherogram-autoradiographs. The cells were obtained by one of three methods: (i) isolation of synchronous subpopulations of growing cells by zonal centrifugation; (ii) fractionatio...

  7. On-line sensitive lightness measurement of cell mass in Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture

    Queinnec, I. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France); Guillou, V.; Uribelarrea, J.L.; Pareilleux, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1995-12-31

    An industrial spectrophotometer was used as a very accurate on-line sensor to investigate fast dynamic changes in yeast culture in the range of 0.5-5 g/l. High sensitive variation in biomass concentration of 0.015 g/l was detected. A fast dynamic response is conduced in a steady state continuous culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by an acetate pulse and biomass concentration profile clearly determined by this sensor. (authors) 11 refs.

  8. Use of Nonionic Surfactants for Improvement of Terpene Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Kirby, James; Nishimoto, Minobu; Chow, Ruthie W. N.; Pasumarthi, Venkata N.; Chan, Rossana; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate enzyme and pathway engineering, a selection was developed for improved sesquiterpene titers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. α-Bisabolene, a candidate advanced biofuel, was found to protect yeast against the disruptive action of nonionic surfactants such as Tween 20 (T20). An experiment employing competition between two strains of yeast, one of which makes twice as much bisabolene as the other, demonstrated that growth in the presence of T20 provided sufficient selective pressure to...

  9. Old Yellow Enzymes Protect against Acrolein Toxicity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Trotter, Eleanor W; Collinson, Emma J.; Dawes, Ian W.; Grant, Chris M.

    2006-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous reactive aldehyde which is formed as a product of lipid peroxidation in biological systems. In this present study, we screened the complete set of viable deletion strains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for sensitivity to acrolein to identify cell functions involved in resistance to reactive aldehydes. We identified 128 mutants whose gene products are localized throughout the cell. Acrolein-sensitive mutants were distributed among most major biological processes but parti...

  10. Improvement of ethanol production by ethanol-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae UVNR56

    Thammasittirong, Sutticha Na-Ranong; Thirasaktana, Thanawan; Thammasittirong, Anon; Srisodsuk, Malee

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol tolerance is one of the important characteristics of ethanol-producing yeast. This study focused on the improvement of ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae NR1 for enhancing ethanol production by random UV-C mutagenesis. One ethanol-tolerant mutant, UVNR56, displayed a significantly improved ethanol tolerance in the presence of 15% (v/v) ethanol and showed a considerably higher viability during ethanol fermentation from sugarcane molasses and sugarcane molasses with initial e...

  11. Sex and the Spread of Retrotransposon Ty3 in Experimental Populations of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Zeyl, C; Bell, G; Green, D M

    1996-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements may be molecular parasites that reduce the fitness of individuals that bear them by causing predominantly deleterious mutations, but increase in frequency when rare because transposition increases their rates of transmission to the progeny of crosses between infected and uninfected individuals. If this is true, then the initial spread of a mobile element requires sex. We tested this prediction using the yeast retrotransposon Ty3 and a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  12. Stimulation of DNA repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae by ginkgo biloba leaf extract

    Marques, Filipe; Azevedo, F.; Johansson, Björn; Oliveira, Rui Pedro Soares de

    2011-01-01

    Many extracts prepared from plants traditionally used for medicinal applications contain a variety of phytochemicals with antioxidant and antigenotoxic activity. In this work we measured the DNA protective effect of extracts of Ginkgo biloba leaves from oxidative stress using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as experimental model. The extract improved viability of yeast cells under oxidative stress imposed by hydrogen peroxide. In accordance with previous reports on antioxidant properties of G. bilob...

  13. Toxic detection in mine water based on proteomic analysis of lysosomal enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Tu; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Bang, Seung Hyuck; Hong, Ji Hye; Kwon, Soon Dong; Min, Jiho

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lysosome is the cell-organelle which is commonly used as biomonitoring tool in environmental pollution. In this study, the lysosomal proteomic of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was analyzed for utilization in the detection of toxic substances in mine water samples. Methods This work informs the expression of lysosomal proteomic in yeast in response with toxic chemicals, such as sodium meta-arsenite and tetracycline, for screening specific biomarkers. After that, a recombinant y...

  14. Effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on immune functions of broilers challenged with Eimeria tenella.

    Gao, J; Zhang, H J; Wu, S G; Yu, S H; Yoon, I; Moore, D; Gao, Y P; Yan, H J; Qi, G H

    2009-10-01

    Three hundred sixty 1-d-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 6 groups with a 2x3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Three supplemental levels (0, 0.25, and 0.50%) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (XP) were fed to control and Eimeria tenella-infected broilers. Growth performance and immune response criteria were measured after coccidian infection. Broiler ADG was lowered (Pcoccidia-infected broilers. PMID:19762868

  15. Enhanced xylose fermentation and ethanol production by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain

    Vilela, Leonardo de Figueiredo; de Araujo, Verônica Parente Gomes; Paredes, Raquel de Sousa; Bon, Elba Pinto da Silva; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves; Neves, Bianca Cruz; Eleutherio, Elis Cristina Araújo

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that heterologous expression of a bacterial xylose isomerase gene (xylA) of Burkholderia cenocepacia enabled a laboratorial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain to ferment xylose anaerobically, without xylitol accumulation. However, the recombinant yeast fermented xylose slowly. In this study, an evolutionary engineering strategy was applied to improve xylose fermentation by the xylA-expressing yeast strain, which involved sequential batch cultivation on xylose. The r...

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rif1 cooperates with MRX-Sae2 in promoting DNA-end resection

    Martina, Marina; Bonetti, Diego; VILLA Matteo; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    Diverse roles in DNA metabolism have been envisaged for budding yeast and mammalian Rif1. In particular, yeast Rif1 is involved in telomere homeostasis, while its mammalian counterpart participates in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rif1 supports cell survival to DNA lesions in the absence of MRX or Sae2. Furthermore, it contributes to the nucleolytic processing (resection) of DSBs. This Rif1-dependent control of DSB resect...

