WorldWideScience
1

Can small institutes address some problems facing biomedical researchers?  

Science.gov (United States)

At a time of historically low National Institutes of Health funding rates and many problems with the conduct of research (unfunded mandates, disgruntled reviewers, and rampant paranoia), there is a concern that biomedical research as a profession is waning in the United States (see "Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws" by Alberts and colleagues in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences). However, it is wonderful to discover something new and to tackle tough puzzles. If we could focus more of our effort on discussing scientific problems and doing research, then we could be more productive and perhaps happier. One potential solution is to focus efforts on small thematic institutes in the university structure that can provide a stimulating and supportive environment for innovation and exploration. With an open-lab concept, there are economies of scale that can diminish paperwork and costs, while providing greater access to state-of-the-art equipment. Merging multiple disciplines around a common theme can catalyze innovation, and this enables individuals to develop new concepts without giving up the credit they deserve, because it is usually clear who did the work. Small institutes do not solve larger systemic problems but rather enable collective efforts to address the noisome aspects of the system and foster an innovative community effort to address scientific problems. PMID:25360047

Sheetz, Michael P

2014-11-01

2

Can small institutes address some problems facing biomedical researchers?  

OpenAIRE

At a time of historically low National Institutes of Health funding rates and many problems with the conduct of research (unfunded mandates, disgruntled reviewers, and rampant paranoia), there is a concern that biomedical research as a profession is waning in the United States (see ”Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws” by Alberts and colleagues in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences). However, it is wonderful to discover something new and to tackle toug...

Sheetz, Michael P.

2014-01-01

3

Addressing Problems of Conceptualization and Construct Validity in Researching Teachers' Job Satisfaction.  

Science.gov (United States)

Ambiguity in the meaning of job satisfaction has caused construct validity problems in research. A series of small-scale studies of teachers suggested a distinction between job fulfillment and job comfort as well as a need for understanding how job satisfaction is interpreted by researchers. (SK)

Evans, Linda

1997-01-01

4

Brown Superfund Basic research Program: a multistakeholder partnership addresses real-world problems in contaminated communities.  

Science.gov (United States)

The NIEHS funds several basic and applied research programs, many of which also require research translation or outreach. This paper reports on a project by the Brown University Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in which outreach and research translation teams collaborated with state regulatory agency personnel and community activists on a legislative initiative to mitigate the financial impacts of living in a contaminated community. The Environmentally Compromised Home Ownership (ECHO) program makes home equity loans of up to $25,000 available to qualified applicants. This collaboration provides a case study in community engagement and demonstrates how research translation and outreach activities that are clearly differentiated yet well-integrated can improve a suite of basic and applied research. Although engaging diverse constituencies can be difficult community-engaged translation and outreach have the potential to make research findings more useful to communities, address some of the social impacts of contamination, and empower stakeholders to pursue their individual and collectively held goals for remediation. The NIEHS has recently renewed its commitment to community-engaged research and advocacy, making this an optimal time to reflect on how basic research programs that engage stakeholders through research translation and outreach can add value to the overall research enterprise. PMID:18677987

Senier, Laura; Hudson, Benjamin; Fort, Sarah; Hoover, Elizabeth; Tillson, Rebecca; Brown, Phil

2008-07-01

5

The Brown Superfund Basic Research Program: A Multistakeholder Partnership Addresses Real-World Problems in Contaminated Communities  

OpenAIRE

The NIEHS funds several basic and applied research programs, many of which also require research translation or outreach. This paper reports on a project by the Brown University Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in which outreach and research translation teams collaborated with state regulatory agency personnel and community activists on a legislative initiative to mitigate the financial impacts of living in a contaminated community. The Environmentally Compromised Home Ownership (ECHO...

Senier, Laura; Hudson, Benjamin; Fort, Sarah; Hoover, Elizabeth; Tillson, Rebecca; Brown, Phil

2008-01-01

6

Addressing complex design problems through inductive learning  

OpenAIRE

Optimisation and related techniques are well suited to clearly defined problems involving systems that can be accurately simulated, but not to tasks in which the phenomena in question are highly complex or the problem ill-defined. These latter are typical of architecture and particularly creative design tasks, which therefore currently lack viable computational tools. It is argued that as design teams and construction projects of unprecedented scale are increasingly frequent, this is just whe...

Hanna, S.

2012-01-01

7

Addressing the Problems of Homeless Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

Homeless adolescents, known as "unaccompanied youth," constitute a small but important portion of the overall homeless population, one that needs particular attention at school. In this article, we review existing literature to provide a background for educational leaders, researchers, and policymakers hoping to understand the phenomenon of…

Murphy, Joseph F.; Tobin, Kerri

2012-01-01

8

Addressing real-time control problems in complex environments using dynamic multi-objective evolutionary approaches  

OpenAIRE

The demand for increased automation of industrial processes generates control problems that are dynamic, multi-objective and noisy at the same time. The primary hypothesis underlying this research is that dynamic evolutionary methods could be used to address dynamic control problems where con icting control criteria are necessary. The aim of this research is to develop a framework for on-line optimisation of dynamic problems that is capable of a) representing problems in a q...

Butans, Jevgenijs

2011-01-01

9

Beyond Open Big Data: Addressing Unreliable Research  

OpenAIRE

The National Institute of Health invests US $30.9 billion annually in medical research. However, the subsequent impact of this research output on society and the economy is amplified dramatically as a result of the actual medical treatments, biomedical innovations, and various commercial enterprises that emanate from and depend on these findings. It is therefore a great concern to discover that much of published research is unreliable. We propose extending the open data concept to the culture...

Moseley, Edward T.; Hsu, Douglas J.; Stone, David J.; Celi, Leo Anthony

2014-01-01

10

Addressing The Inverse Problem of Far-field Imaging  

Science.gov (United States)

This talk describes an approach to a solution of inverse problems in far-field imaging with application to optical, electron/ion beam, x-ray and other imaging modalities. Two aspects of the inverse problem in optical imaging are phase and resolution. Whereas techniques such as Confocal, STED, PALM, STORM etc address the latter they lack phase information as is the case in near-field optics. Furthermore, all of these techniques are serial. We introduce an approach based on a controllable nanoscopic far-field optical point source integrated into parallel imaging. In the first demonstration of this development we focus on the inverse problem of the phase of an image which has never been solved exactly and can only be approached through iterative methods with all their problems of nonconvergence, slow convergence, convergence to local minima, and stagnation. We now show that it is possible to obtain, with such a method, an exact solution to the inverse problem of phase both experimentally and theoretically. Our method is based on the breakthrough that crystallography experienced in phase retrieval for large molecular entities by Max Perutz's introduction of ``heavy atoms'' using the method of isomorphous replacement.

Lewis, Aaron; Honigstein, Danielle; Weinroth, Jacques; Werman, Michael

2013-03-01

11

Addressing the P2P Bootstrap Problem for Small Networks  

CERN Document Server

P2P overlays provide a framework for building distributed applications consisting of few to many resources with features including self-configuration, scalability, and resilience to node failures. Such systems have been successfully adopted in large-scale services for content delivery networks, file sharing, and data storage. In small-scale systems, they can be useful to address privacy concerns and for network applications that lack dedicated servers. The bootstrap problem, finding an existing peer in the overlay, remains a challenge to enabling these services for small-scale P2P systems. In large networks, the solution to the bootstrap problem has been the use of dedicated services, though creating and maintaining these systems requires expertise and resources, which constrain their usefulness and make them unappealing for small-scale systems. This paper surveys and summarizes requirements that allow peers potentially constrained by network connectivity to bootstrap small-scale overlays through the use of e...

Wolinsky, David Isaac; Boykin, P Oscar; Figueiredo, Renato

2010-01-01

12

Beyond open big data: addressing unreliable research.  

Science.gov (United States)

The National Institute of Health invests US $30.9 billion annually in medical research. However, the subsequent impact of this research output on society and the economy is amplified dramatically as a result of the actual medical treatments, biomedical innovations, and various commercial enterprises that emanate from and depend on these findings. It is therefore a great concern to discover that much of published research is unreliable. We propose extending the open data concept to the culture of the scientific research community. By dialing down unproductive features of secrecy and competition, while ramping up cooperation and transparency, we make a case that what is published would then be less susceptible to the sometimes corrupting and confounding pressures to be first or journalistically attractive, which can compromise the more fundamental need to be robustly correct. PMID:25405277

Moseley, Edward T; Hsu, Douglas J; Stone, David J; Celi, Leo Anthony

2014-01-01

13

Operations research problems statements and solutions  

CERN Document Server

The objective of this book is to provide a valuable compendium of problems as a reference for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, researchers and practitioners of operations research and management science. These problems can serve as a basis for the development or study of assignments and exams. Also, they can be useful as a guide for the first stage of the model formulation, i.e. the definition of a problem. The book is divided into 11 chapters that address the following topics: Linear programming, integer programming, non linear programming, network modeling, inventory theory, queue theory, tree decision, game theory, dynamic programming and markov processes. Readers are going to find a considerable number of statements of operations research applications for management decision-making. The solutions of these problems are provided in a concise way although all topics start with a more developed resolution. The proposed problems are based on the research experience of the authors in real-world com...

Poler, Raúl; Díaz-Madroñero, Manuel

2014-01-01

14

Asia/Pacific moves to address mountainous waste problem  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

There is a serious lack of chemical waste treatment units in the Asia/Pacific region. In many countries a lack of infrastructure, coupled with scant or no legislation or enforcement, results in significant amounts of chemical waste being dumped without proper treatment. The exception is Japan, which has substantial incineration, treatment, and landfill capabilities. Japan's chemical industry generates more than 14 million m.t./year of waste, which is reduced to 2.51 million m.t./year after treatment and recycling. Chemical companies operating in Asia/Pacific countries that do not have authorized waste contractors and disposal plants have few options. They can treat wastes inhouse, increase recycling, ship wastes outside for treatment, or store wastes onsite. Some companies, such as Monsanto (St. Louis), claim to have managed to avoid producing any final wastes. The company's farm chemicals plant in Malaysia is one example - even the drums used to transport raw materials to the site have been replaced with returnable containers. Chiba (Basel) also has invested in cutting waste. The Swiss firm's dyestuffs plant at Candra Sari, Indonesia cut primary pollution by 90%, while product output rose 12% - a result of changing operations procedures and capital investment of only $6,500. A number of countries have started to address the industrial waste problem - foremost is Hong Kong, which is currently commissioning one of the first chemical waste treatment centers in the regiomical waste treatment centers in the region. Other countries planning integrated waste treatment facilities include Indonesia, Malaysia, Australia, Thailand, Singapore, and China

15

Presidential Address: Culture and the Future of Education Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent changes in higher education have confronted education research with a conundrum: how our traditionally multidisciplinary field can refine itself as a unified discipline. In this address I sketch out what this conundrum may mean for education research, both substantively and methodologically, in the future. I propose that one starting point…

Halse, Christine

2013-01-01

16

Reservoir technology research at LBL addressing geysers issues  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Geothermal Technology Division of the Department of Energy is redirecting a significant part of its Reservoir Technology funding to study problems now being experienced at The Geysers. These include excessive pressure drawdown and associated decline in well flow rates, corrosion due to high chloride concentration in the produced steam and high concentration of noncondensible gases in some parts of the field. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is addressing some of these problems through field, laboratory and theoretical studies. 11 refs., 6 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1990-04-01

17

Problems of Educational Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

The diversification and internationalization of educational activity and the growing relations between communication and education come up against the institutional world of educational research, which is not always able to apprehend these dynamic processes and finds it easy from its outside position to impose priorities, research topics, and…

Gelpi, Ettore

1985-01-01

18

Multidimensional family therapy: addressing co-occurring substance abuse and other problems among adolescents with comprehensive family-based treatment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Adolescent substance abuse rarely occurs without other psychiatric and developmental problems, but it is often treated and researched as if it can be isolated from comorbid conditions. Few comprehensive interventions are available that effectively address the range of co-occurring problems associated with adolescent substance abuse. This article reviews the clinical interventions and research evidence supporting the use of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) for adolescents with substance abuse and co-occurring problems. MDFT is uniquely suited to address adolescent substance abuse and related disorders given its comprehensive interventions that systematically target the multiple interacting risk factors underlying many developmental disruptions of adolescence. PMID:20682221

Rowe, Cynthia L

2010-07-01

19

Helping policy-makers address rural health access problems.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper provides a comprehensive review of the key dimensions of access and their significance for the provision of primary health care and a framework that assists policy-makers to evaluate how well policy targets the dimensions of access. Access to health care can be conceptualised as the potential ease with which consumers can obtain health care at times of need. Disaggregation of the concept of access into the dimensions of availability, geography, affordability, accommodation, timeliness, acceptability and awareness allows policy-makers to identify key questions which must be addressed to ensure reasonable primary health care access for rural and remote Australians. Evaluating how well national primary health care policies target these dimensions of access helps identify policy gaps and potential inequities in ensuring access to primary health care. Effective policies must incorporate the multiple dimensions of access if they are to comprehensively and effectively address unacceptable inequities in health status and access to basic health services experienced by rural and remote Australians. PMID:23586567

Russell, Deborah J; Humphreys, John S; Ward, Bernadette; Chisholm, Marita; Buykx, Penny; McGrail, Matthew; Wakerman, John

2013-04-01

20

A Few Examples of ISPs Addressing Specific Reactor Safety Problems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Four International Standard Problems which were related to safety reactor problems are briefly discussed. ISP-20 (Steam Generator Tube Rupture in DOEL 2) is a unique ISP as it is based on a real incident which occurred in a commercial Power Plant. This ISP clearly illustrated the special problems of an ISP based on a real plant, namely limited access to precise plant data, some lack in the detailed knowledge of sensor behaviour, etc. ISP-26 (ROSA IV-LSTF small break test) was an open ISP. A qualitatively good prediction of the measured events was obtained even if some modelling deficiencies were identified. ISP-27 (BETHSY Exp. 9.1 B) was a blind ISP. All important trends observed during the test were qualitatively calculated by most computer codes. However, some deficiencies in calculating some variables were evident. ISP-33 (PACTEL Natural Circulation) was an exercise with a test facility modelled on the basis of a Russian VVER 440 and with participations from Eastern and Western organisations. ISP-33 was a double-blind exercise. The simulation of some variables caused some problems although they were in principle not too complicated. Post-test calculations demonstrated significant improvements. For all the four ISPs, the influence of the code user was evident and caused some scatter in the results. A specific study was performed in ISP-26 to clarify from where those user effects were coming. The reactor safety problems related to those ISPs are detailed and the specific contribution of the ISPs to bring solutions is discussed.

21

Addressing communications between Regulatory Body and TSO: perceptions and problems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The use of TSO assistance by the Regulatory Bodies is a way of facing the complexity of the technology and issues to be dealt with in the licensing and controlling process in the nuclear area. Although both TSO and Regulatory Body are well prepared and adjusted, the nature and environment of TSO work is rather different from the regulators. Some of the TSO members act as a consultant, giving expert advice to the regulators in a specific subject, some are in charge of inspections and audits, others do the job together with the regulators. The way that a TSO member perceives the work to be done, however, often creates different perspectives for questions related to the licensing and controlling process. These perceptions are usually a source of problems between the two partners, regulators and TSO members. In this paper some of this kind of problems are raised and suggestions of how to deal with them are proposed for discussion. (author)

22

Multidimensional Family Therapy: Addressing Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Other Problems among Adolescents with Comprehensive Family-Based Treatment  

OpenAIRE

Adolescent substance abuse rarely occurs without other psychiatric and developmental problems, yet it is often treated and researched as if it can be isolated from comorbid conditions. Few comprehensive interventions are available that effectively address the range of co-occurring problems associated with adolescent substance abuse. This article reviews the clinical interventions and research evidence supporting the use of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) for adolescents with substance ...

Rowe, Cynthia L.

2010-01-01

23

Addressing the problem of ADHD medication as neuroenhancements.  

Science.gov (United States)

The prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnoses is rising. ADHD is closely linked to its treatment with medications such as methylphenidate and amphetamines, which have popular appeal as neuroenhancement drugs by persons without a neurological disorder. The three main reasons for the increase in ADHD medication demand, production, and consumption are a) the inclusion of milder ADHD diagnoses; b) the vast marketing of ADHD medications by the pharmaceutical industry; and c) the illegal diversion of controlled ADHD medication to consumers seeking stimulants as neuroenhancements. Rapidly rising rates of any neurological disorder - especially a behaviorly-defined disorder closely linked to potent medications currently prescribed to more than 5% of the population - deserves ongoing scrutiny. Major social and ethical problems arise from vague-symptom medicalization, neurological disorder trivialization, medication overuse, and controlled substances diversion to healthy persons for nonmedical purposes. We argue against the 'spectrumization' of ADHD in an effort to curtail further diagnosis creep. PMID:24738763

Graf, William D; Miller, Geoffrey; Nagel, Saskia K

2014-05-01

24

Recent NRC research activities addressing valve and pump issues  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The mission of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is to ensure the safe design, construction, and operation of commercial nuclear power plants and other facilities in the U.S.A. One of the main roles that the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) plays in achieving the NRC mission is to plan, recommend, and implement research programs that address safety and technical issues deemed important by the NRC. The results of the research activities provide the bases for developing NRC positions or decisions on these issues. Also, RES performs confirmatory research for developing the basis to evaluate industry responses and positions on various regulatory requirements. This presentation summarizes some recent RES supported research activities that have addressed safety and technical issues related to valves and pumps. These activities include the efforts on determining valve and motor-operator responses under dynamic loads and pressure locking events, evaluation of monitoring equipment, and methods for detecting and trending aging of check valves and pumps. The role that RES is expected to play in future years to fulfill the NRC mission is also discussed.

Morrison, D.L.

1996-12-01

25

Research Activities Addressing the Fuel Design of Lead Fast Reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Since the end of the 1990s, ENEA Brasimone Research Centre operates several experimental facilities aimed at supporting the research on LBE and lead systems, such as ADS and LFR. The experimental activities are related to thermal- hydraulics, heat exchange, science of materials, and qualification of components. Experimental loops operated at ENEA and an experiment addressing the compatibility of structural materials to withstand with aggressive coolants (i.e. Lead and LBE), at high temperature and high dose rate are described in this paper. These loops have been also operated for supporting the research related to the selection of the cladding materials for ADS and LRF technologies. The paper provides an overview of the recent and future activities devoted to material development. (author)

26

Addressing food security through public policy action in a community-based participatory research partnership.  

Science.gov (United States)

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is an increasingly utilized research approach that involves the affected community identifying a health-related problem, developing a research agenda, and planning an appropriate intervention to address the problem. This report on a CBPR partnership in San Francisco's Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood documents the rise of a community food security policy in response to youth-involved research that found poor access to quality food in an economically disadvantaged area of the city. To analyze the impact of the research on public policy, a framework of specific steps in the policy-making process is used to organize and better understand the partnership's objectives, activities, strategies, and successes. This community-health department partnership has been able to achieve an innovative and sustainable public policy solution, the Good Neighbor Program, by working closely with policy makers and local businesses to expand community accessibility to healthy food. PMID:17728199

Vásquez, Victoria Breckwich; Lanza, Dana; Hennessey-Lavery, Susana; Facente, Shelley; Halpin, Helen Ann; Minkler, Meredith

2007-10-01

27

Addressing Global Environmental Challenges through Interdisciplinary Biogeochemical Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Our planet is dynamic; energy and matter constantly move between the hydrosphere, atmosphere and lithosphere on time scales from seconds to millenia. These tight interactions - including those between organisms and their physical environment - are what make Earth habitable. However, as Rachel Carson wrote, 'Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species - man - acquired significant power to alter the nature of this world'. Globalization and explosive population growth have generated far-reaching environmental problems on a scale that humanity has never faced before. Fortunately, our species has also developed an unprecedented ability to provide science-based solutions. Since processes impacting the environment involve complex biological, physical, chemical and geological interactions and feedbacks, they require the integration of expertise from all these scientific disciplines as well as input from policy makers, social scientists, and economists. This talk presents four examples of current interdisciplinary research projects conducted in my lab, each one related to a theme from one of Carson's books (Under the Sea-wind, The Sea Around Us, The Edge of the Sea, and Silent Spring). These projects, and others like them, provide hope that we can move toward a sustainable relationship with the natural world by encouraging the best scientists to conduct interdisciplinary research with direct applications for environmental management and stewardship.

Paytan, A.

2013-12-01

28

Coloured Petri nets and graphical animation: a proposal for a means to address problem frame concerns  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

To address a frame concern in Jackson's problem frames, we must make appropriate descriptions of (1) the problem domain; (2) the requirements; (3) the specification of the machine. Based on these descriptions, we must give a convincing argument that the given domain properties and the machine specification together entail that the requirements are fulfilled. In this paper, we demonstrate how to address certain frame concerns with the use of the formal modelling language coloured Petri nets (CPN). Problem domain description and machine specification are brought together in a CPN model, which is augmented with a graphical animation. The CPN model is executable and we simulate it to address frame concerns. We illustrate the approach on the elevator controller example.

JØrgensen, Jens Bæk

2008-01-01

29

Addressing Earth Science Data Access Challenges through User Experience Research  

Science.gov (United States)

The NASA Capacity Building Program (Earth Science Division, Applied Sciences Program) works to enhance end-user capabilities to employ Earth observation and Earth science (EO/ES) data in decision-making. Open data access and user-tailored data delivery strategies are critical elements towards this end. User Experience (UX) and User Interface (UI) research methods can offer important contributions towards addressing data access challenges, particularly at the interface of science application/product development and product transition to end-users. This presentation focuses on developing nation contexts and describes methods, results, and lessons learned from two recent UX/UI efforts conducted in collaboration with NASA: the SERVIRglobal.net redesign project and the U.S. Water Partnership (USWP) Portal development effort. SERVIR, a collaborative venture among NASA, USAID, and global partners, seeks to improve environmental management and climate change response by helping governments and other stakeholders integrate EO and geospatial technologies into decision-making. The USWP, a collaboration among U.S. public and private sectors, harnesses U.S.-based resources and expertise to address water challenges in developing nations. SERVIR's study, conducted from 2010-2012, assessed and tested user needs, preferences, and online experiences to generate a more user-friendly online data portal at SERVIRglobal.net. The portal provides a central access interface to data and products from SERVIR's network of hubs in East Africa, the Hindu Kush Himalayas, and Mesoamerica. The second study, conducted by the USWP Secretariat and funded by the U.S. Department of State, seeks to match U.S.-based water information resources with developing nation stakeholder needs. The USWP study utilizes a multi-pronged approach to identify key design requirements and to understand the existing water data portal landscape. Adopting UX methods allows data distributors to design customized UIs that help users find, interpret, and obtain appropriate content quickly. The data access challenge for both SERVIR and USWP consisted of organizing a wide range of content for their respective user bases, which are diverse, international, and in some cases loosely characterized. The UX/UI design approach generated profiles of prototypical users and corresponding task flows and organizational schemes for their preferred types of content. Wireframe acceptance testing by SERVIR helped elicit and optimize how users interact with the information online. These approaches produced customized UIs and knowledge management strategies to address the data access challenges faced by each user type. Both studies revealed critical considerations for user experiences in developing nations (e.g., low-bandwidth internet connections, rolling power outages at data storage or network centers). For SERVIR, these findings influenced not only the portal infrastructure; they also informed the transition of the platform to a Cloud-based model, as well as the development of custom data delivery tools such as SMS and other mobile solutions. While SERVIR's data access solutions are customized for the network's community of users, they are also standardized and interoperable according to GEO and ISO standards, providing a model for other initiatives such as the ongoing USWP Portal development effort.

Hemmings, S. N.; Banks, B.; Kendall, J.; Lee, C. M.; Irwin, D.; Toll, D. L.; Searby, N. D.

2013-12-01

30

Brief report : ethical problems in research practice  

OpenAIRE

Most accounts of the ethical problems facing researchers across a broad spectrum of research fields come from ethicists, ethics committees, and specialists committed to the study of ethics in human research. In contrast, this study reports on the ethical questions that researchers, themselves, report facing in their everyday practice. Fifty-five Swedish researchers contributed 109 examples of ethical dilemmas, conflicts, and problems in research. They were all researchers at the postdoctoral ...

Colnerud, Gunnel

2013-01-01

31

Ethical Issues in Addressing Inequity in/through ESL Research  

Science.gov (United States)

This article outlines a researcher's struggles with conducting "ethical" research when her case study reveals racializations faced by a minority teacher in a Canadian ESL program. How might becoming privy to research participants' experiences of inequity in ESL education complicate the notion of research ethics when "doing the right thing" runs…

Lee, Ena

2011-01-01

32

Physics Problem Solving Research Using Protocols.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents an overview of research on physics problem solving using verbal protocols. It asserts that the understanding of physics problem solving strategies enables researchers to write computer programs, which can automatically solve physics problems without the users having to be experts in physics. This, in turn, can generate more…

Brekke, Stewart E.

33

Identifying and Addressing water-foods research needs  

OpenAIRE

Presentation into the conference “ Water Innovation Europe 2013”, Brussels, April 16 to 18. This Conference war organized by the research programme for European cooperation in science and technology COST and the Water Supply and Sanitation Technology Platform (WssTP) as a opportunity for scientists, water industry representatives, policy makers, researchers, innovators and utility representatives to meet, debate and build bridges between research and the market. 1 .pdf file (41 Pags.) fro...

Playa?n Jubillar, Enrique

2013-01-01

34

Addressing the Cosmic Coincidence Problem in f(T) Gravity Models  

CERN Document Server

In this paper we address the well-known cosmic coincidence problem in the framework of the f(T) gravity. In order to achieve this, an interaction between dark energy and dark matter is considered. A constraint equation is obtained which generates the f(T) models that do not suffer from the coincidence problem. Due to the absence of a universally accepted interaction term introduced by a fundamental theory, the study is conducted over three different forms of chosen interaction terms. As an illustration two widely known models of f(T) gravity are taken into consideration and used in the setup designed to study the problem. The study reveals that there exists a perfect solution for the coincidence problem in the background of the second model while the first model remains utterly plagued by the phenomenon. This not only shows the cosmological viability but also the superiority of the second model over its counterpart.

Rudra, Prabir

2014-01-01

35

AGING WATER INFRASTRUCTURE RESEARCH PROGRAM: ADDRESSING THE CHALLENGE THROUGH INNOVATION  

Science.gov (United States)

A driving force behind the Sustainable Water Infrastructure (SI) initiative and the Aging Water Infrastructure (AWI) research program is the Clean Water and Drinking Water Infrastructure Gap Analysis. In this report, EPA estimated that if operation, maintenance, and capital inves...

36

Addressing the challenges of low clearance in drug research.  

Science.gov (United States)

As a result of high-throughput ADME screening, early metabolite identification, and exploration of novel chemical entities, low-intrinsic-clearance compounds continue to increase in drug discovery portfolios. Currently available in vitro tools have limited resolution below a certain intrinsic clearance value, which can lead to overestimation of clearance and dose and underestimation of half-life. Significant advances have been made in recent years and novel approaches have been developed to address the challenges of low clearance in drug discovery, such as the hepatocyte relay method, use of qNMR-based standards of biosynthesized drug metabolites to permit monitoring metabolite formation, coculture hepatocyte systems, and the time depending modeling approach. Future development in the field will enable faster, more precise, and lower cost profiling of the properties of low-clearance compounds for intrinsic clearance, metabolite identification, and reaction phenotyping. PMID:25567366

Di, Li; Obach, R Scott

2015-03-01

37

Obama address touches on research, energy, and environmental issues  

Science.gov (United States)

President Barack Obama's State of the Union message, delivered on 24 January, touched on the need for basic research, energy production, support for clean energy, and environmental protection, but it included just one passing reference to climate change. In addition, the speech made no note of the Administration's recent denial of a controversial application for the Keystone XL pipeline to transport crude oil from Canada to the United States and made just an elliptical reference regarding the bankrupt Solyndra Corporation, which the administration had touted as a clean energy company. Innovation “demands basic research,” Obama said, adding that Congress should not “gut these investments in our budget.” Noting that one promise for innovation is American-made energy, Obama said he is directing the administration to “open more than 75% of our potential offshore oil and gas resources.”

Showstack, Randy

2012-02-01

38

What is occupational therapy’s role in addressing sleep problems among older adults?  

OpenAIRE

Sleep problems, prevalent among older adults, are associated with poor outcomes and high healthcare costs. In 2008, rest and sleep became its own area of occupation in the AOTA Occupational Therapy Practice Framework. This scoping review examined a broad context of sleep research in order to highlight efficacious interventions for older adults that fall within the occupational therapy scope of practice and present an agenda for research and practice. Four sleep intervention areas clearly alig...

Leland, Natalie E.; Marcione, Nicole; Niemiec, Stacey L. Schepens; Don Fogelberg, Kaivalya Kelkar

2014-01-01

39

ODEL can address the Reality-Problems of Agriculturists’ Post Graduation in Bangladesh  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A research project was carried out during 2007-08 at the Open University, UK to explore the suitable strategic policy & practices, and partnership possibilities for open, distance and e-learning (ODEL programme for the postgraduate agricultural education in Bangladesh. The methodology followed was based on the searches on Internet, Journal articles, books, periodicals, brochures, proceedings, reports, attending lectures workshops, seminars, symposia, conferences, contacts, and visits to other Universities/Instition/Organisations for case studies. Under the new millennium context resurgence of global interest in web-based Open, distance and e-learning (ODEL has been proved to be potentially useful strategy for human development issues, particularly due to the evolution of fast-growing as well as net-working new Information and Communication Technologies (ICT. The study reveals that though ODEL has been found widely used in many reputed and world leading universities in UK for higher studies leading to degrees, diploma and certificates on arts, general & environmental sciences as well the commerce subjects, and trainings for professional developments etc. The application ODEL especially in higher agricultural education and training leading to MScs and PhDs is almost scanty except a few cases of Fisheries and Livestock, the two sections of Agriculture in the Universities like the University of Sterling, University of Edinburgh and the University of London (Royal Veterinary College etc. But in cases of other major areas of Agricultural subjects such as the crop sciences including Agronomy, Soil science, Crop botany, Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Entomology, Genetics & Pl. Breeding, Agric. Extension Education, Agric. Chemistry, Biochemistry, Agro forestry, Biotechnology, Seed Sci. & Techno. Farm Structure, Farm Power & Machinery, Irrigation & Water Management, Food Tech. & Rural Farm Industry, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Finance, Agricultural Statistics, Ag. Cooperation & Ag. Marketing, Rural Development etc. the application of ODEL has not yet been found employed in anywhere except, a few recent endeavours under a limited scope in the Asian countries like India (IGNOU. ODEL extends the learning and self-development opportunities to those beyond the access to the conventional system due to professional, familial, economic, geographical etc. restrictions. The scenario is more acute especially in case of the applied science like Agriculture in Agriculture-dependent developing country like Bangladesh where the tool may be potential alternative to address the postgraduate agricultural education, the acute problem of a vast number of target group seeking higher studies. Bangladesh is one of the most thickly populated and agriculture dependent developing countries of the world, and Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU established in 1962 is only the premier seat of higher agricultural education and research in the country offering Masters and Doctoral degrees through the conventional face to face class room system. Since its establishment out of the total passed out bachelors (BSc Ag. so far till July 2007 only 31.29% Masters and 0.64% PhDs have been produced. Bangladesh has recently been connected to the information super-highway through submarine cables. As a result, along with BTTB private companies already could ramify their ICT-based business orientations in different sectors like banking, transportation, administration etc. The use of computer and the long-ranged, portable electronic device with the telephone and the cell phone networks are widely used now a day. Under the circumstances, for better and progressive existence in the competitive global context it should be concentrated on its special attention to the ICT-based ODEL as a pragmatic focal issue with a view to transforming the ever increasing vast population potential into more productive force, so as to solve the higher agricultural education problems and ultimately towards greater awareness and appreciation leading to sustainable a

. Q. M. Bazlur RASHID

2009-10-01

40

Helping address the national research and research capacity needs of Australian chiropractic: introducing the Australian Chiropractic Research Network (ACORN) project.  

Science.gov (United States)

Chiropractic is a popular health care choice in Australia and yet major gaps in our empirical understanding of this area of practice remain. Furthermore, while some research excellence exists, a largely uncoordinated approach to research activity and development has in effect led to silos of interest and a lack of strategic 'big-picture' planning essential to producing a sustainable research culture and capacity for the profession. This commentary identifies the significance of a number of key features - including a national, coordinated focus, and a rich engagement with the practitioner and patient base amongst others - arguably important to the future development of research and research capacity within Australian chiropractic. The design features and phases of the Australian Chiropractic Research Network (ACORN) project are also outlined. ACORN is one contemporary initiative specifically developed to address chiropractic's research and research capacity building needs and help grow a broad evidence-base to inform safe, effective patient care. PMID:25834727

Adams, Jon; Steel, Amie; Chang, Sungwon; Sibbritt, David

2015-01-01

41

Research integrity in China: problems and prospects.  

Science.gov (United States)

In little more than 30 years, China has recovered from the intellectual stagnation brought about by the Cultural Revolution to become a global leader in science and technology. Like other leading countries in science and technology, China has encountered some ethical problems related to the conduct of research. China's leaders have taken some steps to respond to these problems, such as developing ethics policies and establishing oversight committees. To keep moving forward, China needs to continue to take effective action to promote research integrity. Some of the challenges China faces include additional policy development, promoting education in responsible conduct of research, protecting whistle-blowers, and cultivating an ethical research environment. PMID:19832885

Zeng, Weiqin; Resnik, David

2010-12-01

42

BERA Presidential Address 2013: Educational Research--What's to Be Done?  

Science.gov (United States)

In his inaugural Presidential Address, given to the BERA Conference 2013 at the University of Sussex, Ian Menter addresses a number of issues concerning educational policy and the contributions that educational research might make to policy development. As BERA approaches its fortieth anniversary, he also sets out some of the responsibilities that…

Menter, Ian

2014-01-01

43

The problem of appraising qualitative research  

OpenAIRE

?? Qualitative research can make a valuable contribution to the study of quality and safety in health care. Sound ways of appraising qualitative research are needed, but currently there are many different proposals with few signs of an emerging consensus. One problem has been the tendency to treat qualitative research as a unified field. We distinguish universal features of quality from those specific to methodology and offer a set of minimally prescriptive prompts to assist with the asse...

Dixon-woods, M.; Shaw, R.; Agarwal, S.; Smith, J.

2004-01-01

44

Current topics in opioid therapy for pain management: addressing the problem of abuse.  

Science.gov (United States)

Opioids are an established therapy for cancer pain and have become an accepted therapy for chronic noncancer pain. However, increased prescribing of opioids in recent years has been accompanied by an increase in prescription opioid abuse. All opioids have inherent potential for abuse, but gaps in healthcare provider understanding of or adherence to best prescribing practices may facilitate the misdirection of opioids for abuse. To address these concerns, the US Food and Drug Administration has required pharmaceutical manufacturers to develop Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) for prescribers of extended-release/long-acting (ER/LA) opioids and has encouraged research to develop opioid formulations that are less easily abused or less attractive for abuse. The ER/LA opioid REMS require a partnership between the pharmaceutical industry, regulators, and healthcare providers to develop educational materials for physicians and patients that are not promotional. This article addresses challenges associated with improving the quality of pain care through support of prescriber education, developing formulations that combine efficacy with tamper-resistant properties, and encouraging collaborative efforts by regulatory bodies, legislators, healthcare providers, and patient advocacy groups to achieve these ends. PMID:23740336

Casty, Frank E; Wieman, Matthew S; Shusterman, Neil

2013-07-01

45

RESEARCH INTEGRITY IN CHINA: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS  

OpenAIRE

In little more than 30 years, China has recovered from the intellectual stagnation brought about by the Cultural Revolution to become a global leader in science and technology. Like other leading countries in science and technology, China has encountered some ethical problems related to the conduct of research. China’s leaders have taken some steps to respond to these problems, such as developing ethics policies and establishing oversight committees. To keep moving forward, China needs to c...

Resnik, David; Zeng, Weiqin

2010-01-01

46

Addressing students' difficulties with Faraday's law: A guided problem solving approach  

Science.gov (United States)

In traditional teaching, the fundamental concepts of electromagnetic induction are usually quickly analyzed, spending most of the time solving problems in a more or less rote manner. However, physics education research has shown that the fundamental concepts of the electromagnetic induction theory are barely understood by students. This article proposes an interactive teaching sequence introducing the topic of electromagnetic induction. The sequence has been designed based on contributions from physics education research. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between experimental findings (macroscopic level) and theoretical interpretation (microscopic level). An example of the activities that have been designed will also be presented, describing the implementation context and the corresponding findings. Since implementing the sequence, a considerable number of students have a more satisfactory grasp of the electromagnetic induction explicative model. However, difficulties are manifested in aspects that require a multilevel explanation, referring to deep structures where the system description is better defined.

Zuza, Kristina; Almudí, José-Manuel; Leniz, Ane; Guisasola, Jenaro

2014-06-01

47

Research problems in Portugal run deep  

OpenAIRE

As founders of the Portuguese National Association of Researchers in Science and Technology (ANICT), we believe that research problems in the country run deeper than just funding (see Nature 507, 306; 2014).Evaluation procedures for recruitment, career progression and funding allocation are in need of fundamental reform. They must become more transparent and be based solely on merit. Selection for nationally funded PhD and postdoc scholarships, for example, is beset by conflicting interests a...

Cerca, Nuno; Lopes, J.; Jorge, M.

2014-01-01

48

Landmine research: technology solutions looking for problems  

Science.gov (United States)

The global landmine problem came to the attention of researchers in the mid 1990's and by 1997 several advanced and expensive sensor research programs had started. Yet, by the end of 2003, there is little sign of a major advance in the technology available to humanitarian demining programs. Given the motivation and dedication of researchers, public goodwill to support such programs, and substantial research resources devoted to the problem, it is worth asking why these programs do not seem to have had an impact on demining costs or casualty rates. Perhaps there are factors that have been overlooked. This paper reviews several research programs to gain a deeper understanding of the problem. A possible explanation is that researchers have accepted mistaken ideas on the nature of the landmine problems that need to be solved. The paper provides several examples where the realities of minefield conditions are quite different to what researchers have been led to believe. Another explanation may lie in the political and economic realities that drive the worldwide effort to eliminate landmines. Most of the resources devoted to landmine clearance programs come from humanitarian aid budgets: landmine affected countries often contribute only a small proportion because they have different priorities based on realistic risk-based assessment of needs and political views of local people. Some aid projects have been driven by the need to find a market for demining technologies rather than by user needs. Finally, there is a common misperception that costs in less developed countries are intrinsically low, reflecting low rates paid for almost all classes of skilled labour. When actual productivity is taken into account, real costs can be higher than industrialized countries. The costs of implementing technological solutions (even using simple technologies) are often significantly under-estimated. Some political decisions may have discouraged thorough investigation of cost-effective alternatives to landmine clearance.

Trevelyan, James P.

2004-09-01

49

Design Step 2: Research the Problem  

Science.gov (United States)

Through Internet research, patent research, standards and codes research, user interviews (if possible) and other techniques (idea web, reverse engineering), students further develop the context for their design challenge. In subsequent activities, the design teams use this body of knowledge about the problem to generate product design ideas. (Note: Conduct this activity in the context of a design project that students are working on, which could be a challenge determined by the teacher, brainstormed with the class, or the example project challenge provided [to design a prosthetic arm that can perform a mechanical function]. This activity is Step 2 in a series of six that guide students through the engineering design loop.)

Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

50

Defining Educational Research: A Perspective of/on Presidential Addresses and the Australian Association for Research in Education  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper is concerned with the definition of the field of educational research and the changing and developing role of the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) in representing and constituting this field. The evidence for the argument is derived from AARE Presidential Addresses across its 40-year history. The paper documents…

Lingard, Bob; Gale, Trevor

2010-01-01

51

Hydrogen problems in reactor safety research  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The BMFT and BMI have initiated a workshop 'Hydrogen Problems in Reactor Safety Research' that took place October 3./4., 1983. The objective of this workshop was to present the state of the art in the main areas - Hydrogen-Production - Hydrogen-Distribution - Hydrogen-Ignition - Hydrogen-Burning and Containment Behaviour - Mitigation Measures. The lectures on the different areas are compiled. The most important results of the final discussion are summarized as well. (orig.)

52

Survey on Protocols addressing Head of Line Blocking Problem in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks using Directional Antennas  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Head of Line blocking phenomenon is common in First in First Out (FIFO nature queues. Head of line blocking problem becomes significant in wireless ad hoc networks using directional antennas as it uses FIFO queue which consists of packets intended for different directions. A packet on the top of the queue may block the remaining packets if it finds the medium busy in its intended direction, where as the packets in the queue intended for other directions may find the medium to be idle. Very few of the MAC protocols for ad hoc networks using directional antennas have addressed this problem. In this paper we will exploit the Head of Line Blocking problem and review the protocols that have addressed the head of Line Blocking Problem.

P. SAI KIRAN,

2011-02-01

53

Critical Event Preparedness and Response: Keynote Address to the 2006 Sloan Research Workshop by Jon Links  

Science.gov (United States)

At the intersection of online education and preparedness, Johns Hopkins University's (JHU) Center for Public Health Preparedness provides all-hazards preparedness and response training for public health and public safety professionals. This report comes from Jonathan Links' keynote address to the Sloan Summer Research Workshop in Baltimore,…

Moore, Janet C.

2008-01-01

54

Welcome address to the 26th international meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

While the IAEA has been a vigorous supporter of the RERTR programme since its inception. RERTR and the related fresh and spent fuel return efforts have gained new momentum with the launching of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) by U.S. Energy Secretary Abraham here in Vienna on May 25, 2004. All of the activities to be be discussed are included within the framework of the GTRI. The international programmes to qualify high density, LEU, dispersion fuels based on U-Mo alloys have run into unexpected technical difficulties that will delay qualification. A number of the presentations address the problems that have been encountered. At the same time, it is encouraging that the international resolve to reduce and eventually eliminate HEU in international commerce appears to have strengthened. In the past year, fresh HEU at research reactors in different countries have been returned to the country of origin. In all these examples, the return of the fresh fuel was accompanied by plans for conversion of existing reactors or design of new reactors to use LEU, as well as for the repatriation of spent research reactor fuel. The IAEA, particularly the Department of Technical Cooperation and my Department of Nuclear Energy has played an important role in implementing these fresh fuel return activities. In addition, several of the reactor conversion projects will be carried out under the auspices of IAEA technical cooperation projects and with important involvement of the Department of Nuclear Energy. The IAEA has also supported the repatriation of spent fuel to the country of original enrichment. The U.S. spent fuel acceptance programme has been operating for more than eight years, and was originally scheduled to terminate in 2006. Important announcements concerning the extension of the U.S. programme are expected. At the same time, the IAEA has been working hard with the U.S. and Russia to initiate the Russian research reactor spent fuel return programme. We are eager to see the first successful shipment in this programme, continue to assist it every way we can, and look forward to presentations this week on both the Russian RERTR and spent fuel return efforts

55

A roadmap for climate change adaptation in Sweden's forests: addressing wicked problems using adaptive management  

Science.gov (United States)

Climate change is expected to have significant direct and indirect effects on forest ecosystems. Forests will have to adapt not only to changes in mean climate variables but also to increased climatic variability and altered disturbance regimes. Rates of change will likely exceed many forests capabilities to naturally adapt and many of today's trees will be exposed to the climates of 2090. In Sweden the effects are already being seen and more severe impacts are expected in the future. Exacerbating the challenge posed by climate change, a large proportion of Sweden's forests are, as a consequence of dominant production goals, greatly simplified and thus potentially more vulnerable to the uncertainties and risks associated with climate change. This simplification also confers reduced adaptive capacity to respond to potential impacts. Furthermore, many adaptation measures themselves carry uncertainties and risks. Future changes and effects are thus uncertain, yet forest managers, policymakers, scientists and other stakeholders must act. Strategies that build social and ecological resilience in the face of multiple interacting unknowns and surprises are needed. Adaptive management aims to collect and integrate knowledge about how a managed system is likely to respond to alternative management schemes and changing environmental conditions within a continuous decision process. There have been suggestions that adaptive management is not well suited to the large complex uncertainties associated with climate change and associated adaptation measures. However, more recently it has been suggested that adaptive management can handle such wicked problems, given adequate resources and a suitable breakdown of the targeted uncertainties. Here we test this hypothesis by evaluating how an adaptive management process could be used to manage the uncertainties and risks associated with securing resilient, biodiverse and productive forests in Sweden in the face of climate change. We illustrate how, along with the engagement of other stakeholders, scientific research and management agency actions can interact to develop and implement measures to assist climate change adaptation in Sweden's forests.

