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Sample records for rpa mediates recombination

  1. RPA mediates recombination repair during replication stress and is displaced from DNA by checkpoint signalling in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleeth, Kate M; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Issaeva, Natalia; Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Bartek, Jiri; Helleday, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The replication protein A (RPA) is involved in most, if not all, nuclear metabolism involving single-stranded DNA. Here, we show that RPA is involved in genome maintenance at stalled replication forks by the homologous recombination repair system in humans. Depletion of the RPA protein inhibited the formation of RAD51 nuclear foci after hydroxyurea-induced replication stalling leading to persistent unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We demonstrate a direct role of RPA in homology direct...

  2. RPA mediates recombination repair during replication stress and is displaced from DNA by checkpoint signalling in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleeth, Kate M; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Issaeva, Natalia; Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Bartek, Jiri; Helleday, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The replication protein A (RPA) is involved in most, if not all, nuclear metabolism involving single-stranded DNA. Here, we show that RPA is involved in genome maintenance at stalled replication forks by the homologous recombination repair system in humans. Depletion of the RPA protein inhibited...... the formation of RAD51 nuclear foci after hydroxyurea-induced replication stalling leading to persistent unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We demonstrate a direct role of RPA in homology directed recombination repair. We find that RPA is dispensable for checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation...... and that RPA directly binds RAD52 upon replication stress, suggesting a direct role in recombination repair. In addition we show that inhibition of Chk1 with UCN-01 decreases dissociation of RPA from the chromatin and inhibits association of RAD51 and RAD52 with DNA. Altogether, our data suggest a...

  3. RPA mediates recombination repair during replication stress and is displaced from DNA by checkpoint signalling in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeth, Kate M; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Issaeva, Natalia; Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Bartek, Jiri; Helleday, Thomas

    2007-10-12

    The replication protein A (RPA) is involved in most, if not all, nuclear metabolism involving single-stranded DNA. Here, we show that RPA is involved in genome maintenance at stalled replication forks by the homologous recombination repair system in humans. Depletion of the RPA protein inhibited the formation of RAD51 nuclear foci after hydroxyurea-induced replication stalling leading to persistent unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We demonstrate a direct role of RPA in homology directed recombination repair. We find that RPA is dispensable for checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation and that RPA directly binds RAD52 upon replication stress, suggesting a direct role in recombination repair. In addition we show that inhibition of Chk1 with UCN-01 decreases dissociation of RPA from the chromatin and inhibits association of RAD51 and RAD52 with DNA. Altogether, our data suggest a direct role of RPA in homologous recombination in assembly of the RAD51 and RAD52 proteins. Furthermore, our data suggest that replacement of RPA with the RAD51 and RAD52 proteins is affected by checkpoint signalling. PMID:17765923

  4. Molecular anatomy of the recombination mediator function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seong, C.; Sehorn, M.G.; Plate, Iben; Shi, I.; Song, B.; Chi, P.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Sung, P.; Krejci, L.

    2008-01-01

    A helical filament of Rad51 on single-strand DNA (ssDNA), called the presynaptic filament, catalyzes DNA joint formation during homologous recombination. Rad52 facilitates presynaptic filament assembly, and this recombination mediator activity is thought to rely on the interactions of Rad52 with...... Rad51, the ssDNA-binding protein RPA, and ssDNA. The N-terminal region of Rad52, which has DNA binding activity and an oligomeric structure, is thought to be crucial for mediator activity and recombination. Unexpectedly, we find that the C-terminal region of Rad52 also harbors a DNA binding function....... Importantly, the Rad52 C-terminal portion alone can promote Rad51 presynaptic filament assembly. The middle portion of Rad52 associates with DNA-bound RPA and contributes to the recombination mediator activity. Accordingly, expression of a protein species that harbors the middle and C-terminal regions of Rad...

  5. The sensitivity of R_pA to color recombination effects

    CERN Document Server

    Zapp, Korinna Christina; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-01-01

    In hadronization models with color recombination, partons are allowed to regroup into color singlet structures that are different from those determined by the perturbative parton shower. This aims at modeling the possibility that soft interactions of partons with the underlying event can change color connections. If such an effect is at play in proton-proton collisions, it may be expected to be enhanced in proton-nucleus collisions due to the higher color charge density in the underlying event. Here, we provide a qualitative argument that color recombination effects could lead to a multiplicity dependent hardening of single inclusive hadron spectra that dies out very weakly with increasing transverse momentum. We present results of a (conservative) model implementation in the cluster hadronization model of the SHERPA event generator. In this model, we find that color recombination effects harden indeed the single inclusive hadron spectra without affecting the jet spectra, but that this effect does not depend ...

  6. Molecular anatomy of the recombination mediator function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seong, C.; Sehorn, M.G.; Plate, Iben; Shi, I.; Song, B.; Chi, P.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Sung, P.; Krejci, L.

    2008-01-01

    A helical filament of Rad51 on single-strand DNA (ssDNA), called the presynaptic filament, catalyzes DNA joint formation during homologous recombination. Rad52 facilitates presynaptic filament assembly, and this recombination mediator activity is thought to rely on the interactions of Rad52 with Rad51, the ssDNA-binding protein RPA, and ssDNA. The N-terminal region of Rad52, which has DNA binding activity and an oligomeric structure, is thought to be crucial for mediator activity and recombinati...

  7. RFWD3-Dependent Ubiquitination of RPA Regulates Repair at Stalled Replication Forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Andrew E H; Wang, David C; Willis, Nicholas A; Boardman, Alexander P; Hajdu, Ildiko; Adeyemi, Richard O; Lowry, Elizabeth; Gygi, Steven P; Scully, Ralph; Elledge, Stephen J

    2015-10-15

    We have used quantitative proteomics to profile ubiquitination in the DNA damage response (DDR). We demonstrate that RPA, which functions as a protein scaffold in the replication stress response, is multiply ubiquitinated upon replication fork stalling. Ubiquitination of RPA occurs on chromatin, involves sites outside its DNA binding channel, does not cause proteasomal degradation, and increases under conditions of fork collapse, suggesting a role in repair at stalled forks. We demonstrate that the E3 ligase RFWD3 mediates RPA ubiquitination. RFWD3 is necessary for replication fork restart, normal repair kinetics during replication stress, and homologous recombination (HR) at stalled replication forks. Mutational analysis suggests that multisite ubiquitination of the entire RPA complex is responsible for repair at stalled forks. Multisite protein group sumoylation is known to promote HR in yeast. Our findings reveal a similar requirement for multisite protein group ubiquitination during HR at stalled forks in mammalian cells. PMID:26474068

  8. Anharmonicity in extended RPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical formula for the calculation of the anharmonicity of the two-phonon state is presented which is based on a variational derivation of RPA-like equations for a many fermion system. Analytical estimations of the anharmonicity have been made using the Lipkin model and a degenerated schematic model. The formula obtained, together with the extended RPA predictions, have been checked by comparison with the exact solutions of the models. A rough estimation of the anharmonicity of the two phonon state built on the Giant Dipole Resonance and on the Giant Quadrupole Resonance has been deduced. (authors) 32 refs., 6 figs

  9. Stn1-Ten1 is an Rpa2-Rpa3-like complex at telomeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jia; Yu, Eun Young; Yang, Yuting; Confer, Laura A; Sun, Steven H; Wan, Ke; Lue, Neal F; Lei, Ming; (Weill); (Michigan-Med)

    2010-09-02

    In budding yeast, Cdc13, Stn1, and Ten1 form a heterotrimeric complex (CST) that is essential for telomere protection and maintenance. Previous bioinformatics analysis revealed a putative oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold at the N terminus of Stn1 (Stn1N) that shows limited sequence similarity to the OB fold of Rpa2, a subunit of the eukaryotic ssDNA-binding protein complex replication protein A (RPA). Here we present functional and structural analyses of Stn1 and Ten1 from multiple budding and fission yeast. The crystal structure of the Candida tropicalis Stn1N complexed with Ten1 demonstrates an Rpa2N-Rpa3-like complex. In both structures, the OB folds of the two components pack against each other through interactions between two C-terminal helices. The structure of the C-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 (Stn1C) was found to comprise two related winged helix-turn-helix (WH) motifs, one of which is most similar to the WH motif at the C terminus of Rpa2, again supporting the notion that Stn1 resembles Rpa2. The crystal structure of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Stn1N-Ten1 complex exhibits a virtually identical architecture as the C. tropicalis Stn1N-Ten1. Functional analyses of the Candida albicans Stn1 and Ten1 proteins revealed critical roles for these proteins in suppressing aberrant telomerase and recombination activities at telomeres. Mutations that disrupt the Stn1-Ten1 interaction induce telomere uncapping and abolish the telomere localization of Ten1. Collectively, our structural and functional studies illustrate that, instead of being confined to budding yeast telomeres, the CST complex may represent an evolutionarily conserved RPA-like telomeric complex at the 3' overhangs that works in parallel with or instead of the well-characterized POT1-TPP1/TEBP{alpha}-{beta} complex.

  10. Human DNA helicase B functions in cellular homologous recombination and stimulates Rad51-mediated 5'-3' heteroduplex extension in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanjian; Yan, Peijun; Fanning, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination is involved in the repair of DNA damage and collapsed replication fork, and is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. Its process involves a network of proteins with different enzymatic activities. Human DNA helicase B (HDHB) is a robust 5'-3' DNA helicase which accumulates on chromatin in cells exposed to DNA damage. HDHB facilitates cellular recovery from replication stress, but its role in DNA damage response remains unclear. Here we report that HDHB silencing results in reduced sister chromatid exchange, impaired homologous recombination repair, and delayed RPA late-stage foci formation induced by ionizing radiation. Ectopically expressed HDHB colocalizes with Rad51, Rad52, RPA, and ssDNA. In vitro, HDHB stimulates Rad51-mediated heteroduplex extension in 5'-3' direction. A helicase-defective mutant HDHB failed to promote this reaction. Our studies implicate HDHB promotes homologous recombination in vivo and stimulates 5'-3' heteroduplex extension during Rad51-mediated strand exchange in vitro. PMID:25617833

  11. Cross-talk and regulatory interactions between the essential response regulator RpaB and cyanobacterial circadian clock output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Javier; Boyd, Joseph S.; Cantos, Raquel; Salinas, Paloma; Golden, Susan S.; Contreras, Asuncion

    2015-01-01

    The response regulator RpaB (regulator of phycobilisome associated B), part of an essential two-component system conserved in cyanobacteria that responds to multiple environmental signals, has recently been implicated in the control of cell dimensions and of circadian rhythms of gene expression in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. However, little is known of the molecular mechanisms that underlie RpaB functions. In this study we show that the regulation of phenotypes by RpaB is intimately connected with the activity of RpaA (regulator of phycobilisome associated A), the master regulator of circadian transcription patterns. RpaB affects RpaA activity both through control of gene expression, a function requiring an intact effector domain, and via altering RpaA phosphorylation, a function mediated through the N-terminal receiver domain of RpaB. Thus, both phosphorylation cross-talk and coregulation of target genes play a role in the genetic interactions between the RpaA and RpaB pathways. In addition, RpaB?P levels appear critical for survival under light:dark cycles, conditions in which RpaB phosphorylation is environmentally driven independent of the circadian clock. We propose that the complex regulatory interactions between the essential and environmentally sensitive NblS-RpaB system and the SasA-RpaA clock output system integrate relevant extra- and intracellular signals to the circadian clock. PMID:25653337

  12. Mechanochemical regulations of RPA's binding to ssDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Le, Shimin; Basu, Anindita; Chazin, Walter J.; Yan, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein that serves to protect ssDNA from degradation and annealing, and as a template for recruitment of many downstream factors in virtually all DNA transactions in cell. During many of these transactions, DNA is tethered and is likely subject to force. Previous studies of RPA's binding behavior on ssDNA were conducted in the absence of force; therefore the RPA-ssDNA conformations regulated by force remain unclear. Here, using a combination of atomic force microscopy imaging and mechanical manipulation of single ssDNA tethers, we show that force mediates a switch of the RPA bound ssDNA from amorphous aggregation to a much more regular extended conformation. Further, we found an interesting non-monotonic dependence of the binding affinity on monovalent salt concentration in the presence of force. In addition, we discovered that zinc in micromolar concentrations drives ssDNA to a unique, highly stiff and more compact state. These results provide new mechanochemical insights into the influences and the mechanisms of action of RPA on large single ssDNA.

  13. GENERATION OF RECOMBINANT BACULOVIRUS VIA LIPOSOME MEDIATED TRANSFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baculovirus expression vectors have become a popular method of producing recombinant proteins. Production of recombinant virus requires the transfection of both the native viral DNA and a transfer plasmid into insect cells where recombination takes place. While several methods of...

  14. Cre-Mediated Recombination in Rhombic Lip Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Fünfschilling, Ursula; Reichardt, Louis F.

    2002-01-01

    To study the development of the cerebellum, we generated a transgenicmouse line Tg(m?6-cre)B1LFR that expresses CRE recombinase under the GABAA receptor ?6 subunit promoter. In this line, recombination of an R26R reporter allele occurred postnatally in granule cells of the cerebellum and dorsal cochlear nucleus, as well as in a subset of precerebellar nuclei in the brainstem. All neurons in which recombination occurred originated during embryogenesis from the rhombic lip. This might be explai...

  15. RPA calculations with Gaussian expansion method

    OpenAIRE

    Nakada, H.; Mizuyama, K.; Yamagami, M; Matsuo, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Gaussian expansion method (GEM) is extensively applied to the calculations in the random-phase approximation (RPA). We adopt the mass-independent basis-set that has been tested in the mean-field calculations. By comparing the RPA results with those obtained by several other available methods for Ca isotopes, using a density-dependent contact interaction and the Woods-Saxon single-particle states, we confirm that energies, transition strengths and widths of their distribution are described...

  16. Homologous recombination-mediated cloning and manipulation of genomic DNA regions using Gateway and recombineering systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagale Sateesh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Employing genomic DNA clones to characterise gene attributes has several advantages over the use of cDNA clones, including the presence of native transcription and translation regulatory sequences as well as a representation of the complete repertoire of potential splice variants encoded by the gene. However, working with genomic DNA clones has traditionally been tedious due to their large size relative to cDNA clones and the presence, absence or position of particular restriction enzyme sites that may complicate conventional in vitro cloning procedures. Results To enable efficient cloning and manipulation of genomic DNA fragments for the purposes of gene expression and reporter-gene studies we have combined aspects of the Gateway system and a bacteriophage-based homologous recombination (i.e. recombineering system. To apply the method for characterising plant genes we developed novel Gateway and plant transformation vectors that are of small size and incorporate selectable markers which enable efficient identification of recombinant clones. We demonstrate that the genomic coding region of a gene can be directly cloned into a Gateway Entry vector by recombineering enabling its subsequent transfer to Gateway Expression vectors. We also demonstrate how the coding and regulatory regions of a gene can be directly cloned into a plant transformation vector by recombineering. This construct was then rapidly converted into a novel Gateway Expression vector incorporating cognate 5' and 3' regulatory regions by using recombineering to replace the intervening coding region with the Gateway Destination cassette. Such expression vectors can be applied to characterise gene regulatory regions through development of reporter-gene fusions, using the Gateway Entry clones of GUS and GFP described here, or for ectopic expression of a coding region cloned into a Gateway Entry vector. We exemplify the utility of this approach with the Arabidopsis PAP85 gene and demonstrate that the expression profile of a PAP85::GUS transgene highly corresponds with native PAP85 expression. Conclusion We describe a novel combination of the favourable attributes of the Gateway and recombineering systems to enable efficient cloning and manipulation of genomic DNA clones for more effective characterisation of gene function. Although the system and plasmid vectors described here were developed for applications in plants, the general approach is broadly applicable to gene characterisation studies in many biological systems.

  17. ATR Prohibits Replication Catastrophe by Preventing Global Exhaustion of RPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Altmeyer, Matthias; Rask, Maj-Britt; Lukas, Claudia; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Povlsen, Lou Klitgaard; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Bartek, Jiri; Lukas, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    ATR, activated by replication stress, protects replication forks locally and suppresses origin firing globally. Here, we show that these functions of ATR are mechanistically coupled. Although initially stable, stalled forks in ATR-deficient cells undergo nucleus-wide breakage after unscheduled...... induced breakage of stalled forks even in cells with active ATR. Thus, ATR-mediated suppression of dormant origins shields active forks against irreversible breakage via preventing exhaustion of nuclear RPA. This study elucidates how replicating genomes avoid destabilizing DNA damage. Because cancer cells...

  18. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    E. Quattrocchi; Feldmann, M

    2011-01-01

    Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA) is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig), which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking...

  19. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  20. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or ?-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control ?-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.

  1. PCR-mediated recombination of the amplification products of the Hibiscus tiliaceus cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linghui; Tang, Tian; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2007-03-31

    PCR-mediated recombination describes the process of in vitro chimera formation from related template sequences present in a single PCR amplification. The high levels of genetic redundancy in eukaryotic genomes should make recombination artifacts occur readily. However, few evolutionary biologists adequately consider this phenomenon when studying gene lineages. The cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GapC), which encodes a NADP-dependent nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the cytosol, is a classical low-copy nuclear gene marker and is commonly used in molecular evolutionary studies. Here, we report on the occurrence of PCR-mediated recombination in the GapC gene family of Hibiscus tiliaceus. The study suggests that recombinant areas appear to be correlated with DNA template secondary structures. Our observations highlight that recombination artifacts should be considered when studying specific and allelic phylogenies. The authors suggest that nested PCR be used to suppress PCR-mediated recombination. PMID:17394766

  2. Extended GIPQ description of the RPA excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents an application of the GIPQ quantization method, extended to include the wave function quantization. By explicit calculation on a particular proton-neutron system it is shown that the extended quantization gives the same excitation operator and energy as the RPA. (authors)

  3. A recurrent translocation is mediated by homologous recombination between HERV-H elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermetz Karen E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome rearrangements are caused by many mutational mechanisms; of these, recurrent rearrangements can be particularly informative for teasing apart DNA sequence-specific factors. Some recurrent translocations are mediated by homologous recombination between large blocks of segmental duplications on different chromosomes. Here we describe a recurrent unbalanced translocation casued by recombination between shorter homologous regions on chromosomes 4 and 18 in two unrelated children with intellectual disability. Results Array CGH resolved the breakpoints of the 6.97-Megabase (Mb loss of 18q and the 7.30-Mb gain of 4q. Sequencing across the translocation breakpoints revealed that both translocations occurred between 92%-identical human endogenous retrovirus (HERV elements in the same orientation on chromosomes 4 and 18. In addition, we find sequence variation in the chromosome 4 HERV that makes one allele more like the chromosome 18 HERV. Conclusions Homologous recombination between HERVs on the same chromosome is known to cause chromosome deletions, but this is the first report of interchromosomal HERV-HERV recombination leading to a translocation. It is possible that normal sequence variation in substrates of non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR affects the alignment of recombining segments and influences the propensity to chromosome rearrangement.

  4. Partial Depletion of Histone H4 Increases Homologous Recombination-Mediated Genetic Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, Félix; Aguilera, Andrés

    2005-01-01

    DNA replication can be a source of genetic instability. Given the tight connection between DNA replication and nucleosome assembly, we analyzed the effect of a partial depletion of histone H4 on genetic instability mediated by homologous recombination. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain was constructed in which the expression of histone H4 was driven by the regulated tet promoter. In agreement with defective nucleosome assembly, partial depletion of histone H4 led to subtle changes in plasmid ...

  5. Hin-mediated DNA knotting and recombining promote replicon dysfunction and mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Jennifer K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic code imposes a dilemma for cells. The DNA must be long enough to encode for the complexity of an organism, yet thin and flexible enough to fit within the cell. The combination of these properties greatly favors DNA collisions, which can knot and drive recombination of the DNA. Despite the well-accepted propensity of cellular DNA to collide and react with itself, it has not been established what the physiological consequences are. Results Here we analyze the effects of recombined and knotted plasmids in E. coli using the Hin site-specific recombination system. We show that Hin-mediated DNA knotting and recombination (i promote replicon loss by blocking DNA replication; (ii block gene transcription; and (iii cause genetic rearrangements at a rate three to four orders of magnitude higher than the rate for an unknotted, unrecombined plasmid. Conclusion These results show that DNA reactivity leading to recombined and knotted DNA is potentially toxic and may help drive genetic evolution.

  6. RPA regulates telomerase action by providing Est1p access to chromosome ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramke, Vera; Luciano, Pierre; Brevet, Vanessa; Guillot, Sylvine; Corda, Yves; Longhese, Maria Pia; Gilson, Eric; Géli, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a highly conserved single-stranded DNA-binding protein involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair. We show here that RPA is present at the telomeres of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a maximal association in S phase. A truncation of the N-terminal region of Rfa2p (associated with the rfa2Delta40 mutated allele) results in severe telomere shortening caused by a defect in the in vivo regulation of telomerase activity. Cells carrying rfa2Delta40 show impaired binding of the protein Est1p, which is required for telomerase action. In addition, normal telomere length can be restored by expressing a Cdc13-Est1p hybrid protein. These findings indicate that RPA activates telomerase by loading Est1p onto telomeres during S phase. We propose a model of in vivo telomerase action that involves synergistic action of RPA and Cdc13p at the G-rich 3' overhang of telomeric DNA. PMID:14702040

  7. RPA calculations with Gaussian expansion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gaussian expansion method (GEM) is applied to calculations of the nuclear excitations in the random-phase approximation (RPA). We adopt the mass-independent basis-set that is successful in the mean-field calculations. The RPA results obtained by the GEM are compared with those obtained by several other available methods in Ca isotopes, by using a density-dependent contact interaction along with the Woods-Saxon single-particle states. It is confirmed that energies, transition strengths and widths of their distribution are described by the GEM with good precision, for the 1-, 2+ and 3- collective states. The GEM is then applied to the self-consistent RPA calculations with the finite-range Gogny D1S interaction. The spurious center-of-mass motion is well separated from the physical states in the E1 response, and the energy-weighted sum rules for the isoscalar transitions are fulfilled reasonably well. Properties of low-energy transitions in 60Ca are investigated in some detail.

  8. RPA calculations with Gaussian expansion method

    CERN Document Server

    Nakada, H; Yamagami, M; Matsuo, M

    2009-01-01

    The Gaussian expansion method (GEM) is extensively applied to the calculations in the random-phase approximation (RPA). We adopt the mass-independent basis-set that has been tested in the mean-field calculations. By comparing the RPA results with those obtained by several other available methods for Ca isotopes, using a density-dependent contact interaction and the Woods-Saxon single-particle states, we confirm that energies, transition strengths and widths of their distribution are described by the GEM bases to good precision, for the $1^-$, $2^+$ and $3^-$ collective states. The GEM is then applied to the self-consistent RPA calculations with the finite-range Gogny D1S interaction. The spurious center-of-mass motion is well separated from the physical states in the $E1$ response, and the energy-weighted sum rules for the isoscalar transitions are fulfilled reasonably well. Properties of low-energy transitions in $^{60}$Ca are argued in some detail.

  9. Recombinant equine interleukin-1? induces putative mediators of articular cartilage degradation in equine chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, J. T.; Fenton, J. I.; Arnold, C.; Alexander, L.; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, V.; Venta, P. J.; Peters, T. L.; Orth, M. W.; Richardson, D. W.; Caron, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin-1 is considered a central mediator of cartilage loss in osteoarthritis in several species, however an equine recombinant form of this cytokine is not readily available for in vitro use in equine osteoarthritis research. Equine recombinant interleukin-1? was cloned and expressed and its effects on the expression and activity of selected chondrocytic proteins implicated in cartilage matrix degradation were characterized. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction methods were used to amplify the entire coding region of the equine IL-1? mRNA, which was cloned into an expression vector, expressed in E. coli, and purified using a Ni2+ chromatographic method. The effects of the recombinant peptide on chondrocyte gene expression were determined by Northern blotting using RNA from equine chondrocyte cultures hybridized to probes for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP 1, MMP 3, MMP 13), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP 1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX 2). Effects on selected mediators of cartilage degradation (nitrite concentrations and MMP activity) were determined using conditioned medium from reIL-1?-treated equine cartilage explant cultures. A recombinant peptide of approximately 21 kd was obtained. Northern blotting analyses revealed a marked up-regulation of expression of all MMPs, TIMP 1, and COX 2 in mRNA from treated chondrocytes. Furthermore, cartilage explants exposed to reIL-1? had augmented collagenase/gelatinase and stromelysin activities as well as increased concentration of nitrite in conditioned media. The development of a biologically active, species-specific IL-1? provides a valuable tool in the study of osteoarthritis pathophysiology and its treatment in horses. PMID:11858644

  10. Recombinant equine interleukin-1beta induces putative mediators of articular cartilage degradation in equine chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, J T; Fenton, J I; Arnold, C; Alexander, L; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, V; Venta, P J; Peters, T L; Orth, M W; Richardson, D W; Caron, J P

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin-1 is considered a central mediator of cartilage loss in osteoarthritis in several species, however an equine recombinant form of this cytokine is not readily available for in vitro use in equine osteoarthritis research. Equine recombinant interleukin-1beta was cloned and expressed and its effects on the expression and activity of selected chondrocytic proteins implicated in cartilage matrix degradation were characterized. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction methods were used to amplify the entire coding region of the equine IL-1beta mRNA, which was cloned into an expression vector, expressed in E. coli, and purified using a Ni2+ chromatographic method. The effects of the recombinant peptide on chondrocyte gene expression were determined by Northern blotting using RNA from equine chondrocyte cultures hybridized to probes for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP 1, MMP 3, MMP 13), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP 1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX 2). Effects on selected mediators of cartilage degradation (nitrite concentrations and MMP activity) were determined using conditioned medium from reIL-1beta-treated equine cartilage explant cultures. A recombinant peptide of approximately 21 kd was obtained. Northern blotting analyses revealed a marked up-regulation of expression of all MMPs, TIMP 1, and COX 2 in mRNA from treated chondrocytes. Furthermore, cartilage explants exposed to reIL-1beta had augmented collagenase/gelatinase and stromelysin activities as well as increased concentration of nitrite in conditioned media. The development of a biologically active, species-specific IL-1beta provides a valuable tool in the study of osteoarthritis pathophysiology and its treatment in horses. PMID:11858644

  11. Tamoxifen-Containing Eye Drops Successfully Trigger Cre-Mediated Recombination in the Entire Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, Anja; Leimbeck, Sarah V; Tamm, Ernst R; Braunger, Barbara M

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic lethality in mice with targeted gene deletion is a major issue that can be circumvented by using Cre-loxP-based animal models. Various inducible Cre systems are available, e.g. such that are activated following tamoxifen treatment, and allow deletion of a specific target gene at any desired time point during the life span of the animal. In this study, we describe the efficiency of topical tamoxifen administration by eye drops using a Cre- reporter mouse strain (R26R). We report that tamoxifen-responsive CAGGCre-ER (TM) mice show a robust Cre- mediated recombination throughout the entire eye. PMID:26427451

  12. ATR Prohibits Replication Catastrophe by Preventing Global Exhaustion of RPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Altmeyer, Matthias; Rask, Maj-Britt; Lukas, Claudia; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Povlsen, Lou Klitgaard; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Bartek, Jiri; Lukas, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    ATR, activated by replication stress, protects replication forks locally and suppresses origin firing globally. Here, we show that these functions of ATR are mechanistically coupled. Although initially stable, stalled forks in ATR-deficient cells undergo nucleus-wide breakage after unscheduled origin firing generates an excess of single-stranded DNA that exhausts the nuclear pool of RPA. Partial reduction of RPA accelerated fork breakage, and forced elevation of RPA was sufficient to delay such ...

  13. Quantization in the high-spin RPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of how to quantize the angular momentum of the self-consistent cranking model at high spin when small oscillations (RPA) about the steady rotation are included is reexamined, in view of a recent criticism by Reinhardt of an earlier treatment. This criticism is shown to be unfounded. On the other hand, it is shown that Reinhardt's quantization procedure leads to some serious problems, and the result that the vibrational frequencies differ in the rotating and lab frames is called into question. (orig.)

  14. RPA prevents G-rich structure formation at lagging-strand telomeres to allow maintenance of chromosome ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audry, Julien; Maestroni, Laetitia; Delagoutte, Emmanuelle; Gauthier, Tiphaine; Nakamura, Toru M; Gachet, Yannick; Saintomé, Carole; Géli, Vincent; Coulon, Stéphane

    2015-07-14

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a highly conserved heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA-binding protein involved in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In fission yeast, the Rpa1-D223Y mutation provokes telomere shortening. Here, we show that this mutation impairs lagging-strand telomere replication and leads to the accumulation of secondary structures and recruitment of the homologous recombination factor Rad52. The presence of these secondary DNA structures correlates with reduced association of shelterin subunits Pot1 and Ccq1 at telomeres. Strikingly, heterologous expression of the budding yeast Pif1 known to efficiently unwind G-quadruplex rescues all the telomeric defects of the D223Y cells. Furthermore, in vitro data show that the identical D to Y mutation in human RPA specifically affects its ability to bind G-quadruplex. We propose that RPA prevents the formation of G-quadruplex structures at lagging-strand telomeres to promote shelterin association and facilitate telomerase action at telomeres. PMID:26041456

  15. Extended RPA study of nuclear collective phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fully microscopic study of nuclear collective phenomena is presented within the framework of an extended RPA which includes 1p-1h and 2p-2h excitations in a consistent way. This theory allows us to obtain a very realistic description of various excitation spectra. As a result, a strong evidence of correlation effects beyond mean-field theory emerges. The effective interaction used is a G-matrix derived from the meson-exchange potential. The extended theory introduces also additional correlations which screen the long-large part of the effective interaction. This effect significantly enhances the stability of the ground state against density fluctuations. In this connection a possible importance of relativistic effects is also discussed. 99 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs. (author)

  16. RPA correction to the optical potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauge E.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In studies of nucleon elastic scattering, a correction to the microscopic optical potential built from Melbourne g-matrix was found to be necessary at low nucleon incident energy [1,2]. Indeed, at energies lower than 60 MeV, the absorption generated from Melbourne g-matrix is too weak within 25%. Coupling to collective excited states of the target nucleus are not included in the g-matrix and could explain the missing absorption. We propose to calculate this correction to the optical potential using the Gogny D1S effective nucleon-nucleon interaction in the coupling to excited states of the target. We use the Random Phase Approximation (RPA description of the excited states of the target with the same interaction.

  17. Environment Control to Improve Recombinant Protein Yields in Plants Based on Agrobacterium-Mediated Transient Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiuchi, Naomichi; Matoba, Nobuyuki; Matsuda, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression systems enable plants to produce a wide range of recombinant proteins on a rapid timescale. To achieve economically feasible upstream production and downstream processing, two yield parameters should be considered: (1) recombinant protein content per unit biomass and (2) recombinant protein productivity per unit area–time at the end of the upstream production. Because environmental factors in the upstream production have impacts on these parameters, environment control is important to maximize the recombinant protein yield. In this review, we summarize the effects of pre- and postinoculation environmental factors in the upstream production on the yield parameters and discuss the basic concept of environment control for plant-based transient expression systems. Preinoculation environmental factors associated with planting density, light quality, and nutrient supply affect plant characteristics, such as biomass and morphology, which in turn affect recombinant protein content and productivity. Accordingly, environment control for such plant characteristics has significant implications to achieve a high yield. On the other hand, postinoculation environmental factors, such as temperature, light intensity, and humidity, have been shown to affect recombinant protein content. Considering that recombinant protein production in Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression systems is a result of a series of complex biological events starting from T-DNA transfer from Agrobacterium tumefaciens to protein biosynthesis and accumulation in leaf tissue, we propose that dynamic environment control during the postinoculation process, i.e., changing environmental conditions at an appropriate timing for each event, may be a promising approach to obtain a high yield. Detailed descriptions of plant growth conditions and careful examination of environmental effects will significantly contribute to our knowledge to stably obtain high recombinant protein content and productivity, thus enhancing the utility of plant-based transient expression systems as recombinant protein factories.

  18. Radiosensitization effect of recombinant adenoviral-mediated PUMA gene on pancreatic carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of PUMA gene mediated by recombinant adenovirus vector combined with radiation on the pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: The PANC-1 cells were infected with Ad- PUMA (MOI=10, 50 and 100, respectively) for 48 h. The expression of PUMA mRNA and protein was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. PANC-1 cells were divided into 4 groups: control group, transfection group, irradiation group and combined treatment group. The cell growth inhibition rate and apoptotic rate of PANC-1 cells were assessed by MTT assay and flow cytometry. Human pancreatic carcinomas were transplanted subcutaneously in nude mice, which were randomized into 4 groups: control group, transfection group, irradiation group and combined treatment group. Tumor growth rate and apoptotic index at different time points were recorded in 35 days. Results: The expression of PUMA mRNA and protein was increased with the increase of MOI of Ad-PUMA, which was does-dependant (MOI=10, mRNA=0.46± 0.02, protein=0.75± 0.09; MOI=50, mRNA=1.12±0.09, protein=1.01±0.18; MOI=100, mRNA=1.50±0.08, protein= 1.80±0.15; P3, (39.5±9.23)mm3, (33.6±10.3)mm3 and (52.0±11.43)mm3, respectively, P<0.05]. And the apoptotic index was increased in the same manner (AI=0.43±0.05, 0.29±0.10, 0.24±0.05 and 0.00±0.00, respectively, P<0.05). Conclusions: Recombinant adenoviral-mediated PUMA gene combined with irradiation could increase the cell-killing effect on pancreatic carcinoma. It is better than that of either one kind of therapy. (authors)

  19. Enhanced levels of ? Red-mediated recombinants in mismatch repair mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Homologous recombination can be used to generate recombinants on episomes or directly on the Escherichia coli chromosome with PCR products or synthetic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides (oligos). Such recombination is possible because bacteriophage ?-encoded functions, called Red, efficiently recombine linear DNA with homologies as short as 20–70 bases. This technology, termed recombineering, provides ways to modify genes and segments of the chromosome as well as to study homologou...

  20. Regression of established pulmonary metastases and subcutaneous tumor mediated by the systemic administration of high-dose recombinant interleukin 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incubation of resting lymphoid cells with recombinant interleukin 2 (IL-2) in vitro leads to the generation of lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells capable of lysing fresh tumor cell suspensions in short-term chromium-release assays. Previous studies have demonstrated that the injection of LAK cells plus low doses of recombinant IL-2 were capable of inhibiting the growth of pulmonary metastases. The authors have now explored the ability of high doses of recombinant IL-2, administered systemically, to generate LAK cells in vivo, and to mediate antitumor effects directly. Doses of 100,000 U recombinant IL-2 administered intraperitoneally approximately every 8 h for 5 d were capable of dramatically inhibiting established 3-d pulmonary metastases from the MCA-105 and MCA-106 syngeneic sarcomas and the syngeneic B16 melanoma in C57BL/6 mice. Grossly visible metastases present at 10 d after tumor injection also underwent regression following IL-2 therapy. All antitumor effects of the systemic administration of recombinant IL-2 were eliminated if mice received prior treatment with 500 rad total body irradiation. The administration of high doses of recombinant IL-2 was also capable of inhibiting the growth of 3-d established subcutaneous tumors from the MCA-105 sarcoma, and of mediating the inhibition of growth and regression of established palpable subcutaneous MCA-105 sarcomas. The ready availability of high doses of recombinant human IL-2, and the demonstration of antitumor effects seen in animal models have led us to the initiation of the clinical trials of recombinant IL-2 in humans

  1. Surface reengineering of RPA70N enables co-crystallization with an inhibitor of the RPA interaction motif of ATRIP

    OpenAIRE

    Feldkamp, Michael D.; Frank, Andreas O.; Kennedy, J. Phillip; Patrone, James D.; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Waterson, Alex G.; Fesik, Stephen W.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is the primary single stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of the RPA70 subunit (RPA70N) interacts via a basic cleft with a wide range of DNA processing proteins, including several that regulate DNA damage response and repair. Small molecule inhibitors that disrupt these protein-protein interactions are therefore of interest as chemical probes of these critical DNA processing pathways and as inhibitors to counter the up-regulati...

  2. The crystal structure of the complex of replication protein A subunits RPA32 and RPA14 reveals a mechanism for single-stranded DNA binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Bochkarev, A.; Bochkareva, E; Frappier, L.; A.M. Edwards

    1999-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the eukaryote single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), is a heterotrimer. The largest subunit, RPA70, which harbours the major DNA-binding activity, has two DNA-binding domains that each adopt an OB-fold. The complex of the two smaller subunits, RPA32 and RPA14, has weak DNA-binding activity but the mechanism of DNA binding is unknown. We have determined the crystal structure of the proteolytic core of RPA32 and RPA14, which consists of the central two-thirds of...

  3. 76 FR 54195 - 2010 Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment Draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service 2010 Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment Draft AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION... analyses of forests, rangelands, wildlife and fish, biodiversity, water, outdoor recreation,...

  4. RPA equations and the instantaneous Bethe-Salpeter equation

    CERN Document Server

    Resag, J

    1993-01-01

    We give a derivation of the particle-hole RPA equations for an interacting multi-fermion system by applying the instantaneous approximation to the amputated two-fermion propagator of the system. In relativistic field theory the same approximation leads from the fermion-antifermion Bethe-Salpeter equation to the Salpeter equation. We show that RPA equations and Salpeter equation are indeed equivalent.

  5. Wilms' tumor gene WT1 promotes homologous recombination-mediated DNA damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oji, Yusuke; Tatsumi, Naoya; Kobayashi, Junya; Fukuda, Mari; Ueda, Tazu; Nakano, Eri; Saito, Chisae; Shibata, Syohei; Sumikawa, Mihoko; Fukushima, Hisashi; Saito, Akari; Hojo, Nozomi; Suzuki, Miyu; Hoshikawa, Tomoko; Shimura, Tsutomu; Morii, Eiichi; Oka, Yoshihiro; Hosen, Naoki; Komatsu, Kenshi; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2015-12-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is overexpressed in leukemia and various types of solid tumors and plays an oncogenic role in these malignancies. Alternative splicing at two sites yields four major isoforms, 17AA(+)KTS(+), 17AA(+)KTS(-), 17AA(-)KTS(+), and 17AA(-)KTS(-), and all the isoforms are expressed in the malignancies. However, among the four isoforms, function of WT1[17AA(-)KTS(+)] isoform still remains undetermined. In the present study, we showed that forced expression of WT1[17AA(-)KTS(+)] isoform significantly inhibited apoptosis by DNA-damaging agents such as Doxorubicin, Mitomycin, Camptothesisn, and Bleomycin in immortalized fibroblast MRC5SV and cervical cancer HeLa cells. Knockdown of Rad51, an essential factor for homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair canceled the resistance to Doxorubicin induced by WT1[17AA(-)KTS(+)] isoform. GFP recombination assay showed that WT1[17AA(-)KTS(+)] isoform alone promoted HR, but that three other WT1 isoforms did not. WT1[17AA(-)KTS(+)] isoform significantly upregulated the expression of HR genes, XRCC2, Rad51D, and Rad54. Knockdown of XRCC2, Rad51D, and Rad54 inhibited the HR activity and canceled resistance to Doxorubicin in MRC5SV cells with forced expression of WT1[17AA(-)KTS(+)] isoform. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed the binding of WT1[17AA(-)KTS(+)] isoform protein to promoters of XRCC2 and Rad51D. Immunohistochemical study showed that Rad54 and XRCC2 proteins were highly expressed in the majority of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and gastric cancer, and that expression of these two proteins was significantly correlated with that of WT1 protein in NSCLCs. Our results presented here showed that WT1[17AA(-)KTS(+)] isoform had a function to promote HR-mediated DNA repair. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25418835

  6. CtIP promotes microhomology-mediated alternative end joining during class-switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Theilen, Mieun; Matthews, Allysia J; Kelly, Dierdre; Zheng, Simin; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh locus) class-switch recombination (CSR) requires targeted introduction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) into repetitive 'switch'-region DNA elements in the Igh locus and subsequent ligation between distal DSBs. Both canonical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ) that seals DNA ends with little or no homology and a poorly defined alternative end joining (A-NHEJ, also known as alt-NHEJ) process that requires microhomology ends for ligation have been implicated in CSR. Here, we show that the DNA end-processing factor CtIP is required for microhomology-directed A-NHEJ during CSR. Additionally, we demonstrate that microhomology joins that are enriched upon depletion of the C-NHEJ component Ku70 require CtIP. Finally, we show that CtIP binds to switch-region DNA in a fashion dependent on activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Our results establish CtIP as a bona fide component of microhomology-dependent A-NHEJ and unmask a hitherto unrecognized physiological role of microhomology-mediated end joining in a C-NHEJ-proficient environment. PMID:21131982

  7. Characterization of Fabry mice treated with recombinant adeno-associated virus 2/8-mediated gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Choi Jin-Ok; Lee Mi; Park Hae-Young; Jung Sung-Chul

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with ?-galactosidase A (?-Gal A) is currently the most effective therapeutic strategy for patients with Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disease. However, ERT has limitations of a short half-life, requirement for frequent administration, and limited efficacy for patients with renal failure. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene therapy for a Fabry disease mouse model and ...

  8. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-12-01

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed description of all oligonucleotide sequences used in this study; list of figures that support claims from the main text. Mainly these show sensor sequences, phage display results, scFv purification and binding data, cell images clamped at different pH and co-localization studies with endocytic tracers. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03769j

  9. Generation of Cell Lines to Complement Adenovirus Vectors using Recombination-Mediated Cassette Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farley Daniel C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 has many favourable characteristics for development as a gene therapy vector. However, the utility of current Ad5 vectors is limited by transient transgene expression, toxicity and immunogenicity. The most promising form of vector is the high capacity type, which is deleted for all viral genes. However, these vectors can only be produced to relatively low titres and with the aid of helper virus. Therefore a continuing challenge is the generation of more effective Ad5 vectors that can still be grown to high titres. Our approach is to generate complementing cell lines to support the growth of Ad5 vectors with novel late gene deficiencies. Results We have used LoxP/Cre recombination mediated cassette exchange (RMCE to generate cell lines expressing Ad5 proteins encoded by the L4 region of the genome, the products of which play a pivotal role in the expression of Ad5 structural proteins. A panel of LoxP parent 293 cell lines was generated, each containing a GFP expression cassette under the control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter inserted at a random genome location; the cassette also contained a LoxP site between the promoter and GFP sequence. Clones displayed a variety of patterns of regulation, stability and level of GFP expression. Clone A1 was identified as a suitable parent for creation of inducible cell lines because of the tight inducibility and stability of its GFP expression. Using LoxP-targeted, Cre recombinase-mediated insertion of an L4 cassette to displace GFP from the regulated promoter in this parent clone, cell line A1-L4 was generated. This cell line expressed L4 100K, 22K and 33K proteins at levels sufficient to complement L4-33K mutant and L4-deleted viruses. Conclusions RMCE provides a method for rapid generation of Ad5 complementing cell lines from a pre-selected parental cell line, chosen for its desirable transgene expression characteristics. Parent cell lines can be selected for high or low gene expression, and for tight regulation, allowing viral protein expression to mirror that found during infection. Cell lines derived from a single parent will allow the growth of different vectors to be assessed without the complication of varying complementing protein expression.

  10. Heterosubtypic immunity to influenza mediated by liposome adjuvanted H5N1 recombinant protein vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thueng-in, Kanyarat; Maneewatch, Santi; Srimanote, Potjanee; Songserm, Thaweesak; Tapchaisri, Pramuan; Sookrung, Nitat; Tongtawe, Pongsri; Channarong, Sunee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2010-09-24

    A non-egg, non-culture based influenza vaccine that intervenes large influenza outbreaks and protects against heterosubtypic infections is needed. Candidates of such vaccine are likely to be conserved influenza virus proteins or their coding DNA. The vaccine must be conveniently produced at reasonable cost, safe, highly immunogenic and should be able to recall rapidly the immunological memory upon the antigenic re-exposure. In this study vaccines made of full length recombinant NP and M2 of the H5N1 influenza A virus were entrapped either alone or together into liposome (L) made of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. The vaccines (L-NP, L-M2 or L-NP+M2) and mocks (L or PBS) were safe without causing any adverse reaction in the intramuscularly injected mice. They were readily immunogenic at a single dose and a recalled response could be detected within one day post booster. Cytokine and antibody data indicated that the vaccines induced a Th1 bias immune response. NP containing vaccines stimulated a marked increase of cytotoxic lymphocytes, i.e., CD8(+), intracellular IFN?(+) cells, while M2 containing vaccines elicited good antibody response which neutralized infectivity of heterologous influenza viruses. Although the three vaccines elicited different immunological defense factors; nevertheless, they similarly and readily abrogated lung histopathology mediated by viruses belonging to different H5N1 clade/subclade and heterosubtypes including swine H1N1 and human H1N1/2009 viruses. They protected the vaccinated mice against lethal challenges with mouse adapted avian H5N1 virus. The liposome adjuvanted vaccines which demonstrated high protective efficacy in mice warrant testing further in a non-rodent model as well as in humans. PMID:20688037

  11. The IRG Mouse: A Two-Color Fluorescent Reporter for Assessing Cre-Mediated Recombination and Imaging Complex Cellular Relationships In Situ

    OpenAIRE

    Gasperi, Rita De; Rocher, Anne B.; Sosa, Miguel A Gama; Wearne, Susan L; Perez, Gissel M.; Friedrich, Victor L.; Hof, Patrick R; Elder, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    The Cre-loxP system is widely used for making conditional alterations to the mouse genome. Cre-mediated recombination is frequently monitored using reporter lines in which Cre expression activates a reporter gene driven by a ubiquitous promoter. Given the distinct advantages of fluorescent reporters, we developed a transgenic reporter line, termed IRG, in which DsRed-Express, a red fluorescent protein (RFP) is expressed ubiquitously prior to Cre-mediated recombination and an enhanced green fl...

  12. Structure Factor in the Presence of Shear - an RPA Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Vinograd, G; Vinograd, Guy; Schwartz, Moshe

    2002-01-01

    We consider the structure factor of a system of colloidal particles immersed in a host liquid. Each particle is assumed to be affected by forces due to other particles, a drag force proportional to the velocity of the particle relative to the local velocity of the fluid and a fluctuating random noise. The effect of the particles on the velocity field of the host liquid is neglected. The problem is treated within the RPA approximation which is a widely used tool in many body theory. The validity of the RPA result is discussed.

  13. Pauli principle corrections to RPA within a boson formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Random Phase Approximation (RPA) is examined in a boson formalism and special attention is focused on the problem of the violation of the Pauli Principle affecting this theory. A mapping technique is discussed and the boson image of a two-body fermion Hamiltonian is constructed. Within the boson space so defined, an extension of RPA is proposed where structure and energy of the ground state, as well as of the first excited one, are analyzed on the basis of the Thouless Theorem for bosons and with regard to the role of the spurious components. Numerical tests are performed within the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs

  14. RPA instabilities in finite nuclei at low density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early development of the instabilities in a dilute nuclear source is investigated using a finite temperature quantal Random Phase Approximation (RPA) approach for different systems. The growth rates of the unstable collective modes are determined by solving a dispersion relation. Calculations indicate that, for an expanding source, unstable modes show a transition from surface to volume character. (author)

  15. BLM and RMI1 Alleviate RPA Inhibition of TopoIIIa Decatenase Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jay; Bachrati, Csanad Z; Hickson, Ian D; Brown, Grant W

    2012-01-01

    RPA is a single-stranded DNA binding protein that physically associates with the BLM complex. RPA stimulates BLM helicase activity as well as the double Holliday junction dissolution activity of the BLM-topoisomerase IIIa complex. We investigated the effect of RPA on the ssDNA decatenase activity of topoisomerase IIIa. We found that RPA and other ssDNA binding proteins inhibit decatenation by topoisomerase IIIa. Complex formation between BLM, TopoIIIa, and RMI1 ablates inhibition of decatenation...

  16. Generation of Nkx2.2:lacZ mice using Recombination-Mediated Cassette Exchange Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Arnes, Luis; Leclerc, Kevin; Friel, Jessica M.; Hipkens, Susan B.; Magnuson, Mark A; Sussel, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Nkx2.2 encodes a homeodomain transcription factor required for the correct specification and/or differentiation of cells in the pancreas, intestine and CNS. To follow the fate of cells deleted for Nkx2.2 within these tissues, we generated Nkx2.2:lacZ knockin mice using a recombination-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) approach. Expression analysis of lacZ and/or ?-galactosidase in Nkx2.2lacZ/+ heterozygote embryos and adults demonstrates that lacZ faithfully recapitulates endogenous Nkx2.2 ex...

  17. Binding polarity of RPA to telomeric sequences and influence of G-quadruplex stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safa, Layal; Delagoutte, Emmanuelle; Petruseva, Irina; Alberti, Patrizia; Lavrik, Olga; Riou, Jean-François; Saintomé, Carole

    2014-08-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA binding protein that plays an essential role in telomere maintenance. RPA binds to and unfolds G-quadruplex (G4) structures formed in telomeric DNA, thus facilitating lagging strand DNA replication and telomerase activity. To investigate the effect of G4 stability on the interactions with human RPA (hRPA), we used a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches. Our data revealed an inverse relationship between G4 stability and ability of hRPA to bind to telomeric DNA; notably small G4 ligands that enhance G4 stability strongly impaired G4 unfolding by hRPA. To gain more insight into the mechanism of binding and unfolding of telomeric G4 structures by RPA, we carried out photo-crosslinking experiments to elucidate the spatial arrangement of the RPA subunits along the DNA strands. Our results showed that RPA1 and RPA2 are arranged from 5' to 3' along the unfolded telomeric G4, as already described for unstructured single-stranded DNA, while no contact is possible with RPA3 on this short oligonucleotide. In addition, these data are compatible with a 5' to 3' directionality in G4 unfolding by hRPA. PMID:24747047

  18. Multiple Regulation of Rad51-Mediated Homologous Recombination by Fission Yeast Fbh1

    OpenAIRE

    Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Kurokawa, Yumiko; Ito, Kentaro; Siddique, Md. Shahjahan P.; Kawano, Yumiko; Yamao, Fumiaki; IWASAKI, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    Fbh1, an F-box helicase related to bacterial UvrD, has been proposed to modulate homologous recombination in fission yeast. We provide several lines of evidence for such modulation. Fbh1, but not the related helicases Srs2 and Rqh1, suppressed the formation of crossover recombinants from single HO-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Purified Fbh1 in complex with Skp1 (Fbh1-Skp1 complex) inhibited Rad51-driven DNA strand exchange by disrupting Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments in an ATP-dependent ma...

  19. A set of vectors for introduction of antibiotic resistance genes by in vitro Cre-mediated recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassetzky Yegor S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Introduction of new antibiotic resistance genes in the plasmids of interest is a frequent task in molecular cloning practice. Classical approaches involving digestion with restriction endonucleases and ligation are time-consuming. Findings We have created a set of insertion vectors (pINS carrying genes that provide resistance to various antibiotics (puromycin, blasticidin and G418 and containing a loxP site. Each vector (pINS-Puro, pINS-Blast or pINS-Neo contains either a chloramphenicol or a kanamycin resistance gene and is unable to replicate in most E. coli strains as it contains a conditional R6Kγ replication origin. Introduction of the antibiotic resistance genes into the vector of interest is achieved by Cre-mediated recombination between the replication-incompetent pINS and a replication-competent target vector. The recombination mix is then transformed into E. coli and selected by the resistance marker (kanamycin or chloramphenicol present in pINS, which allows to recover the recombinant plasmids with 100% efficiency. Conclusion Here we propose a simple strategy that allows to introduce various antibiotic-resistance genes into any plasmid containing a replication origin, an ampicillin resistance gene and a loxP site.

  20. Construction of targeted single copy lac fusions using lambda Red and FLP-mediated site-specific recombination in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellermeier, Craig D; Janakiraman, Anuradha; Slauch, James M

    2002-05-15

    A simple method for the construction of targeted transcriptional and translational fusions to the lac operon using FLP mediated site-specific recombination is described. Conditional plasmids containing promoterless lacZY genes and the FLP recognition target (FRT) site in both orientations were constructed for generating transcriptional fusions. Similarly, a plasmid used to create translational fusions was constructed in which the endogenous translational start of lacZ has been removed. These plasmids can be transformed into strains containing a single FRT site, which was previously integrated downstream of the promoter of interest using the lambda Red recombination method. The FLP protein produced from a helper plasmid that contains a conditional origin of replication promotes site-specific recombination between the FRT sites, resulting in an integrated lac fusion to the gene of interest. Transcriptional fusions to the Salmonella typhimurium genes sodCII and sitA were constructed using this method and shown to respond appropriately to mutations in the respective regulatory genes, rpoS and fur. Translational fusions were also constructed using this method. In this case, expression of beta-galactosidase was dependent on translation of the target protein. Given that the FLP recombinase does not require host factors for function and that this method requires no molecular cloning, this method should be applicable for the analysis of gene expression in a variety of organisms. PMID:12062810

  1. FLP recombinase-mediated site-specific recombination in silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive understanding of gene function and the production of site-specific genetically modified mutants are two major goals of genetic engineering in the post-genomic era. Although site-specific recombination systems have been powerful tools for genome manipulation of many organisms, they h...