  17. Shelterin-Like Proteins and Yku Inhibit Nucleolytic Processing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Telomeres

    Bonetti, Diego; Clerici, Michela; Anbalagan, Savani; Martina, Marina; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells distinguish their chromosome ends from accidental DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by packaging them into protective structures called telomeres that prevent DNA repair/recombination activities. Here we investigate the role of key telomeric proteins in protecting budding yeast telomeres from degradation. We show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae shelterin-like proteins Rif1, Rif2, and Rap1 inhibit nucleolytic processing at both de novo and native telomeres during G1 and G2 cel...

  18. Transcriptional control of the sporulation-specific glucoamylase gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Yamashita, I.; Fukui, S.

    1985-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glucoamylase activity appears specifically in sporulating cells heterozygous for the mating-type locus (MAT). We identified a sporulation-specific glucoamylase gene (SGA) and show that expression of SGA is positively regulated by the mating-type genes, both MATa1 and MAT alpha 2. Northern blot analysis revealed that control of SGA is exerted at the level of RNA production. Expression of SGA or the consequent degradation of glycogen to glucose in cells is...

  19. The Linker Histone Plays a Dual Role during Gametogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Bryant, Jessica M; Govin, Jrme; Zhang, Liye; Donahue, Greg; Pugh, B. Franklin; BERGER, SHELLEY L.

    2012-01-01

    The differentiation of gametes involves dramatic changes to chromatin, affecting transcription, meiosis, and cell morphology. Sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shares many chromatin features with spermatogenesis, including a 10-fold compaction of the nucleus. To identify new proteins involved in spore nuclear organization, we purified chromatin from mature spores and discovered a significant enrichment of the linker histone (Hho1). The function of Hho1 has proven to be elusive during ve...

  20. Expression of the Escherichia coli xylose isomerase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Sarthy, A. V.; McConaughy, B L; Lobo, Z.; Sundstrom, J A; Furlong, C E; Hall, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by yeast expression plasmids bearing the Escherichia coli xylose isomerase gene leads to production of the protein. Western blotting (immunoblotting) experiments show that immunoreactive protein chains which comigrate with the E. coli enzyme are made in the transformant strains and that the amount produced parallels the copy number of the plasmid. When comparable amounts of immunologically cross-reactive xylose isomerase protein made in E. coli or S....

  1. Overlapping Roles of the Cytoplasmic and Mitochondrial Redox Regulatory Systems in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Trotter, Eleanor W; Grant, Chris M.

    2005-01-01

    Thioredoxins are small, highly conserved oxidoreductases which are required to maintain the redox homeostasis of the cell. Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a cytoplasmic thioredoxin system (TRX1, TRX2, and TRR1) as well as a complete mitochondrial thioredoxin system, comprising a thioredoxin (TRX3) and a thioredoxin reductase (TRR2). In the present study we have analyzed the functional overlap between the two systems. By constructing mutant strains with deletions of both the mitochondrial an...

  2. Multi-Capillary Column-Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Volatile Metabolites Emitted by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Christoph Halbfeld; Ebert, Birgitta E.; Blank, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS). The high sensitivity and f...

  3. Microbial transformations of ferulic acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Huang, Z; Dostal, L; Rosazza, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dry baker's yeast) and Pseudomonas fluorescens were used to convert trans-ferulic acid into 4-hydroxy-3-methoxystyrene in 96 and 89% yields, respectively. The metabolites were isolated by solid-phase extraction and analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The identities of the metabolites were determined by 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by mass spectrometry. The mechanism of the decarboxylation of fer...

  4. Rpb4 and Rpb9 mediate subpathways of transcription-coupled DNA repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Li, Shisheng; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Rpb9, a non-essential subunit of RNA polymerase II, mediates a transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This subpathway initiates at the same upstream site as the previously identified Rad26 subpathway. However, the Rpb9 subpathway operates more effectively in the coding region than in the region upstream of the transcription start site, whereas the Rad26 subpathway operates equally in the two regions. Rpb4, another non-essential subunit of RNA polymerase II,...

  5. Effect of cultural and nutritional conditions on the control of flocculation expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Soares, Eduardo V.; J. A. TEIXEIRA; Mota, M.

    1994-01-01

    Nous avons etudie chez trois souches de Saccharomyces cerevisiae l'effet de conditions de culture (temperature et pH) et de conditions nutritives (source d'azote et de carbone) sur !'expression de la flocculation. Ce phenomene a ete etudie plairant Jes cellules en phase stationnaire dans des conditions habitue!les de flocculation. La temperature de croissance a eu plus d'influence sur le pouvoir de flocculation de la souche NCYC 1195, classee recernrnent dans la Iitterature comme phe...

  6. Effect of benzoic acid on glycolytic metabolite levels and intracellular pH in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Warth, A D

    1991-01-01

    Low concentrations of benzoic acid stimulated fermentation rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. At concentrations near the maximum permitting growth, there was inhibition of fermentation, lowered ATP and intracellular pH, and relatively greater accumulation of benzoate. Changes in the levels of glycolytic intermediates suggested that fermentation was inhibited as a result of high ATP usage rather than of lowered intracellular pH. Specific inhibition of phosphofructokinase or of several other gl...

  7. A Kinetic Study of the Fermentation of Cane Sugar Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Egharevba Felix; Ogbebor Clara; Akpoveta Oshevwiyo Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The fermentation of cane sugar as substrate by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (enzyme) was critically investigated to obtain certain useful kinetic parameters and to determine the effect of temperature, pH, substrate and yeast (enzyme) concentration on the rate of fermentation. The results indicate that the rate of fermentation (measured as rate of production of CO2) increased in proportion with temperature (optimum 32°C - 36°C), pH (optimum 5.5) substrate (optimu...

  8. Glutamine synthesis is a regulatory signal controlling glucose catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Flores-Samaniego, B; Olivera, H; González, A.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of glutamine biosynthesis and degradation on glucose catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. A wild-type strain and mutants altered in glutamine biosynthesis and degradation were analyzed. Cells having low levels of glutamine synthetase activity showed high ATP/ADP ratios and a diminished rate of glucose metabolism. It is proposed that glutamine biosynthesis plays a role in the regulation of glucose catabolism.

  9. Regulation of glutamine-repressible gene products by the GLN3 function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Mitchell, A.P.; Magasanik, B.