Rist, L.; Felton, A.; Samuelsson, L.; Marald, E.; Karlsson, B.; Johansson, U.; Rosvall, O.

2013-12-01

56

Cancer Core Europe: a consortium to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum challenge.  

Science.gov (United States)

European cancer research for a transformative initiative by creating a consortium of six leading excellent comprehensive cancer centres that will work together to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum. Prerequisites for joint translational and clinical research programs are very demanding. These require the creation of a virtual single 'e-hospital' and a powerful translational platform, inter-compatible clinical molecular profiling laboratories with a robust underlying computational biology pipeline, standardised functional and molecular imaging, commonly agreed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for liquid and tissue biopsy procurement, storage and processing, for molecular diagnostics, 'omics', functional genetics, immune-monitoring and other assessments. Importantly also it requires a culture of data collection and data storage that provides complete longitudinal data sets to allow for: effective data sharing and common database building, and to achieve a level of completeness of data that is required for conducting outcome research, taking into account our current understanding of cancers as communities of evolving clones. Cutting edge basic research and technology development serve as an important driving force for innovative translational and clinical studies. Given the excellent track records of the six participants in these areas, Cancer Core Europe will be able to support the full spectrum of research required to address the cancer research- cancer care continuum. Cancer Core Europe also constitutes a unique environment to train the next generation of talents in innovative translational and clinical oncology. PMID:25263570

Eggermont, Alexander M M; Caldas, Carlos; Ringborg, Ulrik; Medema, René; Tabernero, Josep; Wiestler, Otmar

2014-11-01

57

2014 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address: Cautious Optimism for the Future of Research in Music Teaching and Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This article presents the transcript of Peter Webster's 2014 Senior Researcher Award Acceptance Address. Webster comments on several big ideas in music education: (1) The consideration of teaching as a blend of constructivist approaches and direct instruction that values student-centered work primarily as evidence of learning; (2) The…

Webster, Peter R.

2014-01-01

58

Addressing the Intercultural via Task-Based Language Teaching: Possibility or Problem?  

Science.gov (United States)

A frequent weakness of communicative approaches to foreign language teaching is a neglect of the intercultural dimension. Cultural knowledge is often treated as an addendum which focuses on learning facts about the target country. This article explores whether task-based language teaching (TBLT) can successfully address the intercultural…

East, Martin

2012-01-01

59

"Research in Cambodia, Half a Century Ago: An Address to the Thailand, Laos, Cambodia Studies Group"  

OpenAIRE

Address to the Thailand, Laos, Cambodia Studies Association at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Toronto, March 16, 2012This event has given me the opportunity to return to almost the beginning of my academic career: my doctoral fieldwork in Cambodia fifty years ago. (It was preceded by fieldwork in an Inuit community in the Ungava, Northern Canada; not relevant here.) Rereading my publications from that research has allowed me to relive the excitement of my Cambodian yea...

Willmott, William E.

2012-01-01

60

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The program of this 9th Meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors IGORR includes are quite a number of fascinating new research reactor projects in France, Germany, Russia, Canada, China, Thailand, and in Australia. In addition to the session about New Facilities there are interesting sessions on the Upgrades and on the Optimization of Operation and Utilization of existing research reactors, on Secondary Neutron Sources, on Neutron Scattering applications, and on the aspects of Safety, Licensing and Decommissioning. Two particular projects of new research reactors are mentioned specially: the TRR-II project in Taiwan, has unfortunately been terminated last year because of a change to anti-nuclear of the ruling parties in the government - and the new FRM-II in Munich, Germany, which will hopefully survive such a political change and receive its green light for nuclear start up in the very near future. The charter of IGORR and its objectives are part of this address: The International Group on Research Reactors IGORR was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. The main IGORR objectives are to promote contacts between its members, to identify and discuss problems of common interest, to distribute newsletters about once or twice every year and to organize meetings about once every one-and-a-half years

61

Researcher-Researched Difference: Adapting an Autoethnographic Approach for Addressing the Racial Matching Issue  

OpenAIRE

This introspective essay was inspired by a desire to reflect on the use of qualitative research methods--where I am a Caucasian woman examining work experiences of women of color. I launched a journey backward to discover respondents' motivation for participating in my focus groups over the years, to closely examine their comfort level with a cross-ethnic dyad. The exercise enabled me to reflect on how I had negotiated power issues inherent in the research process. It contributes to the ongoi...

Donnalyn Pompper

2010-01-01

62

Comparison among the variants of subspace-based optimization method for addressing inverse scattering problems: transverse electric case.  

Science.gov (United States)

The subspace-based optimization method (SOM) is an efficient approach to addressing the inverse scattering problem. In this paper, a comparative study, on the basis of numerical experiments, is conducted to evaluate the performances of variants of SOM, so as to find the optimal method for the determination of the ambiguous portion, which has a dominant influence on the computational cost and the reconstruction capability of the algorithm. PMID:20922011

Pan, Li; Chen, Xudong; Zhong, Yu; Yeo, Swee Ping

2010-10-01

63

Emergency Physicians Research Common Problems in Proportion to their Frequency  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medicine (EM organizations such as the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the Institute of Medicine have called for more clinical research as a way of addressing thescarcity of research in EM. Previous investigations have examined funding and productivity in EM research, but whether EM researchers preferentially concentrate on certain patient-related topics is notknown. We hypothesized that at least part of the scarcity of EM research is from the tendency of EM researchers, like researchers in other fields, to focus on rarer conditions with higher morbidity or mortality instead of on more common conditions with less acuity. This study compared the frequency of specific medical conditions presenting to emergency departments nationwide with the frequency of emergency physician research on those same conditions.Methods: This study is a structured retrospective review and comparison of 2 databases during an 11-year span. Principal diagnoses made by emergency physicians as reported by the National HospitalAmbulatory Medical Care Survey were compared to all first-author publications by emergency physicians as reported in PubMed between 1996 and 2006. Statistics included correlations and linear regression with the number of emergency department (ED visits per diagnosis as the independent variable and the number of articles published as the dependent variable.Results: During the study period, there was significant concordance between the frequency of presenting conditions in the emergency department and the frequency of research being performed onthose conditions, with a high correlation of 0.85 (P,0.01. More common ED diagnoses such as injury/poisoning, symptoms/ill-defined conditions, and diseases of the respiratory system accounted for 60.9% of ED principal diagnoses and 50.2% of the total research published in PubMed.Conclusion: Unlike researchers in other fields, emergency physicians investigate clinical problems in almost the exact proportion as those conditions are encountered in the emergency department. The scarcity of EM research does not have to do with a skewed focus toward less common patient problems.

Michael P. Wilson

2012-09-01

64

Emergency Physicians Research Common Problems in Proportion to their Frequency  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction: Emergency medicine (EM) organizations such as the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the Institute of Medicine have called for more clinical research as a way of addressing the scarcity of research in EM. Previous investigations have examined funding and productivity in EM research, but whether EM researchers preferentially concentrate on certain patient-related topics is not known. We hypothesized that at least part of the scarcity of EM research is from the tendency of EM researchers, like researchers in other fields, to focus on rarer conditions with higher morbidity or mortality instead of on more common conditions with less acuity. This study compared the frequency of specific medical conditions presenting to emergency departments nationwide with the frequency of emergency physician research on those same conditions. Methods: This study is a structured retrospective review and comparison of 2 databases during an 11-year span. Principal diagnoses made by emergency physicians as reported by the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were compared to all first-author publications by emergency physicians as reported in PubMed between 1996 and 2006. Statistics included correlations and linear regression with the number of emergency department (ED) visits per diagnosis as the independent variable and the number of articles published as the dependent variable. Results: During the study period, there was significant concordance between the frequency of presenting conditions in the emergency department and the frequency of research being performed on those conditions, with a high correlation of 0.85 (P < 0.01). More common ED diagnoses such as injury/poisoning, symptoms/ill-defined conditions, and diseases of the respiratory system accounted for 60.9% of ED principal diagnoses and 50.2% of the total research published in PubMed. Conclusion: Unlike researchers in other fields, emergency physicians investigate clinical problems in almost the exact proportion as those conditions are encountered in the emergency department. The scarcity of EM research does not have to do with a skewed focus toward less common patient problems. PMID:23251714

Wilson, Michael P.; Vilke, Gary M.; Govindarajan, Prasanthi; Itagaki, Michael W.

2012-01-01

65

Nanotechnology for sustainability: what does nanotechnology offer to address complex sustainability problems?  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Nanotechnology is widely associated with the promise of positively contributing to sustainability. However, this view often focuses on end-of-pipe applications, for instance, for water purification or energy efficiency, and relies on a narrow concept of sustainability. Approaching sustainability problems and solution options from a comprehensive and systemic perspective instead may yield quite different conclusions about the contribution of nanotechnology to sustainability. This study conceptualizes sustainability problems as complex constellations with several potential intervention points and amenable to different solution options. The study presents results from interdisciplinary workshops and literature reviews that appraise the contribution of the selected nanotechnologies to mitigate such problems. The study focuses exemplarily on the urban context to make the appraisals tangible and relevant. The solution potential of nanotechnology is explored not only for well-known urban sustainability problems such as water contamination and energy use but also for less obvious ones such as childhood obesity. Results indicate not only potentials but also limitations of nanotechnology's contribution to sustainability and can inform anticipatory governance of nanotechnology in general, and in the urban context in particular.

Wiek, Arnim, E-mail: arnim.wiek@asu.edu; Foley, Rider W. [Arizona State University, School of Sustainability (United States); Guston, David H. [Arizona State University, Center for Nanotechnology in Society, Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes (United States)

2012-09-15

66

Addressing Bullying Problems in Irish Schools and in Cyberspace: A Challenge for School Management  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: School management, in Ireland and also internationally, are currently faced with the problem of peer aggression among students both in a traditional school context and in a cyber context. Although Irish school principals are obliged to implement policy and procedures to counter bullying among students, there is a need for guidance that…

Corcoran, Lucie; Mc Guckin, Conor

2014-01-01

67

Nanotechnology for sustainability: what does nanotechnology offer to address complex sustainability problems?  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Nanotechnology is widely associated with the promise of positively contributing to sustainability. However, this view often focuses on end-of-pipe applications, for instance, for water purification or energy efficiency, and relies on a narrow concept of sustainability. Approaching sustainability problems and solution options from a comprehensive and systemic perspective instead may yield quite different conclusions about the contribution of nanotechnology to sustainability. This study conceptualizes sustainability problems as complex constellations with several potential intervention points and amenable to different solution options. The study presents results from interdisciplinary workshops and literature reviews that appraise the contribution of the selected nanotechnologies to mitigate such problems. The study focuses exemplarily on the urban context to make the appraisals tangible and relevant. The solution potential of nanotechnology is explored not only for well-known urban sustainability problems such as water contamination and energy use but also for less obvious ones such as childhood obesity. Results indicate not only potentials but also limitations of nanotechnology’s contribution to sustainability and can inform anticipatory governance of nanotechnology in general, and in the urban context in particular.

68

Addressing the Wicked Problem of Quality in Higher Education: Theoretical Approaches and Implications  

Science.gov (United States)

This article explores the wicked problem of quality in higher education, arguing for a more robust theorising of the subject at national, institutional and local department level. The focus of the discussion rests on principles for theorising in more rigorous ways about the multidimensional issue of quality. Quality in higher education is proposed…

Krause, Kerri-Lee

2012-01-01

69

Shaping a new generation of Hispanic clinical and translational researchers addressing minority health and health disparities.  

Science.gov (United States)

In 2011, research educators face significant challenges. Training programs in Clinical and Translational Research need to develop or enhance their curriculum to comply with new scientific trends and government policies. Curricula must impart the skills and competencies needed to help facilitate the dissemination and transfer of scientific advances at a faster pace than current health policy and practice. Clinical and translational researchers are facing also the need of new paradigms for effective collaboration, and resource sharing while using the best educational models. Both government and public policy makers emphasize addressing the goals of improving health quality and elimination of health disparities. To help achieve this goal, our academic institution is taking an active role and striving to develop an environment that fosters the career development of clinical and translational researchers. Consonant with this vision, in 2002 the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus School of Health Professions and School of Medicine initiated a multidisciplinary post-doctoral Master of Science in Clinical Research focused in training Hispanics who will address minority health and health disparities research. Recently, we proposed a curriculum revision to enhance this commitment in promoting competency-based curricula for clinician-scientists in clinical and translational sciences. The revised program will be a post-doctoral Master of Science in Clinical and Translational Research (MCTR), expanding its outreach by actively engaging in establishing new collaborations and partnerships that will increase our capability to diversify our educational efforts and make significant contributions to help reduce and eliminate the gap in health disparities. PMID:22263296

Estapé, Estela S; Segarra, Barbara; Báez, Adriana; Huertas, Aracelis; Díaz, Clemente; Frontera, Walter R

2011-12-01

70

Keynote address: Closing the research-to-practice gap in emergency medicine.  

Science.gov (United States)

Emergency medicine in the United States is facing tremendous challenges due to recent public health emergencies, continuing threats of bioterrorism, and an increasing and unprecedented demand for emergency department services. These challenges include overcrowding; long waiting times; "boarding" of patients; ambulance diversion; a need for better, more reliable tools for triaging patients; and medical errors and other patient safety concerns. These challenges and concerns were brought to the forefront several years ago by the Institute of Medicine in several landmark reports that call for closing the research-to-practice gap in emergency medicine. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality is funding a number of projects that address many of the concerns raised in the reports, including the use of an advanced access appointment scheduling system to improve access to care; the use of an electronic medical record system to reduce waiting times and errors and improve patient and provider satisfaction; and the refinement of the Emergency Severity Index, a five-level triage scale to get patients to the right resources at the right time. The agency's Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project is gathering data that will allow researchers to examine a broad range of issues affecting the use, quality, and cost of emergency services. Although progress has been made over the past few years in closing the research-to-practice gap in emergency medicine, many challenges remain. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has supported and will continue to support a broad portfolio of research to address the many challenges confronting emergency medicine, including ways to improve emergency care through the application of research findings. PMID:17916788

Clancy, Carolyn M

2007-11-01

71

RAPD MARKERS AS A MOLECULAR TOOL FOR ADDRESSING THE SPECIES PROBLEM IN CORALS. (R828008)  

Science.gov (United States)

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

72

RAPD MARKERS AS A MOLECULAR TOOL FOR ADDRESSING THE SPECIES PROBLEM IN CORALS. (R825158)  

Science.gov (United States)

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

73

How to Investigate Polish Clusters’ Attractiveness for Inward FDI? Addressing Ambiguity Problem  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to assess whether, and in what fashion, managers of Polish cluster organizations perceive the attractiveness of foreign direct investment in Polish clusters This research is exploratory and qualitative in nature. The complex nature of Polish clusters, which can benefit from and be competitively challenged by, FDI are identified and a conceptual framework for assessing that nature is proposed; specifically, research using the grounded theory method (GTM.

Götz Marta

2014-09-01

74

The Factors Affecting Definition of Research Problems in Educational Technology Researches  

Science.gov (United States)

Research problems in a scientific research are formed after a certain process. This process starts with defining a research topic and transforms into a specific research problem or hypothesis. The aim of this study was to examine the way educational technology researchers identify their research problems. To this end, sources that educational…

Bahçekapili, Ekrem; Bahçekapili, Tugba; Fis Erümit, Semra; Göktas, Yüksel; Sözbilir, Mustafa

2013-01-01

75

School effectiveness research: a review of criticisms and some proposals to address them.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Based on Lakato’s notion of research programmes, the paper analyses the structure of the School Effectiveness Research (SER programme and reviews the main criticisms that have arisen, stressing those regarding its objectivity and theoretical limitations. Then, some proposals are made to address these criticisms, namely: to adopt a critical realist approach to the study of SE and an Abductive Theory of Scientific Method that lead to the development of sound theory in the field. Based on this analysis the paper concludes that, in terms of Lakatos, a movement towards a new research programme is needed in order to ensure that the main objectives originally set for SER can be eventually reached.

Andres Sandoval-Hernandez

2008-03-01

76

Teacher pedagogical knowledge in mathematics: a tool for addressing learning problems  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper attempts to give a pedagogical role a classroom teacher is suppose to play in disseminating and imparting of mathematical knowledge. To achieve this, the paper focuses on the concept of teacher pedagogy, pedagogical knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK and mathematical pedagogical knowledge. Problems encountered by teachers as a consequence of mathematical pedagogy have been closely looked at, and possible solutions offered.

A.K. Tsafe

2013-01-01

77

Addressing the net balances problem as a prerequisite for EU budget reform : a proposal  

OpenAIRE

Conflict among member states regarding the distribution of net financial burdens has been allowed to contaminate the entire design of the EU budget with very negative consequences in terms of equity, efficiency and transparency. To get around this problem and pave the way for a substantive budget reform, we propose to decouple distributional negotiations from the rest of the budget process by linking member state net balances in a rigid manner to relative prosperity. This would be achieved th...

Fuente, A?ngel La

2008-01-01

78

An Argumentation-Based Framework to Address the Attribution Problem in Cyber-Warfare  

OpenAIRE

Attributing a cyber-operation through the use of multiple pieces of technical evidence (i.e., malware reverse-engineering and source tracking) and conventional intelligence sources (i.e., human or signals intelligence) is a difficult problem not only due to the effort required to obtain evidence, but the ease with which an adversary can plant false evidence. In this paper, we introduce a formal reasoning system called the InCA (Intelligent Cyber Attribution) framework that i...

Shakarian, Paulo; Simari, Gerardo I.; Moores, Geoffrey; Parsons, Simon; Falappa, Marcelo A.

2014-01-01

79

Iron deficiency anemia among children: Addressing a global public health problem within a Canadian context  

OpenAIRE

Despite current Canadian pre- and perinatal nutrition programs, the prevalence of both iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is very high among young Aboriginal children from Canada’s remote north. The major risk factors for IDA include prolonged consumption of evaporated cow’s milk, chronic infection and prolonged exclusive breastfeeding. In the present article, the authors discuss IDA as a significant public health problem in Canadian Aboriginal communities. Whereas the preva...

Christofides, Anna; Schauer, Claudia; Zlotkin, Stanley H.

2005-01-01

80

The Institutional Design of Open Source Programming: Implications for Addressing Complex Public Policy and Management Problems  

OpenAIRE

Recently, an exciting approach to solving complex problems has evolved out of computer science, called Open Source programming. In open source software development settings, programmers freely share their intellectual property ? their readable programming source code ? over the Internet. Some open source endeavors have resulted in very complex, high-quality software products, of which the best-known are the Linux operating system and the Apache Web server. A great advantage of an Internet-bas...

Schweik, Charles

2003-01-01

81

Addressing racial disparities in social welfare programs: using social equity analysis to examine the problem.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) allows states considerable discretion in developing and implementing their Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs. Little research so far has compared the implementation of TANF programs across racial groups. Without such analysis, it is difficult to interpret program outcomes. Using client survey data from a large Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC) study, the Project on Devolution and Urban Change, this article compares African-American, Hispanic and White Clients' experiences with diversion, case management, sanctioning, exiting welfare, and dispute resolution. Using residual differences analysis, this article identifies significant differences in treatment among racial and ethnic groups. PMID:17255069

Gooden, Susan T

2006-01-01

82

Violence and Vandalism in the Schools: The Problem and How to Address It.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper was prepared by members of the National Community Education Association's Committee on Violence and Vandalism in the Schools as a review of the literally hundreds of pounds of information, research, and news generated on this topic. The purpose of this review is to indicate how community education coordinators and directors can…

Deaver, Philip

83

Activity theory as a tool to address the problem of chemistry's lack of relevance in secondary school chemical education  

Science.gov (United States)

In a previous article, the problem of chemistry's lack of relevance in secondary chemical education was analysed using logical positivism as a tool. This article starts with the hypothesis that the problem can be addressed by means of activity theory, one of the important theories within the sociocultural school. The reason for this expectation is that, while logical positivism creates a divide between science and society, activity theory offers a model of society in which science and society are related. With the use of this model, a new course for grade nine has been constructed. This results in a confirmation of the hypothesis, at least at a theoretical level. A comparison with the Salters' approach is made in order to demonstrate the relative merits of a mediated way of dealing with the problem of the lack of relevance of chemistry in chemical education.

van Aalsvoort, Joke

84

Evaluating potentialities and constrains of Problem Based Learning curriculum : Research methodology  

OpenAIRE

This paper presents a research design to evaluate Problem Based Learning (PBL) curriculum potentialities and constrains for future changes. PBL literature lacks examples of how to evaluate and analyse established PBL learning environments to address new challenges posed. The research design encloses three methodological approaches to investigate three interrelated research questions. Phase one, a literature review; aims develop a theoretical and analytical framework. The second phase aims to ...

Guerra, Aida

2013-01-01

85

How multiagency partnerships can successfully address large-scale pollution problems: a Hawaii case study.  

Science.gov (United States)

Oceanic circulation patterns deposit significant amounts of marine pollution, including derelict fishing gear from North Pacific Ocean fisheries, in the Hawaiian Archipelago [Mar. Pollut. Bull. 42(12) (2001) 1301]. Management responsibility for these islands and their associated natural resources is shared by several government authorities. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and private industry also have interests in the archipelago. Since the marine debris problem in this region is too large for any single agency to manage, a multiagency marine debris working group (group) was established in 1998 to improve marine debris mitigation in Hawaii. To date, 16 federal, state, and local agencies, working with industry and NGOs, have removed 195 tons of derelict fishing gear from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. This review details the evolution of the partnership, notes its challenges and rewards, and advocates its continued use as an effective resource management tool. PMID:12787578

Donohue, Mary J

2003-06-01

86

Research to action to address inequities: the experience of the Cape Town Equity Gauge  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background While the importance of promoting equity to achieve health is now recognised, the health gap continues to increase globally between and within countries. The description that follows looks at how the Cape Town Equity Gauge initiative, part of the Global Equity Gauge Alliance (GEGA) is endeavouring to tackle this problem. We give an overview of the first phase of our research in which we did an initial assessment of health status and the socio-economic determinants of healt...

Reagon Gavin; Sanders David; Stern Ruth; Scott Vera; Mathews Verona

2008-01-01

87

Polar Engineering and Research to Address Operational Challenges in Austere Environments  

Science.gov (United States)

Logistics constraints and operational challenges in the austere environs of the polar regions present unique technological and engineering problems. Working closely with universities, government agencies and industry, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab (CRREL) routinely conducts scientific research and engineering in the Arctic, sub-Arctic and Antarctic covering a wide range of topics and applications. Current areas of focus include: improved mobility techniques for overland traverses; robotic vehicles for traversing, sampling and data collection; snow road and transportation characterization; integrated operational systems including airfield consolidation proof-of-concept studies; infrastructure technology such as firn air cooling, building design, snow foundations and sewage handling; remote/renewable autonomous power solutions for data collection; subsurface radar for crevasse detection and cryosphere characterization; ground-based lidar topographic scanning and near-real-time climate/environmental monitoring linked to AIS infrastructure. While these research and engineering efforts provide solutions and improved technology for specific problems, the impacts are many and wide-reaching and the results are often applicable to other challenging environments. Here, an overview of current research foci and projects is presented along with in-the-field applications, effects and future implications. The results and solutions of these efforts typically lead to technological improvements in operations and logistics which are cost-beneficial, thus freeing up funding dollars for fundamental scientific research. The links between basic research and applied solutions delivering far-reaching impacts (both large- and small-scale) on society, the environment, industry and scientific research are also demonstrated.

Mercer, J. L.; Richter-Menge, J.; Weale, J. C.; Lever, J. H.; Knuth, M. A.; Shoop, S. A.; Haehnel, R.; Arcone, S. A.; Bjella, K.; Finnegan, D. C.; Courville, Z.; Tracy, B. T.

2009-12-01

88

Lattice Boltzmann Methods to Address Fundamental Boiling and Two-Phase Problems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report presents the progress made during the fourth (no cost extension) year of this three-year grant aimed at the development of a consistent Lattice Boltzmann formulation for boiling and two-phase flows. During the first year, a consistent LBM formulation for the simulation of a two-phase water-steam system was developed. Results of initial model validation in a range of thermo-dynamic conditions typical for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) were shown. Progress was made on several fronts during the second year. Most important of these included the simulation of the coalescence of two bubbles including the surface tension effects. Work during the third year focused on the development of a new lattice Boltzmann model, called the artificial interface lattice Boltzmann model (AILB model) for the 3 simulation of two-phase dynamics. The model is based on the principle of free energy minimization and invokes the Gibbs-Duhem equation in the formulation of non-ideal forcing function. This was reported in detail in the last progress report. Part of the efforts during the last (no-cost extension) year were focused on developing a parallel capability for the 2D as well as for the 3D codes developed in this project. This will be reported in the final report. Here we report the work carried out on testing the AILB model for conditions including the thermal effects. A simplified thermal LB model, based on the thermal energy distribution approach, was developed. The simplifications are made after neglecting the viscous heat dissipation and the work done by pressure in the original thermal energy distribution model. Details of the model are presented here, followed by a discussion of the boundary conditions, and then results for some two-phase thermal problems.

Uddin, Rizwan

2012-01-01

89

Earth-Science Research for Addressing the Water-Energy Nexus  

Science.gov (United States)

In the coming decades, the United States will face two significant and sometimes competing challenges: preserving sustainable supplies of fresh water for humans and ecosystems, and ensuring available sources of energy. This presentation provides an overview of the earth-science data collection and research needed to address these challenges. Uncertainty limits our understanding of many aspects of the water-energy nexus. These aspects include availability of water, water requirements for energy development, energy requirements for treating and delivering fresh water, effects of emerging energy development technologies on water quality and quantity, and effects of future climates and land use on water and energy needs. Uncertainties can be reduced with an integrated approach that includes assessments of water availability and energy resources; monitoring of surface water and groundwater quantity and quality, water use, and energy use; research on impacts of energy waste streams, hydraulic fracturing, and other fuel-extraction processes on water quality; and research on the viability and environmental footprint of new technologies such as carbon capture and sequestration and conversion of cellulosic material to ethanol. Planning for water and energy development requires consideration of factors such as economics, population trends, human health, and societal values; however, sound resource management must be grounded on a clear understanding of the earth-science aspects of the water-energy nexus. Information gained from an earth-science data-collection and research program can improve our understanding of water and energy issues and lay the ground work for informed resource management.

Healy, R. W.; Alley, W. M.; Engle, M.; McMahon, P. B.; Bales, J. D.

2013-12-01

90

Radioactive Materials in Scrap Metal, How This Problem is Addressed in the Netherlands  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: The port of Rotterdam is the biggest trading place of scrap metal in the World. After the introduction of fixed radiation detection systems at the entrance gates of scrap yards, further referred to as portal detectors, incoming loads of scrap metal are inspected for radioactive sources. In the Netherlands exists a legal system in which every suspicion to be in the possession of radioactive materials without a license has to be reported to the authorities, hence also an alarm of a portal detector. A regulation is developed in consensus by the authorities, the scrap metal traders, and RTD (Research, Technology and Development) in order to control this flow of unwanted radioactive materials. At the present the scrap metal traders announce radioactive materials voluntarily, the authorities control, and RTD takes care of the disposal of unwanted radioactive materials. Since 1994 RTD has gained considerable experience in isolating radioactive materials, and assisting the scrap metal traders in deciding on further actions to be taken. In this paper it will be described how inspections are performed on loads of scrap metal that caused the alarm of a portal detector to go off. Some examples, and characteristics of radioactive objects that were intercepted will be given. (author)

91

Addressing conflicts of interest in the research paper: a societal demand in contemporary science?  

Science.gov (United States)

In the last decade, dialogue between science and society has found a forum in an increasing number of publications on topics such as public engagement with science and public trust in science. Concerning the latter, issues that include cases of research misconduct, accountability in research, and conflicts of interest (COIs) have shaped global discussions on the communication of science. In the publication setting, the perception that hiding COIs and/or not managing them well may affect public trust in the research record has grown among editors. We conducted a search for editorials addressing COIs between 1989 and 2011, using four major databases: Medline/PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Knowledge. We explored the content of these editorials and the relationship they established between COIs and the public trust in science. Our results demonstrate that the relationship between disclosure of COIs and public trust in science has become a major concern among editors. We, thus, argue that COIs should be discussed more openly and frequently in graduate courses in the sciences, around the globe, not only in biomedical but also in non-biomedical areas. This is a critical issue in contemporary science, as graduate students are the future voices and decision-makers of the research community. Therefore, COIs, especially in the broader context of science and society, merit closer attention from policymakers, researchers, and educators. At times of great expectations for public engagement with science, mishandling of COIs may have undesirable consequences for public engagement with science and confidence in the scientific endeavor. PMID:24345908

Vasconcelos, S M R; Cassimiro, M C; Martins, M F M; Palácios, M

2013-12-01

92

Addressing conflicts of interest in the research paper: a societal demand in contemporary science?  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available In the last decade, dialogue between science and society has found a forum in an increasing number of publications on topics such as public engagement with science and public trust in science. Concerning the latter, issues that include cases of research misconduct, accountability in research, and co [...] nflicts of interest (COIs) have shaped global discussions on the communication of science. In the publication setting, the perception that hiding COIs and/or not managing them well may affect public trust in the research record has grown among editors. We conducted a search for editorials addressing COIs between 1989 and 2011, using four major databases: Medline/PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Knowledge. We explored the content of these editorials and the relationship they established between COIs and the public trust in science. Our results demonstrate that the relationship between disclosure of COIs and public trust in science has become a major concern among editors. We, thus, argue that COIs should be discussed more openly and frequently in graduate courses in the sciences, around the globe, not only in biomedical but also in non-biomedical areas. This is a critical issue in contemporary science, as graduate students are the future voices and decision-makers of the research community. Therefore, COIs, especially in the broader context of science and society, merit closer attention from policymakers, researchers, and educators. At times of great expectations for public engagement with science, mishandling of COIs may have undesirable consequences for public engagement with science and confidence in the scientific endeavor.

S.M.R., Vasconcelos; M.C., Cassimiro; M.F.M., Martins; M., Palacios.

2013-12-02

93

Scientific English: a program for addressing linguistic barriers of international research trainees in the United States.  

Science.gov (United States)

Within the international research environment, English is indisputably the lingua franca, and thus, the majority of the world's scientists must adapt to a second language. Linguistic barriers in science affect not only researchers' career paths but institutional productivity and efficiency as well. To address these barriers, we designed and piloted a specialized course, Scientific English. The pedagogical approach is based on English for specific purposes methodology in which curriculum and content are driven by the types of daily language used and interactions which occur in the participants' occupation, in this case, cancer research. The 11-week program was organized into three sections: presentation skill, meeting and discussion skills, and writing skills. Effectiveness of the course was measured by the number of participants able to produce the presentations and written products with a score of at least 75 of 100 possible points. From January to December 2008, participant scores averaged 90.4 for presentation and 86.8 for written products. The authors provide insights and recommendations on the development and delivery of the program. PMID:20623348

Cameron, Carrie; Chang, Shine; Pagel, Walter

2011-03-01

94

Addressing Responsible Research and Innovation to Industry – Introduction of a Conceptual Framework  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Researchers have recently begun to discuss how industry may actually implement and address RRI principles (e.g. Owen and Goldberg, 2010, Eden, Jirotka, & Stahl, 2013; Van den Hoven et.al, 2014). Most existing studies of RRI, however, focus on policy stakeholders, civil society actors, and research institutions (Rowe and Frewer, 2005; Clarke, 2009; Owen et.al, 2013; Von Schomberg, 2011). While industrial responsibility efforts to date assist industry to move in the right direction, little attention have been given to the RRI principles that industry should play (e.g. Wright, 2011). In view of the lack of knowledge concerning implementing RRI principles in industry, a normatively grounded and an analytical instrument could contribute the literature for deeper understanding of RRI principles. To construct a solid framework for that reason, this study draws a fundamental path, in which industrial activities are far better aligned with environmental and societal needs thereafter with RRI principles. Building on these ideas and integrating the “social-­?connection” logic (Young 2004,2006) into research on RRI, this study contributes to the literature by establishing a conceptual framework for a deeper involvement of industry in RRI research area. The framework develops a normatively grounded conceptual path for managing and assessing RRI principles in industry. To identify insight for it, we adopt a bibliometric analysis approach; in essence, we discuss the existing discourse on industry and emerging literature on RRI through the literature review -­?search the databases Google Scholar and Business Source Complete (BSC). We depict the successive stages of increasing implementation of RRI principles in five stages, at the same time exhibit dimensions of RRI that represent different categories and corresponding indicators of RRI in three dimensions. The rationale behind the model has been derived from extant models of corporate social responsibility (CSR) organizational learning (Young 2004,2006; Zadek, 2004). The framework helps to justify the ethical association between industry associations and regulatory gaps on a global scale. Collectively, the framework provides a conceptual starting point for empirical research that aims to assess and compare industrial actors and measure their progress in reducing regulatory gaps over time. Furthermore, this framework offers industry associations a practical guideline tool for implementing RRI principles, while the dimensions distinguished can serve as reference points for stakeholders who wish to engage RRI principles in their activities. Overall, the proposed framework provides a conceptual starting point for future research on levels of RRI. More specifically, this framework may determine the stage of RRI in a certain industrial actor, to compare it with other actors, and to measure an industry actor progress to address societal and ethical aspects over time. Reference: Clarke, R. (2009). Privacy impact assessment: Its origins and development. Computer Law & Security Review, 25(2), 123–135. oi:10.1016/j.clsr.2009.02.002 Eden, G., Jirotka, M., & Stahl, B. (2013). Responsible research and innovation: Critical reflection into the potential social consequences of ICT. In 2013 IEEE Seventh International Conference on Research Challenges in Information Science (RCIS) (pp. 1–12). doi:10.1109/RCIS.2013.6577706 Owen, R. and Goldberg, N. (2010). Responsible innovation: A pilot study with the U.K. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. Risk Analysis: An International Journal, 30: 1699–707. doi:10.1111/j.1539-­?6924.2010.01517.x. Owen, R., Heintz, M., & Bessant, J. (Eds.). (2013). Responsible Innovation. Wiley. Rowe, G. and Frewer, L. J. (2005). A typology of public engagement mechanisms. Science, Technology and Human Values, 30: 251–90. doi:10.1177/0162243904271724. Van den Hoven, J., Doorn, N., Swierstra, T., Koops, B.-­?J., Romijn, H. (Eds.) (2014). Responsible Innovation 1: Innovative Solutions for Global Issues, Springer Dordrecht Heidelberg New York Lond

Yaghmaei, Emad; Brem, Alexander

2015-01-01

95

Digital instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) technologies: Issues and current research [Keynote address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by licenseability concerns. Although international implementation of evolutionary nuclear power plants and the progression toward new plants in the United States have spurred design of more fully digital plantwide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. As a result, there are challenges that need to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to effectively and efficiently complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of digital technology. To respond to technology challenges, roadmaps for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) are being developed. These roadmapping efforts address technology gaps, technology maturity, and technology experience by establishing a comprehensive, systematic approach to meet high-priority technological needs. The first RD and D objective is to identify and eliminate technology gaps that may constrain measurement, monitoring, control, or protection. Tent, monitoring, control, or protection. The second RD and D objective is to ensure technology maturity so that needed methods, tools, equipment, or other products are available with a sound infrastructure. The third RD and D objective is to demonstrate performance and resolve licensing and usage uncertainty. This presentation summarizes the key elements of an ICHMI technology roadmap and discusses current research activities. (author)

96

NASA DEVELOP Program: Students Extending Earth Science Research to Address Community Needs  

Science.gov (United States)

Eight years ago, several students at NASA Langley Research Center launched the DEVELOP Program. DEVELOP is now at six NASA centers and is a program element of the NASA Applied Sciences Human Capital Development Program that extends the use of Earth observation sources to address Earth science issues in local communities. Students in the program strengthen their leadership and academic skills by analyzing scientific data, experimenting with novel technology, and engaging in cooperative interactions. Graduate, undergraduate and high school students from across the United States collaborate to integrate NASA space-based Earth observation sources and partner agencies' science data, models and decision support tools. Information from these collaborations result in rapid prototype projects addressing local policy and environmental issues. Following a rigorous 10-week term, DEVELOP students present visual products demonstrating the application of NASA scientific information to community leaders at scientific and public policy forums such as the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the American Meteorological Society (AMS), and the Southern Growth Policies Board (SGPB). Submission of written products to peer-reviewed scientific publications and other public databases is also done. Student experiences and interactions working with NASA data, advanced technological programs and community leaders have, and continue to prove, beneficial to student professional development. DEVELOP's human capital development focus affords students real world experience, making them a valuable asset to the scientific and global community and to the continuation of a scientifically aware society. NASA's DEVELOP Program is more than scientific exploration and valuable results; DEVELOP fosters human capital development by bridging the gap between NASA science research and federal, state, local and tribal resource managers.

Richards, A. L.; Ross, A. L.

2006-12-01

97

Proceedings of the public meeting to address a proposed federal radiation research agenda. Volume 2. Science projection papers  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 14 science projection papers presented at a public meeting on March 10-11, 1980 to address a proposed federal radiation research agenda into the biological effects of ionizing radiation

98

What is the 'problem' that outreach work seeks to address and how might it be tackled? Seeking theory in a primary health prevention programme  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventive approaches to health are disproportionately accessed by the more affluent and recent health improvement policy advocates the use of targeted preventive primary care to reduce risk factors in poorer individuals and communities. Outreach has become part of the health service response. Outreach has a long history of engaging those who do not otherwise access services. It has, however, been described as eclectic in its purpose, clientele and mode of practice; its effectiveness is unproven. Using a primary prevention programme in the UK as a case, this paper addresses two research questions: what are the perceived problems of non-engagement that outreach aims to address; and, what specific mechanisms of outreach are hypothesised to tackle these. Methods Drawing on a wider programme evaluation, the study undertook qualitative interviews with strategically selected health-care professionals. The analysis was thematically guided by the concept of 'candidacy' which theorises the dynamic process through which services and individuals negotiate appropriate service use. Results The study identified seven types of engagement 'problem' and corresponding solutions. These 'problems' lie on a continuum of complexity in terms of the challenges they present to primary care. Reasons for non-engagement are congruent with the concept of 'candidacy' but point to ways in which it can be expanded. Conclusions The paper draws conclusions about the role of outreach in contributing to the implementation of inequalities focused primary prevention and identifies further research needed in the theoretical development of both outreach as an approach and candidacy as a conceptual framework.

Mackenzie Mhairi

2011-12-01

99

Addressing food insecurity in a Native American reservation using community-based participatory research.  

Science.gov (United States)

The food insecurity faced by many Native American communities has numerous implications for the health and welfare of families. To identify and address upstream causes of food insecurity in a rural California reservation, we conducted a community assessment using the Tool for Health and Resilience in Vulnerable Environments (THRIVE). Guided by a community-based participatory research orientation, the THRIVE tool was adapted using digital storytelling and implemented in a series of focus groups. As a result of the THRIVE assessment, community members identified racial injustice and physical and financial barriers to accessing healthy and culturally appropriate foods as areas of greatest importance. Subsequently, the project partnership developed policies to reduce identified barriers which included an integrated community supported agriculture and commodity food program, the introduction of Electronic Benefits Transfer and culturally appropriate foods at the local farmers' market and reallocation of shelf space at the grocery store to include vegetables and fruits as well as special foods for diabetics. Results suggest that a participatory research orientation coupled with the use of a culturally adapted THRIVE tool may be an effective means for identifying structural determinants of food insecurity and initiating novel policy interventions to reduce health disparities experienced by Native American communities. PMID:21994709

Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Salvatore, Alicia L; Styne, Dennis M; Winkleby, Marilyn

2012-08-01

100

Participatory action research: Addressing social vulnerability of rural women through income-generating activities  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Participatory action research (PAR is a robust and versatile research and development strategy. It can be utilised to: understand complex community structures and interaction; determine various types of vulnerability; assist in community capacity building and skills transfer; ensure community participation,and allow for the strengthening of livelihoods. This article focuses on PAR as a strategy, applying various methods and specific participatory tools to understand social vulnerability, within the context of women as rural farm dwellers in the North-West Province, South Africa. It emphasises the need for continued participation and highlights the practical principles and benefits derived from PAR. The PAR process cycles are discussed and parallels are drawn with the practical setting. In conclusion, the article emphasises that the application of the PAR process can make a multi-dimensional contribution towards the development of a community by creating an understanding of social vulnerability, by building capacity and by ensuring participation, and also addresses income-generating activities.

Liezel van Niekerk

2009-04-01

101

The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad range of subjects, including nuclear material accountancy principles, legal definitions and the regulatory base and inspection tools and techniques. This 60% core part is given by representatives from regulatory bodies (The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Directorate General for Nuclear Energy and Transport), industry (AREVA, British Nuclear Group), and research (Stockholm University, Hamburg University, Joint Research Centre-Institute of Transuranic Elements, and Joint Research Centre-Institute for the Protection of the Citizen). The remaining part is completed with topical lectures addressed by invited lecturers, such as from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the IAEA addressing topics of physical protection, illicit trafficking, the Iraq case study, exercises, including satellite imagery interpretation etc. With this structure of a stable core plus a variable set of invited lectures, the course will remain sustainable and up-to-date. A syllabus provides the students a homogeneous set of information material in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation matters at the European and international level. In this way, the ESARDA TKMWG aims to contribute to a two-fold scientific-technical and political-juridical education and training.

102

Using ecotechnology to address water quality and wetland habitat loss problems in the Mississippi basin: a hierarchical approach.  

Science.gov (United States)

Human activities are affecting the environment at continental and global scales. An example of this is the Mississippi basin where there has been a large scale loss of wetlands and water quality deterioration over the past century. Wetland and riparian ecosystems have been isolated from rivers and streams. Wetland loss is due both to drainage and reclamation, mainly for agriculture, and to isolation from the river by levees, as in the Mississippi delta. There has been a decline in water quality due to increasing use of fertilizers, enhanced drainage and the loss of wetlands for cleaning water. Water quality has deteriorated throughout the basin and high nitrogen in the Mississippi river is causing a large area of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi delta. Since the causes of these problems are distributed over the basin, the solution also needs to be distributed over the basin. Ecotechnology and ecological engineering offer the only ecologically sound and cost-effective method of solving these problems. Wetlands to promote nitrogen removal, mainly through denitrification but also through burial and plant uptake, offer a sound ecotechnological solution. At the level of the Mississippi basin, changes in farming practices and use of wetlands for nitrogen assimilation can reduce nitrogen levels in the River. There are additional benefits of restoration of wetland and riverine ecosystems, flood control, reduction in public health threats, and enhanced wildlife and fisheries. At the local drainage basin level, the use of river diversions in the Mississippi delta can address both problems of coastal land loss and water quality deterioration. Nitrate levels in diverted river water are rapidly reduced as water flows through coastal watersheds. At the local level, wetlands are being used to treat municipal wastewater. This is a cost-effective method, which results in improved water quality, enhanced wetland productivity and increased accretion. The problems in the Mississippi basin serves as an example for other watersheds in the Gulf of Mexico. This is especially important in Mexico, where there is a strong need for economical solutions to ecological problems. The Usumacinta delta-Laguna de Terminos regional ecosystem is an example where ecotechnological approaches offer realistic solutions to environmental problems. PMID:14623048

Day, John W; Yañéz Arancibia, Alejandro; Mitsch, William J; Lara-Dominguez, Ana Laura; Day, Jason N; Ko, Jae-Young; Lane, Robert; Lindsey, Joel; Lomeli, David Zarate

2003-12-01

103

Neighborhoods, Alcohol Outlets and Intimate Partner Violence: Addressing Research Gaps in Explanatory Mechanisms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Indices of heavy drinking have consistently been linked with increased risk for intimate partner violence (IPV among couples in the general household population. Because IPV is a ‘private’ event, most IPV research has focused on individual-level risk factors, but current social ecological theory suggests that alcohol outlets can act with neighborhood conditions to increase risks for IPV. This paper reviews the theoretical and empirical literatures relevant to identifying specific social mechanisms linking IPV to alcohol use in community settings, and discusses three social mechanisms relevant to these effects: greater numbers of alcohol outlets within a neighborhood may (1 be a sign of loosened normative constraints against violence; (2 promote problem alcohol use among at-risk couples, and; (3 provide environments where groups of persons at risk for IPV may form and mutually reinforce IPV-related attitudes, norms, and problem behaviors. Understanding these mechanisms is of critical public health importance for developing environmental strategies aimed at prevention of IPV, such as changes in zoning, community action and education, and policing.