  2. Various applications of TALEN- and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homologous recombination to modify the Drosophila genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongsheng Yu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modifying the genomes of many organisms is becoming as easy as manipulating DNA in test tubes, which is made possible by two recently developed techniques based on either the customizable DNA binding protein, TALEN, or the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Here, we describe a series of efficient applications derived from these two technologies, in combination with various homologous donor DNA plasmids, to manipulate the Drosophila genome: (1 to precisely generate genomic deletions; (2 to make genomic replacement of a DNA fragment at single nucleotide resolution; and (3 to generate precise insertions to tag target proteins for tracing their endogenous expressions. For more convenient genomic manipulations, we established an easy-to-screen platform by knocking in a white marker through homologous recombination. Further, we provided a strategy to remove the unwanted duplications generated during the “ends-in” recombination process. Our results also indicate that TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 had comparable efficiency in mediating genomic modifications through HDR (homology-directed repair; either TALEN or the CRISPR/Cas9 system could efficiently mediate in vivo replacement of DNA fragments of up to 5 kb in Drosophila, providing an ideal genetic tool for functional annotations of the Drosophila genome.

  3. Cell cycle-specific UNG2 phosphorylations regulate protein turnover, activity and association with RPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Lars; Kavli, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    Human UNG2 is a multifunctional glycosylase that removes uracil near replication forks and in non-replicating DNA, and is important for affinity maturation of antibodies in B cells. How these diverse functions are regulated remains obscure. Here, we report three new phosphoforms of the non-catalytic domain that confer distinct functional properties to UNG2. These are apparently generated by cyclin-dependent kinases through stepwise phosphorylation of S23, T60 and S64 in the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of S23 in late G1/early S confers increased association with replication protein A (RPA) and replicating chromatin and markedly increases the catalytic turnover of UNG2. Conversely, progressive phosphorylation of T60 and S64 throughout S phase mediates reduced binding to RPA and flag UNG2 for breakdown in G2 by forming a cyclin E/c-myc-like phosphodegron. The enhanced catalytic turnover of UNG2 p-S23 likely optimises the protein to excise uracil along with rapidly moving replication forks. Our findings may aid further studies of how UNG2 initiates mutagenic rather than repair processing of activation-induced deaminase-generated uracil at Ig loci in B cells.

  4. BLM and RMI1 Alleviate RPA Inhibition of TopoIIIa Decatenase Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jay; Bachrati, Csanad Z; Hickson, Ian D; Brown, Grant W

    2012-01-01

    of topoisomerase IIIa. We found that RPA and other ssDNA binding proteins inhibit decatenation by topoisomerase IIIa. Complex formation between BLM, TopoIIIa, and RMI1 ablates inhibition of decatenation by ssDNA binding proteins. Together, these data indicate that inhibition by RPA does not involve...... species-specific interactions between RPA and BLM-TopoIIIa-RMI1, which contrasts with RPA modulation of double Holliday junction dissolution. We propose that topoisomerase IIIa and RPA compete to bind to single-stranded regions of catenanes. Interactions with BLM and RMI1 enhance toposiomerase IIIa...

  5. Small molecule inhibitor of the RPA70 N-terminal protein interaction domain discovered using in silico and in vitro methods

    OpenAIRE

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Liu, Shengqin; Oakley, Gregory G.

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacological suppression of the DNA damage response and DNA repair can increase the therapeutic indices of conventional chemotherapeutics. Replication Protein A (RPA), the major single-stranded DNA binding protein in eukaryotes, is required for DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA recombination, and DNA damage response signaling. Through the use of high-throughput screening of 1500 compounds, we have identified a small molecule inhibitor, 15-carboxy-13-isopropylatis-13-ene-17,18-dioic acid...

  6. Skyrme RPA for spherical and axially symmetric nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Repko, Anton; Nesterenko, V O; Reinhard, P -G

    2015-01-01

    Random Phase Approximation (RPA) is the basic method for calculation of excited states of nuclei over the Hartree-Fock ground state, suitable also for energy density functionals (EDF or DFT). We developed a convenient formalism for expressing densities and currents in a form of reduced matrix elements, which allows fast calculation of spectra for spherical nuclei. All terms of Skyrme functional were taken into account, so it is possible to calculate electric, magnetic and vortical/toroidal/compression transitions and strength functions of any multipolarity. Time-odd (spin) terms in Skyrme functional become important for magnetic M1 and isovector toroidal E1 transitions. It was also found that transition currents in pygmy region (low-lying part of E1 resonance) exhibit isoscalar toroidal flow, so the previously assumed picture of neutron-skin vibration is not the only mechanism present in pygmy transitions. RPA calculations with heavy axially-symmetric nuclei now become feasible on ordinary PC. Detailed formul...

  7. Properties of magnetized neutral mesons within a full RPA evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Avancini, Sidney S; Pinto, Marcus B

    2015-01-01

    We consider the two flavor Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model within the RPA framework to evaluate the masses of the $\\sigma$ and $\\pi^0$ mesons and the $\\pi^0$ decay constant in the presence of a magnetic field at vanishing temperatures and baryonic densities. The present work extends other RPA applications by fully considering the external momenta, which enter the integrals representing the magnetized polarization tensor, so that more accurate results can be obtained in the evaluation of physical quantities containing pionic contributions. As we show, this technical improvement generates results which agree well with those produced by lattice simulations and chiral perturbation theory. Our method may also prove to be useful in future evaluations of quantities such as the shear viscosity and the equation of state of magnetized quark matter with mesonic contributions.

  8. Properties of magnetized neutral mesons within a full RPA evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancini, Sidney S.; Tavares, William R.; Pinto, Marcus B.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model within the random phase approximation (RPA) framework to evaluate the masses of the σ and π0 mesons and the π0 decay constant in the presence of a magnetic field at vanishing temperatures and baryonic densities. The present work extends other RPA applications by fully considering the external momenta which enter the integrals representing the magnetized polarization tensor. We employ a a field-independent regularization scheme so that more accurate results can be obtained in the evaluation of physical quantities containing pionic contributions. As we show, this technical improvement generates results which agree well with those produced by lattice simulations and chiral perturbation theory. Our method may also prove to be useful in future evaluations of quantities, such as the shear viscosity and the equation of state of magnetized quark matter with mesonic contributions.

  9. CtIP promotes microhomology-mediated alternative end-joining during class switch recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Lee-Theilen, Mieun; Matthews, Allysia J.; Kelly, Dierdre; Zheng, Simin; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2010-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) class switch recombination (CSR) requires targeted introduction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) into repetitive “switch” region DNA elements in the Igh locus and subsequent ligation between distal DSBs. Both canonical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) that seals DNA ends with little or no homology, and a poorly defined alternative-end joining (A-NHEJ) process that requires microhomology ends for ligation have been implicated in CSR. Here we show that the ...

  10. Generation of TALEN-Mediated GRdim Knock-In Rats by Homologous Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Ponce de León, Verónica; Mérillat, Anne-Marie; Tesson, Laurent; Anegón, Ignacio; Hummler, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN) are potential tools for precise genome engineering of laboratory animals. We report the first targeted genomic integration in the rat using TALENs (Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases) by homology-derived recombination (HDR). We assembled TALENs and designed a linear donor insert targeting a pA476T mutation in the rat Glucocorticoid Receptor (Nr3c1) namely GRdim, that prevents receptor homodimerization in the mouse. TALEN mRN...

  11. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA of CaMV-35S Promoter and nos Terminator for Rapid Detection of Genetically Modified Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA is a novel isothermal DNA amplification and detection technology that enables the amplification of DNA within 30 min at a constant temperature of 37–42 °C by simulating in vivo DNA recombination. In this study, based on the regulatory sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV-35S promoter and the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase gene (nos terminator, which are widely incorporated in genetically modified (GM crops, we designed two sets of RPA primers and established a real-time RPA detection method for GM crop screening and detection. This method could reliably detect as few as 100 copies of the target molecule in a sample within 15–25 min. Furthermore, the real-time RPA detection method was successfully used to amplify and detect DNA from samples of four major GM crops (maize, rice, cotton, and soybean. With this novel amplification method, the test time was significantly shortened and the reaction process was simplified; thus, this method represents an effective approach to the rapid detection of GM crops.

  12. Random-Matrix Approach to RPA equations. I

    CERN Document Server

    Barillier-Pertuisel, X; Weidenmüller, H A

    2008-01-01

    We study the RPA equations in their most general form by taking the matrix elements appearing in the RPA equations as random. This yields either a unitarily or an orthogonally invariant random-matrix model which is not of the Cartan type. The average spectrum of the model is studied with the help of a generalized Pastur equation. Two independent parameters govern the behaviour of the system: The strength $\\alpha^2$ of the coupling between positive- and negative-energy states and the distance between the origin and the centers of the two semicircles that describe the average spectrum for $\\alpha^2 = 0$, the latter measured in units of the equal radii of the two semicircles. With increasing $\\alpha^2$, positive- and negative-energy states become mixed and ever more of the spectral strength of the positive-energy states is transferred to those at negative energy, and vice versa. The two semicircles are deformed and pulled toward each other. As they begin to overlap, the RPA equations yield non--real eigenvalues:...

  13. Mediator facilitates transcriptional activation and dynamic long-range contacts at the IgH locus during class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Claudepierre, Anne-Sophie; Robert, Isabelle; Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Schiavo, Ebe; Heyer, Vincent; Bonneau, Richard; Luo, Vincent M; Reddy, Janardan K; Borggrefe, Tilman; Skok, Jane A; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by the transcription-coupled recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig switch regions (S regions). During CSR, the IgH locus undergoes dynamic three-dimensional structural changes in which promoters, enhancers, and S regions are brought to close proximity. Nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we show that Med1 and Med12, two subunits of the mediator complex implicated in transcription initiation and long-range enhancer/promoter loop formation, are dynamically recruited to the IgH locus enhancers and the acceptor regions during CSR and that their knockdown in CH12 cells results in impaired CSR. Furthermore, we show that conditional inactivation of Med1 in B cells results in defective CSR and reduced acceptor S region transcription. Finally, we show that in B cells undergoing CSR, the dynamic long-range contacts between the IgH enhancers and the acceptor regions correlate with Med1 and Med12 binding and that they happen at a reduced frequency in Med1-deficient B cells. Our results implicate the mediator complex in the mechanism of CSR and are consistent with a model in which mediator facilitates the long-range contacts between S regions and the IgH locus enhancers during CSR and their transcriptional activation. PMID:26903242

  14. Long-term Cre-mediated Retrograde Tagging of Neurons Using a Novel Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassana Oyibo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain regions contain diverse populations of neurons that project to different long-range targets. The study of these subpopulations in circuit function and behavior requires a toolkit to characterize and manipulate their activity in vivo. We have developed a novel set of reagents based on Pseudorabies Virus (PRV for efficient and long-term genetic tagging of neurons based on their projection targets. By deleting IE180, the master transcriptional regulator in the PRV genome, we have produced a mutant virus capable of infection and transgene expression in neurons but unable to replicate in or spread from those neurons. IE180-null mutants showed no cytotoxicity, and infected neurons exhibited normal physiological function more than 45 days after infection, indicating the utility of these engineered viruses for chronic experiments. To enable rapid and convenient construction of novel IE180-null recombinants, we engineered a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC shuttle-vector system for moving new constructs into the PRV IE180-null genome. Using this system we generated an IE180-null recombinant virus expressing the site-specific recombinase Cre. This Cre-expressing virus (PRV-hSyn-Cre efficiently and robustly infects neurons in vivo and activates transgene expression from Cre-dependent vectors in local and retrograde projecting populations of neurons in the mouse. We also generated an assortment of recombinant viruses expressing fluorescent proteins (mCherry, EGFP, ECFP. These viruses exhibit long-term labeling of neurons in vitro but transient labeling in vivo. Together these novel IE180-null PRV reagents expand the toolkit for targeted gene expression in the brain, facilitating functional dissection of neuronal circuits in vivo.

  15. Recombinant dimeric IgA antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor mediate effective tumor cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Stefan; Derer, Stefanie; Beyer, Thomas; Klausz, Katja; Peipp, Matthias; Leusen, Jeanette H W; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Dechant, Michael; Valerius, Thomas

    2011-03-15

    Dimeric IgA Abs contribute significantly to the humoral part of the mucosal immune system. However, their potential as immunotherapeutic agent has hardly been explored. In this article, we describe the production, purification, and functional evaluation of recombinant dimeric IgA against the epidermal growth factor receptor. Human joining chain-containing IgA was produced by nonadherent Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO)-K1 cells under serum-free conditions. Purification by anti-human ? and anti-His-tag affinity, as well as size exclusion chromatography, resulted in a homogenous preparation of highly pure IgA dimers. Functional studies demonstrated dimeric IgA to be at least as effective as monomeric IgA in triggering Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by isolated monocytes or polymorphonuclear cell and in human whole-blood assays. Importantly, dimeric IgA was more effective in F(ab)-mediated killing mechanisms, such as inhibition of ligand binding, receptor downmodulation, and growth inhibition. Furthermore, only dimeric but not monomeric IgA or IgG was directionally transported by the polymeric Ig receptor through an epithelial cell monolayer. Together, these studies demonstrate that recombinant dimeric IgA Abs recruit a distinct repertoire of effector functions compared with monomeric IgA or IgG1 Abs. PMID:21317397

  16. MODEST: a web-based design tool for oligonucleotide-mediated genome engineering and recombineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Klausen, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Recombineering and multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) offer the possibility to rapidly modify multiple genomic or plasmid sites at high efficiencies. This enables efficient creation of genetic variants including both single mutants with specifically targeted modifications as well as combinatorial cell libraries. Manual design of oligonucleotides for these approaches can be tedious, time-consuming, and may not be practical for larger projects targeting many genomic sites. At present, the change from a desired phenotype (e.g. altered expression of a specific protein) to a designed MAGE oligo, which confers the corresponding genetic change, is performed manually. To address these challenges, we have developed the MAGE Oligo Design Tool (MODEST). This web-based tool allows designing of MAGE oligos for (i) tuning translation rates by modifying the ribosomal binding site, (ii) generating translational gene knockouts and (iii) introducing other coding or non-coding mutations, including amino acid substitutions, insertions, deletions and point mutations. The tool automatically designs oligos based on desired genotypic or phenotypic changes defined by the user, which can be used for high efficiency recombineering and MAGE. MODEST is available for free and is open to all users at http://modest.biosustain.dtu.dk.

  17. Photoinduced molecular dissociation and photoinduced recombination mediated by superfluid helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautsch, Andreas; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2015-05-14

    We have investigated photoinduced chemical reaction dynamics of cold, isolated Cr2 molecules in helium nanodroplets (HeN), exploiting the quantum state specific spatial separation of solvated and surface locations on the droplet. The molecules are excited to achieve dissociation to a ground state (a(7)S3) and a metastable state (a(5)S2) atom. State specific spatial separation, in combination with efficient translational cooling to avoid ejection, causes the ground state atom to be solvated inside the droplet while the metastable atom migrates to the surface. A barrier between the two reactants formed by the HeN prevents recombination. We apply a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization scheme including the y(5)P°(1,2,3) laser scheme including the y(7)P°(2,3,4) <-- a(7)S(3) transition of the solvated atom in order to verify the locations and separation of the dissociation products. Furthermore, ionization of the a(5)S2 surface atom triggers solvation followed by geminate recombination with the a(7)S3 atom, which is verified by the detection of Cr2(+) molecular ions. For small Cr clusters, our results indicate that they may be composed of chromium dimers that exhibit the same dissociation behavior. PMID:25894482

  18. P-glycoprotein-mediated resistance to chemotherapy in cancer cells: using recombinant cytosolic domains to establish structure-function relationships

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    A., Di Pietro; G., Dayan; G., Conseil; E., Steinfels; T., Krell; D., Trompier; H., Baubichon-Cortay; J.-M., Jault.

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to chemotherapy in cancer cells is mainly mediated by overexpression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter which extrudes cytotoxic drugs at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Pgp consists of two homologous halves each containing a transmembrane dom [...] ain and a cytosolic nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) which contains two consensus Walker motifs, A and B, involved in ATP binding and hydrolysis. The protein also contains an S signature characteristic of ABC transporters. The molecular mechanism of Pgp-mediated drug transport is not known. Since the transporter has an extraordinarily broad substrate specificity, its cellular function has been described as a "hydrophobic vacuum cleaner". The limited knowledge about the mechanism of Pgp, partly due to the lack of a high-resolution structure, is well reflected in the failure to efficiently inhibit its activity in cancer cells and thus to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR). In contrast to the difficulties encountered when studying the full-length Pgp, the recombinant NBDs can be obtained in large amounts as soluble proteins. The biochemical and biophysical characterization of recombinant NBDs is shown here to provide a suitable alternative route to establish structure-function relationships. NBDs were shown to bind ATP and analogues as well as potent modulators of MDR, such as hydrophobic steroids, at a region close to the ATP site. Interestingly, flavonoids also bind to NBDs with high affinity. Their binding site partly overlaps both the ATP-binding site and the steroid-interacting region. Therefore flavonoids constitute a new promising class of bifunctional modulators of Pgp.

  19. P-glycoprotein-mediated resistance to chemotherapy in cancer cells: using recombinant cytosolic domains to establish structure-function relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pietro A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to chemotherapy in cancer cells is mainly mediated by overexpression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp, a plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter which extrudes cytotoxic drugs at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Pgp consists of two homologous halves each containing a transmembrane domain and a cytosolic nucleotide-binding domain (NBD which contains two consensus Walker motifs, A and B, involved in ATP binding and hydrolysis. The protein also contains an S signature characteristic of ABC transporters. The molecular mechanism of Pgp-mediated drug transport is not known. Since the transporter has an extraordinarily broad substrate specificity, its cellular function has been described as a "hydrophobic vacuum cleaner". The limited knowledge about the mechanism of Pgp, partly due to the lack of a high-resolution structure, is well reflected in the failure to efficiently inhibit its activity in cancer cells and thus to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR. In contrast to the difficulties encountered when studying the full-length Pgp, the recombinant NBDs can be obtained in large amounts as soluble proteins. The biochemical and biophysical characterization of recombinant NBDs is shown here to provide a suitable alternative route to establish structure-function relationships. NBDs were shown to bind ATP and analogues as well as potent modulators of MDR, such as hydrophobic steroids, at a region close to the ATP site. Interestingly, flavonoids also bind to NBDs with high affinity. Their binding site partly overlaps both the ATP-binding site and the steroid-interacting region. Therefore flavonoids constitute a new promising class of bifunctional modulators of Pgp.

  20. The therapeutic potential of the recombinant antigen from Dirofilaria immitis (rDiAg) for immune-mediated pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine-Aizawa, Shihoko; Izumi, Yasuyuki; Imai, Shinjiro; Fujita, Koichiro; Hayakawa, Satoshi

    2011-12-01

    The mammalian fetuses are semi-allograft for mothers. Therefore the failure of immunological tolerance often causes pregnancy loss. Recently, the effects of helminthes therapy for immune mediated diseases have been reported. In the present study we employed the murine model to examine the therapeutic potential of the recombinant antigen from a nematoda parasite, Dirofilaria immitis for immune mediated pregnancy loss. Recombinant D. immitis polyproteins (rDiAg) had been cloned and selected by us for the strongest immuno-regulatory activities in parasite antigens. Female CBA/J mice were injected with sterilized rDiAg or PBS solution using micro-osmotic pumps before mating. Pregnant CBA/J mice were sacrificed on day 13.5 for scoring the number of resorbed and viable fetuses for histological and immunological analysis. The serum cytokine concentrations were measured using suspension array system. The resorption rate of mock-treated mice was 42.9% (resorbed fetus 12/total fetus 28). The resorption rate was decreased to 11.1% (resorbed fetus 3/total fetus 27) with rDiAg treatments. The IL-4, IL-23 and TNF-? concentrations in serum were significantly lower in rDiAg-treated mice than mock-treated mice. The serum IL-17 level was also reduced in rDiAg-treated mice but the difference was not significant. The rDiAg treatment reduced the resorption rates of CBA/J×DBA/2J mouse model, which mimic human pregnancy failures with allo-immune backgrounds. Our observations suggest as the first time of therapeutic potentials of the rDiAg for pregnancy loss. PMID:21983343

  1. Finite temperature RPA in symmetric nuclear matter with Skyrme interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the RPA response for thermally excited nuclear matter interacting through Skyrme interactions. Closed analytical expressions are obtained for the dynamic susceptibility in each spin-isopspin channel. We compute the strength as a function of energy, transferred momentum and temperature, and examine the evolution of collective states, when present. The energy weighted sum rules Mk, for k = -1, 1 and 3 are also shown to possess explicit expressions as functions of both momentum and temperature. It is seen that thermal effects on the susceptibility are as important as dynamical ones associated to momentum transfer, at least for temperatures as high as 20% of the Fermi energy. (orig.)

  2. Suppression of mutagenesis by Rad51D-mediated homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinz, J M; Tebbs, R S; Wilson, P F; Nham, P B; Salazar, E P; Nagasawa, H; Urbin, S S; Thompson, L H

    2005-11-15

    Homologous recombinational repair (HRR) restores chromatid breaks arising during DNA replication and prevents chromosomal rearrangements that can occur from the misrepair of such breaks. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs are identified that contribute in a nonessential but critical manner to HRR efficiency. We constructed and characterized a Rad51D knockout cell line in widely studied CHO cells. The rad51d mutant (51D1) displays sensitivity to a wide spectrum of induced DNA damage, indicating the broad relevance of HRR to genotoxicity. Untreated 51D1 cells exhibit {approx}5-fold elevated chromosomal breaks, a 12-fold increased rate of hprt mutation, and 4- to 10-fold increased rates of gene amplification at the dhfr and CAD loci, respectively. These results explicitly show the quantitative importance of HHR in preventing these types genetic alterations, which are associated with carcinogenesis. Thus, HRR copes in an error-free manner with spontaneous DNA damage encountered during DNA replication, and Rad51D is essential for this fidelity.

  3. Inhibition of corneal neovascularization by recombinant adenovirus-mediated sFlk-1 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (Flt-1, Flk-1/KDR) is correlated with neovascularization in the eyes. Therefore, blocking the binding of VEGF and the corresponding receptor has become critical for inhibiting corneal neovascularization. In this study, we have expressed the cDNA for sFlk-1 under the control of cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (CMV) from an E1/partial E3 deleted replication defective recombinant adenovirus, and Ad.sflk-1 expression was determined by Western blotting. We have shown that conditioned media from Ad.sflk-1-infected ARPE-19 cells significantly reduced VEGF-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and murine endothelial cells (SVEC) proliferation in vitro compared with the control vector. In vivo, adenoviral vectors expressing green fluorescent protein alone (Ad.GFP) were utilized to monitor gene transfer to the cornea. Moreover, in the models of corneal neovascularization, the injection of Ad.sflk-1 (108 PFU) into the anterior chamber could significantly inhibit angiogenic changes compared with Ad.null-injected and vehicle-injected models. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that corneal endothelial cells and corneal stroma of cauterized rat eyes were efficiently transduced and expressed sFlk-1. These results not only support that adenoviral vectors are capable of high-level transgene expression but also demonstrate that Ad.sflk-1 gene therapy might be a feasible approach for inhibiting the development of corneal neovascularization

  4. Interethnic polymorphism of EWS intron 6: genome plasticity mediated by Alu retroposition and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucman-Rossi, J; Batzer, M A; Stoneking, M; Delattre, O; Thomas, G

    1997-03-01

    The EWS gene has been identified as being systematically translocated in Ewing's sarcoma. In order to ascertain the basis of a marked interethnic difference in the incidence of Ewing's sarcoma, intron 6 of EWS, which is located near the translocation breakpoint region (EWSR1), was characterized. Sequence analysis of the entire intron 6 region revealed a very high density of Alu elements. Most of these Alu sequences could be classified in previously described subfamilies, facilitating delineation of an evolutionary model that involves successive retroposition events. According to this model, the EWS intron 6 region progressively expanded until about 5 million years ago. More recently (10(5) years ago), in part of the human population, the size of this region decreased by over 50% as the result of a homeologous recombination between two Alu sequences, which removed 2480 bp. This rare allele has only been observed in individuals of African origin, a population that is characterized by the lowest incidence of Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:9050923

  5. Current Challenges and Future Directions in Recombinant AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin'ichi Takeda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Various characteristics of adeno-associated virus (AAV-based vectors with long-term safe expression have made it an exciting transduction tool for clinical gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Although host immune reactions against the vector as well as transgene products were detected in some instances of the clinical studies, there have been promising observations. Methods of producing AAV vectors for considerable in vivo experimentation and clinical investigations have been developed and a number of studies with AAV vector-mediated muscle transduction were attempted. Notably, an intravenous limb perfusion transduction technique enables extensive transgene expression in the skeletal muscles without noticeable adverse events. Furthermore, cardiac transduction by the rAAV9-microdystrophin would be promising to prevent development of cardiac dysfunction. Recent achievements in transduction technology suggest that long-term transgene expression with therapeutic benefits in DMD treatment would be achieved by the rAAV-mediated transduction strategy with an adequate regimen to regulate host immune response.

  6. A high-throughput screen identifying sequence and promiscuity characteristics of the loxP spacer region in Cre-mediated recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Robert A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cre-loxP recombination refers to the process of site-specific recombination mediated by two loxP sequences and the Cre recombinase protein. Transgenic experiments exploit integrative recombination, where a donor plasmid carrying a loxP site and DNA of interest integrate into a recipient loxP site in a target genome. Unfortunately, integrative recombination is highly inefficient because the insert is flanked by two loxP sites, which themselves become targets for Cre and lead to subsequent excision of the insert. A small number of mutations have been discovered in parts of the loxP sequence, specifically the spacer and inverted repeat segments, that increase the efficiency of integrative recombination. In this study we introduce a high-throughput in vitro assay to rapidly detect novel loxP spacer mutants and describe the sequence characteristics of successful recombinants. Results We created synthetic loxP oligonucleotides that contained a combination of inverted repeat mutations (the lox66 and lox71 mutations and mutant spacer sequences, degenerate at 6 of the 8 positions. After in vitro Cre recombination, 3,124 recombinant clones were identified by sequencing. Included in this set were 31 unique, novel, self-recombining sequences. Using network visualization tools, we recognized 12 spacer sets with restricted promiscuity. We observed that increased guanine content at all spacer positions save for position 8 resulted in increased recombination. Interestingly, recombination between identical spacers was not preferred over non-identical spacers. We also identified a set of 16 pairs of loxP spacers that reacted at least twice with another spacer, but not themselves. Further, neither the wild-type P1 phage loxP sequence nor any of the known loxP spacer mutants appeared to be kinetically favoured by Cre recombinase. Conclusion This study approached loxP spacer mutant screening in an unbiased manner, assuming nothing about candidate loxP sites save for the conserved 4 and 5 spacer positions. Candidate sites were free to recombine with any other sequence in the pool of all possible sites. The subset of loxP sites identified here are candidates for in vivo serial recombination as they have already demonstrated limited promiscuity with other loxP spacer and stability in the presence of Cre.

  7. Peptide nucleic acid-mediated recombination for targeted genomic repair and modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifman, Erica B; Glazer, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    The ability to directly manipulate the human genome to correct a disease-related mutation, introduce a sequence change that would lead to site-specific gene knockout, or increase gene expression is a very powerful tool with tremendous clinical value. Triplex formation by synthetic DNA-binding molecules such as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) has been studied for over 20 years and much of the work in the last 10 years has shown its great promise in its use to direct site-specific gene modification for the use in gene therapy. In this chapter, detailed protocols are described for the design and use of triplex-forming PNAs to bind and mediate gene modification at specific chromosomal targets. Target site identification, PNA and donor oligonucleotide design, in vitro characterization of binding, optimization with reporter systems, as well as various methods to assess gene modification and isolate modified cells are described. PMID:24297362

  8. Human RPA (hSSB) interacts with EBNA1, the latent origin binding protein of Epstein-Barr virus.

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, D; Frappier, L.; Gibbs, E; Hurwitz, J; O'Donnell, M

    1998-01-01

    RPA is the replicative single-strand DNA (ssDNA) binding protein of eukaryotic chromosomes. This report shows that human RPA interacts with EBNA1, the latent origin binding protein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). RPA binds to EBNA1 both in solution, and when EBNA1 is bound to the EBV origin. RPA is a heterotrimer, and the main contact with EBNA1 is formed through the 70 kDa subunit of RPA, the subunit which binds to ssDNA. We propose that this interaction between RPA and EBNA1 is an early step i...

  9. Imaging of human sodium-iodide symporter gene expression mediated by recombinant adenovirus in skeletal muscle of living rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of recombinant adenovirus-mediated human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression by 99mTcO4- scintigraphy in skeletal muscle of rats. Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus encoding hNIS gene [Rad-CMV-hNIS 5 x 107, 2 x 108 or 1 x 109 plaque forming units (pfu)] or ?-galactosidase gene (Rad-CMV-LacZ 1 x 109 pfu) was injected into the right biceps femoris muscle of rats (n=5-6 for each group). Three days after gene transfer, scintigraphy was performed using a gamma camera 30 min after injection of 99mTcO4- (1.85 MBq). An additional two rats injected with 1 x 109 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS underwent 99mTcO4- scintigraphy with sodium perchlorate. After the imaging studies, rats were sacrificed for assessment of the biodistribution of 99mTcO4- and measurement of hNIS mRNA expression. In all the rats injected with 1 x 109 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS, hNIS expression was successfully imaged by 99mTcO4- scintigraphy, while rats injected with Rad-CMV-LacZ or lower doses of Rad-CMV-hNIS failed to show uptake. The biodistribution studies indicated that a significantly different amount of 99mTcO4- was retained in the liver (p9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS. The muscular hNIS mRNA level quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was significantly higher in rats injected with 1 x 109 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS (p9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS were specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. This study illustrated that 99mTcO4- scintigraphy can monitor Rad-CMV-hNIS-mediated gene expression in skeletal muscle of rats, non-invasively and quantitatively. (orig.)

  10. Protective immunity to Listeria monocytogenes infection mediated by recombinant Listeria innocua harboring the VGC locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Walid; Sethi, Shneh; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Darji, Ayub; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2012-01-01

    In this study we propose a novel bacterial vaccine strategy where non-pathogenic bacteria are complemented with traits desirable for the induction of protective immunity. To illustrate the proof of principle of this novel vaccination strategy, we use the model organism of intracellular immunity Listeria. We introduced a, low copy number BAC-plasmid harbouring the virulence gene cluster (vgc) of L. monocytogenes (Lm) into the non-pathogenic L. innocua (L.inn) strain and examined for its ability to induce protective cellular immunity. The resulting strain (L.inn::vgc) was attenuated for virulence in vivo and showed a strongly reduced host detrimental inflammatory response compared to Lm. Like Lm, L.inn::vgc induced the production of Type I Interferon's and protection was mediated by Listeria-specific CD8(+) T cells. Rational vaccine design whereby avirulent strains are equipped with the capabilities to induce protection but lack detrimental inflammatory effects offer great promise towards future studies using non-pathogenic bacteria as vectors for vaccination. PMID:22536395

  11. Targeted Integration of Single-Copy Transgenes in Drosophila melanogaster Tissue-Culture Cells Using Recombination-Mediated Cassette Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Sathiya N; Jacobsen, Thomas L; Lyon, Peter; Selvaraj, Bhavani; Halpin, Peter; Simcox, Amanda

    2015-12-01

    Transfection of transgenes into Drosophila cultured cells is a standard approach for studying gene function. However, the number of transgenes present in the cell following transient transfection or stable random integration varies, and the resulting differences in expression level affect interpretation. Here we developed a system for Drosophila cell lines that allows selection of cells with a single-copy transgene inserted at a specific genomic site using recombination-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). We used the ?C31 integrase and its target sites attP and attB for RMCE. Cell lines with an attP-flanked genomic cassette were transfected with donor plasmids containing a transgene of interest (UAS-x), a dihydrofolate reductase (UAS-DHFR) gene flanked by attB sequences, and a thymidine kinase (UAS-TK) gene in the plasmid backbone outside the attB sequences. In cells undergoing RMCE, UAS-x and UAS-DHFR were exchanged for the attP-flanked genomic cassette, and UAS-TK was excluded. These cells were selected using methotrexate, which requires DHFR expression, and ganciclovir, which causes death in cells expressing TK. Pure populations of cells with one copy of a stably integrated transgene were efficiently selected by cloning or mass culture in ?6 weeks. Our results show that RMCE avoids the problems associated with current methods, where transgene number is not controlled, and facilitates the rapid generation of Drosophila cell lines in which expression from a single transgene can be studied. PMID:26500255

  12. Characterization of Fabry mice treated with recombinant adeno-associated virus 2/8-mediated gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Jin-Ok

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with ?-galactosidase A (?-Gal A is currently the most effective therapeutic strategy for patients with Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disease. However, ERT has limitations of a short half-life, requirement for frequent administration, and limited efficacy for patients with renal failure. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector-mediated gene therapy for a Fabry disease mouse model and compared it with that of ERT. Methods A pseudotyped rAAV2/8 vector encoding ?-Gal A cDNA (rAAV2/8-hAGA was prepared and injected into 18-week-old male Fabry mice through the tail vein. The ?-Gal A expression level and globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 levels in the Fabry mice were examined and compared with Fabry mice with ERT. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies were conducted. Results Treatment of Fabry mice with rAAV2/8-hAGA resulted in the clearance of accumulated Gb3 in tissues such as liver, spleen, kidney, heart, and brain with concomitant elevation of ?-Gal A enzyme activity. Enzyme activity was elevated for up to 60 weeks. In addition, expression of the ?-Gal A protein was identified in the presence of rAAV2/8-hAGA at 6, 12, and 24 weeks after treatment. ?-Gal A activity was significantly higher in the mice treated with rAAV2/8-hAGA than in Fabry mice that received ERT. Along with higher ?-Gal A activity in the kidney of the Fabry mice treated with gene therapy, immunohistochemical studies showed more ?-Gal A expression in the proximal tubules and glomerulus, and less Gb3 deposition in Fabry mice treated with this gene therapy than in mice given ERT. The ?-gal A gene transfer significantly reduced the accumulation of Gb3 in the tubules and podocytes of the kidney. Electron microscopic analysis of the kidneys of Fabry mice also showed that gene therapy was more effective than ERT. Conclusions The rAAV2/8-hAGA mediated ?-Gal A gene therapy provided improved efficiency over ERT in the Fabry disease mouse model. Furthermore, rAAV2/8-hAGA-mediated expression showed a greater effect in the kidney than ERT.

  13. Extended minus-strand DNA as template for R-U5-mediated second-strand transfer in recombinational rescue of primer binding site-modified retroviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Dybkaer, K; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated recombinational rescue of primer binding site (PBS)-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based vectors involving initial priming on endogenous viral sequences and template switching during cDNA synthesis to obtain PBS complementarity in second-strand transfer of...... mutated PBS during minus-strand synthesis, and subsequent second-strand transfer mediated by the R-U5 complementarity of the plus strand and the extended minus-strand DNA acceptor template. Mechanisms for R-U5-mediated second-strand transfer and its possible role in retrovirus replication and evolution...

  14. Escherichia coli MW005: lambda Red-mediated recombineering and copy-number induction of oriV-equipped constructs in a single host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope Ian A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli strain EL350 contains chromosomally integrated phage lambda Red recombinase genes enabling this strain to be used for modifying the sequence of resident clones via recombineering. BAC and fosmid clones are highly suitable for modification by recombineering but, because they are present at low (1-2 copies per cell, the DNA is difficult to isolate in high yield and purity. To overcome this limitation vectors, e.g. pCC1FOS, have been constructed that contain the additional replication origin, oriV, which permits copy-number to be induced transiently when propagated in a suitable host strain, e.g. EPI300, that supplies the cognate trans-replication protein TrfA. Previously, we used EL350 and EPI300 sequentially to recombineer oriV-equipped fosmid genomic clones and, subsequently, to induce copy-number of the resulting recombinant clone. To eliminate these intervening DNA isolation and transformation steps we retrofitted EL350 with a PBAD-driven trfA gene generating strain MW005 that supports, independently, both recombineering and copy-number induction. Results The PBAD-driven copy of cre in EL350 was replaced seamlessly with a copy of trfA, PCR-amplified from EPI300 chromosomal DNA, to generate MW005. This new strain has been used to both generate, via recombineering, a number of reporter gene fusions directly from pCC1FOS-based Caenorhabditis elegans genomic clones and to transiently induce copy-number of fosmid and BAC clones prior to DNA preparation. Conclusions By retrofitting EL350, an established 'recombineering' E. coli strain, with a tightly regulated copy of trfA we have produced a new strain, MW005, which combines recombineering capacity with the useful ability to transiently induce copy-number of oriV-equipped clones. By coupling these two steps in a single strain, use of MW005 will enable the more rapid recombineering-mediated production of recombinant clones in the yield and quality necessary for many downstream purposes.

  15. Use of Recombination-Mediated Genetic Engineering for Construction of Rescue Human Cytomegalovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulal, Kalpana; Silver, Benjamin; Zhu, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning. PMID:22500089

  16. Radiation protection authorized persons (RPA) in Germany; Der Strahlenschutzbevollmaechtigte in Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahre, P.; Beutmann, A.; Lorenz, J. [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany); Leder, F. [Saechsisches Staatsministerium fuer Umwelt und Landwirtschaft, Dresden (Germany); Philipp, T. [Saechsisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt, Landwirtschaft und Geologie, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The radiation protection authorized person (RPA) is playing an important role in the fields of organization, realization and checking the radiation protection in Germany, first of all in big institutions like research centers, facilities and medical centers. The paper deals with the legal status of the RPA especially the clear dividing line between his tasks and the tasks of the radiation protection supervisor and the radiation protection commissioner. The paper shows that the embodiment of the RPA in the radiation protection law has advantages also in coordinating the tasks of radiation protection officer and radiation protection expert recommended by the European Union. (orig.)

  17. In vitro and in vivo activities of recombinant anthrax protective antigen co-expressed with thioredoxin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Zhu, Yu-Feng; Xu, Qing; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-11-01

    Because of the central role it plays in the formation of lethal toxin and edema toxin, protective antigen (PA) is the principal target for the development of vaccines against anthrax. In the present study, we explored and compared the in vitro and in vivo activities of recombinant anthrax protective antigen (rPA) and receptor binding domain of protective antigen (PA4). As a result, the fully soluble rPA and PA4 proteins were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli by co-expression with thioredoxin (Trx), and the rPA was active in forming cytotoxic lethal toxins, indicating that the rPA protein retains a functionally biological activity. Furthermore, immunization with rPA protein induced stronger PA-specific immune responses in mice than PA4 protein. The protection elicited by immunization with PA4 suggests the presence of common neutralizing epitopes between rPA and PA4, but the immunization with rPA protein induced stronger neutralizing antibodies and protective levels against challenge with the B. anthracis strain A16R than the PA4 protein. The sera neutralizing antibodies titers correlated well with anti-PA group ELISA antibodies titers and the in vivo protective potency. Based on the results of cell cytotoxicity assays and the observed immune responses and protective potency, we concluded that the soluble rPA protein retains the in vitro and in vivo functionally biological activity and can be developed into a highly effective human subunit vaccine candidate against anthrax. PMID:23880942

  18. Evaluation of the effect of RFCA in patients with WPW syndrome using RPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whether radionuclide phase analysis (RPA) could evaluate the effect of radiofrequency current ablation (RFCA) in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome was evaluated. 18 patients with WPW syndrome were studied using RPA pre- and post-RFCA. RPA identified the sites of pre-excitation in all patients before RFCA. Compared with the pre-RFCA study, the sites of pre-excitation disappeared in 12 cases, disappeared gradually in 4 cases and unchanged in 2 cases. 50 RFCA was successful in the former two patterns, but failed in the last pattern. RPA can evaluate the changes of pre-excitation sites in patients with WPW syndrome before and after RFCA. It was a noninvasive and reliable method for assessing and monitoring the effect of RFCA in patients with WPW syndrome

  19. IS2-mediated re-arrangement of the promoter sequence supresses metabolic burden of the recombinant plasmid.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valešová, Renata; Št?pánek, Václav; Ve?erek, Branislav; Kyslík, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Ro?. 50, ?. 4 (2005), s. 275-282. ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : is2 * recombinant plasmid * escherichia coli Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2005

  20. Inhibition of highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication by recombinant pseudorabies virus-mediated RNA interference in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Su-Fang; Guo, Qing-Yong; Wang, Yan

    2015-12-31

    Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) is a variant of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) which, in recent years, has caused heavy economic losses to swine-producing areas. Although current vaccines are somewhat prophylactic, they provide only limited protection. Furthermore, there are currently no effective anti-HP-PRRSV drugs. Consequently, it is necessary to develop novel antiviral strategies. In the present study, three recombinant pseudorabies viruses (PRV) expressing siRNAs against the ORF7 of HP-PRRSV strain HN1 (PRV gG-/siRNAN1, PRV gG-/siRNAN2, and PRV gG-/siRNAN3) were evaluated for the inhibition of HP-PRRSV replication. The results indicated that recombinant PRV-mediated siRNA could significantly decrease the replication of traditional PRRSV strain H1 at mRNA and protein levels in Marc-145 cells. Moreover, one recombinant PRV (PRV gG-/siRNAN2) was found to be inhibit the multiplication of HP-PRRSV strain HN1 effectively in Marc-145 cells at both the protein and ORF7 mRNA level. Twenty 21-day-old healthy weaned piglets were divided into four groups of five piglets each. Groups 1 and 2 were injected i.m. with PRV gG-/siRNAN2 and PRV gG-/siRNANeg individually. The piglets in group 3 were challenged with the HP-PRRSV control. After 24h, the piglets in groups 1-3 were challenged i.m. with HP-PRRSV strain HN1, while those in group 4 were i.m. administered with PBS as a negative control. The results showed that HP-PRRSV in serum and lung samples from piglets was effectively inhibited by PRV gG-/siRNAN2. The clinical signs and gross lesions of piglets inoculated with PRV gG-/siRNAN2 were significantly less invasive than those of the PRV gG-/siRNANeg group and HP-PRRSV control group. These results showed that siRNAs mediated by recombinant PRV could effectively suppress HP-PRRSV replication in vitro as well as in vivo. RNAi mediated by recombinant PRV presents a potential novel method to prevent HP-PRRSV infections in swine. However, the protective efficiency of PRV gG-/siRNAN2 should be assessed in a larger number of piglets in future studies. PMID:26560709

  1. Cultured mast cells from asthmatic patients and controls respond with similar sensitivity to recombinant Der P2 induced, IgE-mediated activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Inge Jacoba Maria Kortekaas; Sverrild, Asger; Lund, Gitte; Dahl, Ronald; Erjefält, Jonas S; Backer, Vibeke; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The function of cultured mast cells may depend on genetic or environmental influence on the stem cell donor. This study investigates whether asthma or atopy in the donor influenced the growth and sensitivity of mast cells cultured from asthma patients and healthy controls under identical conditions...... allergen Der p2. The sensitivity of IgE-mediated activation of mast cells was investigated as Fc?RI-mediated up-regulation of CD63. Ten subjects were atopic, defined as a positive skin prick test (>3 mm) to at least one of ten common allergens. After activation with recombinant Der p2, the maximum CD63...... appears to depend on culture conditions (IL-4, IgE) rather than on donor status as atopy and asthma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  2. Assessment of toxicity and biodistribution of recombinant AAV8 vector–mediated immunomodulatory gene therapy in mice with Pompe disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gensheng; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; Hutt, Julie; Li, Songtao; Benson, Janet; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2014-01-01

    A preclinical safety study was conducted to evaluate the short- and long-term toxicity of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV2/8) vector that has been developed as an immune-modulatory adjunctive therapy to recombinant human acid ?-glucosidase (rhGAA, Myozyme) enzyme replacement treatment (ERT) for patients with Pompe disease (AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA). The AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA vector at 1.6?×?1013 vector particles/kg, after intravenous injection, did not cause significant short- or long...

  3. Sum-rules and Goldstone modes from extended RPA theories in Fermi systems with spontaneously broken symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Delion, D S; Tohyama, M

    2016-01-01

    The Self-Consistent RPA (SCRPA) approach is elaborated for cases with a continuously broken symmetry, this being the main focus of the present article. Correlations beyond standard RPA are summed up correcting for the quasi-boson approximation in standard RPA. Desirable properties of standard RPA such as fullfillment of energy weighted sum rule and appearance of Goldstone (zero) modes are kept. We show theoretically and, for a model case, numerically that, indeed, SCRPA maintains all properties of standard RPA for practically all situations of spontaneously broken symmetries. A simpler approximate form of SCRPA, the so-called renormalised RPA, also has these properties. The SCRPA equations are first outlined as an eigenvalue problem, but it is also shown how an equivalent many body Green's function approach can be formulated.

  4. Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes for the therapy of cervical carcinoma elicit humoral and cell-mediated responses in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacchioni Sole

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around half million new cases of cervical cancer arise each year, making the development of an effective therapeutic vaccine against HPV a high priority. As the E6 and E7 oncoproteins are expressed in all HPV-16 tumour cells, vaccines expressing these proteins might clear an already established tumour and support the treatment of HPV-related precancerous lesions. Methods Three different immunisation regimens were tested in a pre-clinical trial in rabbits to evaluate the humoral and cell-mediated responses of a putative HPV-16 vaccine. Fowlpoxvirus (FP recombinants separately expressing the HPV-16 E6 (FPE6 and E7 (FPE7 transgenes were used for priming, followed by E7 protein boosting. Results All of the protocols were effective in eliciting a high antibody response. This was also confirmed by interleukin-4 production, which increased after simultaneous priming with both FPE6 and FPE7 and after E7 protein boost. A cell-mediated immune response was also detected in most of the animals. Conclusion These results establish a preliminary profile for the therapy with the combined use of avipox recombinants, which may represent safer immunogens than vaccinia-based vectors in immuno-compromised individuals, as they express the transgenes in most mammalian cells in the absence of a productive replication.

  5. Stable transgene expression in rod photoreceptors after recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer to monkey retina

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Jean; Maguire, Albert M.; Cideciyan, Artur V; Schnell, Michael; Glover, Ernest; Anand, Vibha; Aleman, Tomas S.; Chirmule, Narendra; Gupta, Abha R; Huang, Yijun; Gao, Guang-Ping; Nyberg, William C.; Tazelaar, John; Hughes, Joseph; Wilson, James M

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is a promising vector for therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. We evaluated the efficiency, cellular specificity, and safety of retinal cell transduction in nonhuman primates after subretinal delivery of an rAAV carrying a cDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (EGFP), rAAV.CMV.EGFP. The treatment results in efficient and stable EGFP expression lasting >1 year. Transgene expression in the neural retina is limited exclusively to rod photoreceptor...

  6. TRESK gene recombinant adenovirus vector inhibits capsaicin-mediated substance P release from cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    OpenAIRE

    zhou, Jun; YAO, SHANG-LONG; YANG, CHENG-XIANG; ZHONG, JI-YING; WANG, HAN-BING; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether the activation of TRESK in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by the TRESK gene recombinant adenovirus vector inhibits the capsaicin-evoked substance P (SP) release using a radioimmunoassay. TRESK is an outwardly rectifying K+ current channel that contributes to the resting potential and is the most important background potassium channel in DRG. Previous studies have shown that neuropathic pain (NP) is closely related to the regulation of certa...

  7. Use of Aspirin in normalization of recombinant human erythropoietin-mediated hyper-reactivity of platelets in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hitesh M Soni; Vekaria, Amit M.; Rath, Akshyaya C.; Sateesh Belemkar; Mukul R Jain

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The cytokine erythropoietin is the primary stimulator of erythropoiesis and recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO), which is widely used in the treatment of anemia associated with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Adverse cardiovascular outcomes have been observed during clinical trials of anemia correction with rHuEPO in CKD patients. We investigated the effects of short-term, high-dose treatment with rHuEPO on platelet reactivity and effects of aspirin on platelet reacti...

  8. Engineering neonatal Fc receptor-mediated recycling and transcytosis in recombinant proteins by short terminal peptide extensions

    OpenAIRE

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T.; Tiffany, Matthew R.; Szoka, Francis C

    2012-01-01

    The importance of therapeutic recombinant proteins in medicine has led to a variety of tactics to increase their circulation time or to enable routes of administration other than injection. One clinically successful tactic to improve both protein circulation and delivery is to fuse the Fc domain of IgG to therapeutic proteins so that the resulting fusion proteins interact with the human neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). As an alternative to grafting the high molecular weight Fc domain to therapeut...

  9. Eri silkworm (Samia ricini), a non-mulberry host system for AcMNPV mediated expression of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Madhusudan; Basagoudanavar, Suresh H; Sreenivasa, B P; Inumaru, Shigeki; Ballal, Chandish R; Venkataramanan, Ramamurthy

    2015-12-20

    The baculovirus expression system (BVES) based on Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is widely used for the expression of eukaryotic proteins. Several insect cells/larvae that are permissive to AcMNPV have been routinely used as hosts to express heterologous proteins. Domesticated Eri silkworm (Samia ricini), reared in many parts of India, Japan and China, is a non-mulberry silkworm. The present study shows that the Eri silkworm larvae are susceptible to intra-haemocoelical inoculation of AcMNPV. The virus replicates in the larva, as indicated by an increased viral loads in the haemolymph upon injection of a recombinant AcMNPV carrying green fluorescent protein gene. The virus showed localized replication in different tissues including the fat body, haemocytes, tracheal matrix and in the Malphigian tubules. The larval system was successfully used to express heterologous protein, by infecting with a recombinant AcMNPV carrying the 3ABC coding sequence of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). The study shows that the Eri silkworm larva can be a potential alternative bioreactor, for scaling up of the recombinant proteins employing the baculovirus system. PMID:26467714

  10. Adeno-associated-virus-mediated transduction of the mammary gland enables sustained production of recombinant proteins in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Stefan; Thresher, Rosemary; Bland, Ross; Laible, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Biopharming for the production of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in the mammary gland of transgenic animals is an attractive but laborious alternative compared to mammalian cell fermentation. The disadvantage of the lengthy process of genetically modifying an entire animal could be circumvented with somatic transduction of only the mammary epithelium with recombinant, replication-defective viruses. While other viral vectors offer very limited scope for this approach, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) appear to be ideal candidates because AAV is helper-dependent, does not induce a strong immune response and has no association with disease. Here, we sought to test the suitability of recombinant AAV (rAAV) for biopharming. Using reporter genes, we showed that injected rAAV efficiently transduced mouse mammary cells. When rAAV encoding human myelin basic protein (hMBP) was injected into the mammary glands of mice and rabbits, this resulted in the expression of readily detectable protein levels of up to 0.5 g/L in the milk. Furthermore we demonstrated that production of hMBP persisted over extended periods and that protein expression could be renewed in a subsequent lactation by re-injection of rAAV into a previously injected mouse gland. PMID:26463440

  11. RPA classification has prognostic significance for surgically resected single brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate prognostic factors that correlate with overall survival among patients with a surgically resected single brain metastasis. Methods and Materials: An Institutional Review Board-approved database of Cleveland Clinic Brain Tumor Institute was queried for patients with a single brain metastasis treated by surgical resection between February 1984 and January 2004. The primary endpoint was overall survival from the date of surgery by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 271 patients were included. Statistically significant variables for improved survival on multivariate analysis included age <65 years, lack of extracranial metastases, control of primary tumor, histology (non-small-cell lung carcinoma), and use of stereotactic radiosurgery. The median survival for all patients was 10.2 months. Survival of patients in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 1 was better (21.4 months) than those in RPA class 2 (9.0 months, p < 0.001), RPA class 3 (8.9 months, p = 0.15), or the combined group of RPA classes 2 and 3 (9.0 months, p < 0.001). Patients had a median survival of 10.6 months after documented gross total resection and 8.7 months after subtotal resection, which approached statistical significance (p 0.07). Those who were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery had a median survival of 17.1 months, which was greater than patients who were not treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (8.9 months, p = 0.006). Conclusions: This analysis supports the prognostic significance of the RPA classification in patients with a single brain metastasis who undergo surgical resection and adjuvant therapy. RPA class 1 patients have a very favorable prognosis with a median survival of 21.4 months

  12. A complex integration technique to remove spurious states associated with spontaneously broken symmetries in RPA calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of the spurious states associated with the violation of rotational and gauge invariance by mean field approximation from the RPA solutions describing the low-energy spectrum of nuclei is a notoriously difficult task, in particular in a rotating frame. A novel, numerically accurate yet technically simple method to accomplish this aim has been developed based on linear response theory. The results of calculations carried out for the deformed, superfluid, rotating nucleus 168Yb testify to the power of the technique, the associated solutions respecting the variety of sum rules required to be fulfilled by the RPA solutions because of conservation laws

  13. [Production of l-ephedrine and d-pseudoephedrine in recombined yeasts obtained by argon ion implantation mediated Ephedra genome DNA transformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Pei-Hong; Ma, Xiang-Dong; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Hong-Mei; Lou, Kai

    2007-10-01

    The genome DNA from Ephedra glauca was randomly transferred into Hansenula anomala, respectively, by argon ion bombardment. Then, after screening by the motheds of bromothymol blue indicator selection, slant cultivation, l-ephedrine and d-pseudoephedrine copper chromic salt qualitative test and RP-HPLC determination, 3 strains, producing recombined yeasts were obtained, which can use glucose as a carbon source, NaNO3 as nitrogen source and be genetically stable. After cultivated in liquid medium for 72 hours and analyzed by the RP-HPLC, the recombined strains can produce l-ephedrine 11.87 mg/L and d-pseudoephedrine 4.11 mg/L excellular, d-pseudoephedrine 294.86 mg/g dry cell incellular, but l-ephedrine not detected incellular. The transformation efficiency of Ephedra genome DNA transferred into yeasts via argon ion bombardment was 0.65%. The effects of Ephedra genome DNA macromolecule integrity on yeast transformation system were discussed. The results shown that DNA macromolecule with integrated structure used as exogenous donor can obtain higher transformation efficiency than DNA macromolecule random fragments by ion implantation mediated DNA transformation. It was inferred that biosynthesis of l-ephedrine and the d-pseudoephedrin were controlled by linked together genes or gene clusters. PMID:18062271

  14. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  15. Characterization of transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis and cellular iron delivery of recombinant human serum transferrin from rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Deshui

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transferrin (TF plays a critical physiological role in cellular iron delivery via the transferrin receptor (TFR-mediated endocytosis pathway in nearly all eukaryotic organisms. Human serum TF (hTF is extensively used as an iron-delivery vehicle in various mammalian cell cultures for production of therapeutic proteins, and is also being explored for use as a drug carrier to treat a number of diseases by employing its unique TFR-mediated endocytosis pathway. With the increasing concerns over the risk of transmission of infectious pathogenic agents of human plasma-derived TF, recombinant hTF is preferred to use for these applications. Here, we carry out comparative studies of the TFR binding, TFR-mediated endocytosis and cellular iron delivery of recombinant hTF from rice (rhTF, and evaluate its suitability for biopharmaceutical applications. Result Through a TFR competition binding affinity assay with HeLa human cervic carcinoma cells (CCL-2 and Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells (HTB-37, we show that rhTF competes similarly as hTF to bind TFR, and both the TFR binding capacity and dissociation constant of rhTF are comparable to that of hTF. The endocytosis assay confirms that rhTF behaves similarly as hTF in the slow accumulation in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and the rapid recycling pathway in HeLa cells. The pulse-chase assay of rhTF in Caco-2 and HeLa cells further illustrates that rice-derived rhTF possesses the similar endocytosis and intracellular processing compared to hTF. The cell culture assays show that rhTF is functionally similar to hTF in the delivery of iron to two diverse mammalian cell lines, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells (CCL-240 and murine hybridoma cells derived from a Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma fusion partner (HB-72, for supporting their proliferation, differentiation, and physiological function of antibody production. Conclusion The functional similarity between rice derived rhTF and native hTF in their cellular iron delivery, TFR binding, and TFR-mediated endocytosis and intracellular processing support that rice-derived rhTF can be used as a safe and animal-free alternative to serum hTF for bioprocessing and biopharmaceutical applications.