    1984-01-01

    Mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been isolated which fail to derepress glutamine synthetase upon glutamine limitation. The mutations define a single nuclear gene, GLN3, which is located on chromosome 5 near HOM3 and HIS1 and is unlinked to the structural gene for glutamine synthetase, GLN1. The three gln3 mutations are recessive, and one is amber suppressible, indicating that the GLN3 product is a positive regulator of glutamine synthetase expression. Four polypeptides, in a...

  10. CRISPR–Cas system enables fast and simple genome editing of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Vratislav Stovicek; Irina Borodina; Jochen Forster

    2015-01-01

    There is a demand to develop 3rd generation biorefineries that integrate energy production with the production of higher value chemicals from renewable feedstocks. Here, robust and stress-tolerant industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae will be suitable production organisms. However, their genetic manipulation is challenging, as they are usually diploid or polyploid. Therefore, there is a need to develop more efficient genetic engineering tools. We applied a CRISPR–Cas9 system for geno...

  11. Toward a Comprehensive Temperature-Sensitive Mutant Repository of the Essential Genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Ben-Aroya, Shay; Coombes, Candice; Kwok, Teresa; O’Donnell, Kathryn A.; Boeke, Jef D.; Hieter, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cereivisiae gene deletion project revealed that approximately 20% of yeast genes are required for viability. The analysis of essential genes traditionally relies on conditional mutants, typically temperature-sensitive (ts) alleles. We developed a systematic approach (termed “diploid shuffle”) useful for generating a ts allele for each essential gene in S. cerevisiae and for improved genetic manipulation of mutant alleles and gene constructs in general. Importantly, each ts a...

  12. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and its dynamic changes under oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Zechmann, Bernd; Liou, Liang-Chun; Koffler, Barbara E.; Horvat, Lucija; Tomašić, Ana; Fulgosi, Hrvoje; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is an important antioxidant in most prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It detoxifies reactive oxygen species and is also involved in the modulation of gene expression, in redox signaling, and in the regulation of enzymatic activities. In this study, the subcellular distribution of glutathione was studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by quantitative immunoelectron microscopy. Highest glutathione contents were detected in mitochondria and subsequently in the cytosol, nuclei, cell walls, and...

  13. Improved xylose and arabinose utilization by an industrial recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain using evolutionary engineering

    Sanchez, R.G.; Karhumaa, Kaisa; Fonseca, C.; Nogue, V.S.; Almeida, J.R.M.; Larsson, C.U.; Bengtsson, O.; Bettiga, M.; Hahn-Hagerdal, B.; Gorwa-Grauslund, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cost-effective fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires efficient mixed sugar utilization. Notably, the rate and yield of xylose and arabinose co-fermentation to ethanol must be enhanced. Results: Evolutionary engineering was used to...... xylose and arabinose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Improved anaerobic ethanol production was achieved at the expense of xylitol and glycerol but arabinose was almost stoichiometrically converted to arabitol. Further characterization of the strain indicated that the selection pressure during...

  14. Engineering of a novel cellulose-adherent cellulolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae for cellulosic biofuel production

    Zhuo Liu; Shih-Hsin Ho; Kengo Sasaki; Riaan den Haan; Kentaro Inokuma; Chiaki Ogino; van Zyl, Willem H; Tomohisa Hasunuma; Akihiko Kondo

    2016-01-01

    Cellulosic biofuel is the subject of increasing attention. The main obstacle toward its economic feasibility is the recalcitrance of lignocellulose requiring large amount of enzyme to break. Several engineered yeast strains have been developed with cellulolytic activities to reduce the need for enzyme addition, but exhibiting limited effect. Here, we report the successful engineering of a cellulose-adherent Saccharomyces cerevisiae displaying four different synergistic cellulases on the cell ...

  15. Comparison of xylose fermentation by two high-performance engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Xin Li; Annsea Park; Raissa Estrela; Soo-Rin Kim; Yong-Su Jin; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2016-01-01

    Economical biofuel production from plant biomass requires the conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose in the plant cell wall. The best industrial fermentation organism, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been developed to utilize xylose by heterologously expressing either a xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase (XR/XDH) pathway or a xylose isomerase (XI) pathway. Although it has been proposed that the optimal means for fermenting xylose into biofuels would use XI instead of the X...

  16. EasyCloneMulti: A Set of Vectors for Simultaneous and Multiple Genomic Integrations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Baallal Jacobsen, Simo Abdessamad; Jensen, Niels B.; Kildegaard, Kanchana R.; Herrgrd, Markus J.; Schneider, Konstantin; Koza, Anna; Forster, Jochen; Nielsen, Jens; Borodina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used in the biotechnology industry for production of ethanol, recombinant proteins, food ingredients and other chemicals. In order to generate highly producing and stable strains, genome integration of genes encoding metabolic pathway enzymes is the preferred option. However, integration of pathway genes in single or few copies, especially those encoding rate-controlling steps, is often not sufficient to sustain high metabolic fluxes. By exploiting the sequence diversity in the long terminal repeats (LTR) of Ty retrotransposons, we developed a new set of integrative vectors, EasyCloneMulti, that enables multiple and simultaneous integration of genes in S. cerevisiae. By creating vector backbones that combine consensus sequences that aim at targeting subsets of Ty sequences and a quickly degrading selective marker, integrations at multiple genomic loci and a range of expression levels were obtained, as assessed with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system. The EasyCloneMulti vector set was applied to balance the expression of the rate-controlling step in the ?-alanine pathway for biosynthesis of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP). The best 3HP producing clone, with 5.45 g.L-1 of 3HP, produced 11 times more 3HP than the lowest producing clone, which demonstrates the capability of EasyCloneMulti vectors to impact metabolic pathway enzyme activity. PMID:26934490

  17. Mutations that cause threonine sensitivity identify catalytic and regulatory regions of the aspartate kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Arévalo-Rodríguez, M; Calderón, I L; Holmberg, S

    1999-01-01

    inhibited by threonine than the wild-type enzyme. The predicted amino acid substitution in this mutant, A406T, is located in a region associated with the modulation of the enzymatic activity. The other two mutants carry an aspartate kinase with reduced affinity for its substrates, aspartate and ATP. The...... corresponding amino acid substitutions, K26I and G25D, affect residues located in the vicinity of a highly conserved lysine-phenylalanine-glycine-glycine (KFGG) stretch present in the N-terminal part of the aspartate kinase, to which no function has so far been assigned. We suggest that this region is involved......The HOM3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes aspartate kinase, which catalyses the first step in the branched pathway leading to the synthesis of threonine and methionine from aspartate. Regulation of the carbon flow into this pathway takes place mainly by feedback inhibition of this enzyme by...