Carol B. Cunradi

2010-03-01

104

Developing a Gap Taxonomy to Address Crew Health Risks in NASA's Human Research Program  

Science.gov (United States)

The mission of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is to understand and reduce the risk to crew health and performance in exploration missions. The HRP addresses 27 specific risks by identifying and then filling gaps in understanding the risks and in the ability to disposition the risks. The primary bases for identifying gaps have been past experience and requirements definition. This approach has been very effective in identifying some important, relevant gaps, but may be inadequate for identifying gaps outside the past experience base. We are exploring the use of a gap taxonomy as a comprehensive, underlying conceptual framework that allows a more systematic identification of gaps. The taxonomy is based on these stages in medical care: prediction, prevention, detection/diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, rehabilitation, and lifetime surveillance. This gap taxonomy approach identifies new gaps in HRP health risks. Many of the new gaps suggest risk reduction approaches that are more cost effective than present approaches. A major benefit of the gap taxonomy approach is to identify new, economical approaches that reduce the likelihood and/or consequence of a risk.

Kundrot, Craig E.; Edwards, J. Michelle

2009-01-01

105

Some Problems in Advising on Research Methodology.  

Science.gov (United States)

By and large behavioral scientists, particularly in education and psychology lack the sophisticated mathematical understanding necessary for adequate statistical analysis, especially multivariate analysis. And incompetent use of measurement theory, psychometry, and statistics cannot but lead to bad research. The remedy for this is better…

Larsson, Bernt

106

Problems Portraying Migrants in Applied Linguistics Research  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper is a very personal attempt to explore the problematics of portraying migrants in Applied Linguistics research. I begin with a discussion of identity, in particular what we might mean when we use the term, and from there I go on to explore its fundamental imprecision through an analysis of a census question about ethnicity. I then…

Block, David

2010-01-01

107

University Research on Problems Posed by Society.  

Science.gov (United States)

Concern for changes in the environment in which we live and the need for change within universities to realistically meet the expectations of society are explored in this speech. Education, research, and public service, representing three inseparable aspects of the overall mission of the university, are of foremost consideration. The nature of…

Alpert, Daniel

108

Medicina y filosofía: abordaje filosófico de algunos problemas de la medicina actual / Medicine and philosophy: philosophical addressing of some problems of today’s medicine  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Peru | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish El pensamiento médico y el ejercicio de la medicina plantean un cúmulo de problemas filosóficos. Éstos estriban desde la caracterización de la medicina hasta los problemas epistemológicos, lógicos y éticos. Este ensayo abordará filosóficamente seis problemas de la medicina actual: la investigación b [...] iomédica -su evolución actual y las implicancias de las políticas de desarrollo científico-; la medicina basada en evidencias -su caracterización como nuevo paradigma y el análisis de su "verdadero" rol en la práctica médica-; la caracterización de la medicina como saber y praxis -¿qué entendemos por medicina, arte, ciencia o tecnología?-; el problema de la falta de un concepto general de enfermedad; la epistemología personal y sus implicancias en la labor del médico; por último, el examen filosófico sobre la validez de la llamada medicina alternativa. Este ensayo pretende mostrar que el abordaje filosófico de muchos problemas médicos no representa un mero juego intelectual, sino una herramienta eficaz para la investigación y la enseñanza de la medicina, principalmente, para la observación crítica de la problemática en juego. Se pretende mostrar, además, que la filosofía de la medicina no puede resumirse sólo a la parcela de lo ético, lo axiológico o lo histórico. Abstract in english The medical thought and practice pose a number of philosophical problems; these include the characterization of medicine itself, and the epistemological, ethical and logic problems. This essay will philosophically address six current medical problems: The biomedical investigation -evolution today an [...] d the implication of the scientific development policies-; the evidence based medicine -its characterization as new paradigm, and the analysis of its "real" role in medical practice-; the characterization of medicine as knowledge and practice -What do we understand by medicine, art, science or technology?-; the problem of lack of a general disease concept -the personal epistemology and its implications in the physicians’ work-; finally, the philosophical examination on the validity of so named alternative medicine. This essay intends to show that the philosophical addressing of many medical problems does not represent a mere intellectual game, but an effective tool for medical research and teaching, mainly, for the critical observation of problems. We intend to show, furthermore, that the philosophy of medicine cannot be summarized only to the ethical and historical plot.

Adolfo, Peña.

2004-03-01

109

Chemoradiotherapy: successes and problems in translational research  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The development of mechanistic-based clinical regimens which combine radiation and chemotherapy to improve local control and cure in solid malignancies has proven to be a difficult problem. Studies with human and animal cell lines in culture provide valuable data on the effects and mechanisms of action of radiation and anticancer drugs. They can also suggest mechanisms of interaction between drugs and radiation that might be used to obtain therapeutic gain. Studies with syngeneic rodent tumors or human tumor cell lines xenografted into immune-deficient rodents can be used to test the effects of combined modality regimens on tumors in vivo. Studies of normal tissues in rodents can be used to evaluate potential toxicities. However, at each step in this process of preclinical evaluation there are limitations of the model systems and gaps in the knowledge obtainable from the models. There are also gaps in our understanding of the biology of malignancies in human patients both before treatment and to an even greater extent during protracted therapeutic regimens. Our knowledge of the mechanisms producing dose-limiting injuries in patients is also limited, as is our understanding of the factors which influence the risk to individual patients and the interactions of drug and radiation injury in patients. The limitations of our models and our knowledge generally preclude the direct translation of preclinical findings into rationally designed, effective clinical trials, and cansigned, effective clinical trials, and can lead to either unexpectedly positive or disappointing results when clinical trials are developed, performed and analyzed. Successes and problems in the translation of preclinical studies of radiation/drug combinations into effective clinical regimens will be discussed and will be illustrated using our laboratory and clinical experience with agents designed to modulate tumor oxygenation and with regimens combining radiation therapy with radiosensitizers or with the mitomycins

110

Research program with no ''measurement problem''  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The ''measurement problem'' of contemporary physics is met by recognizing that the physicist participates when constructing and when applying the theory consisting of the formulated formal and measurement criteria (the expressions and rules) providing the necessary conditions which allow him to compute and measure facts, yet retains objectivity by requiring that these criteria, rules and facts be in corroborative equilibrium. We construct the particulate states of quantum physics by a recursive program which incorporates the non-determinism born of communication between asynchronous processes over a shared memory. Their quantum numbers and coupling constants arise from the construction via the unique 4-level combinatorial hierarchy. The construction defines indivisible quantum events with the requisite supraluminal correlations, yet does not allow supraluminal communication. Measurement criteria incorporate c, h-bar, and m/sub p/ or (not ''and'') G. The resulting theory is discrete throughout, contains no infinities, and, as far as we have developed it, is in agreement with quantum mechanical and cosmological fact

111

Software problems in magnetic fusion research  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The main world effort in magnetic fusion research involves studying the plasma in a Tokamak device. Four large Tokamaks are under construction (TFTR in USA, JET in Europe, T15 in USSR and JT60 in Japan). To understand the physical phenomena that occur in these costly devices, it is generally necessary to carry out extensive numerical calculations. These computer simulations make use of sophisticated numerical methods and demand high power computers. As a consequence they represent a substantial investment. To reduce software costs, the computer codes are more and more often exhanged among scientists. Standardization (STANDARD FORTRAN, OLYMPUS system) and good documentation (CPC program library) are proposed to make codes exportable. Centralized computing centers would also help in the exchange of codes and ease communication between the staff at different laboratories. (orig.)

112

Addressing the challenges of cleft lip and palate research in India  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The Indian sub-continent remains one of the most populous areas of the world with an estimated population of 1.1 billion in India alone. This yields an estimated 24.5 million births per year and the birth prevalence of clefts is somewhere between 27,000 and 33,000 clefts per year. Inequalities exist, both in access to and quality of cleft care with distinct differences in urban versus rural access and over the years the accumulation of unrepaired clefts of the lip and palate make this a significant health care problem in India. In recent years the situation has been significantly improved through the intervention of Non Governmental Organisations such as SmileTrain and Transforming Faces Worldwide participating in primary surgical repair programmes. The cause of clefts is multi factorial with both genetic and environmental input and intensive research efforts have yielded significant advances in recent years facilitated by molecular technologies in the genetic field. India has tremendous potential to contribute by virtue of improving research expertise and a population that has genetic, cultural and socio-economic diversity. In 2008, the World Health Organisation (WHO has recognised that non-communicable diseases, including birth defects cause significant infant mortality and childhood morbidity and have included cleft lip and palate in their Global Burden of Disease (GBD initiative. This will fuel the interest of India in birth defects registration and international efforts aimed at improving quality of care and ultimately prevention of non-syndromic clefts of the lip and palate.

Mossey Peter

2009-10-01

113

Evaluating potentialities and constrains of Problem Based Learning curriculum : Research methodology  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This paper presents a research design to evaluate Problem Based Learning (PBL) curriculum potentialities and constrains for future changes. PBL literature lacks examples of how to evaluate and analyse established PBL learning environments to address new challenges posed. The research design encloses three methodological approaches to investigate three interrelated research questions. Phase one, a literature review; aims develop a theoretical and analytical framework. The second phase aims to investigate examples of practices that combine PBL and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in the curriculum and a mean to choose cases for further case study (third phase).

Guerra, Aida

2013-01-01

114

Preventing Alcohol-Related Problems Through Health Policy Research  

OpenAIRE

Alcohol-related health policy research is responsible for guiding the implementation of laws and public health policies that have reduced alcohol-related highway injuries and deaths, as well as other alcohol-related problems over the last 40 years. This research, which tests theories about potential policy changes and responds to specific problems, has examined a vast array of prevention programs. This article briefly identifies 10 program categories and highlights four programs to illustrate...

Voas, Robert B.; Fell, James C.

2010-01-01

115

Esperanto and International Language Problems: A Research Bibliography.  

Science.gov (United States)

This bibliography is intended both for the researcher and for the occasional student of international language problems, particularly as these relate to the international language Esperanto. The book is divided into two main sections: Part One deals with problems arising from communication across national boundaries and the search for a solution…

Tonkin, Humphrey R.

116

A Simulated Research Problem for Undergraduate Metamorphic Petrology.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents a laboratory problem in metamorphic petrology designed to simulate a research experience. The problem deals with data on scales ranging from a geologic map to hand specimens to thin sections. Student analysis includes identifying metamorphic index minerals, locating their isograds on the map, and determining the folding sequence. (BC)

Amenta, Roddy V.

1984-01-01

117

76 FR 60505 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Approach to Addressing Drug Shortage; Public Workshop...  

Science.gov (United States)

...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration...Approach to Addressing Drug Shortage; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...preventing or mitigating drug shortages. DATES: Either electronic...Management (HFA- 305), Food and Drug...

2011-09-29

118

A Framework for Addressing Skeptics' Claims Using Evidence-Based Argumentation: Lessons Learned from Educational Research  

Science.gov (United States)

In science education, climate change is an issue that is especially useful for teaching concepts spanning several fields of science, as well the nature and practices of science. In response, we are developing a NASA-funded curriculum, titled Climate Science Investigations (CSI): South Florida, that teaches high school and first-year undergraduate level students how to analyze and use scientific data answer questions about climate change. To create an effective curriculum, we integrated lessons learned from our educational research conducted within our elementary science methods courses (Lambert, Lindgren, & Bleicher, 2012). For the past few years, we have been integrating climate science in our courses as a way to teach standards across several science disciplines and assessing our preservice teachers' gains in knowledge over the semesters. More recently, given the media attention and reports on the public's shift in opinion toward being more skeptical (Kellstedt, Zahran, & Vedlitz, 2008; Washington & Cook, 2011), we have assessed our students' perceptions about climate change and implemented strategies to help students use evidence-based scientific argumentation to address common claims of climate skeptics. In our elementary science methods courses, we framed climate change as a crosscutting theme, as well as a core idea, in the Next Generation Science Standards. We proposed that the issue and science of climate change would help preservice teachers not only become more interested in the topic, but also be more prepared to teach core science concepts spanning several disciplines (physical, life, and earth sciences). We also thought that highlighting the "practice of scientific inquiry" by teaching students to develop evidence-based arguments would help the preservice teachers become more analytical and able to differentiate scientific evidence from opinions, which could ultimately influence their perceptions on climate change. Lessons learned from our preservice teachers' conceptions and perceptions about climate change, as well as the difficulties in engaging in evidence-based argumentation, have informed and enhanced the framework for development of the CSI: South Florida curriculum. The modules are sequenced according to the proposed learning progression. First, students are introduced to the nature of science and Earth's energy balance. Students then investigate the temporal and spatial temperature data to answer the question of whether Earth is warming. Students also compare natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change, investigate the various observed and projected consequences of climate change in the fourth module, and examine ways to mitigate the effects of and adapt to climate change. Finally, students learn how to refute skeptics' claims by providing counter evidence and reasoning of why the skeptics' claim is not the appropriate explanation. This paper describes our conceptual framework for teaching students how to address the skeptics' claims using the content learned in the CSI: South Florida curriculum and evidence-based argumentation.

Lambert, J. L.; Bleicher, R. E.; Edwards, A.; Henderson, A.

2012-12-01

119

1998 Proceedings: Solving Forest Insect Problems Through Research  

Science.gov (United States)

The Proceedings of the 1998 Puerto Rico conference on Solving Forest Insect Problems Through Research (sponsored in part by the International Union of Forestry Research Organizations) are available at this Website. The proceedings include the program, abstracts from presentations and posters, and contact information for presenters.

120

A facility for using cluster research to study environmental problems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report begins by describing the general application of cluster based research to environmental chemistry and the development of a Cluster Structure and Dynamics Research Facility (CSDRF). Next, four important areas of cluster research are described in more detail, including how they can impact environmental problems. These are: surface-supported clusters, water and contaminant interactions, time-resolved dynamic studies in clusters, and cluster structures and reactions. These facilities and equipment required for each area of research are then presented. The appendices contain workshop agenda and a listing of the researchers who participated in the workshop discussions that led to this report

121

Local problems; local solutions: an innovative approach to investigating and addressing causes of maternal deaths in Zambia's Copperbelt  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal mortality in developing countries is high and international targets for reduction are unlikely to be met. Zambia's maternal mortality ratio was 591 per 100,000 live births according to survey data (2007 while routinely collected data captured only about 10% of these deaths. In one district in Zambia medical staff reviewed deaths occurring in the labour ward but no related recommendations were documented nor was there evidence of actions taken to avert further deaths. The Investigate Maternal Deaths and Act (IMDA approach was designed to address these deficiencies and is comprised of four components; identification of maternal deaths; investigation of factors contributing to the deaths; recommendations for action drawn up by multiple stakeholders and monitoring of progress through existing systems. Methods A pilot was conducted in one district of Zambia. Maternal deaths occurring over a period of twelve months were identified and investigated. Data was collected through in-depth interviews with family, focus group discussions and hospital records. The information was summarized and presented at eleven data sharing meetings to key decision makers, during which recommendations for action were drawn up. An output indicator to monitor progress was included in the routine performance assessment tool. High impact interventions were identified using frequency analysis. Results A total of 56 maternal deaths were investigated. Poor communication, existing risk factors, a lack of resources and case management issues were the broad categories under which contributing factors were assigned. Sixty three recommendations were drawn up by key decision-makers of which two thirds were implemented by the end of the pilot period. Potential high impact actions were related to management of AIDS and pregnancy, human resources, referral mechanisms, birth planning at household level and availability of safe blood. Conclusion In resource constrained settings the IMDA approach promotes the use of existing systems to reduce maternal mortality. In turn the capacity of local health officers to use data to determine, plan and implement relevant interventions that address the local factors contributing to maternal deaths is strengthened. Monitoring actions taken against the defined recommendations within the routine performance assessment ensures sustainability. Suggestions for further research are provided.

Hadley Mary B

2011-05-01

122

76 FR 45268 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Approach to Addressing Drug Shortage; Public Workshop  

Science.gov (United States)

...White Oak Conference Center Parking and Transportation...ucm241740.htm). Contact Persons: Christine Moser or Lori Benner, Center for Drug Evaluation and...title, firm name, address, telephone, and fax...or Lori Benner (see Contact) at least 7 days...

2011-07-28

123

CYANOBACTERIA, CYANOBACTERIA TOXINS & USEPA DRINKING WATER TREATMENT RESEARCH TO ADDRESS THE PROBLEM  

Science.gov (United States)

The 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SWDA) require the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to establish a list of unregulated microbiological and chemical contaminants to aid in priority-setting for the Agency's drinking water program. This list, known as th...

124

Presidential address: the role of research networks in tackling major challenges in international health.  

Science.gov (United States)

One pressing challenge in the fields of international health and tropical medicine is how to achieve the Millennium Development Goals by 2015. Changes in how research is conducted are, however, contributing to progress in reaching these targets. Increasingly researchers from different institutions, countries and even continents are working together through research consortia. These consortia can be focused around research questions such as developing new TB vaccines, designed to deliver capacity building, promote advocacy, or to maintain efforts directed at threatened research areas such as leprosy research. Researchers connected through consortia can provide robust answers to research questions, removing duplication of effort, within a stimulating environment for discussion and development of research ideas. Another advantage is that south-south research links may be strengthened, which is of increasing relevance as the balance of power and money is moving south, providing new opportunities for the African continent. However, there are disadvantages as well as advantages to consortia. Having too many connections can immobilise researchers in a web of meetings, teleconferences, and reports, reducing the time for original innovative ideas. Learned societies, such as the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene provide their own networks and connections and allow the bigger issues of international health and development to be discussed in a multidisciplinary environment. PMID:24037698

Dockrell, Hazel M

2010-09-01

125

SHAPING A NEW GENERATION OF HISPANIC CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCHERS ADDRESSING MINORITY HEALTH AND HEALTH DISPARITIES  

OpenAIRE

In 2011, research educators face significant challenges. Training programs in Clinical and Translational Research need to develop or enhance their curriculum to comply with new scientific trends and government policies. Curricula must impart the skills and competencies needed to help facilitate the dissemination and transfer of scientific advances at a faster pace than current health policy and practice. Clinical and translational researchers are facing also the need of new paradigms for effe...

Estape, Estela S.; Segarra, Barbara; Baez, Adriana; Huertas, Aracelis; Diaz, Clemente; Frontera, Walter

2011-01-01

126

Private Property Rights and Selective Private Forest Conservation: Could a Nordic Hybrid Policy Address a United States Problem?  

Science.gov (United States)

Political and legal conflicts between the need for targeted private forest conservation and the continued assurance of private property rights in the U.S. presents a seemingly intractable resource management problem. Scandinavian use of habitat protection areas on private forests offers an additional tool that may be suitable for solving the historical and on-going tension found within U.S. efforts to reconcile desires to maintain lands in a forested condition while also respecting private property rights. This article presents a comparative cross-sectional policy analysis of Sweden, Finland, and the U.S., supported with a supplemental case example from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Similarities in all three countries among forest ownership patterns, use of public subsidies, and changing attitudes towards conservation are generally encouraging. Additionally, Virginia’s current consideration and development of state-wide forest policies focused on forestland and open space conservation suggests both a need and an opportunity to systematically assess the applicability of the Nordic forest reserve approach to local private forest conservation. Future research at a high-resolution, and specifically at the state level, should focus on the social and political factors that would ultimately determine the viability of a forest reserve program.

Mortimer, Michael J.

2008-05-01

127

A Collection of NIDA NOTES. Articles That Address Research on Heroin.  

Science.gov (United States)

Included in this document are selections of topic-specific articles on heroin research reprinted from the National Institute on Drug Abuses (NIDA) research newsletter, NIDA Notes. Titles include: Buprenorphine Taken Three Times Per Week Is as Effective as Daily Doses in Treating Heroin Addiction; 33-Year Study Finds Lifelong, Lethal Consequences…

National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

128

Qualitative research between craftsmanship and McDonaldization. A keynote address from the 17th Qualitative Health Research Conference  

OpenAIRE

Although qualitative research methods remain marginalized in certain disciplines, qualitative inquiry has within the last couple of decades become generally accepted as a legitimate scientific way of working. Today, society at large is making more use of qualitative research than ever, not just in laudable social justice research, for example, but also in relation to market and consumer research and focus groups for different political parties. With this in mind, I wish to discuss three curre...

Svend Brinkmann

2012-01-01

129

Enabling Effective Problem-oriented Research for Sustainable Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Environmental problems caused by human activities are increasing; biodiversity is disappearing at an unprecedented rate, soils are being irreversibly damaged, freshwater is increasingly in short supply, and the climate is changing. To reverse or even to reduce these trends will require a radical transformation in the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Just how this can be achieved within, at most, a few decades is unknown, but it is clear that academia must play a crucial role. Many believe, however, that academic institutions need to become more effective in helping societies move toward sustainability. We first synthesize current thinking about this crisis of research effectiveness. We argue that those involved in producing knowledge to solve societal problems face three particular challenges: the complexity of real-world sustainability problems, maintaining impartiality when expert knowledge is used in decision making, and ensuring the salience of the scientific knowledge for decision makers. We discuss three strategies to meet these challenges: conducting research in interdisciplinary teams, forming research partnerships with actors and experts from outside academia, and framing research questions with the aim of solving specific problems (problem orientation. However, we argue that implementing these strategies within academia will require both cultural and institutional change. We then use concepts from transition management to suggest how academic institutions can make the necessary changes. At the level of system optimization, we call for: quality criteria, career incentives, and funding schemes that reward not only disciplinary excellence but also achievements in inter-/transdisciplinary work; professional services and training through specialized centers that facilitate problem-oriented research and reciprocal knowledge exchange with society; and the integration of sustainability and inter-/transdisciplinary research practices into all teaching curricula. At the level of system innovation, we propose radical changes in institutional structures, research and career incentives, teaching programs, and research partnerships. We see much value in a view of change that emphasizes the complementarity of system innovation and system optimization. The goal must be a process of change that preserves the traditional strengths of academic research, with its emphasis on disciplinary excellence and scientific rigor, while ensuring that institutional environments and the skills, worldviews, and experiences of the involved actors adapt to the rapidly changing needs of society.

Michael Stauffacher

2012-12-01

130

Addressing transportation energy and environmental impacts: technical and policy research directions  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is establishing a local chapter of the University of California Energy Institute (UCEI). In order to most effectively contribute to the Institute, LLNL sponsored a workshop on energy and environmental issues in transportation. This workshop took place in Livermore on August 10 and brought together researchers from throughout the UC systems in order to establish a joint LLNL-UC research program in transportation, with a focus on energy and environmental impacts.

Weissenberger, S.; Pasternak, A.; Smith, J.R.; Wallman, H.

1995-08-01

131

Addressing conflicts of interest in the research paper: a societal demand in contemporary science?  

OpenAIRE

In the last decade, dialogue between science and society has found a forum in an increasing number of publications on topics such as public engagement with science and public trust in science. Concerning the latter, issues that include cases of research misconduct, accountability in research, and conflicts of interest (COIs) have shaped global discussions on the communication of science. In the publication setting, the perception that hiding COIs and/or not managing them well may affect publi...

Vasconcelos, S. M. R.; Cassimiro, M. C.; Martins, M. F. M.; Pala?cios, M.

2013-01-01

132

Using a Participatory Research Process to Address Disproportionate Hispanic Cancer Burden  

OpenAIRE

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers great potential for increasing the impact of research on reducing cancer health disparities. This article reports how the Community Outreach Core (COC) of the Meharry-Vanderbilt-Tennessee State University (TSU) Cancer Partnership has collaborated with community partners to develop and implement CBPR. The COC, Progreso Community Center, and Nashville Latino Health Coalition jointly developed and conducted the 2007 Hispanic Health in Nashvill...

Hull, Pamela C.; Canedo, Juan R.; Reece, Michelle C.; Lira, Irma; Reyes, Francisco; Garcia, Erandi; Juarez, Paul; Williams, Elizabeth; Husaini, Baqar A.

2010-01-01

133

Theoretical foundations of organizational problem solving methodologies in Operational Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Paradigms are some principles and assumptions, which define frameworks and research priorities in each discipline. Many believe that operational research (OR is not a science and like many other sciences does not have any paradigm. However, since OR is committed to scientific methods, therefore it contains a methodological paradigm. The purpose of this paper is to consider theoretical methodologies in the field of OR. This paper performs a review on the existing literature based on interpretive hermeneutic approach. Based on literature review, the study determines four principles and assumptions for each OR paradigms and a classification of the methods are presented. The results show that OR has four main paradigms and there are many methods in OR fields to tackle a particular problem where each problem belongs to a particular paradigm. In addition, instead of using a particular method in problem situations, we can implement a combination of methodologies.

Seyyed Hasan Ghodsipoor

2013-06-01

134

The Role of the African Languages Research Institute in Addressing Language of Instruction Dilemmas in Zimbabwe  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

Abstract: The lexicographic work of the African Languages Research Institute (ALRI has played a significant role in attempting to avoid some of the dilemmas associated with using African languages as media of instruction in the Zimbabwean education system. Monolingual Shona and Ndebele dictionaries, biomedical reference works, dictionaries of musical, literary and linguistic terms as well as children's dictionaries constitute part of ALRI's contribution towards the goal of mainstreaming African languages in the education system. This article is an evaluation of the research activities taking place at ALRI. The aim of the article is to demonstrate that if they receive adequate attention through corpus planning, African languages possess the capacity to play an important role as media of instruction across the entire spectrum of the education curricula in Zimbabwe and elsewhere. The article concludes by observing that, if the efforts of ALRI are to succeed, there is need for the co-operation of all stakeholders in language practice.

Keywords: DICTIONARIES, LEXICOGRAPHY, LEXICOGRAPHER, LEXICOGRAPHIC RESEARCH, INDIGENOUS AFRICAN LANGUAGES, AFRICAN LANGUAGES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (ALRI, EDUCATION, CURRICULUM, MEDIUM OF INSTRUCTION, SHONA, NDEBELE, ZIMBABWE

Opsomming: Die rol van die African Languages Research Institute by die hantering van onderrigtaaldilemmas in Zimbabwe. Die leksikografiese werk van die African Languages Research Institute (ALRI het 'n betekenisvolle rol gespeel om sommige van die dilemmas te probeer vermy wat gepaard gaan met die gebruik van Afrikatale as onderrigmedia in die Zimbabwiese opvoedingstelsel. Eentalige Sjona- en Ndebelewoordeboeke, biomediese naslaanwerke, woordeboeke van musiek-, letterkunde- en taalkundeterme sowel as woordeboeke vir kinders maak deel uit van ALRI se bydrae tot die doelwit om Afrikatale in die hoofstroom van die opvoedingstelsel te plaas. Hierdie artikel is 'n beoordeling van die navorsingsaktiwiteite wat by ALRI plaasvind. Die doel van die artikel is om te toon dat, indien hulle voldoende aandag deur korpusbeplanning ontvang, Afrikatale die vermoë besit om 'n belangrike rol as onderrigmedia oor die hele spektrum van die opvoedingsleerplanne in Zimbabwe en elders te speel. Die artikel sluit met die waarneming dat, indien die pogings van ALRI wil slaag, daar behoefte is aan die same-werking van alle belanghebbendes in die taalpraktyk.

Sleutelwoorde: WOORDEBOEKE, LEKSIKOGRAFIE, LEKSIKOGRAAF, LEKSIKO-GRAFIESE NAVORSING, INHEEMSE AFRIKATALE, AFRICAN LANGUAGES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (ALRI, OPVOEDING, LEERPLAN, ONDERRIGMEDIUM, SJONA, NDEBELE, ZIMBABWE

Jesta Masuku

2011-10-01

135

[The research of the idea of population problems (author's transl)].  

Science.gov (United States)

Approximately 200 years have passed since Malthus pointed out various population problems. Since then, many scholars have discussed and researched the population principles attributable to Malthus. Formal demography has developed recently. However, the conception of population problems has been discussed more on an a priori level rather than on a philosophical level. We cannot conceive of man himself without introspection about what is man. This problem has also been approached by other philosophers--Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Feuerbach, Marx, Neitzche, Scheler, Heidegger, Dilthey, Pascal, Northrop, Sartre, Buber, Landmann, and others. It is possible to classify views of the human being into about 20 patterns. Until now, there have been different ideas among population researchers and students in Japan. Some have thought of population as the abstract mass of man; others thought of it as a concrete mass of man. Further inquiry into this idea would allow the author to proceed to examine man himself, population, and population problems from a philosopher's point of view. A new theory of population problems could then be established by improving the population principles of Malthus. (author's modified) PMID:12155101

Shinozaki, N

1982-07-01

136

Neighborhoods, Alcohol Outlets and Intimate Partner Violence: Addressing Research Gaps in Explanatory Mechanisms  

OpenAIRE

Indices of heavy drinking have consistently been linked with increased risk for intimate partner violence (IPV) among couples in the general household population. Because IPV is a ‘private’ event, most IPV research has focused on individual-level risk factors, but current social ecological theory suggests that alcohol outlets can act with neighborhood conditions to increase risks for IPV. This paper reviews the theoretical and empirical literatures relevant to identifying specific social ...

Cunradi, Carol B.

2010-01-01

137

Addressing children's oral health inequalities in Northern Ireland: a research-practice-community partnership initiative.  

OpenAIRE

OBJECTIVE: Northern Ireland has a high prevalence of childhood dental caries, reflecting heavy consumption of cariogenic snack foods. To develop a policy to promote and facilitate healthier eating, researchers, practitioners, and the school community formed a partnership, together creating the Boost Better Breaks (BBB) school-based policy. The policy was developed with and supported by dieticians, health promotion officers, teachers, school meal advisors, and local suppliers of school milk. E...

Freeman, R.; Oliver, M.; Bunting, G.; Kirk, J.; Saunderson, W.

2001-01-01

138

Addressing Oral Health Disparities in Settings Without a Research-Intensive Dental School: Collaborative Strategies  

OpenAIRE

Research suggests that oral health is linked to systemic health, and those with poor oral health are potentially at greater risk for important diseases, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes mellitus, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Asians and Pacific Islanders (APIs) in Hawaii have high rates of many such diseases. Studies in children in Hawaii have revealed disparities in dental health; for example, API children have significantly higher rates of cavities than other groups. Hen...

Easa, David; Harrigan, Rosanne; Hammatt, Zoe?; Greer, Mark; Kuba, Carolyn; Davis, James; Beck, James D.; Offenbacher, Steven

2005-01-01

139

Artificial intelligence and design: Opportunities, research problems and directions  

Science.gov (United States)

The issues of industrial productivity and economic competitiveness are of major significance in the U.S. at present. By advancing the science of design, and by creating a broad computer-based methodology for automating the design of artifacts and of industrial processes, we can attain dramatic improvements in productivity. It is our thesis that developments in computer science, especially in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and in related areas of advanced computing, provide us with a unique opportunity to push beyond the present level of computer aided automation technology and to attain substantial advances in the understanding and mechanization of design processes. To attain these goals, we need to build on top of the present state of AI, and to accelerate research and development in areas that are especially relevant to design problems of realistic complexity. We propose an approach to the special challenges in this area, which combines 'core work' in AI with the development of systems for handling significant design tasks. We discuss the general nature of design problems, the scientific issues involved in studying them with the help of AI approaches, and the methodological/technical issues that one must face in developing AI systems for handling advanced design tasks. Looking at basic work in AI from the perspective of design automation, we identify a number of research problems that need special attention. These include finding solution methods for handling multiple interacting goals, formation problems, problem decompositions, and redesign problems; choosing representations for design problems with emphasis on the concept of a design record; and developing approaches for the acquisition and structuring of domain knowledge with emphasis on finding useful approximations to domain theories. Progress in handling these research problems will have major impact both on our understanding of design processes and their automation, and also on several fundamental questions that are of intrinsic concern to AI. We present examples of current AI work on specific design tasks, and discuss new directions of research, both as extensions of current work and in the context of new design tasks where domain knowledge is either intractable or incomplete. The domains discussed include Digital Circuit Design, Mechanical Design of Rotational Transmissions, Design of Computer Architectures, Marine Design, Aircraft Design, and Design of Chemical Processes and Materials. Work in these domains is significant on technical grounds, and it is also important for economic and policy reasons.

Amarel, Saul

1990-01-01

140

Energy Frontier Research Centers: Helping Win the Energy Innovation Race (2011 EFRC Summit Keynote Address, Secretary of Energy Chu)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Secretary of Energy Steven Chu gave the keynote address at the 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum. In his talk, Secretary Chu highlighted the need to "unleash America's science and research community" to achieve energy breakthroughs. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

Chu, Steven (DOE Secretary of Energy)

2011-05-25

141

Energy Frontier Research Centers: Helping Win the Energy Innovation Race (2011 EFRC Summit Keynote Address, Secretary of Energy Chu)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Secretary of Energy Steven Chu gave the keynote address at the 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum. In his talk, Secretary Chu highlighted the need to 'unleash America's science and research community' to achieve energy breakthroughs. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss 'Science for our Nation's Energy Future.' In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energyearch that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

142

Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site: Field-Scale Test Facility for Addressing Fundamental Questions of Environmental Science  

Science.gov (United States)

The Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) is a research wellfield or field-scale test facility developed in a shallow, coarse, fluvial aquifer with the objectives of supporting (a) development of cost-effective, non- invasive methods for quantitative characterization and imaging methods in heterogeneous aquifers using hydrologic and geophysical techniques; (b) examination of fundamental relationships and processes at multiple scales; (c) testing theories and models for groundwater flow and solute transport; and (d) educating and training the next generation of professionals in multidisciplinary subsurface science and engineering. The design of the wells and the wellfield provide for a wide range of single-well, cross-hole, multiwell and multilevel hydrologic, geophysical, and combined hydrologic-geophysical experiments. Efforts have been focused largely on (a) establishing the 3D distributions of geologic, hydrologic, and geophysical parameters which can then be used as the basis for testing methods to jointly invert hard and soft data to return the "known" 3D K distribution and (b) developing subsurface measurement and imaging methods including static and time-lapse tomographic imaging methods. From this work we have developed a good understanding of the hydrostratigraphic framework of the BHRS as a hierarchical system which includes layers and lenses; this framework is recognized with geologic, hydrologic, radar, seismic, and EM methods and tracer tests. Work to date has been conducted by Boise State University with some collaboration and exchange with researchers and students from other institutions. At this point the BHRS is functioning well as a field-scale control volume and test cell in a multiscale heterogeneous aquifer so there is an opportunity to increase the range of both collaborative participation and research activities at the BHRS. In this regard, opportunities exist to investigate and monitor process and property variation in time and space, and fluxes within system components and across boundaries (i.e., ground water, surface water, unsaturated zone, phreatophytes) including chemical and biological/microbiological investigations in addition to on-going hydrologic and geophysical investigations.

Barrash, W.; Routh, P. S.

2006-12-01

143

Research on TRIZ and CAIs Application Problems for Technology Innovation  

Science.gov (United States)

In order to realize application of invent problem solve theory (TRIZ) and computer aided innovation software (CAIs) , need to solve some key problems, such as the mode choice of technology innovation, establishment of technology innovation organization network(TION), and achievement of innovative process based on TRIZ and CAIs, etc.. This paper shows that the demands for TRIZ and CAIs according to the characteristics and existing problem of the manufacturing enterprises. Have explained that the manufacturing enterprises need to set up an open TION of enterprise leading type, and achieve the longitudinal cooperation innovation with institution of higher learning. The process of technology innovation based on TRIZ and CAIs has been set up from researching and developing point of view. Application of TRIZ and CAIs in FY Company has been summarized. The application effect of TRIZ and CAIs has been explained using technology innovation of the close goggle valve product.

Li, Xiangdong; Li, Qinghai; Bai, Zhonghang; Geng, Lixiao

144

Computer codes for problems of isotope and radiation research  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A survey is given of computer codes for problems in isotope and radiation research. Altogether 44 codes are described as titles with abstracts. 17 of them are in the INIS scope and are processed individually. The subjects are indicated in the chapter headings: 1) analysis of tracer experiments, 2) spectrum calculations, 3) calculations of ion and electron trajectories, 4) evaluation of gamma irradiation plants, and 5) general software

145

Financial and personnel problems of research libraries in Poland  

OpenAIRE

Explains how managers of Polish research libraries face many problems provoked by the changes which have taken place both in these institutions and in their surroundings on the one hand, and by the obsolete rules which their operations regulate. Among the most serious financial obstacles are the following: a prolonged delay in the confirmation of a library's budget; too many financial sources; financial dependence of the majority of the libraries; restrictions on self-...

Jazdon, Artur

1995-01-01

146

The Real Issues of the Middle East and the Arab Spring Addressing Research, Innovation and Entrepreneurship  

CERN Document Server

The wave of protests and populist uprisings in the Middle East has heightened the focus on a volatile region. But the emphasis on political issues has obscured underlying issues concerning education, infrastructure, research, innovation, entrepreneurship and sustainable environmental and social development. This volume, emerging in the aftermath of a conference and workshop on science and technology in the region, presents contributions from a range of experts from the Middle East, Europe, and the world to provide fresh new insights and perspectives on the challenges and prospects for regional development in the changing global context of our time. The authors explore such topics as: the role of information and communication technologies; mindset change in support of investment in intangible assets and risk-taking; how to approach cultural issues, institutions and governance; collaborations with other regions, and; benchmarking performance while drawing lessons of relevance for the special local context. Ulti...

Djeflat, Abdelkader

2013-01-01

147

University bioscientists' risk epistemologies and research problem choices  

Science.gov (United States)

Scientific discoveries take place within scientific communities that are established in legitimating organizations such as universities and research institutes. Often times, scientists undergo tensions and paradoxes as they evaluate the risks they are willing to accept in their work. The types of risk/benefit decisions scientists make to determine which research projects to engage in and how they engage in them is more important than ever, due to current restrictions on funding for scientific research. The main objective of this dissertation is to analyze the ways in which university bioscientists define, evaluate, and manage risks in science, i.e. their risk epistemologies. In the process, I examine bioscientists' risk perceptions and demographic and contextual factors that influence those perceptions. Additionally, I investigate the associations between risk perceptions and research problem choices. This dissertation followed a mix-methods approach. The data collection included twenty semi-structured in-depth interviews and a large-scale online survey of university bioscientists. Based on three theoretically driven research questions that surfaced through examining current literature, I organized the dissertation into three different essays. The first essay explores risk epistemologies of university bioscientists as they determine the best trajectories for their scientific careers. This essay analyses data gathered by conducting in-depth interviews meant to elicit university bioscientists' different understandings of the notion of risk. The second essay quantifies bioscientists' risk perceptions using data gathered from the online survey. In this essay, I investigate the influence of life-course, gender, sources of funding, research orientation, network interactions, and perceived significance of research on risk perception. In the third essay I use data gathered from the online survey to investigate the associations between university bioscientists' risk perceptions and their research problem choices. The results suggest that risk is a useful paradigm to study decision-making in science. In making scientific risk decisions, at times scientists conform to the existing institutional structures. Other times they challenge them, persist through them, or compromise their actions. Bioscientists' risk epistemologies matter to the extent that these allow for more creative ways in which individual scientists can navigate the institutional environments that they are embedded in. Risk perceptions of university bioscientists differ based on the specific dimension of risk under investigation. Several significant relationships between perceived risks and problem choice orientations have emerged through the data analysis. Overall, university bioscientists' risk epistemologies seem to be related to the unique reward structure of science, compelling them to use various risk management techniques while navigating their research environments.

Appuhamilage Dilshani Eranga Sarathchandra, Walakada

148

Addressing the global burden of chronic kidney disease through clinical and translational research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Worldwide, an estimated 200 million people have chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the United States, African Americans (AAs) have a four-fold excess risk of CKD compared to non-Hispanic white people and globally, people in the low-to-middle income countries of Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa have the highest rates of CKD. Annually, more than 500,000 individuals develop end-stage renal disease (or CKD stage 5) in Sub-Saharan Africa alone and the vast majority of these patients suffer premature mortality. The health care costs and economic burden of CKD are huge and not sustainable even in advanced Western countries. A recent discovery on the role of Apolipoprotein 1 (APOL1) G1 and G2 renal risk variants in AAs has a huge potential to unravel the etiology of CKD in both AA and other black populations. Under the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) initiative, a large prospective genetic study of CKD is being conducted in 8000 participants in four African countries (Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, and Nigeria; for a total population of 320 million). This and other basic research studies in the United States could potentially shed great insight into the genetics and biologic mechanisms involved in the excess predilection of Africans and AAs to CKD. PMID:25125737

Ojo, Akinlolu

2014-01-01

149

Addressing Prediabetes in Childhood Obesity Treatment Programs: Support from Research and Current Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and prediabetes have increased in prevalence among overweight and obese children, with significant implications for long-term health. There is little published evidence on the best approaches to care of prediabetes among overweight youth or the current practices used across pediatric weight management programs. Methods: This article reviews the literature and summarizes current practices for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of prediabetes at childhood obesity treatment centers. Findings regarding current practice were based on responses to an online survey from 28 pediatric weight management programs at 25 children's hospitals in 2012. Based on the literature reviewed, and empiric data, consensus support statements on prediabetes care and T2DM prevention were developed among representatives of these 25 children's hospitals' obesity clinics. Results: The evidence reviewed demonstrates that current T2DM and prediabetes diagnostic parameters are derived from adult-based studies with little understanding of clinical outcomes among youth. Very limited evidence exists on preventing progression of prediabetes. Some evidence suggests that a significant proportion of obese youth with prediabetes will revert to normoglycemia without pharmacological management. Evidence supports lifestyle modification for children with prediabetes, but further study of specific lifestyle changes and pharmacological treatments is needed. Conclusion: Evidence to guide management of prediabetes in children is limited. Current practice patterns of pediatric weight management programs show areas of variability in practice, reflecting the limited evidence base. More research is needed to guide clinical care for overweight youth with prediabetes. PMID:25055134

Grow, H. Mollie; Fernandez, Cristina; Lukasiewicz, Gloria J.; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Shaffer, Laura A.; Sweeney, Brooke; Woolford, Susan J.; Estrada, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

150

Postal addressing  

CERN Document Server

Specifies the maximum dimensions of the postal address and its locations on forms complying with ISO 8439 and is designed to standardize its presentation and structure. Annexes A and B give elements of the addressee's address and examples of addresses.

International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

1993-01-01

151

Barriers to communication and cooperation in addressing community impacts of radioactive releases from research facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Two instances of research facilities responding to public scrutiny will be discussed. The first concerns emissions from a tritium labeling facility operated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); the second deals with releases of plutonium from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). There are many parallels between these two cases, both of which are still ongoing. In both, the national laboratory is the acknowledged source of low-level (by regulatory standards) radioactive contamination in the community. A major purpose of both investigations is to determine the degree of the contamination and the threat it poses to public health and the environment. The examining panel or committee is similarly constituted in the two cases, including representatives from all four categories of stakeholders: decision makers; scientists and other professionals doing the analysis/assessment; environmental activist or public interest groups; and ordinary citizens (nearly everyone else not in one or more of the first three camps). Both involved community participation from the beginning. The levels of outrage over the events triggering the assessment are comparable; though discovered or appreciated only a few years ago, the release of radiation in both cases occurred or began occurring more than a decade ago. The meetings have been conducted in a similar manner, with comparable frequency, often utilizing the services of professional facilitators. In both cases, the sharpnal facilitators. In both cases, the sharply contrasting perceptions of risk commonly seen between scientists and activists were present from the beginning, though the contrast was sharper and more problematical in the Berkeley case. Yet, the Livermore case seems to be progressing towards a satisfactory resolution, while the Berkeley case remains mired in ill-will, with few tangible results after two years of effort. We perceive a wide gap in negotiation skills (at the very least), and a considerable difference in willingness to compromise, between the environmental activist groups participating in the two cases. A degree of contentiousness existed from the start among the participants in the Berkeley case-particularly between the environmental activists and the scientists/regulators that was not approached in the Livermore case, and which was and still is severe enough to stifle meaningful progress. The Berkeley activists are considerably more aggressive, we believe, in arguing their points of view, making demands about what should be done, and verbally assailing the scientists and government regulators. We offer the following comments on the barriers to communication and cooperation that distinguish the Berkeley and Livermore cases. In no particular order, they are (a) the presence of a higher degree of polarization between the Berkeley activists and the establishment, as represented by government scientists and regulators, (b) the absence, in the Berkeley case, of an activist leader with skills and effectiveness comparable to a well-known leader in Livermore, (c) frequent displays by several of the Berkeley activists of incivility, distrust, and disrespect for the regulators and scientists, (d) extraordinary difficulties in reaching consensus in the Tritium Issues Work Group meetings, perhaps because goals diverged among the factions, (e) a considerable degree of resentment by the Berkeley activists over the imbalance in conditions of participation, pitting well-paid, tax-supported professionals against citizen volunteers, (f) the brick wall that divides the perspectives of no safe dose and levels below regulatory concern when trying to reach conclusions about radiation dangers to the community, and (g) unwillingness to consider both sides of the risk-reward coin: benefits to the community and society at large of the tritium labeling activity, vs. the health risk from small quantities of tritium released to the environment

152

A selection of biomechanical research problems: From modeling to experimentation  

Science.gov (United States)

The research undertakings within this manuscript illustrate the importance of biomechanics in today's science. Without doubt, biomechanics can be utilized to obtain a better understanding of many unsolved mysteries involved in the field of medicine. Moreover, biomechanics can be used to develop better prosthetic or surgical devices as well. Chapter 2 represents a medical problem, which has not been solved for more than a century. With the use of fundamental principles of biomechanics', a better insight of this problem and its possible causes were obtained. Chapter 3 investigates the mechanical interaction between the human teeth and some processed food products during mastication, which is a routine but crucial daily activity of a human being. Chapter 4 looks at a problem within the field of surgery. In this chapter the stability and reliability of two different Suturing-Techniques are explored. Chapters 5 and 6 represent new patent designs as a result of the investigations made in Chapter 4. Chapter 7 studies the impact and load transfer patterns during the collision between a child's head and the ground. All of the above mentioned chapters show the significance of biomechanics in solving a range of different medical problems that involve physical and or mechanical characters.