  16. Cultured mast cells from patients with asthma and controls respond with similar sensitivity to recombinant Der p2-induced, IgE-mediated activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, I K; Sverrild, A

    2013-01-01

    The function of cultured mast cells may depend on genetic or environmental influence on the stem cell donor. This study investigates whether asthma or atopy in the donor influenced the growth and sensitivity of mast cells cultured from patients with asthma and healthy controls under identical conditions. Mast cells were cultured from peripheral blood from twelve patients with an objectively confirmed asthma diagnosis and eight healthy subjects. During the last 2 weeks of culture, mast cells were incubated with IL-4 and 80 kU/l recombinant human IgE containing two clones (7% + 7%) specific for mite allergen Der p2. The sensitivity of IgE-mediated activation of mast cells was investigated as Fc?RI-mediated upregulation of CD63. Ten subjects were atopic, defined as a positive skin prick test (>3 mm) to at least one of ten common allergens. After activation with recombinant Der p2, the maximum CD63 median fluorescence intensity was 20 456 ± 1640 (SE) for patients with asthma and 22,275 ± 1971 (SE) for controls (ns). The fraction of CD63 positive cells was 54.4% in patients with asthma and 48.4% in controls (ns). The allergen concentration inducing 50% of the maximal CD63 response was similar in patients with asthma [-0.4795 log ng/ml ± 0.092 (SE)] and controls (-0.6351 log ng/ml ± 0.083, ns) and in atopic and non-atopic subjects. When cultured, sensitized and activated under identical conditions, mast cells from allergic asthmatics and healthy controls respond similar. Activation of cultured mast cells appears to depend on culture conditions (IL-4, IgE) rather than on donor status as atopy and asthma.

  17. Experimental study on the effects of recombinant adenoviral-mediated mI?B? gene combined with irradiation on the treatment of hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the effect of recombinant adenovirus vector mediated mutant I?B? (mI?B?) combined with radiation on the hepatocarcinoma. Methods: Limited dilution method was used to test the virus titer in 293 cells. The HCC9204 cells were infected with MOI 10,20,30 and 50 for 48 h, respectively. The expression of p65 and mI?B? protein was analyzed by Western blot. Transfected HCC9204 cells and controls were treated with 4 Gy ? rays. The inhibition rate of HCC9204 cells was examined by MTT. Rat models of HCC9204 was constructed. AdmI?B? plasmids were injected into tumor tissue and the tumors were administered with 6 Gy ? irradiation 48 hours later. Tumor growth at different time points was recorded during 28 days. Results: The titer of AdmI?B? is 1.252 x 109 pfu/ml. The expression of mI?B? protein was increased with titer of AdmI?B?, and p65 protein began to decrease when MOI was 10, and reached the lowest when MOI was 50, they were all dose-dependent. The proliferation of HCC9204 cell lines were suppressed, as was more significant combined with radiation, and the effect was in a viral dose-dependent manner. From days 7 to 28 after AdmI?B? gene and radiotherapy, the tumor growth was significantly slower than after irradiation or gene therapy alone. Conclusions: Recombinant adenoviral-mediated mI?B? gene, combined with irradiation, can increase the cell-killing effect. It is better than that of either one alone. (authors)

  18. G-quadruplex formation in telomeres enhances POT1/TPP1 protection against RPA binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sujay; Bandaria, Jigar N.; Qureshi, Mohammad H.; Yildiz, Ahmet; Balci, Hamza

    2014-01-01

    Human telomeres terminate with a single-stranded 3? G overhang, which can be recognized as a DNA damage site by replication protein A (RPA). The protection of telomeres (POT1)/POT1-interacting protein 1 (TPP1) heterodimer binds specifically to single-stranded telomeric DNA (ssTEL) and protects G overhangs against RPA binding. The G overhang spontaneously folds into various G-quadruplex (GQ) conformations. It remains unclear whether GQ formation affects the ability of POT1/TPP1 to compete against RPA to access ssTEL. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we showed that POT1 stably loads to a minimal DNA sequence adjacent to a folded GQ. At 150 mM K+, POT1 loading unfolds the antiparallel GQ, as the parallel conformation remains folded. POT1/TPP1 loading blocks RPA’s access to both folded and unfolded telomeres by two orders of magnitude. This protection is not observed at 150 mM Na+, in which ssTEL forms only a less-stable antiparallel GQ. These results suggest that GQ formation of telomeric overhangs may contribute to suppression of DNA damage signals. PMID:24516170

  19. Second RPA dynamics at finite temperature: time-evolutions of dynamical operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-evolutions of dynamical operators, in particular the generalized density matrix comprising both diagonal and off-diagonal elements, are investigated within the framework of second RPA dynamics at finite temperature. The calculation of the density matrix previously carried out through the appliance of the second RPA master equation by retaining only the slowly oscillating coupling terms is extended to include in the interaction Hamiltonian both the rapidly and slowly oscillating coupling terms. The extended second RPA master equation, thereby formulated without making use of the so-called resonant approximation, is analytically solved and a closed expression for the generalized density matrix is extracted. We provide illustrative examples of the generalized density matrix for various specific initial conditions. We turn particularly our attention to the Poisson distribution type of initial condition for which we deduce specifically a particular form of the density matrix from the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation for the coherent state representation. The relation of the Fokker-Planck equation to the second RPA master equation and its properties are briefly discussed. The oversight incurred in the time-evolution of operators by the resonant approximation is elucidated. The first and second moments of collective coordinates are also computed in relation to the expectation value of various dynamical operators involved in the extended master equation

  20. On the dynamics of polymer mixtures in solution using the RPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of polymer mixtures and copolymers in solution is investigated using the Random Phase Approximation (RPA). It is shown that the known results for the intermediate scattering functions are recovered in the Rouse limit only. If hydrodynamic interaction is not negligible, a discrepancy appears. This discrepancy can be observed by combining static and dynamic scattering experiments. (author). 10 refs

  1. Lyapunov stability and Poisson structure of the thermal TDHF and RPA equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal TDHF equation is analyzed in the Liouville representation of quantum mechanics, where the matrix elements of the single-particle (s.p.) density ? behave as classical dynamical variables. By introducing the Lie-Poisson bracket associated with the unitary group of the s.p. Hilbert space, we show that TDHF has a hamiltonian, but non-canonical, classical form. Within this Poisson structure, either the s.p. energy or the s.p. grand potential ?(?) act as a Hamilton function. The Lyapunov stability of both the TDHF and RPA equations around a HF state then follows, since the HF approximation for thermal equilibrium is determined by minimizing ?(?). The RPA matrix in the Liouville space is expressed as the product of the Poisson tensor with the HF stability matrix, interpreted as a metric tensor generated by the entropy. This factorization displays the roles of the energy and entropy terms arising from ?(?) in the RPA dynamics, and it helps to construct the RPA modes. Several extensions are considered

  2. Recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated transduction and optogenetic manipulation of cortical neurons in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Wienke; Jin, Lei; Maybeck, Vanessa; Meisenberg, Annika; Baumann, Arnd; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Genetically encoded light-sensitive proteins can be used to manipulate and observe cellular functions. According to different modes of action, these proteins are divided into actuators like the blue-light gated cation channel Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and detectors like the calcium sensor GCaMP. In order to optogenetically control and study the activity of rat primary cortical neurons, we established a transduction procedure using recombinant Adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) as gene-ferries. Thereby, we achieved high transduction rates of these neurons with ChR2. In ChR2 expressing neurons, action potentials could be repeatedly and precisely elicited with laser pulses and measured via patch clamp recording.

  3. Evaluation in mice of the capillary leak syndrome (CLS) mediated by the systemic administration of recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since a CLS with interstitial pulmonary edema has been the major toxicity of IL-2 administration in humans, the authors studied this CLS in mice by quantitating the IL-2 mediated, tissue extravasation (Ex) of intravenously injected 125I-bovine serum albumin (BSA). Mice received saline (HBSS) or 200,000 U of IL-2 intraperitoneally thrice daily from day 0-6 before tissues were counted. A permeability index (PI) was calculated by dividing the mean counts per minute (CPM) from tissues of treated mice by those from controls. In a representative experiment, increased BSA Ex was noted in the lungs of mice treated with IL-2 when compared with HBSS (6187 +/- 141 and 638 +/- 64 CPM +/- SEM, respectively; p2 < .001; PI = 9.7). Other tissues with increased BSA Ex included the liver, spleen, kidneys and mesenteric lymph nodes (PI = 6.7, 10.0, 6.3, 6.0, respectively). BSA Ex, which did not occur with the excipient control, was dependent upon the dose and the duration of IL-2. Serial lung weights showed dramatic increases in water weight induced by IL-2. Treatment of mice with radiation (500R), cyclophosphamide, or cortisone acetate significantly reduced IL-2 mediated BSA Ex. Thus, IL-2 induced a generalized CLS which is mediated directly or indirectly by cellular mechanisms

  4. Evaluation in mice of the capillary leak syndrome (CLS) mediated by the systemic administration of recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettinghausen, S.E.; Rosenstein, M.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1986-03-01

    Since a CLS with interstitial pulmonary edema has been the major toxicity of IL-2 administration in humans, the authors studied this CLS in mice by quantitating the IL-2 mediated, tissue extravasation (Ex) of intravenously injected /sup 125/I-bovine serum albumin (BSA). Mice received saline (HBSS) or 200,000 U of IL-2 intraperitoneally thrice daily from day 0-6 before tissues were counted. A permeability index (PI) was calculated by dividing the mean counts per minute (CPM) from tissues of treated mice by those from controls. In a representative experiment, increased BSA Ex was noted in the lungs of mice treated with IL-2 when compared with HBSS (6187 +/- 141 and 638 +/- 64 CPM +/- SEM, respectively; p2 < .001; PI = 9.7). Other tissues with increased BSA Ex included the liver, spleen, kidneys and mesenteric lymph nodes (PI = 6.7, 10.0, 6.3, 6.0, respectively). BSA Ex, which did not occur with the excipient control, was dependent upon the dose and the duration of IL-2. Serial lung weights showed dramatic increases in water weight induced by IL-2. Treatment of mice with radiation (500R), cyclophosphamide, or cortisone acetate significantly reduced IL-2 mediated BSA Ex. Thus, IL-2 induced a generalized CLS which is mediated directly or indirectly by cellular mechanisms.

  5. Protection of erythrocytes from human complement-mediated lysis by membrane-targeted recombinant soluble CD59: a new approach to PNH therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anita; Ridley, Simon H; Esser, Dirk; Oldroyd, Rodney G; Cullen, Matthew J; Kareclas, Paula; Gallagher, Seán; Smith, Geoffrey P; Richards, Stephen J; White, Jennifer; Smith, Richard A G; Hillmen, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) results from the expansion of a hematopoietic clone that is deficient in glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored molecules. PNH is characterized by chronic hemolysis with acute exacerbations due to the uncontrolled activity of complement on PNH cells, which lack the inhibitor of homologous complement, CD59. Symptoms include severe fatigue, hemoglobinuria, esophageal spasm, erectile dysfunction, and thrombosis. We report the use of a novel synthetically modified recombinant human CD59, rhCD59-P, a soluble protein that attaches to cell membranes. In vitro treatment of PNH erythrocytes with rhCD59-P resulted in levels of CD59 equivalent to normal erythrocytes and effectively protected erythrocytes from complement-mediated hemolysis. The administration of rhCD59-P to CD1 mice resulted in levels of CD59 on erythrocytes, which protected them from complement-mediated lysis. Thus, rhCD59-P corrects the CD59 deficiency in vitro and can bind to erythrocytes in an in vivo murine model, protecting the cells from the activity of human complement, and represents a potential therapeutic strategy in PNH. PMID:16322479

  6. Targeted gene addition in human epithelial stem cells by zinc-finger nuclease-mediated homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccio, Andrea; Miselli, Francesca; Lombardo, Angelo; Marconi, Alessandra; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Gonçalves, Manuel A; Pincelli, Carlo; Maruggi, Giulietta; Del Rio, Marcela; Naldini, Luigi; Larcher, Fernando; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies showed that autologous transplantation of epidermis derived from genetically modified epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) leads to long-term correction of inherited skin adhesion defects. These studies were based on potentially genotoxic retroviral vectors. We developed an alternative gene transfer strategy aimed at targeting a "safe harbor" locus, the adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1), by zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-induced homologous recombination (HR). Delivery of AAVS1-specific ZFNs and a GFP-expressing HR cassette by integration-defective lentiviral (LV) vectors (IDLVs) or adenoviral (Ad) vectors resulted in targeted gene addition with an efficiency of > 20% in a human keratinocyte cell line, > 10% in immortalized keratinocytes, and integration. Skin equivalents derived from unselected keratinocyte cultures coinfected with a GFP-IDLV and a ZFN-Ad vector were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. GFP-positive clones were observed in all grafts up to 18 weeks post-transplantation. By histological and molecular analysis, we were able to demonstrate highly efficient targeting of the AAVS1 locus in human repopulating EpSCs. PMID:23760447

  7. The lactoferrin receptor may mediate the reduction of eosinophils in the duodenum of pigs consuming milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Caitlin; Nonnecke, Eric; Lönnerdal, Bo; Murray, James

    2014-10-01

    Lactoferrin is part of the immune system and multiple tissues including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, liver, and lung contain receptors for lactoferrin. Lactoferrin has many functions, including antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and iron binding. Additionally, lactoferrin inhibits the migration of eosinophils, which are constitutively present in the GI tract, and increase during inflammation. Lactoferrin suppresses eosinophil infiltration into the lungs and eosinophil migration in -vitro. Healthy pigs have a large population of eosinophils in their small intestine and like humans, pigs have small intestinal lactoferrin receptors (LFR); thus, pigs were chosen to investigate the effects of consumption of milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF-milk) on small intestinal eosinophils and expression of eosinophilic cytokines. In addition, LFR localization was analyzed in duodenum and circulating eosinophils to determine if the LFR could play a role in lactoferrin's ability to inhibit eosinophil migration. In the duodenum there were significantly fewer eosinophils/unit area in pigs fed rhLF-milk compared to pigs fed control milk (p = 0.025); this was not seen in the ileum (p = 0.669). In the duodenum, no differences were observed in expression of the LFR, or any eosinophil migratory cytokines, and the amount of LFR protein was not different (p = 0.386). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed that within the duodenum the LFR localized on the brush border of villi, crypts, and within the lamina propria. Circulating eosinophils also contained LFRs, which may be a mechanism allowing lactoferrin to directly inhibit eosinophil migration. PMID:25085595

  8. Inhibition of tumor growth in xenograft nude mice model by recombinant adenovirus-mediated human endostatin gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the expression efficiency of adenovirus-mediated human endostatin gene (Ad/hEndo) in vitro and in vivo, and to observe its inhibition of tumor growth in xenografted nude mice model. Methods: The expression efficiency of endostatin gene was examined during the infection of Ad/hEndo in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) CNE-2 cell and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304) by Western blot and ELISA. The effect on inhibition of growth of NPC CNE-2 xenografted tumors in Balb/c nude mice was observed after administration with Ad/hEndo. The serum endostatin levels were measured by ELISA, and intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) was analyzed. Results: Western blot and ELISA analysis demonstrated high level of endostatin expression in CNE2 and ECV304 cells infected with Ad/ hEndo. The highest concentration of endostatin in supernatant reached 588.34 ng/ml after 72 h of Ad/hEndo infection at a MOI of 20. Ad/hEndo significantly inhibited growth of xenografted CNE-2 (nasopharyngeal carcinoma) tumors with inhibition rate of 46.43% (Ad/ hEndo group versus Ad/LacZ group, t=2.226, P<0.05) and 49.70% (Ad/ hEndo group versus DMEM group, t=2.254, P<0.05), respectively. In the study group, serum levels of endostatin in treated group were much higher than that of control groups for 3- and 7- day term. The intratumoral MVD also decreased significantly in the treated tumors (9.95±2.20 versus 18.54±1.80, t=7.158, P< 0.05). Conclusion: Adenovirus-mediated human endostatin gene had obtained high level of expression in vitro and in vivo, and significantly inhibited the angiogenesis and growth of CNE-2 xenografted tumors in nude mice

  9. Self-Consistent Separable Rpa Approach for Skyrme Forces: Axial Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, V O; Kleinig, W; Kvasil, J; Reinhard, P G

    2005-01-01

    The self-consistent separable RPA (random phase approximation) method is formulated for Skyrme forces with pairing. The method is based on a general self-consistent procedure for factorization of the two-body interaction. It is relevant for various density- and current-dependent functionals. The contributions of the time-even and time-odd Skyrme terms as well as of the Coulomb and pairing terms to the residual interaction are taken self-consistently into account. Most of the expression have a transparent analytical form, which makes the method convenient for the treatment and analysis. The separable character of the residual interaction allows to avoid diagonalization of high-rank RPA matrices and thus to minimize the calculation effort. The previous studies have demonstrated high numerical accuracy and efficiency of the method for spherical nuclei. In this contribution, the method is specified for axial nuclei. We provide systematic and detailed presentation of formalism and discuss different aspects of the ...

  10. Recombinant AAV-mediated HSVtk gene transfer with direct intratumoral injections and Tet-On regulation for implanted human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV) gene therapy has been extensively studied in tumors and relies largely on the gene expression of HSVtk. Most studies, however, have failed to demonstrate any significant benefit of a controlled gene expression strategy in cancer treatment. The Tet-On system is commonly used to regulate gene expression following Dox induction. We have evaluated the antitumor effect of HSVtk/ganciclovir gene therapy under Tet-On regulation by means of adeno-associated virus-2 (AAV-2)-mediated HSVtk gene transfer with direct intratumoral injections in mice bearing breast cancer tumors. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-2 (rAAV) was constructed and transduced into MCF-7 cell line. GCV treatment to the rAAV infected MCF-7 cells was performed by MTT assay under the doxycycline (Dox) induction or without Dox induction at a vp (viral particle) number of ?104 /cell. The virus was administered intratumorally to nude mice that had also received GCV intraperitoneally. The antitumor effects were evaluated by measuring tumor regression and histological analysis. We have demonstrated that GCV treatment to the infected MCF-7 cells under the Dox induction was of more inhibited effects than those without Dox induction at ?104 vp/cell. In ex vivo experiments, tumor growth of BALB/C nude mice breast cancer was retarded after rAAV-2/HSVtk/Tet-On was injected into the tumors under the Dox induction. Infiltrating cells were also observed in tumors after Dox induction followed by GCV treatment and cells were profoundly damaged. The expression of HSVtk gene in MCF-7 cells and BALB/C nude mice tumors was up-regulated by Tet-On under Dox induction with reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis. The antitumor effect of rAAV-mediated HSVtk/GCV gene therapy under the Dox induction with direct intratumoral injections may be a useful treatment for breast cancer and other solid tumors

  11. The correlation energy functional within the GW-RPA approximation: exact forms, approximate forms and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2010-01-01

    In principle, the Luttinger-Ward Green's function formalism allows one to compute simultaneously the total energy and the quasiparticle band structure of a many-body electronic system from first principles. We present approximate and exact expressions for the correlation energy within the GW-RPA approximation that are more amenable to computation and allow for developing efficient approximations to the self-energy operator and correlation energy. The exact form is a sum over...

  12. Vibronic contributions to the n ? ? ? absorption band of cyclopentanone. An ab initio SCF-RPA calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, J. P.; Gervais, H. P.

    The SCF-RPA scheme is applied to the n ? ? ? absorption band of cyclopentanone in its ( C2) ground-state nuclear configuration. Using the Cederbaum-Domcke algorithm, the effects of the ( ?3) C=0 stretching, ( ?18) ring puckering and ( ?25) C=0 out-of-plane vibrations are investigated. The calculated spectrum shows both allowed and vibronic components, in agreement with the experimental observations of Howard-Lock and King.

  13. The Bogolubov Representation of the Polaron Model and Its Completely Integrable RPA-Approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polaron model in ionic crystal is studied in the N. Bogolubov representation using a special RPA-approximation. A new exactly solvable approximated polaron model is derived and described in detail. Its free energy at finite temperature is calculated analytically. The polaron free energy in the constant magnetic field at finite temperature is also discussed. Based on the structure of the N. Bogolubov unitary transformed polaron Hamiltonian a very important new result is stated: the full polaron model is exactly solvable. (author)

  14. The Bogolubov representation of the polaron model and its completely integrable RPA-approximation

    OpenAIRE

    N.N. Bogolubov (Jr.); Prykarpatsky, Ya. A.; A.A. Ghazaryan

    2010-01-01

    The polaron model in ionic crystal is studied in the Bogolubov representation using a special RPA-approximation. A new exactly solvable approximated polaron model is derived and described in detail. Its free energy at finite temperature is calculated analytically. The polaron free energy in the constant magnetic field at finite temperature is also discussed. Based on the structure of the Bogolubov unitary transformed polaron Hamiltonian there is stated a very important new result: the full po...

  15. Self-consistent quasi-particle RPA for the description of superfluid Fermi systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-Consistent Quasi-Particle RPA (SCQRPA) is for the first time applied to a more level pairing case. Various filling situation and values for the coupling constant are considered. Very encouraging results in comparison with the exact solution of the model are obtaining. The nature of the low lying mode in SCQRPA is identified. The strong reduction of the number fluctuation in SCQRPA vs BCS is pointed out. The transition from superfluidity to the normal fluid case is carefully investigated. (authors)

  16. The nature of excess electrons in anatase and rutile from hybrid DFT and RPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreafico, Clelia; VandeVondele, Joost

    2014-12-21

    The behavior of excess electrons in undoped and defect free bulk anatase and rutile TiO2 has been investigated by state-of-the-art electronic structure methods including hybrid density functional theory (DFT) and the random phase approximation (RPA). Consistent with experiment, charge trapping and polaron formation is observed in both anatase and rutile. The difference in the anisotropic shape of the polarons is characterized, confirming for anatase the large polaron picture. For anatase, where polaron formation energies are small, charge trapping is observed also with standard hybrid functionals, provided the simulation cell is sufficiently large (864 atoms) to accommodate the lattice relaxation. Even though hybrid orbitals are required as a starting point for RPA in this system, the obtained polaron formation energies are relatively insensitive to the amount of Hartree-Fock exchange employed. The difference in trapping energy between rutile and anatase can be obtained accurately with both hybrid functionals and RPA. Computed activation energies for polaron hopping and delocalization clearly show that anatase and rutile might have different charge transport mechanisms. In rutile, only hopping is likely, whereas in anatase hopping and delocalization are competing. Delocalization will result in conduction-band-like and thus enhanced transport. Anisotropic conduction, in agreement with experimental data, is observed, and results from the tendency to delocalize in the [001] direction in rutile and the (001) plane in anatase. For future work, our calculations serve as a benchmark and suggest RPA on top on hybrid orbitals (PBE0 with 30% Hartree-Fock exchange), as a suitable method to study the rich chemistry and physics of TiO2. PMID:25360624

  17. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated microRNA delivery into the postnatal mouse brain reveals a role for miR-134 in dendritogenesis in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Christensen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies using primary neuronal cultures have revealed important roles of the microRNA pathway in the regulation of neuronal development and morphology. For example, miR-134 is involved in dendritogenesis and spine development in hippocampal neurons by regulating local mRNA translation in dendrites. The in vivo roles of microRNAs in these processes are still uninvestigated, partly due to the lack of tools enabling stable in vivo delivery of microRNAs or microRNA inhibitors into neurons of the mammalian brain. Here we describe the construction and validation of a vector-based tool for stable delivery of microRNAs in vivo by use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV. rAAV-mediated overexpression of miR-134 in neurons of the postnatal mouse brain provided evidence for a negative role of miR-134 in dendritic arborization of cortical layer V pyramidal neurons in vivo, thereby confirming previous findings obtained with cultured neurons. Our system provides researchers with a unique tool to study the role of any candidate microRNA in vivo and can easily be adapted to microRNA loss-of-function studies. This platform should therefore greatly facilitate investigations on the role of microRNAs in synapse development, plasticity and behavior in vivo.

  18. Recombinant Kluyveromyces lactis expressing highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP5 elicits mucosal and cell-mediated immune responses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Yalan; Ma, Zhitao; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-01-01

    Currently, killed-virus and modified-live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccines are used to control porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome. However, both types of vaccines have inherent drawbacks; accordingly, the development of novel PRRSV vaccines is urgently needed. Previous studies have suggested that yeast possesses adjuvant activities, and it has been used as an expression vehicle to elicit immune responses to foreign antigens. In this report, recombinant Kluyveromyces lactis expressing GP5 of HP-PRRSV (Yeast-GP5) was generated and immune responses to this construct were analyzed in mice. Intestinal mucosal PRRSV-specific sIgA antibody and higher levels of IFN-? in spleen CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were induced by oral administration of Yeast-GP5. Additionally, Yeast-GP5 administered subcutaneously evoked vigorous cell-mediated immunity, and PRRSV-specific lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-? secretion were detected in the splenocytes of mice. These results suggest that Yeast-GP5 has the potential for use as a vaccine for PRRSV in the future. PMID:24378591

  19. Perfluorochemical (PFC liquid enhances recombinant adenovirus vector-mediated viral interleukin-10 (AdvIL-10 expression in rodent lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerman Jerry J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adenovirus and cationic liposome mediated transfer of Interleukin-10 (IL-10, a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, has been shown to decrease pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and overall lung inflammation in models of lung transplantation and injury. Limitations to current approaches of IL-10 gene therapy include poor vector delivery methods and pro-inflammatory properties of human IL-10 under certain conditions. We hypothesize that using perfluorochemical (PFC liquid to deliver the highly homologous viral IL-10 (vIL-10, which is predominantly anti-inflammatory with minimal pro-inflammatory activities, can potentially be a more effective strategy to combat inflammatory lung diseases. In this study, we compare the use of PFC liquid versus aerosolized method to deliver adenovirus encoding the vIL-10 gene (AdvIL-10 in C57Bl6 mice. Detectable vIL-10 levels were measured from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenates at one, four, ten and thirty days after AdvIL-10. Furthermore, we determined if use of PFC liquid could allow for the use of a lower dose of AdvIL-10 by comparing the levels of detectable vIL-10 at different doses of AdvIL-10 delivered +/- PFC liquid. Results showed that PFC liquid enhanced detectable vIL-10 by up to ten fold and that PFC liquid allowed the use of ten-fold less vector. PFC liquid increased detectable vIL-10 in lung homogenates at all time points; however, the increase in detectable vIL-10 in BAL fluid peaked at four days and was no longer evident by thirty days after intratracheal instillation. In summary, this is the first report utilizing PFC liquid to enhance the delivery of a potentially therapeutic molecule, vIL-10. We believe this strategy can be used to perform future studies on the use of the predominantly anti-inflammatory vIL-10 to treat inflammatory lung diseases.

  20. Benefits of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV)-Mediated Insulinlike Growth Factor I (IGF-I) Overexpression for the Long-Term Reconstruction of Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage by Modulation of the IGF-I Axis

    OpenAIRE

    Weimer, Anja; Madry, Henning; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K.; Schmitt, Gertrud; Frisch, Janina; Wezel, Anna; Jung, Jochen; Kohn, Dieter; Terwilliger, Ernest F.; TRIPPEL, STEPHEN B.; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    Administration of therapeutic genes to human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage is a potential approach to generate effective, durable treatments against this slow, progressive disorder. Here, we tested the ability of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated overexpression of human insulinlike growth factor (hIGF)-I to reproduce an original surface in human OA cartilage in light of the pleiotropic activities of the factor. We examined the proliferative, survival and anabolic effects of t...

  1. Recombinant AAV-mediated HSVtk gene transfer with direct intratumoral injections and Tet-On regulation for implanted human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai-Qun LUO

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV gene therapy has been extensively studied in tumors and relies largely on the gene expression of HSVtk. Most studies, however, have failed to demonstrate any significant benefit of a controlled gene expression strategy in cancer treatment. The Tet-On system is commonly used to regulate gene expression following Dox induction. We have evaluated the antitumor effect of HSVtk/ganciclovir gene therapy under Tet-On regulation by means of adeno-associated virus-2 (AAV-2-mediated HSVtk gene transfer with direct intratumoral injections in mice bearing breast cancer tumors. Methods Recombinant adeno-associated virus-2 (rAAV was constructed and transduced into MCF-7 cell line. GCV treatment to the rAAV infected MCF-7 cells was performed by MTT assay under the doxycycline (Dox induction or without Dox induction at a vp (viral particle number of ?104 /cell. The virus was administered intratumorally to nude mice that had also received GCV intraperitoneally. The antitumor effects were evaluated by measuring tumor regression and histological analysis. Results We have demonstrated that GCV treatment to the infected MCF-7 cells under the Dox induction was of more inhibited effects than those without Dox induction at ?104 vp/cell. In ex vivo experiments, tumor growth of BALB/C nude mice breast cancer was retarded after rAAV-2/HSVtk/Tet-On was injected into the tumors under the Dox induction. Infiltrating cells were also observed in tumors after Dox induction followed by GCV treatment and cells were profoundly damaged. The expression of HSVtk gene in MCF-7 cells and BALB/C nude mice tumors was up-regulated by Tet-On under Dox induction with reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR analysis. Conclusion The antitumor effect of rAAV-mediated HSVtk/GCV gene therapy under the Dox induction with direct intratumoral injections may be a useful treatment for breast cancer and other solid tumors.

  2. Cre-Mediated Recombination in Tas2r131 Cells-A Unique Way to Explore Bitter Taste Receptor Function Inside and Outside of the Taste System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Anja; Hübner, Sandra; Döring, Linda; Perlach, Nathalie; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Boehm, Ulrich; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    The type 2 taste receptors (Tas2rs) comprise a large family of G protein-coupled receptors that recognize compounds bitter to humans and aversive to vertebrates. Tas2rs are expressed in both gustatory and nongustatory tissues, however, identification and functional analyses of T2R-expressing cells have been difficult in most tissues. To overcome these limitations and to be able to manipulate Tas2r-expressing cells in vivo, we used gene-targeting to generate a Tas2r131-specific Cre knock-in mouse strain. We then employed a binary genetic approach to characterize Cre-mediated recombination in these animals and to investigate Tas2r131 expression during postnatal development. We demonstrate that a Cre-activated fluorescent reporter reliably visualizes Tas2r131-cells in gustatory tissue. We show that the onset of Tas2r131 as well as of ?-Gustducin expression is initiated at different developmental stages depending on the type of taste bud. Furthermore, the number of Tas2r131- and ?-Gustducin-expressing cells increased during postnatal development. Our results demonstrate that the Tas2r131-expressing cells constitute a subpopulation of ?-Gustducin positive cells at all stages. We detected Tas2r131-expressing cells in several nongustatory tissues including lung, trachea, ovary, ganglia, and brain. Thus, the Tas2r131-Cre strain will help to dissect the functional role of Tas2r131 cells in both gustatory and nongustatory tissues in the future. PMID:26377344

  3. Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2-mediated transfer of the human superoxide-dismutase gene does not confer radioresistance on HeLa cervical carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The success rate of any therapeutic approach depends on the therapeutic window, which can be increased by either raising the resistance of the normal tissue without protecting the tumor cells or by sensitizing the tumor cells but not the normal cells. Two promising candidate genes for normal tissue protection against radiation-induced damage may be the copper-zinc (CuZnSOD) and manganese superoxide-dismutase genes (MnSOD). The recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV-2) offers attractive advantages over other vector systems: low immunogenicity, ability to infect dividing and non-dividing tissues and a low chance of insertional mutagenesis, due to extra-chromosomal localization. We report the production of novel rAAV-2-SOD vectors and the investigation of their modulating effects on HeLa-RC cells after irradiation. Material and methods: rAAV-2 vectors were cloned containing the human CuZnSOD or MnSOD as transgene and vector stocks were produced. In the initial experiments human cervix carcinoma (HeLa-RC) cells were chosen for their susceptibility to rAAV-2. On day 0, cells were seeded and transduced with the rAAV-2-SOD vectors. On day 3, cells were harvested, irradiated (0.5-8 Gy) and reseeded in different assays (FACS, SOD, MTT and colony assays). Results: Although >70% of all cells expressed SOD and significant amounts of functional SOD protein were detected, no radioprotective effect of SOD was observed after transduction of HeLa-RC cells. Conclusions: Novel rAAV-2-SOD vectors that could be produced at high titer, were able to efficiently infect cells and express the SOD genes. The absence of a radioprotective effect in HeLa-RC cancer cells indicates an additional safety feature and suggests that rAAV-mediated MnSOD overexpression might contribute to increasing the therapeutic index when applied for normal tissue protection

  4. Electromagnetic transitions between giant resonances within a continuum-RPA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general continuum-RPA approach is developed to describe electromagnetic transitions between giant resonances. Using a diagrammatic representation for the three-point Green's function, an expression for the transition amplitude is derived which allows one to incorporate effects of mixing of single and double giant resonances as well as to take the entire basis of particle-hole states into consideration. The radiative widths for E1 transition between the charge-exchange spin-dipole giant resonance and Gamow-Teller states are calculated for 90Nb and 208Bi. (orig.)

  5. The Bogolubov representation of the polaron model and its completely integrable RPA-approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.N.Bogolubov (jr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The polaron model in ionic crystal is studied in the Bogolubov representation using a special RPA-approximation. A new exactly solvable approximated polaron model is derived and described in detail. Its free energy at finite temperature is calculated analytically. The polaron free energy in the constant magnetic field at finite temperature is also discussed. Based on the structure of the Bogolubov unitary transformed polaron Hamiltonian there is stated a very important new result: the full polaron model is exactly solvable.

  6. Function of Rad51 paralogs in eukaryotic homologous recombinational repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Homologous recombinational repair (HRR) is an important mechanism for maintaining genetic integrity and cancer prevention by accurately repair of DNA double strand breaks induced by environmental insults or occurred in DNA replication. A critical step in HRR is the polymerization of Rad51 on single stranded DNA to form nuclear protein filaments, the later conduct DNA strand paring and exchange between homologous strands. A number of proteins, including replication protein A (RPA), Rad52 and Rad51 paralogs, are suggested to modulate or facilitate the process of Rad51 filament formation. Five Rad51 paralogs, namely XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C and Rad51D have been identified in eucaryotic cells. These proteins show distant protein sequence identity to Rad51, to yeast Rad51 paralogs (Rad55 and Rad57) and to each other. Hamster or chicken mutants of Rad51 paralogs exhibit hypersensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents, especially cross-linking agents, and are defective in assembly of Rad51 onto HRR site after DNA damage. Recent data from our and other labs showed that Rad51 paralogs constitute two distinct complexes in cell extracts, one contains XRCC2, Rad51B, Rad51C and Rad51D, and the other contains Rad51C and XRCC3. Rad51C is involved in both complexes. Our results also showed that XRCC3-Rad51C complex interacts with Rad51 in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of Rad52 can partially suppress the hypersensitivity of XRCC2 mutant irs1 to ionizing radiation and corrected the defects in Rad51 focus formation. These results suggest that XRCC2 and other Rad51 paralogs play a mediator function to Rad51 in the early stage of HRR

  7. Optimization of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Expression for Large Transgenes, Using a Synthetic Promoter and Tandem Array Enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ziying; Sun, Xingshen; Feng, Zehua; Li, Guiying; Fisher, John T; Stewart, Zoe A; Engelhardt, John F

    2015-06-01

    The packaging capacity of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors limits the size of the promoter that can be used to express the 4.43-kb cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cDNA. To circumvent this limitation, we screened a set of 100-mer synthetic enhancer elements, composed of ten 10-bp repeats, for their ability to augment CFTR transgene expression from a short 83-bp synthetic promoter in the context of an rAAV vector designed for use in the cystic fibrosis (CF) ferret model. Our initial studies assessing transcriptional activity in monolayer (nonpolarized) cultures of human airway cell lines and primary ferret airway cells revealed that three of these synthetic enhancers (F1, F5, and F10) significantly promoted transcription of a luciferase transgene in the context of plasmid transfection. Further analysis in polarized cultures of human and ferret airway epithelia at an air-liquid interface (ALI), as well as in the ferret airway in vivo, demonstrated that the F5 enhancer produced the highest level of transgene expression in the context of an AAV vector. Furthermore, we demonstrated that increasing the size of the viral genome from 4.94 to 5.04 kb did not significantly affect particle yield of the vectors, but dramatically reduced the functionality of rAAV-CFTR vectors because of small terminal deletions that extended into the CFTR expression cassette of the 5.04-kb oversized genome. Because rAAV-CFTR vectors greater than 5 kb in size are dramatically impaired with respect to vector efficacy, we used a shortened ferret CFTR minigene with a 159-bp deletion in the R domain to construct an rAAV vector (AV2/2.F5tg83-fCFTR?R). This vector yielded an ?17-fold increase in expression of CFTR and significantly improved Cl(-) currents in CF ALI cultures. Our study has identified a small enhancer/promoter combination that may have broad usefulness for rAAV-mediated CF gene therapy to the airway. PMID:25763813

  8. Encapsidation of adeno-associated virus type 2 Rep proteins in wild-type and recombinant progeny virions: Rep-mediated growth inhibition of primary human cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kube, D M; Ponnazhagan, S; Srivastava, A.

    1997-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) arrests the growth of primary human fibroblasts in vitro at high particle-to-cell ratios. To test the role of AAV gene expression in the observed growth inhibition, primary human cells were infected, under identical conditions, with wild-type (wt) AAV or with recombinant AAV that lacked all viral promoters and coding sequences. Significant, dose-dependent growth inhibition of primary human cells was observed with both wt and recombinant AAV at particle-...

  9. Validation of the RTOG recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification for small-cell lung cancer-only brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) developed a prognostic classification based on a recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) of patient pretreatment characteristics from three completed brain metastases randomized trials. Clinical trials for patients with brain metastases generally exclude small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cases. We hypothesize that the RPA classes are valid in the setting of SCLC brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 154 SCLC patients with brain metastases treated between April 1983 and May 2005 was performed. RPA criteria used for class assignment were Karnofsky performance status (KPS), primary tumor status (PT), presence of extracranial metastases (ED), and age. Results: Median survival was 4.9 months, with 4 patients (2.6%) alive at analysis. Median follow-up was 4.7 months (range, 0.3-40.3 months). Median age was 65 (range, 42-85 years). Median KPS was 70 (range, 40-100). Number of patients with controlled PT and no ED was 20 (13%) and with ED, 27 (18%); without controlled PT and ED, 34 (22%) and with ED, 73 (47%). RPA class distribution was: Class I: 8 (5%); Class II: 96 (62%); Class III: 51 (33%). Median survivals (in months) by RPA class were: Class I: 8.6; Class II: 4.2; Class III: 2.3 (p = 0.0023). Conclusions: Survivals for SCLC-only brain metastases replicate the results from the RTOG RPA classification. These classes are therefore valid for brain metastases from SCLC, support the inclusion of SCLC patients in future brain metastases trials, and may also serve as a basis for historical comparisons

  10. Novel types of bistability in a model of a bursting pacemaker neuron RPa1 from the snail, Helix pomatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahata, T

    2013-03-01

    The RPa1 neuron identified in the snail, Helix pomatia, produced a variety of electrical activities (e.g. bursting and spiking). A previously developed mathematical model, which described these activities, revealed bistability between bursting and chaotic spiking, where chaotic spiking was transformed into bursting by a short-lasting external stimulus, and vice versa. The present study used this model to detect other types of bistability, i.e. bistability between bursting and period-2 spiking and between bursting and period-4 spiking (period-2 and -4 spiking are generated by period-doubling bifurcation). This contributes to our understanding of the electrophysiological properties of RPa1. PMID:23567837

  11. A novel third type of recurrent NF1 microdeletion mediated by non-allelic homologous recombination between LRRC37B-containing low-copy repeats in 17q11.2

    OpenAIRE

    Bengesser, Kathrin; Cooper, David N.; Steinmann, Katharina; Kluwe, Lan; Chuzhanova, Nadia; Wimmer, Katharina; Tatagiba, Marcos; Tinschert, Sigrid; Mautner, Victor; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Large microdeletions encompassing the neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) gene and its flanking regions at 17q11.2 belong to the group of genomic disorders caused by aberrant recombination between segmental duplications. The most common NF1 microdeletions (type-1) span 1.4-Mb and have breakpoints located within NF1-REPs A and C, low-copy repeats (LCRs) containing LRRC37-core duplicons. We have identified a novel type of recurrent NF1 deletion mediated by non-allelic homologous ...

  12. Comparative genome analysis of "Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense" (subgroup tuf-Australia I; rp-A) and "Ca. Phytoplasma asteris" Strains OY-M and AY-WB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Nguyen, L T T; Kube, M; Schneider, B; Reinhardt, R; Gibb, K S

    2008-06-01

    The chromosome sequence of "Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense" (subgroup tuf-Australia I; rp-A), associated with dieback in papaya, Australian grapevine yellows in grapevine, and several other important plant diseases, was determined. The circular chromosome is represented by 879,324 nucleotides, a GC content of 27%, and 839 protein-coding genes. Five hundred two of these protein-coding genes were functionally assigned, while 337 genes were hypothetical proteins with unknown function. Potential mobile units (PMUs) containing clusters of DNA repeats comprised 12.1% of the genome. These PMUs encoded genes involved in DNA replication, repair, and recombination; nucleotide transport and metabolism; translation; and ribosomal structure. Elements with similarities to phage integrases found in these mobile units were difficult to classify, as they were similar to both insertion sequences and bacteriophages. Comparative analysis of "Ca. Phytoplasma australiense" with "Ca. Phytoplasma asteris" strains OY-M and AY-WB showed that the gene order was more conserved between the closely related "Ca. Phytoplasma asteris" strains than to "Ca. Phytoplasma australiense." Differences observed between "Ca. Phytoplasma australiense" and "Ca. Phytoplasma asteris" strains included the chromosome size (18,693 bp larger than OY-M), a larger number of genes with assigned function, and hypothetical proteins with unknown function. PMID:18359806

  13. Comparative Genome Analysis of “Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense” (Subgroup tuf-Australia I; rp-A) and “Ca. Phytoplasma asteris” Strains OY-M and AY-WB? †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Nguyen, L. T. T.; Kube, M.; Schneider, B.; Reinhardt, R.; Gibb, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    The chromosome sequence of “Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense” (subgroup tuf-Australia I; rp-A), associated with dieback in papaya, Australian grapevine yellows in grapevine, and several other important plant diseases, was determined. The circular chromosome is represented by 879,324 nucleotides, a GC content of 27%, and 839 protein-coding genes. Five hundred two of these protein-coding genes were functionally assigned, while 337 genes were hypothetical proteins with unknown function. Potential mobile units (PMUs) containing clusters of DNA repeats comprised 12.1% of the genome. These PMUs encoded genes involved in DNA replication, repair, and recombination; nucleotide transport and metabolism; translation; and ribosomal structure. Elements with similarities to phage integrases found in these mobile units were difficult to classify, as they were similar to both insertion sequences and bacteriophages. Comparative analysis of “Ca. Phytoplasma australiense” with “Ca. Phytoplasma asteris” strains OY-M and AY-WB showed that the gene order was more conserved between the closely related “Ca. Phytoplasma asteris” strains than to “Ca. Phytoplasma australiense.” Differences observed between “Ca. Phytoplasma australiense” and “Ca. Phytoplasma asteris” strains included the chromosome size (18,693 bp larger than OY-M), a larger number of genes with assigned function, and hypothetical proteins with unknown function. PMID:18359806

  14. Nuclear vorticity in isoscalar E1 modes: Skyrme-RPA analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhard, P -G; Repko, A; Kvasil, J

    2013-01-01

    Two basic concepts of nuclear vorticity, hydrodynamical (HD) and Rawenthall-Wambach (RW), are critically inspected. As a test case, we consider the interplay of irrotational and vortical motion in isoscalar electric dipole E1(T=0) modes in $^{208}$Pb, namely the toroidal and compression modes. The modes are described in a self-consistent random-phase-approximation (RPA) with the Skyrme force SLy6. They are examined in terms of strength functions, transition densities, current fields, and formfactors. It is shown that the RW conception (suggesting the upper component of the nuclear current as the vorticity indicator) is not robust. The HD vorticity is not easily applicable either because the definition of a velocity field is too involved in nuclear systems. Instead, the vorticity is better characterized by the toroidal strength which closely corresponds to HD treatment and is approximately decoupled from the continuity equation.

  15. Precise all-electron dynamical response functions: Application to COHSEX and the RPA correlation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzinger, Markus; Friedrich, Christoph; Görling, Andreas; Blügel, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    We present a methodology to calculate frequency and momentum dependent all-electron response functions determined within Kohn-Sham density functional theory. It overcomes the main obstacle in calculating response functions in practice, which is the slow convergence with respect to the number of unoccupied states and the basis-set size. In this approach, the usual sum-over-states expression of perturbation theory is complemented by the response of the orbital basis functions, explicitly constructed by radial integrations of frequency-dependent Sternheimer equations. To an essential extent an infinite number of unoccupied states are included in this way. Furthermore, the response of the core electrons is treated virtually exactly, which is out of reach otherwise. The method is an extension of the recently introduced incomplete-basis-set correction (IBC) [Betzinger et al., Phys. Rev. B 85, 245124 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.245124; Phys. Rev. B 88, 075130 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.075130] to the frequency and momentum domain. We have implemented the generalized IBC within the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method and demonstrate for rocksalt BaO the improved convergence of the dynamical Kohn-Sham polarizability. We apply this technique to compute (a) quasiparticle energies employing the COHSEX approximation for the self-energy of many-body perturbation theory and (b) all-electron RPA correlation energies. It is shown that the favorable convergence of the polarizability is passed over to the COHSEX and RPA calculation.

  16. Spectra of nuclei in the lead region in the framework of the RPA with OBE-G-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the base of an existing Computer program for the calculation of particle-hole RPA matrix elements (especially) for finite-range interactions as well for the solution of the particle-hole RPA equations the corresponding matrix elements for two-particle respectively two-hole nuclei were calculated (and tested) and the corresponding RPA equations solved. For the calculation of the nuclear spectra meson-exchange G-matrix interactions were used instead of phenomenological approaches. The former constitute only a part of the effective NN interaction. A direct comparison with the experimental spectra is therefore just as little convenient as the calculation of transition probabilities or an evaluating comparison of TDA and RPA. The results let nevertheless recognize following: (1) The density dependence of the effective NN interaction. (2) For the states of two-particle respectively two-hole nuclei the (?+rho) exchange plays no such dominating role as for unnatural-parity states in double-magic nuclei. (3) An approximation of the missing part of the effective NN interaction by delta-function interactions is not sufficient. (orig.)

  17. Transformation of tobacco cpDNA with fusion E7GGG/GUS gene and homologous recombination mediated elimination of the marker gene.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    B?íza, Jind?ich; Vlasák, Josef; Ryba, Š.; Ludvíková, V.; Niedermeierová, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 27, ?. 2 (2013), s. 3644-3648. ISSN 1310-2818 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA500960903 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : E7GGG oncogene * chloroplast transformation * marker-free plant * homologous recombination Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.379, year: 2013

  18. SETD2-Dependent Histone H3K36 Trimethylation Is Required for Homologous Recombination Repair and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia X. Pfister

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modulating chromatin through histone methylation orchestrates numerous cellular processes. SETD2-dependent trimethylation of histone H3K36 is associated with active transcription. Here, we define a role for H3K36 trimethylation in homologous recombination (HR repair in human cells. We find that depleting SETD2 generates a mutation signature resembling RAD51 depletion at I-SceI-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB sites, with significantly increased deletions arising through microhomology-mediated end-joining. We establish a presynaptic role for SETD2 methyltransferase in HR, where it facilitates the recruitment of C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CtIP and promotes DSB resection, allowing Replication Protein A (RPA and RAD51 binding to DNA damage sites. Furthermore, reducing H3K36me3 levels by overexpressing KDM4A/JMJD2A, an oncogene and H3K36me3/2 demethylase, or an H3.3K36M transgene also reduces HR repair events. We propose that error-free HR repair within H3K36me3-decorated transcriptionally active genomic regions promotes cell homeostasis. Moreover, these findings provide insights as to why oncogenic mutations cluster within the H3K36me3 axis.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in the absence of integrase-mediated dna recombination: definition of permissive and nonpermissive T-cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, N; Lu, R; Engelman, A

    2001-09-01

    Functional retroviral integrase protein is thought to be essential for productive viral replication. Yet, previous studies differed on the extent to which integrase mutant viruses expressed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genes from unintegrated DNA. Although one reason for this difference was that class II integrase mutations pleiotropically affected the viral life cycle, another reason apparently depended on the identity of the infected cell. Here, we analyzed integrase mutant viral infectivities in a variety of cell types. Single-round infectivity of class I integration-specific mutant HIV-1 ranged from culture infectious doses, however, was only 0.0006 to 0.005% of that of WT. Since the frequencies of mutant DNA recombination in these lines ranged from 0.023 to <0.093% of the WT, we conclude that productive replication in the absence of integrase function most likely required the illegitimate integration of HIV-1 into host chromosomes by cellular DNA recombination enzymes. PMID:11483739

  20. I-SceI-Mediated Double-Strand Break Does Not Increase the Frequency of Homologous Recombination at the Dct Locus in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fenina, Myriam; Simon-Chazottes, Dominique; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Soueid, Jihane; Langa, Francina; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel; Bernard, Bruno A.; Panthier, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Targeted induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) at natural endogenous loci was shown to increase the rate of gene replacement by homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells. The gene encoding dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) is specifically expressed in melanocytes and their precursors. To construct a genetic tool allowing the replacement of Dct gene by any gene of interest, we generated an embryonic stem cell line carrying the recognition site for the yeast I-SceI meganuclease embed...

  1. Oral Administration of Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus-mediated Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Suppresses CCl4-induced Hepatic Fibrosis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Zhi-Ming; Cai, Min; Lv, Yi-Fei; Huang, Yan-Hua; Li, Hong-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Fibrogenesis and hepatocyte degeneration are the main pathological processes in chronic liver diseases. Transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) is the key profibrotic cytokine in hepatic fibrosis. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) is a potent antagonist of TGF-?1 and an antifibrotic factor. In this study, we generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying BMP-7 (AAV–BMP-7) and tested its ability to suppress carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic fibrosis when orally administere...

  2. Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 6 (rAAV2/6)-mediated gene transfer to nociceptive neurons through different routes of delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Beggah Ahmed T; Pertin Marie; Towne Chris; Aebischer Patrick; Decosterd Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Gene transfer to nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is a promising approach to dissect mechanisms of pain in rodents and is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of persistent pain disorders such as neuropathic pain. A number of studies have demonstrated transduction of DRG neurons using herpes simplex virus, adenovirus and more recently, adeno-associated virus (AAV). Recombinant AAV are currently the gene transfer vehicles of choice for the ...

  3. A Limited Number of Transducible Hepatocytes Restricts a Wide-Range Linear Vector Dose Response in Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Liver Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Thomas, Clare E.; Storm, Theresa A.; Fuess, Sally; Powell, Sharon; Wright, J Fraser; KAY, MARK A.

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are promising vehicles for achieving stable liver transduction in vivo. However, the mechanisms of liver transduction are not fully understood, and furthermore, the relationships between rAAV dose and levels of transgene expression, total number of hepatocytes transduced, and proportion of integrated vector genomes have not been well established. To begin to elucidate the liver transduction dose response with rAAV vectors, we injected mice wit...