  18. Metabolic engineering of ammonium assimilation in xylose-fermenting Saccharomyes cerevisiae improves ethanol production

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    Cofactor imbalance impedes xylose assimilation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that has been metabolically engineered for xylose utilization. To improve cofactor use, we modified ammonia assimilation in recombinant S. cerevisiae by deleting GDH1, which encodes an NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase...

  19. Functional equivalence of translation factor eIF5B from Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Jun, Kyung Ok; Yang, Eun Ji; Lee, Byeong Jeong; Park, Jeong Ro; Lee, Joon H; Choi, Sang Ki

    2008-04-30

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) plays a role in recognition of the AUG codon in conjunction with translation factor eIF2, and promotes joining of the 60S ribosomal subunit. To see whether the eIF5B proteins of other organisms function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we cloned the corresponding genes from Oryza sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana, Aspergillus nidulans and Candida albican and expressed them under the control of the galactose-inducible GAL promoter in the fun12Delta strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of Candida albicans eIF5B complemented the slow-growth phenotype of the fun12Delta strain, but that of Aspergillus nidulance did not, despite the fact that its protein was expressed better than that of Candida albicans. The Arabidopsis thaliana protein was also not functional in Saccharomyces. These results reveal that the eIF5B in Candida albicans has a close functional relationship with that of Sacharomyces cerevisiae, as also shown by a phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequences of the eIF5Bs. PMID:18414002

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of motif N from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbf4

    To understand the role of the Cdc7–Dbf4 complex in checkpoint responses, a fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbf4 encompassing motif N was isolated, overproduced and crystallized. The Cdc7–Dbf4 complex plays an instrumental role in the initiation of DNA replication and is a target of replication-checkpoint responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cdc7 is a conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activity depends on association with its regulatory subunit, Dbf4. A conserved sequence near the N-terminus of Dbf4 (motif N) is necessary for the interaction of Cdc7–Dbf4 with the checkpoint kinase Rad53. To understand the role of the Cdc7–Dbf4 complex in checkpoint responses, a fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbf4 encompassing motif N was isolated, overproduced and crystallized. A complete native data set was collected at 100 K from crystals that diffracted X-rays to 2.75 Å resolution and structure determination is currently under way

  1. The toxic potential of an industrial effluent determined with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based assay.

    Schmitt, Marcel; Gellert, Georg; Lichtenberg-Fraté, Hella

    2005-09-01

    Increasing levels of environmental pollution and the continuous monitoring of water quality both request specific and sensitive methods for the detection of detrimental water contents. On a regulatory basis genotoxicity is assessed by the standard umu-test (ISO 13829) that responds to DNA damage induced by chemicals. The focus of this study was the examination of the toxic potential of samples taken from the wastewater treatment plant of a refinery factory to explore the applicability of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae (bakers yeast) test for the detection of bio-available genotoxic activity in complex matrices. The toxic potential of samples without pre-treatment and following centrifugation was determined with the eukaryotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioassay based on the transcriptional activation of the green fluorescent protein (gfp) fused to the DNA damage inducible RAD54 promoter and general growth inhibition. Primary effluent samples were taken as qualified sterile spot samples from the final effluent of the purification plant. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae assay yielded geno- and cytotoxic responses in all complex untreated and centrifuged samples with high reproducibility. The obtained results suggest that the yeast assay is suited as a screening tool to monitor genotoxic potential of wastewater. PMID:16002118

  2. Pengaruh Media Tumbuh terhadap Kadar Protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae dalam Pembuatan Protein Sel Tunggal

    RATNA SETYANINGSIH

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to examine the influence of difference growth media, i. e. tofu liquid waste, tofu solid waste, and coconut water in various composition and Yeast Extract Peptone Dextrose (YEPD, to protein contents of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Single Cell Protein (SCP production. The framework of this research was that tofu liquid waste, tofu solid waste, and coconut water were containing a lot of carbons, nitrogens, minerals, and vitamin that could be used as growth medium of S. cerevisiae to produce SCP, which was commonly used. The medium from tofu liquid waste and the coconut water were made by ratio 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and added with tofu solid waste 1.5 g and 2.5 g. Then, the measurement of pH medium, the amount of cell, cell dried weight, and the protein content in S. cerevisiae was done. The measurement of protein content was done by Lowry method. The result of the research showed that growth media influenced protein content of S. cerevisiae. Protein content of S. cerevisiae cultured in tofu liquid waste- coconut water was lower then in YEPD medium. The protein content of S. cerevisiae cultured in tofu liquid waste and coconut water ratio 1:2, added with 2.5 g tofu solid waste was higher then in other medium composition.

  3. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae microbial cell factories for succinic acid production

    Otero, José Manuel; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a proven, robust, industrial production platform used for expression of a wide range of therapeutic agents, high added-value chemicals, and commodities. Central carbon metabolism in S. cerevisiae has been extensively investigated using a wide variety of substrates for...... systems biology tools to drive C6 carbon flux to succinic acid by enhancement of the two native pathways for succinic acid production: the TCA and glyoxylate cycles. S. cerevisiae does not naturally accumulate succinic acid; however, through the use of in silico metabolic predictions guiding targeted gene...... deletions and over-expression, mutants that overproduce succinic acid have been engineered and thoroughly characterised. Metabolic engineering approaches developed promise to have broad applicability to industrial biotechnology platforms, as well as enhancing fundamental understanding of central carbon...

  4. Parameter Optimization for Enhancement of Ethanol Yield by Atmospheric Pressure DBD-Treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Dong, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Yulian; Tang, Qian; Dou, Shaohua; Di, Lanbo; Zhang, Xiuling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) was exposed to dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBD) to improve its ethanol production capacity during fermentation. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the discharge-associated parameters of DBD for the purpose of maximizing the ethanol yield achieved by DBD-treated S. cerevisiae. According to single factor experiments, a mathematical model was established using Box-Behnken central composite experiment design, with plasma exposure time, power supply voltage, and exposed-sample volume as impact factors and ethanol yield as the response. This was followed by response surface analysis. Optimal experimental parameters for plasma discharge-induced enhancement in ethanol yield were plasma exposure time of 1 min, power voltage of 26 V, and an exposed sample volume of 9 mL. Under these conditions, the resulting yield of ethanol was 0.48 g/g, representing an increase of 33% over control.