Abbasi, Cyrus Omid

153

The Use of the Ames Test as a Tool for Addressing Problem-Based Learning in the Microbiology Lab  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Our environment is full of potential carcinogens such as UV light, industrial pollutants, pesticides, and food additives, among others. It is estimated that 90% of all carcinogens are also mutagens. The Ames test is one of the most common tests for mutagens. In this problem-based learning activity, undergraduate biology students used the Ames test to screen a substance they provided, to see if it could be considered a mutagen. The idea of surveying substances used in everyday life appealed to our students, and helped engage them in this activity.

Eliana Rodríguez

2012-08-01

154

Survey on Protocols addressing Head of Line Blocking Problem in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks using Directional Antennas  

OpenAIRE

Head of Line blocking phenomenon is common in First in First Out (FIFO) nature queues. Head of line blocking problem becomes significant in wireless ad hoc networks using directional antennas as it uses FIFO queue which consists of packets intended for different directions. A packet on the top of the queue may block the remaining packets if it finds the medium busy in its intended direction, where as the packets in the queue intended for other directions may find the medium to be idle. Very f...

P. SAI KIRAN,; Reddy, Dr L. S. S.

2011-01-01

155

The problem of time in ethnographic health care research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Drawing on the ideas outlined by anthropologist Fabian and feminist scholars Halford, Savage, and Witz, in this article I make two arguments that challenge ethnography's claim to theoretical inference and empirical generalization, particularly for research examining contemporary health care practices. For Fabian, the dilemma arose out of ethnography's origins in the secularization of time. Accounts of the subject's experiences using present tense assume no progress; accounts using past tense freeze the subjects in the past. For Halford and her colleagues, the methodological problem was reversed. Their respondents were engaged in a battle with health systems in constant change that resulted in the loss of memory of a corporate past. The problem now for the ethnographer, as in many other research approaches, is one of verification of observations and reliability of interpretations. The ethnographer now becomes frozen in time as is his or her account of events in the field. Drawing on ethnographic research in hospital workplace change, in this article I examine these time-based implications for truth claims. PMID:20142605

Willis, Eileen M

2010-04-01

156

Prospects of research works on radiation ecology problem in Kazakhstan  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In paper radioecological researches status on Kazakhstan territory are discussed. Mainly radioecological investigations are carrying out at the institutes of National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan. At present the radioecological investigations are concentrated on the territory of Semipalatinsk test site (STS) and places where hydrocarbon ores are mining (West Kazakhstan oil fields and Kara-Zhyra coal deposit on territory STS). In these examinations the main attention are paid to problems, related with the particular objects: 1) water (contamination by different radionuclides, radionuclide migration); 2) plutonium (soil contamination on the STS territory); 3) hydrocarbon fuels (contamination with different radionuclides): radon (determination of radon background of the total country territory)

157

Lumped parameters analysis of the IAEA research reactor benchmark problem  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A simple model has been developed to predict the transient behaviour of research reactors with simple means. The developed model uses a lumped parameters approach for the kinetics and heat transfer modeling with continuous feedback reactivities. The model is used for the analysis of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) 10 mw MTR research reactor benchmark problem. Transient responses to reactivity insertion and loss of coolant flow are presented and analyzed. The model predictions are accurate enough compared with the calculations conducted in various institutions using different codes. It is shown that the model can provide accurate predictions as long as the clad temperature does not exceed the ONB (onset of nucleate boiling) temperature. However, the results are very encouraging and the model is useful for practical purposes. (orig.)

Gaheen, M.A.; Elaraby, S. [Atomic Energy Authority, Abou Zabal (Egypt). Egypt Second Research Reactor; Aly, M.N.; Nagy, M.S. [Alexandria Univ. (Egypt). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

2006-08-15

158

Complex problems require complex solutions: the utility of social quality theory for addressing the Social Determinants of Health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to improve the health of the most vulnerable groups in society, the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH called for multi-sectoral action, which requires research and policy on the multiple and inter-linking factors shaping health outcomes. Most conceptual tools available to researchers tend to focus on singular and specific social determinants of health (SDH (e.g. social capital, empowerment, social inclusion. However, a new and innovative conceptual framework, known as social quality theory, facilitates a more complex and complete understanding of the SDH, with its focus on four domains: social cohesion, social inclusion, social empowerment and socioeconomic security, all within the same conceptual framework. This paper provides both an overview of social quality theory in addition to findings from a national survey of social quality in Australia, as a means of demonstrating the operationalisation of the theory. Methods Data were collected using a national random postal survey of 1044 respondents in September, 2009. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results Statistical analysis revealed that people on lower incomes (less than $45000 experience worse social quality across all of the four domains: lower socio-economic security, lower levels of membership of organisations (lower social cohesion, higher levels of discrimination and less political action (lower social inclusion and lower social empowerment. The findings were mixed in terms of age, with people over 65 years experiencing lower socio-economic security, but having higher levels of social cohesion, experiencing lower levels of discrimination (higher social inclusion and engaging in more political action (higher social empowerment. In terms of gender, women had higher social cohesion than men, although also experienced more discrimination (lower social inclusion. Conclusions Applying social quality theory allows researchers and policy makers to measure and respond to the multiple sources of oppression and advantage experienced by certain population groups, and to monitor the effectiveness of interventions over time.

Ward Paul R

2011-08-01

159

ATM addressing  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Requirements for addressing in an ATM network were discussed, including a description of the different addressing formats adopted by the ATM Forum. Guidelines for selecting an ATM address plan were provided. Ease of administration, unique identification of an ATM endpoint, ability to integrate addresses, and to accommodate the interworking between public and private networks, should be the principal objectives in selecting an address plan.2 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

Baillargeon, S. [Bell Canada Northern Electric Research Ltd., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

1996-07-01

160

Update: Health Status of Iranian Victims of Chemical Weapons / Ongoing Research Projects Addressing CW Health Effects in Iran  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Use of chemical weapons against Iran during the 1980s was a horrifying epic in the annals of modern warfare, inflicting enormous suffering during the conflict that continues to the present day in the form of latent illness among survivors. Surviving victims suffer from a diverse range of chronic illnesses placing an enormous strain on the nation's medical infrastructure. To define the scope of this problem, the National Organization for Veteran's Affairs (Janbazan) established a subsidiary research department called Janbazan Medical and Engineering Research Center (JMERC). Beginning in 2000 JMERC has conducted epidemiological, clinical and basic scientific studies to characterize disease among chemical attack survivors and develop new therapeutic strategies. The primary JMERC mission has been to identify where resources may be allocated so as to most effectively treat patients with the greatest need - requiring a comprehensive picture of the major medical problems among this population. Accordingly, JMERC's initial task was to define the nature and distribution of serious chronic illness among CW survivors. Therefore epidemiological studies in CW-exposed Iranian populations are currently underway. Ultimately these studies will allow management of illness among CW-exposed populations that is both compassionate and cost-effective. A summary of the above mentioned research projects will be reported in this article. (author)

161

Addressing learning difficulties in Newtons 1st and 3rd Laws through problem based inquiry using Easy Java Simulation  

CERN Document Server

We develop an Easy Java Simulation (EJS) model for students to visualize Newtons 1st and 3rd laws, using frictionless constant motion equation and a spring collision equation during impact. Using Physics by Inquiry instructional (PbI) strategy, the simulation and its problem based inquiry worksheet aim to enhance learning of these two Newtonian concepts. We report results from Experimental (N=62 students) and Control (N=67) Groups in 11 multiple choice questions pre and post tests, conducted by three teachers in the school. Results suggest, at 95 percent confidence level, significant improvement for concept of Newtons 1st Law while not so for Newtons 3rd Law. A Focus Group Discussion revealed students confirming the usefulness of the EJS model in visualizing the 1st Law while not so much for the 3rd Law. We speculate the design ideas for constant velocity motion in the computer model coupled with the PbI worksheet did allow for making sense and experiencing of the 1st Law, where traditional pen-paper represen...

Goh, Khoon Song Aloysius; Yip, Kim Wah; Toh, Ping Yong Jeffrey; Lye, Sze Yee

2013-01-01

162

Nuclear and isotopic techniques for addressing nutritional problems, with special reference to current applications in developing countries.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nuclear and isotopic techniques are valuable tools in human nutritional research studies. Isotopes, both radioactive and nonradioactive, enable detailed evaluations of nutrient intake, body composition, energy expenditure, status of micronutrients, and nutrient bioavailability. In recent times, isotopic methods have been widely used in a number of coordinated research projects and technical cooperation projects of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Nutrition Programme. The doubly labeled water technique combines the use of the stable isotopes oxygen-18 and hydrogen-2 (deuterium) to measure total energy expenditure in free-living human subjects, and to investigate the magnitude and causes of both undernutrition and the emergence of obesity in developing countries. The deuterium dilution technique is a reliable tool to measure breastmilk intake and thereby infant growth and development. In collaboration with the World Health Organization's Growth Monitoring Program, this technique is being used to generate new data on growth standards for children in developing countries. This technique is also used in the measurement of body composition by the estimation of lean body mass and fat mass in individuals. Stable isotopes of iron and zinc have been successfully used to assess the nutritional impact of several nationwide food supplementation-programs conducted on pregnant and lactating women and children in both industrialized and developing countries. Isotopic techniques are especially suitable for monitoring changes in body composition, energy metabolism, and mineral status (with particular reference to osteoporosis) in the elderly. Nuclear methods have also served to develop models for a physiological reference man in Asia in support of radiological health and safety issues, for establishing elemental composition of foods, and for measurement of pollutants in the environment. PMID:11975366

Iyengar, Venkatesh

2002-03-01

163

Research Problems in Data Curation: Outcomes from the Data Curation Education in Research Centers Program  

Science.gov (United States)

The need for data curation is being recognized in numerous institutional settings as national research funding agencies extend data archiving mandates to cover more types of research grants. Data curation, however, is not only a practical challenge. It presents many conceptual and theoretical challenges that must be investigated to design appropriate technical systems, social practices and institutions, policies, and services. This presentation reports on outcomes from an investigation of research problems in data curation conducted as part of the Data Curation Education in Research Centers (DCERC) program. DCERC is developing a new model for educating data professionals to contribute to scientific research. The program is organized around foundational courses and field experiences in research and data centers for both master's and doctoral students. The initiative is led by the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in collaboration with the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee, and library and data professionals at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). At the doctoral level DCERC is educating future faculty and researchers in data curation and establishing a research agenda to advance the field. The doctoral seminar, Research Problems in Data Curation, was developed and taught in 2012 by the DCERC principal investigator and two doctoral fellows at the University of Illinois. It was designed to define the problem space of data curation, examine relevant concepts and theories related to both technical and social perspectives, and articulate research questions that are either unexplored or under theorized in the current literature. There was a particular emphasis on the Earth and environmental sciences, with guest speakers brought in from NCAR, National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Through the assignments, students constructed dozens of research questions informed by class readings, presentations, and discussions. A technical report is in progress on the resulting research agenda covering: data standards; infrastructure; research context; data reuse; sharing and access; preservation; and conceptual foundations. This presentation will discuss the agenda and its importance for the geosciences, highlighting high priority research questions. It will also introduce the related research to be undertaken by two DCERC doctoral students at NCAR during the 2013-2014 academic year and other data curation research in progress by the doctoral DCERC team.

Palmer, C. L.; Mayernik, M. S.; Weber, N.; Baker, K. S.; Kelly, K.; Marlino, M. R.; Thompson, C. A.

2013-12-01

164

IPCC and other assessments as vehicles for integrating natural and social science research to address human dimensions of climate change  

Science.gov (United States)

IPCC and other assessments address both natural and social science aspects of climate change, but this approach has historically involved relatively little integration across the two sets of disciplines. In a framing that is only slightly oversimplified, past relationships were mostly sequential. From a physical climate perspective, human behavior was a boundary condition setting the trajectory of atmospheric forcing. And from an impacts perspective, changes in the physical climate set the stage upon which humans experienced impacts and made decisions about adaptation and mitigation. Integrated assessment models have been the main locus of research on questions about bi-directional coupling, where the trajectory of the physical climate influences GHG balance related to the need for agricultural land as well as GHG emissions from other activities. In the IPCC AR4 (2007), feedbacks from the natural carbon cycle to climate were a focus, but with little discussion of the potentially important feedbacks from climate-carbon interactions in the human domain. Detailed research and modeling in this area are still in the relatively early stages. For the future, IPCC and other assessments potentially provide a vehicle for new insights about the interaction of natural and social science dimensions of climate change. Several aspects could be interesting. Some of these relate to the decisions that modulate GHG emissions. For example, how does scientific understanding of climate change influence people's interest in mitigation and adaptation? How does it influence their willingness to pay? How are these modulated by regional and global geopolitics? Other potentially interesting aspects relate to interactions between mitigation and adaptation. For example, how does local experience of climate change alter the balance of focus on adaptation and mitigation? Still others relate to the nature of impacts and the role of sustainable development. With an aggress sustainable development agenda aimed at building resilience, would societies be more or less focused on impacts? Finding ways to address these questions in the context of an assessment presents a range of challenges, beginning with the challenge that the assessments are generally not designed to conduct new research. But on the other hand, the juxtaposition of disciplines, perspectives, and tools creates a fertile ground for new insights.

Field, C. B.

2012-12-01

165

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Problem-Solving Intervention Addressing Barriers to Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Behaviors in 3 Underserved Populations: Colorado, North Carolina, West Virginia, 2009  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction In low-income and underserved populations, financial hardship and multiple competing roles and responsibilities lead to difficulties in lifestyle change for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. To improve CVD prevention behaviors, we adapted, pilot-tested, and evaluated a problem-solving intervention designed to address barriers to lifestyle change. Methods The sample consisted of 81 participants from 3 underserved populations, including 28 Hispanic or non-Hispanic white women in a western community (site 1), 31 African-American women in a semirural southern community (site 2), and 22 adults in an Appalachian community (site 3). Incorporating focus group findings, we assessed a standardized intervention involving 6-to-8 week group sessions devoted to problem-solving in the fall of 2009. Results Most sessions were attended by 76.5% of participants, demonstrating participant adoption and engagement. The intervention resulted in significant improvement in problem-solving skills (P < .001) and perceived stress (P < .05). Diet, physical activity, and weight remained stable, although 72% of individuals reported maintenance or increase in daily fruit and vegetable intake, and 67% reported maintenance or increase in daily physical activity. Conclusion Study results suggest the intervention was acceptable to rural, underserved populations and effective in training them in problem-solving skills and stress management for CVD risk reduction. PMID:24602586

Bryant, Lucinda L.; Leary, Janie M.; Vu, Maihan B.; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D.; McMilin, Colleen R.; Keyserling, Thomas C.

2014-01-01

166

Keynote address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

DOE biomass R ampersand D programs have the potential to provide America with both plentiful, clean-burning domestic transportation fuels and cost-competitive industrial and utility fuels, benefiting energy security in the United States. Biofuels developed under our programs will also help improve air quality, reduce greenhouse gases, reduce the large daily quantities of waste we produce, and revitalize rural America. These research motivations have been documented in the National Energy Strategy. DOE looks forward to expanding its biofuels research program and to forging a partnership with private sector for cost-shared commercialization of new fuels and vehicle technologies. Many alternative fuels (e.g., ethanol, methanol, compressed natural gas, propane, or electricity) are candidates for gaining market share. Indeed, there may be significant regional variation in the future fuel mix. Alcohol fuels from biomass, particularly ethanol, have the potential to make a major contribution. Currently, ethanol in the United States is almost entirely made from corn; and the limitations of that process are well known (e.g., costly feedstock, end product requiring subsidy to be competitive, use of fossil fuels in renewable feedstock production and processing, and potential adverse impact of corn ethanol production on the price of food). To address these concerns, the DOE biofuels program is pursuing an ambitious research program to develop the technologies needed to convert thelop the technologies needed to convert these crops into alternative transportation fuels, primarily cellulose-based ethanol and methanol. Program R ampersand D has reduced the estimated cost per gallon of cellulose-based ethanol from $3.60 in 1980 to the current $1.35, with a program goal of $0.60 by the year 2000. DOE is also investigating the thermochemical conversion of biomass to methanol. The program goal is to achieve commercial production of methanol (like ethanol) at the gasoline equivalent of $0.90 per gallon by the year 2000. 4 figs

167

Quality of life of people with mental health problems: a synthesis of qualitative research  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose To identify the domains of quality of life important to people with mental health problems. Method A systematic review of qualitative research undertaken with people with mental health problems using a framework synthesis. Results We identified six domains: well-being and ill-being; control, autonomy and choice; self-perception; belonging; activity; and hope and hopelessness. Firstly, symptoms or ‘ill-being’ were an intrinsic aspect of quality of life for people with severe mental health problems. Additionally, a good quality of life was characterised by the feeling of being in control (particularly of distressing symptoms), autonomy and choice; a positive self-image; a sense of belonging; engagement in meaningful and enjoyable activities; and feelings of hope and optimism. Conversely, a poor quality life, often experienced by those with severe mental health difficulties, was characterized by feelings of distress; lack of control, choice and autonomy; low self-esteem and confidence; a sense of not being part of society; diminished activity; and a sense of hopelessness and demoralization. Conclusions Generic measures fail to address the complexity of quality of life measurement and the broad range of domains important to people with mental health problems. PMID:23173689

2012-01-01

168

High density electroencephalography in sleep research: potential, problems, future perspective  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available High density EEG (hdEEG during sleep combines the superior temporal resolution of EEG recordings with high spatial resolution. Thus, this method allows a topographical analysis of sleep EEG activity and thereby fosters the shift from a global view of sleep to a local one. HdEEG allowed to investigate sleep rhythms in terms of their characteristic behavior (e.g. the traveling of slow waves and in terms of their relationship to cortical functioning (e.g. consciousness and cognitive abilities. Moreover, recent studies successfully demonstrated that hdEEG can be used to study brain functioning in neurological and neuro-developmental disorders, and to evaluate therapeutic approaches. This review highlights the potential, the problems and future perspective of hdEEG in sleep research.

CarolineLustenberger

2012-05-01

169

Conducting Community Research in Rural China -Addressing the Methodological Challenges of Recruiting Participants in Rapidly Changing Social Environments.  

Science.gov (United States)

BACKGROUND: The paper addressed a unique challenge for public health and community research in rural China, i.e., the very large percentage of young adults that comprises a highly mobile working population that has been an essential component of the country's economic transformation. Fluid local demographic patterns potentially have a substantial impact on sample representativeness and data validity. METHODS: This report is based upon a cross sectional survey with face-to-face interviews of residents aged 16-34 years in rural communities of Mianyang, Sichuan Province, China. Two waves of fieldwork and other strategies were adopted in response to recruitment challenges. RESULTS: 1654 of 3008 potential participants took part in the study; this constituted 98% of those individuals approached and 55% of the persons enumerated in the local household registration system (hukou). Analyses revealed substantial differences among those who were interviewed during September and October 2005, versus those seen during the Chinese Lunar New Year of 2006 when many migrant workers and students returned to their homes. Both groups together differed from those who were unavailable during either recruiting episode. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: We discuss potential responses to associated methodological challenges, including, (1) permanent hukou mismatches; (2) temporary hukou mismatches; (3) difficulties faced by potential participants to fully understand the purpose of research, the informed consent process, and specific research questions; and (4) appreciation of the importance of local social networks, as they pertain in particular to rural China. These findings underscore that there may be a need to make "on-the-ground" adjustments to varying local conditions to maximize sample representativeness and data validity. PMID:22662022

Dai, Jing; Chiu, Helen F K; Hou, Zai-Jin; Caine, Eric D

2012-06-01

170

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The opening address by the host country started by thanking to the International Atomic Energy Agency for holding this important scientific event in in Morocco. The themes to be considered by this conference are among the priorities of the Scientific Research Department in its endeavour to promote scientific research in the field of nuclear science and technology for peaceful uses in Morocco. By so doing, this Department is following and supporting the efforts being made by our country to provide training, and elaborate rules and regulations, and to create infrastructure, acquire material and, equipment and encourage qualified and active researchers. Hence, the convening of this conference responds to a strategic interest of our country, which, similar to other countries, is committed to the achievement of comprehensive and sustainable development for the protection of human kind and the environment. This is considered nowadays as a strategic and vital objective as it entails the protection of people from radiation and against all kinds of professional risks and health hazards. Morocco attaches great importance to radiation safety issues. Our country adhered to all international conventions related to nuclear safety. It is in the process of adapting its internal regulations to international norms and standards, and it is making progress towards the establishment of a national safety body which meets those norms and standards, with the assistance of the IAEA. For this with the assistance of the IAEA. For this purpose, a standing committee for the follow-up of nuclear affairs has been created on the basis of Royal Instructions, and placed under the authority of the Prime Minister. Its task is to serve as a think-tank on nuclear safety issues and to make proposals on ways and means of reinforcing radiation safety measures. It goes without saying that the peaceful uses of nuclear energy must meet the safety standards elaborated by the IAEA. However, we are convinced that the elaboration of safety standards would not be enough unless they are understood and applied by all. In order to attain this objective, the IAEA should spare no effort for the provision of training. Thus, Morocco has put at the disposal of the IAEA the National Centre for Nuclear Energy, Science, and Techniques for the organization of a post-graduate training course on radiation safety and the safety of nuclear waste for African French-speaking countries. Morocco has also elaborated, with the assistance of the IAEA, a law aimed at unifying and harmonizing the existing legislation and creating a regulatory body. In addition, Morocco has acquired scientific know-how and technical expertise in the field of nuclear research that allow him to serve as a centre of excellence for Africa

171

The Ethical Problems of Reserach : An empirical study of ethics in research practice  

OpenAIRE

Most accounts of the ethical problems facing researchers across a broad spectrum of research fields come from ethicists, ethics committees and specialists committed to the study of ethics in human research. In contrast, this study reports on the ethical questions that researchers, themselves, report facing in their everyday practice. Fifty-five Swedish researchers contributed 109 examples of ethical dilemmas, conflicts and problems in research. They were all researchers at the post-doctoral l...

Colnerud, Gunnel

2013-01-01

172

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Berlin has become a modern, open and forward looking city filling its role as the German capital with self confidence and a very special charm. I really appreciate that this conference is being held here in Berlin. Supporting communication between science and the economy is one of our policy objectives, and we are also determined to develop Berlin's attraction for congresses and conferences. In the next week you will focus on the 'Safe Decommissioning for Nuclear Activities'. You work in an enormous field. Currently, there are more than 110 nuclear installations in the European Union in varying stages of decommissioning, and an additional 150 installations will be dismantled by the year 2020. This means that decommissioning will no longer be treated in a case by case fashion like, for example, the Greifswald Nuclear Power Plant or the Wismut remediation site, which some of you will visit on Friday. Rather, decommissioning will have to be turned into a full scale industrial process with standardized procedures. Each of these procedures has to be optimized, not only with respect to technical requirements but most importantly in a way that guarantees maximum safety for the workers, for the population and for the environment. Consequently, the focal points of this conference cover an extremely wide range, including: Strategies for the safe termination and the assessment of the adequacy of the current technology; Waste management and disposal; Release of materials from regnd disposal; Release of materials from regulatory control; Remediation of sites; Social impact of practice termination. Adequate coverage of all these issues is probably not made easier by the proposed enlargement of the European Union to include a number of Central European and Baltic countries. At an early stage, it is the scientific community, with its creativity and potential, which conceives novel approaches and designs new processes. But at a certain point the foundation for the successful handling of a complex problem must be enlarged and become more technical. Involving experts from all fields is then crucial for success. This perception is reflected in the goals of this meeting. It is designed as an extensive information exchange forum between decision makers, regulators, radiation and waste safety specialists, and the nuclear industry. It is this mix which promises high efficiency with respect to solving the problems that you are addressing. I am sure that the safe termination of practices involving radioactive materials during the decommissioning of nuclear installations is one of the major challenges that industrialized nations will have to face during the next decades

173

Presidential address.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Secretary of India's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare serves as Chair of the Executive Council of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay. She addressed its 35th convocation in 1993. Global population stands at 5.43 billion and increases by about 90 million people each year. 84 million of these new people are born in developing countries. India contributes 17 million new people annually. The annual population growth rate in India is about 2%. Its population size will probably surpass 1 billion by the 2000. High population growth rates are a leading obstacle to socioeconomic development in developing countries. Governments of many developing countries recognize this problem and have expanded their family planning programs to stabilize population growth. Asian countries that have done so and have completed the fertility transition include China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Burma, Malaysia, North Korea, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam have not yet completed the transition. Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Iran, Nepal, and Pakistan are half-way through the transition. High population growth rates put pressure on land by fragmenting finite land resources, increasing the number of landless laborers and unemployment, and by causing considerable rural-urban migration. All these factors bring about social stress and burden civic services. India has reduced its total fertility rate from 5.2 to 3.9 between 1971 and 1991. Some Indian states have already achieved replacement fertility. Considerable disparity in socioeconomic development exists among states and districts. For example, the states of Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh have female literacy rates lower than 27%, while that for Kerala is 87%. Overall, infant mortality has fallen from 110 to 80 between 1981 and 1990. In Uttar Pradesh, it has fallen from 150 to 98, while it is at 17 in Kerala. India needs innovative approaches to increase contraceptive prevalence rates and to reach replacement level fertility. PMID:12287408

Vohra, U

1993-07-01

174

Anxiety disorders and comorbid sleep problems in school-aged youth: review and future research directions.  

Science.gov (United States)

This review examines the relationship between anxiety disorders and sleep related problems (SRPs) in school-aged youth. Following an overview of normative sleep patterns and maturational sleep changes, the review addresses issues related to sleep measurement. SRPs are reviewed in relation to executive functions (e.g. affect regulation) as is the shared role of neurological regions in the regulation of anxiety and sleep. Studies of the association between SRPs and anxiety in anxiety-disordered samples are reviewed with explicit consideration of the potential mechanisms underlying the sleep-anxiety relationship (e.g., arousal, sleep hygiene, parental accommodation). Specific cognitive-behavioral treatments for SRPs and anxiety are reviewed with regard to their impact on comorbid anxiety or SRPs. Methodological limitations are noted and recommendations for future research are proposed. PMID:24962165

Peterman, Jeremy S; Carper, Matthew M; Kendall, Philip C

2015-06-01

175

Means-end chains and laddering: An inventory of problems and an agenda for research  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Executive summary 1. Means-end chains are a device used to understand how consumers mentally link products to self-relevant consequences. Means-end chains are usually measured by a method called laddering. 2. Means-end chains may fall short of tapping all relevant aspects of how consumers think about products. Specifically, nonverbal imagery, episodic information, and procedural knowledge are not included in means-end chains. 3. A number of methodological problems can be identified in the collection of means-end chain data. Major problems, which should be addressed in research, are methods to elicit the product attributes the laddering is to start with, the integration of a usage situation in the interview, and the basic decision on how much direct the respondent. 4. Concerning the coding of laddering data, a higher degree of transparency of the coding process would be desirable. 5. Hierarchical value maps, a major graphic device used to visualise results from laddering studies, should take care of possible non-homogeneity of respondents and of the intricacies of aggregation following from it. 6. A catalog of research topics is developed that can guide studies aimed at improving the means-end chains and laddering methodology.

Grunert, Klaus G.; Grunert, Suzanne C.

1995-01-01

176

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In on of the three 'pillars' of the overall IAEA mission, the 'safety pillar', the IAEA seeks to contribute towards a vision of a strong, sustainable and visible global safety regime by pursuing three main objectives: to establish and maintain a set of safety standards that are universally accepted as global standards; to integrate fully these safety standards and the various mechanisms to provide for their application; and to promote self-sustaining regional and global networks of safety knowledge and experience. The purpose of this conference is to foster the exchange of information, but this is not an end in itself. The aim of this conference is to clarify the key issues within the larger global picture and set out a road map for the future direction and priorities for work on safety standards for decommissioning and for applying those standards. The word 'decommissioning' is often treated as though it was synonymous with dismantling nuclear reactors and returning to a 'green field' site, and we quite deliberately intended to challenge that interpretation. The subject of this conference is one that no country can ignore. All countries whether or not they have nuclear power programs or research reactors - make use of at least some applications involving radiation sources or radioactive materials, in medicine, industry, agriculture and research. All of these countries will need to terminate these activities safely. Decommissioning is also a subject that has suffered oning is also a subject that has suffered from being addressed in a piecemeal and sometimes ad hoc fashion.The IAEA must take its share of responsibility for this: IAEA has published safety standards on particular aspects of decommissioning, and more general safety standards on the regulatory control of practices, on operational safety, on occupational radiation protection, on the management of different types of radioactive waste and discharges, and we are developing standards on the management of very low activity wastes and of contaminated areas. Yet, the IAEA has not succeeded in bringing all these elements together into safety standards to cover the entire process of decommissioning and the termination of practices. Similarly, the IAEA has recently been involved in the organization of international conferences on the remediation of contaminated areas and of an international workshop on the regulatory aspects of decommissioning. Within the IAEA, one step towards a more holistic approach to the issue was taken by establishing a Technical Group on Decommissioning (TEGDE)

177

Integrated solutions to SHM problems: an overview of SHM research at the LANL/UCSD engineering institute  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This seminar will provide an overview of structural health monitoring (SHM) research that is being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The seminar will begin by stating that SHM should be viewed as an important component of the more comprehensive intelligent life-cycle engineering process. Then LANL's statistical pattern recognition paradigm for addressing SHM problems will be introduced and current research that is focused on each part of the paradigm will be discussed. In th is paradigm, the process can be broken down into four parts: (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition and Cleansing, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Model Development for Feature Discrimination. When one attempts to apply this paradigm to data from real world structures, it quickly becomes apparent that the ability to cleanse, compress, normalize and fuse data to account for operational and environmental variability is a key implementation issue when addressing Parts 2-4 of this paradigm. This discussion will be followed by the introduction a new project entitled 'Intelligent Wind Turbines' which is the focus of much of our current SHM research . This summary will be followed by a discussion of issues that must be addressed if this technology is to make the transition from research to practice and new research directions that are emerging for SHM.

Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08

178

Perspectives on problem solving in cognitive research and educational assessment: analytical, interactive, and collaborative problem solving  

OpenAIRE

Problem solving has received broad public interest as an important competency in modern societies. In educational large-scale assessments paper-pencil based analytical problem solving was included first (e.g., Programme for International Student Assessment, PISA 2003). With growing interest in more complex situations, the focus has shifted to interactive problem solving (e.g., PISA 2012) requiring identification and control of complex systems. In the future, collaborative problem solving repr...

Greiff, Samuel; Holt, Daniel; Funke, Joachim

2013-01-01

179

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: Honourable Representatives of His Majesty King Mohammed VI and of the Government of Morocco, representatives of sponsoring organizations, distinguished participants, on behalf of the Director General of the IAEA, it is my pleasure and privilege to welcome you to this International Conference on National Infrastructures for Radiation Safety: Towards Effective and Sustainable Systems. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to His Majesty King Mohammed VI for his patronage, to the Government of Morocco and the University Mohammed V, Agdal, for hosting this conference in the beautiful and historic city of Rabat, and to the local organizers for their diligent planning and gracious hospitality. I would also like to thank the four organizations that are co-operating with the IAEA in holding this conference: the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, the International Labour Organization, the European Commission and the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency. National infrastructure for radiation safety has emerged as an issue of international concern over the last two decades. Systematic and strategic consideration of infrastructure has become widely recognized as an essential prerequisite for safety. The first IAEA conference to address the topic was in Munich, Germany, in 1990. The 1996 edition of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (known as the Basic Sof Radiation Sources (known as the Basic Safety Standards or BSS) highlighted the issue, and the IAEA's technical co-operation Model Project for Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure was introduced to help address it. The Model Project has helped, and continues to help, more than 85 IAEA Member States to work towards the goal of a radiation safety infrastructure in accordance with the Basic Safety Standards. A great deal has been achieved, but this work is not complete. Furthermore, not all States are members of the IAEA or the Model Project, and there are around 50 non-Member States that may need similar assistance. I would, therefore, like to extend a special welcome to representatives of those States that are not members of the IAEA, and to thank the United States of America for providing extrabudgetary support to make possible the participation of these States in this conference. The issue of orphan sources has been instrumental in stirring the international community into action. Initially, orphan sources were seen primarily as a safety issue. However, since the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 in the USA, the security dimension has brought an increased sense of urgency. Security considerations have also led to a greater recognition that national systems for the control of sources can only be fully effective if all States have effective systems, that is, if there is an effective global system of control. But there is a broader underlying reason why we need to continue to strengthen national infrastructures for radiation safety. Technologies that make use of radiation and radioactive material - in medicine, in research, in industry, in agriculture and water resource management - have expanded and spread all around the world, and continue to grow. These technologies bring great benefits - often desperately needed - but those benefits cannot be fully enjoyed unless the technologies can be used safely. Effective national infrastructures provide the foundation for the safe use of these technologies.I hope that the sharing of knowledge and experience at this conference will contribute to a 'virtuous circle' of continuous improvement. I look forward to the conference providing deeper and broader ideas for how the IAEA can be more effective in assisting in this very challenging area. I wish you well in your deliberations this week, and I look forward to hearing your findings. I invite the representatives of the four co-operating organizations to make their opening remarks, and I give the floor firstly to Mr. Repacholi, representing the World Healt

180

Integrating participatory engagement and scientific research to inform causes and solutions to water problems in the River Njoro Watershed Kenya.  

Science.gov (United States)

Over the course of 9 years, an international multidisciplinary team of US and Kenyan scientists under the Sustainable Management of Rural Watersheds (SUMAWA) Project, based at Egerton University in Kenya, worked with Kenyan public agencies to apply a variety of participatory methods and outreach activities combined with land use mapping, hydrologic and water system modeling, and other scientific tools and evaluations to investigate and identify solutions to declining water quantity and quality problems affecting communities and environmental and productive sectors in the River Njoro Watershed in Kenya. Traditional participatory rural appraisal techniques were modified to engage low income, informal, and tribal communities in identification of local services, benefits, and groups linked to water and riparian resources and collect their perceptions of water-related problems, priorities, and solution options throughout the watershed. Building on this foundation of insights, information, and engagement on water issues with local communities and other stakeholders, the project designed a research agenda aimed at creating shared scientific understanding of the causes of identified problems and developing and testing promising interventions to address community and stakeholder priority concerns. This presentation will share lessons from the SUMAWA experience of using a problem-driven, solution-oriented, community-based watershed approach to address water resource problems at local scale in a semi-arid African developing country setting.

Jenkins, M.

2012-12-01

181

The National Historic Preservation Act is Not Your Problem, But How You are Addressing it for Your CERCLA Project May Be - 12344  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The 1995 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) joint 'Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under CERCLA was developed so that decommissioning could occur in a manner that ensures protection of worker and public health and the environment, that is consistent with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), that provides for stakeholder involvement, and that achieves risk reduction without unnecessary delay'. The source of the 'unnecessary delays' the joint policy intended to avert could be attributed to numerous factors such as obtaining permits, conducting administrative activities, or implementing regulatory processes that could yield, among other things, differing preferred alternatives. Why, you might ask, more than fifteen years later, does DOE continue to struggle through CERCLA projects with unnecessary delays? From problem identification, to determination of nature and extent, to alternative analysis and ultimately remedy selection and implementation, reaching a compliant and effective clean-up end-point can be a process that seems to mimic geologic timescales. The source of these delays is often the failure to use all of the tools the CERCLA process offers. As one example, renewed commitment to follow the CERCLA process to address the regulatory reviews pursuant to the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) is called for. Project managers implementing CERCLA actions in any agency, not only DOE, do not need to be apprehensive about using the CERCLA process for NHPA review but should welcome it. It is critical that methods are used that address substantive NHPA requirements clearly and consistently, and that they are shared and communicated as frequently as needed to interested and questioning stakeholders. (author)

182

Brains in Jars: The Problem of Language in Neuroscientific Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Neuroscience is a rapidly expanding scientific field, and its influence on our perceptions of fundamental aspects of human life is becoming widespread, particularly in the social and behavioral sciences. This influence has many philosophical implications, only one of which will be addressed in this article. For many centuries, philosophers have…

Scott, Jessica A.; Curran, Christopher M.

2010-01-01

183

Addressing Global Health, Development, and Social Inequalities through Research and Policy Analyses: the International Journal of MCH and AIDS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available One year after the birth of the International Journal of MCH and AIDS (IJMA, we continue to share the passion to document, and shine the light on the myriads of global health issues that debilitate developing countries.Although the focus of IJMA is on the social determinants of health and disease as well as on the disparities in the burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases affecting infants, children, women, adults, and families in developing countries, we would like to encourage our fellow researchers and policy makers in both the developing and developed countries to consider submitting work that examines cross-national variations in heath and social inequalities.Such a global focus allows us to identify and understand social, structural, developmental, and health policy determinants underlying health inequalities between nations.Global assessment of health and socioeconomic patterns reaffirms the role of broader societal-level factors such as human development, gender inequality, gross national product, income inequality, and healthcare infrastructure as the fundamental determinants of health inequalities between nations.This is also confirmed by our analysis of the WHO data that shows a strong negative association between levels of human development and infant and maternal mortality rates.Focusing on socioeconomic, demographic, and geographical inequalities within a developing country, on the other hand, should give us a sense of how big the problem of health inequity is within its own borders.Such an assessment, then, could lead to development of policy solutions to tackle health inequalities that are unique to that country.

Romuladus E. Azuine, DrPH, RN

2012-11-01

184

Virtual address cache with no reverse address buffering  

OpenAIRE

A virtual address cache memory, whose operation is controlled explicitly by software, is presented. Ad-hoc hardware mechanisms, including new machine instructions and a new operand addressing mode, reduce the complexity of cache management logic in favour of the capacity of the cache, and solve the major problem of virtual address cache organization: two or more virtual addresses mapping into the same real address.

Lopriore, Lanfranco

1987-01-01

185

Keynote address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

One of the functions of the CSN, as the regulatory authority responsible for nuclear safety and radiation protection, is the performance of studies, assessments and inspections of all plans, programmes and projects relating to the different phases of radioactive waste management, from production to final disposal. The development of general criteria for the dismantling and decommissioning of nuclear and other facilities which, give rise to large volumes of low activity waste, is a priority issue in Spain. In the same context, mention should be made of the importance of having a solid materials declassification process for use during the operating phase of the facilities. This naturally contributes to reducing the waste to be managed in decommissioning and to optimizing overall radioactive waste management. In relation to declassification, a large number of activities have been carried out or are currently under way in Spain, e.g. the systematic approach to the licensing of various common projects for the declassification of materials at nuclear power plants, such as those applied to metallic scrap, spent resins, activated carbon and wood. A general standard for the declassification of materials at medical, research and industrial facilities was recently adopted; this includes general criteria and specific activity values for the radionuclides usually used at such installations. All of the above mentioned declassification initiatives have taken full account of the recoatives have taken full account of the recommendations of the IAEA. To date, one nuclear power plant has been dismantled in Spain and the dismantling of a second nuclear plant is foreseen after the year 2006. A number of nuclear production facilities have been decommissioned and various uranium mine restoration projects have been carried out. In keeping with the lines mapped out in the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, Spain possesses an administrative structure, a regulatory framework, an assignment of responsibilities and a financing system that provide assurance that the management of spent fuel and radioactive waste will be carried out safely. Although, to date, no generic regulations have been developed governing the long term management of radioactive waste, the regulatory authorities have defined and approved, upon request, specific criteria applicable to the licensing of individual facilities. Currently standards relating to safety in the management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste are developed, radioactive waste management plans at the sites of waste production and actions are developed and integrated. They are aimed at improving the general capacity to respond to radiological emergencies in which significant amounts of low activity radioactive waste might be generated. Likewise, several initiatives have been launched for the adoption of general criteria applicable to the release of sites; this includes requirements for institutional surveillance when the sites cannot be released without restrictions. Of special interest is the problem of the management of the long lived low activity waste associated with uranium mining and milling activities, on which the Symposium will include a specific session. Managing TENORM waste arising from the processing of materials contaminated by isotopes of natural origin, which is very much a major issue in Spain at poses a major problem. The new complementary facility at El Cabril for the disposal of very low activity waste was licensed. Work has been carried out jointly with ENRESA during the preparatory phases for the definition of applicable safety and radiation protection criteria. In order to guarantee adequate protection for workers, the public and the environment, and to respond with rigour to the current social demands relating to radioactive waste management, very close collaboration is required between all those involved; this includes the regulatory authorities, the waste producers and, obviously, those responsible for the

186

Using the World Health Organization's 4S-Framework to Strengthen National Strategies, Policies and Services to Address Mental Health Problems in Adolescents in Resource-Constrained Settings  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Most adolescents live in resource-constrained countries and their mental health has been less well recognised than other aspects of their health. The World Health Organization's 4-S Framework provides a structure for national initiatives to improve adolescent health through: gathering and using strategic information; developing evidence-informed policies; scaling up provision and use of health services; and strengthening linkages with other government sectors. The aim of this paper is to discuss how the findings of a recent systematic review of mental health problems in adolescents in resource-constrained settings might be applied using the 4-S Framework. Method Analysis of the implications of the findings of a systematic search of the English-language literature for national strategies, policies, services and cross-sectoral linkages to improve the mental health of adolescents in resource-constrained settings. Results Data are available for only 33/112 [29%] resource-constrained countries, but in all where data are available, non-psychotic mental health problems in adolescents are identifiable, prevalent and associated with reduced quality of life, impaired participation and compromised development. In the absence of evidence about effective interventions in these settings expert opinion is that a broad public policy response which addresses direct strategies for prevention, early intervention and treatment; health service and health workforce requirements; social inclusion of marginalised groups of adolescents; and specific education is required. Specific endorsed strategies include public education, parent education, training for teachers and primary healthcare workers, psycho-educational curricula, identification through periodic screening of the most vulnerable and referral for care, and the availability of counsellors or other identified trained staff members in schools from whom adolescents can seek assistance for personal, peer and family relationship problems. Conclusion The predominant endorsed action is not that dedicated mental health services for adolescents are required, but that mental health care should be integrated using cross-sectoral strategies into the communities in which adolescents live, the institutions they attend and the organisations in which they participate.

Cabral de Mello Meena

2011-09-01

187

Solving Problems in Social–Ecological Systems: Definition, Practice and Barriers of Transdisciplinary Research  

OpenAIRE

Translating policies about sustainable development as a social process and sustainability outcomes into the real world of social–ecological systems involves several challenges. Hence, research policies advocate improved innovative problem-solving capacity. One approach is transdisciplinary research that integrates research disciplines, as well as researchers and practitioners. Drawing upon 14 experiences of problem-solving, we used group modeling to map perceived barriers and bridges for re...