  4. The addition of recombinant vaccinia HER2/neu to oncolytic vaccinia-GMCSF given into the tumor microenvironment overcomes MDSC-mediated immune escape and systemic anergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, C R; Monken, C E; Lattime, E C

    2015-04-01

    Effective immunotherapeutic strategies require the ability to generate a systemic antigen-specific response capable of impacting both primary and metastatic disease. We have built on our oncolytic vaccinia a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) strategy by adding recombinant tumor antigen to increase the response in the tumor microenvironment and systemically. In the present study, orthotopic growth of a syngeneic HER2/neu-overexpressing mammary carcinoma in FVB/N mice (NBT1) was associated with increased Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) both systemically and in the tumor microenvironment. This MDSC population had inhibitory effects on the HER2/neu-specific Th1 immune response. VVneu and VVGMCSF are recombinant oncolytic vaccinia viruses that encode HER2/neu and GM-CSF, respectively. Naive FVB mice vaccinated with combined VVneu and VVGMCSF given systemically developed systemic HER2/neu-specific immunity. NBT1-bearing mice became anergic to systemic immunization with combined VVneu and VVGMCSF. Intratumoral VVGMCSF failed to result in systemic antitumor immunity until combined with intratumoral VVneu. Infection/transfection of the tumor microenvironment with combined VVGMCSF and VVneu resulted in development of systemic tumor-specific immunity, reduction in splenic and tumor MDSC and therapeutic efficacy against tumors. These studies demonstrate the enhanced efficacy of oncolytic vaccinia virus recombinants encoding combined tumor antigen and GM-CSF in modulating the microenvironment of MDSC-rich tumors. PMID:25633483

  5. Recombinant AAV-mediated in vivo long-term expression and antitumour activity of an anti-ganglioside GM3(Neu5Gc) antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperno, G M; López-Requena, A; Predonzani, A; Dorvignit, D; Labrada, M; Zentilin, L; Burrone, O R; Cesco-Gaspere, M

    2015-12-01

    The ganglioside GM3(Neu5Gc) has gained increasing attention as therapeutic target because of its selective expression in various human tumours, such as melanoma, breast and lung cancer. 14F7 is a mouse IgG1 with specific reactivity to GM3(Neu5Gc)-positive tumours. The therapeutic activity of 14F7 has also been demonstrated in vivo, through its repetitive passive administration in tumour-bearing animals. In this work we used an alternative strategy to deliver recombinant 14F7 in vivo and analysed the therapeutic efficacy of this approach. We engineered a recombinant adeno-associated vector to direct the expression of secretable recombinant 14F7 in BALB/c animals. A single administration of the rAAV induced efficient production and secretion of the antibody in the bloodstream, with an expression level reaching plateau at ?3 weeks after injection and persisting for almost a year. Strikingly, upon challenge with GM3(Neu5Gc)-positive X63-AG8.653 myeloma cells, tumour development was significantly delayed in animals treated with rAAV-14F7 with respect to animals treated with a control rAAV codifying for an irrelevant antibody. Finally, no significant differences in survival proportion were detected in animals injected with rAAV-14F7 or treated by standard administration of repetitive doses of purified monoclonal antibody 14F7. PMID:26181624

  6. DNAzyme-mediated recovery of small recombinant RNAs from a 5S rRNA-derived chimera expressed in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willson Richard C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manufacturing large quantities of recombinant RNAs by overexpression in a bacterial host is hampered by their instability in intracellular environment. To overcome this problem, an RNA of interest can be fused into a stable bacterial RNA for the resulting chimeric construct to accumulate in the cytoplasm to a sufficiently high level. Being supplemented with cost-effective procedures for isolation of the chimera from cells and recovery of the recombinant RNA from stabilizing scaffold, this strategy might become a viable alternative to the existing methods of chemical or enzymatic RNA synthesis. Results Sequence encoding a 71-nucleotide recombinant RNA was inserted into a plasmid-borne deletion mutant of the Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA gene in place of helix III - loop C segment of the original 5S rRNA. After transformation into Escherichia coli, the chimeric RNA (3×pen aRNA was expressed constitutively from E. coli rrnB P1 and P2 promoters. The RNA chimera accumulated to levels that exceeded those of the host's 5S rRNA. A novel method relying on liquid-solid partitioning of cellular constituents was developed for isolation of total RNA from bacterial cells. This protocol avoids toxic chemicals, and is therefore more suitable for large scale RNA purification than traditional methods. A pair of biotinylated 8-17 DNAzymes was used to bring about the quantitative excision of the 71-nt recombinant RNA from the chimera. The recombinant RNA was isolated by sequence-specific capture on beads with immobilized complementary deoxyoligonucleotide, while DNAzymes were recovered by biotin affinity chromatography for reuse. Conclusions The feasibility of a fermentation-based approach for manufacturing large quantities of small RNAs in vivo using a "5S rRNA scaffold" strategy is demonstrated. The approach provides a route towards an economical method for the large-scale production of small RNAs including shRNAs, siRNAs and aptamers for use in clinical and biomedical research.

  7. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, CO; Gillingham, MB; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A.; Koeberl, DD

    2006-01-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudo-typed with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pahenu2 mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte t...

  8. Range-Separated Approach to the RPA Correlation Applied to the van der Waals Bond and to Diffusion of Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneval, Fabien

    2012-06-01

    The random-phase approximation (RPA) is a promising approximation to the exchange-correlation energy of density functional theory, since it contains the van der Waals (vdW) interaction and yields a potential with the correct band gap. However, its calculation is computationally very demanding. We apply a range-separation concept to RPA and demonstrate how it drastically speeds up the calculations without loss of accuracy. The scheme is then successfully applied to a layered system subjected to weak vdW attraction and is used to address the controversy of the self-diffusion in silicon. We calculate the formation and migration energies of self-interstitials and vacancies taking into account atomic relaxations. The obtained activation energies deviate significantly from the earlier calculations and challenge some of the experimental interpretations: the diffusion of vacancies and interstitials has almost the same activation energy.

  9. Range-separated approach to the RPA correlation applied to van der Waals bond and to diffusion of defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneval, Fabien

    2013-03-01

    The Random Phase Approximation (RPA) is a promising approximation to the exchange-correlation energy of Density Functional Theory (DFT), since it contains the van der Waals (vdW) interaction and yields a potential with the correct band gap. However, its calculation is computationally very demanding. We apply a range separation concept to RPA and demonstrate how it drastically speeds up the calculations without loss of accuracy. The scheme is succesfully applied to a layered system subjected to weak vdW attraction and to address the controversy of the self-diffusion in silicon. We calculate the formation and migration energies of self-interstitials and vacancies taking into account atomic relaxations. The obtained activation energies deviate significantly from the earlier calculations that were affected by the band gap problem and challenge some of the experimental interpretations: the diffusion of vacancies and interstitials have almost the same activation energy.

  10. Centrifugal step emulsification applied for absolute quantification of nucleic acids by digital droplet RPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Friedrich; Schwemmer, Frank; Trotter, Martin; Wadle, Simon; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix; Paust, Nils

    2015-07-01

    Aqueous microdroplets provide miniaturized reaction compartments for numerous chemical, biochemical or pharmaceutical applications. We introduce centrifugal step emulsification for the fast and easy production of monodisperse droplets. Homogenous droplets with pre-selectable diameters in a range from 120 ?m to 170 ?m were generated with coefficients of variation of 2-4% and zero run-in time or dead volume. The droplet diameter depends on the nozzle geometry (depth, width, and step size) and interfacial tensions only. Droplet size is demonstrated to be independent of the dispersed phase flow rate between 0.01 and 1 ?l s(-1), proving the robustness of the centrifugal approach. Centrifugal step emulsification can easily be combined with existing centrifugal microfluidic unit operations, is compatible to scalable manufacturing technologies such as thermoforming or injection moulding and enables fast emulsification (>500 droplets per second and nozzle) with minimal handling effort (2-3 pipetting steps). The centrifugal microfluidic droplet generation was used to perform the first digital droplet recombinase polymerase amplification (ddRPA). It was used for absolute quantification of Listeria monocytogenes DNA concentration standards with a total analysis time below 30 min. Compared to digital droplet polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR), with processing times of about 2 hours, the overall processing time of digital analysis was reduced by more than a factor of 4. PMID:25947077

  11. Static correlation and electron localization in molecular dimers from the self-consistent RPA and G W approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, Maria; Caruso, Fabio; Rohr, Daniel R.; Ren, Xinguo; Rubio, Angel; Scheffler, Matthias; Rinke, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    We investigate static correlation and delocalization errors in the self-consistent G W and random-phase approximation (RPA) by studying molecular dissociation of the H2 and LiH molecules. Although both approximations contain topologically identical diagrams, the nonlocality and frequency dependence of the G W self-energy crucially influence the different energy contributions to the total energy as compared to the use of a static local potential in the RPA. The latter leads to significantly larger correlation energies, which allow for a better description of static correlation at intermediate bond distances. The substantial error found in G W is further analyzed by comparing spin-restricted and spin-unrestricted calculations. At large but finite nuclear separation, their difference gives an estimate of the so-called fractional spin error normally determined only in the dissociation limit. Furthermore, a calculation of the dipole moment of the LiH molecule at dissociation reveals a large delocalization error in G W making the fractional charge error comparable to the RPA. The analyses are supplemented by explicit formulas for the G W Green's function and total energy of a simplified two-level model providing additional insights into the dissociation limit.

  12. Protective Effect of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus 2/8-Mediated Gene Therapy from the Maternal Hyperphenylalaninemia in Offsprings of a Mouse Model of Phenylketonuria

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Sung-Chul; PARK, JOO-WON; Oh, Hyun-Jeong; Choi, Jin-Ok; Seo, Kyung-In; Park, Eun-Sook; PARK, HAE-YOUNG

    2008-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The accumulation of phenylalanine leads to severe mental and psychomotor retardation, and the fetus of an uncontrolled pregnant female patient presents with maternal PKU syndrome. We have reported previously on the cognitive outcome of biochemical and phenotypic reversal of PKU in a mouse model, Pahenu2, by the AAV serotype 2-mediated gene delivery of a hum...

  13. Applications of the Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) 'MASC' in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildmann, Norman; Platis, Andreas; Tupman, David-James; Bange, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) MASC (Multipurpose Airborne Sensor Carrier) was developed at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with the University of Stuttgart, University of Applied Sciences Ostwestfalen-Lippe and 'ROKE-Modelle'. Its purpose is the investigation of thermodynamic processes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), including observations of temperature, humidity and wind profiles, as well as the measurement of turbulent heat, moisture and momentum fluxes. The aircraft is electrically powered, has a maximum wingspan of 3.40~m and a total weight of 5-8~kg, depending on the battery- and payload. The standard meteorological payload consists of two temperature sensors, a humidity sensor, a flow probe, an inertial measurement unit and a GNSS. The sensors were optimized for the resolution of small-scale turbulence down to length scales in the sub-meter range. In normal operation, the aircraft is automatically controlled by the ROCS (Research Onboard Computer System) autopilot to be able to fly predefined paths at constant altitude and airspeed. Only take-off and landing are carried out by a human RC pilot. Since 2012, the system is operational and has since then been deployed in more than ten measurement campaigns, with more than 100 measurement flights. The fields of research that were tackled in these campaigns include sensor validation, fundamental boundary-layer research and wind-energy research. In 2014, for the first time, two MASC have been operated at the same time within a distance of a few kilometres, in order to investigate the wind field over an escarpment in the Swabian Alb. Furthermore, MASC was first deployed off-shore in October 2014, starting from the German island Heligoland in the North Sea, for the purpose of characterization of the marine boundary layer for offshore wind parks. Detailed descriptions of the experimental setup and first preliminary results will be presented.

  14. Replication protein A: directing traffic at the intersection of replication and repair

    OpenAIRE

    Oakley, Greg G.; Patrick, Steve M.

    2010-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of replication protein A (RPA) as a DNA replication factor, much progress has been made on elucidating critical roles for RPA in other DNA metabolic pathways. RPA has been shown to be required for DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA recombination, and the DNA damage response pathway with roles in checkpoint activation. This review summarizes the current understanding of RPA structure, phosphorylation and protein-protein interactions in mediating these DNA metabolic pr...

  15. Efficient generation of recombinant adenoviral vectors by Cre-lox recombination in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, K.; Barker, C; Danthinne, X; Imperiale, M. J.; Nabel, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recombinant adenovirus vectors are attractive for use in gene expression studies and therapeutic applications, the construction of these vectors remains relatively time-consuming. We report here a strategy that simplifies the production of adenoviruses using the Cre-loxP system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Full-length recombinant adenovirus DNA was generated in vitro by Cre-mediated recombination between loxP sites in a linearized shuttle plasmid containing a transgene and ade...

  16. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer for the potential therapy of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Jared N; Elder, Melissa; Conlon, Thomas; Cruz, Pedro; Wright, Amy J; Srivastava, Arun; Flotte, Terence R

    2011-08-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, potentially fatal pediatric disease, which results from mutations within the ADA gene, leading to metabolic abnormalities and ultimately profound immunologic and nonimmunologic defects. In this study, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors based on serotypes 1 and 9 were used to deliver a secretory version of the human ADA (hADA) gene to various tissues to promote immune reconstitution following enzyme expression in a mouse model of ADA deficiency. Here, we report that a single-stranded rAAV vector, pTR2-CB-Ig?-hADA, (1) facilitated successful gene delivery to multiple tissues, including heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney, (2) promoted ectopic expression of hADA, and (3) allowed enhanced serum-based enzyme activity over time. Moreover, the rAAV-hADA vector packaged in serotype 9 capsid drove partial, prolonged, and progressive immune reconstitution in ADA-deficient mice. Overview Summary Gene therapies for severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency (ADA-SCID) over two decades have exclusively involved retroviral vectors targeted to lymphocytes and hematopoietic progenitor cells. These groundbreaking gene therapies represented an unprecedented revolution in clinical medicine but in most cases did not fully correct the immune deficiency and came with the potential risk of insertional mutagenesis. Alternatively, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained attention as valuable tools for gene transfer, having demonstrated no pathogenicity in humans, minimal immunogenicity, long-term efficacy, ease of administration, and broad tissue tropism (Muzyczka, 1992 ; Flotte et al., 1993 ; Kessler et al., 1996 ; McCown et al., 1996 ; Lipkowitz et al., 1999 ; Marshall, 2001 ; Chen et al., 2003 ; Conlon and Flotte, 2004 ; Griffey et al., 2005 ; Pacak et al., 2006 ; Stone et al., 2008 ; Liu et al., 2009 ; Choi et al., 2010 ). Currently, rAAV vectors are being utilized in phase I/II clinical trials for cystic fibrosis, ?-1 antitrypsin deficiency, Canavan's disease, Parkinson's disease, hemophilia, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, arthritis, Batten's disease, and Leber's congenital amaurosis (Flotte et al., 1996 , 2004 ; Kay et al., 2000 ; Aitken et al., 2001 ; Wagner et al., 2002 ; Manno et al., 2003 ; Snyder and Francis, 2005 ; Maguire et al., 2008 ; Cideciyan et al., 2009 ). In this study, we present preclinical data to support the viability of an rAAV-based gene transfer strategy for cure of ADA-SCID. We report efficient transduction of a variety of postmitotic target tissues in vivo, subsequent human ADA (hADA) expression, and enhanced hADA secretion in tissues and blood, with increasing peripheral lymphocyte populations over time. PMID:21142972

  17. Gimeracil, an inhibitor of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, inhibits the early step in homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeracil (5-chloro-2, 4-dihydroxypyridine) is an inhibitor of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD), which degrades pyrimidine including 5-fluorouracil in the blood. Gimeracil was originally added to an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative S-1 to yield prolonged 5-fluorouracil concentrations in serum and tumor tissues. We have already reported that gimeracil had radiosensitizing effects by partially inhibiting homologous recombination (HR) in the repair of DNA double strand breaks. We investigated the mechanisms of gimeracil radiosensitization. Comet assay and radiation-induced focus formation of various kinds of proteins involved in HR was carried out. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) for DPYD were transfected to HeLa cells to investigate the target protein for radiosensitization with gimeracil. SCneo assay was carried out to examine whether DPYD depletion by siRNA inhibited HR repair of DNA double strand breaks. Tail moments in neutral comet assay increased in gimeracil-treated cells. Gimeracil restrained the formation of foci of Rad51 and replication protein A (RPA), whereas it increased the number of foci of Nbs1, Mre11, Rad50, and FancD2. When HeLa cells were transfected with the DPYD siRNA before irradiation, the cells became more radiosensitive. The degree of radiosensitization by transfection of DPYD siRNA was similar to that of gimeracil. Gimeracil did not sensitize DPYD-depleted cells. Depletion of DPYD by siRNA significantly reduced the frequency of neopositive clones in SCneo assay. Gimeracil partially inhibits the early step in HR. It was found that DPYD is the target protein for radiosensitization by gimeracil. The inhibitors of DPYD, such as gimeracil, could enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy through partial suppression of HR-mediated DNA repair. (author)

  18. DNA RECOMBINATION IN EUCARYOTIC CELLS BY THE BACTERIOPHAGE PHIC31 RECOMBINATION SYSTEM",

    Science.gov (United States)

    This invention provides methods for obtaining specific and stable integration of nucleic acids into eukaryotic cells. The invention makes use of site-specific recombination systems that use prokaryotic recombinase polypeptides, such as the ph:C31 integrase, that can mediate recombination between th...

  19. Generation and Characterization of a MYF5 Reporter Human iPS Cell Line Using CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianbo; Hunt, Samuel D; Xue, Haipeng; Liu, Ying; Darabi, Radbod

    2016-01-01

    Human iPS cells hold great promise for disease modeling and treatment of degenerative disorders including muscular dystrophies. Although a few research groups have used them for skeletal muscle differentiation, most were based on gene over-expression or long-term mesenchymal differentiation and retrospective identification of myogenic cells. Therefore, this study was aimed to generate a knock-in reporter human iPS cell line for MYF5, as an early myogenic specification gene, to allow prospective identification and purification of myogenic progenitors from human iPS cells. By using a CRISPR/Cas9 double nickase strategy, a 2A-GFP reporter was inserted before the stop codon of the MYF5 gene using homologous recombination. This approach allowed for highly efficient in-frame targeting of MYF5 in human iPS cells. Furthermore, in order to prove the reporter function, endogenous MYF5 expression was induced using a novel dead Cas9-VP160 transcriptional activator. Induced clones demonstrated appropriate MYF5-GFP co-expression. Finally, to confirm the differentiation potential, reporter human iPS clones were differentiated through embryoid body method and MYF5-GFP(+) myogenic cells were sorted and characterized. These data provides valuable guidelines for generation of knock-in reporter human iPS cell lines for myogenic genes which can be used for disease modeling, drug screening, gene correction and future in vivo applications. PMID:26729410

  20. Cell-Mediated and Humoral Immune Responses after Immunization of Calves with a Recombinant Multiantigenic Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Subunit Vaccine at Different Ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Aagaard, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Neonates and juvenile ruminants are very susceptible to paratuberculosis infection. This is likely due to a high degree of exposure from their dams and an immature immune system. To test the influence of age on vaccine-induced responses, a cocktail of recombinant Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins (MAP0217, MAP1508, MAP3701c, MAP3783, and MAP1609c/Ag85B) was formulated in a cationic liposome adjuvant (CAF01) and used to vaccinate animals of different ages. Male jersey calves were divided into three groups that were vaccinated at 2, 8, or 16 weeks of age and boosted twice at weeks 4 and 12 relative to the first vaccination. Vaccine-induced immune responses, the gamma interferon (IFN-?) cytokine secretion and antibody responses, were followed for 20 weeks. In general, the specific responses were significantly elevated in all three vaccination groups after the first booster vaccination with no or only a minor effect from the second booster. However, significant differences were observed in the immunogenicity levels of the different proteins, and it appears that the older age group produced a more consistent IFN-? response. In contrast, the humoral immune response is seemingly independent of vaccination age as we found no difference in the IgG1 responses when we compared the three vaccination groups. Combined, our results suggest that an appropriate age of vaccination should be considered in vaccination protocols and that there is a possible interference of vaccine-induced immune responses with weaning (week 8).

  1. Synthesis, characterization and immunological properties of LPS-based conjugate vaccine composed of O-polysaccharide from pseudomonas aeruginosa IATS 10 bound to recombinant exoprotein A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an improtant opportunistic pathogen that can cause infection in immunocompromised patient. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major surface antigen of P. aeruginosa, is immunogenic and elieits protective antibodies in animals. The O-polysaccharids (O-PS) from international Antigenic typing Scheme (IATS) 10, the antigenic determinant of LPS, was coupled to recombinant exoprotein A (rPA) through adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) mediated by carbodiimide condensation reaction. Mice were immunized with the conjugate emulsifield with monophosphoryl lipid A-trehalose dicorynomycolate (MPL-T) and freund's adjuvants. The conjiugate emulsified with MPL-T adjuvant elicited the highest level of IgG and IgM followed by freuns's adjuvant. IgG titers using both MPL-T and freund's adjuvants were recorded to be higher than IgM titers after the second post of the immunization. Immunization of mice with the prepared conjugates emulsified with MPL-T and freund's adjvaided provide high level of protection (100%) against ten times the LD50 of homologous strain of P. aeruginsoa. the elicited high IgG level and the in vivo protection test results provided good evidences for the possible protection of the conjugate aginst subsequent infection with the pathogen. These findings will enable us to use it as protective vaccine candidate (authors).

  2. Recombinant Bivalent Fusion Protein rVE Induces CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Mediated Memory Immune Response for Protection Against Yersinia enterocolitica Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit K.; Kingston, Joseph J.; Gupta, Shishir K.; Batra, Harsh V.

    2015-01-01

    Studies investigating the correlates of immune protection against Yersinia infection have established that both humoral and cell mediated immune responses are required for the comprehensive protection. In our previous study, we established that the bivalent fusion protein (rVE) comprising immunologically active regions of Y. pestis LcrV (100–270 aa) and YopE (50–213 aa) proteins conferred complete passive and active protection against lethal Y. enterocolitica 8081 challenge. In the present study, cohort of BALB/c mice immunized with rVE or its component proteins rV, rE were assessed for cell mediated immune responses and memory immune protection against Y. enterocolitica 8081. rVE immunization resulted in extensive proliferation of both CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets; significantly high antibody titer with balanced IgG1: IgG2a/IgG2b isotypes (1:1 ratio) and up-regulation of both Th1 (TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-2, and IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines. On the other hand, rV immunization resulted in Th2 biased IgG response (11:1 ratio) and proliferation of CD4+ T-cell; rE group of mice exhibited considerably lower serum antibody titer with predominant Th1 response (1:3 ratio) and CD8+ T-cell proliferation. Comprehensive protection with superior survival (100%) was observed among rVE immunized mice when compared to the significantly lower survival rates among rE (37.5%) and rV (25%) groups when IP challenged with Y. enterocolitica 8081 after 120 days of immunization. Findings in this and our earlier studies define the bivalent fusion protein rVE as a potent candidate vaccine molecule with the capability to concurrently stimulate humoral and cell mediated immune responses and a proof of concept for developing efficient subunit vaccines against Gram negative facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:26733956

  3. Anti-prostate cancer effects of CTL cell induction in vitro by recombinant adenovirus mediated PSMA/4-1BBL dendritic cells: an immunotherapy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, C-G; Wu, D; Meng, F-D; Yang, M-H; Jiang, Y-H

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine anti-prostate cancer immune response induced by dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with PSMA/4-1BBL recombinant adenoviruses in vitro. Ad-PSMA, Ad-4-1BBL, and Ad-GFP were transfected into DCs derived from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. Ad-PSMA/4-1BBL-DC, Ad-PSMA-DC, Ad-4-1BBL-DC, Ad-GFP-DC, and normal-DC, PSMA and 4-1BBL protein levels in DCs were detected by western blot. IL-12, IFN-? and IL-10 were measured by ELISA. Mixed lymphocyte reaction and the cytotoxicity of each group targeted to LNCap, Du145, and 22RV prostate cancer cells were determined by CCK-8 assay. PSMA and 4-1BBL protein could express on DC successfully, the IL-12 supernatant content (134.29 ± 2.22 pg) was higher than others (P PSMA/4-1BBL-DC-CTL group showed the highest content of IFN-? (1176.10 ± 14.37pg/5 x 10(6) cells), but the lowest IL-10 content (75.14 ± 2.01 pg/5 x 10(6) cells) (P PSMA/4- 1BBL not only showed high secretion of IL-12, but also induced CTLs to stimulate and enhance the killing effect of PSMA specific effector cells to PSMA positively expressing prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the DCs infected with two kinds of tumor-associated antigens would induce more effective tumor-specific CTL induction. PMID:26125931

  4. Non-small lung cancer cells are prime targets for p53 gene transfer mediated by a recombinant adeno-associated virus type-2 vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Ulrich-Peter; Wulf, Marc-Andre; Stahn, Susanne; Heyd, Florian; Steidl, Ulrich; Fenk, Roland; Opalka, Bertram; Pitschke, Gerald; Prisack, Hans-Bernd; Bojar, Hans; Haas, Rainer; Kronenwett, Ralf

    2003-12-01

    In this study, we elucidated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus type-2 (rAAV-2) vectors for lung cancer gene therapy. Cell lines of the three major histological subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were highly susceptible for rAAV-2 showing transduction rates between 63.4 and 98.9%. In contrast, cell lines of small cell carcinomas were resistant to rAAV-2 infection. For restoration of p53 function in p53 deficient NSCLC, a rAAV-2 vector was constructed containing wt p53 cDNA. Following transduction with rAAV-p53, cell growth of all NSCLC cell lines was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner between 44 and 71.7% in comparison with rAAV-GFP transduced cells. The reduction of tumor cell growth was associated with increased apoptosis. Adding cisplatin to rAAV-p53-infected cells led to a significant growth inhibition between 81 and 91% indicating a synergistic effect between cisplatin and rAAV-p53. Interestingly, the tumor cells surviving cisplatin and rAAV-p53 treatment were inhibited in their ability to form colonies as reflected by a reduction of colony growth between 57 and 90.4%. In conclusion, rAAV-2 vectors exhibit a strong tropism for NSCLC. Successful inhibition of tumor cell growth following transduction with a rAAV-p53 vector underlines the potential role of rAAV-2 in cancer gene therapy. PMID:14712316

  5. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    KAUST Repository

    Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.

    2014-06-27

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (?4%) of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates. © 2014 Hill-Cawthorne et al.

  6. Manipulating Mitotic Recombination in the Zebrafish Embryo Through RecQ Helicases

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Jing; Bessling, Seneca L.; Cooper, Timothy K.; Harry C Dietz; McCallion, Andrew S; Fisher, Shannon

    2007-01-01

    RecQ DNA helicases resolve Rad-51-mediated recombination and suppress aberrant homologous recombination. RecQ gene loss is associated with cancer susceptibility and increased mitotic recombination. We have developed an in vivo assay based on a zebrafish pigment mutant for suppression of RecQ activity, and demonstrate that zebrafish RecQ genes have conserved function in suppressing mitotic recombination.

  7. Two fast temperature sensors for probing of the atmospheric boundary layer using small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Wildmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Two types of temperature sensors are designed and tested: a thermocouple and a fine wire resistance thermometer. The intention of this study is to figure out which kind of measurement principle is in general more suited for atmospheric boundary layer meteorology with small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA. The sensors are calibrated in a NIST traceable climate chamber and validated in flight against tower measurements, radiosondes and remote sensing. The sensors have a measurement range of at least ?10–50 °C, an absolute RMS error of less than ±0.2 K which is stable over the lifetime of the sensors, and a resolution of about 0.01 K. Both devices are tested for typical errors like radiation error and adiabatic heating, as well as for their dynamic response. Spectral resolutions of up to approximately 10 Hz can be obtained with both sensors, which makes them suitable for turbulence measurement. Their low cost of less than 100 EUR in pure hardware is a major advantage for research with small RPA.

  8. ATRIP Deacetylation by SIRT2 Drives ATR Checkpoint Activation by Promoting Binding to RPA-ssDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Head, PamelaSara E; Daddacha, Waaqo; Park, Seong-Hoon; Li, Xingzhe; Pan, Yunfeng; Madden, Matthew Z; Duong, Duc M; Xie, Maohua; Yu, Bing; Warren, Matthew D; Liu, Elaine A; Dhere, Vishal R; Li, Chunyang; Pradilla, Ivan; Torres, Mylin A; Wang, Ya; Dynan, William S; Doetsch, Paul W; Deng, Xingming; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Gius, David; Yu, David S

    2016-02-16

    The ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase checkpoint pathway maintains genome integrity; however, the role of the sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) acetylome in regulating this pathway is not clear. We found that deacetylation of ATR-interacting protein (ATRIP), a regulatory partner of ATR, by SIRT2 potentiates the ATR checkpoint. SIRT2 interacts with and deacetylates ATRIP at lysine 32 (K32) in response to replication stress. SIRT2 deacetylation of ATRIP at K32 drives ATR autophosphorylation and signaling and facilitates DNA replication fork progression and recovery of stalled replication forks. K32 deacetylation by SIRT2 further promotes ATRIP accumulation to DNA damage sites and binding to replication protein A-coated single-stranded DNA (RPA-ssDNA). Collectively, these results support a model in which ATRIP deacetylation by SIRT2 promotes ATR-ATRIP binding to RPA-ssDNA to drive ATR activation and thus facilitate recovery from replication stress, outlining a mechanism by which the ATR checkpoint is regulated by SIRT2 through deacetylation. PMID:26854234

  9. Static correlation and electron localization in molecular dimers from the self-consistent RPA and GW approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Hellgren, Maria; Rohr, Daniel R; Ren, Xinguo; Rubio, Angel; Scheffler, Matthias; Rinke, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We investigate static correlation and delocalization errors in the self-consistent GW and random-phase approximation (RPA) by studying molecular dissociation of the H_2 and LiH molecules. Although both approximations are diagrammatically identical, the non-locality and frequency dependence of the GW self-energy crucially influence the different energy contributions to the total energy as compared to the use of a static local potential in the RPA. The latter leads to significantly larger correlation energies which allows for a better description of static correlation at intermediate bond distances. The substantial error found in GW is further analyzed by comparing spin-restricted and spin-unrestricted calculations. At large but finite nuclear separation their difference gives an estimate of the so-called fractional spin error normally determined only in the dissociation limit. Furthermore, a calculation of the dipole moment of the LiH molecule at dissociation reveals a large delocalization error in GW making t...

  10. Nuclear dissipation as damping of collective motion in the time-dependent RPA and extensions of it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have formulated a nonperturbative, microscopic dissipative process in the limit of an infinite mean free path which does not require any statistical assumptions. It attributes the damping of the collective motion to real transitions from the collective state to degenerate, more complicated nucelar states. The dissipation is described through wave packets which solve an approximate Schroedinger equation within extended subspaces, larger than the original subspace of the undamped motion. When the simple RPA is used, this process associates the dissipation with the escape width for direct particle emission. When the Second RPA is used, it associates the dissipation with the spreading width for transitions to the 2p-2h components of the nuclear compound states. The energy loss rate for sharp n-phonon initial states is proportional to the total collective energy. The classical dissipation, however, is obtained for coherent, multiphonon, initial packets which describe the damping of the mean field oscillations, and allow a theoretical connection with the Vibrating Potential Model, and thereby with models of one-body dissipation. The present model contrasts with linear response theories. Canonical coordinates for the collective degree of freedom are explicitly introduced. This allows the construction of a nonlinear frictional Hamiltonian which provides a connection with quantal friction. The dissipation process developed here is properly reversible rather than irreversible, in the sense that it is described by an approximate Schroedinger equation which honors time reversibility, rather than by a coarse grained master equation which violates it. Thus, the present theory contrasts with transport theories

  11. Recombinant hTRBP and hPACT Modulate hAgo2-Catalyzed siRNA-Mediated Target RNA Cleavage In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willkomm, Sarah; Deerberg, Andrea; Heidemann, Johannes; Flügge, Friedemann; Meine, Janica; Hu, Rui; Kretschmer-Kazemi Far, Rosel; Restle, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The human TAR RNA-binding protein (hTRBP) and protein activator of protein kinase R (hPACT) are important players in RNA interference (RNAi). Together with hArgonaute2 (hAgo2) and hDicer they have been reported to form the RISC-loading complex (RLC). Among other functions, hTRBP was suggested to assist the loading of hAgo2 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) within the RLC. Although several studies have been conducted to evaluate the specific functions of hTRBP and hPACT in RNAi, exact mechanisms and modes of action are still unknown. Here, we present a biochemical study further evaluating the role of hTRBP and hPACT in hAgo2-loading. We found that both proteins enhance hAgo2-mediated RNA cleavage significantly; even a hAgo2 mutant impaired in siRNA binding shows full cleavage activity in the presence of hTRBP or hPACT. Pre-steady state binding studies reveal that the assembly of wildtype-hAgo2 (wt-hAgo2) and siRNAs remains largely unaffected, whereas the binding of mutant hAgo2-PAZ9 to siRNA is restored by adding either hTRBP or hPACT. We conclude that both proteins assist in positioning the siRNA within hAgo2 to ensure optimal binding and cleavage. Overall, our data indicate that hTRBP and hPACT are part of a regulative system of RNAi that is important for efficient target RNA cleavage. PMID:26784517

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana mutants altered in homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, J E; Paszkowski, J

    1997-10-14

    Homologous recombination contributes both to the generation of allelic diversity and to the preservation of genetic information. In plants, a lack of suitable experimental material has prevented studies of the regulatory and enzymatic aspects of recombination in somatic and meiotic cells. We have isolated nine Arabidopsis thaliana mutants hypersensitive to x-ray irradiation (xrs) and examined their recombination properties. For the three xrs loci described here, single recessive mutations were found to confer simultaneous hypersensitivities to the DNA-damaging chemicals mitomycin C (MMCs) and/or methyl methanesulfonate (MMSs) and alterations in homologous recombination. Mutant xrs9 (Xrays, MMSs) is reduced in both somatic and meiotic recombination and resembles yeast mutants of the rad52 epistatic group. xrs11 (Xrays, MMCs) is deficient in the x-ray-mediated stimulation of homologous recombination in somatic cells in a manner suggesting a specific signaling defect. xrs4 (Xrays, MMSs, MMCs) has a significant deficiency in somatic recombination, but this is accompanied by meiotic hyper-recombination. A corresponding phenotype has not been reported in other systems and thus this indicates a novel, plant-specific regulatory circuit linking mitotic and meiotic recombination. PMID:9326679

  13. Recombinant Technology and Probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icy D’Silva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant technology has led the way to monumental advances in the development of useful molecules, including the development of safe probiotics. The development of novel approaches using recombinant technology and probiotics that allow accurate targeting of therapeutics to the mucosa is an interesting area of research. The creation and use of recombinant probiotics expressing recombinantovalbumin, recombinant ovalbumin mutants and yet-to-be-designed recombinant hypo/non-allergenic molecules offer the opportunity to further investigate their effects for food, nutrition, environment andhealth. This review highlights advances in native probiotics and recombinant probiotics expressing native and recombinant molecules for food, nutrition, environment and health.

  14. Recombinant Technology and Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Icy D’Silva

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant technology has led the way to monumental advances in the development of useful molecules, including the development of safe probiotics. The development of novel approaches using recombinant technology and probiotics that allow accurate targeting of therapeutics to the mucosa is an interesting area of research. The creation and use of recombinant probiotics expressing recombinantovalbumin, recombinant ovalbumin mutants and yet-to-be-designed recombinant hypo/non-allergenic molecule...

  15. Changes in primary metabolism under light and dark conditions in response to overproduction of a response regulator RpaA in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hiroko; Shirai, Tomokazu; Okamoto, Mami; Kondo, Akihiko; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The study of the primary metabolism of cyanobacteria in response to light conditions is important for environmental biology because cyanobacteria are widely distributed among various ecological niches. Cyanobacteria uniquely possess circadian rhythms, with central oscillators consisting from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. The two-component histidine kinase SasA/Hik8 and response regulator RpaA transduce the circadian signal from KaiABC to control gene expression. Here, we generated a strain overexpressing rpaA in a unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The rpaA-overexpressing strain showed pleiotropic phenotypes, including slower growth, aberrant degradation of an RNA polymerase sigma factor SigE after the light-to-dark transition, and higher accumulation of sugar catabolic enzyme transcripts under dark conditions. Metabolome analysis revealed delayed glycogen degradation, decreased sugar phosphates and organic acids in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and increased amino acids under dark conditions. The current results demonstrate that in this cyanobacterium, RpaA is a regulator of primary metabolism and involved in adaptation to changes in light conditions. PMID:26379657

  16. Generation of Modified Pestiviruses by Targeted Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Friis, Martin Barfred

    Infectious cDNA clones are a prerequisite for directed genetic manipulation of pestivirus RNA genomes. We have developed a novel strategy to facilitate manipulation and rescue of modified pestiviruses from infectious cDNA clones based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The strategy involves targeted modification of viral cDNA genomes, cloned within BACs, by Red/ET recombination-mediated mutagenesis in E.coli DH10B cells. Using recombination-mediated mutagenesis for the targeted design, the work can be expedited and focused in principal on any sequence within the viral genome and hence is not limited to the use of internal restriction sites. Rescue of modified pestiviruses can be obtained by electroporation of cell cultures with full-length RNA transcripts in vitro transcribed from the recombined BAC clones. We have used this approach to generate a series of new pestivirus BACs modified within different genomic regions and infectious pestiviruses have been rescued from several of these new constructs,demonstrating that recombination-mediated mutagenesis of pestivirus BACs provides a useful tool for expediting the construction of recombinant pestiviruses.

  17. Recombinant DNA in Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Cederbaum, Stephen D.; Fareed, George C.; Lovett, Michael A.; Shapiro, Larry J.

    1984-01-01

    Studies in bacteria and bacterial viruses have led to methods to manipulate and recombine DNA in unique and reproducible ways and to amplify these recombined molecules millions of times. Once properly identified, the recombinant DNA molecules can be used in various ways useful in medicine and human biology. There are many applications for recombinant DNA technology. Cloned complementary DNA has been used to produce various human proteins in microorganisms. Insulin and growth hormone have been...

  18. Improving baculovirus recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yuguang; Chapman, David A.G.; Jones, Ian M

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses have established themselves as a favoured technology for the high-level expression of recombinant proteins. The construction of recombinant viruses, however, is a time consuming step that restricts consideration of the technology for high throughput developments. Here we use a targeted gene knockout technology to inactivate an essential viral gene that lies adjacent to the locus used for recombination. Viral DNA prepared from the knockout fails to initiate an infecti...

  19. Generation of Modified Pestiviruses by Targeted Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Friis, Martin Barfred; Risager, Peter Christian; Reimann, Ilona; Beer, Martin

    involves targeted modification of viral cDNA genomes, cloned within BACs, by Red/ET recombination-mediated mutagenesis in E.coli DH10B cells. Using recombination-mediated mutagenesis for the targeted design, the work can be expedited and focused in principal on any sequence within the viral genome and......Infectious cDNA clones are a prerequisite for directed genetic manipulation of pestivirus RNA genomes. We have developed a novel strategy to facilitate manipulation and rescue of modified pestiviruses from infectious cDNA clones based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The strategy...... hence is not limited to the use of internal restriction sites. Rescue of modified pestiviruses can be obtained by electroporation of cell cultures with full-length RNA transcripts in vitro transcribed from the recombined BAC clones. We have used this approach to generate a series of new pestivirus BACs...

  20. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  1. DNA Detection Using Recombination Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Piepenburg, Olaf; Williams, Colin H; Stemple, Derek L; Armes, Niall A

    2006-01-01

    DNA amplification is essential to most nucleic acid testing strategies, but established techniques require sophisticated equipment or complex experimental procedures, and their uptake outside specialised laboratories has been limited. Our novel approach, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), couples isothermal recombinase-driven primer targeting of template material with strand-displacement DNA synthesis. It achieves exponential amplification with no need for pretreatment of sample DNA....

  2. PRODUCTION OF RECOMBINANT PROTEINS IN INSECT CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kollewe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the wide range of methods and expression hosts available for the heterologous production of recombinant proteins, insect cells are ideal for the production of complex proteins requiring extensive post-translational modification. This review article provides an overview of the available insect-cell expression systems and their properties, focusing on the widely-used Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS. We discuss the different strategies used to generate recombinant baculovirus vectors and show how advanced techniques for virus titer determination can accelerate the production of recombinant proteins. The stable transfection of insect cells is an alternative to BEVS which has recently been augmented with recombinase-mediated cassette exchange for site-specific gene integration. We consider the advantages and limitations of these techniques for the production of recombinant proteins in insect cells and compare them to other expression platforms.

  3. Degradation of RPA 202248 [U-14C-phenyl]alpha(-(cyclopropylcarbonyl)-2-(methylsulfonyl)-beta-oxo-4-(trifluromethyl)benzenepropanenitrile), the primary degradation product of isoxaflutole, in an outdoor aquatic microcosm system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, J Kent; Liu, Anne; Kelly, Iain; Allen, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Isoxaflutole, the active ingredient in BALANCE WDG and BALANCE PRO corn herbicides and a co-formulant with the herbicide flufenacet in the product EPIC, is readily degraded in soil and water to RPA 202248 alpha(-(cyclopropylcarbonyl)-2-(methyvlsulfonyl)-beta-oxo-4-(trifluromethyl)benzenepropanenitrile). Because RPA 202248 is responsible at the molecular level for isoxaflutole's herbicidal activity it is important to understand the environmental behavior of the degradation product. Laboratory studies suggest that RPA 202248 is stable to hydrolysis and photolysis in aqueous systems and hence poses a possible environmental concern. As part of a program of work towards understanding the actual field situation, an outdoor microcosm study was carried out. Over the course of the 29-day study, residues remained predominantly in the aqueous phase. A slow but steady degradation of RPA 202248 was observed leading to the formation of RPA 203328 (2-methylsulfonyl-4-trifluoromethylbenzoic acid), which has no herbicidal activity. The half-life of RPA 202248 was calculated to be 103 days. These findings indicate that aqueous degradation should be considered as a potential route of dissipation when assessing the fate of RPA 202248 in large scale impounded water bodies, such as ponds, lakes, or reservoirs in the Mid-West Corn Belt. PMID:15620081

  4. Single-stranded heteroduplex intermediates in ? Red homologous recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Youming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Red proteins of lambda phage mediate probably the simplest and most efficient homologous recombination reactions yet described. However the mechanism of dsDNA recombination remains undefined. Results Here we show that the Red proteins can act via full length single stranded intermediates to establish single stranded heteroduplexes at the replication fork. We created asymmetrically digestible dsDNA substrates by exploiting the fact that Red? exonuclease activity requires a 5' phosphorylated end, or is blocked by phosphothioates. Using these substrates, we found that the most efficient configuration for dsDNA recombination occurred when the strand that can prime Okazaki-like synthesis contained both homology regions on the same ssDNA molecule. Furthermore, we show that Red recombination requires replication of the target molecule. Conclusions Hence we propose a new model for dsDNA recombination, termed 'beta' recombination, based on the formation of ssDNA heteroduplexes at the replication fork. Implications of the model were tested using (i an in situ assay for recombination, which showed that recombination generated mixed wild type and recombinant colonies; and (ii the predicted asymmetries of the homology arms, which showed that recombination is more sensitive to non-homologies attached to 5' than 3' ends. Whereas beta recombination can generate deletions in target BACs of at least 50 kb at about the same efficiency as small deletions, the converse event of insertion is very sensitive to increasing size. Insertions up to 3 kb are most efficiently achieved using beta recombination, however at greater sizes, an alternative Red-mediated mechanism(s appears to be equally efficient. These findings define a new intermediate in homologous recombination, which also has practical implications for recombineering with the Red proteins.

  5. Recombination in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A M; McCahon, D; Slade, W R; Newman, J W

    1982-07-01

    The aphthovirus genome consists of a single molecule of single-stranded RNA that encodes all the virus-induced proteins. We isolated recombinant aphthoviruses from cells simultaneously infected with temperature-sensitive mutants of two different subtype strains. Analysis of the proteins induced by 16 independently generated recombinants revealed two types of protein pattern, which were consistent with single genetic crossovers on the 5' side and 3' side, respectively, of the central P34-coding region. Recombinants invariably inherited all four coat proteins from the same parent, and novel recombinant proteins were not observed. RNAase T1 fingerprints of virus RNA, prepared from representatives of each recombinant type, confirmed the approximate crossover sites that had been deduced from the inheritance of proteins. These fingerprints provide molecular evidence of recombination at the level of RNA and demonstrate the potential of RNA recombination for producing genetic diversity among picornaviruses. PMID:6295637

  6. Kinetic theory of spin-polarized systems in electric and magnetic fields with spin-orbit coupling: II. RPA response functions and collective modes

    OpenAIRE

    Morawetz, K.

    2015-01-01

    The spin and density response functions in the random phase approximation (RPA) are derived by linearizing the kinetic equation including a magnetic field, the spin-orbit coupling, and mean fields with respect to an external electric field. Different polarization functions appear describing various precession motions showing Rabi satellites due to an effective Zeeman field. The latter turns out to consist of the mean-field magnetization, the magnetic field, and the spin-orbit vector. The coll...

  7. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin Volume VIII : Comparison of the RPA Testing Rules, Technical Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalski, John; Ngouenet, Roger

    2002-08-01

    The 2000 FCRPS Biological Opinion (BO) suggested two statistical hypothesis tests to assess the RPA compliance by the years 2005 and 2008. With the decision rules proposed in the BO, Skalski and Ngouenet (2001) developed a compliance framework based on classical t-tests and used Monte-Carlo simulations to calculate power curves. Unfortunately, the two-sample t tests proposed in the BO only have moderate-to-low probability of correctly assessing the true status of the smolt survival recovery. We have developed a superior two-phase regression statistical model for testing the RPA compliance. The two-phase regression model improves the statistical power over the standard two-sample t-tests. In addition, the two-phase regression model has a higher probability of correctly assessing the true status of the smolt survival recovery. These classical statistical power curve approaches do not incorporate prior knowledge into the decision process. Therefore, we propose to examine Bayesian methods that complement classical statistics in situations where uncertainty must be taken into account. The Bayesian analysis will incorporate scientific/biological knowledge/expertise to thoroughly assess the RPA compliance in 2005 and 2008.

  8. Calculation of the RPA response function of nuclei to quasi-elastic electron scattering with a density-dependent NN interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So far, the non-relativistic longitudinal and transverse functions in electron quasi-elastic scattering on the nuclei failed in reproducing satisfactorily the existent experimental data. The calculations including relativistic RPA correlations utilize until now the relativistic Hartree approximation to describe the nuclear matter. But, this provides an incompressibility module two times higher than its experimental value what is an important drawback for the calculation of realistic relativistic RPA correlations. Hence, we have determined the RPA response functions of nuclei by utilising a description of the relativistic nuclear matter leading to an incompressibility module in agreement with the empirical value. To do that we have utilized an interaction in the relativistic Hartree approximation in which we have determined the coupling constants ?-N and ?-N as a function of the density in order to reproduce the saturation curve obtained by a Dirac-Brueckner calculation. The results which we have obtained show that the longitudinal response function and the Coulomb sum generally overestimated when one utilizes the pure relativistic Hartree approximation, are here in good agreement with the experimental data for several nuclei

  9. Recombination and Genetic Diversity

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    T. C., Coutinho; T.T.da, Silva; G.L., Toledo.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a spatial stochastic model for genetic recombination, that answers if diversity is preserved in an infinite population of recombinat-ing individuals distributed spatially. We show that, for finite times, recombination may maintain all the various potential different types, b [...] ut when time grows infinitely, the diversity of individuals extinguishes off. So under the model premisses, recombination and spatial localization alone are not enough to explain diversity in a population. Further we discuss an application of the model to a controversy regarding the diversity of "Major Histocompatibility Complex" (MHC).

  10. Do avian mitochondria recombine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Sofia; Smith, Nick G C; Ellegren, Hans

    2004-02-01

    The dogma of strict maternal inheritance of mitochondria is now being tested with population genetics methods on sequence data from many species. In this study we investigated whether recombination occurs in the mitochondria of the blue tit ( Parus caeruleus) by studying polymorphisms in the mitochondrial control region and in a recently identified (A)(n) microsatellite on the W chromosome. The female heterogamety of avian sex chromosomes allows a test of whether mitochondrial recombination affects genealogical inference by comparison of mitochondrial and W-linked sequence variation. There is no discrepancy between mitochondrial and W-linked genealogies in blue tits, consistent with no recombination. We also analyzed mitochondrial sequence variation in both blue tits and peregrine falcons ( Falco peregrinus) using a coalescent-based approach which accounts for recurrent mutation; in neither bird species did we find evidence of recombination. We conclude that it is unlikely that mitochondrial recombination has large effects on mitochondrial genetic variability in birds. PMID:15042336

  11. Minutes and group memories from all NERBC/USGS-RPA power plant siting task force meetings through October, 1980. Appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New England River Basins Commission/United States Geological Survey-Resource Planning Analysis Office (NERBC/USGS-RPA) Power Plant Siting Task Force has formerly met seven times between July 1979 and August 1980. At the first meeting on July 13, 1979, the members agreed that there were many problems with the current process of selecting sites for power plants in New England, and that they would work by consensus to find solutions for these problems. At the second meeting on October 19, 1979, NERBC staff presented information on the site selection and approval processes in New England. The Task Force began a preliminary discussion of problems in these processes, and agreed that the initial scope of work of the Task Force would focus on issues in site selection. At the third meeting on January 18, 1980, the Task Force began initial discussions in three areas: imperfections in the site selection process, stakeholders in the site selection process, and principles to guide solutions to the problems in site selection. On March 7, 1980, at the fourth meeting, the Task Force continued discussions on imperfections, stakeholders, and principles. At the fifth meeting on May 2, 1980, the Task Force reached a wide range of agreements on the difficulties encountered in the site selection process and on the principles guiding problem solving in site selection. At the sixth meeting on May 29, 1980, the Task Force focused on solutions to the problems identified at earlier meetings. Groups of Task Force members constructed eight different scenarios describing alternative power plant siting processes. In July 1980, the Task Force met for the seventh time and refined the eight scenarios, paring them down to five. An attempt was made to develop two scenarios using the common elements from the five. One of these two graphic models was based on government involvement in the site selection process, and the other was based on stakeholder involvement in the process

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana mutants altered in homologous?recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Jean E.; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    Homologous recombination contributes both to the generation of allelic diversity and to the preservation of genetic information. In plants, a lack of suitable experimental material has prevented studies of the regulatory and enzymatic aspects of recombination in somatic and meiotic cells. We have isolated nine Arabidopsis thaliana mutants hypersensitive to x-ray irradiation (xrs) and examined their recombination properties. For the three xrs loci described here, single recessive mutations were found to confer simultaneous hypersensitivities to the DNA-damaging chemicals mitomycin C (MMCs) and/or methyl methanesulfonate (MMSs) and alterations in homologous recombination. Mutant xrs9 (Xrays, MMSs) is reduced in both somatic and meiotic recombination and resembles yeast mutants of the rad52 epistatic group. xrs11 (Xrays, MMCs) is deficient in the x-ray-mediated stimulation of homologous recombination in somatic cells in a manner suggesting a specific signaling defect. xrs4 (Xrays, MMSs, MMCs) has a significant deficiency in somatic recombination, but this is accompanied by meiotic hyper-recombination. A corresponding phenotype has not been reported in other systems and thus this indicates a novel, plant-specific regulatory circuit linking mitotic and meiotic recombination. PMID:9326679

  13. Multiphoton Assisted Recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed multiphoton assisted recombination in the presence of a 38.8 GHz microwave field. Stimulated emission of up to ten microwave photons results in energy transfer from continuum electrons, enabling recombination. The maximum electron energy loss is far greater than the 2Up predicted by the standard 'simpleman's' model. The data are well reproduced by both an approximate analytic expression and numerical simulations in which the combined Coulomb and radiation fields are taken into account

  14. Resolution-of-identity approach to Hartree-Fock, hybrid density functionals, RPA, MP2 and GW with numeric atom-centered orbital basis functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficient implementation of electronic structure methods is essential for first principles modeling of molecules and solids. We present here a particularly efficient common framework for methods beyond semilocal density-functional theory (DFT), including Hartree-Fock (HF), hybrid density functionals, random-phase approximation (RPA), second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and the GW method. This computational framework allows us to use compact and accurate numeric atom-centered orbitals (NAOs), popular in many implementations of semilocal DFT, as basis functions. The essence of our framework is to employ the ‘resolution of identity (RI)’ technique to facilitate the treatment of both the two-electron Coulomb repulsion integrals (required in all these approaches) and the linear density-response function (required for RPA and GW). This is possible because these quantities can be expressed in terms of the products of single-particle basis functions, which can in turn be expanded in a set of auxiliary basis functions (ABFs). The construction of ABFs lies at the heart of the RI technique, and we propose here a simple prescription for constructing ABFs which can be applied regardless of whether the underlying radial functions have a specific analytical shape (e.g. Gaussian) or are numerically tabulated. We demonstrate the accuracy of our RI implementation for Gaussian and NAO basis functions, as well as the convergence behavior of our NAO basis sets for the above-mentioned methods. Benchmark results are presented for the ionization energies of 50 selected atoms and molecules from the G2 ion test set obtained with the GW and MP2 self-energy methods, and the G2-I atomization energies as well as the S22 molecular interaction energies obtained with the RPA method. (paper)

  15. Human XPC-hHR23B interacts with XPA-RPA in the recognition of triplex-directed psoralen DNA interstrand crosslinks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoma, Brian S; Wakasugi, Mitsuo; Christensen, Jesper; Reddy, Madhava C; Vasquez, Karen M

    2005-01-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) represent a severe form of damage that blocks DNA metabolic processes and can lead to cell death or carcinogenesis. The repair of DNA ICLs in mammals is not well characterized. We have reported previously that a key protein complex of nucleotide excision repair (NER), XPA-RPA, recognizes DNA ICLs. We now report the use of triplex technology to direct a site-specific psoralen ICL to a target DNA substrate to determine whether the human global genome NER damage re...