  5. Parameter Optimization for Enhancement of Ethanol Yield by Atmospheric Pressure DBD-Treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) was exposed to dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBD) to improve its ethanol production capacity during fermentation. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the discharge-associated parameters of DBD for the purpose of maximizing the ethanol yield achieved by DBD-treated S. cerevisiae. According to single factor experiments, a mathematical model was established using Box-Behnken central composite experiment design, with plasma exposure time, power supply voltage, and exposed-sample volume as impact factors and ethanol yield as the response. This was followed by response surface analysis. Optimal experimental parameters for plasma discharge-induced enhancement in ethanol yield were plasma exposure time of 1 min, power voltage of 26 V, and an exposed sample volume of 9 mL. Under these conditions, the resulting yield of ethanol was 0.48 g/g, representing an increase of 33% over control. (plasma technology)

  6. Cellular and molecular engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for advanced biobutanol production.

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Butanol is an attractive alternative energy fuel owing to several advantages over ethanol. Among the microbial hosts for biobutanol production, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a great potential as a microbial host due to its powerful genetic tools, a history of successful industrial use, and its inherent tolerance to higher alcohols. Butanol production by S. cerevisiae was first attempted by transferring the 1-butanol-producing metabolic pathway from native microorganisms or using the endogenous Ehrlich pathway for isobutanol synthesis. Utilizing alternative enzymes with higher activity, eliminating competitive pathways, and maintaining cofactor balance achieved significant improvements in butanol production. Meeting future challenges, such as enhancing butanol tolerance and implementing a comprehensive strategy by high-throughput screening, would further elevate the biobutanol-producing ability of S. cerevisiae toward an ideal microbial cell factory exhibiting high productivity of biobutanol. PMID:26712533

  7. Ethanol Production from Sago Waste Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vits-M1

    D. Subashini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the biotechnological production of ethanol from sago waste materials. As petroleum has become depleted, renewable energy production has started to gain attention all over the world, including the production of ethanol from sago wastes. In our research we have standardized the production of ethanol from sago wastes using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain isolated from molasses. The production of ethanol was carried out by means of simultaneous saccharification with acids, followed by fermentation. The yeast strains were isolated from either batter or molasses and the taxonomy was studied by phenotypic characters in comparison with the standard strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 173. Among the two isolated strains, S. cerevisiae VITS-M1 isolated from molasses showed better survival rate in different sugars such as glucose, sucrose, maltose and galactose except lactose; it also showed better survival rate at high ethanol concentration and at acidic pH. The saccharification process of sago liquid waste and solid waste was standardized using hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid under different treatments. The fermented product, ethanol was distilled using laboratory model distillation unit and measured qualitatively using gas chromatography in comparison with the standard analytical grade ethanol. The overall experimental data indicates that the sago liquid waste yielded more ethanol by simultaneous saccharification with 0.3N HCl and 0.3N H2SO4 and fermentation with the S. cerevisiae VITS-M1 isolated from molasses.

  8. PREPARAÇÕES DE Saccharomyces cerevisiae ELICITORAS DE FITOALEXINAS EM MESOCÓTILOS DE SORGO

    N.A. WULFF

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A levedura Saccharomyces cerevisiae estimula o acúmulo de fitoalexinas e tem potencial para ser utilizada como agente de controle alternativo no tratamento de doenças fúngicas em sorgo. São descritos aqui os procedimentos iniciais para a purificação de elicitores de fitoalexinas em sorgo, os quais são extraídos das células da levedura S. cerevisiae por autoclavagem, indicando serem termoestáveis. Após precipitacão com etanol, em concentrações finais de 50 e 80%, as moléculas elicitoras permanecem em solução. O acúmulo de fitoalexinas nos mesocótilos é mais elevado quanto maiores os teores de proteínas das amostras elicitoras.The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae stimulates phytoalexin accumulation and is a potential agent for biological control of fungal diseases in sorghum. The present investigation establishes the initial steps to purify elicitor molecules of phytoalexins in sorghum from S. cerevisiae. These molecules are extracted using heat and remain in solution after ethanol precipitation. They are active even after autoclaving, thus showing to be thermostable. A correlation between phytoalexin accumulation in mesocotyls and increasing amounts of protein on elicitor samples was observed.

  9. Bioethanol production by a flocculent hybrid, CHFY0321 obtained by protoplast fusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus

    Choi, Gi-Wook; Kang, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Yule [Changhae Institute of Cassava and Ethanol Research, Changhae Ethanol Co., LTD, Palbok-Dong 829, Dukjin-Gu, Jeonju 561-203 (Korea); Um, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Mina; Kim, Yang-Hoon [Department of Microbiology, Chungbuk National University, 410 Sungbong-Ro, Heungduk-Gu, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    Fusion hybrid yeast, CHFY0321, was obtained by protoplast fusion between non-flocculent-high ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHY1011 and flocculent-low ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces bayanus KCCM12633. The hybrid yeast was used together with the parental strains to examine ethanol production in batch fermentation. Under the conditions tested, the fusion hybrid CHFY0321 flocculated to the highest degree and had the capacity to ferment well at pH 4.5 and 32 C. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation for ethanol production was carried out using a cassava (Manihot esculenta) powder hydrolysate medium containing 19.5% (w v{sup -1}) total sugar in a 5 l lab scale jar fermenter at 32 C for 65 h with an agitation speed of 2 Hz. Under these conditions, CHFY0321 showed the highest flocculating ability and the best fermentation efficiency for ethanol production compared with those of the wild-type parent strains. CHFY0321 gave a final ethanol concentration of 89.8 {+-} 0.13 g l{sup -1}, a volumetric ethanol productivity of 1.38 {+-} 0.13 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1}, and a theoretical yield of 94.2 {+-} 1.58%. These results suggest that CHFY0321 exhibited the fermentation characteristics of S. cerevisiae CHY1011 and the flocculent ability of S. bayanus KCCM12633. Therefore, the strong highly flocculent ethanol fermentative CHFY0321 has potential for improving biotechnological ethanol fermentation processes. (author)