Angelstam, Per; Andersson, Kjell; Annerstedt, Matilda; Axelsson, Robert; Elbakidze, Marine; Garrido, Pablo; Grahn, Patrik; Jo?nsson, K. Ingemar; Pedersen, Simen; Schlyter, Peter; Ska?rba?ck, Erik; Smith, Mike; Stjernquist, Ingrid

2013-01-01

188

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: It is encouraging to see so many experts gathered here today to discuss the important issue of environmental protection from ionizing radiation. The International Union of Radioecology (IUR) has collaborated constructively with other international organizations, notably the ICRP, the IAEA, UNSCEAR and the EU, and hope that these close links may be strengthened and developed in the future. Such international cooperation has been conducive to rapid progress on the theme of radiological protection of the environment in recent years. The IUR, as an independent scientific association, has been fighting to put environmental radioactivity in the same context as other environmental problems within regulatory and political agendas. In the early years, it could be quite embarrassing because there was little support for this initiative, but now it can give us great satisfaction that the topic appears to be receiving the international attention it deserves. However, it is imperative that any advances are built on a foundation of scientific knowledge. The IUR task group, formed in 1997, took note of a number of initiatives and ideas being developed within the radiological protection community. The IUR was the first international organization to conclude that a systematic approach was required in order to develop a framework within which various initiatives could be accommodated and, in 2000, such a system was presented and promoted. The IUR also highlighted the need to ted. The IUR also highlighted the need to consider the broader socioeconomic context within which these ideas were beginning to evolve. I would now like to spend a few moments of your time to update you on the IUR's views and activities. A consensus conference was held in Oslo in 2001, supported by a number of representatives from NGOs, industry, academia and regulators. A surprising degree of agreement was achieved, enabling the drafting of a consensus statement - stating that the environment should receive radiological protection. Members of the IUR have been at the forefront of exploring ethical and legal aspects of protection of the environment. Their work can be seen in recent IAEA and IUR publications as well as participation at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg and contributions made to the ICRP Task Group working on radiological protection of non-human species. At the IUR-sponsored conference in Monaco, together with other current initiatives and research efforts, the IUR have been able to present the current status of work connected to radiological protection of the environment and have also been able to make recommendations for future work in the field. Foremost amongst these recommendations was the requirement for basic scientific research in order to strengthen our assessment system and increase confidence in our decision making practices. I can assure you that the IUR will continue in these activities, and I hope that you all enjoy this interesting and useful conference. I would like to finish by expressing my gratitude to the personnel of Swedish Radiation Protection Authority for their great efforts in staging this event. (author)

189

Research activity on thermohydraulic problems of PWR reactors  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The general review of the experimental and theoretical research works on thermohydraulic investigation of pressurized water type reactors being done in the Central Research Institute for Physics is given. The main results of the theoretical and theoretical-numerical research are summarized. The most important result of the past years is the construction of the High Pressure Water Cooled Loop (NVH) thermohydraulic loop. Another significant achievement was the development of the reactor thermohydraulic program system. (Sz.N.Z.)

190

Keynote address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The keynote address to a debate in the UK on global warming is presented. Topics covered include the scientific consensus on the greenhouse effect, developing countries and their increasing energy demands, energy efficiency, non-fossil fuel technologies, deforestation and economic and political implications of CO2 reduction targets. Short discussions are also presented on adoptive measures to climate change and world population trends. (UK)

191

Radioactive waste management: the present situation, problems, research  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Paper deals with overview of the problem linked with radioactive waste (RW) in Russia, with the sources of RW and with the active procedures of RW management including the RADON unified system. Principal procedures of the closed nuclear fuel cycle and its significance for the nuclear power industry of Russia are examined. Techniques to treat low- and middle-radioactive liquid waste and techniques to solidify liquid RW via bitumization and cementing are described. Techniques to vitrify highly active waste and problems linked with selection of matrix materials to fix radionuclides are discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

192

Dealing with misconduct in biomedical research: a review of the problems and the proposed methods for improvement.  

Science.gov (United States)

The increasing complexity of scientific research has been followed by increasing varieties of research misconduct. Dealing with misconduct involves the processes of detection, reporting, and investigation of misconduct. Each of these steps is associated with numerous problems which need to be addressed. Misconduct investigation should not stop with inquiries and disciplinary actions in specific episodes of misconduct. It is necessary to decrease the personal price paid by those who expose misconduct and to protect the personal and professional interests of honest researchers accused of misconduct unfairly or mistakenly. There is no dearth of suggestions to improve the objectivity and fairness of investigations. What is needed is the willingness to test the various options and implement the most suitable ones. PMID:19866380

Kumar, Malhar N

2009-11-01

193

Outcome Research on Behavioral and Traditional Treatment for Problem Drinkers.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper describes a study which compared the results of treating out-patient middle-income problem drinkers with: (1) a multi-component positive reinforcement procedure emphasizing moderation; or (2) traditional group encounter therapy emphasizing abstinence. Results suggested that behavioral treatment was more effective than traditional…

Pomerleau, Ovide; Adkins, David

194

Problems in SLA. Second Language Acquisition Research Series  

Science.gov (United States)

Second language acquisition has an identity problem. It is a young field struggling to emerge from the parent fields of education and applied linguistics. In this book, the author proposes a way to help second language acquisition develop a systematic and coherent focus using the philosophy of science as the lens. The structure of the book allows…

Long, Michael H.

2006-01-01

195

The problem of creative activity in of social work research  

OpenAIRE

Current Latvian research in the area of social work is not characteristic of a creative and innovative methodological approach. The methodological conservatism derived from general sociology is particularly affecting students in doctoral studies. This proposes a question: should, in the name of scientific novelty, we support research in which the PhD student aims to get rid of his personality behind the shield of authority, sometimes even general sociology textbook truths? Or should we encour...

Vilka L.; Vilks A.

2012-01-01

196

Keynote address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper addresses various aspects of the bases underlying the nuclear third party liability regime, and also analyses the distinction between danger and risk and the manner in which damage caused by flood, mass unemployment (economic damage mainly) and certain diseases is dealt with in the absence of liability provisions similar to those applicable to nuclear incidents. It also is suggested that the State because of its duty under the Basic Law to ensure adequate energy supplies, should be co-responsible for liability questions along with the nuclear operator. (NEA)

197

Problems of Research Work in the Information Society ???????? ???????????? ????? ? ?????????????? ????????  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper put three issues which, in my opinion, are essential in the modern study of labor in the information society. In particular, to the author's vision of what can be considered informational labor; logical approach to the measurement of product information work, the theoretical possibility of pricing to our work. Proposed to the author's vision of theoretical approaches to solving problems and resolving conflicts that are associated with them.? ?????? ???????? ??? ????????, ???????, ?? ?????? ??????, ???????? ?????????? ? ??????????? ???????????? ????? ? ?????????????? ????????. ? ?????????, ???????????? ????????? ???????, ??? ?????? ????? ??????? ?????????????? ??????; ?????????? ?????? ? ????????? ???????? ??????????????? ?????; ????????????? ??????????? ???????????? ???? ?? ?????????????? ????. ???????????? ????????? ??????? ????????????? ???????? ? ??????? ???????????? ??????? ? ?????????? ????????????, ??????? ? ???? ???????.

Yadranskyy Dmytro M.

2012-07-01

198

Micronutrient problems in Thailand - extent, past and present research  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Micronutrient problems in Thailand are briefly discussed, particularly with reference to rice. At present, the relative amounts of zinc in rice-growing areas (soils) are being analyzed for total and available zinc. Fertilizer (N, P, K) uptake by rice is being studied in the field by means of zinc-65. Observations on the relative uptake of P by rice associated with different zinc levels are made on pot cultures, using phosphorus-32

199

President's address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The speaker discusses some of the economic problems facing the Canadian nuclear industry. The worldwide economic slowdown has caused a fall in energy needs in Canada as well as in other nations. Consequently the demand for uranium has fallen and the market for new reactors looks bleak. However, the speaker feels that a solution can be found using creativity and innovative thinking

200

Connecting scientific research and classroom instruction: Developing authentic problem sets for the undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum  

Science.gov (United States)

Reform efforts in science education have called for instructional methods and resources that mirror the practice of science. Little research and design methods have been documented in the literature for designing such materials. The purpose of this study was to develop problems sets for sophomore-level organic chemistry instruction. This research adapted an instructional design methodology from the science education literature for the creation of new curricular problem sets. The first phase of this study was to establish an understanding of current curricular problems in sophomore-level organic chemistry instruction. A sample of 792 problems was collected from four organic chemistry courses. These problems were assessed using three literature reported problem typologies. Two of these problem typologies have previously been used to understand general chemistry problems; comparisons between general and organic chemistry problems were thus made. Data from this phase was used to develop a set of five problems for practicing organic chemists. The second phase of this study was to explore practicing organic chemists' experiences solving problems in the context of organic synthesis research. Eight practicing organic chemists were interviewed and asked to solve two to three of the problems developed in phase one of this research. These participants spoke of three problem types: project level, synthetic planning, and day-to-day. Three knowledge types (internal knowledge, knowledgeable others, and literature) were used in solving these problems in research practice and in the developed problems. A set of guiding factors and implications were derived from this data and the chemistry education literature for the conversion of the problems for practicing chemists to problems for undergraduate students. A subsequent conversion process for the five problems occurred. The third, and last phase, of this study was to explore undergraduate students' experiences solving problems in the classroom. Eight undergraduate students from four different organic chemistry courses were interviewed and asked to solve three of the problems converted at the end of phase two. Data from these interviews were used to understand the types, methods, and knowledge uses by undergraduate students in the problem-solving process. Data from all three phases were used to assert seven ideas for the development of problems for undergraduate students.

Raker, Jeffrey R.

201

INFORMATION ASPECTS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH EXPERIMENTAL PROBLEMS IN ELECTRODYNAMICS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The article discusses the experimental task, the analysis of which cannot be carried out without the use of methods of calculus mathematics. It is shown that the use of modern information technology in educational research tasks to confront theory with real physical experiments lets us raise the level of quality of training future teachers of physics and computer science

Tchernykh A. G.

2014-06-01

202

Luncheon address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Public policy responses to climate change are discussed from a global viewpoint. The public policy issue is one of unprecedented scope and complexity, and concerns the interaction of two vast and complex systems: the physical planetary system, and the human economic system. Decision making is required in the face of uncertainty, and scientific knowledge is lagging behind policy issues. Continuing world development is going to drastically change the balance of global population, trade, and economic power. Environmental quality performance requirements should be set with a great deal of attention paid to how they will affect the process of innovation, and must encourage demand for emerging technologies, products and services. Effective solutions can come only from effective international agreement. Governments, citizens and industry must become partners in action, and improved education and communication is required. Science, public policy and social consensus must converge, as climate change is not merely a scientific or technical problem, but is also a social and political problem

203

PROBLEMS AND OUTLOOK OF RESEARCH ACTIVITIES IN KAZAKHSTAN  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Performance evaluation of scientific work on regional and individual levels can be achieved by the using scientometric methods of a quantitative analysis of bibliographic information available in such databases as Science Citation Index (SCI. Unfortunately, Kazakhstan scientific journals have not been included yet in the Thomson Reuters Corp. register of periodicals, that substantially distorts the actual national scientometric indexes. The analysis of Database “National Citation Reports” (Kazakhstan, which correlated with a contribution of Kazakhstan into the world science development, has shown the low level of research activities of Kazakhstan scientists on international arena. So, the share of international publications of Kazakhstan in the global flow is equal to 0,021 % (1044 doc. that corresponds to the 87th place in the general list of countries of 177 names. Subject to the ranking of countries into groups by the number of the published works, Kazakhstan is referring to the group of 46 countries having 1000-10000 publications over 5 years, of which 8,6% in  medicine. In this article the use of statistics and appropriate software by the authors of original articles in such journals as recommended by the Kazakh National Centre for Scientific & Technical Expertise (NCSTE and included in the Database ?library.kz was evaluated. Research was conducted according to Research Report, due to which a research design and statistical analysis methods were estimated.  In the rating of the research design, the authors of articles mostly used as follows: description of a series of cases–63,2%, description of the individual cases -27,1%, and description of specific cases–9,1%. A scope of selection in Section “Research Methods” was only calculated in 21,8% of cases, and in 63,9% of cases there was no description how the selection was carried out. Methods of analytical statistics were used in the 46,0% of cases. And there were references to the program package in use only in 17,5% of works. Thus shown that non-compliance with international standards in the preparation of scientific papers, primarily statistical requirements directly affect the quality and ratings of domestic articles.

Botagoz Turdalieva

2013-10-01

204

The SERP Approach to Problem-Solving Research, Development, and Implementation  

Science.gov (United States)

Education researchers are increasingly working in practice-based partnerships in order to direct their research efforts toward important problems of practice. We argue for the creation of an infrastructure to support routine and sustained interaction among researchers, practitioners, and designers in order to make partnership efforts more…

Donovan, M. Suzanne; Snow, Catherine; Daro, Phil

2013-01-01

205

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) has funded, and continues to fund, research into genetic effects of radiation. Of particular note is the continuation of studies into the apparent excess of leukemia in children in the area around the Bruce Nuclear Power Development, and the apparent deficit of leukemia in children around the Chalk River Laboratories, neither of which appears to be statistically significant. The sponsorship of meetings such as this is another way in which the AECB supports research into radiation effects. (L.L.)

206

Addressing the nuclear misconception  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

There is a perception, fostered and encouraged by the anti-nuclear groups, that the nuclear industry generates large quantities of waste with no idea how to deal with it, is unsafe, uneconomic, and environmentally damaging. The task of the industry is to change the perception by demonstrating that the industry provides solutions to problems, and is not a problem in itself. This paper, whilst primarily concerned with waste, addresses all of these issues as each has a bearing on the perception of the industry and therefore must be considered when addressing the issue of waste. The paper concludes that evidence exists to support the industry, but that the mission of the industry should be to change the perception of it, by influencing and working together with its stakeholders to address their concerns, rather than merely presenting more and more facts. (author)

207

Industry, university and government partnership to address research, education and human resource challenges for nuclear industry in Canada  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: This paper describes the outcome of an important recent initiative of Canadian nuclear industry to reinvigorate interest in education and collaborative research in prominent Canadian universities. This initiative has led to the formation of the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE), incorporated in 2002. During the recent past, the slowdown in nuclear power development in Canada has curtailed the demand for new nuclear professionals down to a trickle. Without exciting job opportunities in sight the interest of prospective students in nuclear education and research has plunged. Consequently, with declining enrolment in nuclear studies and higher demand from competing disciplines, most universities have found it difficult to sustain nuclear programs. As such the available pool of graduating students is small and insufficient to meet emerging industry demand. With nuclear industry employees' average age hovering around mid-forties and practically no younger cohort to back up, nuclear industry faces the risk of knowledge loss and significant difficulty in recruiting new employees to replenish its depleting workforce. It is, therefore, justifiably concerned. Also, since nuclear generation is now the purview of smaller companies, their in-house capability for mid- to longer-term research is becoming inadequate. Recognizing the above challenges, Ontario Power Generation, Bruce Power and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited have formed an alliance with prominent Canadian universities and undertaken to invest money and offer in-kind support to accomplish three main objectives: Reinvigorate university-based nuclear engineering research by augmenting university resources by creating new industry supported research professorships and supporting research of other professors; Promote enrolment in graduate programs by supporting students and making use of a course-based Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) Program that is taught collectively by professors from all supported universities and which can be completed through part-time studies; Create a pool of nuclear expertise in universities that can be accessed by public and governments for impartial and trustworthy advice. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), the Canadian Regulator, and Candu Owners Group are also participating in UNENE activities. Nuclear industries have linked with a select group of Canadian universities agreeable to committing to nuclear research and education and seeking investment from governments to match cash and in-kind contributions from industry. The University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) was thus created involving universities of McMaster, Queen's, Toronto, Waterloo, Western Ontario and the new University of Ontario Institute of Technology. These universities are recipients of funds for setting up NSERC-UNENE Industry Research Chairs in Nuclear Engineering. Also, Ecole Polytechnique and the University of New Brunswick, supported respectively by Hydro Quebec and New Brunswick Power, and Royal Military College - operating a joint graduate program with Queen's University, are participants in UNENE. The following Industrial Research Chairs are either in place or approved to start within the next few months. In each case there is a provision for hiring a junior Research Chair. - Dr. John Luxat, Nuclear Safety Analysis and Thermal Hydraulics, McMaster University; - Dr. Rick Holt, Advanced Nuclear Materials, Queen's University; - Dr. Roger Newman, Nano-Engineering of Alloys for Nuclear Power Systems, University of Toronto; - Dr. Mahesh Pandey, Risk-Based Life Cycle Management of Engineering Systems, University of Waterloo; - Dr. Jin Jiang, Control, Instrumentation and Electrical Systems of Nuclear Power Plants, University of Western Ontario. Progress is being made to find a candidate and define a research program for an Industrial Research Chair:- Knowledge Management, University of Ontario Institute of Technology. Each of the above six NSERC-UNENE Industrial Research Chairs are tenured positions, funded

208

Opening Address [International Conference on Research Reactors: Safe Management and Effective Utilization, Rabat (Morocco), 14-18 November 2011  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Significant issues still being faced by the research reactor community are primarily related to the operation, utilization, safety, ageing, decommissioning and waste management. More recently, challenges such as initiatives for creating new RR facilities, securing isotope production, human resources, infrastructure capacity building, or sustainability of RR programmes, are receiving greater attention. This conference will focus on new developments in the relevant, efficient and safe utilisation of Nuclear Research Reactors for the countries' social and economic development. It will contribute to foster the exchange of information on current and new research reactors and to provide a forum for reactor users, operators, managers, regulators, designers and suppliers to share experience and exchange opinions. It constitutes an opportunity to discuss common challenges, options and strategies and to strengthen regional and international cooperation between Research Reactors' centres from developed and developing countries with special emphasis on the transfer of knowledge and know how. In this particular context, the International Atomic Energy Agency is a central partner, playing a major role in strengthening the operation, applications and safety of Nuclear Research Reactors, thus supporting the development of civil and peaceful nuclear technologies worldwide

209

Research to assess impacts on developing countries of measures to address emissions in the international aviation and shipping sectors  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The greenhouse gas emissions of international aviation and maritime transport are projected to increase rapidly over the coming decades, despite significant improvements in the fuel efficiency of aircraft and ships. In order to address their growth, Market Based Measures (MBMs) have been proposed to complement technical and operational measures. These measures are being discussed in ICAO (the UN organization for civil aviation) and IMO (the UN organization for maritime transport). One of the main issues in the debate has been the impact of MBMs on developing countries and especially on remote economies. This report quantifies the economic impacts of MBMs on ten case study economies and globally. The case study economies have been selected in the expectation that they would be relatively highly impacted because of their remoteness and/or dependence on international aviation or maritime transport. This report shows that the decrease in GDP is less than 0.01% on average and significantly less than 0.1% for all but a few of the case study countries. Countries with a higher dependency on tourism and trade are likely to experience greater economic impacts as market-based measures raise the costs of aviation and maritime transport; they impact economies due to increased prices for passenger travel and exported and imported goods. Some of these countries are small island states that are also vulnerable to climate change impacts. Undesired economic impacts on developing countries can be addressed effectively by a combination of measures such as exemptions of certain routes, lump sum rebates, and investments in infrastructure efficiency and development of more efficient ships and aircraft.

Anger, A. [Cambridge University, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Faber, J.; Koopman, M. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Van Velzen, A. [Transport Analysis and Knowledge Systems TAKS, s.l. (Netherlands); Long, K.; Pollitt, H.; Barker, T. [Cambridge Econometrics, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Comberti, C.; Fazekas, D.; Blachowicz, A. [Climate Strategies, London (United Kingdom)

2013-02-15

210

Final Technical Report for "Applied Mathematics Research: Simulation Based Optimization and Application to Electromagnetic Inverse Problems"  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The focus of research was: Developing adaptive mesh for the solution of Maxwell's equations; Developing a parallel framework for time dependent inverse Maxwell's equations; Developing multilevel methods for optimization problems with inequal- ity constraints; A new inversion code for inverse Maxwell's equations in the 0th frequency (DC resistivity); A new inversion code for inverse Maxwell's equations in low frequency regime. Although the research concentrated on electromagnetic forward and in- verse problems the results of the research was applied to the problem of image registration.

Haber, Eldad

2014-03-17

211

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The supply of energy is the most important problem facing mankind today. Energy is necessary for economic development, and it is in the interests of the industrialized nations to ensure that the developing countries reach their economic potential. The need for the increased use of nuclear power is evident, and the CANDU reactor provides a simple, proven energy source; the 950 MW CANDU has potential applications in both industrialized and third world nations. The Canadian nuclear industry has an important role to play in the world, but must be rationalized in order to compete successfully in the international marketplace

212

Information and meaning revisiting Shannon's theory of communication and extending it to address todays technical problems.  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper has three goals. The first is to review Shannon's theory of information and the subsequent advances leading to today's statistics-based text analysis algorithms, showing that the semantics of the text is neglected. The second goal is to propose an extension of Shannon's original model that can take into account semantics, where the 'semantics' of a message is understood in terms of the intended or actual changes on the recipient of a message. The third goal is to propose several lines of research that naturally fall out of the proposed model. Each computational approach to solving some problem rests on an underlying model or set of models that describe how key phenomena in the real world are represented and how they are manipulated. These models are both liberating and constraining. They are liberating in that they suggest a path of development for new tools and algorithms. They are constraining in that they intentionally ignore other potential paths of development. Modern statistical-based text analysis algorithms have a specific intellectual history and set of underlying models rooted in Shannon's theory of communication. For Shannon, language is treated as a stochastic generator of symbol sequences. Shannon himself, subsequently Weaver, and at least one of his predecessors are all explicit in their decision to exclude semantics from their models. This rejection of semantics as 'irrelevant to the engineering problem' is elegant and combined with developments particularly by Salton and subsequently by Latent Semantic Analysis, has led to a whole collection of powerful algorithms and an industry for data mining technologies. However, the kinds of problems currently facing us go beyond what can be accounted for by this stochastic model. Today's problems increasingly focus on the semantics of specific pieces of information. And although progress is being made with the old models, it seems natural to develop or extend information theory to account for semantics. By developing such theory, we can improve the quality of the next generation analytical tools. Far from being a mere intellectual curiosity, a new theory can provide the means for us to take into account information that has been to date ignored by the algorithms and technologies we develop. This paper will begin with an examination of Shannon's theory of communication, discussing the contributions and the limitations of the theory and how that theory gets expanded into today's statistical text analysis algorithms. Next, we will expand Shannon's model. We'll suggest a transactional definition of semantics that focuses on the intended and actual change that messages are intended to have on the recipient. Finally, we will examine implications of the model for algorithm development.

Bauer, Travis LaDell

2009-12-01

213

A call to action for evidence-based military women's health care: developing a women's health research agenda that addresses sex and gender in health and illness.  

Science.gov (United States)

Women in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines are serving in complex occupational specialties that sustain national policy and ensure combat effectiveness of our forces. Their roles have evolved from supportive roles during early conflicts to active roles in combat support and counterinsurgency operations today. Although women have received military health care over the past three decades, sex- and gender-specific care has been limited to reproductive needs and has rarely addressed military-specific health risks and outcomes. The complexity of military jobs and increased deployments to combat operations has led to increased occupational and health risks for women. As differences have been noted between men and women's deployment-related health outcomes, it is incumbent on the Military Health Care System (MHS) to create an evidence base that addresses sex and gender differences in the health of its service members. A working group of military women's health advanced practice nurses (APN) and research experts proposes to address this gap in knowledge and practices through sex- and gender-specific research. A sex-and gender-based research agenda for military women's health will be a valuable instrument to those who are dedicated to the health of this population, including members of the Army, Navy, and Air Force military nursing community. Using the knowledge that the research agenda generates, military health care providers can develop clinical practice guidelines, influence policy, and participate in program development to improve the health of servicewomen. Shaping a sex- and gender-specific military women's health research agenda will create the foundation for future evidence-based care. PMID:20798161

Trego, Lori; Wilson, Candy; Steele, Nancy

2010-10-01

214

Addressing the Inequitable Distribution of Teachers: What It Will Take to Get Qualified, Effective Teachers in All Communities. Research Brief  

Science.gov (United States)

Students of color in low-income schools are 3 to 10 times more likely to have unqualified teachers than students in predominantly White schools. These disparities in teacher distribution matter greatly: Research consistently shows that teacher quality is one of the most important variables for student success and that teachers with stronger…

Adamson, Frank; Darling-Hammond, Linda

2011-01-01

215

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: I have been asked to say a few words about the origins of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, held in Stockholm in 1972. That conference can, I think, be regarded as the beginning of organized international discussion on protection of the environment. In the 1960s, when I was Swedish Ambassador to the United Nations, it was customary for the United Nations to organize each year a major conference on a topic of global importance. There were always two proposals for the topic, between which the representatives of United Nations Member States in New York had to choose. In 1968 the choice of topic for 1972 was between the peaceful uses of atomic energy and protection of the environment. In the Swedish delegation, we thought that a further major conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy was not necessary, having concluded that the main purpose of such conferences was to promote United States industrial interests. Moreover, in our view the time was right for a major conference on protection of the environment. The international community was becoming increasingly aware of the harmful environmental effects of rapid industrialization, particularly after the publication of Rachel Carson's book 'Silent Spring'. So we took the initiative in the autumn of 1968 and succeeded in having protection of the environment chosen as the topic for 1972. During the preparations for the conference, which was to take place in Stockholm, we faced a formidabke place in Stockholm, we faced a formidable array of opponents. Firstly, some industrially advanced countries, such as France and the United Kingdom, thought a strong United Nations focus on environmental protection would lead to constraints on their further industrial development - and they were supported by a number of the United Nations agencies, such as FAO and UNESCO, which thought that they were doing enough about environmental protection within their respective spheres. Secondly - and more importantly - there was opposition in the beginning from developing countries which, led by Brazil, thought that the choice of environmental protection as the topic was a plot of some industrial countries to hinder industrial development in the developing world by creating various obstacles in the form of regulations for the protection of the environment. Their opposition slowly melted away, however, thanks mainly to Maurice Strong, a rare mixture of idealist and pragmatist who became Secretary General of the conference - and later also of the conference held in 1992 in Rio de Janeiro. In addition, there was opposition from the Soviet Union, whose representatives said 'There are no environmental problems in the Soviet Union. Under Socialism, such problems cannot exist!' However, assistants from academia attached to the Soviet delegation would come and whisper in my ear 'Don't believe that official nonsense. The Soviet Union is the worst hit country in the world as regards environmental deterioration. The whole country is a catastrophe!' Ultimately, however, the Soviet Government modified its practical position - if not its ideology - and collaborated, to some extent, in preparing for the conference, and after the conference (in which the Soviet Union did not take part since the Germany Democratic Republic had not been invited to participate) it took part without reservations in the follow-up work. The conference was to a large extent designed to increase awareness of the problems of environmental protection, since many governments - including the governments of some very important countries - were completely ignorant of and indifferent to such problems. In order to formulate positions regarding the various items on the conference agenda, governments had to get in touch with and seek advice from their scientific institutions, with which there had generally been very few contacts before. The scientific institutions were, of course, delighted to be consulted and to have an opportunity to tell their governments the truth about environmental problems. The 1972 conferenc

216

Banquet address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The theme of the address is the position of nuclear power following the reactor accident at Chernobyl. After acknowledging the Russian openness over the accident, Lord Marshall explains why a similar accident could not happen in the United Kingdom. The pressure tube design at Chernobyl had been investigated in 1976 but had been rejected because of three major disadvantages - the reactor had a positive void coefficient, it had zonal instabilities and local criticality in the core and it had a very high graphite temperature. In addition the British report of 1976 listed two other concerns - that the Russian design appeared to have insufficient shut-down margin and there was no back-up for the control rods for reactivity shutdown. The Russian safety philosophy is also seen as different from that of most Western reactor operators. It is thus concluded that Chernobyl could not happen in the West. However, the confidence of the public has to be won back and communication is important in this. The effects of Chernobyl should be seen in perspective - compared, for instance, against other accidents where a greater number of lives were lost. (U.K.)

217

Progress in research on laser damage mechanisms and contamination problem  

Science.gov (United States)

In high power laser systems, the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in optical coating is very important parameters for obtaining high performances. Recently, LIDT was found to have strong temperature dependences in the bulk, surface of substrates, and in coatings. These temperature dependences of LIDT were carefully measured, and the damage formation model was constructed regarding to this temperature dependence. To explain this temperature dependence of LIDT, the temperature dependences of the initial electron generation and electron multiplication in the avalanche process were taken into account. On the other hand, LIDT in optical coating is very sensitive to organic contaminations accumulated in coating layers during storage and using condition. This paper also introduces the oil-contamination problem in LFEX laser system for First Ignition scheme in the laser fusion. We have analyzed contaminants and evaluated the effects of the contamination. We also developed new cleaning methods to remove contamination from the coating, and we have succeeded to prevent the degradation in LIDT for the duration of evacuation with Silica-gel in the chamber. The quantitative analysis of contamination on LIDT was made. We have investigated the characteristics of LIDT in dielectric coatings under the controlled contamination with several materials.

Jitsuno, T.; Murakami, H.; Kato, K.; Sato, E.; Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Miyanaga, N.; Azechi, H.

2014-09-01

218

Research on key problems for LAMOST optical fiber detection system  

Science.gov (United States)

The large sky area multi-object fiber spectroscopic telescope (LAMOST) is an innovative reflecting schmidt telescope, promising a very high spectrum acquiring rate of several ten-thousands of spectra per night. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, LAMOST makes reconfiguration of fibers accurately according to the positions of objects in minutes and fine adjusting the fibers. During telescope observation period, each optical fiber unit positional accuracy directly determines the quality of subsequent spectrum acqusition, yet for real-time optical fiber positional accuracy, there only exists an internal information feedback which focus on the corresponding stepper motor driving conditions, however, this available information is not comprehensive, it can not offer the actual positional information for each fiber unit. Considering the LAMOST on-site environment, a novel real-time optical fiber positional accuracy detection system which can be integrated in the existing observation and control system need to be developed to solve this problem. During the observation interval, this system can offer a comprehensive and effective information feedback about the focal optical fiber positional accuracy. Based on this feedback, the observation assistants can properly adjust the observation strategies to ensure the effectiveness and accuracy of acquired spectrum. Furthermore, this fiber positional accuracy feedback can provide prior spectral quality information to the spectral processing personnel and optimal the spectrum processing efficiency.

Wang, Mengxin; Chen, Jianjun; Luo, Ali; Chen, Xiaoran

2014-07-01

219

Being useful: the nature and consequences of psychological research on social problems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The movement to make psychological research more relevant to social problems needs to avoid potential pitfalls and unanticipated negative consequence of moving the orientation of psychology into the public arena. The authors discuss social policy at the national level in terms of the tendency to hold individuals responsible for their problems, then explore the utility and applicability of psychological thought and research to social problems within this framework. Noting that, regardless of the type of problem and the intent of the investigator, the findings of psychologically oriented research lend themselves more easily to person-blame than to system-blame interpretations, they focus on the processes by which this takes place and the implications for problem subgroups, the profession, and society as a whole. 21 references, 1 table.

Caplan, N.; Nelson, S.D.

1973-03-01

220

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This opening address covers two main areas: first, a snapshot of the continuing threat and the recent changes having been made to the United Kingdom's counterterrorism structures to respond to it; and second, how the United Kingdom is combating nuclear terrorism through a range of measures covering physical security, decreasing vulnerability to attack and increasing resilience. Combating the threat of nuclear terrorism requires an international effort. Radiological and fissile materials are present throughout the world and, as such, it should be secured wherever it is found. All countries are encouraged to continue to enhance security and protection mechanisms for radiological and fissile material; and to develop contingency plans should the worst happen. The United Kingdom has responded to the very serious and real threat by consolidating and strengthening elements of its counterterrorist planning via the creation in May this year of the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism (OSCT). These changes have been coupled with an unprecedented level of investment to enable the delivery of the United Kingdom counterterrorist strategy - known as CONTEST - through which we aim to (a) stop terrorist attacks; (b) where it cannot be stopped, to mitigate its impact; (c) strengthen our overall protection against terrorist attack; (d) stop people becoming terrorists or supporting violent extremism. In the case of radiological and nuclear terrorism, it is not sufficient merely to terrorism, it is not sufficient merely to prepare for such an attack; one must also devote efforts to preventing such attacks in the first instance by intercepting dangerous materials before they reach their intended target; and by strengthening the protection of vulnerable places and detecting or mitigating any devices before they are placed or activated. As such, in terms of the United Kingdom's efforts on radiological and nuclear terrorism, there are three main strands to this work: physical protection of materials including the global threat reduction programme; decreasing vulnerability to attack; and increasing resilience should an incident occur

221

Proceedings of the public meeting to address a proposed federal radiation research agenda. Volume I. Issue papers  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Separate abstracts were prepared for 11 of the 12 invited issue papers and for 3 of the 13 documents received from the public at large in the preparation of an agenda for federally sponsored and conducted research into the biological effects of ionizing radiation. One issue paper previously input to the data base deals with the potential for significant human exposure from environmentally dispersed radionuclides

222

Does the EU cause domestic developments? The problem of case selection in Europeanization research  

OpenAIRE

Europeanization research has evolved into a promising research programme and has benefited from its increasing linkages with general theories of the social sciences. The paper starts from the assumption that the research programme would also benefit from a greater awareness of social science methodology. The paper focuses on the problem of case selection. Most Europeanization studies are designed in ways that the independent variables in which Europeanization research should be most intereste...

Haverland; Markus, MR

2005-01-01

223

Evaluation of online accessed systems: example of qualitative research of Fast Addresses of GeaBios System  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available An efficient online information service user interface enables independent use of these online. Designers of the GeaBios Internet information system intended to evaluate the user-friendliness of their service »Fast adresses« (»Hitri naslovi«. In December 2003, as a research project for a graduation thesis, an evaluation of »Fast adresses« was conducted. The study consisted of 10 study participants performing assigned tasks and a survey of the same individuals. During the study research questions were developed as well as list of tasks to be assigned to the participants for the observations. Each observation was performed using a qualitative research paradigm. This paradigm was enhanced with an adaptation of Shneiderman’s (1998 questionnaire. Identified difficulties participants had in using »Fast adresses« fell into four types: (1 formulation of queries, (2 display of results, (3 the influence of the operating system, Windows, and, (4 the color and design of the display background and elements of the Web page. Results indicate that the difficulties encountered were not limited to the inappropriate design of the user interface, but also are attributable to user error.

Aleš Klemen

2006-01-01

224

Higher specialist training--teething problems. Working Minds Research Project.  

Science.gov (United States)

An interview survey was conducted to ascertain the views of the first cohort of doctors in Scotland completing Higher Specialist Training under the new Calman arrangements. It was intended that this information would influence plans for the future training of Specialists in Scotland, building on strengths and addressing weaknesses. A team of interviewers saw 140 out of the 168 Senior/Specialist Registrars who were due to receive their Certificate of Completion of Specialist Training (CCST) in the year leading to August 1999. The response rate was 83 per cent. The median age of respondents was 34 years (range of 29-51 years), with a third of the cohort being female. Overall the doctors had spent between nine and 13 years in training after graduation with a median of 10 years by the time they entered their final year of higher specialist training. On average, eighteen months had been spent in another specialty. Psychiatry and Surgery stand out as specialties that trainees enter immediately after gaining full registration. Most of the doctors (84 per cent) wish to remain in Scotland for their career posts. Although the majority (69 per cent) plan to work full-time, two thirds of the women said they might or would work part-time in the future. When asked whether they perceived gaps in their clinical training, 39 per cent said they did. No consistent pattern emerged according to the specialty and dual certification did not appear to create difficulties. On balance, the doctors felt as prepared for the role of Consultant as those appointed to Consultant posts five years ago. However, they had experienced both old and new style training and were concerned that the next generation of Specialist Registrars would not be so well prepared and might find the transition from Specialist Registrar to Consultant difficult. The benefits of an explicit and detailed curriculum were recognised but there were doubts expressed as to whether such a structure could be implemented. In craft specialties, doctors felt that it was impossible to acquire the skills and experience to become a competent Consultant within five or six years of higher specialist training. A second major concern is a perceived lack of flexibility under the new training arrangements both in geographical location and in catering to the training needs of individuals. Responses to questions exploring the nature of clinical supervision, appraisal, assessment and mentoring emphasised the fundamental importance of the relationship between supervising Consultant and the trainee. Good supervision, regular appraisal and mentoring are seen as highly desirable and extremely valuable when carried out well. This high standard was not perceived to be the norm. Only one third of the sample felt that they had had a continuing mentor or supervisor throughout the training programme. Trainees have reservations about their annual formal RITA assessments with some feeling that they lack objectivity as far as assessment of their own performance is concerned. They were more positive about the impact of Specialty Committees on the quality of training posts. PMID:12836623

Baldwin, P J

1999-09-01

225

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: The International Labour Organization (ILO), is very pleased to be associated with this International Conference on National Infrastructures for Radiation Safety. On behalf of the Director General, Mr. J. Somavia, I would like to congratulate the national organizer and host, the University Mohammed V, Agdal, and the Government of Morocco, the IAEA and the other co-operating organizations: the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, the European Commission and the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency for taking this initiative. When flying here to Morocco yesterday, I read newspaper reports about the results of the investigations related to the disaster of the Columbia space shuttle. The findings were as follows: the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), must establish a safety culture within itself. NASA was well aware of the problem of falling insulation material but did not take it seriously before the disaster. The workers in the Chernobyl power plant knew the hazards and safety rules but did not take them seriously. Every day, more than 5000 people die from occupational accidents and work related diseases as the hazards are not taken seriously. Some of them are caused by ionizing radiation. We in the ILO expect enterprises and workplaces to follow proper occupational safety and health management systems so as to avoid accidents, diseases and other problems at work. Equally, we must expect national leadership,ually, we must expect national leadership, sound nationwide management, for radiation safety, which means: National policy setting, which usually results in national standards and laws; National structures and mechanisms, that is, who is in charge of what; Responsibilities and accountabilities set, and resources allocated; National action plans, a national programme;Implementation of these plans;Follow-up, monitoring, review, feedback to enhance the process using selected indicators; Continuous improvement in measurable steps at national level. The ILO adopted, two months ago, a new global strategy to prevent workplace hazards such as radiation from causing death, disability and disease. We would be pleased to encourage related infrastructures in national workplaces to do their share in our concerted efforts for achieving the required safety culture. The labour inspectorates worldwide, the employers and the workers, as well as their organizations, professionals and scientists, all of them can contribute. We need well organized, systematic and continuous collaborative efforts that end up in progressive and stepwise improvement which covers all those at risk. I am convinced this conference will be one step in that direction. (author)

226

Verbal Math Problem Solving: What the Research on Instruction Tells Us.  

Science.gov (United States)

The paper is a discussion of research on direct instruction and its implications for effective instruction in verbal math problem solving for elementary learning disabled students. Characteristics and problems of conventional programs are reviewed, as are the major features and logic of direct instruction programing. Components of instructional…

Jones Eric D.; Krouse, James P.

227

Addressable terminally linked DNA-CNT nanowires.  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite many advances in carbon nanotube (CNT) research, several issues continue to plague the field with regard to the construction of well-defined hybrid CNT materials. Regiospecific covalent functionalization, nonspecific surface absorption, and carbon nanotube aggregation/bundling present major difficulties when working with these materials. In this communication, we circumvent these problems and report a new addressable hybrid material composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes terminally linked by oligonucleotides into a nanowire motif. We show that the oligonucleotide junctions are addressable and can be targeted by gold nanoparticles. PMID:20857907

Weizmann, Yossi; Chenoweth, David M; Swager, Timothy M

2010-10-13

228

Data Linkage: A powerful research tool with potential problems  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy makers, clinicians and researchers are demonstrating increasing interest in using data linked from multiple sources to support measurement of clinical performance and patient health outcomes. However, the utility of data linkage may be compromised by sub-optimal or incomplete linkage, leading to systematic bias. In this study, we synthesize the evidence identifying participant or population characteristics that can influence the validity and completeness of data linkage and may be associated with systematic bias in reported outcomes. Methods A narrative review, using structured search methods was undertaken. Key words "data linkage" and Mesh term "medical record linkage" were applied to Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL databases between 1991 and 2007. Abstract inclusion criteria were; the article attempted an empirical evaluation of methodological issues relating to data linkage and reported on patient characteristics, the study design included analysis of matched versus unmatched records, and the report was in English. Included articles were grouped thematically according to patient characteristics that were compared between matched and unmatched records. Results The search identified 1810 articles of which 33 (1.8% met inclusion criteria. There was marked heterogeneity in study methods and factors investigated. Characteristics that were unevenly distributed among matched and unmatched records were; age (72% of studies, sex (50% of studies, race (64% of studies, geographical/hospital site (93% of studies, socio-economic status (82% of studies and health status (72% of studies. Conclusion A number of relevant patient or population factors may be associated with incomplete data linkage resulting in systematic bias in reported clinical outcomes. Readers should consider these factors in interpreting the reported results of data linkage studies.

Scott Ian

2010-12-01

229

Deconstructing the Elephant and the Flag in the Lavatory: Promises and Problems of Moral Foundations Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Moral Foundations research offers rich promise, opening up key questions about how affect and cognition are integrated in moral response, and exploring how different moral discourses may supply meaning and valence to moral experience. Haidt and his colleagues also associate different discourses with different political positions. However I address

Haste, Helen

2013-01-01

230

Methodical preparedness of the Research Institute of the Fuel and Power Complex, Bratislava, to solve problems of implementation of new-generation power plants in Czechoslovakia  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Thanks to its many years' experience, the Research Institute of the Fuel and Power Complex (VUPEK) in Bratislava is capable of addressing the following problems associated with the design of the new-generation unit: probabilistic safety assessment, fire safety assessment, maneuverability analysis, optimum fuel strategy analysis, and economic analysis of future development concepts. The world trends in the use of nuclear fuel in relation to the development of new, advanced reactor systems are also outlined. (Z.S.)

231

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Nuclear terrorism has been recognized as a potential threat to human security and economic prosperity since at least the 1970s. Evidence of Al Qaeda's interest in acquiring nuclear material came to light during the 1990s. However, it is since the attacks of 11 September 2001 that the risk of nuclear terrorist acts has come to be a widespread public and governmental concern, for understandable reasons, and that efforts to combat illicit trafficking, which could lead to nuclear or other radioactive materials falling into the hands of terrorists, have intensified. Six years on, it makes sense to take stock of what has been achieved in the combat to stem illicit trafficking and of where further actions - actions of individual States and cooperative international actions - might usefully be initiated. The IAEA has maintained an Illicit Trafficking Database since 1995. Information reported to this database confirms that concerns about illicit trafficking in nuclear material are justified. Database information points to persistent theft and loss of radioactive sources. States' international obligations relevant to international nuclear trafficking are based on the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM), the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism, the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540, which deals with weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear weapons and non-State actors, and the United Nations non-State actors, and the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1375, which requires all States to take the necessary steps to prevent the commission of terrorist acts, including early warning to other States. In addition to these legally binding instruments, there is the non-binding Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources, which Member States of the IAEA agreed in 2003. The Code addresses the establishment of an adequate system of regulatory control, from the production of radioactive sources to their final disposal, and a system for the restoration of such control if it has been lost. The Supplementary Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources provides non-binding guidance concerning the import and export of Category 1 and 2 radioactive sources, notably in relation to the evaluation of export authorization requests and pre-shipment notification. Furthermore there is the IAEA Safeguards Agreements and their Additional Protocols, which require accounting and control of nuclear material, and the establishment of State systems of accounting and control. The purpose and objectives of this conference are, on the one hand, to look back and review our collective experience in combating illicit nuclear trafficking, and on the other hand, looking forward, to see whether we can identify ways in which existing practices can be improved, and where it might be useful for new practices to be developed

232

Addressable Terminally Linked DNA-CNT Nanowires  

OpenAIRE

Despite many advances in carbon nanotube (CNT) research, several issues continue to plague the field with regard to the construction of well-defined hybrid CNT materials. Regiospecific covalent functionalization, nonspecific surface absorption, and carbon nanotube aggregation/bundling present major difficulties when working with these materials. In this communication, we circumvent these problems and report a new addressable hybrid material composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes terminall...