  16. The use of recombinant DNA plasmids for the determination of DNA-repair and recombination in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, R; Masson, W. K.; Debenham, P G; Webb, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    Using the recombinant plasmid pSV2gpt and DNA transfer techniques, cell mediated DNA ligation and recombination of plasmid DNA have been demonstrated in four human cell lines. Data suggesting the involvement of a possible defect in the cellular equilibrium between ligation and exonuclease digestion of double strand DNA scissions in an ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cell line is discussed. The same A-T line was grossly proficient in DNA recombination but it will be necessary to distinguish betwee...

  17. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system for assaying recombination using tetrad analysis in a higher eukaryotic system (6). This system enabled the measurement of the frequency and distribution of recombination events at a genome wide level in wild type Arabidopsis (7), construction of genetic linkage maps which include positions for each centromere (8), and modeling of the strength and pattern of interference (9). This proposal extends the use of tetrad analysis in Arabidopsis by using it as the basis for assessing the phenotypes of mutants in genes important for recombination and the regulation of crossover interference and performing a novel genetic screen. In addition to broadening our knowledge of a classic genetic problem - the regulation of recombination by crossover interference - this proposal also provides broader impact by: generating pedagogical tools for use in hands-on classroom experience with genetics, building interdisciplinary collegial partnerships, and creating a platform for participation by junior scientists from underrepresented groups. There are three specific aims: (1) Isolate mutants in Arabidopsis MUS81 homologs using T-DNA and TILLING (2) Characterize recombination levels and interference in mus81 mutants (3) Execute a novel genetic screen, based on tetrad analysis, for genes that regulate meiotic recombination

  18. Randomized Phase II Trial of High-Dose Melatonin and Radiation Therapy for RPA Class 2 Patients With Brain Metastases (RTOG 0119)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine if high-dose melatonin for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 2 patients with brain metastases improved survival over historical controls, and to determine if the time of day melatonin was given affected its toxicity or efficacy. RTOG 0119 was a phase II randomized trial for this group of patients. Methods and Materials: RTOG RPA Class 2 patients with brain metastases were randomized to 20 mg of melatonin, given either in the morning (8-9 AM) or in the evening (8-9 PM). All patients received radiation therapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) in the afternoon. Melatonin was continued until neurologic deterioration or death. The primary endpoint was overall survival time. Neurologic deterioration, as reflected by the Mini-Mental Status Examination, was also measured. Results: Neither of the randomized groups had survival distributions that differed significantly from the historic controls of patients treated with whole-brain radiotherapy. The median survivals of the morning and evening melatonin treatments were 3.4 and 2.8 months, while the RTOG historical control survival was 4.1 months. Conclusions: High-dose melatonin did not show any beneficial effect in this group of patients

  19. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the "next-generation" recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design. PMID:25787135

  20. Illegitimate V(D)J recombination-mediated deletions in Notch1 and Bcl11b are not sufficient for extensive clonal expansion and show minimal age or sex bias in frequency or junctional processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Examines illegitimate V(D)J deletion junctions in Notch1 and Bcl11b. • Suggests little influence of deletions alone on clonal outgrowth in wild-type mice. • No age or sex biases in frequency, clonality, or junctional processing observed. • Contrasts with previous results at TCRβ and HPRT1 loci. • Deletions in Bcl11b may be tolerated more easily than those in Notch1. - Abstract: Illegitimate V(D)J recombination at oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes is implicated in formation of several T cell malignancies. Notch1 and Bcl11b, genes involved in developing T cell specification, selection, proliferation, and survival, were previously shown to contain hotspots for deletional illegitimate V(D)J recombination associated with radiation-induced thymic lymphoma. Interestingly, these deletions were also observed in wild-type animals. In this study, we conducted frequency, clonality, and junctional processing analyses of Notch1 and Bcl11b deletions during mouse development and compared results to published analyses of authentic V(D)J rearrangements at the T cell receptor beta (TCRβ) locus and illegitimate V(D)J deletions observed at the human, nonimmune HPRT1 locus not involved in T cell malignancies. We detect deletions in Notch1 and Bcl11b in thymic and splenic T cell populations, consistent with cells bearing deletions in the circulating lymphocyte pool. Deletions in thymus can occur in utero, increase in frequency between fetal and postnatal stages, are detected at all ages examined between fetal and 7 months, exhibit only limited clonality (contrasting with previous results in radiation-sensitive mouse strains), and consistent with previous reports are more frequent in Bcl11b, partially explained by relatively high Recombination Signal Information Content (RIC) scores. Deletion junctions in Bcl11b exhibit greater germline nucleotide loss, while in Notch1 palindromic (P) nucleotides are more abundant, although average P nucleotide length is similar for both genes and consistent with results at the TCRβ locus. Non-templated (N) nucleotide insertions appear to increase between fetal and postnatal stages for Notch1, consistent with normal terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) activity; however, neonatal Bcl11b junctions contain elevated levels of N insertions. Finally, contrasting with results at the HPRT1 locus, we find no obvious age or gender bias in junctional processing, and inverted repeats at recessed coding ends (Pr nucleotides) correspond mostly to single-base additions consistent with normal TdT activity

  1. Illegitimate V(D)J recombination-mediated deletions in Notch1 and Bcl11b are not sufficient for extensive clonal expansion and show minimal age or sex bias in frequency or junctional processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champagne, Devin P., E-mail: devin.champagne@uvm.edu; Shockett, Penny E., E-mail: pshockett@selu.edu

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • Examines illegitimate V(D)J deletion junctions in Notch1 and Bcl11b. • Suggests little influence of deletions alone on clonal outgrowth in wild-type mice. • No age or sex biases in frequency, clonality, or junctional processing observed. • Contrasts with previous results at TCRβ and HPRT1 loci. • Deletions in Bcl11b may be tolerated more easily than those in Notch1. - Abstract: Illegitimate V(D)J recombination at oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes is implicated in formation of several T cell malignancies. Notch1 and Bcl11b, genes involved in developing T cell specification, selection, proliferation, and survival, were previously shown to contain hotspots for deletional illegitimate V(D)J recombination associated with radiation-induced thymic lymphoma. Interestingly, these deletions were also observed in wild-type animals. In this study, we conducted frequency, clonality, and junctional processing analyses of Notch1 and Bcl11b deletions during mouse development and compared results to published analyses of authentic V(D)J rearrangements at the T cell receptor beta (TCRβ) locus and illegitimate V(D)J deletions observed at the human, nonimmune HPRT1 locus not involved in T cell malignancies. We detect deletions in Notch1 and Bcl11b in thymic and splenic T cell populations, consistent with cells bearing deletions in the circulating lymphocyte pool. Deletions in thymus can occur in utero, increase in frequency between fetal and postnatal stages, are detected at all ages examined between fetal and 7 months, exhibit only limited clonality (contrasting with previous results in radiation-sensitive mouse strains), and consistent with previous reports are more frequent in Bcl11b, partially explained by relatively high Recombination Signal Information Content (RIC) scores. Deletion junctions in Bcl11b exhibit greater germline nucleotide loss, while in Notch1 palindromic (P) nucleotides are more abundant, although average P nucleotide length is similar for both genes and consistent with results at the TCRβ locus. Non-templated (N) nucleotide insertions appear to increase between fetal and postnatal stages for Notch1, consistent with normal terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) activity; however, neonatal Bcl11b junctions contain elevated levels of N insertions. Finally, contrasting with results at the HPRT1 locus, we find no obvious age or gender bias in junctional processing, and inverted repeats at recessed coding ends (P{sub r} nucleotides) correspond mostly to single-base additions consistent with normal TdT activity.

  2. The 32 kDa subunit of replication protein A (RPA) participates in the DNA replication of Mung bean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) by interacting with the viral Rep protein

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Karjee, Sumona; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Mung bean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a member of genus begomoviridae and its genome comprises of bipartite (two components, namely DNA-A and DNA-B), single-stranded, circular DNA of about 2.7 kb. During rolling circle replication (RCR) of the DNA, the stability of the genome and maintenance of the stem–loop structure of the replication origin is crucial. Hence the role of host single-stranded DNA-binding protein, Replication protein A (RPA), in the RCR of MYMIV was examined. Two RPA...

  3. Dielectronic recombination at nebular temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination via low-lying resonance states are calculated for the recombined ions C+, C2+, N2+, N3+ and O4+ at the temperatures and densities appropriate to planetary nebulae. The total dielectronic recombination coefficients obtained are substantially larger than the corresponding radiative recombination coefficients, calculated neglecting resonances, and differ considerably from the dielectronic recombination coefficients generally in use. Effective recombination coefficients are given for spectrum lines that are formed during the cascade process. Some of these lines have been observed in IUE spectra of planetary nebulae. (author)

  4. Recombineering Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  5. Recombinant hormones in osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars

    2013-01-01

    For the last 10 years, bone anabolic therapy with the recombinant human parathyroid hormone (rhPTH) analogue, teriparatide (rhPTH[1 - 34]), or full-length rhPTH(1 - 84) has been an option in the treatment of osteoporosis. Both drugs are given as a daily subcutaneous injection. In the USA, only teriparatide is marketed.

  6. Dissociative recombination of NH+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have experimentally investigated dissociative recombination of NH+ with electrons using a merged ion and electron beam configuration in a storage ring. A fast counting and position sensitive imaging detector enabled us to perform fragment imaging measurements over relative electron-ion collision energies from 0 to 12 eV. The results show unprecedented details on product excitation and on the reaction dynamics.

  7. Recombineering: A Homologous Recombination-Based Method of Genetic Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Sharan, Shyam K.; Thomason, Lynn C.; Kuznetsov, Sergey G; Court, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    Recombineering is an efficient method of in vivo genetic engineering applicable to chromosomal as well as episomal replicons in E. coli. This method circumvents the need for most standard in vitro cloning techniques. Recombineering allows construction of DNA molecules with precise junctions without constraints being imposed by restriction enzyme site location. Bacteriophage homologous recombination proteins catalyze these recombineering reactions using double- and single-strand linear DNA sub...

  8. Recombination Phenotypes of Escherichia coli greA Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poteete Anthony R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elongation factor GreA binds to RNA polymerase and modulates transcriptional pausing. Some recent research suggests that the primary role of GreA may not be to regulate gene expression, but rather, to promote the progression of replication forks which collide with RNA polymerase, and which might otherwise collapse. Replication fork collapse is known to generate dsDNA breaks, which can be recombinogenic. It follows that GreA malfunction could have consequences affecting homologous recombination. Results Escherichia coli mutants bearing substitutions of the active site acidic residues of the transcription elongation factor GreA, D41N and E44K, were isolated as suppressors of growth inhibition by a toxic variant of the bacteriophage lambda Red-beta recombination protein. These mutants, as well as a D41A greA mutant and a greA deletion, were tested for proficiency in recombination events. The mutations were found to increase the efficiency of RecA-RecBCD-mediated and RecA-Red-mediated recombination, which are replication-independent, and to decrease the efficiency of replication-dependent Red-mediated recombination. Conclusion These observations provide new evidence for a role of GreA in resolving conflicts between replication and transcription.

  9. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Germann, Susanne Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is accompanied by extensive changes to chromatin organization at the site of DNA damage. Some of these changes are mediated through acetylation/deacetylation of histones. Here, we show that recombinational repair of DNA damage induced by the anti-cancer drug camptothecin (CPT) and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) is blocked by sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, PBA suppresses CPT- and MMS-induced genetic recombination as well as DNA double-strand break repair during mating-type interconversion. Treatment with PBA is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in histone H4 lysine 8 acetylation. Live cell imaging of homologous recombination proteins indicates that repair of CPT-induced DNA damage is redirected to a non-recombinogenic pathway in the presence of PBA without loss in cell viability. In contrast, the suppression of MMS-induced recombination by PBA is accompanied by a dramatic loss in cell viability. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PBA inhibits DNA damage-induced homologous recombination likely by mediating changes in chromatin acetylation. Moreover, the combination of PBA with genotoxic agents can lead to different cell fates depending on the type of DNA damage inflicted.

  10. RNA-RNA recombination in plant virus replication and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztuba-Soli?ska, Joanna; Urbanowicz, Anna; Figlerowicz, Marek; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2011-01-01

    RNA-RNA recombination is one of the strongest forces shaping the genomes of plant RNA viruses. The detection of recombination is a challenging task that prompted the development of both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems. In the divided genome of Brome mosaic virus system, both inter- and intrasegmental crossovers are described. Other systems utilize satellite or defective interfering RNAs (DI-RNAs) of Turnip crinkle virus, Tomato bushy stunt virus, Cucumber necrosis virus, and Potato virus X. These assays identified the mechanistic details of the recombination process, revealing the role of RNA structure and proteins in the replicase-mediated copy-choice mechanism. In copy choice, the polymerase and the nascent RNA chain from which it is synthesized switch from one RNA template to another. RNA recombination was found to mediate the rearrangement of viral genes, the repair of deleterious mutations, and the acquisition of nonself sequences influencing the phylogenetics of viral taxa. The evidence for recombination, not only between related viruses but also among distantly related viruses, and even with host RNAs, suggests that plant viruses unabashedly test recombination with any genetic material at hand. PMID:21529157

  11. Cell biology of mitotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ...

  12. Recombinational DNA repair and human disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the genes and proteins related to the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) pathway that are implicated in cancer through either genetic disorders that predispose to cancer through chromosome instability or the occurrence of somatic mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), and an ataxia-like disorder (ATLD), are chromosome instability disorders that are defective in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), NBS, and Mre11 genes, respectively. These genes are critical in maintaining cellular resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which kills largely by the production of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Bloom syndrome involves a defect in the BLM helicase, which seems to play a role in restarting DNA replication forks that are blocked at lesions, thereby promoting chromosome stability. The Werner syndrome gene (WRN) helicase, another member of the RecQ family like BLM, has very recently been found to help mediate homologous recombination. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically complex chromosomal instability disorder involving seven or more genes, one of which is BRCA2. FA may be at least partially caused by the aberrant production of reactive oxidative species. The breast cancer-associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are strongly implicated in HRR; BRCA2 associates with Rad51 and appears to regulate its activity. We discuss in detail the phenotypes of the various mutant cell lines and the signaling pathways mediated by the ATM kinase. ATM's phosphorylation targets can be grouped into oxidative stress-mediated transcriptional changes, cell cycle checkpoints, and recombinational repair. We present the DNA damage response pathways by using the DSB as the prototype lesion, whose incorrect repair can initiate and augment karyotypic abnormalities

  13. Recombinant Protein Production by In Vivo Polymer Inclusion Display ?

    OpenAIRE

    Grage, Katrin; Peters, Verena; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach to produce purified recombinant proteins was established. The target protein is produced as polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase fusion protein, which mediates intracellular formation of PHA inclusions displaying the target protein. After isolation of the PHA inclusions, the pure target protein was released by simple enterokinase digestion.

  14. Auger recombination in sodium-iodide scintillators from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAllister, Andrew [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Åberg, Daniel [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Schleife, André [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Kioupakis, Emmanouil, E-mail: kioup@umich.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    Scintillator radiation detectors suffer from low energy resolution that has been attributed to non-linear light yield response to the energy of the incident gamma rays. Auger recombination is a key non-radiative recombination channel that scales with the third power of the excitation density and may play a role in the non-proportionality problem of scintillators. In this work, we study direct and phonon-assisted Auger recombination in NaI using first-principles calculations. Our results show that phonon-assisted Auger recombination, mediated primarily by short-range phonon scattering, dominates at room temperature. We discuss our findings in light of the much larger values obtained by numerical fits to z-scan experiments.

  15. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Germann, Susanne Manuela; Westergaard, Tine; Lisby, Michael

    (CPT) and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) is blocked by sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, PBA suppresses CPT- and MMS-induced genetic recombination as well as DNA double-strand break repair during mating-type interconversion....... Treatment with PBA is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in histone H4 lysine 8 acetylation. Live cell imaging of homologous recombination proteins indicates that repair of CPT-induced DNA damage is redirected to a non-recombinogenic pathway in the presence of PBA without loss in cell viability. In...... contrast, the suppression of MMS-induced recombination by PBA is accompanied by a dramatic loss in cell viability. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PBA inhibits DNA damage-induced homologous recombination likely by mediating changes in chromatin acetylation. Moreover, the combination of PBA...

  16. Kinetic theory of spin-polarized systems in electric and magnetic fields with spin-orbit coupling: II. RPA response functions and collective modes

    CERN Document Server

    Morawetz, K

    2015-01-01

    The spin and density response functions in the random phase approximation (RPA) are derived by linearizing the kinetic equation including a magnetic field, the spin-orbit coupling, and mean fields with respect to an external electric field. Different polarization functions appear describing various precession motions showing Rabi satellites due to an effective Zeeman field. The latter turns out to consist of the mean-field magnetization, the magnetic field, and the spin-orbit vector. The collective modes for charged and neutral systems are derived and a threefold splitting of the spin waves dependent on the polarization and spin-orbit coupling is shown. The dielectric function including spin-orbit coupling, polarization and magnetic fields is presented analytically for long wave lengths and in the static limit. The dynamical screening length as well as the long-wavelength dielectric function shows an instability in charge modes, which are interpreted as spin segregation and domain formation. The spin response...

  17. 3D Radiation Therapy Boost Improves the Outcome of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy Treated RPA II Patients with One or Two Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Antoni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the role of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT and radiation boost (RB for 208 patients recursive partitioning analysis (RPA II with 1 or 2 brain metastases (BM at a single institution. Methods and Materials: the dose of WBRT was 30 Gy (10 fractions of 3 Gy. One hundred thirty-two patients (63.5% benefited from RB of 9 Gy in 3 fractions of 3 Gy at the metastatic site. Patients had 1 or 2 BM in 122 (58.7% and 86 cases (41.3%, respectively. Results: patients with one or two metastases had similar survival (4.6 and 5.1 months, respectively (p = 0.4. Median overall survival (OS for patients treated with WBRT and RB, and with WBRT alone was 5.9 and 3.7 months, respectively (p = 0.03. The 6-, 12- and 24-month OS rates after WBRT and RB were 48.5%, 25% and 10.6%, respectively, while WBRT alone resulted in OS rates of 34%, 22.4% and 3.2%, respectively (p = 0.03. After WBRT and RB, the 6-, 12- and 24-month local control rates were 92%, 82% and 67%, respectively, while they were 81.2%, 75% and 37.5%, respectively, after WBRT alone (p = 0.03. The 6-, 12- and 24-month brain control rates after WBRT and RB were 88.7%, 75.8% and 62%, respectively, and after WBRT alone they were 78.5%, 59% and 37.7%, respectively (p = 0.03. Conclusion: additional boost delivered with 3D conformal radiotherapy improves local and brain control rates significantly as well as overall survival for RPA II patients with 1 or 2 unresectable BM.

  18. Nonradiative recombination in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Abakumov, VN; Yassievich, IN

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, great progress has been made in the understandingof recombination processes controlling the number of excessfree carriers in semiconductors under nonequilibrium conditions. As a result, it is now possible to give a comprehensivetheoretical description of these processes. The authors haveselected a number of experimental results which elucidate theunderlying physical problems and enable a test of theoreticalmodels. The following topics are dealt with: phenomenological theory ofrecombination, theoretical models of shallow and deep localizedstates, cascade model of carrier captu

  19. Hydrogen--oxygen recombiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apparatus is disclosed for efficiently and safely recombining hydrogen and oxygen gas to form water vapor, the apparatus being particularly adapted for use with a nuclear reactor system in which potentially dangerous hydrogen gas, evolved within the containment vessel during certain postulated accident conditions, can be eliminated. Further, this apparatus also aids in the removal of certain radioactive contaminents from the gases in a containment vessel

  20. Intrachromosomal recombination in plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Peterhans, A; Schlüpmann, H; Basse, C; Paszkowski, J

    1990-01-01

    Molecular evidence for intrachromosomal recombination between closely linked DNA repeats within the plant genome is presented. The non-overlapping complementary deletion derivatives of the selectable neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII), when intact conferring kanamycin resistance, were inserted into the genome of Nicotiana tabacum. The functional marker gene was restored with frequencies between 10(-4) and 10(-6) per proliferating cell clone. Prolonged tissue culture prior to kanamycin s...

  1. A Simplified Recombinant PSO

    OpenAIRE

    Bratton, Daniel; Blackwell, Tim M.

    2008-01-01

    Simplified forms of the particle swarm algorithm are very beneficial in contributing to understanding how a particle swarm optimization (PSO) swarm functions. One of these forms, PSO with discrete recombination, is extended and analyzed, demonstrating not just improvements in performance relative to a standard PSO algorithm, but also significantly different behavior, namely, a reduction in bursting patterns due to the removal of stochastic components from the update equations.

  2. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases. PMID:16902336

  3. Dielectronic recombination theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory now in wide use for the calculation of dielectronic recombination cross sections (?DR) and rate coefficients (?DR) was one introduced originally by Feshbach for nuclear physics applications, and then later adapted for atomic scattering problems by Hahn. In the following, we briefly review this theory in a very general form, which allows one to account for the effects of overlapping and interacting resonances, as well as continuum-continuum coupling. An extension of our notation will then also allow for the inclusion of the effects of direct radiative recombination, along with a treatment of the interference between radiative and dielectronic recombination. Other approaches to the calculation of ?DR have been described by Fano and by Seaton. We will not consider those theories here. Calculations of ?DR have progressed considerably over the last 25 years, since the early work of Burgess. Advances in the reliability of theoretical predictions have also been promoted recently b a variety of direct laboratory measurements of ?DR. While the measurements of ?DR for ?n ? 0 excitations have tended to agree very well with calculations, the case of ?n = 0 has been much problematic. However, by invoking a mechanism originally proposed by Jacobs, which takes into account the effect of stray electric fields on high Rydberg states (HRS) participating in the DR process, new calculations have improved the agreement between theory and experiment for these cases. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies still remain

  4. Bacterial Recombineering: Genome Engineering via Phage-Based Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Gur; Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The ability to specifically modify bacterial genomes in a precise and efficient manner is highly desired in various fields, ranging from molecular genetics to metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Much has changed from the initial realization that phage-derived genes may be employed for such tasks to today, where recombineering enables complex genetic edits within a genome or a population. Here, we review the major developments leading to recombineering becoming the method of choice for in situ bacterial genome editing while highlighting the various applications of recombineering in pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology. We also present the current understanding of the mechanism of recombineering. Finally, we discuss in detail issues surrounding recombineering efficiency and future directions for recombineering-based genome editing. PMID:25856528

  5. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  6. Primordial magnetogenesis before recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Fabre, Ophélia

    2015-01-01

    The origin of large magnetic fields in the Universe remains currently unknown. We investigate here a mechanism before recombination based on known physics. The source of the vorticity is due to the changes in the photon distribution function caused by the fluctuations in the background photons. We show that the magnetic field generated in the MHD limit, due to the Coulomb scattering, is of the order $10^{-49}$ G. We explicitly show that the magnetic fields generated from this process are sustainable and are not erased by resistive diffusion. We compare the results with current observations and discuss the implications.

  7. Brh2-Dss1 interplay enables properly controlled recombination in Ustilago maydis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kojic, Milorad; Zhou, Qingwen; Lisby, Michael; Holloman, William K

    2005-01-01

    Brh2, the BRCA2 homolog in Ustilago maydis, functions in recombinational repair of DNA damage by regulating Rad51 and is, in turn, regulated by Dss1. Dss1 is not required for Brh2 stability in vivo, nor for Brh2 to associate with Rad51, but is required for formation of green fluorescent protein...... after DNA damage was almost fully restored by a chimeric form of Brh2 having a DNA-binding domain from RPA70 fused to the Brh2 N-terminal domain, but Rad51 focus formation and mitotic recombination were elevated above wild-type levels. The results provide evidence for a mechanism in which Dss1 activates...... (GFP)-Rad51 foci following DNA damage by gamma radiation. To understand more about the interplay between Brh2 and Dss1, we isolated mutant variants of Brh2 able to bypass the requirement for Dss1. These variants were found to lack the entire C-terminal DNA-Dss1 binding domain but to maintain the N...

  8. Improved generation of recombinant baculovirus genomes in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Airenne, Kari J.; Peltomaa, Erik; Hytönen, Vesa P; Laitinen, Olli H; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2003-01-01

    An improved method for the generation of recombinant baculoviruses by Tn7-mediated transposition is described. The method is based on the modified donor vector (pBVboost) and an improved selection scheme of the baculovirus bacmids in Escherichia coli with a mutated SacB gene. Recombinant bacmids can be generated at a frequency of ?107/µg of donor vector with a negligible background. This easy-to-use and efficient pBVboost system provides the basis for a high-throughput generation of recombina...

  9. Enteric Immunization of Mice Against Influenza with Recombinant Vaccinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitin, Catherine A.; Bender, Bradley S.; Small, Parker A., Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Intrajejunal administration to mice of a recombinant vaccinia virus containing the influenza virus hemagglutinin gene induced IgA antibody in nasal, gut, and vaginal secretions. It also induced IgG antibody in serum and cell-mediated immunity. The immunization provided significant protection against an influenza virus challenge. This work suggests that enteric-coated recombinant vaccinia could be an orally administered, inexpensive, multivalent, temperature-stable, safe, and effective vaccine for children that could be particularly useful in developing nations, where multiple injections are not easily administered. Oral administration of vaccines should also reduce children's fear of shots at the doctor's office.

  10. Cell biology of mitotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as...... well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this...

  11. Intercultural Mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Marian Radulescu; Denisa Mitrut

    2012-01-01

    The Intercultural Mediator facilitates exchanges between people of different socio-cultural backgrounds and acts as a bridge between immigrants and national and local associations, health organizations, services and offices in order to foster integration of every single individual. As the use mediation increases, mediators are more likely to be involved in cross-cultural mediation, but only the best mediators have the opportunity to mediate cross border business disputes or international poli...

  12. Hadron Correlations and Parton Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, Rainer J.(Cyclotron Institute, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843-3366, USA)

    2007-01-01

    Parton recombination has been found to be an extremely useful model to understand hadron production at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. It is particularly important to explore its connections with hard processes. This article reviews some of the aspects of the quark recombination model and places particular emphasis on hadron correlations.

  13. Gravitino Dark Matter in Tree Level Gauge Mediation with and without R-parity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcadi, G.; Di Luzio, L.; Nardecchia, M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological aspects of Tree Level Gauge Mediation, a recently proposed mechanism in which the breaking of supersymmetry is communicated to the soft scalar masses by extra gauge interactions at the tree level. Embedding the mechanism in a Grand Unified Theory and requiring the observability of sfermion masses at the Large Hadron Collider, it follows that the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle is a gravitino with a mass of the order of 10 GeV. The analysis in the presence of R-pa...

  14. Detecting variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J gene segment recombination using a two-colour fluorescence system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Gina B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diversity of immunoglobulins and the T cell antigen receptors is achieved via the recombination activating gene (RAG-mediated rearrangement of variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J gene segments, and this underpins the efficient recognition of a seemingly limitless array of antigens. Analysis of V(DJ recombination activity is typically performed using extrachromosomal recombination substrates that are recovered from transfected cells and selected using bacterial transformation. We have developed a two-colour fluorescence-based system that simplifies detection of both deletion and inversion joining events mediated by RAG proteins. Results This system employs two fluorescent reporter genes that differentially mark unrearranged substrates and those that have undergone RAG-mediated deletion or inversion events. The recombination products bear the hallmarks of true V(DJ recombination and activity can be detected using fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. Recombination events can be detected without the need for cytotoxic selection of recombination products and the system allows analysis of recombination activity using substrates integrated into the genome. Conclusions This system will be useful in the analysis and exploitation of the V(DJ recombination machinery and suggests that similar approaches could be used to replace expression of one gene with another during lymphocyte development.

  15. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  16. Intercultural Mediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Marian Radulescu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Intercultural Mediator facilitates exchanges between people of different socio-cultural backgrounds and acts as a bridge between immigrants and national and local associations, health organizations, services and offices in order to foster integration of every single individual. As the use mediation increases, mediators are more likely to be involved in cross-cultural mediation, but only the best mediators have the opportunity to mediate cross border business disputes or international politics conflicts. This article attempts to provide a new perspective about the intercultural mediation.

  17. Similarity of Recombinant Human Perlecan Domain 1 by Alternative Expression Systems Bioactive Heterogenous Recombinant Human Perlecan D1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis April L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans are diverse components of certain proteoglycans and are known to interact with growth factors as a co-receptor necessary to induce signalling and growth factor activity. In this report we characterize heterogeneously glycosylated recombinant human perlecan domain 1 (HSPG2 abbreviated as rhPln.D1 synthesized in either HEK 293 cells or HUVECs by transient gene delivery using either adenoviral or expression plasmid technology. Results By SDS-PAGE analysis following anion exchange chromatography, the recombinant proteoglycans appeared to possess glycosaminoglycan chains ranging, in total, from 6 kDa to >90 kDa per recombinant. Immunoblot analysis of enzyme-digested high Mr rhPln.D1 demonstrated that the rhPln.D1 was synthesized as either a chondroitin sulfate or heparan sulfate proteoglycan, in an approximately 2:1 ratio, with negligible hybrids. Secondary structure analysis suggested helices and sheets in both recombinant species. rhPln.D1 demonstrated binding to rhFGF-2 with an apparent kD of 2 ± 0.2 nM with almost complete susceptibility to digestion by heparinase III in ligand blot analysis but not to chondroitinase digestion. Additionally, we demonstrate HS-mediated binding of both rhPln.D1 species to several other GFs. Finally, we corroborate the augmentation of FGF-mediated cell activation by rhPln.D1 and demonstrate mitogenic signalling through the FGFR1c receptor. Conclusions With importance especially to the emerging field of DNA-based therapeutics, we have shown here that proteoglycan synthesis, in different cell lines where GAG profiles typically differ, can be directed by recombinant technology to produce populations of bioactive recombinants with highly similar GAG profiles.

  18. Transposon-facilitated recombination in classical biotypes of Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    Sublett, R D; Romig, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    Transposon-facilitated recombination (Tfr) donors of classical Vibrio cholerae strain 162 were constructed by introducing the ampicillin transposon Tn1 into the P conjugative plasmid and the bacterial chromosome. The improved donors mediated high-frequency, polarized transfer of chromosomal genes from origins to confirm the gene orders of the previous classical strain 162 genetic map and to establish its circularity. Significant transfer of linked genes from E1 Tor Tfr donors to classical rec...

  19. Structural basis for broad DNA-specificity in integron recombination.

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, Douglas; Demarre, Gaëlle; Bouvier, Marie; Mazel, Didier; Gopaul, Deshmukh N.

    2006-01-01

    Lateral DNA transfer--the movement of genetic traits between bacteria--has a profound impact on genomic evolution and speciation. The efficiency with which bacteria incorporate genetic information reflects their capacity to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Integron integrases are proteins that mediate site-specific DNA recombination between a proximal primary site (attI) and a secondary target site (attC) found within mobile gene cassettes encoding resistance or virulence factors. ...

  20. Iodine chemistry in hydrogen recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen recombiners, recently introduced in the French nuclear reactor buildings, display high temperature (up to about 900 deg. C) and several thousands square meters of a very reactive surface when operating during a severe accident scenario. Small scale analytical experiments show that cesium and cadmium iodides are unstable, and generate volatile iodine, when heated in an oven that reproduces most physico-chemical parameters of recombiner operation. Based on these results, and due to its potential with regard to the environmental source term of a severe accident, iodine chemistry in hydrogen recombiners deserves close and careful scrutiny. (authors)

  1. Recombining WMAP: constraints on ionizing and resonance radiation at recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joe

    2003-01-01

    We place new constraints on sources of ionizing and resonance radiation at the epoch of the recombination process using the recent CMB temperature and polarization spectra coming from WMAP. We find that non-standard recombination scenarios are still consistent with the current data. In light of this we study the impact that such models can have on the determination of several cosmological parameters. In particular, the constraints on curvature and baryon density appear to be...

  2. CRISPR–Cas9-assisted recombineering in Lactobacillus reuteri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jee-Hwan; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and the CRISPR-associated (Cas) nuclease protect bacteria and archeae from foreign DNA by site-specific cleavage of incoming DNA. Type-II CRISPR–Cas systems, such as the Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR–Cas9 system, can be adapted such that Cas9 can be guided to a user-defined site in the chromosome to introduce double-stranded breaks. Here we have developed and optimized CRISPR–Cas9 function in the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475. We established proof-of-concept showing that CRISPR–Cas9 selection combined with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombineering is a realistic approach to identify at high efficiencies edited cells in a lactic acid bacterium. We show for three independent targets that subtle changes in the bacterial genome can be recovered at efficiencies ranging from 90 to 100%. By combining CRISPR–Cas9 and recombineering, we successfully applied codon saturation mutagenesis in the L. reuteri chromosome. Also, CRISPR–Cas9 selection is critical to identify low-efficiency events such as oligonucleotide-mediated chromosome deletions. This also means that CRISPR–Cas9 selection will allow identification of recombinant cells in bacteria with low recombineering efficiencies, eliminating the need for ssDNA recombineering optimization procedures. We envision that CRISPR–Cas genome editing has the potential to change the landscape of genome editing in lactic acid bacteria, and other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25074379

  3. CRISPR-Cas9-assisted recombineering in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jee-Hwan; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and the CRISPR-associated (Cas) nuclease protect bacteria and archeae from foreign DNA by site-specific cleavage of incoming DNA. Type-II CRISPR-Cas systems, such as the Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR-Cas9 system, can be adapted such that Cas9 can be guided to a user-defined site in the chromosome to introduce double-stranded breaks. Here we have developed and optimized CRISPR-Cas9 function in the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475. We established proof-of-concept showing that CRISPR-Cas9 selection combined with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombineering is a realistic approach to identify at high efficiencies edited cells in a lactic acid bacterium. We show for three independent targets that subtle changes in the bacterial genome can be recovered at efficiencies ranging from 90 to 100%. By combining CRISPR-Cas9 and recombineering, we successfully applied codon saturation mutagenesis in the L. reuteri chromosome. Also, CRISPR-Cas9 selection is critical to identify low-efficiency events such as oligonucleotide-mediated chromosome deletions. This also means that CRISPR-Cas9 selection will allow identification of recombinant cells in bacteria with low recombineering efficiencies, eliminating the need for ssDNA recombineering optimization procedures. We envision that CRISPR-Cas genome editing has the potential to change the landscape of genome editing in lactic acid bacteria, and other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25074379

  4. Recombineering: genetic engineering in bacteria using homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Lynn C; Sawitzke, James A; Li, Xintian; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial chromosome and bacterial plasmids can be engineered in vivo by homologous recombination using PCR products and synthetic oligonucleotides as substrates. This is possible because bacteriophage-encoded recombination proteins efficiently recombine sequences with homologies as short as 35 to 50 bases. Recombineering allows DNA sequences to be inserted or deleted without regard to location of restriction sites. This unit first describes preparation of electrocompetent cells expressing the recombineering functions and their transformation with dsDNA or ssDNA. It then presents support protocols that describe several two-step selection/counter-selection methods of making genetic alterations without leaving any unwanted changes in the targeted DNA, and a method for retrieving onto a plasmid a genetic marker (cloning by retrieval) from the Escherichia coli chromosome or a co-electroporated DNA fragment. Additional protocols describe methods to screen for unselected mutations, removal of the defective prophage from recombineering strains, and other useful techniques. Curr. Protoc. Mol. Biol. 106:1.16.1-1.16.39. © 2014 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:24733238

  5. Stable recombination hotspots in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M; Strand, Alva I; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Griffith, Simon C; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-11-20

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but it appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking the gene that encodes PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species: the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, and the long-tailed finch, Poephila acuticauda. We found that both species have recombination hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, most hotspots are shared between the two species, and their conservation seems to extend over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution. PMID:26586757

  6. Hydrogen recombiner development at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic recombiners have been developed at AECL for the purpose of hydrogen removal in post-accident nuclear containment buildings. The recombiners are based on a particular catalyst designed by AECL which has extraordinary resistance to fouling from water and water vapour and a large thermodynamic range of operation. The catalysts were developed, originally, for the purpose of heavy water manufacturing by way of a catalytic exchange process. Application of these catalyst materials in recombiners for containment applications began in the late 1980's. The first application was a passive recombiner, qualified for use in control of radiolytic hydrogen in the headspace of a pool-type experimental reactor of AECL design in 1988. The passive, or natural convection recombiner concept has continued development to commercial stage for application in power reactor containments. This paper reviews the AECL recombiner development, describes the current model and shows results from tests of full-scale recombiners in the Large Scale Vented Combustion Test Facility at AECL-WL. The AECL recombiner is designed for compactness and ease of engineering into containment. The design is a simple, open-ended rectangular enclosure with catalyst elements arranged inside to promote optimum convective flow driven by heat of recombination at the catalyst surface. Self start, as evidenced by catalyst heating and initiation of flow, is achieved in less than 1% hydrogen, with available oxygen, at room temperature and 100% relative humidity. This low temperature start-up in condensing atmospheres is viewed as the most challenging condition for wet-proofing effectiveness. Cold start-up is a vital performance requirement in containments, such as CANDU, where engineered air-cooling systems are operating and where long-term hydrogen control is required, after containment atmospheres have cooled. Once started, the removal capacity scales linearly with the inlet cross-section area and the partial pressure of hydrogen. The recombiner also reacts carbon monoxide, in the presence of hydrogen, at approximately the same rate as the hydrogen. The catalyst materials and wet-proofing are unaffected by radiation or high temperatures. Large scale tests confirm self-start behavior and demonstrate strong mixing, irrespective of recombiner placement. (author)

  7. Progenitors of Recombining Supernova Remnants

    OpenAIRE

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-01-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with the ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, is recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the t...

  8. Eukaryotes arose after genetic recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupar Milanko R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Division of ancestral prokaryotic pragenome into two circular double-stranded DNA molecules by genetic recombination, is a base for future separate evolution of nuclear and mitochondrial gene compartment. This suggests monophyletic origin of both, mitochondrion and nucleus. Presumed organism which genome undergoes genetic recombination has to be searched among an aerobic, oxygen nonproducing, archaeon with no rigid cell wall, but a plasma membrane. Plastid evolves from an aerobic, oxygen producing protoeukaryote, after mitoplastid genome duplication and subsequent functional segregation.

  9. Calculation of Gamow-Teller #betta#-strength functions in the Rubidium region in the RPA approximation with Nilsson model wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate allowed Gamow-Teller and, in a few cases, Fermi #betta#strength functions in a model that is applicable to studies of nuclei throughout the periodic system. For our first study we have selected a sequence of rubidium isotopes, namely 8937Rb - 9937Rb. We develop a model that use calculated Nilsson model wave functions, spherical or deformed, as the case may be, as the starting point for determining the wave functions of the mother and daughter nuclei in the #betta# decay. Pairing is treated in the BCS approximation. To account for the retardation of low-energy GT-decay rates we add, as is customarily done, a simple residual interaction specific to GT decay, namely V sub (GT)=:#betta#-1 x #betta#1:, to the Hamiltonian. This residual interaction is treated in the RPA approximation. The strength of the interaction is adjusted to get agreement between the calculated and experimental energy of the giant Gamow-Teller resonance for 208Pb and 144Sm. Since the present model is based on calculated wave functions and single-particle levels, studies of nuclei far from stability, where little experimental information is available, are more straightforward relative to calculations where experimental levels are used. The model can treat deformed nuclei employing wave functions calculated to desired accuracy, within the framework of the model, for the deformed single-particle well. The calcualtions show that use of single-particle parameters appropriate to the region studied and taking deformation into account is important. We find good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra over the region studied, provided an appropriate choice of single-particle parameters and deformation is made. (Authors)

  10. Cervical cancer isolate PT3, super-permissive for adeno-associated virus replication, over-expresses DNA polymerase ?, PCNA, RFC and RPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melchert Russell B

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adeno-associated virus (AAV type 2 is an important virus due to its use as a safe and effective human gene therapy vector and its negative association with certain malignancies. AAV, a dependo-parvovirus, autonomously replicates in stratified squamous epithelium. Such tissue occurs in the nasopharynx and anogenitals, from which AAV has been clinically isolated. Related autonomous parvoviruses also demonstrate cell tropism and preferentially replicate in oncogenically transformed cells. Combining these two attributes of parvovirus tropism, squamous and malignant, we assayed if AAV might replicate in squamous cervical carcinoma cell isolates. Results Three primary isolates (PT1-3 and two established cervical cancer cell lines were compared to normal keratinocytes (NK for their ability to replicate AAV. One isolate, PT3, allowed for high levels of AAV DNA replication and virion production compared to others. In research by others, four cellular components are known required for in vitro AAV DNA replication: replication protein A (RPA, replication factor C (RFC, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, and DNA polymerase delta (POLD1. Thus, we examined PT3 cells for expression of these components by DNA microarray and real-time quantitative PCR. All four components were over-expressed in PT3 over two representative low-permissive cell isolates (NK and PT1. However, this super-permissiveness did not result in PT3 cell death by AAV infection. Conclusion These data, for the first time, provide evidence that these four cellular components are likely important for AAV in vivo DNA replication as well as in vitro. These data also suggest that PT3 will be a useful reagent for investigating the AAV-permissive transcriptome and AAV anti-cancer effect.

  11. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, ns, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z*=1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1? to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: ??i<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  12. Telomeric transcripts stimulate telomere recombination to suppress senescence in cells lacking telomerase

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Tai-Yuan; Kao, Yu-wen; Lin, Jing-Jer

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase expression is essential for the long-term proliferation of most cancer cells. In cancer cells lacking telomerase, an alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway is activated to maintain telomere length through telomere recombination. Using yeast as a model system, we found that the noncoding telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) plays a major role in recombination-mediated maintenance of telomere in telomerase-deficient cells. Increased levels of telomere-associated TERRA ...

  13. Targeting the site of RNA-RNA recombination in brome mosaic virus with antisense sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, P. D.; Bujarski, J J

    1993-01-01

    It has been postulated that local hybridizations between viral RNAs can mediate recombination in brome mosaic virus (BMV) and in poliovirus. To test this model, a 3' fragment of BMV RNA1 was inserted into the 3' noncoding sequence of BMV RNA3 in an antisense orientation. This resulted in high-frequency nonhomologous crossovers at or near the hybridized region. Insertion of the same RNA1 fragment in a positive-sense orientation did not promote recombination. Modification of the antisense inser...

  14. Immunization of cattle with recombinant Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, S.A.; Palmer, G H; JASMER, D. P.; Goff, W L; McElwain, T F

    1995-01-01

    Cattle immunized with a recombinant merozoite surface antigen-1 molecule (MSA-1) produced high-titered antibody that reacted with the surface of the parasite and neutralized merozoite infectivity in vitro. However, recombinant MSA-1 immunization did not confer protection against challenge with virulent Babesia bovis. These results indicate that antibody-mediated neutralization of merozoite infectivity in vitro, at least for MSA-1-specific antibody, does not reflect in vivo protective immunity...

  15. Double strand interaction is the predominant pathway for intermolecular recombination of adeno-associated viral genomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermolecular recombination is the foundation for dual vector mediated larger gene transfer by recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV). To identify precursors for intermolecular recombination, we sequentially infected skeletal muscle with AAV LacZ trans-splicing viruses. At 1 month postinfection, nearly all inputting single-strand (ss) AAV genomes were cleared out in muscle. If ss-ss interaction is absolutely required for intermolecular recombination, LacZ expression from sequential infection will be negligible to that from coinfection. Interestingly, expression from sequential infection reached ?50% of that from coinfection at the 1-month time-point in BL6 mice. In immune deficient SCID mice, expression from sequential infection was comparable to that from coinfection at the 4- and 13-month time points. Our results suggest that ds interaction represents the predominant pathway for AAV intermolecular recombination

  16. The Slx5-Slx8 complex affects sumoylation of DNA repair proteins and negatively regulates recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Rahman, Sadia; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2007-01-01

    Recombination is important for repairing DNA lesions, yet it can also lead to genomic rearrangements. This process must be regulated, and recently, sumoylation-mediated mechanisms were found to inhibit Rad51-dependent recombination. Here, we report that the absence of the Slx5-Slx8 complex, a newly...... identified player in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) pathway, led to increased Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent recombination. The increases were most striking during S phase, suggesting an accumulation of DNA lesions during replication. Consistent with this view, Slx8 protein localized to...... propose that, during replication, the Slx5-Slx8 complex helps prevent DNA lesions that are acted upon by recombination. In addition, the complex inhibits Rad51-independent recombination via modulating the sumoylation of DNA repair proteins....

  17. Recombinant Goat VEGF164 Increases Hair Growth by Painting Process on the Skin of Shaved Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Wenlei; Yin, Jianxin; Liang, Yan; Guo, Zhixin; WANG, YANFENG; Liu, Dongjun; WANG, XIAO; Wang, ZhiGang

    2014-01-01

    To detect goat vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated regrowth of hair, full-length VEGF164 cDNA was cloned from Inner Mongolia cashmere goat (Capra hircus) into the pET-his prokaryotic expression vector, and the recombinant plasmid was transferred into E. coli BL21 cells. The expression of recombinant 6×his-gVEGF164 protein was induced by 0.5 mM isopropyl thio-?-D-galactoside at 32°C. Recombinant goat VEGF164 (rgVEGF164) was purified and identi ed by western blot using monoclonal...

  18. Investigations for designing catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of a severe accident in pressurised water reactors (PWR) a high amount of hydrogen up to about 20,000 m3 might be generated and released into the containments. The mixture consisting of hydrogen and oxygen may either burn or detonate, if ignited. In case of detonation the generated shock wave may endanger the components of the plant or the plant itself. Consequently, effective removal of hydrogen is required. The fact that hydrogen and oxygen react exo-thermally on catalytically acting surfaces already at low temperatures generating steam and heat is made use of in catalytic recombiners. They consist of substrates coated with catalyst (mainly platinum or palladium) which are arranged inside a casing. Being passively acting measures, recombiners do not need any additional energy supply. Experimental investigations on catalytic hydrogen recombination are conducted at FZJ (Forschungszentrum Juelich) using three test facilities. The results yield insight in the development potential of contemporary recombiner systems as well as of innovative systems. Detailed investigations on a recombiner section show strong temperature gradients over the surface of a catalytically coated sample. Dependent on the flow velocity, ignition temperature may be reached at the leading edge already at an inlet hydrogen concentration of about 5 vol.-%. The thermal strain of the substrate leads to considerable detachment of catalyst particles probably causing unintended ignition of the flammable mixture. Temperature peaks can be prevented effectively by leaving the first part of the plate uncoated. In order to avoid overheating of the catalyst elements of a recombiner even at high hydrogen concentrations a modular system of porous substrates is proposed. The metallic substrates are coated with platinum at low catalyst densities thus limiting the activity of the single specimen. A modular arrangement of these elements provides high recombination rates over a large hydrogen concentration range without igniting the mixture

  19. Recombining WMAP: Constraints on ionizing and resonance radiation at recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We place new constraints on sources of ionizing and resonance radiation at the epoch of the recombination process using the recent cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization spectra coming from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We find that non-standard recombination scenarios are still consistent with the current data. In light of this we study the impact that such models can have on the determination of several cosmological parameters. In particular, the constraints on curvature and baryon density appear to be weakly affected by a modified recombination scheme. However, it may affect the current WMAP constraints on inflationary parameters such as the spectral index ns and its running. Physically motivated models, such as those based on primordial black holes or super heavy dark matter decay, are able to provide a good fit to the current data. Future observations in both temperature and polarization will be needed to more stringently test these models

  20. Inhomogeneous recombinations during cosmic reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Sobacchi, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    By depleting the ionizing photon budget available to expand cosmic HII regions, recombining systems (or Lyman limit systems) can have a large impact during (and following) cosmic reionization. Unfortunately, directly resolving such structures in large-scale reionization simulations is computationally impractical. Instead, here we implement a sub-grid prescription for tracking inhomogeneous recombinations in the intergalactic medium. Building on previous work parameterizing photo-heating feedback on star-formation, we present large-scale, semi-numeric reionization simulations which self-consistently track the local (sub-grid) evolution of both sources and sinks of ionizing photons. Our simple, single-parameter model naturally results in both an extended reionization and a modest, slowly-evolving emissivity, consistent with observations. Recombinations are instrumental in slowing the growth of large HII regions, and damping the rapid rise of the ionizing background in the late stages of (and following) reioniza...

  1. Workshop on Radio Recombination Lines

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    Since their first detection 15 years ago, radio recombination lines from several elements have been observed in a wide variety of objects including HII regions, planetary nebulae, molecular clouds, the diffuse interstellar medium, and recently, other galaxies. The observations span almost the entire range from 0.1 to 100 GHz, and employ both single­ djsh and aperture synthesis techniques. The theory of radio recombination lines has also advanced strongly, to the point where it is perhaps one of the best-understood in astro­ physics. In a parallel development, it has become possible over the last decade to study these same highly-excited atoms in the laboratory; this work provides further confirmation of the theoretical framework. However there has been continuing controversy over the astrophysical interpre­ tation of radio recombination line observations, especially regarding the role of stimulated emission. A workshop was held in Ottawa on 24-25 August, 1979, bringing together many of the active scientist...

  2. Dissociative recombination of protonated methanol

    OpenAIRE

    Geppert, Wolf; Hamberg, Mathias; Thomas, Richard D; Österdahl, Fabian; Hellberg, Fredrik; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Ehlerding, Anneli; Millar, Tom; Roberts, Helen; Semaniak, Jacek; af Ugglas, Magnus; Källberg, Anders; Simonsson, Ansgar; Kaminska, Magdalena; Larsson, Mats

    2006-01-01

    The branching ratios of the different reaction pathways and the overall rate coefficients of the dissociative recombination reactions of CH3OH2+ and CD3OD2+ have been measured at the CRYRING storage ring located in Stockholm, Sweden. Analysis of the data yielded the result that formation of methanol or deuterated methanol accounted for only 3 and 6% of the total rate in CH3OH2+ and CD3OD2+, respectively. Dissociative recombination of both isotopomeres mainly involves fragmentation of the C–O ...

  3. Selenium incorporation using recombinant techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of techniques for recombinant incorporation of selenium and subsequent purification and crystallization of the resulting labelled protein. Using selenomethionine to phase macromolecular structures is common practice in structure determination, along with the use of selenocysteine. Selenium is consequently the most commonly used heavy atom for MAD. In addition to the well established recombinant techniques for the incorporation of selenium in prokaryal expression systems, there have been recent advances in selenium labelling in eukaryal expression, which will be discussed. Tips and things to consider for the purification and crystallization of seleno-labelled proteins are also included

  4. Lambda red mediated gap repair utilizes a novel replicative intermediate in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Thimma R; Fevat, Léna M S; Munson, Sarah E; Stewart, A Francis; Cowley, Shaun M

    2015-01-01

    The lambda phage Red recombination system can mediate efficient homologous recombination in Escherichia coli, which is the basis of the DNA engineering technique termed recombineering. Red mediated insertion of DNA requires DNA replication, involves a single-stranded DNA intermediate and is more efficient on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Lagging strand recombination has also been postulated to explain the Red mediated repair of gapped plasmids by an Okazaki fragment gap filling model. Here, we demonstrate that gap repair involves a different strand independent mechanism. Gap repair assays examining the strand asymmetry of recombination did not show a lagging strand bias. Directly testing an ssDNA plasmid showed lagging strand recombination is possible but dsDNA plasmids did not employ this mechanism. Insertional recombination combined with gap repair also did not demonstrate preferential lagging strand bias, supporting a different gap repair mechanism. The predominant recombination route involved concerted insertion and subcloning though other routes also operated at lower frequencies. Simultaneous insertion of DNA resulted in modification of both strands and was unaffected by mutations to DNA polymerase I, responsible for Okazaki fragment maturation. The lower efficiency of an alternate Red mediated ends-in recombination pathway and the apparent lack of a Holliday junction intermediate suggested that gap repair does not involve a different Red recombination pathway. Our results may be explained by a novel replicative intermediate in gap repair that does not involve a replication fork. We exploited these observations by developing a new recombineering application based on concerted insertion and gap repair, termed SPI (subcloning plus insertion). SPI selected against empty vector background and selected for correct gap repair recombinants. We used SPI to simultaneously insert up to four different gene cassettes in a single recombineering reaction. Consequently, our findings have important implications for the understanding of E. coli replication and Red recombination. PMID:25803509

  5. KEGG PATHWAY / Homologous recombination [KEGG

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PATHWAY: map03440 Entry map03440Pathway Name Homologous recombination Description Homologous rec ... drome mutated) are tumor suppressors that maintain genome ... integrity, at least in part, through HR. Class Gen ... 2MRX complex [PATH:map03440]M00295BRCA1-associated genome ... surveillance complex (BASC) [PATH:map03440] Diseas ...

  6. CRMAGE: CRISPR Optimized MAGE Recombineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Sommer, Morten O A; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2016-01-01

    A bottleneck in metabolic engineering and systems biology approaches is the lack of efficient genome engineering technologies. Here, we combine CRISPR/Cas9 and ? Red recombineering based MAGE technology (CRMAGE) to create a highly efficient and fast method for genome engineering of Escherichia coli. Using CRMAGE, the recombineering efficiency was between 96.5% and 99.7% for gene recoding of three genomic targets, compared to between 0.68% and 5.4% using traditional recombineering. For modulation of protein synthesis (small insertion/RBS substitution) the efficiency was increased from 6% to 70%. CRMAGE can be multiplexed and enables introduction of at least two mutations in a single round of recombineering with similar efficiencies. PAM-independent loci were targeted using degenerate codons, thereby making it possible to modify any site in the genome. CRMAGE is based on two plasmids that are assembled by a USER-cloning approach enabling quick and cost efficient gRNA replacement. CRMAGE furthermore utilizes CRISPR/Cas9 for efficient plasmid curing, thereby enabling multiple engineering rounds per day. To facilitate the design process, a web-based tool was developed to predict both the ? Red oligos and the gRNAs. The CRMAGE platform enables highly efficient and fast genome editing and may open up promising prospective for automation of genome-scale engineering. PMID:26797514

  7. Improving recombinant protein purification yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production of adequate amounts of recombinant proteins is essential for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. It’s technologically challenging and a limiting factor for tung oil research because analytical reagents such as high qua...