  10. Bioethanol production by a flocculent hybrid, CHFY0321 obtained by protoplast fusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus

    Fusion hybrid yeast, CHFY0321, was obtained by protoplast fusion between non-flocculent-high ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHY1011 and flocculent-low ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces bayanus KCCM12633. The hybrid yeast was used together with the parental strains to examine ethanol production in batch fermentation. Under the conditions tested, the fusion hybrid CHFY0321 flocculated to the highest degree and had the capacity to ferment well at pH 4.5 and 32 oC. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation for ethanol production was carried out using a cassava (Manihot esculenta) powder hydrolysate medium containing 19.5% (w v-1) total sugar in a 5 l lab scale jar fermenter at 32 oC for 65 h with an agitation speed of 2 Hz. Under these conditions, CHFY0321 showed the highest flocculating ability and the best fermentation efficiency for ethanol production compared with those of the wild-type parent strains. CHFY0321 gave a final ethanol concentration of 89.8 ± 0.13 g l-1, a volumetric ethanol productivity of 1.38 ± 0.13 g l-1 h-1, and a theoretical yield of 94.2 ± 1.58%. These results suggest that CHFY0321 exhibited the fermentation characteristics of S. cerevisiae CHY1011 and the flocculent ability of S. bayanus KCCM12633. Therefore, the strong highly flocculent ethanol fermentative CHFY0321 has potential for improving biotechnological ethanol fermentation processes.

  11. Improvement of ethanol production by electrochemical redox coupling of Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Jeon, Bo Young; Park, Doo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis was immobilized in a modified graphite felt cathode with neutral red (NR-graphite cathode) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated on a platinum plate anode to electrochemically activate ethanol fermentation. Electrochemical redox reaction was induced by 3 approximately 4 volt of electric potential charged to a cathode and an anode. Z. mobilis produced 1.3 approximately 1.5 M of ethanol in the cathode compartment and S. cerevisiae did 1.7 approximately 1.9 M in the anode compartment for 96 hr. The ethanol production by Z. mobilis immobilized in the NR-graphite cathode and S. cerevisiae cultivated on the platinum plate was 1.5 approximately 1.6 times higher than those cultivated in the conventional condition. The electrochemical oxidation potential greatly inhibited ethanol fermentation of Z. mobilis but did not S. cerevisiae. Total soluble protein pattern of Z. mobilis cultivated in the electrochemical oxidation condition was getting simplified in proportion to potential intensity based on SDS-PAGE pattern; however the SDS-PAGE pattern of protein extracted from S. cerevisiae cultivated in both oxidation and reduction condition was not changed. When Z. mobilis culture incubated in the cathode compartment for 24 hr was transferred to S. cerevisiae culture in the anode compartment, 0.8 approximately 0.9 M of ethanol was additionally produced by S. cerevisiae for another 24 hr. Conclusively, total 2.0 approximately 2.1 M of ethanol was produced by the electrochemical redox coupling of Z. mobilis and S. cerevisiae for 48 hr. PMID:20134239

  12. Nucleotide sequence, transcript mapping, and regulation of the RAD2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequence, mapped the 5' and 3' nRNA termini, and examined the regulation of the RAD2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A long open reading frame within the RAD2 transcribed region encodes a protein of 1031 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 117,847. A disruption of the RAD2 gene that deletes the 78 carboxyl terminal codons results in loss of RAD2 function. The 5' ends of RAD2 mRNA show considerable heterogeneity, mapping 5 to 62 nucleotides upstream of the first ATG codon of the long RAD2 open reading frame. The longest RAD2 transcripts also contain a short open reading frame of 37 codons that precedes and overlaps the 5' end of the long RAD2 open reading frame. The RAD2 3' nRNA end maps 171 nucleotides downstream of the TAA termination codon and 20 nucleotides downstream from a 12-base-pair inverted repeat that might function in transcript termination. Northern blot analysis showed a ninefold increase in steady-state levels of RAD2 mRNA after treatment of yeast cells with UV light. The 5' flanking region of the RAD2 gene contains several direct and inverted repeats and a 44-nuclotide-long purine-rich tract. The sequence T G G A G G C A T T A A found at position - 167 to -156 in the RAD2 gene is similar to at sequence present in the 5' flanking regions of the RAD7 and RAD10 genes

  13. A novel strategy to construct yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for very high gravity fermentation.

    Tao, Xianglin; Zheng, Daoqiong; Liu, Tianzhe; Wang, Pinmei; Zhao, Wenpeng; Zhu, Muyuan; Jiang, Xinhang; Zhao, Yuhua; Wu, Xuechang

    2012-01-01

    Very high gravity (VHG) fermentation is aimed to considerably increase both the fermentation rate and the ethanol concentration, thereby reducing capital costs and the risk of bacterial contamination. This process results in critical issues, such as adverse stress factors (ie., osmotic pressure and ethanol inhibition) and high concentrations of metabolic byproducts which are difficult to overcome by a single breeding method. In the present paper, a novel strategy that combines metabolic engineering and genome shuffling to circumvent these limitations and improve the bioethanol production performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under VHG conditions was developed. First, in strain Z5, which performed better than other widely used industrial strains, the gene GPD2 encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was deleted, resulting in a mutant (Z5?GPD2) with a lower glycerol yield and poor ethanol productivity. Second, strain Z5?GPD2 was subjected to three rounds of genome shuffling to improve its VHG fermentation performance, and the best performing strain SZ3-1 was obtained. Results showed that strain SZ3-1 not only produced less glycerol, but also increased the ethanol yield by up to 8% compared with the parent strain Z5. Further analysis suggested that the improved ethanol yield in strain SZ3-1 was mainly contributed by the enhanced ethanol tolerance of the strain. The differences in ethanol tolerance between strains Z5 and SZ3-1 were closely associated with the cell membrane fatty acid compositions and intracellular trehalose concentrations. Finally, genome rearrangements in the optimized strain were confirmed by karyotype analysis. Hence, a combination of genome shuffling and metabolic engineering is an efficient approach for the rapid improvement of yeast strains for desirable industrial phenotypes. PMID:22363590