Chenoweth, David M.; Swager, Timothy Manning

2010-01-01

233

Opening Address [International Conference on Research Reactors: Safe Management and Effective Utilization, Rabat (Morocco), 14-18 November 2011  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Significant issues that the RR community continues to face are primarily related to operation, utilization and safety, ageing, decommissioning, fuel and waste management. There are also more recent challenges, such as initiatives for new RR facilities, securing radioisotope production, human resource and infrastructure capacity building, as well as sustainability of RR programmes, all of which are receiving greater attention. In view of the above, it is timely to convene another in the series of international conferences to discuss the issues and foster cooperation within the worldwide RR community. For more than 60 years, RRs have been one of the locomotives of nuclear science and technology. To date, approximately 670 RRs have been built, and some 240 of these facilities continue to operate in 55 countries. It goes without saying that RRs must be safely and reliably operated, adequately utilized, refurbished when necessary, provided with adequate proliferation-resistant fuel cycle services and safely decommissioned at the end of life. In this regard, the IAEA provides assistance to Member States by developing safety standards and disseminating information on good practices for all aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle as well as the planning and implementation of decommissioning. Member States look to the IAEA for coordination of the worldwide effort in this area and for help in solving specific problems. Today RR operating organizations need to overcome challenges suchnizations need to overcome challenges such as effective utilization, the on-going management of ageing facilities, pressures for increased vigilance with respect to non-proliferation, and shrinking resources, both financial and human, while fulfilling an expanding role in support of nuclear technology development. The IAEA coordinates and implements an array of activities that together provide broad support for RRs. As with other aspects of nuclear technology, RR activities within the IAEA are spread among diverse groups in different Departments. To ensure harmonized approaches a cross-cutting coordination group on RRs has been established, with representatives from all IAEA departments actively supporting RR activities

234

Opening address  

Science.gov (United States)

Ladies and Gentlemen My cordial thanks to you for participating in our workshop and to all those who have sponsored it. When in 1957 I attended the International Congress on Fundamental Constants held in Turin on the occasion of the first centenary of the death of Amedeo Avogadro, I did not expect that about thirty-five years later a small but representative number of distinguished scientists would meet here again, to discuss how to go beyond the sixth decimal figure of the Avogadro constant. At that time, the uncertainty of the value of this constant was linked to the fourth decimal figure, as reported in the book by DuMond and Cohen. The progress made in the meantime is universally acknowledged to be due to the discovery of x-ray interferometry. We are honoured that one of the two founding fathers, Prof. Ulrich Bonse, is here with us, but we regret that the other, Prof. Michael Hart, is not present. After Bonse and Hart's discovery, the x-ray crystal density method triggered, as in a chain reaction, the investigation of two other quantities related to the Avogadro constant—density and molar mass. Scientists became, so to speak, resonant and since then have directed their efforts, just to mention a few examples, to producing near-perfect silicon spheres and determining their density, to calibrating, with increasing accuracy, mass spectrometers, and to studying the degree of homogeneity of silicon specimens. Obviously, I do not need to explain to you why the Avogadro constant is important. I wish, however, to underline that it is not only because of its position among fundamental constants, as we all know very well its direct links with the fine structure constant, the Boltzmann and Faraday constants, the h/e ratio, but also because when a new value of NA is obtained, the whole structure of the fundamental constants is shaken to a lesser or greater extent. Let me also remind you that the second part of the title of this workshop concerns the silicon representation of the mole. Most of you, I presume, are neo-Pythagoreans, and consequently believe that a new definition and, maybe, a new realization of the unit of mass will be based on a number of atoms of silicon, a view which will certainly lead you to cross swords with the "electrical party". The importance of NA is also linked to the considerable and far-reaching return in other scientific and industrial fields. Finally, let me add that, ethically, the work of many persons all over the world and the money and energy they spend in order to add a decimal figure, may be an example of commitment to be given to our students. Last but not least, my warm thanks to the Director of the Istituto di Metrologia "G Colonnetti", where the experiment has been in progress since 1971, and to all the researchers involved in this work. I do hope that the National Council of Research will continue to support this important project. While wishing you a pleasant stay in Turin, I express the hope that our meeting will prove a fruitful opportunity for discussion and exchange of views.

Castagnoli, C.

1994-01-01

235

Opening Address  

Science.gov (United States)

Dear Colleagues, It is a great pleasure and honor for me to invite you on the occasion of the IAU Colloquium International Cooperation in Dissemination of the Astronomical Data to the Central (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences. This distinguished gathering of experts in the vast field of modern methods for archiving and managing almost infinite astronomical data files of everlasting value will doubtlessly make a considerable and important contribution to success in the present and future research in astronomy. All of us are witnesses of a great technological, even psychological upturn that occurs in the everyday astronomical practice. The small but the most powerful handy devices known as desktop, laptop, or even palm-top PCs, have rendered a tedious calculating work and stressing search in the card-file or book-form catalogs to a pure pleasure and raised an admiration for those brilliant minds that have invented such a kind of hard- and software. The networks of all kinds and sorts -- Internet, Bitnet, World Wide Web, etc. -- have realized ancient dreams of a Man to fly with thought all over the world communicating with other human beings. But ... don't forget that the most real and valuable communication is the live one, when one can see the face and the eyes of his (or her) partner, listen to his voice as large as life, and the only opportunity for this is to stay together. And this just occurs at the colloquium like ours! So, let me heartily welcome you to the Pulkovo Observatory.

Abalakin, V. K.

1997-03-01

236

Current state of designing, manufacturing and mounting of marine system pipelines. Research problems statement  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The current state of designing, manufacturing and mounting of marine system pipelines is considered. The review of researches in the field of pipeline route deviation compensation is given. The research problems of pipeline routes compensating capabilities taking into account features of their configuration are stated.

Sakhno Konstantin Nickolaevich

2013-04-01

237

Scientific Paradigms and Falsification: Kuhn, Popper, and Problems in Education Research  

Science.gov (United States)

By examining the respective contributions of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn to the philosophy of science, the author highlights some prevailing problems in this article with the methods of so-called scientific research in education. The author enumerates a number of reasons why such research, in spite of its limited tangible return, continues to gain…

Hyslop-Margison, Emery James

2010-01-01

238

Disconnected Youth in the Research Triangle Region: An Ominous Problem Hidden in Plain Sight  

Science.gov (United States)

In September 2006, the North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation commissioned MDC, Inc. of Chapel Hill to analyze the problem of "disconnected youth" in the Research Triangle region, determine the current state of the region's responses to the challenge, and recommend steps to deepen and accelerate action on the issue. The research process was…

Dodson, David; Guillory, Ferrel; Lipsitz, Joan; Raper, Noah; Rausch, Christina

2008-01-01

239

New paradigms for old problems: some (small) advances in laser resonator research at the CSIR  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper we outline new approaches to old problems, namely understanding the transverse modes in Porro prism resonators, and creating methods to select Gaussian beams by phase-only intra-cavity elements. In the process we outline some of the recent research that has taken place within the Mathematical Optics research group.

Forbes, Andrew

2010-02-01

240

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

There is now universal recognition of the illicit trafficking problem and more uniform agreement on the need to take action to combat nuclear terrorism. In the past, security issues were considered strictly a national responsibility. It is now recognized that illicit trafficking not only concerns the protection of national borders but that there are vital international parameters. The IAEA's activities in the nuclear security field took a quantum leap in 2002 when it established its first Nuclear Security Plan for 2002-2005, including protection against illicit trafficking. We are now implementing the second plan for 2006-2009, which has been approved by our Board of Governors and the General Conference in 2005. The current Nuclear Security Plan for 2006-2009, which ranges over two bi-annual programme and budget periods, is comprehensive and identifies three activity areas, as well as activities supporting nuclear security. The first activity area is entitled 'Needs assessment, analysis and coordination' and is 'horizontal' in that it supports the implementation of the entire plan, and provides nuclear security relevant information, for purposes of information exchange to help prioritize activities and in support of operational activities. The ITDB programme is a cornerstone in the work to combat illicit trafficking. The second activity area, namely, prevention, aims at supporting sustainable capacity building in IAEA Member States to meet the threat of nuclear terrortates to meet the threat of nuclear terrorism and of other criminal activities involving nuclear and other radioactive substances. Core activities include an effective accounting registry and physical protection, the implementation of a nuclear security culture and measures to sustain effective systems in the long term. Should prevention fail, it will be important to have a second line of defence, which is the third activity area in the plan, referred to as detection and response. This is the area which is of particular concern at this conference. Within this area, activities are performed to help establish enhanced capabilities at border crossings and elsewhere in countries to detect smuggling of radioactive substances. For this, effective and user friendly detection instruments are needed, both for goods, persons and vehicles. Proper procedures must be available to deal with the detection of radioactive material and the seizure of material by law enforcement organizations. Basic plans must be available to meet the radiation dispersal device threat and to deal with emergencies at nuclear installations, other locations and transports resulting from attacks or other malicious acts. The plan outlines what must be done to achieve the goals of prevention, detection and response. It recognizes the need to work on parallel tracks. One track is to implement the plan and provide support for the implementation of the requirements of the legal instruments: reference materials containing a set of internationally accepted guides and recommendations are being established. For the purpose of publishing such guides and recommendations, the IAEA has initiated a Nuclear Security Series. Three categories of documents are now being considered. The first category is the security fundamentals that provide the fundamental principles for nuclear security. The next category of documents will contain recommendations, which establish functional requirements, 'what should be done' as a basis for regulatory systems. The third category is 'how to do it' including best practices for implementation and these are documented in implementing guides and supporting technical guidance. On another track, we find the IAEA nuclear security services; advisory and evaluation missions that are convened with teams of recognized international experts to evaluate the status and provide recommendations for improvements of different features of the nuclear security systems. The International Nuclear Security Advisory Service (INSServ) mission aims at determining the overall needs for improvements in a cou

241

The way of perceiving ecological problems by citizens of Vojvodina: Presentation of empirical research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper presents selected results of an empirical research about the attitudes of Vojvodinian citizens towards ecological problems. Its starting hypothesis is that the sensibility of citizens’ attitudes towards ecological problems is the crucial key to create participative model of decision-making processes regarding environment. Research goals are descriptive and exploratory: evaluating the general attitude towards ecological problems, and checking their links with socio-demographic characteristics of respondents and with the globalization of the consciousness about the environment. The results of research show that respondents first recognize directly observable ecological problems (pollution. The rest of respondents recognized ecological problems which are necessarily mediated by global ecological consciousness and by ideas that put mainly human beings in the center of ecological issues (the lack of ecological consciousness. The respondents are divided in determining the state/civil society as the possible source of ecological problems, where most of them recognized the state institutions (ecological legislation as such. The respondents expressed a significant level of non-anthropocentric values towards nature. The assumed link between socio-demographic characteristics and reception of ecological problems was not confirmed. It is shown that the attitude of Vojvodinian citizens towards ecological problems is highly diversified. On one hand, this attitude reflects an ecological consciousness, formed by the direct experience in the local context; while, on the other hand, it reflects a consciousness formed in the framework of globalized environmental discourse in “networked society”.

Puši? Ljubinko

2012-01-01

242

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you to the international conference on 'Safe Decommissioning for Nuclear Activities: Assuring the Safe Termination of Practices Involving Radioactive Materials', on behalf of the President of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Mr. Wolfram Koenig. The BfS is very pleased to host this conference on behalf of the German Government. We are deeply honoured by the request of the International Atomic Energy Agency to organize this conference and were delighted to accept it. After more than a year of preparatory work we are ready now to start the conference, with its plenary session, the poster presentations and the industrial exhibition. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities is an important issue in Germany. Following the agreement between the Federal Government and the operators of nuclear power plants to phase out of nuclear power generation within the next 20 years, the successive shutdown of facilities and subsequent dismantling will be a major task for all parties involved. As Germany is in favour of immediate dismantling, all the reactor sites should be brought to green field conditions in about 30 years from now. Germany has already gained a lot of practical experience in the decommissioning of all types of nuclear facilities. In total, 57 nuclear facilities were shut down and 27 were dismantled. Most of them are research reactors. The shutdown facilities include 17 nuclear power plants. Two of them were co nuclear power plants. Two of them were completely dismantled to green field conditions. In our definition, 'nuclear power plants' mean facilities that were connected to the grid. Of course, many of the facilities are smaller prototype reactors, but larger ones are also included. These are the five WWER reactors of Soviet design in Greifswald, which is claimed to be the biggest decommissioning project in the world, the Wuergassen BWR with 640 MW(e) (net) and the Muehlheim-Kaerlich PWR with 1220 MW(e) (net). Both facilities, Greifswald and Wuergassen, can be visited on Friday in the context of the 'scientific tours'. Furthermore, an application for the decommissioning of the Stade PWR with 640 MW(e) (net) was submitted to the regulators and is under examination. It should also be mentioned that nine fuel cycle facilities were shut down in Germany and four of them were completely dismantled. Amongst the fuel cycle facilities is the Karlsruhe prototype reprocessing plant, which has the following specialty: the reprocessing plant is being dismantled and a vitrification plant is being constructed in parallel in order to solidify the roughly 80 m3 of liquid HLW originating from the reprocessing of 208 Mg of spent fuel. Dismantling of the vitrification plant is the last step in this process. Another outstanding project is the cleanup and rehabilitation of the uranium mining and milling sites of the Wismut company in the German States of Saxony and Thuringia. When the facility was closed at the end of 1990, it had produced about 231 000 t of uranium. At that time, Wismut was the third largest uranium producer in the world. The ongoing work includes the stabilization and remediation of the waste rock piles, dismantling of the mining and milling facilities and underground remediation measures. The total cleanup costs are estimated to be about Euro 6.5 billion.The site is the destination of a scientific tour on Friday. The tour is not yet fully booked. Last minute registrations are possible at the registration desk. A large amount of research work was carried out in Germany for the development of methods, technologies, etc., for the dismantling of nuclear facilities, which was publicly funded and carried out, for example at universities. A large amount of know how emerged also from the application of equipment in dismantling the actual facilities. Having this background in mind, it is not surprising that Germany decided on some of the issues that are the subject of this conference, for example release from regulatory control. German experts will provide the respective

243

Opening address  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Recognizing the global danger of illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive material, governments have in recent years taken a number of steps which includes the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM), the 2005 Amendments to the CPPNM, the International Convention of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism and the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540. Perhaps more important than formal legal measures alone are the actions governments have initiated to institute practical cooperation in this field. Of course, the IAEA has been a leader in this effort, as reflected in the Nuclear Security Plan. Of the many areas where the IAEA has contributed, let me cite three: the development of the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources, the numerous efforts through technical assistance programmes to assess physical protection needs and to build national capacity to implement physical protection systems, and the collection and dissemination of information through the Illicit Trafficking Database. States are acting together to develop training and communications channels to facilitate intervention in an ongoing illicit transfer or to build national capacity to protect nuclear materials and respond to security threats. 60 nations have joined the Russian Federation and the USA as partners in the global initiative to Combat nuclear Terrorism. These visible forms of international cooperation are backed up by numerous bilateral assistare backed up by numerous bilateral assistance and cooperation programmes directed at improving physical protection, including during transport, consolidating and eliminating unused nuclear materials and radioactive sources, bolstering nuclear detection at ports and borders, strengthening the ability of law enforcement agencies to identify and prosecute nuclear smuggling cases, developing procedures and protocols to intervene in emergency situations involving nuclear or radioactive materials, and exchanging information on nuclear terrorism threats. There is a need to continue and strengthen the multinational cooperation which involves active participation by both nuclear specialists and those with more general security and law enforcement laws. Furthermore priority has to be given to developing national capacity to evaluate security threats, ensure adequate physical protection and intervene in ongoing nuclear trafficking cases complemented by cooperation in the areas of forensic analysis of nuclear material and emergency response. Together with the Russian Federation the USA announce the completion of security upgrades at strategic weapons sites and agreement on measures to ensure the long term sustainability of physical protection improvements in the Russian Federation. The USA is also working to convert research reactors and return the high enriched uranium fuel fro locations around the world which might otherwise become a target for terrorists or thieves. In parallel with efforts to improve security at the source, the USA is building international cooperation to put in place nuclear detection at seaports, airports and land border crossings. Through collaboration with the Russian Federal Customs Service, all of the Russian Federation's official border crossings will be equipped with radiation detection equipment by 2011

244

RESEARCH OF ENVIRONMENT AND STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM OF MARKETING RESEARCH OF BANK «VTB 24» (JOINT-STOCK COMPANY  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the present article the analysis of environment of bank «??? 24» (Joint-Stock Company is given, internal characteristics ofbank, and also algorithm of statement of problems of marketing research of the market of bank services in the south of Russia areinvestigated.

E.A. Livenskaya

2011-07-01

245

How can we improve problem-solving in undergraduate biology? Applying lessons from 30 years of physics education research  

CERN Document Server

Modern biological problems are complex. If students are to successfully grapple with such problems as scientists and citizens, they need to have practiced solving authentic, complex problems during their undergraduate years. Physics education researchers have investigated student problem-solving for the last three decades. Although the surface features and content of biology problems differ from physics problems, teachers of both sciences want students to learn to explain patterns and processes in the natural world and to make predictions about system behaviors. After surveying literature on problem-solving in physics and biology, we propose how biology education researchers could apply research-supported pedagogical techniques from physics to enhance biology students' problem-solving. First, we characterize the problems that biology students are typically asked to solve. We then describe the development of research-validated physics problem-solving curricula. Finally, we propose how biology scholars can appl...

Hoskinson, Anne-Marie; Knight, Jennifer K

2012-01-01

246

Problem-based learning in cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a virtual learning environment – methodological research  

OpenAIRE

Sudden cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of death in the world, however some nurses face several difficulties to perform Basic and Advanced Life Support. We believe that active methodologies, such as Problem-Based Learning (PBL) may be a good option to improve the learning process in Nursing. This is a methodological research and technological production of quantitative nature that aims to develop Problem-Based Learning in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on a Virtual Learning Env...

Pedro Miguel Garcez Sardo; Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal Sasso

2007-01-01

247

Research on the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows Using Firefly Algorithm  

OpenAIRE

As a key factor of logistics distribution, vehicle routing problem (VRP) is a hot research topic in management and computation science. In this paper the principle and algorithm process of firefly algorithm are introduced in detail. Then the algorithm process and solving steps are designed for vehicle routing problem with time windows (VRPTW), including the coding and design of  disturbance mechanism of elicit fireflies. In the end, the testing examples from benchmark and other literatur...

Fengshan Pan; Chunming Ye; Kefeng Wang; Jiangbo Cao

2013-01-01

248

Using Physics to Learn Mathematica to Do Physics: From Homework Problems to Research Examples  

OpenAIRE

We describe the development of a junior-senior level course for Physics majors designed to teach Mathematica skills in support of their undergraduate coursework, but also to introduce students to modern research level results. Standard introductory and intermediate level Physics homework-style problems are used to teach Mathematica commands and programming methods, which are then applied, in turn, to more sophisticated problems in some of the core undergraduate subjects, alo...

Robinett, R. W.

2007-01-01

249

Research on Optimized Problem-solving Solutions: Selection of the Production Process  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available In manufacturing industries, various problems may occur during the production process. The problems are complex and involve the relevant context of working environments. A problem-solving process is often initiated to create a solution and achieve a desired status. In this process, determining how t [...] o obtain a solution from the various candidate solutions is an important issue. In such uncertain working environments, context information can provide rich clues for problem-solving decision making. This work uses a selection approach to determine an optimized problem-solving process which will assist workers in choosing reasonable solutions. A context-based utility model explores the problem context information to obtain candidate solution actual utility values; a multi-criteria decision analysis uses the actual utility values to determine the optimal selection order for candidate solutions. The selection order is presented to the worker as an adaptive knowledge recommendation. The worker chooses a reasonable problem-solving solution based on the selection order. This paper uses a high-tech company's knowledge base log as a source of analysis data. The experimental results show that the chosen approach to an optimized problem-solving solution selection is effective. The contribution of this research is a method which is easy to implement in a problem-solving decision support system.

C. K., Ke.

2013-08-01

250

Analysis of current research addressing complementary use of life-cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: have lessons been learned from previous experience with chemicals?  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

While it is generally agreed that successful strategies to address the health and environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials (NM) should consider the well-established frameworks for conducting life-cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA), scientific research, and specific guidance on how to practically apply these methods are still very much under development. This paper evaluates how research efforts have applied LCA and RA together for NM, particularly reflecting on previous experiences with applying these methods to chemicals. Through a literature review and a separate analysis of research focused on applying LCA and RA together for NM, it appears that current research efforts have taken into account some key ‘‘lessons learned’’ from previous experience with chemicals while many key challenges remain for practically applying these methods to NM. We identified two main approaches for using these methods together for NM: ‘‘LC-based RA’’ (traditional RA applied in a life-cycle perspective) and‘‘RA-complemented LCA’’ (conventional LCA supplemented by RA in specific life-cycle steps). Hence, the latter is the only identified approach which genuinely combines LC- and RA-based methods for NM-risk research efforts to date as the former is rather a continuation of normal RA according to standard assessment procedures (e.g., REACH). Both these approaches along with recommendations for using LCA and RA together for NM are similar to those made previously for chemicals, and thus, there does not appear to be much progress made specific for NM. We have identified one issue in particular that may be specific for NM when applying LCA and RA at this time: the need to establish proper dose metrics within both methods.

Grieger, Khara Deanne; Laurent, Alexis

2012-01-01

251

Analysis of current research addressing complementary use of life-cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: have lessons been learned from previous experience with chemicals?  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

While it is generally agreed that successful strategies to address the health and environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials (NM) should consider the well-established frameworks for conducting life-cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA), scientific research, and specific guidance on how to practically apply these methods are still very much under development. This paper evaluates how research efforts have applied LCA and RA together for NM, particularly reflecting on previous experiences with applying these methods to chemicals. Through a literature review and a separate analysis of research focused on applying LCA and RA together for NM, it appears that current research efforts have taken into account some key 'lessons learned' from previous experience with chemicals while many key challenges remain for practically applying these methods to NM. We identified two main approaches for using these methods together for NM: 'LC-based RA' (traditional RA applied in a life-cycle perspective) and 'RA-complemented LCA' (conventional LCA supplemented by RA in specific life-cycle steps). Hence, the latter is the only identified approach which genuinely combines LC- and RA-based methods for NM-risk research efforts to date as the former is rather a continuation of normal RA according to standard assessment procedures (e.g., REACH). Both these approaches along with recommendations for using LCA and RA together for NM are similar to those made previously for chemicals, and thus, there does not appear to be much progress made specific for NM. We have identified one issue in particular that may be specific for NM when applying LCA and RA at this time: the need to establish proper dose metrics within both methods.

Grieger, Khara D., E-mail: kgrieger@rti.org [RTI International (United States); Laurent, Alexis; Miseljic, Mirko [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Management Engineering (Denmark); Christensen, Frans [Sustainability and Risk Management, COWI A/S, Department for Pollution Prevention (Denmark); Baun, Anders [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering (Denmark); Olsen, Stig I. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Management Engineering (Denmark)

2012-07-15

252

Human embryonic stem cell research, justice, and the problem of unequal biological access  

OpenAIRE

Abstract In 2003, Ruth Faden and eighteen other colleagues argued that a "problem of unequal biological access" is likely to arise in access to therapies resulting from human embryonic stem cell research. They showed that unless deliberate steps are taken in the United States to ensure that the human embryonic stem cell lines available to researchers mirrors the genetic diversity of the general population, white Americans will likely receive the benefits of these therapies to the relative exc...

Moller Mark S

2008-01-01

253

Learning to strategise: problems of practice: SKOPE Research Paper No. 20, Autumn 2001  

OpenAIRE

This paper introduces a pilot study from a wider research project on how company directors learn to strategise. The problem of strategy learning is framed within a conceptualisation of strategy practice as both micro and macro phenomena. This dual framing helps explain both the formalistic nature of strategists' learning and their difficulties in putting their learning into practice. The paper concludes by outlining a proposal for further research and inviting suggestions.

Whittington, Richard

2001-01-01

254

Problem-based learning sessions and undergraduate research: a medical student’s perspective and experience  

OpenAIRE

Undergraduate research (UR) and problem-based learning (PBL) sessions are similar with respect to the type of skills gained through each. However, appropriate modification of PBL sessions would contribute to enhanced UR experience. Based on personal experience in UR and a PBL curriculum, in this short discourse I shall explain how studying under a PBL curriculum enabled me to gain more out of my research experience.

Alamodi, Abdulhadi A.

2013-01-01

255

Solving problems in social-ecological systems: definition, practice and barriers of transdisciplinary research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Translating policies about sustainable development as a social process and sustainability outcomes into the real world of social-ecological systems involves several challenges. Hence, research policies advocate improved innovative problem-solving capacity. One approach is transdisciplinary research that integrates research disciplines, as well as researchers and practitioners. Drawing upon 14 experiences of problem-solving, we used group modeling to map perceived barriers and bridges for researchers' and practitioners' joint knowledge production and learning towards transdisciplinary research. The analysis indicated that the transdisciplinary research process is influenced by (1) the amount of traditional disciplinary formal and informal control, (2) adaptation of project applications to fill the transdisciplinary research agenda, (3) stakeholder participation, and (4) functional team building/development based on self-reflection and experienced leadership. Focusing on implementation of green infrastructure policy as a common denominator for the delivery of ecosystem services and human well-being, we discuss how to diagnose social-ecological systems, and use knowledge production and collaborative learning as treatments. PMID:23475660

Angelstam, Per; Andersson, Kjell; Annerstedt, Matilda; Axelsson, Robert; Elbakidze, Marine; Garrido, Pablo; Grahn, Patrik; Jönsson, K Ingemar; Pedersen, Simen; Schlyter, Peter; Skärbäck, Erik; Smith, Mike; Stjernquist, Ingrid

2013-03-01

256

Research on Optimized Problem-solving Solutions: Selection of the Production Process  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In manufacturing industries, various problems may occur during the production process. The problems are complexand involve the relevant context of working environments. A problem-solving process is often initiated to create asolution and achieve a desired status. In this process, determining how to obtain a solution from the variouscandidate solutions is an important issue. In such uncertain working environments, context information can providerich clues for problem-solving decision making. This work uses a selection approach to determine an optimizedproblem-solving process which will assist workers in choosing reasonable solutions. A context-based utility modelexplores the problem context information to obtain candidate solution actual utility values; a multi-criteria decisionanalysis uses the actual utility values to determine the optimal selection order for candidate solutions. Theselection order is presented to the worker as an adaptive knowledge recommendation. The worker chooses areasonable problem-solving solution based on the selection order. This paper uses a high-tech company’sknowledge base log as a source of analysis data. The experimental results show that the chosen approach to anoptimized problem-solving solution selection is effective. The contribution of this research is a method which iseasy to implement in a problem-solving decision support system.

C. K. Ke

2013-08-01

257

Research on Difficult Family Topics: Helping New and Experienced Researchers Cope.  

Science.gov (United States)

Addresses problems associated with conducting research on difficult family topics. Issues examined are personal issues that play a role in research topic selections, problems obtaining Review Board permission to do certain research, emotional problems experienced by researchers and interviewers doing work on loss, and emotional problems of…

Kitson, Gay C.; And Others

1996-01-01

258

Port virtual addressing for PC  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Instruments for nuclear signal measurements based on add-on card for a personal computer (PC) are designed often. Then one faces the problem of the addressing of data input/output devices which show an integration level or intelligence that makes the use of several port address indispensable, and these are limited in the PC. The virtual addressing offers the advantage of the occupation of few addresses to accede to many of these devices. The principles of this technique and the appliances of a solution in radiometric in a radiometric card based on programmed logic are discussed in this paper

259

Opportunities and Problems of Comparative Higher Education Research: The Daily Life of Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Higher education had a predominant national and institutional focus for a long time. In Europe, supra-national political activities played a major role for increasing the interest in comparative research. Comparative perspectives are important in order to deconstruct the often national perspective of causal reasoning, for proving benchmarks, for…

Teichler, Ulrich

2014-01-01

260

Experimental Research on Mathematics Teaching of "Situated Creation and Problem-Based Instruction" in Chinese Primary and Secondary Schools  

Science.gov (United States)

This research tends to make the experimental study on the mathematics teaching model of "situated creation and problem-based instruction" (SCPBI), namely, the teaching process of "creating situations--posing problems--solving problems--applying mathematics". It is aimed at changing the situation where students generally lack problem-based learning…

Xia, Xiaogang; Lu, Chuanhan; Wang, Bingyi; Song, Yunming

2007-01-01

261

Research on the Problem of Spur Gear Teeth Contact in the Car Gear Box  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The article presents research on the problem of two gear contact in the car gearbox. Contact stiffness is evaluated for the whole period of mesh. Also, contact stresses are evaluated in the contact place. The presented method can be used for calculating spur gear.Article in Lithuanian

Viktor Skrickij

2011-04-01

262

Study of a methodology of identifying important research problems by the PIRT process  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this paper, we propose a new methodology of identifying important research problems to be solved to improve the performance of some specific scientific technologies by the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process which has been used as a methodology for demonstrating the validity of the best estimate simulation codes in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) licensing of nuclear power plants. The new methodology makes it possible to identify important factors affecting the performance of the technologies from the viewpoint of the figure of merit and problems associated with them while it keeps the fundamental concepts of the original PIRT process. Also in this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology by applying it to a task of extracting research problems for improving an inspection accuracy of ultrasonic testing or eddy current testing in the inspection of objects having cracks due to fatigue or stress corrosion cracking. (author)

263

Research program on climatic and environmental problems. Summary of Norwegian climatic and ozone layer research in the last decade and important research tasks in the future  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report includes 44 abstracts, 21 lectures and 23 posters from a workshop arranged by the Norwegian Research Council, the Steering Group for the Norwegian research programme for changes in climate and ozone layer. The topics dealt with are: Results from the research, the greenhouse effect and its influence on the climate of today, the interactions between ocean and climate, pollution influence on ozone layer changes, the UV radiation effects and their influence on the environment, climatic modelling and forecasting, ecological problems related to climatic and environmental changes, the climatic influences of human energy utilisation and suggestions for future research

264

Instruction texts and problems for the training and examination of selected personnel at research nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The publication comprises 6 separate brochures: (1) Selected chapters in reactor theory; (2) Experimental education methods; (3) Research and experimental reactors; (4.1) Technical description of the LVR-15 reactor; (4.2) Technical description of the LR-0 reactor; (4.3) Technical description of the VR-1 reactor; (5) Research reactor safety and operation; and (6) Database of problems for qualification examinations. Brochure No. 4 consists of 3 separate parts. The publication is intended for the training and examination of the following research reactor staff: reactor operator, shift engineer, control physicist, and start-up group head. (J.B.)

265

Beyond Kinsey: The committee for research on problems of sex and American psychology.  

Science.gov (United States)

This introduction to the Special Section of History of Psychology argues for greater attention to psychological research on sex in the decades before the publication of the Kinsey volumes. Drawing on scholarship by Adele Clarke, Donna Haraway and Wade Pickren, this introduction argues for the centrality of the psychological research projects funded by the Committee for Research on Problems of Sex (CRPS), chaired by psychologist Robert Yerkes after 1921. The three individual papers all speak to opposition to the functionalist approach to sex often attributed to Yerkes' CRPS. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23397909

Hegarty, Peter

2012-08-01

266

Research on the Particle-Ant Colony Algorithm in Web Services Composition Problem  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In order to improve the efficiency of finding the optimal solution for web services composition problem to meet increasingly sophisticated demand of users, an algorithm called Particle-Ant Colony Algorithm (PACA based on Quality of Service (QoS is proposed in this article. This algorithm converts the web services composition problem into shortest path problem of QoS-based directed acyclic graph. First, find several suboptimal paths by Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm (PSOA and initialize the pheromones of these paths, then find optimal solution by Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm (ACOA. The experiment result indicates that the PACA can effectively improve the capability of optimizing web services composition problem. The results of the research has theoretical and practical reference values to relevant issues.

Shujun Pei

2014-01-01

267

Simulation research on improved regularized solution of the inverse problem in spectral extinction measurements.  

Science.gov (United States)

We present further results of the simulation research on the constrained regularized least squares (CRLS) solution of the ill-conditioned inverse problem in spectral extinction (turbidimetric) measurements, which we originally presented in this journal [Appl. Opt. 49, 4591 (2010)]. The inverse problem consists of determining the particle size distribution (PSD) function of a particulate system on the basis of a measured extinction coefficient as a function of wavelength. In our previous paper, it was shown that under assumed conditions the problem can be formulated in terms of the discretized Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. The CRLS method incorporates two constraints, which the PSD sought will satisfy: nonnegativity of the PSD values and normalization of the PSD to unity when integrated over the whole range of particle size, into the regularized least squares (RLS) method. This leads to the quadratic programming problem, which is solved by means of the active set algorithm within the research. The simulation research that is the subject of the present paper is a continuation and extension of the research described in our previous paper. In the present research, the performance of the CRLS method variants is compared not only to the corresponding RLS method variants but also to other regularization techniques: the truncated generalized singular value decomposition and the filtered generalized singular value decomposition, as well as nonlinear iterative algorithms: The Twomey algorithm and the Twomey-Markowski algorithm. Moreover, two methods of selecting the optimum value of the regularization parameter are considered: The L-curve method and the generalized cross validation method. The results of our simulation research provide even stronger proof that the CRLS method performs considerably better with reconstruction of PSD than other inversing methods, in terms of better fidelity and smaller uncertainty. PMID:22505162

Mroczka, Janusz; Szczuczy?ski, Damian

2012-04-10

268

A review of three decades of research on some combinatorial optimization problems  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english This paper presents an overview of our research in combinatorial optimization problems. Over the last three decades, our team has been studying mostly optimization problems that arise in industrial environments through the elaboration and solution of mathematical decision models. In addition to elab [...] orating innovative models, we have improved upon existing solutions to complex problems, helping decision makers and researchers to better understand complex industrial systems. Our work has focused on the development of computationally more efficient algorithms that improve on existing methods by improving the solution quality or reducing the computation effort to obtain good solutions. While some of our earlier work became less necessary with the speed up of the computational facilities, the search for improved solution quality and reduced computational effort continues. After reviewing our findings on lot sizing, production scheduling, cutting problems, pattern sequencing, tool switches in flexible manufacturing machines and integrated cutting and sequencing problems, we propose topics for future study.

Horacio Hideki, Yanasse.

2013-04-01

269

Sampling problems in Brazilian research: a critical evaluation of studies on medicinal plants  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available This work compiled Brazilian articles regarding medicinal plant use by local communities in order to analyze the most common sampling problems and if research characteristics can influence the presence of sampling irregularities. We focused on studies about medicinal plants that present a species-in [...] dications list and had a quantitative nature. The proportion of works with and without sampling problems was evaluated considering the journal impact factor, period of publication, community status (urban x rural), sample type, presence of testing hypothesis and presence of research questions. We found that an alarming proportion of papers had some kind of sampling problems (48.39% serious and 19.35% moderate). The most common problems were related to: lack of information regarding the sample size or the universe, small sample sizes and selection of specialists based on obscure criteria. We could not find a significant influence between our tested variables and the occurrence of sampling problems, except for the community status (urban x rural). Results indicate that a significant amount of intracultural diversity is not properly captured, taking into consideration both the population as a whole and a group of interest in the community (= healers).

Patrícia M., Medeiros; Ana H., Ladio; Ulysses P., Albuquerque.

2014-04-01

270

[Problems in quality standard research of new traditional Chinese medicine compound].  

Science.gov (United States)

The new traditional Chinese medicine compound is the main part of the research of new drug of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and the new Chinese herbal compound reflects the characteristics of TCM theory. The new traditional Chinese medicine compound quality standard research is one of the main content of pharmaceutical research, and is also the focus of the new medicine pharmaceutical evaluation content. Although in recent years the research level of new traditional Chinese medicine compound has been greatly improved, but the author during the review found still some common problems existing in new traditional Chinese medicine compound quality standard research data, this paper analyzed the current quality standards for new traditional Chinese medicine compound and the problems existing in the research data, respectively from measurement of the content of index selection, determine the scope of the content, and the quality standard design concept, the paper expounds developers need to concern. The quality of new traditional Chinese medicine compound quality standard is not only itself can be solved, but quality standards is to ensure the key and important content of product quality, improving the quality of products cannot do without quality standards. With the development of science and technology, on the basis of quality by design under the guidance of the concept, new traditional Chinese medicine compound quality standard system will be more scientific, systematic and perfect. PMID:25522635

Zhou, Gang; He, Yan-Ping

2014-09-01

271

Research on the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows Using Firefly Algorithm  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available As a key factor of logistics distribution, vehicle routing problem (VRP is a hot research topic in management and computation science. In this paper the principle and algorithm process of firefly algorithm are introduced in detail. Then the algorithm process and solving steps are designed for vehicle routing problem with time windows (VRPTW, including the coding and design of  disturbance mechanism of elicit fireflies. In the end, the testing examples from benchmark and other literatures are conducted with good outputs, which prove the validity of the firefly algorithm for VRP.

Fengshan Pan

2013-09-01

272

Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume 2, Problem definition, background, and summary of prior research  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Air pollution in Mexico City has increased along with the growth of the city, the movement of its population, and the growth of employment created by industry. The main cause of pollution in the city is energy consumption. Therefore, it is necessary to take into account the city`s economic development and its prospects when considering the technological relationships between well-being and energy consumption. Air pollution in the city from dust and other particles suspended in the air is an old problem. However, pollution as we know it today began about 50 years ago with the growth of industry, transportation, and population. The level of well-being attained in Mexico City implies a high energy use that necessarily affects the valley`s natural air quality. However, the pollution has grown so fast that the City must act urgently on three fronts: first, following a comprehensive strategy, transform the economic foundation of the city with nonpolluting activities to replace the old industries, second, halt pollution growth through the development of better technologies; and third, use better fuels, emission controls, and protection of wooded areas.

1994-06-01

273

Pioneering space research in the USSR and mathematical modeling of large problems of radiation transfer  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This review is to remind scientists of the older generation of some memorable historical pages and of many famous researchers, teachers and colleagues. For the younger researchers and foreign colleagues it will be useful to get to know about pioneer advancements of the Soviet scientists in the field of information and mathematical supply for cosmonautic problems on the eve of the space era. Main attention is paid to the scientific experiments conducted on the piloted space vehicles and the research teams who created the information and mathematical tools for the first space projects. The role of Mstislav Vsevolodovich Keldysh, the Major Theoretician of cosmonautics, is particularly emphasized. He determined for the most part the basic directions of development of space research and remote sensing of the Earth and planets that are shortly called remote sensing

274

Introducing a Graduate Research Problem to a Junior Level Class: A Successful Experience  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Formulating a research project to be designed and implemented by a junior level class during a short time period is a formidable undertaking. In this paper the authors discuss the problem of rough querying of databases presented to the information systems course and the special issues involved with the design and development of such a system. Of particular note was the greater emphasis in this project on research, and the special challenges involved with exposing undergraduates to graduate-level research concepts and tasks. The students were asked by the instructor to research and learn Database Connectivity, SQL Syntax, Microsoft C# Syntax, Graphical-User Interface Controls, and Database Structure and Design and the .Net framework. The students had to elicit the software requirements from the client at different meetings. Moreover, the students worked on their communicational and oral skills because they had to present their final product to the client and provide ample documentation.

Theresa Beaubouef

2010-07-01

275

Personal factors influence use of cervical cancer screening services: epidemiological survey and linked administrative data address the limitations of previous research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background National screening programs have reduced cervical cancer mortality; however participation in these programs varies according to women's personal and social characteristics. Research into these inequalities has been limited by reliance on self-reported service use data that is potentially biased, or administrative data that lacks personal detail. We address these limitations and extend existing research by examining rates and correlates of cervical screening in a large epidemiological survey with linked administrative data. Methods The cross-sectional sample included 1685 women aged 44-48 and 64-68 years from the Australian Capital Territory and Queanbeyan, Australia. Relative risk was assessed by logistic regression models and summary Population Attributable Risk (PAR was used to quantify the effect of inequalities on rates of cervical cancer screening. Results Overall, 60.5% of women participated in screening over the two-year period recommended by Australian guidelines. Screening participation was associated with having children, moderate or high use of health services, employment, reported lifetime history of drug use, and better physical functioning. Conversely, rates of cervical screening were lower amongst women who were older, reliant on welfare, obese, current smokers, reported childhood sexual abuse, and those with anxiety symptoms. A summary PAR showed that effective targeting of women with readily observable risk-factors (no children, no partner, receiving income support payments, not working, obese, current smoker, anxiety, poor physical health, and low overall health service use could potentially reduce overall non-participation in screening by 74%. Conclusions This study illustrates a valuable method for investigating the personal determinants of health service use by combining representative survey data with linked administrative records. Reliable knowledge about the characteristics that predict uptake of cervical cancer screening services will inform targeted health promotion efforts.

Olesen Sarah C

2012-02-01

276

Research priorities for non-pharmacological therapies for common musculoskeletal problems: nationally and internationally agreed recommendations  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal problems such as low back pain, neck, knee and shoulder pain are leading causes of disability and activity limitation in adults and are most frequently managed within primary care. There is a clear trend towards large, high quality trials testing the effectiveness of common non-pharmacological interventions for these conditions showing, at best, small to moderate benefits. This paper summarises the main lessons learnt from recent trials of the effectiveness of non-pharmacological therapies for common musculoskeletal conditions in primary care and provides agreed research priorities for future clinical trials. Methods Consensus development using nominal group techniques through national (UK and international workshops. During a national Clinical Trials Thinktank workshop in April 2007 in the UK, a group of 30 senior researchers experienced in clinical trials for musculoskeletal conditions and 2 patient representatives debated the possible explanations for the findings of recent high quality trials of non-pharmacological interventions. Using the qualitative method of nominal group technique, these experts developed and ranked a set of priorities for future research, guided by the evidence from recent trials of treatments for common musculoskeletal problems. The recommendations from the national workshop were presented and further ranked at an international symposium (hosted in Canada in June 2007. Results 22 recommended research priorities were developed, of which 12 reached consensus as priorities for future research from the UK workshop. The 12 recommendations were reduced to 7 agreed priorities at the international symposium. These were: to increase the focus on implementation (research into practice; to develop national musculoskeletal research networks in which large trials can be sited and smaller trials supported; to use more innovative trial designs such as those based on stepped care and subgrouping for targeted treatment models; to routinely incorporate health economic analysis into future trials; to include more patient-centred outcome measures; to develop a core set of outcomes for new trials of interventions for musculoskeletal problems; and to focus on studies that advance methodological approaches for clinical trials in this field. Conclusion A set of research priorities for future trials of non-pharmacological therapies for common musculoskeletal conditions has been developed and agreed through national (UK and international consensus processes. These priorities provide useful direction for researchers and research funders alike and impetus for improvement in the quality and methodology of clinical trials in this field.

Windt Danielle

2009-01-01

277

Research priorities for non-pharmacological therapies for common musculoskeletal problems: nationally and internationally agreed recommendations  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Musculoskeletal problems such as low back pain, neck, knee and shoulder pain are leading causes of disability and activity limitation in adults and are most frequently managed within primary care. There is a clear trend towards large, high quality trials testing the effectiveness of common non-pharmacological interventions for these conditions showing, at best, small to moderate benefits. This paper summarises the main lessons learnt from recent trials of the effectiveness of non-pharmacological therapies for common musculoskeletal conditions in primary care and provides agreed research priorities for future clinical trials. Methods Consensus development using nominal group techniques through national (UK) and international workshops. During a national Clinical Trials Thinktank workshop in April 2007 in the UK, a group of 30 senior researchers experienced in clinical trials for musculoskeletal conditions and 2 patient representatives debated the possible explanations for the findings of recent high quality trials of non-pharmacological interventions. Using the qualitative method of nominal group technique, these experts developed and ranked a set of priorities for future research, guided by the evidence from recent trials of treatments for common musculoskeletal problems. The recommendations from the national workshop were presented and further ranked at an international symposium (hosted in Canada) in June 2007. Results 22 recommended research priorities were developed, of which 12 reached consensus as priorities for future research from the UK workshop. The 12 recommendations were reduced to 7 agreed priorities at the international symposium. These were: to increase the focus on implementation (research into practice); to develop national musculoskeletal research networks in which large trials can be sited and smaller trials supported; to use more innovative trial designs such as those based on stepped care and subgrouping for targeted treatment models; to routinely incorporate health economic analysis into future trials; to include more patient-centred outcome measures; to develop a core set of outcomes for new trials of interventions for musculoskeletal problems; and to focus on studies that advance methodological approaches for clinical trials in this field. Conclusion A set of research priorities for future trials of non-pharmacological therapies for common musculoskeletal conditions has been developed and agreed through national (UK) and international consensus processes. These priorities provide useful direction for researchers and research funders alike and impetus for improvement in the quality and methodology of clinical trials in this field. PMID:19134184

Foster, Nadine E; Dziedzic, Krysia S; Windt, Danielle AWM van der; Fritz, Julie M; Hay, Elaine M

2009-01-01

278

Human embryonic stem cell research, justice, and the problem of unequal biological access  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract In 2003, Ruth Faden and eighteen other colleagues argued that a "problem of unequal biological access" is likely to arise in access to therapies resulting from human embryonic stem cell research. They showed that unless deliberate steps are taken in the United States to ensure that the human embryonic stem cell lines available to researchers mirrors the genetic diversity of the general population, white Americans will likely receive the benefits of these therapies to the relative exclusion of minority ethnic groups. Over the past five years the problem of unequal biological access has not received much attention from politicians, bioethicists and even many researchers in the United States, in spite of the widely held belief in the country that there is an obligation to prevent and correct ethnic disparities in access to medical care. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of the problem of unequal biological access and of the need to do more than is currently being done to ensure that ethnic disparities in access to human embryonic stem cell-based therapies do not arise. Specifically, this paper explains why the problem of unequal biological access will likely arise in the United States in such a way that white Americans will disproportionately receive most of the benefits of the therapies resulting from human embryonic stem cell research. It also argues for why there is an obligation to prevent these ethnic disparities in access from happening and outlines four steps that need to be taken towards meeting this obligation.