  8. Recombination of Physical Unclonable Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Devadas, Srinivas; Yu, Meng-Day (Mandel)

    2010-01-01

    A new Physical Unclonable Function (PUF) construction is described, by treating silicon unique features extracted from PUF circuits as “genetic material” unique to each silicon, and recombining this chip-unique material in a way to obtain a combination of advantages not possible with the original PUF circuits, including altering PUF output statistics to better suit PUF-based key generation and authentication.

  9. Recombination luminescence in rigid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When separated ion-pairs result from the ?-irradiation of pure or doped matrices or from solute photoionization, some of the photoejected electrons undergo spontaneous recombination, giving rise to the so-called isothermal luminescence (ITL). Cation-anion recombination takes place when molecular diffusion is possible; that is, it appears mostly in thermoluminescence (TL), upon warming irradiated samples. Electrons are photoextracted from matrix traps or from anions, and the neutralization luminescence is designated as stimulated luminescence (SL). ITL, TL, and SL all constitute very sensitive test for the presence of charged species. ITL decay kinetics throw some light on the recombination mechanism. In TL studies, the maxima of the glow curves correlate with phase transition temperatures (crystal ? crystal or glass ? crystal), providing insight into matrix molecular dynamics. From SL spectra, positive and negative charges can be discriminated, and various characteristics of the negative ions - electrons or anions - can be attained. The global SL irrespective of its spectrum composition, SL emission spectra, and SL excitation spectra or stimulation spectra are reviewed. The SL spectra, being specific of negative charged species, complement optical absorption spectroscopy when cations and anions have undistinguishable spectra. Even though radiative charge recombination constitutes the final step of ion-pair existence, it may serve to track back the successive stages of photoelectron life: electron ejection, matrix trapping or the attachments of electrons to molecules or radicals, and the release of trapped electrons. (Yamashita, S.)

  10. Repair and recombination of X-irradiated plasmids in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmid DNA substrates were X-irradiated and injected into the nuclei of Xenopus laevis oocytes. After incubation for 20 h, DNA was recovered from the oocytes and analyzed simultaneously for repair and for intermolecular homologous recombination by electrophoresis and bacterial transformation. Oocyte-mediated repair of DNA strand breaks was observed with both methods. Using a repair-deficient mutant Escherichia coli strain and its repair-proficient parent as hosts for the transformation assay, we also demonstrated that oocytes repaired oxidative-type DNA base damage induced by X-rays. X-irradiation of a circular DNA stimulated its potential to recombine with a homologous linear partner. Recombination products were detected directly by Southern blot hybridization and as bacterial transformant clones expressing two antibiotic resistance markers originally carried separately on the two substrates. The increase in recombination was dependent on X-ray dose. There is some suggestion that lesions other than double-strand breaks contribute to the stimulation of oocyte-mediated homologous recombination. In summary, oocytes have considerable capacity to repair X-ray-induced damage, and some X-ray lesions stimulate homologous recombination in these cells

  11. Infectious Molecular Clones with the Nonhomologous Dimer Initiation Sequences Found in Different Subtypes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Can Recombine and Initiate a Spreading Infection In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    St. Louis, Daniel C.; Gotte, Deanna; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Ritchey, David W.; Salminen, Mika O; Carr, Jean K.; McCutchan, Francine E

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant forms of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been shown to be of major importance in the global AIDS pandemic. Viral RNA dimer formation mediated by the dimerization initiation sequence (DIS) is believed to be essential for viral genomic RNA packaging and therefore for RNA recombination. Here, we demonstrate that HIV-1 recombination and replication are not restricted by variant DIS loop sequences. Three DIS loop forms found among HIV-1 isolates, DIS (CG), DIS (TA), an...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Recombinant 8 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this population have been found. What are the genetic changes related to recombinant 8 syndrome? Recombinant 8 ... Center . Where can I find general information about genetic conditions? The Handbook provides basic information about genetics ...

  13. The ?0 polarization and the recombination mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use the recombination and the Thomas Precession Model to obtain a prediction for the ?0 polarization in the p+p ? ?0 + X reaction. We study the effect of the recombination function on the ?0 polarization. (author)

  14. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume VII : Evaluation of the Compliance Testing Framework for RPA Improvement as Stated in the 2000 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalski, John R.; Ngouenet, Roger F.

    2001-05-01

    Using the pre-2000 reach survival probabilities reported in the 2000 FCRPS Biological Opinion (BO) for three selected stocks: yearling and sub-yearling chinook and steelhead, power curves were constructed for each of the two statistical hypothesis tests suggested in the BO. These power calculation results were interpreted in terms of the ability of the statistical tests to correctly identify the true states of recovery (i.e., fail or succeed in fulfilling RPA expectations). The proposed one-sided tests have a moderate to low probability of correctly assessing the true status of the recovery by the years 2005 and 2008. The relatively poor odds of making the correct decision with the BO proposed Tests 1 and 2 suggest alternative decision rules need to be investigated and developed for assessing RPA compliance. Therefore, we propose to immediately examine alternative decision rules that might maximize the likelihood of correct decisions while minimizing the prospect of incorrect decisions. The Bayesian analysis will incorporate scientific/biological knowledge/expertise.

  15. Population inversion in recombining hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collisional-radiative model is applied to a recombining hydrogen plasma in order to investigate plasma conditions in which a population inversion between the energy levels of hydrogen can be generated. Population inversion is expected in plasmas for which three-body recombination makes a large contribution to the recombining processes and the effective recombination rate is larger than a critical value for a given electron density and temperature. Calculated results are presented in figures and tables. (author)

  16. Recombination in the human Pseudoautosomal region PAR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinch, Anjali G; Altemose, Nicolas; Noor, Nudrat; Donnelly, Peter; Myers, Simon R

    2014-07-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is a short region of homology between the mammalian X and Y chromosomes, which has undergone rapid evolution. A crossover in the PAR is essential for the proper disjunction of X and Y chromosomes in male meiosis, and PAR deletion results in male sterility. This leads the human PAR with the obligatory crossover, PAR1, to having an exceptionally high male crossover rate, which is 17-fold higher than the genome-wide average. However, the mechanism by which this obligatory crossover occurs remains unknown, as does the fine-scale positioning of crossovers across this region. Recent research in mice has suggested that crossovers in PAR may be mediated independently of the protein PRDM9, which localises virtually all crossovers in the autosomes. To investigate recombination in this region, we construct the most fine-scale genetic map containing directly observed crossovers to date using African-American pedigrees. We leverage recombination rates inferred from the breakdown of linkage disequilibrium in human populations and investigate the signatures of DNA evolution due to recombination. Further, we identify direct PRDM9 binding sites using ChIP-seq in human cells. Using these independent lines of evidence, we show that, in contrast with mouse, PRDM9 does localise peaks of recombination in the human PAR1. We find that recombination is a far more rapid and intense driver of sequence evolution in PAR1 than it is on the autosomes. We also show that PAR1 hotspot activities differ significantly among human populations. Finally, we find evidence that PAR1 hotspot positions have changed between human and chimpanzee, with no evidence of sharing among the hottest hotspots. We anticipate that the genetic maps built and validated in this work will aid research on this vital and fascinating region of the genome. PMID:25033397

  17. Dielectronic recombination in laser generated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectronic recombination coefficients have been computed for hydrogenic ions from HeII to FeXVI over a range of conditions typical of laser generated plasma. The results are displayed in a set a graphs together with the corresponding collisional radiative recombination coefficients. A comparison of these results indicates plasma conditions where dielectronic recombination is a significant process. (author)

  18. Dissecting the Requirement for Subgenomic Promoter Sequences by RNA Recombination of Brome Mosaic Virus In Vivo: Evidence for Functional Separation of Transcription and Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Wierzchoslawski, Rafal; Dzianott, Aleksandra; Bujarski, Jozef

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we and others mapped an increased homologous recombination activity within the subgenomic promoter (sgp) region in brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA3 (A. Bruyere et al., J. Virol. 74:4214-4219, 2000; R. Wierzchoslawski et al., J. Virol. 77:6769-6776, 2003). In order to correlate sgp-mediated recombination and transcription, in the present work we used BMV RNA3 constructs that carried altered sgp repeats. We observed that the removal or extension of the poly(U) tract reduced or increase...

  19. Mechanisms of sister chromatid recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies using T948 as a model system have been carried out aimed at elucidating the mechanism of sister chromatid recombination (SCR). Characterization of U.V. light- and x-ray-induced SCR, the relationiship between SCR induction and DNA repair using rad mutations, and the relationship between SCR induction and the time of cell division using cdc mutations are presented. It has been supposed that SCR is induced at the phase of S-G2 following DNA replication, that postreplication break of DNA strands is strongly involved in the induction of SCR, and that induction type of SCR, i.e., conversion type or recombination type, is dependent upon the type of molecular damage of DNA. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Microbial factories for recombinant pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo-Espín Joan; Ferrer-Miralles Neus; Corchero José; Vázquez Esther; Villaverde Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Most of the hosts used to produce the 151 recombinant pharmaceuticals so far approved for human use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and/or by the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) are microbial cells, either bacteria or yeast. This fact indicates that despite the diverse bottlenecks and obstacles that microbial systems pose to the efficient production of functional mammalian proteins, namely lack or unconventional post-translational modifications, proteolytic instability, po...

  1. Recombinant bacteriophage lysins as antibacterials

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Mark; Ross, Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; O'Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing worldwide prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, bacteriophage endolysins (lysins) represent a very promising novel alternative class of antibacterial in the fight against infectious disease. Lysins are phage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases which, when applied exogenously (as purified recombinant proteins) to Gram-positive bacteria, bring about rapid lysis and death of the bacterial cell. A number of studies have recently demonstrated the strong potential of these e...

  2. Detection of Quantitative Trait Loci Influencing Recombination Using Recombinant Inbred Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Dole, Jefferey; Weber, David F.

    2007-01-01

    The genetic basis of variation in recombination in higher plants is polygenic and poorly understood, despite its theoretical and practical importance. Here a method of detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing recombination in recombinant inbred lines (RILs) is proposed that relies upon the fact that genotype data within RILs carry the signature of past recombination. Behavior of the segregational genetic variance in numbers of chromosomal crossovers (recombination) over generations...

  3. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: Origin and recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A.; Mutirangura, A.; Ledbetter, D.H. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Langlois, S. (Univ. of Britisch Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)); Morris, M.A.; Malcolm, S.

    1993-09-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N=27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N-5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, more paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. 33 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  4. Homologous Recombination in Negative Sense RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Worobey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Recombination is an important process that influences biological evolution at many different levels. More and more homologous recombination events have been reported among negative sense RNA viruses recently. While sporadic authentic examples indicate that homologous recombination does occur, recombination seems to be generally rare or even absent in most negative sense RNA viruses, and most of the homologous recombination events reported in the literature were likely generated artificially due to lab contamination or inappropriate bioinformatics methods. Homologous recombination in negative sense RNA viruses should be reported with caution in the future, and only after stringent quality control efforts. Moreover, co-infection experiments should be performed to confirm whether recombination can occur.

  5. Mediatized play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv

    Children’s play must nowadays be understood as a mediatized field in society and culture. Media – understood in a very broad sense - holds severe explanatory power in describing and understanding the practice of play, since play happens both with, through and inspired by media of different sorts........ In this presentation the case of ‘playing soccer’ will be outlined through its different mediated manifestations, including soccer games and programs on TV, computer games, magazines, books, YouTube videos and soccer trading cards....

  6. AAV-mediated gene transfer to the mouse CNS

    OpenAIRE

    Stoica, Lorelei; Ahmed, Seemin S.; Gao, Guangping; Esteves, Miguel Sena

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno associated virus (rAAV) vectors are great tools for gene transfer due to their ability to mediate long-term gene expression. Recombinant AAVs have been used at various ages of development with no apparent toxicity. There are multiple ways of delivering AAV vectors to the CNS, depending on the stage of development of the mouse. In neonates, intravascular injections into the facial vein are often used. In adults, direct injections into target regions of the brain are achieved ...

  7. Global divergence of microbial genome sequences mediated by propagating fronts

    OpenAIRE

    Vetsigian, Kalin; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2005-01-01

    We model the competition between homologous recombination and point mutation in microbial genomes, and present evidence for two distinct phases, one uniform, the other genetically diverse. Depending on the specifics of homologous recombination, we find that global sequence divergence can be mediated by fronts propagating along the genome, whose characteristic signature on genome structure is elucidated, and apparently observed in closely related Bacillus strains. Front propagation provides an...

  8. Phase II Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial of conventional radiation therapy followed by treatment with recombinant interferon-? for supratentorial glioblastoma: Results of RTOG 9710

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether recombinant human interferon ?-1a (rhIFN-?), when given after radiation therapy, improves survival in glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: After surgery, 109 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma were enrolled and treated with radiation therapy (60 Gy). A total of 55 patients remained stable after radiation and were treated with rhIFN-? (6 MU/day i.m., 3 times/week). Outcomes were compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group glioma historical database. Results: RhIFN-? was well tolerated, with 1 Grade 4 toxicity and 8 other patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity. Median survival time (MST) of the 55 rhIFN-?-treated patients was 13.4 months. MST for the 34 rhIFN-?-treated in RPA Classes III and IV was 16.9 vs. 12.4 months for historical controls (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.89-1.81). There was also a trend toward improved survival across all RPA Classes comparing the 55 rhIFN-? treated patients and 1,658 historical controls (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.94-1.63). The high rate of early failures (54/109) after radiation and before initiation of rhIFN-? was likely caused by stricter interpretation of early radiographic changes in the current study. Matched-pair and intent-to-treat analyses performed to try to address this bias showed no difference in survival between study patients and controls. Conclusion: RhIFN-? given after conventional radiation therapy was well tolerated, with a trend toward survival benefit in patients who remained stable after radiation therapy. These data suggest that rhIFN-? warrants further evaluation in additional studies, possibly in combination with current temozolomide-based regimens

  9. Modifiers of (CAG)(n) instability in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3) transmissions: an association study with DNA replication, repair and recombination genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Sandra; Pearson, Christopher E; Coutinho, Paula; Provost, Sylvie; Amorim, António; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Sequeiros, Jorge; Rouleau, Guy A

    2014-10-01

    Twelve neurological disorders are caused by gene-specific CAG/CTG repeat expansions that are highly unstable upon transmission to offspring. This intergenerational repeat instability is clinically relevant since disease onset, progression and severity are associated with repeat size. Studies of model organisms revealed the involvement of some DNA replication and repair genes in the process of repeat instability, however, little is known about their role in patients. Here, we used an association study to search for genetic modifiers of (CAG)n instability in 137 parent-child transmissions in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3). With the hypothesis that variants in genes involved in DNA replication, repair or recombination might alter the MJD CAG instability patterns, we screened 768 SNPs from 93 of these genes. We found a variant in ERCC6 (rs2228528) associated with an expansion bias of MJD alleles. When using a gene-gene interaction model, the allele combination G-A (rs4140804-rs2972388) of RPA3-CDK7 is also associated with MJD instability in a direction-dependent manner. Interestingly, the transcription-coupled repair factor ERCC6 (aka CSB), the single-strand binding protein RPA, and the CDK7 kinase part of the TFIIH transcription repair complex, have all been linked to transcription-coupled repair. This is the first study performed in patient samples to implicate specific modifiers of CAG instability in humans. In summary, we found variants in three transcription-coupled repair genes associated with the MJD mutation that points to distinct mechanisms of (CAG)n instability. PMID:25026993

  10. Dissociative Recombination of He_2^+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, L.; Guna, M.; Simons, L.; Hardy, Kenneth A.

    1999-10-01

    The final product states of the dissociative recombination (DR) of He_2^+ have been studied by time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy. DR final product state atoms were seen in six final product states, and from the V = 2,3,4, and 5 vibrational levels of the molecular ion. The energy resolution of the TOF method is sufficient to separate the rotational levels built of these vibrational states. Rotational states up to J=15 were observed. From the rotational states observed, we made the first measurements of the rotational constants of the molecule, and find that the vibrational constants are in reasonable agreement with those predicted by theory.

  11. CRMAGE: CRISPR Optimized MAGE Recombineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2016-01-01

    A bottleneck in metabolic engineering and systems biology approaches is the lack of efficient genome engineering technologies. Here, we combine CRISPR/Cas9 and λ Red recombineering based MAGE technology (CRMAGE) to create a highly efficient and fast method for genome engineering of Escherichia coli...... assembled by a USER-cloning approach enabling quick and cost efficient gRNA replacement. CRMAGE furthermore utilizes CRISPR/Cas9 for efficient plasmid curing, thereby enabling multiple engineering rounds per day. To facilitate the design process, a web-based tool was developed to predict both the λ Red...

  12. Dissociative recombination in interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1989-01-01

    Molecular ions play a significant role in the chemistry and evolution of interstellar molecular clouds, even though these regions are overwhelmingly neutral. The dissociative recombination (DR) process governs the abundances of many of these ions and of related neutral species. The gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry of the simplest species is summarized, with emphasis on those problems which are most sensitive to uncertain rates or product branching ratios of DR processes. Examples of the kinds of information needed about DR processes are presented. The importance of the H3(+) ion and prospects for its direct observation are discussed.

  13. Effects of nuclear mutations for recombination and repair functions and of caffeine on mitochondrial recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms indicate that pathways governing repair of damage to nuclear DNA caused by x-ray or ultraviolet irradiation overlap with those controlling recombination. Fourteen nuclear mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were tested in order to determine whether these mutant genes affected mitochondrial recombination. None of the mutations studied significantly affected mitochondrial recombination. The nuclear recombination and repair pathways studied do not overlap with the nuclear pathway which controls recombination of mitochondrial DNA. A second set of experiments was designed to test the effect of caffeine on both nuclear and mitochondrial recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. (U.S.)

  14. Osmoregulation of Dimer Resolution at the Plasmid pJHCMW1 mwr Locus by Escherichia coli XerCD Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Van H.; Dery, KJ; Sherratt, DJ; Tolmasky, ME

    2002-01-01

    Xer-mediated dimer resolution at the mwr site of plasmid pJHCMW1 is osmoregulated in Escherichia coli. Whereas under low-salt conditions, the site-specific recombination reaction is efficient, under high-salt conditions, it proceeds inefficiently. Regulation of dimer resolution is independent of H-NS and is mediated by changes in osmolarity rather than ionic effects. The low level of recombination at high salt concentrations can be overcome by high levels of PepA or by mutating the ARG box to...

  15. Microbial factories for recombinant pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Domingo-Espín, Joan; Corchero, José Luis; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Most of the hosts used to produce the 151 recombinant pharmaceuticals so far approved for human use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and/or by the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) are microbial cells, either bacteria or yeast. This fact indicates that despite the diverse bottlenecks and obstacles that microbial systems pose to the efficient production of functional mammalian proteins, namely lack or unconventional post-translational modifications, proteolytic instability, poor solubility and activation of cell stress responses, among others, they represent convenient and powerful tools for recombinant protein production. The entering into the market of a progressively increasing number of protein drugs produced in non-microbial systems has not impaired the development of products obtained in microbial cells, proving the robustness of the microbial set of cellular systems (so far Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisae) developed for protein drug production. We summarize here the nature, properties and applications of all those pharmaceuticals and the relevant features of the current and potential producing hosts, in a comparative way. PMID:19317892

  16. Microbial factories for recombinant pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo-Espín Joan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most of the hosts used to produce the 151 recombinant pharmaceuticals so far approved for human use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA and/or by the European Medicines Agency (EMEA are microbial cells, either bacteria or yeast. This fact indicates that despite the diverse bottlenecks and obstacles that microbial systems pose to the efficient production of functional mammalian proteins, namely lack or unconventional post-translational modifications, proteolytic instability, poor solubility and activation of cell stress responses, among others, they represent convenient and powerful tools for recombinant protein production. The entering into the market of a progressively increasing number of protein drugs produced in non-microbial systems has not impaired the development of products obtained in microbial cells, proving the robustness of the microbial set of cellular systems (so far Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisae developed for protein drug production. We summarize here the nature, properties and applications of all those pharmaceuticals and the relevant features of the current and potential producing hosts, in a comparative way.

  17. Charge recombination in undoped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenar?i?, Zala; Prelovšek, Peter

    2014-12-01

    We theoretically analyze the process of charge recombination in the planar Mott-Hubbard insulators with the aim to explain the short picosecond-range lifetimes of photoexcited carriers, experimentally studied via pump-probe experiments on the undoped cuprates. The recombination mechanism consists of two essential ingredients: the formation of a metastable s -type bound holon-doublon pair, i.e., the Mott exciton, and the decay of such an excitonic state via the multimagnon emission. In spite of the large gap that requires many bosons to be emitted, the latter process is fast due to a large exchange scale and strong charge-spin coupling in planar systems. As the starting microscopic model we consider the single-band Hubbard model and then a more realistic three-band model for cuprates, both leading to the same minimal one. The decay rate of the exciton is evaluated numerically via the Fermi golden rule, having consistency also with the direct time-evolution calculation. The decay rate reveals exponential dependence on the ratio of the Mott-Hubbard gap and the exchange coupling, the result qualitatively reproduced also within a toy exciton-boson model.

  18. Silicon Solar Cells: Recombination and Electrical Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Saïdou,; Madougou,; Kaka, Mohamadou; Sissoko, Gregoire

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that most of silicon solar cell is configured in N-P junctions. In these solar cells, recombination mechanisms occur in five regions and are mainly two types: recombination mechanisms in bulk and surface recombination. In practice, the solar cells can be illuminated using several illumination modes: under monochromatic light, under multispectral light, under intense light concentration or under other modes. Basic equations describe the behaviour of the excess minority carrier...

  19. Asymmetric DNA bending in the Cre-loxP site-specific recombination synapse

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Feng; Gopaul, Deshmukh N.; Van Duyne, Gregory D.

    1999-01-01

    Cre recombinase catalyzes site-specific recombination between two 34-bp loxP sites in a variety of DNA substrates. At the start of the recombination pathway, the loxP sites are each bound by two recombinase molecules, and synapsis of the sites is mediated by Cre–Cre interactions. We describe the structures of synaptic complexes formed between a symmetrized loxP site and two Cre mutants that are defective in strand cleavage. The DNA in these complexes is bent sharply at a single base pair step...

  20. Functional Interactions of Meiotic Recombination Factors Rdh54 and Dmc1

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Peter; Kwon, YoungHo; Moses, Dana N; Seong, Changhyun; Sehorn, Michael G.; Singh, Akhilesh K.; Tsubouchi, Hideo; Greene, Eric C.; Klein, Hannah L.; Sung, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Genetic studies in budding and fission yeasts have provided evidence that Rdh54, a Swi2/Snf2-like factor, synergizes with the Dmc1 recombinase to mediate inter-homologue recombination during meiosis. Rdh54 associates with Dmc1 in the yeast two-hybrid assay, but whether the Rdh54-Dmc1 interaction is direct and the manner in which these two recombination factors may functionally co-operate to accomplish their biological task have not yet been defined. Here, using purified Schizosaccharomyces po...

  1. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these ...

  2. Mediating Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    globally. The book explores the history of key innovations and innovators in the business press. It analyzes changes in the discourse of business journalism associated with the growth in business news and the development of new ways of framing business issues and events. Finally, it examines the......"Mediating Business" is a study of the expansion of business journalism. Building on evidence from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, "Mediating Business" is a comparative and multidisciplinary study of one of the major transformations of the mass media and the realm of business - nationally and...... organizational implications of the increased media visibility of business and, in particular, the development of corporate governance and media relations....

  3. Human Insulin from Recombinant DNA Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Irving S.

    1983-02-01

    Human insulin produced by recombinant DNA technology is the first commercial health care product derived from this technology. Work on this product was initiated before there were federal guidelines for large-scale recombinant DNA work or commercial development of recombinant DNA products. The steps taken to facilitate acceptance of large-scale work and proof of the identity and safety of such a product are described. While basic studies in recombinant DNA technology will continue to have a profound impact on research in the life sciences, commercial applications may well be controlled by economic conditions and the availability of investment capital.

  4. Fine-Scale Population Recombination Rates, Hotspots, and Correlates of Recombination in the Medicago truncatula Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Paape, Timothy; ZHOU, Peng; Branca, Antoine; Briskine, Roman; Young, Nevin; Tiffin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Recombination rates vary across the genome and in many species show significant relationships with several genomic features, including distance to the centromere, gene density, and GC content. Studies of fine-scale recombination rates have also revealed that in several species, there are recombination hotspots, that is, short regions with recombination rates 10–100 greater than those in surrounding regions. In this study, we analyzed whole-genome resequence data from 26 accessions of the mode...

  5. Recombinant viral vaccines for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawood, Ryan; Hills, Thomas; Wong, Suet Ling; Alamoudi, Aliaa A; Beadle, Storm; Fisher, Kerry D; Seymour, Leonard W

    2012-09-01

    Cancer arises from 'self' in a series of steps that are all subject to immunoediting. Therefore, therapeutic cancer vaccines must stimulate an immune response against tumour antigens that have already evaded the body's immune defences. Vaccines presenting a tumour antigen in the context of obvious danger signals seem more likely to stimulate a response. This approach can be facilitated by genetic engineering using recombinant viral vectors expressing tumour antigens, cytokines, or both, from an immunogenic virus particle. We overview clinical attempts to use these agents for systemic immunisation and contrast the results with strategies employing direct intratumoural administration. We focus on the challenge of producing an effective response within the immune-suppressive tumour microenvironment, and discuss how the technology can overcome these obstacles. PMID:22917663

  6. Recombination at silicon dangling bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance experiments (pEDMR) with silicon dangling bonds (db) in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (?c-Si:H) showed that at low temperatures, two db recombination mechanisms exist where electrons are captured (i) by dbs directly (db-dc) or (ii) via band-tail states (tail-db). Here, similar experiments on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon/silicondioxide interfaces (c-Si/SiO2) are presented. They show that at low temperatures, only the db-dc is detectable at dbs in the c-Si/SiO2 interface (Pb centers) while in a-Si:H, only tail-db processes are observed

  7. Glycosylation of recombinant antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferis, Royston

    2005-01-01

    The adaptive immune system has the capacity to produce antibodies with a virtually infinite repertoire of specificities. Recombinant antibodies specific for human targets are established in the clinic as therapeutics and represent a major new class of drug. Therapeutic efficacy depends on the formation of complexes with target molecules and subsequent activation of downstream biologic effector mechanisms that result in elimination of the target. The activation of effector mechanisms is dependent on structural characteristics of the antibody molecule that result from posttranslational modifications, in particular, glycosylation. The production of therapeutic antibody with a consistent human glycoform profile has been and remains a considerable challenge to the biopharmaceutical industry. Recent research has shown that individual glycoforms of antibody may provide optimal efficacy for selected outcomes. Thus a further challenge will be the production of a second generation of antibody therapeutics customized for their clinical indication. PMID:15903235

  8. Heterogeneity in recombinant protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Johanson, Ted; Lundin, Luisa; Sørensen, Søren; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    bioreactors. For this purpose, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, that functions as a protein production reporter, has been developed. A heterologous protein has been tagged with a fluorescent protein providing a way to measure the amount of heterologous protein produced by the cells on single cell level....... Gradients are simulated in small bioreactors and the population heterogeneity can be visualised by analysing single cells with flow cytometry. This can give new insights to cell physiology and recombinant protein production at the industrial scale.......A crucial step in biotechnology is the scale-up process. Normally, lab scale verification and optimization of production processes and strains are performed in small reactors with perfect mixing and hence the cells experience a homogenous environment. The gradients that occur in industrial scale...

  9. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  10. Recombinant Swinepox Virus for Veterinary Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong-Jie; Lin, Hui-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Poxvirus-vectors have been widely used in vaccine development for several important human and animal diseases; some of these vaccines have been licensed and used extensively. Swinepox virus (SPV) is well suited to develop recombinant vaccines because of its large packaging capacity for recombinant DNA, its host range specificity, and its ability to induce appropriate immune responses. PMID:26458836

  11. Telomeric recombination induced by dysfunctional telomeres

    OpenAIRE

    Brault, Marie Eve; AUTEXIER, CHANTAL

    2011-01-01

    Telomeric recombination has been observed in telomerase-negative alternative lengthening of telomeres in human cancer cells and following telomerase inhibition or gene deletion. This study shows that telomeric recombination mechanisms can also be activated by dysfunctional telomeres without telomerase inhibition in telomerase-positive cells.

  12. Consequences of recombination on traditional phylogenetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Hein, J

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the shape of a phylogenetic tree reconstructed from sequences evolving under the coalescent with recombination. The motivation is that evolutionary inferences are often made from phylogenetic trees reconstructed from population data even though recombination may well occur (mtDNA o...

  13. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using fluorescence microscopy.

  14. Electron-ion recombination at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work is based on results obtained with a merged-beams experiment. A beam of electronics with a well characterized density and energy distribution was merged with a fast, monoenergetic ion beam. Results have been obtained for radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination at low relative energies (0 to ?70eV). The obtained energy resolution was improved by about a factor of 30. High vacuum technology was used to suppress interactions with electrons from the environments. The velocity distribution of the electron beam was determined. State-selective dielectronic-recombination measurements were performable. Recombination processes were studied. The theoretical background for radiative recombination and Kramers' theory are reviewed. The quantum mechanical result and its relation to the semiclassical theory is discussed. Radiative recombination was also measured with several different non-bare ions, and the applicability of the semiclassical theory to non-bare ions was investigated. The use of an effective charge is discussed. For dielectronic recombination, the standard theoretical approach in the isolated resonance and independent-processes approximation is debated. The applicability of this method was tested. The theory was able to reproduce most of the experimental data except when the recombination process was sensitive to couplings between different electronic configurations. The influence of external perturbing electrostatic fields is discussed. (AB) (31 refs.)

  15. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina; Holm, Laerke; Geelhood, Jennifer L; Thon, Genevieve; Smith, Gerald R

    2010-05-11

    During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes, is essential in most species for proper homologue segregation. Nevertheless, recombination is repressed specifically in and around the centromeres of chromosomes, apparently because rare centromeric (or pericentromeric) recombination events, when they do occur, can disrupt proper segregation and lead to genetic disabilities, including birth defects. The basis by which centromeric meiotic recombination is repressed has been largely unknown. We report here that, in fission yeast, RNAi functions and Clr4-Rik1 (histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase) are required for repression of centromeric recombination. Surprisingly, one mutant derepressed for recombination in the heterochromatic mating-type region during meiosis and several mutants derepressed for centromeric gene expression during mitotic growth are not derepressed for centromeric recombination during meiosis. These results reveal a complex relation between types of repression by heterochromatin. Our results also reveal a previously undemonstrated role for RNAi and heterochromatin in the repression of meiotic centromeric recombination and, potentially, in the prevention of birth defects by maintenance of proper chromosome segregation during meiosis. PMID:20421495

  16. Titania Photocatalysis beyond Recombination: A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bunsho Ohtani

    2013-01-01

    This short review paper shows the significance of recombination of a photoexcited electron and a hole in conduction and valence bands, respectively, of a titania photocatalyst, since recombination has not yet been fully understood and has not been evaluated adequately during the past several decades of research on heterogeneous photocatalysis.

  17. Titania Photocatalysis beyond Recombination: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunsho Ohtani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This short review paper shows the significance of recombination of a photoexcited electron and a hole in conduction and valence bands, respectively, of a titania photocatalyst, since recombination has not yet been fully understood and has not been evaluated adequately during the past several decades of research on heterogeneous photocatalysis.

  18. Recombinant organisms for production of industrial products

    OpenAIRE

    Adrio, Jose-Luis; Arnold L. Demain

    2009-01-01

    A revolution in industrial microbiology was sparked by the discoveries of ther double-stranded structure of DNA and the development of recombinant DNA technology. Traditional industrial microbiology was merged with molecular biology to yield improved recombinant processes for the industrial production of primary and secondary metabolites, protein biopharmaceuticals and industrial enzymes. Novel genetic techniques such as metabolic engineering, combinatorial biosynthesis and molecular breeding...

  19. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C

    2010-01-01

    During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes, is essential in most species for proper homologue segregation. Nevertheless, recombination is repressed specifically in and around the centromeres of chromosomes, apparently because rare centromeric (or pericentromeric) recombination events, when they do occur, can disrupt proper segregation and lead to genetic disabilities, including birth defects. The basis by which centromeric meiotic recombination is repressed has been largely unknown. We report here that, in fission yeast, RNAi functions and Clr4-Rik1 (histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase) are required for repression of centromeric recombination. Surprisingly, one mutant derepressed for recombination in the heterochromatic mating-type region during meiosis and several mutants derepressed for centromeric gene expression during mitotic growth are not derepressed for centromeric recombination during meiosis. These results reveal a complex relation between types of repression by heterochromatin. Our results also reveal a previously undemonstrated role for RNAi and heterochromatin in the repression of meiotic centromeric recombination and, potentially, in the prevention of birth defects by maintenance of proper chromosome segregation during meiosis.

  20. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  1. Mediatized Humanitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts to legitimate themselves and their moral claim were examined. A time trend analysis of the prioritization of actors in the material indicates that marked shifts in legitimation loci have taken place during the pa...

  2. Containment air circulation for optimal hydrogen recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accepted first-line defense for hydrogen mitigation is to design for the hydrogen to be rapidly mixed with the containment atmosphere and diluted to below flammability concentrations. Then, as hydrogen continues to be produced in the longer term, recombiners can be used to remove hydrogen: recombiners can be located in forced-air ducts or passive recombiners can be distributed within containment and the heat of recombination used to promote local air circulation. However, this principle does not eliminate the possibility of high hydrogen concentrations at locations removed from the recombiners. An improvement on this strategy is to arrange for a specific, buoyancy-driven, overall circulation of the containment atmosphere such that the recombiners can be located within the recirculation flow, immediately downstream of the hydrogen source. This would make the mixing process more predictable and solve the mass-transfer problem associated with distributed recombiners. Ideally, the recombiners would be located just above the hydrogen source so that the heat of recombination would assist the overall circulation. In this way, the hydrogen would be removed as close as possible to the source, thereby minimizing the amount of hydrogen immediately downstream of the source and reducing the hydrogen concentration to acceptable levels at other locations. Such a strategy requires the containment volume to be divided into an upflow path, past the hydrogen source and the recombiner, and a downflow path to complete the circuit. The flow could be generated actively using fans or passively using buoyancy forces arising from the difference in density of gases in the upfiow and downflow paths; the gases in the downflow path being cooled at an elevated heat sink. (author)

  3. Recent Developments in Dissociative Recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been a number of recent developments in dissociative recombination research as it relates to ITER, that should be highlighted. These concern primarily experimental and modelling issues and this document will not touch upon the topics of the other scientists involved in DR studies that are present at the meeting. The topic of branching ratios in general is a topic fundamental to DR especially how it influences the formation of radical and stable neutral molecules that again might play a role in particle formation. It should be remembered that the reactions of neutral radicals to form cyclic compounds are responsible for the formation of soot in combustion, though the role played by ions in flames is at best uncertain. In the near wall plasma environment, ion processes may well be more important since neutral species are rarer. Modelling studies by Pernot and collaborators at the Universite de Paris-Sud have shown that if one compares the yields of individual neutral species in ion-chemistry models (in this particular case, the ionosphere of Titan), and if one assumes that DR reactions of hydrocarbon ions primarily decay via the ejection of a hydrogen ion (which is assumed by most Titan ionospheric models) and if one compares these predictions with those coming from a model where actual measured branching ratios are used, differences of up to 5 orders of magnitude are found. This shows very clearly the need for branching ratio studies. In early merged beam studies of DR performed in Canada in the 1970's, it was noticed that cross sections for polyatomic species typically displayed a sharp fall-off above 0.1 eV. This has since been seen in many storage ring studies and clearly this has important consequences for ITER chemistry where plasma temperatures are likely to be well above ambient. In a recent analysis, Jungen and Pratt have explained this phenomenon on the basis that the recombination is dominated by the indirect process (initial capture into a vibrationally excited, neutral Rydberg state) in which the propensity rule (+?v=1) dominates the capture. When the electron energy exceeds that between the v'=0 and v'=1 levels of the ion, where the capture must now involve a ?v=2 transition, this will be much less effective and so the cross section drops precipitously. This assumes of course that the recombining ion is primarily in the ground v=0 level. H3+ continues to be an active subject of research and a very recent experiment at the TSR ring in Heidelberg has examined the influence of rotational excitation on the rate of the recombination. This is a very beautiful study but an important outcome is that even though a cryogenically cooled storage trap was used to produce the ions, the internal rotational temperature of the ions was never found to be below 150K. This suggests that ion cooling by storage in the ring leads eventually to an equilibrium value for the internal energy of the ions as they are de-excited/re-excited by passage through the electron cooler. As observed in earlier merged beam experiments in Canada, the extraction field in the ion source plays an important role in determining the excitation state of the ions as collisions outside the source can lead to re-heating. Indeed in the TSR experiments using a conventional Penning source and a normal extraction field, the ions were found to have a rotational temperature of several thousands of degrees. This clearly has important significance for earlier measurements taken in storage rings. Finally, the world will soon have a new storage ring facility for dissociative recombination research and this will be in Langzhou in China. This machine will have a higher magnetic rigidity that previous rings used for DR and so heavier ions and higher mass resolution experiments can be performed there. Experimental operation of this new ring is expected to commence in 2012/2013. (author)

  4. Dual regulation of Dmc1-driven DNA strand exchange by Swi5–Sfr1 activation and Rad22 inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Murayama, Yasuto; Kurokawa, Yumiko; Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; IWASAKI, HIROSHI

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic recombination requires two key recombinases: the ubiquitously expressed Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1. Rad52 and its fission yeast ortholog, Rad22, are mediators that help load Rad51 onto ssDNA coated with replication protein A (RPA). Here, Iwasaki and colleagues reveal how the Swi5–Sfr1 complex functions as both a mediator (loading DMC1 onto ssDNA) and an activator (stimulating Dmc1-driven strand exchange). In contrast, Rad22 inhibits Dmc1 by competing for binding to RPA-coated...

  5. Trap-limited charge recombination in intrinsic perovskite film and meso-superstructured perovskite solar cells and the passivation effect of the hole-transport material on trap states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Hao-Yi; Yu, Man; Fu, Li-Min; Qin, Yujun; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Ai, Xi-Cheng

    2015-11-28

    Charge recombination dynamics in intrinsic perovskite film and in meso-superstructured perovskite solar cells have been systematically studied, which are found to be mediated by the energetic distribution of intra-gap trap states as described by the trap-limited recombination theory. Besides, the passivation effect of the hole-transport material on trap states is discussed. PMID:26497590

  6. Recombination of cold electrons with cooled ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombination, one of the possible reactions of cold electrons with ions, has several important applications, besides being of fundamental interest. Astrophysical objects are studied through their radiation spectra emitted from electron-ion recombination. Plasma modeling and diagnostics are based on the knowledge of recombination cross sections. It is the proposed mechanism for anti-hydrogen production in a trap filled with antiprotons and positrons. The most fundamental process of recombination is radiative recombination (RR): Zq+ + e→ Z(q-1)+ + hν. Here, we discuss measurements of recombination rate coefficients in absolute scale between free electrons and ions at the electron cooler of the CRYRING storage ring at MSL, Stockholm. Surprisingly, there is a consistent disagreement between the measured rates and the rates obtained from theoretical descriptions of RR. It could be shown that this deviation depends on external fields, such as a weak magnetic field in the interaction region. Another effect presented is the enhancement by two orders of magnitude of the recombination rates into a certain quantum state of the atom in a strong laser field. We will discuss these results with respect to their implications for the formation of anti-hydrogen atoms in a Penning trap. (authors)

  7. Off-gas system recombining system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type reactor, exhaust gases are accumulated in the upper portion of a condensator which contain hydrogen, oxygen, nirogen, etc. and, accordingly, can not be released as they are into the atmosphere. An off-gas system is disposed for processing the exhaust gases safely and releasing them into the atmosphere. The exhaust gases are sucked by a steam type extract or, sent to a preheater, warmed to about 160degC and then sent to a recombiner. The recombiner is adapted to recombine hydrogen and oxygen into steams while keeping them out of a detonating range to prevent an accidental explosion. Then, a hydrogen densitometer is disposed in the exhaust gases guided to the recombiner and oxygen is injected such that the oxygen density in the exhaust gases flowing into the recombiner is made higher thanb 1/2 of the hydrogen concentration depending on the signals from the densitometer. Since the inside of the recombiner is in an oxygen excess region, the catalyst performance is improved outstandingly to increase the hydrogen conversion ratio. Thus, it is possible to reduce the volume and the size of the catalyst and the recombiner. (N.H.)

  8. Recombinant fowlpox virus elicits transient cytotoxic T cell responses due to suboptimal innate recognition and recruitment of T cell help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Kerrilyn R; Lousberg, Erin L; Beukema, Emma L; Yu, Anastasia; Howley, Paul M; Brown, Michael P; Hayball, John D

    2008-07-01

    Recombinant fowlpox viruses (FPVs) have been used in a variety of vaccine strategies; however strong data clearly demonstrating the characteristics of the strength and nature of the resultant immune response elicited by these vectors are lacking. By utilising a recombinant variant of FPV which expresses the nominal antigen chicken ovalbumin (OVA), and assessing innate FPV- and OVA-specific adaptive immune responses, we show that recombinant FPV induces a rapid type I interferon (IFN) response, mediated primarily by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). These cells are necessary for the development of a strong but transient CD8(+) T cell effector response directed against OVA-expressing target cells. We propose that a combination of suboptimal type I IFN production, poor CD4(+) T cell helper function and inefficient DC licensing likely contribute to this transient response. These findings now provide a sound basis for rational modifications to be made to recombinant FPV, designed to improve subsequent vaccine responses. PMID:18541346

  9. Immunogenicity of therapeutic recombinant immunotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Ronit; Onda, Masanori; Pastan, Ira

    2016-03-01

    Recombinant immunotoxins (RITs) are chimeric proteins designed to treat cancer. They are made up of an Fv or Fab that targets an antigen on a cancer cell fused to a 38-kDa portion of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE38). Because PE38 is a bacterial protein, it is highly immunogenic in patients with solid tumors that have normal immune systems, but much less immunogenic in patients with hematologic malignancies where the immune system is suppressed. RITs have shown efficacy in refractory hairy cell leukemia and in some children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but have been much less effective in solid tumors, because neutralizing antibodies develop and prevent additional treatment cycles. In this paper we will (i) review data from clinical trials describing the immunogenicity of PE38 in different patient populations; (ii) review results from clinical trials using different immunosuppressive drugs; and (iii) describe our efforts to make new less-immunogenic RITs by identifying and removing T- and B-cell epitopes to hide the RIT from the immune system. PMID:26864110

  10. Electron-ion recombination rates for merged-beams experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy dependence of the electron-ion recombination rates are studied for different recombination processes (radiative recombination, three-body recombination, dissociative recombination) for Maxwellian relative velocity distribution of arbitrary asymmetry. The results are discussed in context of the electron-ion merged beams experiments in cooling ion storage rings. The question of indication of a possible contribution of the three-body recombination to the measured recombination rates versus relative energy is particularly addressed. Its influence on the electron beam temperature derived from the energy dependence of recombination rate is discussed

  11. The Purified and Recombinant Legionella pneumophila Chaperonin Alters Mitochondrial Trafficking and Microfilament Organization?

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Audrey; Lima, Celia A.; Allan, David S.; Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Garduño, Rafael A.

    2009-01-01

    A portion of the total cellular pool of the Legionella pneumophila chaperonin, HtpB, is found on the bacterial cell surface, where it can mediate invasion of nonphagocytic cells. HtpB continues to be abundantly produced and released by internalized L. pneumophila and may thus have postinvasion functions. We used here two functional models (protein-coated beads and expression of recombinant proteins in CHO cells) to investigate the competence of HtpB in mimicking early intracellular traffickin...

  12. Construction and expression of recombinant plasmids encoding type 1 fimbriae of a urinary Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate.

    OpenAIRE

    Purcell, B K; Clegg, S.

    1983-01-01

    The type 1 fimbriae of Klebsiella pneumoniae have been implicated as important virulence factors in mediating Klebsiella urinary infections. The chromosomally encoded fimbrial genes were cloned by a cosmid cloning technique. Further subcloning was performed with the cloning vehicles pBR322 and pACYC184, and a recombinant plasmid containing the fimbrial genes was constructed. After transformation by this plasmid, both Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium were shown to express fimbriae w...

  13. Intra-chromosomal rearrangements generated by Cre-lox site-specific recombination.

    OpenAIRE

    Medberry, S L; Dale, E; Qin, M.; Ow, D W

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are useful genetic and breeding tools but are often difficult to detect and characterize. To more easily identify and define chromosome deletions and inversions, we have used the bacteriophage P1 Cre-lox site-specific recombination system to generate these events in plants. This involves three steps: (i) the introduction of two lox sites into one locus in a plant genome, including one site within a modified Ds transposon; (ii) Ac transposase-mediated transposition o...

  14. Recombinant allergen-specific antibody fragments: tools for diagnosis, prevention and therapy of type I allergy.

    OpenAIRE

    VALENTA, R; Flicker, S.; Eibensteiner, PB; Steinberger, P.; Laffer, S; Dolecek, C; Kraft, D

    1997-01-01

    Type I allergy represents a hypersensitivity occurring in almost 20% of the population that is based on the recognition of innocuous airborn antigens (pollen, mite, mould and pet allergens) by specific immunoglobulin E. Allergic symptoms (e.g. allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma) are caused by the release of biological mediators from effector-cells after allergen-induced crosslink of receptor-bound IgE. Here we discuss strategies to obtain recombinant allergen-specific antibody fragment...

  15. Rad52 forms DMA repair and recombination centers during S phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M.; Rothstein, R.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2001-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity and stable transmission of genetic information depend on a number of DNA repair processes. Failure to faithfully perform these processes can result in genetic alterations and subsequent development of cancer and other genetic diseases. In the eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homologous recombination is the major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks. The key role played by Rad52 in this pathway has been attributed to its ability to seek out and mediat...

  16. Construction and analysis of the transgenic carrot and celery plants expressing the recombinant thaumatin II protein

    OpenAIRE

    Luchakivska Yu. S.; Komarnytskii I. K.; Kurchenko I. M.; Yurieva O. M.; Zhytkevich N. V.; Kuchuk M. V.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To obtain the transgenic carrot and celery plants able to express recombinant thaumatin II in order to increase plant stress tolerance. Methods. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the carrot and celery seedlings was used for obtaining the transgenic plants. Presence and transcription of the transgene in plant tissues were proved by PCR and RT-PCR analysis. The plants were tested for the biotic stress tolerance by in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activity assays and for the sali...

  17. V(D)J recombination frequency is affected by the sequence interposed between a pair of recombination signals: sequence comparison reveals a putative recombinational enhancer element.

    OpenAIRE

    Roch, F A; Hobi, R; Berchtold, M W; Kuenzle, C C

    1997-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain intron enhancer (Emu) not only stimulates transcription but also V(D)J recombination of chromosomally integrated recombination substrates. We aimed at reproducing this effect in recombination competent cells by transient transfection of extrachromosomal substrates. These we prepared by interposing between the recombination signal sequences (RSS) of the plasmid pBlueRec various fragments, including Emu, possibly affecting V(D)J recombination. Our work shows that ...

  18. Recombination Every Day: Abundant Recombination in a Virus during a Single Multi-Cellular Host Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froissart Remy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral recombination can dramatically impact evolution and epidemiology. In viruses, the recombination rate depends on the frequency of genetic exchange between different viral genomes within an infected host cell and on the frequency at which such co-infections occur. While the recombination rate has been recently evaluated in experimentally co-infected cell cultures for several viruses, direct quantification at the most biologically significant level, that of a host infection, is still lacking. This study fills this gap using the cauliflower mosaic virus as a model. We distributed four neutral markers along the viral genome, and co-inoculated host plants with marker-containing and wild-type viruses. The frequency of recombinant genomes was evaluated 21 d post-inoculation. On average, over 50% of viral genomes recovered after a single host infection were recombinants, clearly indicating that recombination is very frequent in this virus. Estimates of the recombination rate show that all regions of the genome are equally affected by this process. Assuming that ten viral replication cycles occurred during our experiment-based on data on the timing of coat protein detection-the per base and replication cycle recombination rate was on the order of 2 x 10-5 to 4 x 10-5. This first determination of a virus recombination rate during a single multi-cellular host infection indicates that recombination is very frequent in the everyday life of this virus.

  19. Recombination in narrow-gapped semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In narrow-gapped semiconductors of the type Hgsub(1-x)Cdsub(x)Te as well as in lead chalcogenides and their mixed crystals with energy gaps of some tenths of eV, the band-band recombination processes dominate if the samples are sufficiently perfect in their crystal lattices. The relative importance of the radiative or Auger recombination depends on the width of the energy gap and the charge carrier concentration. In the extreme case of very narrow energy gaps plasmon and one-electron recombination occurs additionally

  20. Recombinant vaccine for canine parvovirus in dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Martínez, C.; Ruiz de Ybáñez, R; Simarro, I; Vela, C.; Casal, I

    1992-01-01

    VP2 is the major component of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsids. The VP2-coding gene was engineered to be expressed by a recombinant baculovirus under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A transfer vector that contains the lacZ gene under the control of the p10 promoter was used in order to facilitate the selection of recombinants. The expressed VP2 was found to be structurally and immunologically indistinguishable from authentic VP2. The recombinant VP2 shows also the capability to self-as...

  1. Construction and characterization of recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus carrying brainspecific miRNA target sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-yuan CAO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective?To construct the recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus ( JEV carrying brain-specific miRNA targeting sequences. Methods?The target sequences of brain-specific miR-124 and miR-125 were introduced into the infectious cDNA clone of JEV to generate recombinant plasmids based on reverse genetics technology. The recombinant plasmids were linearized with Xho ? and served as templates of transcription with SP6 RNA polymerase to generate infectious viral RNA. The RNA transcripts were then transfected into BHK-21 cells, and the supernatant was obtained after incubated at 37?, 5% CO2 for 3 days. The cytopathic changes of BHK-21 cells inoculated with the supernatant were observed after one passage. The rescued viruses carrying miRNA target sequences were validated by RT-PCR, standard plaque forming test on BHK-21 cells and growth curves analysis. Results?Two recombinant viruses carrying miR-124 or miR-125 target sequence were rescued, respectively. The insertion of miRNA target sequences was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The rescued viruses yielded similar plaque morphology and replication efficiency compared with wild type JEV. Conclusion?The recombinant JEV containing brain-specific miRNA target sequences can be obtained by reverse genetics technique, which could be used in further studies of miRNA-mediated tissue-specific attenuation mechanism of JEV. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.06.01

  2. Recombinant I?B?-loaded curcumin nanoparticles for improved cancer therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of recombinant protein therapeutics has been evolving rapidly, making significant impact on clinical applications for several diseases, including cancer. However, the functional aspects of proteins rely exclusively on their structural integrity, in which nanoparticle mediated delivery offers unique advantages over free proteins. In the present work, a novel strategy has been developed where the nanoparticles (NPs) used for the delivery of the recombinant protein could contribute to enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of the recombinant protein. The transcription factor, NF?B, involved in cell growth and its inhibitor, I?B?, regulates its proliferation. Another similar naturally available molecule, which inhibits the function of NF?B, is curcumin. Hence, we have developed a ‘green synthesis’ method for preparing water-soluble curcumin nanoparticles to stabilize recombinant I?B? protein. The NPs were characterized by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering before administration into human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and glioblastoma (U87MG) cells. Experimental results demonstrated that this combined module had enhanced therapeutic efficacy, causing apoptotic cell death, which was confirmed by cytotoxicity assay and flowcytometry analyses. The expression of apoptotic genes studied by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR delineated the molecular pathways involved in cell death. Thus, our study revealed that the functional delivery of recombinant I?B?-loaded curcumin NPs has promise as a natural-product-based protein therapeutics against cancer cells. (paper)

  3. Recombinant I?B?-loaded curcumin nanoparticles for improved cancer therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subhamoy; Sahoo, Amaresh Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Arun; Sankar Ghosh, Siddhartha

    2014-08-01

    The field of recombinant protein therapeutics has been evolving rapidly, making significant impact on clinical applications for several diseases, including cancer. However, the functional aspects of proteins rely exclusively on their structural integrity, in which nanoparticle mediated delivery offers unique advantages over free proteins. In the present work, a novel strategy has been developed where the nanoparticles (NPs) used for the delivery of the recombinant protein could contribute to enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of the recombinant protein. The transcription factor, NF?B, involved in cell growth and its inhibitor, I?B?, regulates its proliferation. Another similar naturally available molecule, which inhibits the function of NF?B, is curcumin. Hence, we have developed a ‘green synthesis’ method for preparing water-soluble curcumin nanoparticles to stabilize recombinant I?B? protein. The NPs were characterized by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering before administration into human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and glioblastoma (U87MG) cells. Experimental results demonstrated that this combined module had enhanced therapeutic efficacy, causing apoptotic cell death, which was confirmed by cytotoxicity assay and flowcytometry analyses. The expression of apoptotic genes studied by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR delineated the molecular pathways involved in cell death. Thus, our study revealed that the functional delivery of recombinant I?B?-loaded curcumin NPs has promise as a natural-product-based protein therapeutics against cancer cells.