  14. Topical reversion at the HIS1 locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A tale of three mutants.

    von Borstel, R C; Savage, E A; Wang, Q; Hennig, U G; Ritzel, R G; Lee, G S; Hamilton, M D; Chrenek, M A; Tomaszewski, R W; Higgins, J A; Tenove, C J; Liviero, L; Hastings, P J; Korch, C T; Steinberg, C M

    1998-04-01

    Mutants of the HIS1 locus of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are suitable reporters for spontaneous reversion events because most reversions are topical, that is, within the locus itself. Thirteen mutations of his1-1 now have been identified with respect to base sequence. Revertants of three mutants and their spontaneous reversion rates are presented: (1) a chain termination mutation (his1-208, ne his1-1) that does not revert by mutations of tRNA loci and reverts only by intracodonic suppression; (2) a missense mutation (his1-798, ne his1-7) that can revert by intragenic suppression by base substitutions of any sort, including a back mutation as well as one three-base deletion; and (3) a -1 frameshift mutation (his1-434, ne his1-19) that only reverts topically by +1 back mutation, +1 intragenic suppression, or a -2 deletion. Often the +1 insertion is accompanied by base substitution events at one or both ends of a run of A's. Missense suppressors of his1-798 are either feeders or nonfeeders, and at four different locations within the locus, a single base substitution encoding an amino acid alteration will suffice to turn the nonfeeder phenotype into a feeder phenotype. Late-appearing revertants of his1-798 were found to be slowly growing leaky mutants rather than a manifestation of adaptive mutagenesis. Spontaneous revertants of his1-208 and his1-434 produced no late-arising colonies. PMID:9560384

  15. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2p

    Lee, Byung-Kwon [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jung, Kyung-Sik [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Son, Cagdas D [ORNL; Kim, Heejung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Arshava, Boris [College of Staten Island; Naider, Fred [College of Staten Island; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare example of a biologically active G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) whose purity and identity were verified by mass spectrometry after being purified to near homogeneity from its native system. An overexpression vector was constructed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPCR -factor receptor (Ste2p, the STE2 gene product) containing a 9-amino acid sequence of rhodopsin that served as an epitope/affinity tag. In the construct, two glycosylation sites and two cysteine residues were removed to aid future structural and functional studies. The receptor was expressed in yeast cells and was detected as a single band in a western blot indicating the absence of glycosylation. Tests of the epitope-tagged, mutated receptor showed it maintained its full biological activity. For extraction of Ste2p, yeast membranes were solubilized with 0.5 % n-dodecyl maltoside (DM). Approximately 120 g of purified -factor receptor was obtained per liter of culture by single-step affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to the rhodopsin epitope. The binding affinity (Kd) of the purified -factor receptor in DM micelles was 28 nM as compared to Kd = 12.7 nM for Ste2p in cell membranes, and approximately 40 % of the purified receptor was correctly folded as judged by ligand saturation binding. About 50 % of the receptor sequence was retrieved from MALDITOF and nanospray mass spectrometry after CNBr digestion of the purified receptor. The methods described will enable structural studies of the -factor receptor and may provide an efficient technique to purify other GPCRs that have been functionally expressed in yeast.

  16. Whole genome sequencing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: from genotype to phenotype for improved metabolic engineering applications

    Asadollahi Mohammad A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need for rapid and efficient microbial cell factory design and construction are possible through the enabling technology, metabolic engineering, which is now being facilitated by systems biology approaches. Metabolic engineering is often complimented by directed evolution, where selective pressure is applied to a partially genetically engineered strain to confer a desirable phenotype. The exact genetic modification or resulting genotype that leads to the improved phenotype is often not identified or understood to enable further metabolic engineering. Results In this work we performed whole genome high-throughput sequencing and annotation can be used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains S288c and CEN.PK113-7D. The yeast strain S288c was the first eukaryote sequenced, serving as the reference genome for the Saccharomyces Genome Database, while CEN.PK113-7D is a preferred laboratory strain for industrial biotechnology research. A total of 13,787 high-quality SNPs were detected between both strains (reference strain: S288c. Considering only metabolic genes (782 of 5,596 annotated genes, a total of 219 metabolism specific SNPs are distributed across 158 metabolic genes, with 85 of the SNPs being nonsynonymous (e.g., encoding amino acid modifications. Amongst metabolic SNPs detected, there was pathway enrichment in the galactose uptake pathway (GAL1, GAL10 and ergosterol biosynthetic pathway (ERG8, ERG9. Physiological characterization confirmed a strong deficiency in galactose uptake and metabolism in S288c compared to CEN.PK113-7D, and similarly, ergosterol content in CEN.PK113-7D was significantly higher in both glucose and galactose supplemented cultivations compared to S288c. Furthermore, DNA microarray profiling of S288c and CEN.PK113-7D in both glucose and galactose batch cultures did not provide a clear hypothesis for major phenotypes observed, suggesting that genotype to phenotype correlations are manifested post-transcriptionally or post-translationally either through protein concentration and/or function. Conclusions With an intensifying need for microbial cell factories that produce a wide array of target compounds, whole genome high-throughput sequencing and annotation for SNP detection can aid in better reducing and defining the metabolic landscape. This work demonstrates direct correlations between genotype and phenotype that provides clear and high-probability of success metabolic engineering targets. The genome sequence, annotation, and a SNP viewer of CEN.PK113-7D are deposited at http://www.sysbio.se/cenpk.