Moller Mark S

2008-09-01

279

Computational Modeling in Applied Problems: collected papers on econometrics, operations research, game theory and simulation  

OpenAIRE

Computational models pervade all branches of the exact sciences and have in recent times also started to prove to be of immense utility in some of the traditionally 'soft' sciences like ecology, sociology and politics. This volume is a collection of a few cutting-edge research papers on the application of variety of computational models and tools in the analysis, interpretation and solution of vexing real-world problems and issues in economics, management, ecology and global...

Smarandache, Florentin; Bhattacharya, Sukanto; Khoshnevisan, Mohammad; Singh, Housila P.; Singh, Rajesh; Kaymram, F.; Malakar, S.; Salmeron, Jose L.

2006-01-01

280

A Semantic Problem Solving Environment for Integrative Parasite Research: Identification of Intervention Targets for Trypanosoma cruzi  

OpenAIRE

Effective research in parasite biology requires analyzing experimental lab data in the context of constantly expanding public data resources. Integrating lab data with public resources is particularly difficult for biologists who may not possess significant computational skills to acquire and process heterogeneous data stored at different locations. Therefore, we develop a semantic problem solving environment (SPSE) that allows parasitologists to query their lab data integrated with public re...

Parikh, Priti P.; Minning, Todd A.; Nguyen, Vinh; Lalithsena, Sarasi; Asiaee, Amir H.; Sahoo, Satya S.; Doshi, Prashant; Tarleton, Rick; Sheth, Amit P.

2012-01-01

281

How can we improve problem solving in undergraduate biology? Applying lessons from 30 years of physics education research.  

Science.gov (United States)

If students are to successfully grapple with authentic, complex biological problems as scientists and citizens, they need practice solving such problems during their undergraduate years. Physics education researchers have investigated student problem solving for the past three decades. Although physics and biology problems differ in structure and content, the instructional purposes align closely: explaining patterns and processes in the natural world and making predictions about physical and biological systems. In this paper, we discuss how research-supported approaches developed by physics education researchers can be adopted by biologists to enhance student problem-solving skills. First, we compare the problems that biology students are typically asked to solve with authentic, complex problems. We then describe the development of research-validated physics curricula emphasizing process skills in problem solving. We show that solving authentic, complex biology problems requires many of the same skills that practicing physicists and biologists use in representing problems, seeking relationships, making predictions, and verifying or checking solutions. We assert that acquiring these skills can help biology students become competent problem solvers. Finally, we propose how biology scholars can apply lessons from physics education in their classrooms and inspire new studies in biology education research. PMID:23737623

Hoskinson, A-M; Caballero, M D; Knight, J K

2013-06-01

282

How Can We Improve Problem Solving in Undergraduate Biology? Applying Lessons from 30 Years of Physics Education Research  

Science.gov (United States)

If students are to successfully grapple with authentic, complex biological problems as scientists and citizens, they need practice solving such problems during their undergraduate years. Physics education researchers have investigated student problem solving for the past three decades. Although physics and biology problems differ in structure and content, the instructional purposes align closely: explaining patterns and processes in the natural world and making predictions about physical and biological systems. In this paper, we discuss how research-supported approaches developed by physics education researchers can be adopted by biologists to enhance student problem-solving skills. First, we compare the problems that biology students are typically asked to solve with authentic, complex problems. We then describe the development of research-validated physics curricula emphasizing process skills in problem solving. We show that solving authentic, complex biology problems requires many of the same skills that practicing physicists and biologists use in representing problems, seeking relationships, making predictions, and verifying or checking solutions. We assert that acquiring these skills can help biology students become competent problem solvers. Finally, we propose how biology scholars can apply lessons from physics education in their classrooms and inspire new studies in biology education research. PMID:23737623

Hoskinson, A.-M.; Caballero, M. D.; Knight, J. K.

2013-01-01

283

Studying Sideways : Displacing the Problem of Power in Research Interviews with Sociologists and Journalists  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

One strand of the qualitative interview literature has been concerned with the normative or otherwise problematic implications of studying down or studying up (i.e., interviewing “disadvantaged” people or elites). This interview literature is part of a tradition of taking up the problem of power inequalities in relation to the people we study. This article argues that not all types of social scientific research interviews benefit from an à priori problematization of power and control, ethics and equality, or emancipation. From a constructivist perspective, the article seeks to displace the methodological concern with power related to the ideas of studying up or down and introduce another set of concerns in relation to producing good empirical material when we “study sideways.” The argument is based on analyses of interview situations from a concrete research project, where researcher and researched share professional background to some degree, where negotiations replace a researcher-imposed dialogue, and where the circulation of shared or common concepts messes up an orderly division between researchers’ vocabulary and interviewees’ vocabularies. It is proposed that when we study sideways, we must cultivate interview methods which cause confrontation and disagreement—not to acknowledge asymmetry but to enhance the quality of research.

Plesner, Ursula

2011-01-01

284

[Risk/protective factors, and their indices in research on adolescents problem behaviours.  

Science.gov (United States)

Description and explanation of adolescent problem behaviours are in a great part based on risk and protective factor analysis. Research on these factors provides many important data, but due to diversity and complexity of the variables analyzed, it is difficult to summarize their results. One way to deal with this problem is the utilization of risk and protective factor indices, which shows individuals' exposure to the sum of risk and protective factors.In this article eight studies explaining adolescent problem behaviours (mainly: substance use) based on risk/protective factor indices are discussed.The review indicates that study results are strongly influenced by authors' arbitraly decisions on risk/protective factors definitions, the initial list of studied variables, way of determining significant intensity of factors. The most undisputed is the result indicating that after controlling for other variables, both indices (risk and protective) are significant in cross-sectional explanations of problem behaviours. This finding strongly supports the argument for enhancement of protective factors in preventive interventions. However, the main disadvantage of studies based on indices is the "averaging" of importance of various factors, which makes it difficult to assess their specific impact on problem behaviours. PMID:19390638

Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna; Bobrowski, Krzysztof

2008-11-19

285

Significant Problems in FITS Limit Its Use in Modern Astronomical Research  

Science.gov (United States)

The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) standard has been a great boon to astronomy, allowing observatories, scientists, and the public to exchange astronomical information easily. The FITS standard is, however, showing its age. Developed in the late 1970s the FITS authors made a number of implementation choices for the format that, while common at the time, are now seen to limit its utility with modern data. The authors of the FITS standard could not appreciate the challenges which we would be facing today in astronomical computing. Difficulties we now face include, but are not limited to, having to address the need to handle an expanded range of specialized data product types (data models), being more conducive to the networked exchange and storage of data, handling very large datasets and the need to capture significantly more complex and data relationships. There are members of the community today who find some (or all) of these limitations unworkable, and have decided to move ahead with storing data in other formats. This reaction should be taken as a wakeup call to the FITS community to make changes in the FITS standard, or to see its usage fall. In this paper we detail some selected important problems which exist within the FITS standard today. It is not our intention to prescribe specific remedies to these issues; rather, we hope to call attention of the FITS and greater astronomical computing communities to these issues in the hopes that it will spur action to address them.

Thomas, B.; Jenness, T.; Economou, F.; Greenfield, P.; Hirst, P.; Berry, D. S.; Bray, E. M.; Gray, N.; Muna, D.; Turner, J.; de Val-Borro, M.; Santander-Vela, J.; Shupe, D.; Good, J.; Berriman, G. B.

2014-05-01

286

A Framework for Addressing the Global Obesity Epidemic Locally: The Child Health Ecological Surveillance System (CHESS)  

OpenAIRE

Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in the developed world. Recent research and commentary suggest that an ecological approach is required to address childhood obesity, given the multidimensional nature of the problem. We propose a Canadian prototype, the Child Health Ecological Surveillance System, for a regional health authority to address the growing obesity epidemic. This prototype could potentially be used in other jurisdictions to address other child health issues. We present ...

Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Lightfoot, Penny; Spinola, Carla; Predy, Gerry; Barrett, Linda

2008-01-01

287

The Progress, Problems and Forsight of Scholarship of Teaching Research in China Since 2000  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Since 2000, Chinese researchers have introduced American ideology of scholarship of teaching (SoT, and conduct localizationas analysis on its definition, connotation and assessing standards, and initially form SoT theoretical framework based on Chinese reality. Researchers have carried out empirical investigations for Chinese SoT levels in universities, and discussed on overall design of Chinese university SoT system from such aspects as SoT cultivating system, value acceptance system, teaching administrative and quality guarantee system based on SoT, teachers’ specialty development system in the view of SoT, and SoT communicating and sharing system. Although SoT research has greatly developed in China, there still exist the following problems: just advocating foreign theories without taking consideration of Chinese context; taking old route in research path; more theoretical imagination but less investigation, many difficulties to implementation recommendation. It will be a tendency for future research to further clarify SoT theoretical foundation, explore the practice from the bottom up and probe into new epistemology and research paradigm applied to SoT.

Xiaohong LI

2014-12-01

288

Readings in computer vision. Issues, problems, principles, and paradigms  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Each chapter of the book addresses a problem, provides a survey of major issues, ideas, and research projects, and presents reprints of key papers. In total, the book presents sixty research papers, most written since 1980.

Fischler, M.A.; Firschein, O.

1987-01-01

289

How can we improve problem-solving in undergraduate biology? Applying lessons from 30 years of physics education research  

OpenAIRE

If students are to successfully grapple with authentic, complex biological problems as scientists and citizens, they need practice solving such problems during their undergraduate years. Physics education researchers have investigated student problem solving for the last three decades. Although physics and biology problems differ in structure and content, the instructional purposes align closely: explaining patterns and processes in the natural world and making predictions a...

Hoskinson, Anne-marie; Caballero, Marcos D.; Knight, Jennifer K.

2012-01-01

290

How Can We Improve Problem Solving in Undergraduate Biology? Applying Lessons from 30 Years of Physics Education Research  

OpenAIRE

If students are to successfully grapple with authentic, complex biological problems as scientists and citizens, they need practice solving such problems during their undergraduate years. Physics education researchers have investigated student problem solving for the past three decades. Although physics and biology problems differ in structure and content, the instructional purposes align closely: explaining patterns and processes in the natural world and making predictions about physical and ...

Hoskinson, A. -m; Caballero, M. D.; Knight, J. K.

2013-01-01

291

Temas e problemas nos projetos de pesquisa Thems and problems in research projects  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available O ponto de partida da atividade cienífica é o espanto e a admiração perante o desconhecido que provocam a imaginação científica, conduzindo o investigador à escolha de uma dada temática. Relevância para o mundo real e contribuição para um campo específico do conhecimento são, aqui, critérios de definição temática. Para o cientista, o tema de pesquisa é o terreno sobre o qual ele formulará problemas relevantes de investigação capazes de suprir lacunas em nossos conhecimentos. Tais problemas devem ser construídos de tal maneira que suas soluções não só esclareçam aspectos até então não explicados do tema, como apontem para novos problemas, ou seja, futuras investigações científicas. Constatando a crescente exigência de monografias de conclusão de curso para a obtenção de título nos cursos de graduação, o artigo procura construir um guia para a definição de temas e a formulação de pesquisa nas ciências humanas. Para tanto, procederá a uma reconstrução metodológica do caminho percorrido por C. Wright Mills em sua obra The power elite. Palavras-chave: Metodologia da pesquisa. Pesquisa cientifica. Problemas científicos. The starting point of the scientific activity is the puzzle and admiration in face of the unknown, which, certainly, will challenge the scientific imagination, leading the researcher in the choice of a certain theme. Relevance for the real world and contribution for a specific field of knowledge are the basic criteria for the thematic definition used here. For the scientist, the theme of the research is the base to formulate relevant research problems able to fill in the gaps of our knowledge. Such problems must be built in such a way that is solutions will not only clarify some aspects of the theme that remained not explained but also provide a path for new questions, i.e., for new scientifc researches to come. As there is a growing demand of under-graduate monographs for the conclusion of the courses, this papaer tries to be a guide for the definition of themes and for the organization of a research in Social Sciences. In order to achieve this goal there will be the reconstruction of The power elite by Wright Mills. Keywords: Methodology of research. Scientific research. Scientific problems.

Alvaro Bianchi

2007-05-01

292

Concept redundancy and contamination in employee commitment research: Current problems and future directions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It is generally accepted that employee commitment has a significant impact on organisational performance. The primary goal of this article is to indicate that the ‘commitment/involvement’ concept did not evolve in an evolutionary and progressive fashion. Several problems in the development course of mainly three streams of research literature are indicated. Arguments are presented for indicating causes of concept contamination and even redundancy. In order to bridge these problems, a motivational approach as an integrating mechanism on a metatheoretical level is presented as a solution. The outcomes thereof should lead to better order on a theoretical level and to the parsimonious use of commitment concepts.

Opsomming
Dit word algemeen aanvaar dat werknemertoewyding ’n duidelike impak op organisasieprestasie het. Die primêre doel van hierdie artikel is om aan te dui dat die ontwikkeling van die ‘betrokkenheid/toewydings-’ konsep nie evolusionêr en progressief verloop het nie. Verskeie probleme in die ontwikkelingsgang van hoofsaaklik drie strome navorsingsliteratuur word aangedui. Argumente word aangevoer wat op oorsake van konsepkontaminasie en selfs -oorbodigheid dui. Ten einde hierdie probleme te oorkom, word ’n motiveringsbenadering as integrerende meganisme op ’n meta-teoretiese vlak as oplossing voorgehou. Die uitkoms daarvan behoort tot beter orde op teoretiese vlak en tot die spaarsamige gebruik van toewydingskonsepte te lei.

Gert Roodt

2004-10-01

293

Study of a methodology of identifying important research problems by the PIRT process  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this paper, we propose a new methodology of identifying important research problems to be solved to improve the performance of some specific scientific technologies by the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process, which has been used as a methodology for demonstrating the validity of the best estimate simulation codes in USNRC licensing of nuclear power plants. It keeps the fundamental concepts of the original PIRT process but makes it possible to identify important factors affecting the performance of the technologies from the viewpoint of the figure of merit and problems associated with them, which need to be solved to improve the performance. Also in this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed method by showing a specific example of the application to physical events or phenomena in objects having fatigue or SCC crack(s) under ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. (author)

294

Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India.  

Science.gov (United States)

In spite of a growing recognition of the importance of doctor-patient communication, the issue of language barriers to healthcare has received very little attention in India. The Indian population speaks over 22 major languages with English used as the lingua franca for biomedicine. Large-scale internal migration has meant that health workers are encountering increasing instances of language discordance within clinical settings. Research done predominantly in the West has shown language discordance to significantly affect access to care, cause problems of comprehension and adherence, and decrease the satisfaction and quality of care. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India requires a stronger political commitment to providing non-discriminatory health services, especially to vulnerable groups such as illiterate migrant workers. Research will have to address three broad areas: the ways in which language barriers affect health and healthcare, the efficacy of interventions to overcome language barriers, and the costs of language barriers and efforts to overcome them. There is a need to address such barriers in health worker education and clinical practice. Proven strategies such as hiring multilingual healthcare workers, providing language training to health providers, employing in situ translators or using telephone interpretation services will have to be evaluated for their appropriateness to the Indian context. Internet-based initiatives, the proliferation of mobile phones and recent advances in machine translation promise to contribute to the solution. PMID:24758452

Narayan, Lalit

2013-01-01

295

Development of Research Infrastructure in Nevada for the Exploitation of Hyperspectral Image Data to Address Proliferation and Detection of Chemical and Biological Materials  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This research was to exploit hyperspectral reflectance imaging technology for the detection and mapping variability (clutter) of the natural background against which gases in the atmosphere are imaged. The natural background consists of landscape surface cover composed of consolidated rocks, unconsolidated rock weathering products, soils, coatings on rock materials, vegetation, water, materials constructed by humans, and mixtures of the above. Human made gases in the atmosphere may indicate industrial processes important to detecting non-nuclear chemical and biological proliferation. Our research was to exploit the Visible and Near-Infrared (NIR) and the Short-wave Infrared (SWIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum to determine the properties of solid materials on the earth's surface that could influence the detection of gases in the Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR). We used some new experimental hyperspectral imaging technologies to collect data over the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Center (NPTEC) located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The SpecTIR HyperSpecTIR (HST) and Specim Dual hyperspectral sensors were used to understand the variability in the imaged background (clutter), that detected, measured, identified and mapped with operational commercial hyperspectral techniques. The HST sensors were determined to be more experimental than operational because of problems with radiometric and atmospheric data correction. However the SpecTIR Dual system, developed by Specim in Finland, eventually was found to provide cost-effective hyperspectral image data collection and it was possible to correct the Dual system's data for specific areas. Batch processing of long flightlines was still complex, and if comparison to laboratory spectra was desired, the Dual system data still had to be processed using the empirical line method. This research determined that 5-meter spatial resolution was adequate for mapping natural background variations. Furthermore, this research determined that spectral resolution of 10um was adequate, but a signal to noise above 300:1 was desirable for hyperspectral sensors with this spectral resolution. Finally, we acquired a hyperspectral thermal dataset (SEBASS) at 3m spatial resolution over our study area in Beatty, Nevada that can be co-registered with the hyperspectral reflectance, LIDAR and digital Orthophoto data sets. This data set will enable us to quantify how measurements in the reflected infrared can be used to make inferences about the response of materials in the thermal infrared, the topic of our follow-on NA-22 investigation ending in 2008. These data provide the basis for our investigations proposed for the NA-22 2008 Broad Area Announcement. Beginning in June 2008, SpecTIR Corporation and Aerospace Corporation plan to fly the SpecTIR Dual and SEBASS in a stabilized mount in a twin Otter aircraft. This research provides the foundation for using reflected and emitted hyperspectral measurements together for mapping geologic and soil materials in arid to semi-arid regions

296

EDITORIAL: Dialog on Science and Policy to Address the Climate Crisis to conclude the International Association of Research Universities Climate Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark Dialog on Science and Policy to Address the Climate Crisis to conclude the International Association of Research Universities Climate Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark  

Science.gov (United States)

This is not the usual Editor-in-Chief letter, namely one that focuses on the accomplishments of the journal—and for ERL they have been numerous this year—but a recognition of the critical time that we are now in when it comes to addressing not only global climate change, but also the dialog between science and politics. In recognition of the many 'tipping points' that we now confront—ideally some of them positive social moments—as well as the clear scientific conclusion that environmental tipping points are points of long-lasting disruption, this paper takes a different form than I might have otherwise written. While the scientific body of knowledge around global environmental change mounts, so too, do the hopeful signs that change can happen. The election of Barack Obama is unquestionably one such sign, witnessed by the exceptional interest that his story has brought not only to US politics, but also to global views of the potential of the United States, as well as to the potential role of science and investigation in addressing pressing issues. In light of these inter-related issues, reproduced here—largely due to the efforts of Paul Baer to transcribe a remarkable conversation—is a dialog not only on the science of global warming and the potential set of means to address this issue, but also on the interaction between research, science and the political process. The dialog itself is sufficiently important that I will dispense with the usual discussion of the exciting recognition that ERL has received with an ISI rating (a factor rapidly increasing), the high levels of downloads of our papers (for some articles over 5000 and counting), and the many news and scientific publications picking up ERL articles (in recent days alone Science, Environmental Science and Technology, and The Economist). This conversation was the concluding plenary session of the 10-12 March International Association of Research Universities (IARU) Conference on Climate Change (http://climatecongress.ku.dk/). Conference Chair Professor Katherine Richardson began the panel by reading the 'key messages'. She then she asked the panelists—Professor Stefan Rahmstorf, Professor Will Steffen, Lord Nicholas Stern, and Professor Dan Kammen to respond. After that, she invited the Danish Prime Minister, Mr Anders Fogh Rasmussen, to respond to the messages. Next there was a dialogue between the panelists and the Prime Minister, with closing remarks from the Prime Minister.

Baer, Paul; Kammen, Daniel M.

2009-06-01

297

[Bioethical problems in researching new vaccines: Do they respond to public health reasons?].  

Science.gov (United States)

The ethical problems in vaccine research have grown in frequency and magnitude in last decades, due to the dominant place of the pharmaceutical industry in the development of such studies. Traditional issues of security and efficacy have been aggravated by the conflicts of interests introduced by commercial competition in a global market worth billions of dollars. We present here a few examples in which the professional integrity of researchers, the moral responsibility of sponsors, and the public regulation and control by national States are put into question. The consequences of these changes represent serious threats to the rights of people included in these studies as well as disputable progress for public health. PMID:25853832

Tealdi, Juan Carlos

2015-03-01

298

Opening Address (by A. Dulanto Rencoret) [International Conference on Research Reactor Utilization, Safety, Decommissioning, Fuel and Waste Management, Santiago, Chile, 10-14 November 2003  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: On behalf of the Government of Chile, I wish to cordially welcome the authorities and scientists involved in the field of nuclear science and technology who have gathered today in Chile from 50 countries to discuss the use of exper- imental nuclear reactors and their contribution to scientific and technological development. Naturally, I also wish to convey to the IAEA our thanks for selecting Chile, through its Commission on Nuclear Energy, to be the host of this important international conference. I would like to begin by explaining the context in which this meeting is taking place. The Government which I have the honour of representing places great importance on scientific and technological development, referring to it in its programme as one of the fundamental pillars for national development, since it is impossible to maintain a competitive productive and exporting sector, or to raise the quality of life of our fellow citizens, without the assistance of science and technology. Conscious of this fact, President Ricardo Lagos, while addressing national business executives last week, issued a call for renewal of the effort being made in research, urging the private sector to increase investment in this area. Investment in science and technology is part of the action being taken by our Government to enable Chile to reach the status of a developed country. Another action measure has been the major increase in State and private investment in education and infnd private investment in education and infrastructure, to mention only some of the priority areas for national development. In the field of education alone, public expenditure has more than tripled during the past decade. The level of investment achieved in infrastructure, on the other hand, is unparalleled in our country, thanks to private investment by major agreements with those countries in which there is greater demand for their use. Chile values the efforts of the IAEA in all fields, especially in terms of implementing safeguards to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the world. I consider this a timely opportunity to reiterate the Government of Chile's iron commitment to exclusively peaceful uses of nuclear energy, as well as our firm opposition to any deviation of this form of energy towards military ends. We also acknowledge the important work achieved through technical cooperation, of which our country has been a beneficiary ever since the initiation of nuclear activity in Chile almost three decades ago. I cannot keep from mentioning the fact that even though nuclear energy represents a major contribution to humanity through the use of isotopes and ionizing radiation, as well as through the generation of electricity throughout the world, our country recognizes that there are some issues pending which must be resolved, taking into account the perspective of developing nations. I refer to the management and final disposal of highly radioactive waste, and also to the cross-border transport of radioactive materials. Both of those issues are rejected by public opinion, making social validation of this form of energy difficult. Esteemed scientists, in closing I would like to convey to you my wishes that the conversations held and agreements entered into during this week may lead to major progress in the use of nuclear research reactors, and that this in turn may contribute to improving the quality of life worldwide, as well as to reinforcing international cooperation. I also hope that your stay in our country will be an enjoyable one, that you may have the opportunity to become a little more acquainted with its natural beauty and culture, and that through the focus on the particular scientific issues which brings you here, it may become possible to achieve progress towards the genuine integration of different peoples and cultures sharing a common ideal: that of putting nuclear science and technology at the service of humankind. Thank you very much. (author)

299

Opening Address (by R. Hojman) [International Conference on Research Reactor Utilization, Safety, Decommissioning, Fuel and Waste Management, Santiago, Chile, 10-14 November 2003  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: I have the high honour of addressing you in order to express on behalf of the Nuclear Energy Commission of Chile (CCHEN), and also on my own behalf, our pleasure in having the opportunity to welcome to our country this select group of authorities and professionals of the IAEA, and more than 100 representatives of nuclear institutions from some 50 countries. We are certain that this conference will facilitate a valuable exchange of knowledge in areas as important as the use of research reactors, safety related aspects of such use, the fuel cycle, and dismantling and management of radioactive waste. We also value the opportunity provided by this forum to share experi- ences, exchange opinions, and discuss options and priorities during the five technical sessions scheduled as part of the conference and, moreover, to deepen existing and create new bonds of international cooperation. I would like to mention the fact that our country has experience in the operation of its experimental reactors and has managed to make contributions to major applications in various fields including medicine, agriculture, industry and mining, and environment and metrology. Health applications have been given priority among the CCHEN's activities, and this is why the use of the reactor at La Reina Nuclear Studies Center has focused on the production of radioisotopes and radio-pharmaceu- tical applications which have short half-lives and are used in the diagnosis of the dynamic functised in the diagnosis of the dynamic functioning of various organs and as therapeutic agents in some types of cancer. In agriculture, various isotope techniques have been investigated and fine tuned in areas such as soil fertility, fertilizing sources, optimum use of nutrients, rationalization and economy in the use of water, quantification of the degree of soil erosion, and irrigation with fertilizers. More recently, a study of residuality and mobility of agro-chemicals in soil and water was initiated through a project developed jointly with the IAEA and with our country's Agricultural and Livestock Raising Service, for the purposes of contributing regulations and standards in the use of pesticides. (author) In the area of mining, the CCHEN has been using radioactive tracers in mining and metallurgical processes for over two decades in determination of residence times, flow rates, fluid velocity, and characterization of runoff in in situ leaching processes, among other techniques, all of which has made it possible to optimize processes and achieve cost reductions. In the environmental field, isotope techniques have been developed for the study of both surface and underground aquifer resources. Work has also been carried out in determining contaminant sources and, more recently, there has been participation in multi-disciplinary research in order to collaborate in the control of marine toxins responsible for red tides through the use of isotope techniques. In the area of chemical metrology, the CCHEN renders major assistance services to the national export system in terms of sanitary certification, giving support and technical assistance to national laboratories so that the latter may raise their standards and undertake measurements in compliance with the growing requirements imposed by international markets. Worth pointing out are both the organization of aptitude drills and inter-comparison rounds at the national and international levels, and the CCHEN's capacity to prepare reference and control materials in natural matrices and also control materials for chemical analyses, all of which has enabled the CCHEN's laboratories to attain formal recognition as the reference laboratory for determining trace elements in biological samples. I have mentioned only some of the technological developments associated with the operation of our reactors for the purposes of contextual- izing the importance that various topics we are to discuss during the current week have for us. I want to end by reiterating that we feel honoured and experience great pleasure in having a sel

300

A review of research on the problem of aggression inhibitors (Part II  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Many researchers in the genesis of the formation of aggressive behavior inextricably consider proagressive and constraining, or inhibiting, aggressive manifestations of structure. The second part of the article deals with a theoretical overview of the problem of aggression inhibitors, which covers the latest Russian and foreign research aimed at studying the individual manifestations of factors deterring aggression. For basis for the analysis we chose classification of personality structures inhibiting aggressive manifestations, proposed by F.S. Safuanov, which includes values, socio-normative, dispositional, emotional, communicative, intellectual restraining structure and psychological protective mechanisms. We made conclusion that the problem of aggression inhibitors currently stands on the threshold of a new phase of the study, that is to provide a holistic model, including illegal aggressive behavior, taking into account not only the socio-psychological characteristics of "aggressor" and his victims, and personality structures that promote and inhibiting aggression, but also covering a wide range of inhibitors of aggression, acting through different psychological mechanisms.

Kalashnikova A.S.

2014-09-01

301

CONCEPTUALIZATION OF IDEAS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY IN SPORTS: PROBLEMS OF EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article is devoted to the research of the concept “psychological safety in sports”. On the basis of analysis of ideas about psychological safety in sports and their representation in printed or verbal form the necessity of overcoming the fragmentation and lack of system is substantiated. The authors state that one and the same sports situation can constructively or destructively affect the psychological safety of direct or indirect participants of sports events. In this context, it is important to create the psycholinguistic basis of experimental research of psychological safety in sports. Great attention is paid to systematization of the content of the concept “psychological safety in sports”. The created models of words and expressions that convey ideas about this phenomenon are of particular value. In the structure of the concept the dominant meanings, expressed in the nucleus, and additional meanings, related to the periphery of the concept are distinguished.Purpose: to explore the ideas of psychological safety in sports and their representation in printed or verbal form; to determine ways of overcoming the conceptual psycholinguistic problems in the process of experimental research of psychological safety in sports; to create the model of words and expressions which are used to verbalize the concept “psychological safety in sports”.Methodology: theoretical analysis of psychological and linguistic literature, creation of the psycholinguistic basis of experimental research, modeling of the conceptual ideas of psychological safety in sports.Results: psycholinguistic basis of experimental research of psychological safety in sports, the model of content and structure of the corresponding concept.Practical implications: Pedagogical Psychology, Sports Psychology, Philology, Psycholinguistics.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-8-11

Yulia Vladimirovna Vardanyan

2013-09-01

302

WebMail versus WebApp: Comparing Problem-Based Learning Methods in a Business Research Methods Course  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the impact of two Problem-Based Learning (PBL) approaches on knowledge transfer, problem-solving self-efficacy, and perceived learning gains among four intact classes of adult learners engaged in a group project in an online undergraduate business research methods course. With two of the classes using a text-only PBL workbook…

Williams van Rooij, Shahron

2007-01-01

303

Children of parent(s) who have a gambling problem: a review of the literature and commentary on research approaches.  

Science.gov (United States)

Problem gambling is becoming an increasingly widespread and damaging social and health problem. As opportunities for gambling become more accessible, especially through lotteries and electronic gaming machines, it is likely that more people will develop serious gambling problems. Given the worldwide increasing spending on gambling activities and the increasing number of problem gamblers, it is unfortunate but likely that the children who grow up in problem gambling families will become an important area of concern for child health and social workers. Considerable research has been undertaken into problem gambling and the adult problem gambler, but within the gambling and child health literature there is almost no recognition of the experiences of children who live in problem-gambling families. Drawing on the findings of the landmark Productivity Commission Report, this review explores the marked increase in gambling and its social effects, especially from the Australian perspective. The damaging social effects of problem gambling on families and children are reviewed and the comparative invisibility of children and young people in such research is discussed. The pervasive influence of developmentalism is critiqued and highlighted in relation to the exclusion of children's perspectives from our research understandings. The review concludes by proposing that adoption of some of the emerging 'new paradigm' approaches to childhood and children's experiences could markedly enhance our understandings of the lives and experiences of this significant group of children and young people. PMID:11560734

Darbyshire, P; Oster, C; Carrig, H

2001-07-01

304

??????????????? The Research Status and Problems on Ecology and Environment of Lake Erhai  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available ?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????50???????????????????????????(???????????????????????????(???????????????????????????????????????????????????(?????????????????????????????????????(??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????There are wide concerns from scholars at domestic and overseas on the ecological environment of Lake Erhai recently as a consequence of worsening status, massive and rapid development on the catchment of Lake Erhai. This paper summarizes the research status of Lake Erhai which has been collected since 1950s, analyzes the current situation of the environment (including eutrophication, heavy metal pollution, and catchment development and vegetation status and ecology (including biological diversity, food web change, and characteristics changes of ecological system, and makes a further analysis on the meteorological factors (including temperature, precipitation and wind speed. Through those data we point out that there are some problems still exist in the research of Lake Erhai, for instance, the Cyano- phyta explosion history, the detailed research on zoo-plankton and food chain, the distinction of drive strength of multi- ple pressure on the process of eutrophication of Lake Erhai for the purpose that we can have a comprehensive under- standing of the situation on ecology and environment of Lake Erhai. In this way we can have cognitive bases for the further relative work carried out in Lake Erhai and support some constructive opinions for ecological restoration work of Lake Erhai preferably.

???

2013-08-01

305

HESS Opinions "Integration of groundwater and surface water research: an interdisciplinary problem?"  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Today there is a great consensus that water resources research needs to become more holistic, integrating perspectives of a large variety of disciplines. Groundwater and surface water (hereafter: GW and SW are typically identified as different compartments of the hydrological cycle and were traditionally often studied and managed separately. However, despite this separation, these respective fields of study are usually not considered to be different disciplines. They are often seen as different specialisations of hydrology with different focus, yet similar theory, concepts, methodology. The present article discusses how this notion may form a substantial obstacle in the further integration of GW and SW research and management. The article focusses on the regional scale (areas of approx. 103 to 106 km2, which is identified as the scale where integration is most greatly needed, but ironically the least amount of fully integrated research seems to be undertaken. The state of research on integrating GW and SW research is briefly reviewed and the most essential differences between GW hydrology (or hydrogeology, geohydrology and SW hydrology are presented. Groundwater recharge and baseflow are used as examples to illustrate different perspectives on similar phenomena that can cause severe misunderstandings and errors in the conceptualisation of integration schemes. It is also discussed that integration of GW and SW research on the regional scale necessarily must move beyond the hydrological aspects, by collaborating with social sciences and increasing the interaction between science and the society in general. The typical elements of an ideal interdisciplinary workflow are presented and their relevance with respect to integration of GW and SW is discussed. The overall conclusions are that GW hydrology and SW hydrogeology study rather different objects of interest, using different types of observation, working on different problem settings. They have thus developed different theory, methodology and terminology. Yet, there seems to be a widespread lack of awareness of these differences which hinders the detection of the existing interdisciplinary aspects of GW and SW integration and consequently the development of truly unifying, interdisciplinary theory and methodology. Thus, despite having the ultimate goal of creating a more holistic approach, we should start integration by analysing potential disciplinary differences. Improved understanding among hydrologists of what interdisciplinary means and how it works is needed. Hydrologists, despite frequently being involved in multidisciplinary projects, are not sufficiently involved in developing interdisciplinary strategies and do usually not regard the process of integration as such as a research topic of its own. There seems to be a general reluctance to apply (truly interdisciplinary methodology because this is tedious and few, immediate incentives are experienced.

R. Barthel

2014-02-01

306

HESS Opinions "Integration of groundwater and surface water research: an interdisciplinary problem?"  

Science.gov (United States)

Today there is a great consensus that water resource research needs to become more holistic, integrating perspectives of a large variety of disciplines. Groundwater and surface water (hereafter: GW and SW) are typically identified as different compartments of the hydrological cycle and were traditionally often studied and managed separately. However, despite this separation, these respective fields of study are usually not considered to be different disciplines. They are often seen as different specializations of hydrology with a different focus yet similar theory, concepts, and methodology. The present article discusses how this notion may form a substantial obstacle in the further integration of GW and SW research and management. The article focuses on the regional scale (areas of approximately 103 to 106 km2), which is identified as the scale where integration is most greatly needed, but ironically where the least amount of fully integrated research seems to be undertaken. The state of research on integrating GW and SW research is briefly reviewed and the most essential differences between GW hydrology (or hydrogeology, geohydrology) and SW hydrology are presented. Groundwater recharge and baseflow are used as examples to illustrate different perspectives on similar phenomena that can cause severe misunderstandings and errors in the conceptualization of integration schemes. The fact that integration of GW and SW research on the regional scale necessarily must move beyond the hydrological aspects, by collaborating with the social sciences and increasing the interaction between science and society in general, is also discussed. The typical elements of an ideal interdisciplinary workflow are presented and their relevance with respect to the integration of GW and SW is discussed. The overall conclusions are that GW hydrology and SW hydrogeology study rather different objects of interest, using different types of observation, working on different problem settings. They have thus developed a different theory, methodology and terminology. However, there seems to be a widespread lack of awareness of these differences, which hinders the detection of the existing interdisciplinary aspects of GW and SW integration and consequently the development of a truly unifying interdisciplinary theory and methodology. Thus, despite having the ultimate goal of creating a more holistic approach, we may have to start integration by analyzing potential disciplinary differences. Improved understanding among hydrologists of what interdisciplinary means and how it works is needed. Hydrologists, despite frequently being involved in multidisciplinary projects, are not sufficiently involved in developing interdisciplinary strategies and do usually not regard the process of integration as such as a research topic of its own. There seems to be a general reluctance to apply a (truly) interdisciplinary methodology because this is tedious and few immediate incentives are experienced. The objective of the present opinion paper is to stimulate a discussion rather than to provide recipes on how to integrate GW and SW research or to explain how specific problems of GW-SW interaction should be solved on a technical level. For that purpose it presents complicated topics in a rather simplified, bold way, ignoring to some degree subtleties and potentially controversial issues.

Barthel, R.

2014-07-01

307

Power Quality Problems Mitigation using Dynamic Voltage Restorer in Egypt Thermal Research Reactor (ETRR-2)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Egypt thermal research reactor (ETRR-2) was subjected to several Power Quality Problems such as voltage sags/swells, harmonics distortion, and short interruption. ETRR-2 encompasses a wide range of loads which are very sensitive to voltage variations and this leads to several unplanned shutdowns of the reactor due to trigger of the Reactor Protection System (RPS). The Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR) has recently been introduced to protect sensitive loads from voltage sags and other voltage disturbances. It is considered as one of the most efficient and effective solution. Its appeal includes smaller size and fast dynamic response to the disturbance. This paper describes a proposal of a DVR to improve power quality in ETRR-2 electrical distribution systems . The control of the compensation voltage is based on d-q-o algorithm. Simulation is carried out by Matlab/Simulink to verify the performance of the proposed method

308

Research program Radiation aspects of home hygiene and related radio-ecological problems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Dutch Research and Development Program into the radiation safety of houses and related radioecological problems is reviewed. Monitoring and registration of background radiation radon concentration in our daily living environment, partly originating from certain building materials, should occur. Radiological stock-taking of materials and construction elements for buildings has to be investigated. Concentration of radionuclides should be determined in samples. Radiological studies related to the emission from coal-fired plants and leaching of fly ash used in building materials have been started. The measurements with temporary integrating passive RN-dosimeters revealed values for exhalation rates, the average ventilation rate and the resulting RN-concentration. The average radiation exposure of the lungs can be calculated from a general risk analysis. (Auth.)

309

Numerical and experimental research to solve MHD problem in liquid blanket system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Thermofluid research issues relating to self-cooling liquid blanket system for fusion reactors are discussed to find ways to realize the system. In this paper, liquid Li and Flibe molten salt are chosen as the blanket coolants. For the Li blanket system, there exists some possibility to overcome MHD problem by using three-surface coated channel with multi-layer structure. The material properties in terms of electrical conductivity required for the innermost metal layer seems achievable together with new concept that the coated material works as the structural component of the innermost thin layer. In the case of Flibe coolant, which shows very small MHD pressure drop, electrolysis occurs to result in generation of fluorine and tritium. The numerical results show that this electrolysis can be suppressed by optimizing the channel geometry. Numerical and experimental results indicate that heat transfer enhancement using pebble beds is expected when the flow velocity is relatively small to reduce the MHD effect

310

Effects of Singapore's Model Method on Elementary Student Problem Solving Performance: Single Subject Research  

Science.gov (United States)

This research investigation examined the effects of Singapore's Model Method, also known as "model drawing" or "bar modeling" on the word problem-solving performance of American third and fourth grade students. Employing a single-case design, a researcher-designed teaching intervention was delivered to a child in third…

Mahoney, Kevin

2012-01-01

311

A review of research on the problem of aggression inhibitors (Part 1  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Most modern scholars in the genesis of the aggressive behavior inextricably consider proagressive factors and factors constraining, or inhibiting, aggressive manifestations. At the same time, there are also scientific approaches to understanding the nature of aggression, which in some cases does not focus directly on the structures inhibiting aggressive impulses, and are limited to considering only the aggression catalysts. In the present article we discuss the need to introduce the term "inhibitors of aggression", analyze different positions and views on this problem. We consider not only Russian conceptions of the nature of aggression retarding structures, but also the international research aimed at understanding the psychological analogue of this phenomenon: "protective factors". The first part of the article is devoted to the theoretical overview of the problem of aggression inhibitors, which not only traces the history of the studies of this phenomenon, but also makes an attempt to analyze few up-to-day theories of aggressive behavior, aimed at objectivation of the psychological mechanism of interaction of proagressive and inhibiting personality structures.

Kalashnikova A.S.

2014-09-01

312

Assessing Risks to Wildlife Populations from Multiple Stressors: Overview of the Problem and Research Needs.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Wildlife populations are experiencing increasing pressure from human-induced changes in the landscape. Stressors including agricultural and urban land use, introduced invasive and exotic species, nutrient enrichment, direct human disturbance, and toxic chemicals directly or indirectly influence the quality and quantity of habitat used by terrestrial and aquatic wildlife. Governmental agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are required to assess risks to wildlife populations, in its broadest definition, that result from exposure to these stressors, yet considerable uncertainty exists with respect to how such assessments should be conducted. This uncertainty is compounded by questions concerning the interactive effects of co-occurring stressors, appropriate spatial scales of analysis, extrapolation of response data among species and from organisms to populations, and imperfect knowledge and use of limited data sets. Further, different risk problems require varying degrees of sophistication, methodological refinement, and data quality. These issues suggest a number of research needs to improve methods for wildlife risk assessments, including continued development of population dynamics models to evaluate the effects of multiple stressors at varying spatial scales, methods for extrapolating across endpoints and species with reasonable confidence, stressor-response relations and methods for combining them in predictive and diagnostic assessments, and accessible data sets describing the ecology of terrestrial and aquatic species. Case study application of models and methods for assessing wildlife risk will help to demonstrate their strengths and limitations for solving particular risk problems.

Wayne R. Munns, Jr.

2006-06-01

313

Closing the Loop: Action research in a multimodal hereditary cancer patient conference is an effective tool to assess and address patient needs  

OpenAIRE

This paper describes the use of action research in a patient conference to provide updated hereditary cancer information, explore patient and family member needs and experiences related to genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA), elicit feedback on how to improve the GCRA process, and inform future research efforts. Invitees completed GCRA at City of Hope or collaborating facilities and had a BRCA mutation or a strong personal or family history of breast cancer. Action research activities were ...

Espenschied, Carin R.; Macdonald, Deborah J.; Culver, Julie O.; Sand, Sharon; Hurley, Karen; Banks, Kimberly C.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Blazer, Kathleen R.

2012-01-01

314

Results Analysis of IP Address Auto- Configuration in Wireless Manets  

OpenAIRE

The main task of an address allocation protocol is to manage the address allocation to the nodes in the ad hoc MANETs. All routing protocols assume nodes to be configured a priori with a uniqueIP address. Allocating addresses to mobile nodes is a fundamental and difficult problem. A mobile device cannot participate in unicast communications until it is assigned a conflict-free IP address. So addressing in MANETs is of significant importance, and the address configuration process should be fas...

Zahoor Ul Huq, S.; Shabana Begum, S.; Sreenivasa Murthy, Dr K. E.; Satyanaryana, Prof B.

2011-01-01

315

The problem of analysing the relationship between change and initial value in oral health research  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The relationship between initial disease status and subsequent change following treatment has attracted great interest in dental research. However, medical statisticians have repeatedly warned against correlating/regressing change with baseline because of two methodological concerns known as mathematical coupling and regression to the mean. In general, mathematical coupling occurs when one variable directly or indirectly contains the whole or part of another, and the two variables are then analyzed by using correlation or regression. Consequently, the statistical procedure of testing the null hypothesis - that the coefficient of correlation or the slope of regression is zero - may become inappropriate. Regression to the mean occurs with any variable that fluctuates within an individual or a population, either owing to measurement error and/or to physiological variation. The aim of this article was to clarify the conceptual confusion around mathematical coupling and regression to the mean within the statistical literature, and to correct a popular misconception about the correct analysis of the relationship between change and initial value. As examples that use inappropriate methods to analyze the relationship between change and baseline are still found in leading dental journals, this article seeks to help oral health researchers understand these problems and explain how to overcome them.

Tu, Yu-Kang; Bælum, Vibeke

2005-01-01

316

Efficient address translation  

OpenAIRE

The address calculation for distributed data access plays a major role for the performance of fine-grained data-parallel applications. This paper reports about the hardware centrifuge of the Cray T3E which enables the shift of the address calculation from software into hardware. This shift minimizes address calculation overhead reducing communication cost of dynamic communication patterns. The centrifuge is compared with complex integer division and modulo and with int...

Mueller, Matthias M.

2000-01-01

317

Sesotho Address Forms  

OpenAIRE

Address forms constitute an integral part of Basotho sociolinguistic etiquette. They are regarded as a kind of emotional capital that may be invested in putting others at ease. They are indicators of deference, politeness and markers of social distance. (Fasold 1990, Akindele 1990, 1991, 1993) This paper examines the address forms used by the Basotho people. It analyzes and discusses the various types and the factors determining their use. The discussion of address forms in Sesotho focuses on...