  4. Emergence of distinct brome mosaic virus recombinants is determined by the polarity of the inoculum RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun-Jung; Rao, A L N

    2012-05-01

    Despite overwhelming interest in the impact exerted by recombination during evolution of RNA viruses, the relative contribution of the polarity of inoculum templates remains poorly understood. Here, by agroinfiltrating Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, we show that brome mosaic virus (BMV) replicase is competent to initiate positive-strand [(+)-strand] synthesis on an ectopically expressed RNA3 negative strand [(-) strand] and faithfully complete the replication cycle. Consequently, we sought to examine the role of RNA polarity in BMV recombination by expressing a series of replication-defective mutants of BMV RNA3 in (+) or (-) polarity. Temporal analysis of progeny sequences revealed that the genetic makeup of the primary recombinant pool is determined by the polarity of the inoculum template. When the polarity of the inoculum template was (+), the recombinant pool that accumulated during early phases of replication was a mixture of nonhomologous recombinants. These are longer than the inoculum template length, and a nascent 3' untranslated region (UTR) of wild-type (WT) RNA1 or RNA2 was added to the input mutant RNA3 3' UTR due to end-to-end template switching by BMV replicase during (-)-strand synthesis. In contrast, when the polarity of the inoculum was (-), the progeny contained a pool of native-length homologous recombinants generated by template switching of BMV replicase with a nascent UTR from WT RNA1 or RNA2 during (+)-strand synthesis. Repair of a point mutation caused by polymerase error occurred only when the polarity of the inoculum template was (+). These results contribute to the explanation of the functional role of RNA polarity in recombination mediated by copy choice mechanisms. PMID:22357282

  5. Recombinant activated factor VII: 30 years of research and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedner, Ulla

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) was initially developed to treat bleeding episodes in patients with congenital haemophilia and inhibitors. The story of its development began in the 1970s, when FVIIa was identified as one of the activated coagulation factors that has minimal potential for inducing thromboembolic side-effects. Extensive research over the last 30 years has greatly increased our knowledge of the characteristics of FVII, its activation, and the mechanisms by which rFVIIa restores haemostasis. In haemophilia, the haemostatic effect of rFVIIa is mediated via binding to thrombin-activated platelets at the site of injury, thereby enhancing thrombin generation also in the absence of factor (F) VIII or FIX. The mechanism of action of rFVIIa has also allowed its successful use in other clinical scenarios characterised by impaired thrombin generation, and its licensed uses have now been extended to acquired haemophilia, congenital FVII deficiency and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. PMID:26073368

  6. Paroxetine suppresses recombinant human P2X7 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao-Ung, Phuong; Skarratt, Kristen K; Fuller, Stephen J; Stokes, Leanne

    2015-12-01

    P2X7 receptor (P2X7) activity may link inflammation to depressive disorders. Genetic variants of human P2X7 have been linked with major depression and bipolar disorders, and the P2X7 knockout mouse has been shown to exhibit anti-depressive-like behaviour. P2X7 is an ATP-gated ion channel and is a major regulator of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1? (IL-1?) secretion from monocytes and microglia. We hypothesised that antidepressants may elicit their mood enhancing effects in part via modulating P2X7 activity and reducing inflammatory responses. In this study, we determined whether common psychoactive drugs could affect recombinant and native human P2X7 responses in vitro. Common antidepressants demonstrated opposing effects on human P2X7-mediated responses; paroxetine inhibited while fluoxetine and clomipramine mildly potentiated ATP-induced dye uptake in HEK-293 cells stably expressing recombinant human P2X7. Paroxetine inhibited dye uptake mediated by human P2X7 in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 24 ?M and significantly reduces ATP-induced inward currents. We confirmed that trifluoperazine hydrochloride suppressed human P2X7 responses (IC50 of 6.4 ?M). Both paroxetine and trifluoperazine did not inhibit rodent P2X7 responses, and mutation of a known residue (F 95L) did not alter the effect of either drug, suggesting neither drug binds at this site. Finally, we demonstrate that P2X7-induced IL-1? secretion from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed human CD14(+) monocytes was suppressed with trifluoperazine and paroxetine. PMID:26341077

  7. Recombinant vaccines: experimental and applied aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels

    1999-01-01

    Development of vaccines for aquaculture fish represent an important applied functional aspect of fish immunology research. Particularly in the case of recombinant vaccines, where a single antigen is usually expected to induce immunity to a specific pathogen, knowledge of mechanisms involved in induction of a protective immune response may become vital. The few recombinant vaccines licensd so far, despite much research during the last decade, illustrate that this is not a straightforward matter. However, as vaccine technology as well as our knowledge of the fish immune system is steadily improved, these fields will open up a number of interesting research objectives of mutual benefit. Recent aspects of recombinant protein vaccines, live recombinant vaccines and DNA vaccines are discussed.

  8. Recombination Lines from two Distant HII Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Courtney; Dickey, John; Anderson, Loren; Bania, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    This proposal uses the CABB system in the newly developed CFB64M-32k mode to observe 15 sets of Hnalpha recombination lines simultaneously in two HII regions that are particularly interesting from a Galactic structure perspective. Their HI absorption spectra indicate that they are on the far side of the Galactic centre, beyond the solar circle. G337 has no reported recombination lines, while G334 has two recombination line detections at quite different velocities. These may be among the most distant HII regions known, with relatively high luminosities and dramatic structure in the infrared continuum. In this project we will detect and map the recombination line and continuum emission from the ionized gas, and measure much more accurate 21-cm absorption spectra.

  9. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  10. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  11. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  12. Recombination Effects on Supernovae Light-Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfriend, Tomer; Sari, Re'em

    2014-01-01

    Supernovae of type IIP are marked by the long plateau seen in their optical light curves. The plateau is believed to be the result of a recombination wave that propagates through the outflowing massive hydrogen envelope. Here, we analytically investigate the transition from a fully ionized envelope to a partially recombined one and its effects on the SN light curve. The motivation is to establish the underlying processes which dominate the evolution at late times when recombination takes place in the envelope, yet early enough so that $^{56}$Ni decay is a negligible source of energy. We assume a simple, yet adequate, hydrodynamic profile of the envelope and study the mechanisms which dominate the energy emission and the observed temperature. We consider the diffusion of photons through the envelope while analyzing the ionization fraction and the coupling between radiation and gas. We find that once recombination starts, the observed temperature decreases slowly in time. However, in a typical red supergiant (R...

  13. Potential energy curves for dissociative recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a discussion of ab inito calculations of potential energy curves. The direct dissociative recombination (DR) of a diatomic molecular ion is identified. Atomic and molecular recombination are briefly compared. The DR mechanisms which will proceed with shock rate if there is a favorable crossing between the potential energy curves for Ds* and Ds+ in (1) are studied. The nature of dissociative states is considered. Wave functions, configuration of orbital, orbital optimization, configuration interaction, are surveyed. The dissociative recombination of 02+ to O ('S), to O ('D), to O (3p) + O (3p) are calculated. The dissociative recombination of H2+ and He2+, and potential energy curves for all the dissociations, are graphed

  14. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina; Holm, Laerke; Geelhood, Jennifer L; Thon, Genevieve; Smith, Gerald R

    2010-01-01

    During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes, is....... Surprisingly, one mutant derepressed for recombination in the heterochromatic mating-type region during meiosis and several mutants derepressed for centromeric gene expression during mitotic growth are not derepressed for centromeric recombination during meiosis. These results reveal a complex relation between...... types of repression by heterochromatin. Our results also reveal a previously undemonstrated role for RNAi and heterochromatin in the repression of meiotic centromeric recombination and, potentially, in the prevention of birth defects by maintenance of proper chromosome segregation during meiosis....

  15. Recombinant vaccines: experimental and applied aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels

    1999-01-01

    Development of vaccines for aquaculture fish represent an important applied functional aspect of fish immunology research. Particularly in the case of recombinant vaccines, where a single antigen is usually expected to induce immunity to a specific pathogen, knowledge of mechanisms involved in...... induction of a protective immune response may become vital. The few recombinant vaccines licensd so far, despite much research during the last decade, illustrate that this is not a straightforward matter. However, as vaccine technology as well as our knowledge of the fish immune system is steadily improved......, these fields will open up a number of interesting research objectives of mutual benefit. Recent aspects of recombinant protein vaccines, live recombinant vaccines and DNA vaccines are discussed....

  16. Breaking the sound barrier in recombination fronts

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, R. J. R.; J. E. Dyson

    1995-01-01

    We exploit a generic instability in the integration of steady, sonic, near-isothermal flows to find the complete transition diagram for recombination fronts (for a model system of equations). The instability requires the integration of the flow equations for speeds between the isothermal and adiabatic sound speeds to be performed with particular care. As a result of this, the previous work of Newman & Axford on the structure of recombination fronts neglected an important cla...

  17. Dielectronic recombination of hydrogen-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decay dynamics of dielectronic recombination (DR) processes of H-like titanium ions was investigated with an electron beam ion trap. In the DR of H-like ions a K-shell vacancy is available even after the decay of the doubly excited state produced by the recombination. Therefore secondary X-ray emission is possible. An observed X-ray spectrum of DR obtained in the present experiment was well reproduced theoretically by taking into account the secondary X-rays

  18. Recombination energy in double white dwarf formation

    OpenAIRE

    Nandez, Jose L. A.; Ivanova, Natalia; Lombardi Jr., James C.

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter we investigate the role of recombination energy during a common envelope event. We confirm that taking this energy into account helps to avoid the formation of the circumbinary envelope commonly found in previous studies. For the first time, we can model a complete common envelope event, with a clean compact double white dwarf binary system formed at the end. The resulting binary orbit is almost perfectly circular. In addition to considering recombination ener...

  19. Competition between ion recombination and scavenging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In low permittivity solvents ion recombination is dominated by the effects of the relative drift of the ions caused by the Coulomb attraction. However, such systems are frequently investigated by scavenging methods. Since the work of Tachiya on electric field effects, drift has been known to affect the steady-state scavenging rate constant. However, during the recombination drift depends on the instantaneous distance between the ions, and is therefore inherently transient. This paper describes an investigation of this problem using simulation methods. It is found that, within the constraint of the diffusion approximation, there are conditions where the Smoluchowski time-dependent rate constant underestimates the degree to which scavenging intercepts geminate recombination. For this to be a substantial effect the initial distance between the ions must be relatively small (e.g. 4 nm) compared to the typical thermalisation distance of an electron (e.g. 8 nm). Simulations have been used to generate numerical time-dependent rate constants for scavenging. But these proved barely more successful than the Smoluchowski theory, in spite of having been calculated from the simulation results. Stratification of results by recombination time shows that there is a strong correlation between the recombination time and the scavenging time. It was hypothesised that this correlation arises through the strong transient drift as the ions approach one another. This hypothesis was confirmed by the application of a novel simulation method in which the ion trajectories are simulated conditional on the recombination time. It was found that in every case the scavenging rate increases sharply just prior to recombination. This dependence of scavenging rate on recombination time is a fundamental breakdown of the assumptions underlying both the theory of diffusion kinetics and the IRT method. Nonetheless, a path decomposition method has been devised that allows IRT simulations to be corrected for this effect with good accuracy.

  20. Persistence and Loss of Meiotic Recombination Hotspots

    OpenAIRE

    Pineda-Krch, Mario; Redfield, Rosemary J

    2005-01-01

    The contradiction between the long-term persistence of the chromosomal hotspots that initiate meiotic recombination and the self-destructive mechanism by which they act strongly suggests that our understanding of recombination is incomplete. This “hotspot paradox” has been reinforced by the finding that biased gene conversion also removes active hotspots from human sperm. To investigate the requirements for hotspot persistence, we developed a detailed computer simulation model of their activi...

  1. Recombination-deficient mutant of Streptococcus faecalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultraviolet radiation-sensitive derivative of Streptococcus faecalis strain JH2-2 was isolated and found to be deficient in recombination, using a plasmid-plasmid recombination system. The strain was sensitive to chemical agents which interact with deoxyribonucleic acid and also underwent deoxyribonucleic acid degradation after ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, the mutant has properties similar to those of recA strains of Escherichia coli

  2. Detecting the cosmological recombination signal from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjacques, Vincent; Chluba, Jens; Silk, Joseph; de Bernardis, Francesco; Doré, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    Spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have recently experienced an increased interest. One of the inevitable distortion signals of our cosmological concordance model is created by the cosmological recombination process, just a little before photons last scatter at redshift z ? 1100. These cosmological recombination lines, emitted by the hydrogen and helium plasma, should still be observable as tiny deviation from the CMB blackbody spectrum in the cm-dm spectral bands. In this paper, we present a forecast for the detectability of the recombination signal with future satellite experiments. We argue that serious consideration for future CMB experiments in space should be given to probing spectral distortions and, in particular, the recombination line signals. The cosmological recombination radiation not only allows determination of standard cosmological parameters, but also provides a direct observational confirmation for one of the key ingredients of our cosmological model: the cosmological recombination history. We show that, with present technology, such experiments are futuristic but feasible. The potential rewards won by opening this new window to the very early universe could be considerable.

  3. Determination of recombination in Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Iben SØgaard; Boesen, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis has been previously described as a heterogeneous species, and in the present study intraspecies diversity of 20 M. hominis isolates from different individuals was analyzed using parts of the unlinked gyrase B (gyrB), elongation factor Tu (tuf), SRalpha homolog (ftsY), hitB-hitL, excinuclease ABC subunit A (uvrA) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gap) genes. The level of variability of these M. hominis genes was low compared with the housekeeping genes from Helicobacter pylori and Neisseria meningitidis, but only few M. hominis isolates had identical sequences in all genes indicating the presence of recombination. In order to test for intergenic recombination, phylogenetic trees were reconstructed for each of the genes but no well-supported bifurcating phylogenetic trees could be obtained. The genes were tested for intragenic recombination using the correlation between linkage disequilibrium and distance between the segregating sites, by the homoplasy ratio (H ratio), and by compatibility matrices. The gap gene showed well-supported evidence for high levels of recombination, whereas recombination was less frequent and not significant within the other genes. The analysis revealed intergenic and intragenic recombination in M. hominis and this may explain the high intraspecies variability. The results obtained in the present study may be of importance for future population studies of Mycoplasma species.

  4. A recombinase-mediated transcriptional induction system in transgenic plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, T; Schnorr, K M; Mundy, J

    2001-01-01

    We constructed and tested a Cre-loxP recombination-mediated vector system termed pCrox for use in transgenic plants. In this system, treatment of Arabidopsis under inducing conditions mediates an excision event that removes an intervening piece of DNA between a promoter and the gene to be expressed......-mediated GUS activation. Induction was shown to be possible at essentially any stage of plant growth. This single vector system circumvents the need for genetic crosses required by other, dual recombinase vector systems. The pCrox system may prove particularly useful in instances where transgene over...

  5. Electron - ion recombination processes - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out for the past 20 years on electron - ion recombination processes, as they are applied to the analysis of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We review the basic understanding gained through these efforts, with emphasis on some of the more recent progress made in recombination theory as the recombining system is affected by time-dependent electric fields and plasma particles at low temperature. Together with collisional ionization and excitation processes, recombination is important in determining ionization balance and excited-state population in non-equilibrium plasmas. The radiation emitted by plasmas is usually the principal medium with which to study the plasma condition, as it is produced mainly during the recombination and decay of excited states of ions inside the plasma. This is especially true when the plasma under study is not readily accessible by direct probes, as in astrophysical plasmas. Moreover, external probes may sometimes cause undesirable disturbances of the plasma. Electron-ion recombination proceeds in several different modes. The direct modes include three-body recombination (TBR) and one-step radiative recombination (RR), all to the ground- and singly-excited states of the target ions. By contrast, the indirect resonant mode is a two-step dielectronic recombination (DR), which proceeds first with the formation of doubly-excited states by radiationless excitation/capture. The resonant states thus formed may relax by autoionization and/or radiative cascades. For more exotic modes of recombination, we consider off-shell dielectronic recombination (radiative DR = RDR), in which an electron capture is accompanied by simultaneous radiative emission and excitation of the target ion. Some discussion on attachment of electrons to neutral atoms, resulting in the formation of negative ions, is also given. When resonance states involve one or more electrons in high Rydberg states, presence of an external or intrinsic electric field in the vicinity of the target ions can seriously affect the ionic states involved and the resulting reaction rates. Such perturbative fields can be intrinsic, as in the case of the plasma ion field, or externally imposed. A proper theoretical treatment of this difficult problem is crucial in understanding the recombination process which takes place in a field contaminated environment. The simple off-shell dressing procedure of high Rydberg states by a time-dependent field is reviewed, and the possibility of an anomalously large enhancement in the rates, due to the momentum coherence effect (MCE), is discussed. The presently available data on recombination rates are summarized, and several important deficiencies and future directions for further research are pointed out. Based on the detailed calculations for a number of cases, several empirical rate formulae for RR and DR processes have been generated to summarize the data for ready applications. As the collection of atoms is cooled to very low temperatures, T 8 Ryd, and the bound electrons are ionized by laser irradiation to states of very precisely controlled energies, the prospect for accurate experimental measurements of very-low-energy recombination rates is considered, where the electron temperature can be very low. Therefore, it is of interest to reconsider theoretically some new phenomena which may occur at such cold environments, in which the electron de Broglie wavelength can be very large, and both the density and coherent effects, as well as possible field effects, must be properly taken into account. Finally, a broader understanding of the various recombination processes may be achieved by studying their relationships to other reactions initiated by electron, ion and photon impact. (author)

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria crosstalk in NIX-mediated murine cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Diwan, Abhinav; Matkovich, Scot J; Yuan, Qunying; Zhao, Wen; Yatani, Atsuko; Brown, Joan Heller; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Kranias, Evangelia G.; Dorn, Gerald W., II

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional upregulation of the proapoptotic BCL2 family protein NIX limits red blood cell formation and can cause heart failure by inducing cell death, but the requisite molecular events are poorly defined. Here, we show complementary mechanisms for NIX-mediated cell death involving direct and ER/sarcoplasmic reticulum–mediated (ER/SR-mediated) mitochondria disruption. Endogenous cardiac NIX and recombinant NIX localize both to the mitochondria and to the ER/SR. In genetic mouse models, ...

  7. Recombination analysis based on the complete genome of bocavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shengxia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bocavirus include bovine parvovirus, minute virus of canine, porcine bocavirus, gorilla bocavirus, and Human bocaviruses 1-4 (HBoVs. Although recent reports showed that recombination happened in bocavirus, no systematical study investigated the recombination of bocavirus. The present study performed the phylogenetic and recombination analysis of bocavirus over the complete genomes available in GenBank. Results confirmed that recombination existed among bocavirus, including the likely inter-genotype recombination between HBoV1 and HBoV4, and intra-genotype recombination among HBoV2 variants. Moreover, it is the first report revealing the recombination that occurred between minute viruses of canine.

  8. Performance testing of passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs) have been under consideration in the U.S. as a combustible gas control system in advanced light water reactor (ALWR) containments for design basis and severe accidents. PARs do not require a source of power. Instead they use palladium or platinum as a catalyst to recombine hydrogen and oxygen gases into water vapor upon contact with the catalyst. Energy from the recombination of hydrogen with oxygen is released at a relatively slow but continuous rate into the containment which prevents the pressure from becoming too high. The heat produced creates strong buoyancy effects which increases the influx of the surrounding gases to the recombiner. These natural convective flow currents promote mixing of combustible gases in the containment. PARs are self-starting and self-feeding under a very wide range of conditions. The recombination rate of the PAR system needs to be great enough to keep the concentration of hydrogen (or oxygen) below acceptable limits. There are several catalytic recombiner concepts under development worldwide. The USNRC is evaluating a specific design of a PAR which is in an advanced stage of engineering development and has been proposed for ALWR designs. Sandia National laboratories (SNL), under the sponsorship and the direction of the USNRC, is conducting an experimental program to evaluate the performance of PARs. The PAR will be tested at the SURTSEY facility at SNL. The test plan currently includes the following experiments: experiments will be conducted to define the startup characteristics of PARs (i.e., to define what is the lowest hydrogen concentration that the PAR starts recombining the hydrogen with oxygen); experiments will be used to define the hydrogen depletion rate of PARs as a function of hydrogen concentration; and experiments will be used to define the PAR performance in the presence of high concentrations of steam. (author)

  9. Distortion of the CMB Spectrum by Primeval Hydrogen Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Boschan, Peter; Biltzinger, Peter

    1996-01-01

    We solve the recombination equation by taking into account the induced recombinations and a physical cut off in the hydrogen spectrum. The effective recombination coefficient is parametrized as a function of temperature and free electron density and is about a factor of four larger than without the induced recombination. This accelerates the last stage of the recombination processes and diminishes the residual ionization by a factor of about 2.6. The number and energy distri...

  10. Microarrayed recombinant allergens for diagnosis of allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwanegg, C; Laffer, S; Hiller, R; Mueller, M W; Kraft, D; Spitzauer, S; Valenta, R

    2003-01-01

    We suggest that the coapplication of recombinant allergens and microarray technology can lead to the development of new forms of multi-allergen tests which allow the determining and monitoring of complex sensitization profiles of allergic patients in single assays. The allergen extracts which have so far been used for diagnosis only allowed the determining of whether an allergic patient is sensitized against a particular allergen source, but the disease-eliciting allergens could not be identified. Through the application of recombinant DNA technology a rapidly growing panel of recombinant allergen molecules has become available which meanwhile comprises the epitope spectrum of most of the important allergen sources. We demonstrate that microarray technology can be used to establish multi-allergen tests consisting of microarrayed recombinant allergen molecules. Microarrayed recombinant allergens can be used to determine and monitor the profile of disease-eliciting allergens using single tests that require minute amounts of serum from allergic patients. The wealth of diagnostic information gained through microarray-based allergy testing will likely improve diagnosis, prevention and treatment of allergy. PMID:12534543

  11. Graded recombination layers for multijunction photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleilat, Ghada I; Wang, Xihua; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-06-13

    Multijunction devices consist of a stack of semiconductor junctions having bandgaps tuned across a broad spectrum. In solar cells this concept is used to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic harvesting, while light emitters and detectors use it to achieve multicolor and spectrally tunable behavior. In series-connected current-matched multijunction devices, the recombination layers must allow the hole current from one cell to recombine, with high efficiency and low voltage loss, with the electron current from the next cell. We recently reported a tandem solar cell in which the recombination layer was implemented using a progression of n-type oxides whose doping densities and work functions serve to connect, with negligible resistive loss at solar current densities, the constituent cells. Here we present the generalized conditions for design of efficient graded recombination layer solar devices. We report the number of interlayers and the requirements on work function and doping of each interlayer, to bridge an work function difference as high as 1.6 eV. We also find solutions that minimize the doping required of the interlayers in order to minimize optical absorption due to free carriers in the graded recombination layer (GRL). We demonstrate a family of new GRL designs experimentally and highlight the benefits of the progression of dopings and work functions in the interlayers. PMID:22554234

  12. Metallurgy of recycled lead for recombinant batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Prengaman, R.

    Recombinant and stationary lead/acid batteries generally use lead—calcium—tin alloys for grids, lead—tin alloys for strap and top lead, and high purity lead for oxide. In many cases, primary lead has been specified for these materials in recombinant batteries because both recycled lead and recycled lead alloys were not thought to be of sufficient purity. With improvements in analytical instruments, it is now possible to determine impurity elements at much lower levels. Because problem elements can be analyzed, refining procedures have now been developed to remove gas-producing impurity elements from recycled lead to levels as low as, or lower than, those in primary lead. These new refinery practices and analytical tests have increased the purity of refined recycled lead, and have permitted the use of recycled lead in recombinant and stand-by batteries. Some elements, deemed to be impurities that must be removed, may in fact be beneficial in alloys for recombinant batteries. This paper examines the purity requirements of lead and lead alloys for recombinant and stand-by batteries, indicates the problem elements, and shows the effects of beneficial elements.

  13. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehmsmeier Marc

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyploidization is the multiplication of the whole chromosome complement and has occurred frequently in vascular plants. Maintenance of stable polyploid state over generations requires special mechanisms to control pairing and distribution of more than two homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Since a minimal number of crossover events is essential for correct chromosome segregation, we investigated whether polyploidy has an influence on the frequency of meiotic recombination. Results Using two genetically linked transgenes providing seed-specific fluorescence, we compared a high number of progeny from diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis plants. We show that rates of meiotic recombination in reciprocal crosses of genetically identical diploid and autotetraploid Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher in tetraploids compared to diploids. Although male and female gametogenesis differ substantially in meiotic recombination frequency, both rates were equally increased in tetraploids. To investigate whether multivalent formation in autotetraploids was responsible for the increased recombination rates, we also performed corresponding experiments with allotetraploid plants showing strict bivalent pairing. We found similarly increased rates in auto- and allotetraploids, suggesting that the ploidy effect is independent of chromosome pairing configurations. Conclusions The evolutionary success of polyploid plants in nature and under domestication has been attributed to buffering of mutations and sub- and neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. Should the data described here be representative for polyploid plants, enhanced meiotic recombination, and the resulting rapid creation of genetic diversity, could have also contributed to their prevalence.

  14. Graded Recombination Layers for Multijunction Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Koleilat, Ghada I.

    2012-06-13

    Multijunction devices consist of a stack of semiconductor junctions having bandgaps tuned across a broad spectrum. In solar cells this concept is used to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic harvesting, while light emitters and detectors use it to achieve multicolor and spectrally tunable behavior. In series-connected current-matched multijunction devices, the recombination layers must allow the hole current from one cell to recombine, with high efficiency and low voltage loss, with the electron current from the next cell. We recently reported a tandem solar cell in which the recombination layer was implemented using a progression of n-type oxides whose doping densities and work functions serve to connect, with negligible resistive loss at solar current densities, the constituent cells. Here we present the generalized conditions for design of efficient graded recombination layer solar devices. We report the number of interlayers and the requirements on work function and doping of each interlayer, to bridge an work function difference as high as 1.6 eV. We also find solutions that minimize the doping required of the interlayers in order to minimize optical absorption due to free carriers in the graded recombination layer (GRL). We demonstrate a family of new GRL designs experimentally and highlight the benefits of the progression of dopings and work functions in the interlayers. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Human recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo-Mojica, Ángela J; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Rodríguez, Alexander; Mosquera, Ángela; Díaz, Dennis; Beltrán, Laura; Díaz, Sergio; Pimentel, Natalia; Moreno, Jefferson; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Sánchez, Oscar F; Córdoba, Henry; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Barrera, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are caused by accumulation of partially degraded substrates within the lysosome, as a result of a function loss of a lysosomal protein. Recombinant lysosomal proteins are usually produced in mammalian cells, based on their capacity to carry out post-translational modifications similar to those observed in human native proteins. However, during the last years, a growing number of studies have shown the possibility to produce active forms of lysosomal proteins in other expression systems, such as plants and microorganisms. In this paper, we review the production and characterization of human lysosomal proteins, deficient in several LSDs, which have been produced in microorganisms. For this purpose, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Ogataea minuta have been used as expression systems. The recombinant lysosomal proteins expressed in these hosts have shown similar substrate specificities, and temperature and pH stability profiles to those produced in mammalian cells. In addition, pre-clinical results have shown that recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms can be taken-up by cells and reduce the substrate accumulated within the lysosome. Recently, metabolic engineering in yeasts has allowed the production of lysosomal enzymes with tailored N-glycosylations, while progresses in E. coli N-glycosylations offer a potential platform to improve the production of these recombinant lysosomal enzymes. In summary, microorganisms represent convenient platform for the production of recombinant lysosomal proteins for biochemical and physicochemical characterization, as well as for the development of ERT for LSD. PMID:26071627

  16. Towards universal systems for recombinant gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen Hans

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recombinant gene expression is among the most important techniques used both in molecular and medical research and in industrial settings. Today, two recombinant expression systems are particularly well represented in the literature reporting on recombinant expression of specific genes. According to searches in the PubMed citation database, during the last 15 years 80% of all recombinant genes reported on in the literature were expressed in either the enterobacterium Escherichia coli or the methylotropic yeast Pichia pastoris. Nevertheless, some eukaryotic proteins are misfolded or inadequately posttranslationally modified in these expression systems. This situation demands identification of other recombinant expression systems that enable the proper expression of the remaining eukaryotic genes. As of now, a single universal system allowing expression of all target genes is still a distant goal. In this light, thorough experimental screening for systems that can yield satisfying quantity and quality of target protein is required. In recent years, a number of new expression systems have been described and used for protein production. Two systems, namely Drosophila melanogaster S2 insect cells and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells stably expressing the EBNA-1 gene, show exceptional promise. The time has come to identify a few well-performing systems that will allow us to express, purify, and characterize entire eukaryotic genomes.

  17. Micro dynamics in mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Boserup, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The author has identified a number of styles in mediation, which lead to different processes and different outcomes. Through discourse and conversation analysis he examines the micro dynamics in three of these, the postmodern styles: systemic, transformative and narrative mediation. The differences between the three mediation ideologies and practice is illustrated through role play scripts enacted in each style. Mediator and providers of mediation and trainers in mediation are encouraged to a...

  18. Transcription-coupled eviction of histones H2A/H2B governs V(D)J recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Sarah; Boyes, Joan

    2013-05-15

    Initiation of V(D)J recombination critically relies on the formation of an accessible chromatin structure at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) but how this accessibility is generated is poorly understood. Immunoglobulin light-chain loci normally undergo recombination in pre-B cells. We show here that equipping (earlier) pro-B cells with the increased pre-B-cell levels of just one transcription factor, IRF4, triggers the entire cascade of events leading to premature light-chain recombination. We then used this finding to dissect the critical events that generate RSS accessibility and show that the chromatin modifications previously associated with recombination are insufficient. Instead, we establish that non-coding transcription triggers IgL RSS accessibility and find that the accessibility is transient. Transcription transiently evicts H2A/H2B dimers, releasing 35-40 bp of nucleosomal DNA, and we demonstrate that H2A/H2B loss can explain the RSS accessibility observed in vivo. We therefore propose that the transcription-mediated eviction of H2A/H2B dimers is an important mechanism that makes RSSs accessible for the initiation of recombination. PMID:23463099

  19. Development of non-defective recombinant densovirus vectors for microRNA delivery in the invasive vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peiwen; Li, Xiaocong; Gu, Jinbao; Dong, Yunqiao; Liu, Yan; Santhosh, Puthiyakunnon; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that mosquito densoviruses (MDVs) are potential vectors for delivering foreign nucleic acids into mosquito cells. However, considering existing expression strategies, recombinant viruses would inevitably become replication-defective viruses and lose their ability for secondary transmission. The packaging limitations of the virion represent a barrier for the development of MDVs for viral paratransgenesis or as high-efficiency bioinsecticides. Herein, we report the development of a non-defective recombinant Aedes aegypti densovirus (AaeDV) miRNA expression system, mediated by an artificial intron, using an intronic miRNA expression strategy. We demonstrated that this recombinant vector could be used to overexpress endogenous miRNAs or to decrease endogenous miRNAs by generating antisense sponges to explore the biological functions of miRNAs. In addition, the vector could express antisense-miRNAs to induce efficient gene silencing in vivo and in vitro. The recombinant virus effectively self-replicated and retained its secondary transmission ability, similar to the wild-type virus. The recombinant virus was also genetically stable. This study demonstrated the first construction of a non-defective recombinant MDV miRNA expression system, which represents a tool for the functional analysis of mosquito genes and lays the foundation for the application of viral paratransgenesis for dengue virus control. PMID:26879823

  20. Development of non-defective recombinant densovirus vectors for microRNA delivery in the invasive vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peiwen; Li, Xiaocong; Gu, Jinbao; Dong, Yunqiao; Liu, Yan; Santhosh, Puthiyakunnon; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that mosquito densoviruses (MDVs) are potential vectors for delivering foreign nucleic acids into mosquito cells. However, considering existing expression strategies, recombinant viruses would inevitably become replication-defective viruses and lose their ability for secondary transmission. The packaging limitations of the virion represent a barrier for the development of MDVs for viral paratransgenesis or as high-efficiency bioinsecticides. Herein, we report the development of a non-defective recombinant Aedes aegypti densovirus (AaeDV) miRNA expression system, mediated by an artificial intron, using an intronic miRNA expression strategy. We demonstrated that this recombinant vector could be used to overexpress endogenous miRNAs or to decrease endogenous miRNAs by generating antisense sponges to explore the biological functions of miRNAs. In addition, the vector could express antisense-miRNAs to induce efficient gene silencing in vivo and in vitro. The recombinant virus effectively self-replicated and retained its secondary transmission ability, similar to the wild-type virus. The recombinant virus was also genetically stable. This study demonstrated the first construction of a non-defective recombinant MDV miRNA expression system, which represents a tool for the functional analysis of mosquito genes and lays the foundation for the application of viral paratransgenesis for dengue virus control. PMID:26879823

  1. Homologous Recombination and Its Role in Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishop Alexander J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer develops when cells no longer follow their normal pattern of controlled growth. In the absence or disregard of such regulation, resulting from changes in their genetic makeup, these errant cells acquire a growth advantage, expanding into precancerous clones. Over the last decade, many studies have revealed the relevance of genomic mutation in this process, be it by misreplication, environmental damage, or a deficiency in repairing endogenous and exogenous damage. Here, we discuss homologous recombination as another mechanism that can result in a loss of heterozygosity or genetic rearrangements. Some of these genetic alterations may play a primary role in carcinogenesis, but they are more likely to be involved in secondary and subsequent steps of carcinogenesis by which recessive oncogenic mutations are revealed. Patients, whose cells display an increased frequency of recombination, also have an elevated frequency of cancer, further supporting the link between recombination and carcinogenesis.

  2. Constraints from jet calculus on quark recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the QCD jet calculus formalism, we deduce an equation describing recombination of quarks and antiquarks into mesons within a quark or gluon jet. This equation relates the recombination function R(x1,x2,x) used in current literature to the fragmentation function for producing that same meson out of the parton initiating the jet. We submit currently used recombination functions to our consistency test, taking as input mainly the u-quark fragmentation data into π+ mesons, but also s-quark fragmentation into K- mesons. The constraint is well satisfied at large Q2 for large moments. Our results depend on one parameter, Q02, the constraint equation being satisfied for small values of this parameter

  3. Jet Fragmentation via Recombination of Parton Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Kyong Chol; Ko, Che Ming

    2016-01-01

    We propose to model hadronization of parton showers in QCD jets through a hybrid approach involving quark recombination and string fragmentation. This is achieved by allowing gluons at the end of the perturbative shower evolution to undergo a non-perturbative splitting into quark and antiquark pairs, then applying a Monte-Carlo version of instantaneous quark recombination, and finally subjecting remnant quarks (those which have not found a recombination partner) to Lund string fragmentation. When applied to parton showers from the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator, the final hadron spectra from our calculation compare quite well to PYTHIA jets that have been hadronized with the default Lund string fragmentation. Our new approach opens up the possibility to generalize hadronization to jets embedded in a quark gluon plasma.

  4. Dielectronic recombination of xenonlike tungsten ions

    CERN Document Server

    Schippers, S; Müller, A; Krantz, C; Grieser, M; Repnow, R; Wolf, A; Lestinsky, M; Hahn, M; Novotný, O; Savin, D W

    2011-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of xenonlike W20+ forming W19+ has been studied experimentally at a heavy-ion storage-ring. A merged-beams method has been employed for obtaining absolute rate coefficients for electron-ion recombination in the collision energy range 0-140 eV. The measured rate coefficient is dominated by strong DR resonances even at the lowest experimental energies. At plasma temperatures where the fractional abundance of W20+ is expected to peak in a fusion plasma, the experimentally derived plasma recombination rate coefficient is over a factor of 4 larger than the theoretically-calculated rate coefficient which is currently used in fusion plasma modeling. The largest part of this discrepancy stems most probably from the neglect in the theoretical calculations of DR associated with fine-structure excitations of the W20+([Kr] 4d10 4f8) ion core.

  5. Comparison of recombination models in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombination in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells is the key loss mechanism, and it directly affects characteristic parameters such as power conversion efficiency, short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage, and fill factor. However, which recombination mechanism dominates the loss in organic materials is unclear at present. In this work, we simulate state-of-art BHJ solar cells using five recombination models, including direct recombination, Langevin recombination, charge transfer state recombination, trap-assisted recombination, and recombination via tail. All processes are strongly dependent on charge carrier mobility and exhibit a similar recombination distribution in active layer. For high mobilities, all models present a similar behavior along with the increased mobilities, whereas, there are slight differences in open-circuit voltage between trap/tail model and other ones at lower mobilities, resulting from the interaction between photo-carriers and dark-carriers

  6. Breaking the sound barrier in recombination fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, R J R

    1995-01-01

    We exploit a generic instability in the integration of steady, sonic near-isothermal flows to find the complete transition diagram for recombination fronts (for a model system of equations). The instability requires the integration of the flow equations for speeds between the isothermal and adiabatic sound speeds to be performed with particular care. As a result of this, the previous work of Newman & Axford on the structure of recombination fronts neglected an important class of solution, that of transonic fronts; our method is readily extensible to a more complete treatment of the ionization structure. Future papers will apply these results in models of the structure of ultracompact HII regions.

  7. Dielectronic recombination measurements of multicharged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectronic recombination rates have been measured for several charge states of isoelectronic Li-like, Be-like, B-like, and Na-like ions. The amount of electron capture attending the passage of MeV/nucleon ion beams through a collinear, magnetically confined space-charge-limited electron beam as a function of relative energy has been observed. The experimental rates are consistent in magnitude and shape with rates determined from distorted-wave calculations of the dielectronic-recombination cross sections. 72 refs., 6 figs

  8. Dielectronic recombination of xenonlike tungsten ions

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, S.; Bernhardt, D; Müller, A.; Krantz, C.; Grieser, M.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.; Lestinsky, M; Hahn, M. (Matthias); Novotný, O.; Savin, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of xenonlike W20+ forming W19+ has been studied experimentally at a heavy-ion storage-ring. A merged-beams method has been employed for obtaining absolute rate coefficients for electron-ion recombination in the collision energy range 0-140 eV. The measured rate coefficient is dominated by strong DR resonances even at the lowest experimental energies. At plasma temperatures where the fractional abundance of W20+ is expected to peak in a fusion plasma, the experi...

  9. Three-dimensional structure of recombinant type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Francis; Morris, Edward; Taylor, Colin W.

    2010-01-01

    IP3Rs (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors) are the intracellular channels that mediate release of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum in response to the many stimuli that evoke Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation. We characterized and purified type 1 IP3R heterologously expressed in Sf9 insect cells, and used the purified IP3R1 to determine its three-dimensional structure by electron microscopy and single-particle analysis. Recombinant IP3R1 has 4-fold symmetry with overall dimensions of approx. 19.5 nm×19.5 nm×17.5 nm. It comprises a small domain, which is likely to include the pore, linked by slender bridges to a large cytoplasmic domain with four petal-like regions. Our structures of recombinant IP3R1 and native cerebellar IP3R have similar appearances and dimensions. The only notable difference is the absence of a central stigma-like domain from the cytoplasmic region of recombinant IP3R1. The first structure of a recombinant IP3R is an important step towards developing three-dimensional structures of IP3R that better contribute to our understanding of the structural basis of IP3R activation. PMID:20377523

  10. Recombination-activating gene 1 and 2 (RAG1 and RAG2) in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xianlei Wang; Xungang Tan; Pei-Jun Zhang; Yuqing Zhang; Peng Xu

    2014-12-01

    During the development of B and T lymphocytes, Ig and TCR variable region genes are assembled from germline V, D, and J gene segments by a site-specific recombination reaction known as V(D)J recombination. The process of somatic V(D)J recombination, mediated by the recombination-activating gene (RAG) products, is the most significant characteristic of adaptive immunity in jawed vertebrates. Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) RAG1 and RAG2 were isolated by Genome Walker and RT-PCR, and their expression patterns were analysed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization on sections. RAG1 spans over 7.0 kb, containing 4 exons and 3 introns, and the full-length ORF is 3207 bp, encoding a peptide of 1068 amino acids. The first exon lies in the 5′-UTR, which is an alternative exon. RAG2 full-length ORF is 1062 bp, encodes a peptide of 533 amino acids, and lacks introns in the coding region. In 6-month-old flounders, the expression of RAG1 and RAG2 was essentially restricted to the pronephros (head kidney) and mesonephros (truck kidney). Additionally, both of them were mainly expressed in the thymus. These results revealed that the thymus and kidney most likely serve as the primary lymphoid tissues in the flounder.

  11. A MEDIATOR METHYLATION MYSTERY: JMJD1C DEMETHYLATES MDC1 TO REGULATE DNA DAMAGE REPAIR

    OpenAIRE

    Jian LU; Matunis, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Mediator of DNA-Damage Checkpoint 1 (MDC1) has a central role in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining, and its function is regulated by post-translational phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation. In this issue, a new study by Watanabe et al. reveals that methylation of MDC1 is also critical for its function in DSB repair and specifically affects repair through BRCA1-dependent homologous recombination.

  12. Immune responses of pigs immunized with a recombinant porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus expressing porcine GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijun; Wang, Gang; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Chong; Huang, Baicheng; Li, Qiongyi; Li, Liangliang; Xue, Biyun; Ding, Peiyang; Cai, Xuehui; Wang, Chengbao; Zhou, En-Min

    2015-11-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has spread worldwide, causing huge economic losses to the swine industry. The current PRRSV vaccines have failed to provide broad protection against various strains. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an efficacious adjuvant, has been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of various vaccines. The purpose of this study was to construct a recombinant live attenuated PRRSV that expresses porcine GM-CSF (pGM-CSF) and evaluate the immune responses of pigs immunized with the recombinant virus. The results showed that the recombinant PRRSV was successfully rescued and had similar growth properties to parental virus grown in Marc-145 cells. The recombinant virus was stable for 10 passages in cell culture. Pigs intramuscularly immunized with the recombinant virus produced a similar humoral response to that elicited using parental virus. With regard to cell-mediated immunity assessed in peripheral blood, the recombinant virus induced higher proportion of CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive T cells (DPT), higher IFN-? level at 0 and 7 days post-challenge (DPC), and lower viremia at 21 DPC than pigs immunized with parental virus. These results indicate that recombinant PRRSV expressing pGM-CSF can induce a significant higher cellular immune response and reduce the persistent infection compared pigs vaccinated with the parental virus. This is first report of evaluation of immune response in pigs elicited by a recombinant live attenuated PRRSV expressing porcine GM-CSF. It may represent a novel strategy for future development of genetic engineered vaccines against PRRSV infection. PMID:26300317

  13. Recombination coefficients in extrinsic n-InSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bulk recombination coefficients for linear recombination via recombination centers as well as for direct recombination have been determined measuring the conductivity decay after two-photon absorption with a CO2 laser. The Suhl effect was applied to measure the surface recombination velocity. The corresponding literature is discussed and compared with our results. We conclude that two different kinds of recombination centers are possible in n-InSb, with energy levels (0.1-0.12)eV above the valence band, or (0.14-0.2)eV respectively. (orig.)

  14. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

    2013-04-30

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  15. Influence of exogenous phytohormones, methyl jasmonate and suppressors of jasmonate biosynthesis on Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression in Nicotiana excelsior

    OpenAIRE

    Kuchuk M. V.; Gerasymenko I. M.; Sindarovska Y. R.; Sheludko Y. V.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the influence of some exogenous agents on the recombinant protein accumulation in plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression. Methods. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression method, spectrophotometric methods for protein analysis, statistical calculations. Results. It was shown that the tested compounds in different concentrations (namely, auxins, cytokinin, methyl jasmonate and suppressors of jasmonate biosynthesis (phenidon and diethyldithiocarbam...

  16. Gene doctoring: a method for recombineering in laboratory and pathogenic Escherichia coli strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penn Charles W

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homologous recombination mediated by the ?-Red genes is a common method for making chromosomal modifications in Escherichia coli. Several protocols have been developed that differ in the mechanisms by which DNA, carrying regions homologous to the chromosome, are delivered into the cell. A common technique is to electroporate linear DNA fragments into cells. Alternatively, DNA fragments are generated in vivo by digestion of a donor plasmid with a nuclease that does not cleave the host genome. In both cases the ?-Red gene products recombine homologous regions carried on the linear DNA fragments with the chromosome. We have successfully used both techniques to generate chromosomal mutations in E. coli K-12 strains. However, we have had limited success with these ?-Red based recombination techniques in pathogenic E. coli strains, which has led us to develop an enhanced protocol for recombineering in such strains. Results Our goal was to develop a high-throughput recombineering system, primarily for the coupling of genes to epitope tags, which could also be used for deletion of genes in both pathogenic and K-12 E. coli strains. To that end we have designed a series of donor plasmids for use with the ?-Red recombination system, which when cleaved in vivo by the I-SceI meganuclease generate a discrete linear DNA fragment, allowing for C-terminal tagging of chromosomal genes with a 6 × His, 3 × FLAG, 4 × ProteinA or GFP tag or for the deletion of chromosomal regions. We have enhanced existing protocols and technologies by inclusion of a cassette conferring kanamycin resistance and, crucially, by including the sacB gene on the donor plasmid, so that all but true recombinants are counter-selected on kanamycin and sucrose containing media, thus eliminating the need for extensive screening. This method has the added advantage of limiting the exposure of cells to the potential damaging effects of the ?-Red system, which can lead to unwanted secondary alterations to the chromosome. Conclusion We have developed a counter-selective recombineering technique for epitope tagging or for deleting genes in E. coli. We have demonstrated the versatility of the technique by modifying the chromosome of the enterohaemorrhagic O157:H7 (EHEC, uropathogenic CFT073 (UPEC, enteroaggregative O42 (EAEC and enterotoxigenic H10407 (ETEC E. coli strains as well as in K-12 laboratory strains.

  17. Radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory for calculating the radiative lifetime of excitons in amorphous semiconductors is presented. Four possibilities of excitonic radiative recombination are considered and the corresponding rates are derived at thermal equilibrium. The radiative lifetime is calculated from the inverse of the maximum rate for all the four possibilities. Results agree very well with experiments

  18. Precise genotyping and recombination detection of Enterovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chieh-Hua; Wang, Yu-Bin; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Hsiung, Chao; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2015-12-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) with different genotypes cause diverse infectious diseases in humans and mammals. A correct EV typing result is crucial for effective medical treatment and disease control; however, the emergence of novel viral strains has impaired the performance of available diagnostic tools. Here, we present a web-based tool, named EVIDENCE (EnteroVirus In DEep conception, http://symbiont.iis.sinica.edu.tw/evidence), for EV genotyping and recombination detection. We introduce the idea of using mixed-ranking scores to evaluate the fitness of prototypes based on relatedness and on the genome regions of interest. Using phylogenetic methods, the most possible genotype is determined based on the closest neighbor among the selected references. To detect possible recombination events, EVIDENCE calculates the sequence distance and phylogenetic relationship among sequences of all sliding windows scanning over the whole genome. Detected recombination events are plotted in an interactive figure for viewing of fine details. In addition, all EV sequences available in GenBank were collected and revised using the latest classification and nomenclature of EV in EVIDENCE. These sequences are built into the database and are retrieved in an indexed catalog, or can be searched for by keywords or by sequence similarity. EVIDENCE is the first web-based tool containing pipelines for genotyping and recombination detection, with updated, built-in, and complete reference sequences to improve sensitivity and specificity. The use of EVIDENCE can accelerate genotype identification, aiding clinical diagnosis and enhancing our understanding of EV evolution. PMID:26678286

  19. Measuring Diffusion and Recombination in Polycrystalline Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Light-beam-induced currents yield information about solar cell material. Apparatus measures short-circuit current generated when spot of concentrated light is scanned across grains and grain boundaries in material under test. Technique used to evaluate SOC samples for diffusion and recombination effects of cell processing and chemical and structural defects.

  20. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone Criticism Grows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaard, Greta

    1995-01-01

    Discusses concerns related to the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone in the United States and other countries. Analyses the issue from the perspectives of animal rights, human health, world hunger, concerns of small and organic farmers, costs to the taxpayer, and environmental questions. A sidebar discusses Canadian review of the hormone.…

  1. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for "molecular pharming" in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered - from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity. PMID:24596570

  2. Recombinative plasma in electron runaway discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Yu. K.; Galvão, R. M. O.; Usuriaga, O. C.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Soboleva, T. K.; Tsypin, V. S.; Fonseca, A. M. M.; Ruchko, L. F.; Sanada, E. K.

    2005-07-01

    Cold recombinative plasma is the basic feature of the new regime of runaway discharges recently discovered in the Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén Brésilien tokamak [R. M. O. Galvão et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1181 (2001)]. With low plasma temperature, the resistive plasma current and primary Dreicer process of runaway generation are strongly suppressed at the stationary phase of the discharge. In this case, the runaway avalanche, which has been recently recognized as a novel important mechanism for runaway electron generation in large tokamaks, such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, during disruptions, and for electric breakdown in matter, is the only mechanism responsible for toroidal current generation and can be easily observed. The measurement of plasma temperature by the usual methods is a difficult task in fully runaway discharges. In the present work, various indirect evidences for low-temperature recombinative plasma are presented. The direct observation of recombinative plasma is obtained as plasma detachment from the limiter. The model of cold recombinative plasma is also supported by measurements of plasma density and Hα emission radial profiles, analysis of time variations of these parameters due to the relaxation instability, estimations of plasma resistivity from voltage spikes, and energy and particle balance calculations.

  3. Recombinant CBM-fusion technology - Applications overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Carvalho, Vera; Domingues, Lucília; Gama, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are small components of several enzymes, which present an independent fold and function, and specific carbohydrate-binding activity. Their major function is to bind the enzyme to the substrate enhancing its catalytic activity, especially in the case of insoluble substrates. The immense diversity of CBMs, together with their unique properties, has long raised their attention for many biotechnological applications. Recombinant DNA technology has been used for cloning and characterizing new CBMs. In addition, it has been employed to improve the purity and availability of many CBMs, but mainly, to construct bi-functional CBM-fused proteins for specific applications. This review presents a comprehensive summary of the uses of CBMs recombinantly produced from heterologous organisms, or by the original host, along with the latest advances. Emphasis is given particularly to the applications of recombinant CBM-fusions in: (a) modification of fibers, (b) production, purification and immobilization of recombinant proteins, (c) functionalization of biomaterials and (d) development of microarrays and probes. PMID:25689072

  4. Vaccine development using recombinant DNA technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccines induce an immune response in the host that subsequently recognizes infectious agents and helps fight off the disease; vaccines must do this without causing the disease. This paper reviews the development of recombinant DNA technologies as a means of providing new ways for attenuating diseas...

  5. Selected techniques in recombinant DNA technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombined DNA technology comprises a complex of techniques in the fields of nucleic acid biochemistry and molecular biology. This presentation gives an introduction, a brief description and example of the procedures of some of the basic techniques in the DNA cloning work currently used. 8 refs

  6. Genetic Recombination as a Chemical Reaction Network

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Stefan; Hofbauer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The process of genetic recombination can be seen as a chemical reaction network with mass-action kinetics. We review the known results on existence, uniqueness, and global stability of an equilibrium in every compatibility class and for all rate constants, from both the population genetics and the reaction networks point of view.

  7. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElizabethASpecht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for “molecular pharming” in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae are poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, and they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally-delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and system immune reactivity.

  8. Different strategies for the recombinant production.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Leitner, C.; Ertl, S.; Volc, Jind?ich; Haltrich, D.; Ludwig, R.

    Prague : Springer, 2007, s. 460-460. [International Symposium on the Genetics of Industrial Microorganisms /10./. Praha (CZ), 24.06.2006-28.06.2006] Grant ostatní: CZ(CZ) KONTAKT ?R–Rakousko Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : recombinant production Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  9. Limiting efficiency calculation of silicon single-nanowire solar cells with considering Auger recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-nanowire solar cells (SNSCs) have attracted considerable attention due to their unique light-harvesting capability mediated by the optical antenna effect and the high photoconversion efficiency due to the orthogonalization of the carrier collection to the photon incidence. We present a detailed prediction of the light-conversion efficiency of Si SNSCs based on finite-element simulation and thermodynamic balance analysis, with especially focusing on the comparison between SNSCs and film systems. Carrier losses due to radiative and Auger recombinations are introduced in the analysis of the limiting efficiency, which show that the Auger recombination plays a key role in accurately predicting the efficiency of Si SNSCs, otherwise, the device performance would be strongly overestimated. The study paves a more realistic way to evaluate the nanostructured solar cells based on indirect-band photoactive materials

  10. Limiting efficiency calculation of silicon single-nanowire solar cells with considering Auger recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiongfei; Wu, Shaolong; Shang, Aixue; Li, Xiaofeng

    2015-02-01

    Single-nanowire solar cells (SNSCs) have attracted considerable attention due to their unique light-harvesting capability mediated by the optical antenna effect and the high photoconversion efficiency due to the orthogonalization of the carrier collection to the photon incidence. We present a detailed prediction of the light-conversion efficiency of Si SNSCs based on finite-element simulation and thermodynamic balance analysis, with especially focusing on the comparison between SNSCs and film systems. Carrier losses due to radiative and Auger recombinations are introduced in the analysis of the limiting efficiency, which show that the Auger recombination plays a key role in accurately predicting the efficiency of Si SNSCs, otherwise, the device performance would be strongly overestimated. The study paves a more realistic way to evaluate the nanostructured solar cells based on indirect-band photoactive materials.