  17. [Functional expression of an omega-3 fatty acid desaturase gene from Glycine max in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Zhang, Hong-Tao; Yang, Jia-Sen; Shan, Lei; Bi, Yu-Ping

    2006-01-01

    Alpha-linolenic acid(ALA, C18:3delta9,12,15 ) is an essential fatty acid which has many sanitary functions to human. However, its contents in diets are often not enough. In plants, omega-3 fatty acid desaturases(FAD) catalyze linoleic acid(LA, C18:2delta9,12) into ALA. The seed oil of Glycine max contains high level of ALA. To investigate the functions of Glycine max omega-3FAD, the cDNA of GmFAD3 C was amplified by RT-PCR from immature seeds, then cloned into the shuttle expression vector p416 to generate the recombinant vector p4GFAD3C. The resulting vector was transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae K601 throuth LiAc method. The positive clones were screened on the CM(Ura-) medium and identified by PCR, and then cultured in CM (Ura-) liquid medium with exogenous LA in 20 degrees C for three days. The intracellular fatty acid composition of the engineering strain Kp416 and Kp4GFAD3C was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). A novel peak in strain Kp4GFAD3C was detected,which was not detectable in control, Comparison of the retention times of the newly yielded peak with that of authentic standard indicated that the fatty acid is ALA. The content of ALA reached to 3.1% of the total fatty acid in recombinant strain, the content of LA correspondingly decreased from 22% to 16.2% by contrast. It was suggested that the protein encoded by GmFAD3 C can specifically catalyze 18 carbon PUFA substrate of LA into ALA by taking off hydrogen atoms at delta15 location. In this study, we expressed a Glycine max omega-3 fatty acid desaturase gene in S. cerevisiae; An efficient and economical yeast expressing system(K601-p416 system) which is suitable for the expression of FAD was built. PMID:16572837

  18. Comportamento celular e resposta antioxidante diferenciados de Saccharomyces cerevisiae e de Saccharomyces chevalieri ao metavanadato de amónio Different cellular behaviour and antioxidant response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces chevalieri growing in presence of ammonium metavanadate

    R. Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A fermentação do vinho é um processo microbiológico complexo que requere a presença de leveduras adaptadas a condições de stresse. No ambiente celular de organismos aeróbios ocorrem naturalmente espécies reactivas de oxigénio (ROS como subprodutos da respiração mitocondrial. A elevada reactividade destas espécies químicas pode gerar danos moleculares que, em alguns casos, levam à morte celular. Em condições fisiológicas normais ou como resposta ao stresse oxidativo, a célula pode desencadear respostas adaptativas que envolvem mecanismos antioxidantes como os enzimas glutationo redutase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2 e catalases T (CAT T; EC 1.11.1.6 e A (CAT A; EC 1.11.1.6. O vanádio, um metal pesado presente em alguns fitofármacos, pode também com portar-se como um gerador de ROS, alterando o estado redox intracelular e exercendo efeitos nocivos em leveduras expostas a quantidade excessiva deste elemento. O principal objectivo deste trabalho foi comparar o efeito do metavanadato de amónio (NH4VO3, um sal pentavalente de vanádio, na viabilidade celular e nas actividades enzimáticas GR, CAT T e CAT A das leveduras vínicas Saccharomyces cerevisiae UE-ME3 e Saccharomyces chevalieri UE-ME1. Os resultados obtidos mostram que S. chevalieri UE-ME1 revelou menor tolerância ao NH4VO3 do que S. cerevisiae UE-ME3, uma vez que culturas de S. chevalieri não sobreviveram para valores de concentração do sal de vanádio superiores a 7,5 mM enquanto que células de S. cerevisiae mantiveram-se viáveis em presença de metavanadato de amónio 75 mM. As actividades enzimáticas estudadas apresentaram em S. chevalieri valores muito inferiores aos que foram determinados em S. cerevisiae embora em ambas as espécies de levedura o NH4VO3 pareça comportarse como um indutor de stresse oxidativo ao provocar um decréscimo significativo da actividade GR (PThe fermentation of wine is a complex microbiological process which requires yeast adaptation to stress conditions. In the cellular environment of aerobic organisms naturally reactive oxygen species (ROS occurs as by-products of mitochondrial respiration. The higher reactivity of these chemical species could cause molecular damages that in several cases induce cellular death. In common physiological conditions or as response to oxidative stress, the cell can generate adapted responses which involve antioxidants mechanisms as glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2 and catalase T (CAT T; EC 1.11.1.6 and A (CAT A; EC 1.11.1.6 enzymes. Vanadium, a heavy metal present in several pesticides could generate ROS changing the intracellular redox state and cause deleterious effects in yeasts exposed to higher levels of this element. The main objective of this work was to compare the effects of ammonium metavanadate (NH4VO3, a pentavalent salt of vanadium on cellular viability and GR, CAT T and CAT A activities of wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae UE-ME3 and Saccharomyces chevalieri UE-ME1. The results obtained show that S. chevalieri UE-ME1 has lower tolerance to NH4VO3 than S. cerevisiae UE-ME3, since S. chevalieri cultures do not survive to concentration values of ammonium metavanadate higher than 7,5 mM, whereas S. cerevisiae cells are still viable in the presence of 75 mM. S. chevalieri has an enzymatic activity lower than S. cerevisiae, although for both yeast species NH4VO3 could behave as oxidative stress inductor, causing a significant decrease of GR activity (P<0,01 and a significant increase of CAT A activity (P<0,01. The results show also an increase of CAT T activity in both yeast species, which can be interpreted as a protective response to oxidative stress. Differences on response to amonium metavanadate by both species of Saccharomyces could be partially justified by more efficient antioxidant systems in S. cerevisiae UE-ME3.

  19. Production of ethanol from blackstrap molasses by saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Blackstrap molasses was analyzed for its composition and its fermentation was brought about by the yeast S. cerevisiae at predetermined optimal environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, Sugar concentration, and incubation period. The results revealed that sugar concentration 17%, pH 4.5, temperature 30 C and incubation period of 72 hours were the optimal conditions for producing maximum (73 g/l) ethanol. Clearance of molasses by 20% single superphosphate enhanced ethanol production by only 0.2%. (author)

  20. Understanding the 3-hydroxypropionic acid tolerance mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Juncker, Agnieszka; Hallstrom, Bjorn; Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Maury, Jerome; Nielsen, Jen; Förster, Jochen; Borodina, Irina

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) is an important platform chemical that can be converted into other valuable chemicals such as acrylic acid and its derivatives that are used in baby diap ers, various plastics, and paints. With the oil and gas resources becoming limiting, biotechnolo gy offers a sust...... evolved strains. Conseq uently, mechanism underlying 3HP tolerance will be investigated....... improve 3HP tolerance in S. cerevisiae by applying adaptive evolution approach. We have generated yeast strains with sign ificantly improved capacity for tolerating 3HP when compared to the wild-type. We will present physiolo gical characterization, genome re-sequencing, and transcriptome analysis of the...