  11. Localization of recombination proteins and Srs2 reveals anti-recombinase function in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Lisby, Michael; Altmannova, Veronika; Krejci, Lumir; Sung, Patrick; Rothstein, Rodney

    2009-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR), although an important DNA repair mechanism, is dangerous to the cell if improperly regulated. The Srs2 "anti-recombinase" restricts HR by disassembling the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament, an intermediate preceding the exchange of homologous DNA strands. Here, we...... surprisingly, can form in the absence of Rad52 mediation. However, these Rad51 foci do not represent repair-proficient filaments, as determined by recombination assays. Antagonistic roles for Rad52 and Srs2 in Rad51 filament formation are also observed in vitro. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Srs2...... removes Rad51 indiscriminately from DNA, while the Rad52 protein coordinates appropriate filament reformation. This constant breakdown and rebuilding of filaments may act as a stringent quality control mechanism during HR....

  12. Enhanced wound healing by recombinant Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 via human epidermal growth factor receptor in human intestinal epithelial cells: therapeutic implication using recombinant probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Jin; Ahn, Jung Hoon; Park, Seong-Hwan; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2012-03-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa has a remarkable ability to repair damage with the support of epidermal growth factor (EGF), which stimulates epithelial migration and proliferative reepithelialization. For the treatment of mucosal injuries, it is important to develop efficient methods for the localized delivery of mucoactive biotherapeutics. The basic idea in the present study came from the assumption that an intestinal probiotic vehicle can carry and deliver key recombinant medicinal proteins to the injured epithelial target in patients with intestinal ulcerative diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. The study was focused on the use of the safe probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917, which was constructed to secrete human EGF in conjunction with the lipase ABC transporter recognition domain (LARD). Using the in vitro physically wounded monolayer model, ABC transporter-mediated EGF secretion by probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 was demonstrated to enhance the wound-healing migration of human enterocytes. Moreover, the epithelial wound closure was dependent on EGF receptor-linked activation, which exclusively involved the subsequent signaling pathway of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) extracellular-related kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). In particular, the migrating frontier of the wounded edge displayed the strongest EGF receptor-linked signaling activation in the presence of the recombinant probiotic. The present study provides a basis for the clinical application of human recombinant biotherapeutics via an efficient, safe probiotic vehicle. PMID:22184415

  13. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-? line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-? line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-? line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly? and frequency diffusion in Ly? and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  14. A molecular recombination map of Antirrhinum majus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Andrew

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic recombination maps provide important frameworks for comparative genomics, identifying gene functions, assembling genome sequences and for breeding. The molecular recombination map currently available for the model eudicot Antirrhinum majus is the result of a cross with Antirrhinum molle, limiting its usefulness within A. majus. Results We created a molecular linkage map of A. majus based on segregation of markers in the F2 population of two inbred lab strains of A. majus. The resulting map consisted of over 300 markers in eight linkage groups, which could be aligned with a classical recombination map and the A. majus karyotype. The distribution of recombination frequencies and distorted transmission of parental alleles differed from those of a previous inter-species hybrid. The differences varied in magnitude and direction between chromosomes, suggesting that they had multiple causes. The map, which covered an estimated of 95% of the genome with an average interval of 2 cM, was used to analyze the distribution of a newly discovered family of MITE transposons and tested for its utility in positioning seven mutations that affect aspects of plant size. Conclusions The current map has an estimated interval of 1.28 Mb between markers. It shows a lower level of transmission ratio distortion and a longer length than the previous inter-species map, making it potentially more useful. The molecular recombination map further indicates that the IDLE MITE transposons are distributed throughout the genome and are relatively stable. The map proved effective in mapping classical morphological mutations of A. majus.

  15. Directed Evolution of RecA Variants with Enhanced Capacity for Conjugational Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taejin; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Cox, Benjamin L.; Wood, Elizabeth A.; Sandler, Steven J.; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    The recombination activity of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RecA protein reflects an evolutionary balance between the positive and potentially deleterious effects of recombination. We have perturbed that balance, generating RecA variants exhibiting improved recombination functionality via random mutagenesis followed by directed evolution for enhanced function in conjugation. A recA gene segment encoding a 59 residue segment of the protein (Val79-Ala137), encompassing an extensive subunit-subunit interface region, was subjected to degenerate oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis. An iterative selection process generated at least 18 recA gene variants capable of producing a higher yield of transconjugants. Three of the variant proteins, RecA I102L, RecA V79L and RecA E86G/C90G were characterized based on their prominence. Relative to wild type RecA, the selected RecA variants exhibited faster rates of ATP hydrolysis, more rapid displacement of SSB, decreased inhibition by the RecX regulator protein, and in general displayed a greater persistence on DNA. The enhancement in conjugational function comes at the price of a measurable RecA-mediated cellular growth deficiency. Persistent DNA binding represents a barrier to other processes of DNA metabolism in vivo. The growth deficiency is alleviated by expression of the functionally robust RecX protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. RecA filaments can be a barrier to processes like replication and transcription. RecA regulation by RecX protein is important in maintaining an optimal balance between recombination and other aspects of DNA metabolism. PMID:26047498

  16. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation : SUMO, DNA Repair and New Insights into Telomere Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of DNA lesions challenging genome integrity. The DNA damage response (DDR) promotes fast and effective detection and repair of the damaged DNA, leading to cell cycle arrest through checkpoint activation and the recruitment of repair factors such as the homologous recombination (HR) machinery. HR constitutes the main DSB repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and despite being largely considered an error-free process and essential for genome stability, uncontrolled recombination can lead to loss of heterozygosity, translocations, deletions, and genome rearrangements that can lead to cell death or cancer in humans. The post-translational modification by SUMO (small ubiquitinlike modifier) has proven to be an important regulator of HR and genome integrity, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for these roles are still unclear. In this study I present new insights for the role of SUMOylation in regulating HR by dissecting the role of SUMO in the interaction between the central HR-mediator protein Rad52 and its paralogue Rad59 and the outcome of recombination. This data provides evidence for the importance of SUMO in promoting protein-protein interactions at the sites of repair, enabling effective Rad51-mediated recombination through the concerted action of the Rad52-Rad59 complex and the helicase Srs2. In addition, I also peer into the role of Rad52 SUMOylation in the context of persistent DSBs and telomere homeostasis. Furthermore, I characterize Mte1, a novel protein involved in DDR that associates with the helicase Mph1 and Rad52. Moreover, I find that Mte1 associates with dysfunctional single-stranded telomeric DNA, constituting a novel factor in telomere homeostasis, potentially associated with replication-stress relief.

  17. The efficacy of recombinant versus urinary HCG in ART outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Eftekhar, Maryam; KHALILI, Mohammad Ali; Rahmani, Elham

    2012-01-01

    Background: Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) has been used as a replacement for the mid-cycle luteinizing hormone (LH) surge for several years. The recent arrival of recombinant DNA technology has made recombinant HCG (rHCG) accessible.

  18. Positive Selection Can Create False Hotspots of Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Floyd A.; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2006-01-01

    Simulations of positive directional selection, under parameter values appropriate for approximating human genetic diversity and rates of recombination, reveal that the effects of strong selective sweeps on patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) mimic the pattern expected with recombinant hotspots.

  19. Multiple barriers to recombination between divergent HIV-1 variants revealed by a dual-marker recombination assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Recombination is a major force for generating human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) diversity and produces numerous recombinants circulating in the human population. We previously established a cell-based system using green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) as a reporter to study the mechanisms of HIV-1 recombination. We now report an improved system capable of detecting recombination using authentic viral sequences. Frameshift mutations were introduced into the gag gene so that parental viruses do not express full-length Gag; however, recombination can generate a progeny virus that expresses a functional Gag. We demonstrate that this Gag reconstitution assay can be used to detect recombination between two group M HIV-1 variants of the same or of different subtypes. Using both gfp and gag assays, we found that, similar to group M viruses, group O viruses also recombine frequently. When recombination between a group M virus and a group O virus was examined, we found three distinct barriers for intergroup recombination. First, similar to recombination within group M viruses, intergroup recombination is affected by the identity of the dimerization initiation signal (DIS); variants with the same DIS recombined at a higher rate than those with different DIS. Second, using the gfp recombination assay, we showed that intergroup recombination occurs much less frequently than intragroup recombination, even though the gfp target sequence is identical in all viruses. Finally, Gag reconstitution between variants from different groups is further reduced compared with green fluorescent protein, indicating that sequence divergence interferes with recombination efficiency in the gag gene. Compared with identical sequences, we estimate that recombination rates are reduced by 3-fold and by 10- to 13-fold when the target regions in gag contain 91% and 72-73% sequence identities, respectively. These results show that there are at least three distinct mechanisms preventing exchange of genetic information between divergent HIV-1 variants from different groups.

  20. Markov jump processes in modeling coalescent with recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xian; Ma, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Genetic recombination is one of the most important mechanisms that can generate and maintain diversity, and recombination information plays an important role in population genetic studies. However, the phenomenon of recombination is extremely complex, and hence simulation methods are indispensable in the statistical inference of recombination. So far there are mainly two classes of simulation models practically in wide use: back-in-time models and spatially moving models. Ho...

  1. Evolution of the Genomic Recombination Rate in Murid Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Beth L.; Payseur, Bret A.

    2011-01-01

    Although very closely related species can differ in their fine-scale patterns of recombination hotspots, variation in the average genomic recombination rate among recently diverged taxa has rarely been surveyed. We measured recombination rates in eight species that collectively represent several temporal scales of divergence within a single rodent family, Muridae. We used a cytological approach that enables in situ visualization of crossovers at meiosis to quantify recombination rates in mult...

  2. Naturally occurring radiation - an RPA's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of radioactive scales on oil platforms in the North Sea and the associated health hazard are considered. Generally the problem is linked with secondary production by means of sea water injection. The radioactive isotopes involved are Ra226, Ra228 and their progeny which coprecipitate as radium sulphate with barium sulphate when the injection water breaks through and mixes with the formation water. Scales are first deposited on the tubulars in the perforation zones and can then be found anywhere through to the produced water discharge system. The hazard arises principally from the ingestion, particularly by inhalation, of scale particles. Appropriate handling and monitoring procedures are described. Scaled items of equipment, even those going for scrap, have to be sent for onshore cleaning and long-term storage. Chemical scale inhibitors are now being injected into most wells but there is some evidence that occasionally almost pure radium sulphate plates out when they are being used. (UK)

  3. Finite temperature nuclear response in extended RPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear collective response at finite temperature is investigated for the first time in the quantum framework of the small amplitude limit of the extended TDHF approach, including a non-Markovian collision term. It is shown that the collision width satisfies a secular equation. By employing a Skyrme force, the isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole excitations in 40Ca are calculated and important quantum features are pointed out. The collisional damping due to decay into incoherent 2p-2h states is small at low temperatures but increases rapidly at higher temperatures. (author)

  4. Ecological genomics in Xanthomonas: the nature of genetic adaptation with homologous recombination and host shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Chao-Li

    2015-03-15

    Background: Comparative genomics provides insights into the diversification of bacterial species. Bacterial speciation usually takes place with lasting homologous recombination, which not only acts as a cohering force between diverging lineages but brings advantageous alleles favored by natural selection, and results in ecologically distinct species, e.g., frequent host shift in Xanthomonas pathogenic to various plants. Results: Using whole-genome sequences, we examined the genetic divergence in Xanthomonas campestris that infected Brassicaceae, and X. citri, pathogenic to a wider host range. Genetic differentiation between two incipient races of X. citri pv. mangiferaeindicae was attributable to a DNA fragment introduced by phages. In contrast to most portions of the genome that had nearly equivalent levels of genetic divergence between subspecies as a result of the accumulation of point mutations, 10% of the core genome involving with homologous recombination contributed to the diversification in Xanthomonas, as revealed by the correlation between homologous recombination and genomic divergence. Interestingly, 179 genes were under positive selection; 98 (54.7%) of these genes were involved in homologous recombination, indicating that foreign genetic fragments may have caused the adaptive diversification, especially in lineages with nutritional transitions. Homologous recombination may have provided genetic materials for the natural selection, and host shifts likely triggered ecological adaptation in Xanthomonas. To a certain extent, we observed positive selection nevertheless contributed to ecological divergence beyond host shifting. Conclusion: Altogether, mediated with lasting gene flow, species formation in Xanthomonas was likely governed by natural selection that played a key role in helping the deviating populations to explore novel niches (hosts) or respond to environmental cues, subsequently triggering species diversification. © Huang et al.

  5. Genetic Analysis of Meiotic Recombination in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Gerald R.

    2009-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is well-suited for studying meiotic recombination. Methods are described here for culturing S. pombe and for genetic assays of intragenic recombination (gene conversion), intergenic recombination (crossing-over), and spore viability. Both random spore and tetrad analyses are described.

  6. Regulation of homologous recombination at telomeres in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is suppressed at normal length telomere sequences. In contrast, telomere recombination is allowed when telomeres erode in the absence of telomerase activity or as a consequence of nucleolytic degradation or incomplete replication. Here, we review the mechanisms that...... contribute to regulating mitotic homologous recombination at telomeres and the role of these mechanisms in signalling short telomeres in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae....

  7. LIMITED EFFECT OF RECOMBINANT PORCINE INTERLEUKIN 12 ON PORCINE LYMPHOCYTES DUE TO A LOW LEVEL OF IL-12 BETA 2 RECEPTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a key molecule in the regulation of CD4+ T cell development and specifically potentiates T helper 1 responses in mouse and man. However, biological effects mediated by IL-12 have not been well defined in pigs. Herein, recombinant porcine IL-12 (rPoIL-12) was ...

  8. Role of attP in Integrase-Mediated Integration of the Shigella Resistance Locus Pathogenicity Island of Shigella flexneri

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Sally A.; Luck, Shelley N.; Sakellaris, Harry; Rajakumar, Kumar; Adler, Ben

    2004-01-01

    The Shigella resistance locus (SRL) pathogenicity island (PAI) in Shigella spp. mediates resistance to streptomycin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. It can be excised from the chromosome via site-specific recombination mediated by the P4-related int gene. Here, we show that SRL PAI attP is capable of RecA-independent, site-specific, int-mediated integration into two bacterial tRNA attB sites.

  9. The role of BRCA1 in homologous recombination repair in response to replication stress: significance in tumorigenesis and cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Junran

    2013-01-01

    Germ line mutations in breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) predispose women to breast and ovarian cancers. Although BRCA1 is involved in many important biological processes, the function of BRCA1 in homologous recombination (HR) mediated repair is considered one of the major mechanisms contributing to its tumor suppression activity, and the cause of hypersensitivity to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors when BRCA1 is defective. Mounting evidence suggests that the mechanism of repairing DN...

  10. Akt1 inhibits homologous recombination in Brca1-deficient cells by blocking the Chk1-Rad51 pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Y.; Song, W.; Zhang, F; Yan, J; Yang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Brca1 deficiency leads to the development of breast cancer. We previously found that Brca1 deficiency activates the Akt oncogenic pathway. Reduced expression of Brca1 was highly correlated with increased activated Akt in human breast cancer samples. Furthermore, activation of Akt1 was involved in Brca1-deficiency-mediated tumorigenesis in mice. Defective homologous recombination (HR) is thought to be a major contributor to tumorigenesis in Brca1 deficiency. Here, we show that Akt1 promotes ch...

  11. Role of Cellular FKBP52 Protein in Intracellular Trafficking of Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus 2 Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Weihong; Zhong, Li; Wu, Jianqing; Chen, Linyuan; Qing, Keyun; Weigel-Kelley, Kirsten A.; Larsen, Steven H.; Shou, Weinian; Warrington, Kenneth H.; Srivastava, Arun

    2006-01-01

    We have reported that tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of a cellular protein, FKBP52, inhibit the second-strand DNA synthesis of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), leading to inefficient transgene expression from recombinant AAV vectors. To further explore the role of FKBP52 in AAV-mediated transduction, we established murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) cultures from FKBP52 wild-type (WT), heterozygous (HE), and knockout (KO) mice. Conventional AAV vectors failed to transduce WT MEFs efficiently, and...

  12. Second-strand synthesis is a rate-limiting step for efficient transduction by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, F K; Samulski, T; Shenk, T; Samulski, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The ability of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) to transduce cells with a marker gene in vitro was found to be substantially increased by the presence of adenovirus. Transfection experiments with adenovirus genomic DNA suggest that this increase is not facilitated by adenovirus-mediated viral uptake but is instead dependent on adenovirus gene expression. Using various adenovirus mutants, we were able to map this function to early-region E4 open reading frame 6. Plasmid expression of o...

  13. Triplex-mediated genome targeting and editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Faisal; Glazer, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Genome targeting and editing in vitro and in vivo can be achieved through an interplay of exogenously introduced molecules and the induction of endogenous recombination machinery. The former includes a repertoire of sequence-specific binding molecules for targeted induction and appropriation of this machinery, such as by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) or triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and recombinagenic donor DNA, respectively. This versatile targeting and editing via recombination approach facilitates high-fidelity and low-off-target genome mutagenesis, repair, expression, and regulation. Herein, we describe the current state-of-the-art in triplex-mediated genome targeting and editing with a perspective towards potential translational and therapeutic applications. We detail several materials and methods for the design, delivery, and use of triplex-forming and recombinagenic molecules for mediating and introducing specific, heritable, and safe genomic modifications. Furthermore we denote some guidelines for endogenous genome targeting and editing site identification and techniques to test targeting and editing efficiency. PMID:24557900

  14. Recombinant production of peptide C-terminal ?-amides using an engineered intein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Louise; Shaw, Allan C; Norrild, Jens Chr.; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Peptides are of increasing interest as therapeutics in a wide range of diseases, including metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. In the latter, peptide hormones such as peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic peptide (PP) are important templates for drug design. Characteristic for these peptides...... is that they contain a C-terminal that is ?-amidated, and this amidation is crucial for biological function. A challenge is to generate such peptides by recombinant means and particularly in a production scale. Here, we have examined an intein-mediated approach to generate a PYY derivative in a...

  15. FBH1 influences DNA replication fork stability and homologous recombination through ubiquitylation of RAD51

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Wai Kit; Payne, Miranda J; Beli, Petra; Hanada, Katsuhiro; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hickson, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Unscheduled homologous recombination (HR) can lead to genomic instability, which greatly increases the threat of neoplastic transformation in humans. The F-box DNA helicase 1 (FBH1) is a 3'-5' DNA helicase with a putative function as a negative regulator of HR. It is the only known DNA helicase to...... leads to hyperrecombination, as well as several phenotypes indicative of an altered response to DNA replication stress. These effects are likely to be mediated by the enhanced nuclear matrix association of the ubiquitylation-resistant RAD51. These data are consistent with FBH1 acting as a negative...

  16. Recombination energy in double white dwarf formation

    CERN Document Server

    Nandez, Jose L A; Lombardi, James C

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter we investigate the role of recombination energy during a common envelope event. We confirm that taking this energy into account helps to avoid the formation of the circumbinary envelope commonly found in previous studies. For the first time, we can model a complete common envelope event, with a clean compact double white dwarf binary system formed at the end. The resulting binary orbit is almost perfectly circular. In addition to considering recombination energy, we also show that between 1/4 and 1/2 of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejected material. We apply this new method to the case of the double-white dwarf system WD 1101+364, and we find that the progenitor system at the start of the common envelope event consisted of a $\\sim1.5M_\\odot$ red giant star in a $\\sim 30$ day orbit with a white dwarf companion.

  17. Recombination energy in double white dwarf formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandez, J. L. A.; Ivanova, N.; Lombardi, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the role of recombination energy during a common envelope event. We confirm that taking this energy into account helps to avoid the formation of the circumbinary envelope commonly found in previous studies. For the first time, we can model a complete common envelope event, with a clean compact double white dwarf binary system formed at the end. The resulting binary orbit is almost perfectly circular. In addition to considering recombination energy, we also show that between 1/4 and 1/2 of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejected material. We apply this new method to the case of the double white dwarf system WD 1101+364, and we find that the progenitor system at the start of the common envelope event consisted of an ˜1.5 M? red giant star in an ˜30 d orbit with a white dwarf companion.

  18. Studies on innovative hydrogen recombining devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prevent the containment and other safety relevant components from incurring serious damage caused by a detonation of the hydrogen/air-mixture generated during a severe accident in Light Water Reactors (LWR) passive autocatalytic recombiners (PAR) are used for hydrogen removal in an increasing number of European plants. These devices make use of the fact that hydrogen and oxygen react exothermally on catalytic surfaces generating steam and heat. Experimental investigations at several research facilities indicate that existing plate-type PAR systems bear the risk of igniting the gaseous mixture due to an overheating of the catalyst elements caused by strong reaction heat generation. Innovative devices could overcome existing limitations making use of the knowledge deduced from experiments at the REKO facilities at FZJ. The paper analyses the mechanisms of the thermal behavior of catalytic plate-type recombiners and presents experimental results on existing and innovative concepts for hydrogen removal. (author)

  19. Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Wolfgang, Schumann; Luis Carlos S., Ferreira.

    Full Text Available Attempts to obtain a recombinant protein using prokaryotic expression systems can go from a rewarding and rather fast procedure to a frustrating time-consuming experience. In most cases production of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli K12 strains has remained an empirical exercise in which di [...] fferent systems are tested without a careful insight into the various factors affecting adequate expression of the encoded protein. The present review will deal with E. coli as protein factory and will cover some of the aspects related to transcriptional and translational expression signals, factors affecting protein stability and solubility and targeting of proteins to different cell compartments. Based on the knowledge accumulated over the last decade, we believe that the rate of success for those dedicated to expression of recombinant proteins based on the use E. coli strains can still be significantly improved.

  20. Dielectronic recombination of lithium-like gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spies, W.; Mueller, A.; Linkemann, J.; Frank, A.; Wagner, M. (Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Giessen, D-6300 Giessen (Germany)); Kozhuharov, C.; Franzke, B.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Eickhoff, H.; Jung, M.; Klepper, O.; Koenig, W.; Mokler, P.H.; Moshammer, R.; Nolden, F.; Schaaf, U.; Spaedtke, P.; Steck, M. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-6100 Darmstadt (Germany)); Zimmerer, P.; Gruen, N.; Scheid, W. (Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-6300 Giessen (Germany)); Pindzola, M.S.; Badnell, N.R. (Department of Phsyics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States))

    1993-06-05

    We report measurements on radiative and dielectronic recombination (RR and DR) of very highly charged ions at energies [ital E][sub cm]=0 to 50 [ital eV]. Novel techniques were employed at the heavy ion storage ring ESR to obtain absolute recombination rates of [ital Au][sup 76+](1[ital s][sup 2]2[ital s]). The increase of the RR rate for [ital E][sub [ital c]m][r arrow]0 could be recorded and single DR resonances in [ital Au][sup 75+](1[ital s][sup 2]2[ital p][sub 3/2]6[ital l][sub [ital j

  1. Recombination and dissociative recombination of H2+ and H3+ ions on surfaces with application to hydrogen negative ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A four-step model for recombination and dissociative recombination of H2+ and H3+ ions on metal surfaces is discussed. Vibrationally excited molecules, H2(v''), from H3+ recombination are produced in a broad spectrum that enhances the excited level distribution. The application of this latter process to hydrogen negative ion discharges is discussed. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Optical recombination of biexcitons in semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, M.; Keeling, J; Parish, M. M.; Rios, P. Lopez; Littlewood, P B

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the photoluminescence spectrum and lifetime of a biexciton in a semiconductor using Fermi's golden rule. Our biexciton wavefunction is obtained using a Quantum Monte Carlo calculation. We consider a recombination process where one of the excitons within the biexciton annihilates. For hole masses greater than or equal to the electron mass, we find that the surviving exciton is most likely to populate the ground state. We also investigate how the confinement of ex...

  3. Photoluminescence lifetime spectroscopy - Surface recombination analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, T.; Rüdiger, M; Rosenits, P.; Diez, S; Trupke, T.; Bardos, R.A.; Glunz, S. W.

    2007-01-01

    The recently introduced quasi-steady-state photoluminescence technique (QSS-PL) for determining the injection-dependent carrier lifetime in silicon samples was shown to be a good complement of the well established quasi-steady-state photoconductance technique (QSS-PC) especially in the low injection regime, where the QSS-PC technique is prone to measurement artefacts due to trapping or depletion region modulation. The ability to measure the real recombination lifetime at low injection densiti...

  4. Telomerase RNA function in recombinant Tetrahymena telomerase

    OpenAIRE

    Licht, Jill D.; Collins, Kathleen

    1999-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase specialized for use of a sequence within its integral RNA component as the template for DNA synthesis. Telomerase adds telomeric simple sequence repeats to single-stranded primers in vitro or chromosome ends in vivo. We have investigated the sequences and structures of recombinant Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase RNA necessary for physical association and activity with the catalytic protein subunit expressed in rabbit reticulocyte lysa...

  5. dielectronic recombination in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of magnetic fields up to 100 T on the dielectronic recombination of helium ions has been calculated. Below 5 T the rate is unaltered because of a cancellation of effects. At higher fields the rate does fall off slowly. Preliminary calculations including the Lorentz electric field appropriate to 3.4 MeV ions reveal a similar behaviour. Contrary to simple intuition, the rate in an electric field is not greatly reduced by Stark ionisation. (author)

  6. Photoionization and recombination of Fe XIX

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hong Lin; Anil K. Pradhan

    1999-01-01

    Photoionization cross sections and recombination rate coefficients are presented for the L-shell ground state fine structure levels $2s^22p^4 \\ ^3P_{2,0,1}$ of Fe~XIX. Several sets of calculations including relativistic effects are carried out: (i) Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM), (ii) Relativistic Distorted Wave (RDW), and (iii) a semi-relativistic calculation. Non-relativistic LS coupling calculations are also done for comparison. The BPRM calculations employ a configuration i...

  7. (Photoexcited charge pair escape and recombination)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    Progress in four research areas on this project are summarized under the following topics: (1) Geminate charge pair recombination in hexane; (2) Fast current measurements resulting from excitation of charge transfer (CT) states; (3) Measurement of the dipole moment of excited states by DC conductivity; and (4) Charge separation at macroscopic interfaces between electron donor and acceptor solids. In a final section, personnel who have contributed to the project during the past budget period are described.

  8. Modelling of procecces in catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve a high degree of safety in nuclear power plants and prevent possible accident scenarios, their consequences are calculated and analysed with numeric codes. One of the most important part of nuclear safety research of hazardous incidents are development and validation of these numeric models, which are implemented into accident codes. The severe hydrogen release during a core meltdown is one of the considered scenario of performed accident analyses. One of the most important measure for the elimination of the hydrogen is catalytic recombiners. Converting the hydrogen with the atmospheric oxygen to water vapor in an exothermic reaction will prevent possible detonation of the hydrogen/air atmosphere. Within the dissertation the recombiner simulation REKO-DIREKT was developed and validated by an extensive experimental database. The performance of recombiners with regard to the conversion of the hydrogen and the temperature development is modelled. The REKO-DIREKT program is unique and has made significant revolution in research of hydrogen safety. For the first time it has been possible to show the performance of the recombiner so great in detail by using REKO-DIREKT. In the future engineers of nuclear power plants will have opportunity to have precise forecasts about the process of the possible accidents with hydrogen release. Also with presence of water vapor or with oxygen depletion which are included in the model. The major discussion of the hydrogen ignition at hot catalyst steel plates can be evaluated in the future with REKO-DIREKT more reliably than the existing used models. (orig.)

  9. Relativistic effects in dielectronic recombination probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of the relativistic parametric potential was used to compute autoionization and radiative transition probabilities for Li-like Mg, Fe, Ni and Mo (Dielectronic Recombination on He-like). Computations were performed with different values of c, enabling analysis of the behaviour of relativistic corrections. It is shown that for atoms up to Fe, the dominant effect is the spin orbit interaction. The effects of the wave-functions being relativistic contribute only a few percent

  10. Lasting recombination and cosmic background radiation spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal decoupling during recombination and the endurance of this process can significantly deform the black-body background radiation spectrum even in the absence of heating sources. Observational data contradicts a flat standard universe but agrees with a low-density model and with a flat matter-antimatter symmetric universe. Evidence is presented against the presumption that matter-antimatter annihilation should necessarily produce large distortions. (Auth.)

  11. Recombinant CBM-fusion technology : applications overview

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Carla Cristina Marques de; Carvalho, Vera; Domingues, Lucília; Gama, F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are small components of several enzymes, which present an independent fold and function, and specific carbohydrate-binding activity. Their major function is to bind the enzyme to the substrate enhancing its catalytic activity, especially in the case of insoluble substrates. The immense diversity of CBMs, together with their unique properties, has long raised their attention for many biotechnological applications. Recombinant DNA technology has been used for...

  12. The Role of Recombination in Evolutionary Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Hildegard; Hermisson, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    How likely is it that a population escapes extinction through adaptive evolution? The answer to this question is of great relevance in conservation biology, where we aim at species' rescue and the maintenance of biodiversity, and in agriculture and medicine, where we seek to hamper the emergence of pesticide or drug resistance. By reshuffling the genome, recombination has two antagonistic effects on the probability of evolutionary rescue: it generates and it breaks up favorable gene combinations. Which of the two effects prevails depends on the fitness effects of mutations and on the impact of stochasticity on the allele frequencies. In this article, we analyze a mathematical model for rescue after a sudden environmental change when adaptation is contingent on mutations at two loci. The analysis reveals a complex nonlinear dependence of population survival on recombination. We moreover find that, counterintuitively, a fast eradication of the wild type can promote rescue in the presence of recombination. The model also shows that two-step rescue is not unlikely to happen and can even be more likely than single-step rescue (where adaptation relies on a single mutation), depending on the circumstances. PMID:26627842

  13. Dissociative recombination of small molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis an analysis is given of merged electron-ion beam experiment and work on dissociative recombination of molecular ions and electrons is described. Chapter II covers a brief introduction of the theory of dissociative recombination. In chapter III, a description is given of the merged electron-ion beam experiment and a method is described which allows the determination of the mean angle between the electron and ion trajectories in a merged electron-ion beam experiment. In chapter IV a paper on the three dominant atmospheric diatomic ions NO+, O2+ and N2+ is presented and in chapter V the dissociative recombination for N2H+ and N2D+ is discussed. In chapter VI two papers on the polyatomic ions of the carbon-containing molecular ions are presented, and in chapter VII a letter with some results of the work presented in more detail in the chapters IV, V and VI is presented. The magnitude and the energy dependence of the cross-section measured by the merged beam technique and by other techniques is compared and discussed. (Auth.)

  14. CFD modeling of passive autocatalytic recombiners*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orszulik Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with numerical modeling of passive autocatalytic hydrogen recombiners (PARs. Such devices are installed within containments of many nuclear reactors in order to remove hydrogen and convert it to steam. The main purpose of this work is to develop a numerical model of passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software ANSYS-FLUENT and tuning the model using experimental results. The REKO 3 experiment was used for this purpose. Experiment was made in the Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology in Julich (Germany. It has been performed for different hydrogen concentrations, different flow rates, the presence of steam, and different initial temperatures of the inlet mixture. The model of this experimental recombiner was elaborated within the framework of this work. The influence of mesh, gas thermal conductivity coefficient, mass diffusivity coefficients, and turbulence model was investigated. The best results with a good agreement with REKO 3 data were received for k-? model of turbulence, gas thermal conductivity dependent on the temperature and mass diffusivity coefficients taken from CHEMKIN program. The validated model of the PAR was next implemented into simple two-dimensional simulations of hydrogen behavior within a subcompartment of a containment building.

  15. Experimental studies of electron-ion recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short history of electron-ion recombination research, discussing dielectronic combination, begins the study. Two classes of measurement techniques--those which determine rate coefficient of recombination by observing decay of plasma species, and those where cross sections are obtained by studying the formation of neutrals in intersecting beam experiments--are reviewed. Of the former, Biondi's microwave afterglow apparatus is detailed. Shock tubes and flame sampling are touched upon. Of the latter, intersecting beams, McGowan's Meide I apparatus, its advantages and disadvantages, are discussed. Hybrid techniques, quadropole traps (schematicized) and hollow electron beam traps are studied. Table II summarizes all measurements of rate coefficients and cross sections for dissociative recombination made thus far. The diatomics, A2+, with examination of isotope effects, and ion-pair formation; the rare gas ions, He2+, Ne2+, Ar2+; the atmospheric gas ions, 02+, N2+; the polytomics, H3+; and the cluster ions, all are listed as to rate coefficient and cross section

  16. Recombination studies using flowing afterglow plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the FALP apparatus the first reliable data have been obtained on the pure binary ionic recombination coefficients (or mutual neutralization coefficients), ?2, for the reactions of mass-identified ground-state reactant ions at thermal energies. Thus values of ?2 have been obtained for several reactions involving simple molecular ions and for several reactions involving cluster ions. The values of ?2 at 300 K for all of these reactions are within the limited range (4 - 10) x 10-8cm3s-1 and are consistent with theoretical expectations for such reactions. The study of the temperature dependence of ?2 for two reactions has shown that they also vary in accordance with theoretical predictions. Upper limits to ?2 have been obtained for a few reactions involving atomic ions only; the very small values for ?2 for these particular reactions are consistent with expectations although this must not be taken as a generalisation for all atomic ion reactions since others are expected to have larger values of ?2 (this has been demonstrated in merged beam experiments). The neutral products and the energy partition in these reactions have not been seriously studied to date; the products of only one reaction (NO+] + NO2-) have been studied spectroscopically in the FALP apparatus. A start has also been made in the study of collision enhanced ionic recombination in the FALP. This very versatile apparatus can be exploited much more in the study of ionic and electronic recombination reactions at thermal energies

  17. Use of Helical Transport Channels for Bunch Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David; Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab; Yoshikawa, Cary; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-03-01

    Cooling scenarios for a high-luminosity Muon Collider require bunch recombination for optimal luminosity. In this report we note that the tunable chronicity property of a helical transport channel (HTC) makes it a desirable component of a bunch recombiner. A large chronicity HTC is desirable for the bunch recombining transport, while more isochronous transport may be preferred for rf manipulations. Scenarios for bunch recombination are presented, with initial 1-D simulations, in order to set the stage for future 3-D simulation and optimization. HTC transports may enable a very compact bunch recombiner.

  18. Short homologies efficiently generate detectable homologous recombination events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osahor, Andrew N; Tan, Chau-Yan; Sim, Edmund Ui-Hang; Lee, Choon-Weng; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2014-10-01

    When recombineering bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), it is common practice to design the ends of the donor molecule with 50 bp of homology specifying its insertion site. We demonstrate that desired recombinants can be produced using intermolecular homologies as short as 15 bp. Although the use of shorter donor end regions decreases total recombinants by several fold, the frequency of recombinants with correctly inserted donor molecules was high enough for easy detection by simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening. This observation may have important implications for the design of oligonucleotides for recombineering, including significant cost savings, especially for high-throughput projects that use large quantities of primers. PMID:24929088

  19. Genome modifications and cloning using a conjugally transferable recombineering system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J Hossain

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic modification of primary bacterial disease isolates is challenging due to the lack of highly efficient genetic tools. Herein we describe the development of a modified PCR-based, ? Red-mediated recombineering system for efficient deletion of genes in Gram-negative bacteria. A series of conjugally transferrable plasmids were constructed by cloning an oriT sequence and different antibiotic resistance genes into recombinogenic plasmid pKD46. Using this system we deleted ten different genes from the genomes of Edwardsiella ictaluri and Aeromonas hydrophila. A temperature sensitive and conjugally transferable flp recombinase plasmid was developed to generate markerless gene deletion mutants. We also developed an efficient cloning system to capture larger bacterial genetic elements and clone them into a conjugally transferrable plasmid for facile transferring to Gram-negative bacteria. This system should be applicable in diverse Gram-negative bacteria to modify and complement genomic elements in bacteria that cannot be manipulated using available genetic tools.

  20. Gimeracil sensitizes cells to radiation via inhibition of homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: 5-Chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine (Gimeracil) is a component of an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative S-1. Gimeracil is originally added to S-1 to yield prolonged 5-FU concentrations in tumor tissues by inhibiting dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, which degrades 5-FU. We found that Gimeracil by itself had the radiosensitizing effect. Methods and materials: We used various cell lines deficient in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) as well as DLD-1 and HeLa in clonogenic assay. ?-H2AX focus formation and SCneo assay was performed to examine the effects of Gimeracil on DNA double strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms. Results: Results of ?-H2AX focus assay indicated that Gimeracil inhibited DNA DSB repair. It did not sensitize cells deficient in HR but sensitized those deficient in NHEJ. In SCneo assay, Gimeracil reduced the frequency of neo-positive clones. Additionally, it sensitized the cells in S-phase more than in G0/G1. Conclusions: Gimeracil inhibits HR. Because HR plays key roles in the repair of DSBH caused by radiotherapy, Gimeracil may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy through the suppression of HR-mediated DNA repair pathways.

  1. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  2. Monitoring homologous recombination in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhuanying; Tang Li [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Li Meiru [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Chen Lei; Xu Jie [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Wu Goujiang [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Li Hongqing, E-mail: hqli@scnu.edu.cn [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2010-09-10

    Here we describe a system to assay homologous recombination during the complete life cycle of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice plants were transformed with two copies of non-functional GUS reporter overlap fragments as recombination substrate. Recombination was observed in all plant organs examined, from the seed stage until the flowering stage of somatic plant development. Embryogenic cells exhibited the highest recombination ability with an average of 3 x 10{sup -5} recombination events per genome, which is about 10-fold of that observed in root cells, and two orders of that observed in leaf cells. Histological analysis revealed that recombination events occurred in diverse cell types, but preferentially in cells with small size. Examples of this included embryogenic cells in callus, phloem cells in the leaf vein, and cells located in the root apical meristem. Steady state RNA analysis revealed that the expression levels of rice Rad51 homologs are positively correlated with increased recombination rates in embryogenic calli, roots and anthers. Finally, radiation treatment of plantlets from distinct recombination lines increased the recombination frequency to different extents. These results showed that homologous recombination frequency can be effectively measured in rice using a transgene reporter assay. This system will facilitate the study of DNA damage signaling and homologous recombination in rice, a model monocot.

  3. Monitoring homologous recombination in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we describe a system to assay homologous recombination during the complete life cycle of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice plants were transformed with two copies of non-functional GUS reporter overlap fragments as recombination substrate. Recombination was observed in all plant organs examined, from the seed stage until the flowering stage of somatic plant development. Embryogenic cells exhibited the highest recombination ability with an average of 3 x 10-5 recombination events per genome, which is about 10-fold of that observed in root cells, and two orders of that observed in leaf cells. Histological analysis revealed that recombination events occurred in diverse cell types, but preferentially in cells with small size. Examples of this included embryogenic cells in callus, phloem cells in the leaf vein, and cells located in the root apical meristem. Steady state RNA analysis revealed that the expression levels of rice Rad51 homologs are positively correlated with increased recombination rates in embryogenic calli, roots and anthers. Finally, radiation treatment of plantlets from distinct recombination lines increased the recombination frequency to different extents. These results showed that homologous recombination frequency can be effectively measured in rice using a transgene reporter assay. This system will facilitate the study of DNA damage signaling and homologous recombination in rice, a model monocot.

  4. Induction of molecular and genetic recombination in eukaryotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review was to generally describe mitotic and meiotic recombination and to relate these processes to DNA repair. The results and mechanisms which have been described for genetic recombination in lower eukaryocytes are related to recent observations with mammalian cell systems in an attempt to bridge the gap between these categories of eukaryotes. The types of genetic recombinations which can be identified in lower eukaryotes, the effects of various mutagens and radiations, the similarities between spontaneous mitotic and meiotic recombination, the importance of recombination in DNA repair, and the role of various mechanisms in recombination are described. Molecular recombination is discussed. Gene conversion (informational transfer) is related to biochemical changes and is a very sensitive genetic tool for detecting DNA alterations

  5. Molecular mechanisms of DNA recombination: testing mitotic and meiotic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hyperhaploid n + 1 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (LBL1) disomic for chromosome VII was employed to isolate hyper-rec and hypo-rec mutations affecting spontaneous mitotic gene conversion and intergenic recombination. The genotype of LBL1 permits simultaneous and independent identification of rec mutations that enhance or diminish gene conversion and those that enhance or diminish intergenic recombination. Five phenotypic groups of rec mutants were isolated following ultraviolet light mutagenesis. Rec mutations that simultaneously abolish or enhance both classes of recombinational events were detected. These results demonstrate that gene conversion and intergenic recombination are under joint genetic control in mitotic cells. Conversion-specific and intergenic recombination-specific rec mutants were also recovered. Their properties indicate that conversion and intergenic recombination are separable pheonomena dependent upon discrete REC genes. The rec mutants isolated in LBL1 provide a method to test molecular models of mitotic and meiotic recombination

  6. Mechanisms and Factors that Influence High Frequency Retroviral Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista Delviks-Frankenberry

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available With constantly changing environmental selection pressures, retroviruses rely upon recombination to reassort polymorphisms in their genomes and increase genetic diversity, which improves the chances for the survival of their population. Recombination occurs during DNA synthesis, whereby reverse transcriptase undergoes template switching events between the two copackaged RNAs, resulting in a viral recombinant with portions of the genetic information from each parental RNA. This review summarizes our current understanding of the factors and mechanisms influencing retroviral recombination, fidelity of the recombination process, and evaluates the subsequent viral diversity and fitness of the progeny recombinant. Specifically, the high mutation rates and high recombination frequencies of HIV-1 will be analyzed for their roles in influencing HIV-1 global diversity, as well as HIV-1 diagnosis, drug treatment, and vaccine development.

  7. Mechanisms and factors that influence high frequency retroviral recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista; Galli, Andrea; Nikolaitchik, Olga; Mens, Helene; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2011-01-01

    With constantly changing environmental selection pressures, retroviruses rely upon recombination to reassort polymorphisms in their genomes and increase genetic diversity, which improves the chances for the survival of their population. Recombination occurs during DNA synthesis, whereby reverse...... transcriptase undergoes template switching events between the two copackaged RNAs, resulting in a viral recombinant with portions of the genetic information from each parental RNA. This review summarizes our current understanding of the factors and mechanisms influencing retroviral recombination, fidelity of...... the recombination process, and evaluates the subsequent viral diversity and fitness of the progeny recombinant. Specifically, the high mutation rates and high recombination frequencies of HIV-1 will be analyzed for their roles in influencing HIV-1 global diversity, as well as HIV-1 diagnosis, drug...

  8. Mediation and Conflict Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald Eisenkopf

    2009-01-01

    Mediation is a popular process to manage conflicts, but there is little systematic insight into its mechanisms. This paper discusses the results from an experiment in which a mediator can induce two conflict parties to behave cooperatively. If the mediator recommends cooperative behavior and threatens to punish deviations, she achieves the efficient solution. Similar results even obtain if the mediator is biased towards one party or has no incentive to prevent the conflict. Communication betw...

  9. Evolution of recombination in eutherian mammals: insights into mechanisms that affect recombination rates and crossover interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Joana; Ferretti, Luca; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián; Capilla, Laia; Farré, Marta; Reis, Fernanda; Oliver-Bonet, Maria; Fernández-Bellón, Hugo; Garcia, Francisca; Garcia-Caldés, Montserrat; Robinson, Terence J; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-11-22

    Recombination allows faithful chromosomal segregation during meiosis and contributes to the production of new heritable allelic variants that are essential for the maintenance of genetic diversity. Therefore, an appreciation of how this variation is created and maintained is of critical importance to our understanding of biodiversity and evolutionary change. Here, we analysed the recombination features from species representing the major eutherian taxonomic groups Afrotheria, Rodentia, Primates and Carnivora to better understand the dynamics of mammalian recombination. Our results suggest a phylogenetic component in recombination rates (RRs), which appears to be directional, strongly punctuated and subject to selection. Species that diversified earlier in the evolutionary tree have lower RRs than those from more derived phylogenetic branches. Furthermore, chromosome-specific recombination maps in distantly related taxa show that crossover interference is especially weak in the species with highest RRs detected thus far, the tiger. This is the first example of a mammalian species exhibiting such low levels of crossover interference, highlighting the uniqueness of this species and its relevance for the study of the mechanisms controlling crossover formation, distribution and resolution. PMID:24068360

  10. Bayesian Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; MacKinnon, David P.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we propose Bayesian analysis of mediation effects. Compared with conventional frequentist mediation analysis, the Bayesian approach has several advantages. First, it allows researchers to incorporate prior information into the mediation analysis, thus potentially improving the efficiency of estimates. Second, under the Bayesian…

  11. mediation: R Package for Causal Mediation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Tingley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the R package mediation for conducting causal mediation analysis in applied empirical research. In many scientific disciplines, the goal of researchers is not only estimating causal effects of a treatment but also understanding the process in which the treatment causally affects the outcome. Causal mediation analysis is frequently used to assess potential causal mechanisms. The mediation package implements a comprehensive suite of statistical tools for conducting such an analysis. The package is organized into two distinct approaches. Using the model-based approach, researchers can estimate causal mediation effects and conduct sensitivity analysis under the standard research design. Furthermore, the design-based approach provides several analysis tools that are applicable under different experimental designs. This approach requires weaker assumptions than the model-based approach. We also implement a statistical method for dealing with multiple (causally dependent mediators, which are often encountered in practice. Finally, the package also offers a methodology for assessing causal mediation in the presence of treatment noncompliance, a common problem in randomized trials.

  12. Phenomenological Implications of Deflected Mirage Mediation: Comparison with Mirage Mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Altunkaynak, Baris(Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 73019, U.S.A.); Everett, Lisa L.; Kim, Ian-Woo; Nelson, Brent D.; Rao, Yongyan

    2010-01-01

    We compare the collider phenomenology of mirage mediation and deflected mirage mediation, which are two recently proposed "mixed" supersymmetry breaking scenarios motivated from string compactifications. The scenarios differ in that deflected mirage mediation includes contributions from gauge mediation in addition to the contributions from gravity mediation and anomaly mediation also present in mirage mediation. The threshold effects from gauge mediation can drastically alter the low energy s...

  13. General gauge mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We give a general definition of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking which encompasses all the known gauge mediation models. In particular, it includes both models with messengers as well as direct mediation models. A formalism for computing the soft terms in the generic model is presented. Such a formalism is necessary in strongly-coupled direct mediation models where perturbation theory cannot be used. It allows us to identify features of the entire class of gauge mediation models and to distinguish them from specific signatures of various subclasses. (author)

  14. Competitive repair by naturally dispersed repetitive DNA during non-allelic homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Tan, Frederick J.; Lai, David C.; Celniker, Sue E.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Zheng, Yixian; Koshland, Douglas

    2010-08-27

    Genome rearrangements often result from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between repetitive DNA elements dispersed throughout the genome. Here we systematically analyze NAHR between Ty retrotransposons using a genome-wide approach that exploits unique features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae purebred and Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces bayanus hybrid diploids. We find that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce NAHR-dependent rearrangements using Ty elements located 12 to 48 kilobases distal to the break site. This break-distal recombination (BDR) occurs frequently, even when allelic recombination can repair the break using the homolog. Robust BDR-dependent NAHR demonstrates that sequences very distal to DSBs can effectively compete with proximal sequences for repair of the break. In addition, our analysis of NAHR partner choice between Ty repeats shows that intrachromosomal Ty partners are preferred despite the abundance of potential interchromosomal Ty partners that share higher sequence identity. This competitive advantage of intrachromosomal Tys results from the relative efficiencies of different NAHR repair pathways. Finally, NAHR generates deleterious rearrangements more frequently when DSBs occur outside rather than within a Ty repeat. These findings yield insights into mechanisms of repeat-mediated genome rearrangements associated with evolution and cancer.

  15. Expression, Delivery and Function of Insecticidal Proteins Expressed by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy A. Kroemer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal potential by shortening the time required for infection to kill or incapacitate insect pests and reducing the quantity of crop damage as a consequence. A wide variety of neurotoxic peptides, proteins that regulate insect physiology, degradative enzymes, and other potentially insecticidal proteins have been evaluated for their capacity to reduce the survival time of baculovirus-infected lepidopteran host larvae. Researchers have investigated the factors involved in the efficient expression and delivery of baculovirus-encoded insecticidal peptides and proteins, with much effort dedicated to identifying ideal promoters for driving transcription and signal peptides that mediate secretion of the expressed target protein. Other factors, particularly translational efficiency of transcripts derived from recombinant insecticidal genes and post-translational folding and processing of insecticidal proteins, remain relatively unexplored. The discovery of RNA interference as a gene-specific regulation mechanism offers a new approach for improvement of baculovirus biopesticidal efficacy through genetic modification.

  16. New Strategies for Expression and Purification of Recombinant Human RNASET2 Protein in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lualdi, Marta; Pedrini, Edoardo; Petroni, Francesca; Näsman, Johnny; Lindqvist, Christer; Scaldaferri, Debora; Taramelli, Roberto; Inforzato, Antonio; Acquati, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Ribonucleases form a large family of enzymes involved in RNA metabolism and are endowed with a broad range of biological functions. Among the different RNase proteins described in the last decades, those belonging to the Rh/T2/S subfamily show the highest degree of evolutionary conservation, suggesting the occurrence of a key critical ancestral role for this protein family. We have recently defined the human RNASET2 gene as a novel member of a group of oncosuppressors called "tumor antagonizing genes," whose activity in the control of cancer growth is carried out mainly in vivo. However, to better define the molecular pathways underlying the oncosuppressive properties of this protein, further structural and functional investigations are necessary, and availability of high-quality recombinant RNASET2 is of paramount importance. Here, we describe a multi-step strategy that allows production of highly pure, catalytically competent recombinant RNASET2 in both wild-type and mutant forms. The recombinant proteins that were produced with our purification strategy will be instrumental to perform a wide range of functional assays aimed at dissecting the molecular mechanisms of RNASET2-mediated tumor suppression. PMID:25663099

  17. In utero recombinant adeno-associated virus gene transfer in mice, rats, and primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marrero Luis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer into the amniotic fluid using recombinant adenovirus vectors was shown previously to result in high efficiency transfer of transgenes into the lungs and intestines. Adenovirus mediated in utero gene therapy, however, resulted in expression of the transgene for less than 30 days. Recombinant adenovirus associated viruses (rAAV have the advantage of maintaining the viral genome in daughter cells thus providing for long-term expression of transgenes. Methods Recombinant AAV2 carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP was introduced into the amniotic sac of fetal rodents and nonhuman primates. Transgene maintenance and expression was monitor. Results Gene transfer resulted in rapid uptake and long-term gene expression in mice, rats, and non-human primates. Expression and secretion of the reporter gene, GFP, was readily demonstrated within 72 hours post-therapy. In long-term studies in rats and nonhuman primates, maintenance of GFP DNA, protein expression, and reporter gene secretion was documented for over one year. Conclusions Because only multipotential stem cells are present at the time of therapy, these data demonstrated that in utero gene transfer with AAV2 into stem cells resulted in long-term systemic expression of active transgene roducts. Thus, in utero gene transfer via the amniotic fluid may be useful in treatment of gene disorders.

  18. Budding yeast Hed1 down-regulates the mitotic recombination machinery when meiotic recombination is impaired

    OpenAIRE

    Tsubouchi, Hideo; Roeder, G Shirleen

    2006-01-01

    In budding yeast, there are two RecA homologs: Rad51 and Dmc1. While Rad51 is involved in both mitotic and meiotic recombination, Dmc1 participates specifically in meiotic recombination. Here, we describe a meiosis-specific protein (Hed1) with a novel Rad51 regulatory function. Several observations indicate that Hed1 attenuates Rad51 activity when Dmc1 is absent. First, although double-strand breaks are normally poorly repaired in the dmc1 mutant, repair becomes efficient when Hed1 is absent,...

  19. Stromelysin 1, neutrophil collagenase, and collagenase 3 do not play major roles in a model of chondrocyte mediated cartilage breakdown.

    OpenAIRE

    Kozaci, L D; Brown, C. J.; Adcocks, C; Galloway, A.; Hollander, A.P.; Buttle, D J

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the collective roles of stromelysin 1, neutrophil collagenase, and collagenase 3 in chondrocyte mediated cartilage proteoglycan and type II collagen degradation in tissue culture model systems. METHODS: Bovine nasal cartilage explants were cultured with and without recombinant human interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), recombinant human tumour necrosis factor alpha, or retinoic acid. Proteoglycan and type II collagen release were determined by colorimetric assay and immunoassa...

  20. Functions and structures of eukaryotic recombination proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have found that Rad51 and RecA Proteins form strikingly similar structures together with dsDNA and ATP. Their right handed helical nucleoprotein filaments extend the B-form DNA double helixes to 1.5 times in length and wind the helix. The similarity and uniqueness of their structures must reflect functional homologies between these proteins. Therefore, it is highly probable that similar recombination proteins are present in various organisms of different evolutional states. We have succeeded to clone RAD51 genes from human, mouse, chicken and fission yeast genes, and found that the homologues are widely distributed in eukaryotes. The HsRad51 and MmRad51 or ChRad51 proteins consist of 339 amino acids differing only by 4 or 12 amino acids, respectively, and highly homologous to both yeast proteins, but less so to Dmcl. All of these proteins are homologous to the region from residues 33 to 240 of RecA which was named ''homologous core. The homologous core is likely to be responsible for functions common for all of them, such as the formation of helical nucleoprotein filament that is considered to be involved in homologous pairing in the recombination reaction. The mouse gene is transcribed at a high level in thymus, spleen, testis, and ovary, at lower level in brain and at a further lower level in some other tissues. It is transcribed efficiently in recombination active tissues. A clear functional difference of Rad51 homologues from RecA was suggested by the failure of heterologous genes to complement the deficiency of Scrad51 mutants. This failure seems to reflect the absence of a compatible partner, such as ScRad52 protein in the case of ScRad51 protein, between different species. Thus, these discoveries play a role of the starting point to understand the fundamental gene targeting in mammalian cells and in gene therapy. (J.P.N.)