Akindele, Dele Femi

2008-01-01

318

Opening Address (by T. Taniguchi) [International Conference on Research Reactor Utilization, Safety, Decommissioning, Fuel and Waste Management, Santiago, Chile, 10-14 November 2003  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: On behalf of the Director General of the IAEA, it is my pleasure and privilege to welcome you to this International Conference on Research Reactor Utilization, Safety, Decommissioning, Fuel and Waste Management. I would like to offer my sincere thanks to the Government of Chile, and the Nuclear Energy Commission of Chile, for hosting this Conference in the beautiful and historic city of Santiago de Chile. I would also like to thank you, the 180 or so registered delegates from around the world, for participating in this conference. I trust that you will have an interesting and enjoyable week. For more than 50 years, research reactors have been one of the locomotives of nuclear science and technology. To date, approximately 670 research reactors have been built, and some 270 of these reactors, in 59 countries, continue to operate today. Altogether, over 13 000 reactor years of operational experience have accumulated during this period. Just as important, however, is the fact that those reactors have operated in a remarkably safe manner. The IAEA's statutes charter it to promote the contributions that atomic energy can bring to the health and prosperity of people throughout the world. Thus, the IAEA is authorized to encourage and assist in the development and practical application of research related to the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. From its inception in 1957, there has been a broad interest at the IAEA in the benefits to be derived by Mhe IAEA in the benefits to be derived by Member States from the safe operation of research reactors. The multi-disciplinary research that a research reactor can support has led to the development of numerous capacities within Member States, many of which have been realized under the umbrella of the IAEA's technical cooperation programme. These benefits have been realized in a wide variety of areas within science and technology: nuclear power, radioisotope production, neutron beam research and analysis, nuclear medicine and personnel training, and more recently, materials development, component testing, computer code validation and environmental pollution control. One can cite numerous Member States, for example, Argentina, Brazil and Mexico in the Latin American region, which have developed high quality nuclear programmes indigenously, thanks in no small part to the growth and effective utilization of their research reactor programmes. Thanks to the recognition of these great benefits for human health, welfare and social development, new research reactors are being planned and built. Pre-eminent to the pursuit of these universal gains, however, is the precondition that any and all reactor operations be conducted with a commitment to and an assurance of safety: safety for the operators, safety for the public and safety for the environment. The research reactor community has had a long and successful history of both productive and safe operations; however, nearly two thirds of the world's operating research reactors, i.e. 63% are now over 30 years old. Many of them have been refurbished to meet today's technological standards and safety requirements; however, there are challenges associated with ageing components and materials - and even members of staff - at these facilities. They continue to be serious issues, and are receiving increased attention, worldwide. Likewise, worldwide attention is focused on the serious erosion in governmental support, management commitment and available resources to the infrastructure necessary for effective research reactor operations. Robust utilization plans are not always an inherent part of the decision making process for determining whether a research reactor should be built, in the first place, or should continue to operate, in the long run. This is compounded by the fact that the use of these reactors is no longer an attractive research vehicle for university students and academic researchers. From these facts, it can be seen that there is a need to infuse vitality into this critical part of the nuclear industry and its i

319

A Research on the General and Financial Problems of Agricultural Sector in North Cyprus: Case of Karpaz Peninsula  

OpenAIRE

The following research focuses on agricultural and farming enterprises located in Iskele Province of Karpaz Peninsula in Turkish Republic of North Cyprus (TRNC), accenting on and examining overall and financial issues and problems.In this frame, the main problems of agriculture in order, are: ‘Position of Karpaz in regard to land use, in Cyprus Conflict’, ‘Natural disasters’, ‘Bureaucratic obstacles’, ‘Negative effects of Cyprus Issue’, ‘Marketing of products,’, ‘Competi...

S?afakli, Okan Veli; Ertanin, Mustafa; Hu?daverdi?, Hu?da

2013-01-01

320

Problems of scientific and development research concerning the reclamation of used foundry sands  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In traditional technologies of casting moulds and core production on the basis of high-silica sands with binding agent addition, the reclamation consists mainly of a sand recovery and very seldom of a sand and bentonite recovery.Analysis of data from several countries indicates that from 600 to 1200 kg of fresh sand is used for 1 tonne of ferrous casting alloys. In Poland it is 1000 kg of sand for 1 tonne of castings [1]. Out of this amount approximately 20% of fresh sand is used for core production and the remaining amount for rebounding moulding sands. Analysis of data from 20 largest Polish foundries, performed in 2004 [2] indicates that approximately 50% of waste foundry sands is reclaimed while the rest is directed to dumping grounds. Taking into account all remaining foundries it can be estimated that approximately 250-350 000 tonnes of waste foundry sands are sent to dumping grounds annually.Important issue are costs of storage, which depend on the kind of wastes and on the ownership form of dump-sites (municipal dumpinggrounds, plant’s or own [belonging to the foundry] as well as on their relation to the costs of purchasing fresh sands. Average charges for storage of moulding sands wastes on storage yards in Europe are within the range: 12.5 to 61 Eu, which means from 85% to above 400% of purchasing costs of 1 tonne of fresh high-silica sand. The contractual price accepted for such sand in the BREF UE document [3] is 14.56 Eu. Problems of scientific and development research concerning the reclamation of used foundry sands can be systematised according to the research fields and the actual state of knowledge - based on the analysis of scientific papers.

R. Da?ko

2010-10-01

321

Radon measurements in Austria and some basic problems in earthquake prediction research  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Some basic problems in earthquake prediction research are discussed in connection with the analysis of spring water radon (222Rn) measurements in Austria. Two possibilities for the definition of an anomaly are proposed. In the analysed data two periods of outstanding radon concentration could be observed. The data were carefully analyzed using different methods but the extreme radon concentrations could not be explained by an influence of vadose water or by meteorological effects or other non-tectonic disturbances. These two periods were identified as anomalies when using the proposed definition of anomaly. Contingency table tests give high probabilities (>90%) for a correlation between certain earthquakes and the observed radon anomalies. The investigations result in the following hypothesis: The probability for the occurrence of an earthquake in the area 42 deg. N???47.5 deg. N, 13 deg. E???20 deg. E, Friuli area excluded, with a magnitude M greater as a certain well defined level, increases during the time of an anomaly in the radon concentration of the Freibadquelle by about a factor of ten. To test this hypothesis a new set of radon data is necessary. However this new set of radon data is still not large enough to reach a sufficient statistical proof. Finally, some recommendations are given in order to improve the possibilities for comparing and judging predictions. (author). 24 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

322

Does problem-based learning work? A meta-analysis of evaluative research.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this review is to synthesize all available evaluative research from 1970 through 1992 that compares problem-based learning (PBL) with more traditional methods of medical education. Five separate meta-analyses were performed on 35 studies representing 19 institutions. For 22 of the studies (representing 14 institutions), both effect-size and supplementary vote-count analyses could be performed; otherwise, only supplementary analyses were performed. PBL was found to be significantly superior with respect to students' program evaluations (i.e., students' attitudes and opinions about their programs)--dw (standardized differences between means, weighted by sample size) = +.55, CI.95 = +.40 to +.70 - and measures of students' clinical performance (dw = +.28, CI.95 = +.16 to +.40). PBL and traditional methods did not differ on miscellaneous tests of factual knowledge (dw = -.09, CI.95 = +.06 to -.24) and tests of clinical knowledge (dw = +.08, CI.95 = -.05 to +.21). Traditional students performed significantly better than their PBL counterparts on the National Board of Medical Examiners Part I examination--NBME I (dw = -.18, CI.95 = -.10 to -.26). However, the NBME I data displayed significant overall heterogeneity (Qt = 192.23, p class attendance, academic process variables, and measures of humanism. In conclusion, the results generally support the superiority of the PBL approach over more traditional methods. Acad. Med. 68 (1993):550-563. PMID:8323649

Vernon, D T; Blake, R L

1993-07-01

323

Private Data -- The Real Story: A Huge Problem with Education Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A very influential paper on improving math outcomes was published in 2008. The authors refused to divulge their data claiming that agreements with the schools and Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act rules (FERPA prevented it.? It turns out that this is not true.? The claimed legal foundations do not say what these authors said they do, this this is a widespread misconception among education researchers.When we found the identities of the schools by other means, serious problems with the conclusions of the article were quickly revealed.? The 2008 paper was far from unique in this respect.? There are many papers that have had enormous influences on K-12 mathematics curricula, and could not be independently verified because the authors refused to reveal their data.In this article we describe how we were able to find the real data for the 2008 paper, and point out the legal constraints that should make it very difficult for authors of such papers to withhold their data in the future.

R. James Milgram

2012-12-01

324

About a problem of reception of antimatter: possibility of research f properties, synthesis and applications  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: It is of special interest to study a possibility of reception of intensive streams of positrons (probably and other antiparticles) at reorganization of physical vacuum in strong fields (for example, in an electric field of modern super-power laser beams) and on accelerators. This topic can be possible related to creation of space solar factories on the Moon or asteroids, etc. with use of the solar radiation energy transformed into electric energy, and use of space for manufacturing and storages of positrons [1-7]. The essence of the method should consist of fast positron streams reception by means of the transformed solar energy on accelerators, or any other methods, with their subsequent delay up to temperatures of the order 0.5 K in some closed area of space. Thus, very significant stocks of positrons could be created. Gathering of such positrons in magnetic traps in space conditions can become rather effective method of accumulation of antimatter. Present level of technologies does not allow accumulation of received antimatter in large amounts. Besides, this reception process of is very expensive. Therefore, probably, only about ten or hundred nanograms of antimatter is yet received. This quantity of antimatter would be apparently sufficient for creation of space vehicles (SV) with the sizes in nano-or a micron range. These are not some crazy fantastic assumption in a context of modern development of nanotechnologies in the World. All the units and detaigies in the World. All the units and details of such SV should not exceed nano- and micron ranges. The situation can change, if the black holes both natural and created by the human can become 'factories' of antimatter http://www.rian.ru/rian/intro.cfm (A.D.Dolgov (ITEP) et al). Gravitation in vicinities of a black hole so is great, that there is no object, even radiation that can leave. Indeed, gravitation of a black hole acts on protons more strongly, than on electrons as their mass is larger. As a result, the black hole gets a positive electric charge. Thus, if the mass of a black hole is rather small, the electric field at horizon of events can reach critical values. It leads to electron-positron instability of vacuum and generation of pairs. As positrons are thrown out by electric field, and electrons are trapped, the black hole works as a factory of antimatter, transforming protons into antiparticles. Reference: 1. E.P. Svetlov-Prokop'ev // Materials of the international conference. Ed. E.I.Artamonov. M.: Institute of problems of management of the Russian Academy of Science. - 2008. P.100-101.; 2. E.P.Prokop'ev. Possible space technologies of the future and a problem of technical progress. Materials of the Third Belarus space congress. On October 23-25, 2007, Minsk, Belarus. Minsk: Publishing house of the Incorporated institute of problems of computer science NAS of Belarus, 2007. P.383-389. http://www.uiip.bas-net.by/kosmos3/sec10.html, http://www.prokopep.narod.ru; 3. Svetlov-Prokopyev / About a problem of physics and chemistry of antisubstance: opportunities of research of properties, search in the Universe, synthesis and applications // In book.: Actual problems of modern physics . Materials of the All-Russia remote scientifically-practical conference with the international participation. Russia, Krasnodar, on June, 5th, 2008. Krasnodar: KGU, 2008. P.15-30.; 4. A.L.Suvorov, E.P.Svetlov-Prokopiev, T.L.Razinkova // Reception of antimatter for use in a modern science, techniques and microelectronics. The Petersburg magazine of electronics. 2007. No 2. P.4 - 16.; 5. E.P.Svetlov-Prokopiev. The general principles of interaction of matter and antimatter. Not relativistic theory // Bull. Kaz. NU, ser. phys. 2007. No 1 (23). P.169 - 177.; 6. E.P.Svetlov-Prokopiev, T.L.Razinkova. About a problem of physics, chemistry and technology of antimatter: opportunities of research of properties, search in the Universe, synthesis and applications // 5 International conferences Nuclear and radiating physics. 26 - 29 September, 2005: ICNP' 05. V.1. Nuclear physics. Alma

325

CAE 2000 Presidential Address: The Council on Anthropology and Education as a Crossroad Community: Reflections on Theory-Oriented and Practice-Oriented Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines the relationship between anthropology and educational research, characterizing the Council on Anthropology and Education as a "crossroad community" and discussing conversations in this crossroad community (e.g., studies oriented toward contributing to anthropological theory or to educational practice). Calls for a horizontal synthesis…

Jacob, Evelyn

2001-01-01

326

Adaptive management of the climate change problem: bridging the gap between research and public policy  

OpenAIRE

There are important differences between adaptation to normal climate and adaptation to climate change. One scientific community is organized to address extreme probabilities in current distributions, and their disaster potential. Another scientific community addresses the longer-term changes in the climate system. There are important differences between natural hazard (extreme and unpredictable events) and disaster as natural hazard with disastrous economic and social consequences as a matter...

Sa?voiu, Gheorghe

2008-01-01

327

The A3 Problem Solving Report: A 10-Step Scientific Method to Execute Performance Improvements in an Academic Research Vivarium  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of this study was to illustrate the application of A3 Problem Solving Reports of the Toyota Production System to our research vivarium through the methodology of Continuous Performance Improvement, a lean approach to healthcare management at Seattle Children's (Hospital, Research Institute, Foundation). The Report format is described within the perspective of a 10-step scientific method designed to realize measurable improvements of Issues identified by the Report's Author, Sponso...

Bassuk, James A.; Washington, Ida M.

2013-01-01

328

Qualitative researches of motions in the elliptical restricted three-bodies problem for the first order commensurability  

Science.gov (United States)

On the basis of the restricted version of the three-body problem qualitative research of orbital elements' evolution for the first order resonances is carried out. The stability of stationary solutions is researched and the classification of phase trajectories is obtained. Expressions of maximum perturbations of orbital elements and of periods of its changes are presented for the passively gravitating body. The results are extended to the more common case when the central body is an oblate ellipsoid.

Gerasimov, I. A.; Mushailov, B. R.; Rakitina, N. V.

329

Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 4. Results: specific problem solving skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

The 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. The previous articles presented background, objectives, and methodology, as well results on 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' and the person-related core competencies of GP/FM. This article reflects on the general practitioner's 'specific problem solving skills'. These include decision making on diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, accounting for the properties of primary care, but also research questions related to quality management and resource use, shared decision making, or professional education and development. Clinical research covers most specific diseases, but often lacks pragmatism and primary care relevance. Quality management is a stronghold of GP/FM research. Educational interventions can be effective when well designed for a specific setting and situation. However, their message that 'usual care' by general practitioners is insufficient may be problematic. GP and their patients need more research into diagnostic reasoning with a step-wise approach to increase predictive values in a setting characterized by uncertainty and low prevalence of specific diseases. Pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies of new and established drugs or non-pharmaceutical therapy are needed. Multi-morbidity and complexity should be addressed. Studies on therapy, communication strategies and educational interventions should consider impact on health and sustainability of effects. PMID:20825274

Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

2010-09-01

330

WSCA Presidential Address, 1999.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents the Presidential Address to the 1999 Western States Communication Association Convention. Discusses four opportunities that should not be squandered by communication teachers and scholars as they enter the communication century. (SR)

Andersen, Peter A.

1999-01-01

331

Moving beyond "It Worked": The Ongoing Evolution of Research on Problem-Based Learning in Medical Education  

Science.gov (United States)

Research on Problem-Based Learning in medical education has undergone an evolutionary process from initial proof of concept studies through critiques of the original methods and beyond. Initial studies focused on whether or not the instructional method was effective for medical students and the goals of medical education. Despite much movement…

Svinicki, Marilla D.

2007-01-01

332

Open science, e-science and the new technologies: Challenges and old problems in qualitative research in the social sciences Open science, e-science and the new technologies: Challenges and old problems in qualitative research in the social sciences Open science, e-science and the new technologies: Challenges and old problems in qualitative research in the social sciences  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Purpose: As well as introducing the articles in the special issue titled "Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences", this article reviews the challenges, problems and main advances made by the qualitative paradigm in the context of the new European science policy based on open science and e-Science and analysis alternative technologies freely available in the 2.0 environment and their application to fieldwork and data analysis. Design/methodology: Theoretical review. Practical implications: The article identifies open access technologies with applications in qualitative research such as applications for smartphones and tablets, web platforms and specific qualitative data analysis software, all developed in both the e-Science context and the 2.0 environment. Social implications: The article discusses the possible role to be played by qualitative research in the open science and e-Science context and considers the impact of this new context on the size and structure of research groups, the development of truly collaborative research, the emergence of new ethical problems and quality assessment in review processes in an open environment. Originality/value: The article describes the characteristics that define the new scientific environment and the challenges posed for qualitative research, reviews the latest open access technologies available to researchers in terms of their main features and proposes specific applications suitable for fieldwork and data analysis.Purpose: As well as introducing the articles in the special issue titled "Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences", this article reviews the challenges, problems and main advances made by the qualitative paradigm in the context of the new European science policy based on open science and e-Science and analysis alternative technologies freely available in the 2.0 environment and their application to fieldwork and data analysis. Design/methodology: Theoretical review. Practical implications: The article identifies open access technologies with applications in qualitative research such as applications for smartphones and tablets, web platforms and specific qualitative data analysis software, all developed in both the e-Science context and the 2.0 environment. Social implications: The article discusses the possible role to be played by qualitative research in the open science and e-Science context and considers the impact of this new context on the size and structure of research groups, the development of truly collaborative research, the emergence of new ethical problems and quality assessment in review processes in an open environment. Originality/value: The article describes the characteristics that define the new scientific environment and the challenges posed for qualitative research, reviews the latest open access technologies available to researchers in terms of their main features and proposes specific applications suitable for fieldwork and data analysis.Purpose: As well as introducing the articles in the special issue titled "Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences", this article reviews the challenges, problems and main advances made by the qualitative paradigm in the context of the new European science policy based on open science and e-Science and analysis alternative technologies freely available in the 2.0 environment and their application to fieldwork and data analysis. Design/methodology: Theoretical review. Practical implications: The article identifies open access technologies with applications in qualitative research such as applications for smartphones and tablets, web platforms and specific qualitative data analysis software, all developed in both the e-Science context and the 2.0 environment. Social implications: The article discusses the possible role to be played by qualitative research in the open science and e-Science context and considers the impact of this new context on the size and structure of research groups, the development of truly collaborative research, the emergence of new ethical problems and quality

Jordi López Sintas

2012-12-01

333

A Research on the General and Financial Problems of Agricultural Sector in North Cyprus: Case of Karpaz Peninsula  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The following research focuses on agricultural and farming enterprises located in Iskele Province of Karpaz Peninsula in Turkish Republic of North Cyprus (TRNC, accenting on and examining overall and financial issues and problems.In this frame, the main problems of agriculture in order, are: ‘Position of Karpaz in regard to land use, in Cyprus Conflict’, ‘Natural disasters’, ‘Bureaucratic obstacles’, ‘Negative effects of Cyprus Issue’, ‘Marketing of products,’, ‘Competing with South Cyprus and imported foreign products’ and ,’Finance’.Entrepreneurs and businesses in agriculture state that, the most important dimensions of financial problem are ‘High finance cost’, ‘Difficulties encountered in collections from market and official bodies’, ‘Limited incentive opportunity’, ‘Collateral and debenture obligations demanded for loans’, ‘Costly capital investment funds ‘‘Insufficient local business capital and problems encountered procuring the business capital’ and ‘Insufficient equity and difficulties faced in obtaining investment credit.’

Okan Veli ?AFAKLI

2013-07-01

334

A Research on the General and Financial Problems of Agricultural Sector in North Cyprus: Case of Karpaz Peninsula  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The following research focuses on agricultural and farming enterprises located in Iskele Province of Karpaz Peninsula in Turkish Republic of North Cyprus (TRNC, accenting on and examining overall and financial issues and problems.In this frame, the main problems of agriculture in order, are: ‘Position of Karpaz in regard to land use, in Cyprus Conflict’, ‘Natural disasters’, ‘Bureaucratic obstacles’, ‘Negative effects of Cyprus Issue’, ‘Marketing of products,’, ‘Competing with South Cyprus and imported foreign products’ and ,’Finance’.Entrepreneurs and businesses in agriculture state that, the most important dimensions of financial problem are ‘High finance cost’, ‘Difficulties encountered in collections from market and official bodies’, ‘Limited incentive opportunity’, ‘Collateral and debenture obligations demanded for loans’, ‘Costly capital investment funds ‘‘Insufficient local business capital and problems encountered procuring the business capital’ and ‘Insufficient equity and difficulties faced in obtaining investment credit.’

Okan Veli ?AFAKLI

2013-06-01

335

Corrosion Induced Leakage Problem of the Radial Beam Port 1 of BAEC Triga Mark-II Research Reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The BAEC reactor has so far been operated as per the technical specifications and procedures laid down in the SAR of the research reactor. The BP leakage problem of the BAEC research reactor was an issue that could lead to a situation close to a LOCA. Therefore, the matter was handled carefully, taking all measures so that such an incident could be prevented. Assistance of agencies outside BAEC was taken for solving the problem. It is understood that the silicone rubber lining of the encirclement clamp may become damaged by neutron irradiation. Therefore, while designing the clamp, provisions were kept such that it can be dismantled and reinstalled again following lining replacement. As a moderately aged facility, the ageing management BAEC TRIGA research reactor deserves significant attention. BAEC, together with its strategic partners, are doing what is needed in this regard

336

How explicable are differences between reviews that appear to address a similar research question? A review of reviews of physical activity interventions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic reviews are promoted as being important to inform decision-making. However, when presented with a set of reviews in a complex area, how easy is it to understand how and why they may differ from one another? Methods An analysis of eight reviews reporting evidence on effectiveness of community interventions to promote physical activity. We assessed review quality and investigated overlap of included studies, citation of relevant reviews, consistency in reporting, and reasons why specific studies may be excluded. Results There were 28 included studies. The majority (n = 22; 79% were included only in one review. There was little cross-citation between reviews (n = 4/28 possible citations; 14%. Where studies appeared in multiple reviews, results were consistently reported except for complex studies with multiple publications. Review conclusions were similar. For most reviews (n = 6/8; 75%, we could explain why primary data were not included; this was usually due to the scope of the reviews. Most reviews tended to be narrow in focus, making it difficult to gain an understanding of the field as a whole. Conclusions In areas where evaluating impact is known to be difficult, review findings often relate to uncertainty of data and methodologies, rather than providing substantive findings for policy and practice. Systematic ‘maps’ of research can help identify where existing research is robust enough for multiple in-depth syntheses and also show where new reviews are needed. To ensure quality and fidelity, review authors should systematically search for all publications from complex studies. Other relevant reviews should be searched for and cited to facilitate knowledge-building.

Woodman Jenny

2012-08-01

337

Research on Excessive Road Fuel Problem Based on Extension Strategy Generating Method  

OpenAIRE

The increase of the demand for gasoline in transportation and traffic vehicles results in excessive fuel consumption problem. However, by the extension strategy generating methods, the way of urban transportation changing from bus into metro may be analyzed and evaluated through extension reasoning, extension transformation and optimal calculation in order to solve the problem of excessive fuel consumption of the urban roads.

Li Shu fei; Ye Guang zai

2012-01-01

338

Causes of Indoor Air Quality Problems in Schools: Summary of Scientific Research. Revised Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

Understanding the primary causes of indoor air quality (IAQ) problems and how controllable factors--proper heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system design, allocation of adequate outdoor air, proper filtration, effective humidity control, and routine maintenance--can avert problems may help all building owners, operators, and…

Bayer, Charlene W.; Crow, Sidney A.; Fischer, John

339

The Relevance of the Identification Problem to Statistical Research on Capital Punishment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reviews several potential problems that often invalidate statistical tests of social theories. Discusses how there may be very serious identification problems in the estimation of the relationship between executions and homicides, and that serious questions may be raised regarding the validity of any particular estimation of this relationship.…

Yunker, James A.

1982-01-01

340

A Framework for Addressing the Global Obesity Epidemic Locally: The Child Health Ecological Surveillance System (CHESS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in the developed world. Recent research and commentary suggest that an ecological approach is required to address childhood obesity, given the multidimensional nature of the problem. We propose a Canadian prototype, the Child Health Ecological Surveillance System, for a regional health authority to address the growing obesity epidemic. This prototype could potentially be used in other jurisdictions to address other child health issues. We present 8 guiding principles for the development and implementation of a regional framework for action.

Ronald C. Plotnikoff, PhD

2008-07-01

341

A problem-based approach to teaching research methodology to medical graduates in Iran  

OpenAIRE

Physicians are reticent to participate in research projects for avariety of reasons. Facilitating the active involvement ofdoctors in research projects is a high priority for the IranianBlood Transfusion Organization (IBTO). A one-month trainingcourse on research methodology was conducted for a groupof physicians in Mashhad, in northeast Iran. The participantswere divided in ten groups. They prepared a researchproposal under the guidance of a workshop leader. Thequality of the research propos...

Mehrdad Jalalian Hosseini; Mohamed Othman; Latiffah Latiff; Syed Tajudin Syed Hassan; Reyhaneh Bazargni; Parichehr Hanachi

2009-01-01

342

Qualitative Research as Policy Knowledge: Framing Policy Problems and Transforming Education from the Ground Up  

Science.gov (United States)

As educational research becomes privatized, commodified and commercialized, research relevance increasingly means being incorporated into neoliberal ideological and economic agendas. Within this social context, qualitative research in particular is often deemed less relevant (if not irrelevant) because it does not provide prescriptions for best…

Dumas, Michael J.; Anderson, Gary

2014-01-01

343

Report on the ANSTO application for a licence to construct a Replacement Research Reactor, addressing seismic analysis and seismic design accident analysis, spent fuel and radioactive wastes  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Report of the Nuclear Safety Committee (NSC) covers specific terms of reference as requested by the Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA. The primary issue for the Working Group(WG) consideration was whether ANSTO had demonstrated: (i) that the overall approach to seismic analysis and its implementation in the design is both conservative and consistent with the international best practice; (ii) whether the full accident analysis in the Probabilistic Safety Assesment Report (PSAR) satisfies the radiation dose/frequency criteria specified in ARPANSA's regulatory assessment principle 28 and the assumptions used in the Reference Accident for the siting assessment have been accounted for in the PSAR; and (iii) the adequacy of the strategies for managing the spent fuel as proposed to be used in the Replacement Research Reactor and other radioactive waste (including emissions, taking into account the ALARA criterion) arising from the operation of the proposed replacement reactor and radioisotope production. The report includes a series of questions that were asked of the Applicant in the course of working group deliberations, to illustrate the breadth of inquiries that were made. The Committee noted that replies to some questions remain outstanding at the date of this document. The NSC makes a number of recommendations that appear in each section of the document, which has been compiled in three parts representing the work of each group. The NSC notes some lack of clarity group. The NSC notes some lack of clarity in what was needed to be considered at this approval stage of the project, as against information that would be required at a later stage. While not in the original work plan, recent events of September 11, 2001 also necessitated some exploration of issues relating to construction security. Copyright (2002) Commonwealth of Australia

344

Problem Solving Process Research of Everyone Involved in Innovation Based on CAI Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

It is very important that non-technical department personnel especially bottom line employee serve as innovators under the requirements of everyone involved in innovation. According the view of this paper, it is feasible and necessary to build everyone involved in innovation problem solving process under Total Innovation Management (TIM) based on the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ). The tools under the CAI technology: How TO mode and science effects database could be very useful for all employee especially non-technical department and bottom line for innovation. The problem solving process put forward in the paper focus on non-technical department personnel especially bottom line employee for innovation.

Chen, Tao; Shao, Yunfei; Tang, Xiaowo

345

Sesotho Address Forms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Address forms constitute an integral part of Basotho sociolinguistic etiquette. They are regarded as a kind of emotional capital that may be invested in putting others at ease. They are indicators of deference, politeness and markers of social distance. (Fasold 1990, Akindele 1990, 1991, 1993 This paper examines the address forms used by the Basotho people. It analyzes and discusses the various types and the factors determining their use. The discussion of address forms in Sesotho focuses on First Name, Title plus First Name, Title plus Last Name, Nickname, Multiple Names, and Teknonym. Drawing data from semi-literate and literate urban and rural population of Maseru district of Lesotho, it was found that the commonest form of address used by the Basotho people is title plus first name. e.g. ntate Thabo (father Thabo, 'm'e Puleng (mother Puleng, ausi Maneo (sister Maneo, abuti Mahao (brother Mahao. It is used by close relations, associates, and familiar people in both formal and informal situations.

Akindele, Dele Femi

2008-01-01

346

Research and Evaluation of Advanced Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Methods for Addressing the Challenges of Inspecting Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel (CASS) Piping  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This Conference paper is for submission to the 7th International Conference on NDE in Relation to Structural Integrity for Nuclear and Pressurized Components, in Yokohama, Japan Specifically, this paper is being presented at this Conference on May 12-14, 2009. Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on developing and evaluating the reliability of nondestructive examination (NDE) approaches for inspecting coarse-grained, cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) reactor components. The objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the utility, effectiveness and limitations of ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection techniques as related to the in-service inspection of primary system piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This paper provides a comprehensive overview of recent efforts at PNNL to conduct confirmatory research, development, and evaluation of advanced NDE methods for characterizing CASS microstructures and inspecting welds in these materials. This paper describes results from recent assessments using low-frequency, phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) techniques as applied to both small-bore pressurizer (PZR) surge line components and larger-bore primary coolant piping components. Cast stainless steel (CSS) pipe specimens were examined that contain thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks located close to the weld rootsgue cracks located close to the weld roots and have inside/outside surface geometrical conditions that simulate several PWR primary piping configurations. Advanced UT methods were applied from the outside surface of these specimens using automated scanning devices and water coupling. The phased-array approach was implemented with a modified instrument operating at lower frequencies than conventionally applied PA-UT (500 kHz and 800 kHz) and composite volumetric images of these samples were generated. Results from laboratory studies for assessing detection, localization, and sizing effectiveness are discussed. In addition, segments of vintage centrifugally cast piping, piping segments used in PISC-III round robin tests, and practice specimens from the Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) were also examined to understand inherent acoustic noise and scattering due to grain structures and determine consistency of UT responses from different locations. Interim results from sound-field mapping in CASS microstructures as a function of frequency, incident angle, and microstructure parameters are presented. This paper also describes progress and recent developments resulting from laboratory studies focused on developing effective in-situ methods for microstructural characterization (classification) in CASS components from the outside surface. A study of past CASS fabrication processes and their impact on resultant microstructures will also be discussed.

347

Is there a role for expectation maximization imputation in addressing missing data in research using WOMAC questionnaire? Comparison to the standard mean approach and a tutorial  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Standard mean imputation for missing values in the Western Ontario and Mc Master (WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index limits the use of collected data and may lead to bias. Probability model-based imputation methods overcome such limitations but were never before applied to the WOMAC. In this study, we compare imputation results for the Expectation Maximization method (EM and the mean imputation method for WOMAC in a cohort of total hip replacement patients. Methods WOMAC data on a consecutive cohort of 2062 patients scheduled for surgery were analyzed. Rates of missing values in each of the WOMAC items from this large cohort were used to create missing patterns in the subset of patients with complete data. EM and the WOMAC's method of imputation are then applied to fill the missing values. Summary score statistics for both methods are then described through box-plot and contrasted with the complete case (CC analysis and the true score (TS. This process is repeated using a smaller sample size of 200 randomly drawn patients with higher missing rate (5 times the rates of missing values observed in the 2062 patients capped at 45%. Results Rate of missing values per item ranged from 2.9% to 14.5% and 1339 patients had complete data. Probability model-based EM imputed a score for all subjects while WOMAC's imputation method did not. Mean subscale scores were very similar for both imputation methods and were similar to the true score; however, the EM method results were more consistent with the TS after simulation. This difference became more pronounced as the number of items in a subscale increased and the sample size decreased. Conclusions The EM method provides a better alternative to the WOMAC imputation method. The EM method is more accurate and imputes data to create a complete data set. These features are very valuable for patient-reported outcomes research in which resources are limited and the WOMAC score is used in a multivariate analysis.

Rutledge John

2011-05-01

348

Research and Teaching: Promoting the Use of Higher-Order Cognitive Skills in Qualitative Problem Solving  

Science.gov (United States)

A study was conducted to promote higher order cognitive skills (HOCS) in a chemistry class using the GOAL (Gather, Organize, Analyze, and Learn) method. Students were assigned four qualitative problems specifically designed to be solved with the method over the course of the semester outside of normal homework and testing. The problems served as a platform to encourage students to use HOCS in their Learn responses. The study focused on students' use of HOCS in these Learn responses regardless of whether HOCS were used in the actual solving of the problems or not. The results of this study suggest that consistent use of the Learn response in problem solving promotes reflection with an accompanied increase in use of HOCS by students during a semester.

Jason Justice

2008-05-01

349

Research of Multi-Depot Vehicle Routing Problem by Cellular Ant Algorithm  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The Multi-Depot Vehicle Routing Problem (MDVRP is a generalization of SDVRP, in which multiple vehicles start from multiple depots and return to their original depots at the end of their assigned tours. The MDVRP is NP-hard, therefore, the development of heuristic algorithms for this problem class is of primary interest. This paper solves Multi-Depot Vehicle Routing Problem with Cellular Ant Algorithm which is a new optimization method for solving real problems by using both the evolutionary rule of cellular, graph theory and the characteristics of ant colony optimization. The simulation experiment shows that the Cellular Ant Algorithm is feasible and effective for the MDVRP. The clarity and simplicity of the Cellular Ant Algorithm is greatly enhanced to ant colony optimization.

Yuanzhi Wang

2013-07-01

350

Research on Existing Problem of China's MBA Education and the Countermeasures  

OpenAIRE

This article started with a brief review of the history and current situation of Chinese MBA education, Moreover, the major problems of Chinese MBA education and the reasonable resolution were presented on improving the MBA education in China as well.

Haiyong Ma

2010-01-01

351

Assessment of some of the problems in the USA of superconducting magnets for fusion research  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper discusses some of the general difficulties and problems encountered during the development of the technology of superconductors and superconducting magnets for fusion and expresses some personal concerns

352

The communication problems of Spanish researchers to get research articles published in Applied Linguistics English-medium journals: proposal and analysis  

OpenAIRE

This paper is a revised version of a three-hour seminar given in Spanish at the VIII Semana de la Ciencia en Madrid, Spain, 18 November 2008, under the title: ??Es el discurso cient??fico universal en su contenido y forma?. The purpose of this seminar was to introduce a non-specialised audience to a relatively new field of research within Applied Linguistics, known as Intercultural Rhetoric. This research field mainly seeks to describe and explain the communication problems encountered by wri...

Moreno, Ana I.

2012-01-01

353

Research on Location-Routing Problem with Empirical Analysis for Regional Logistics Distribution  

OpenAIRE

The location of the distribution facilities and the routing of the vehicles from these facilities are interdependent in many distribution systems. Such a concept recognizes the interdependence; attempts to integrate these two decisions have been limited. Multi-objective location-routing problem (MLRP) is combined with the facility location and the vehicle routing decision and satisfied the different objectives. Due to the problem complexity, simultaneous solution method...

Qian Zhang

2014-01-01

354

Organic propagation of seed and planting material: an overview of problems and challenges for research  

OpenAIRE

By 1 January 2004, as a result of EU-regulation 2092/91 for organic farming, the organic sector needs to have developed efficient schemes to be able to use adequate quantities of organically produced seed and planting material. Market problems and agronomic problems that are related to obtaining sufficient quantities of adequate quality are reviewed. For successful production of organic seed and planting material intensive communication between and mutual commitment of farmers, traders, breed...

Lammerts Bueren, E.; Struik, P. C.; Jacobsen, E.

2003-01-01

355

Community problem-solving framed as a distributed information use environment: bridging research and practice  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction. This article results from a qualitative study of 1 information behavior in community problem-solving framed as a distributed information use environment and 2 approaches used by a best-practice library to anticipate information needs associated with community problem solving. Method. Several approaches to data collection were used - focus groups, interviews, observation of community and library meetings, and analysis of supporting documents. We focused first on the information behaviour of community groups. Finding that the library supported these activities we sought to understand its approach. Analysis. Data were coded thematically for both information behaviour concepts and themes germane to problem-solving activity. A grounded theory approach was taken to capture aspects of the library staff's practice. Themes evolved from the data; supporting documentation - reports, articles and library communication - was also coded. Results. The study showed 1 how information use environment components (people, setting, problems, problem resolutions combine in this distributed information use environment to determine specific information needs and uses; and 2 how the library contributed to the viability of this distributed information use environment. Conclusion. Community problem solving, here explicated as a distributed IUE, is likely to be seen in multiple communities. The library model presented demonstrates that by reshaping its information practice within the framework of an information use environment, a library can anticipate community information needs as they are generated and where they are most relevant.

Joan C. Durrance

2006-01-01

356

Ethical issues in implementation research: a discussion of the problems in achieving informed consent  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Improved quality of care is a policy objective of health care systems around the world. Implementation research is the scientific study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of clinical research findings into routine clinical practice, and hence to reduce inappropriate care. It includes the study of influences on healthcare professionals' behaviour and methods to enable them to use research findings more effectively. Cluster randomized trials represent the optimal design for evaluating the effectiveness of implementation strategies. Various codes of medical ethics, such as the Nuremberg Code and the Declaration of Helsinki inform medical research, but their relevance to cluster randomised trials in implementation research is unclear. This paper discusses the applicability of various ethical codes to obtaining consent in cluster trials in implementation research. Discussion The appropriate application of biomedical codes to implementation research is not obvious. Discussion of the nature and practice of informed consent in implementation research cluster trials must consider the levels at which consent can be sought, and for what purpose it can be sought. The level at which an intervention is delivered can render the idea of patient level consent meaningless. Careful consideration of the ownership of information, and rights of access to and exploitation of data is required. For health care professionals and organizations, there is a balance between clinical freedom and responsibility to participate in research. Summary While ethical justification for clinical trials relies heavily on individual consent, for implementation research aspects of distributive justice, economics, and political philosophy underlie the debate. Societies may need to trade off decisions on the choice between individualized consent and valid implementation research. We suggest that social sciences codes could usefully inform the consideration of implementation research by members of Research Ethics Committees.

Eccles Martin P

2008-12-01

357

Ethical research as the target of animal extremism: an international problem  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Animal extremism has been increasing worldwide; frequently researchers are the targets of actions by groups with extreme animal rights agendas. Sometimes this targeting is violent and may involve assaults on family members or destruction of property. In this article, we summarize recent events and s [...] uggest steps that researchers can take to educate the public on the value of animal research both for people and animals

P., Michael Conn; F.T., Rantin.

2010-02-01

358

Ethical research as the target of animal extremism: an international problem  

OpenAIRE

Animal extremism has been increasing worldwide; frequently researchers are the targets of actions by groups with extreme animal rights agendas. Sometimes this targeting is violent and may involve assaults on family members or destruction of property. In this article, we summarize recent events and suggest steps that researchers can take to educate the public on the value of animal research both for people and animals

Michael Conn, P.; Rantin, F. T.

2010-01-01

359

Ethical issues in implementation research: a discussion of the problems in achieving informed consent  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Improved quality of care is a policy objective of health care systems around the world. Implementation research is the scientific study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of clinical research findings into routine clinical practice, and hence to reduce inappropriate care. It includes the study of influences on healthcare professionals' behaviour and methods to enable them to use research findings more effectively. Cluster randomized trials represent the optimal de...

Eccles Martin P; Hutton Jane L; Grimshaw Jeremy M

2008-01-01

360

A problem-based approach to teaching research methodology to medical graduates in Iran  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Physicians are reticent to participate in research projects for avariety of reasons. Facilitating the active involvement ofdoctors in research projects is a high priority for the IranianBlood Transfusion Organization (IBTO. A one-month trainingcourse on research methodology was conducted for a groupof physicians in Mashhad, in northeast Iran. The participantswere divided in ten groups. They prepared a researchproposal under the guidance of a workshop leader. Thequality of the research proposals, which were prepared by allparticipants, went beyond our expectations. All of theresearch proposals were relevant to blood safety. In this briefreport we describe our approach.

Mehrdad Jalalian Hosseini

2009-08-01

361

Undergraduate occupational therapy students' engagement in qualitative research: Identifying research problems and questions through reflection while in a community fieldwork setting  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english As part of the occupational therapy undergraduate programme at the University of the Western Cape (UWC), students carry out group research projects while in their fieldwork placements. The purpose of the Research module is to introduce them to basic qualitative research methods. Following the progre [...] ss of a group of students in a community fieldwork setting as an example, this article is a commentary on how they use the steps of the community process as a guideline to identify possible research questions. The author will highlight the process that students follow to refine their research questions, the support they require to identify priority problems, the barriers that students face while conducting research in fieldwork, and the positive outcomes for students and the community. In conclusion the community process provided the students with a theoretical guideline, specifically the needs assessment and analysis steps of the process in order for them to conceptualise a research question within a community fieldwork setting.

Jo-Celene, de Jongh.

362

Multiple pathways to inflated responsibility beliefs in obsessional problems: possible origins and implications for therapy and research.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this paper is to consider the possible origins of an inflated sense of responsibility which occupies an important place in the cognitive theory of obsessive compulsive disorder (Rachman, S. (1993). Obsessions, responsibility, and guilt. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 31, 149-154. Salkovskis, P. M. (1985). Obsessional-compulsive Problems: A cognitive-behavioural analysis. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 23 (5), 571-583). Clinical experience and consideration of current cognitive conceptualisations of obsessions and obsessive compulsive disorder suggest a number of possibilities, each of which is described after a brief introduction to the concept itself. While there are reasons to believe that some general patterns can be identified, the origins of obsessional problems are best understood in terms of complex interactions specific to each individual. PMID:10500320

Salkovskis, P; Shafran, R; Rachman, S; Freeston, M H

1999-11-01

363

Inter- and Transdisciplinary Work: Connecting Research on Hormones with Problems of Educational Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

More than ever before, leaders within the field of education are looking to research on basic processes to inform and improve educational practices. Success requires building a reciprocal relationship between the field of education and research on learning and development, similar to what exists between biology and medicine. Key to this effort is…

Rappolt-Schlichtmann, Gabrielle; Watamura, Sarah E.

2010-01-01

364

Research on the Algorithm for Solving Unconstraint Optimization Problems Utilizing Knowledge Evolution Principle  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Based on the evolutionary epistemology idea, an algorithm called UOP-KEA for solving unconstraint optimization problems utilizing knowledge evolution principle is proposed in this study. The main idea of this algorithm can be described as follows. Firstly, an initial knowledge base is formed. The next work is to inherit excellent knowledge individuals by inheritance operator, produce new knowledge individuals by innovation operator, update knowledge base by update operator and accordingly the knowledge evolution is realized. At last, the problem’s optimal solution can be gained from the optimal knowledge individual. Experiments were taken on optimization of unconstraint nonlinear test functions. The successful experimental results show that this algorithm is feasible and valid. The algorithm can search the global optimal solution with less population and less reiteration. The global convergence speed and the global optimal solution quality are all satisfactory.

Yan Taishan

2010-01-01

365

Review of experimental results of upper floodings at research reactors and problems of further investigations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

One analyzed problems dealing with investigation into follow-up upper flooding using both foreign and Russian testing units devoted to efficiency of cooling, chocking phenomenon occurring at steam and water counterflow and installation scale. One determined tasks to be tackled in course of further experiments to obtain correlations in designed programs for coolant loss accidents

366

Problems and challenges in care for children undergoing radiotherapy- A research paper  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

for children undergoing radiotherapy and their parents, a paediatric radiographer may be one welcome solution to relieve the anxiety and stress during this difficult time in their lives. given the various factors, no one solution can be deemed ultimate in dealing with this complex situation. thus further efforts are needed to bring about workable solutions to this problem depending on the circumstances and situation

367

Problems of data and search languages of data retrieval systems in nuclear research and technology  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The prospective importance is pointed out of data retrieval systems and the necessity of resolving related theoretical, technical, technological and semantic problems, which conditions the further successful development of the said systems. Different types of such systems are presented and characterized, including search languages, data collection, selection, evaluation and verification. The said aspects are related to the OEKFAK ZfI Leipzig system.

Toepfer, S.; Pfund, A.; Jankowski, L. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Leipzig. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung)

1984-04-01

368

Exploring quantum mechanics a collection of 700+ solved problems for students, lecturers, and researchers  

CERN Document Server

A series of seminal technological revolutions has led to a new generation of electronic devices miniaturized to such tiny scales where the strange laws of quantum physics come into play. There is no doubt that, unlike scientists and engineers of the past, technology leaders of the future will have to rely on quantum mechanics in their everyday work. This makes teaching and learning the subject of paramount importance for further progress. Mastering quantum physics is a very non-trivial task and its deep understanding can only be achieved through working out real-life problems and examples. It is notoriously difficult to come up with new quantum-mechanical problems that would be solvable with a pencil and paper, and within a finite amount of time. This book remarkably presents some 700+ original problems in quantum mechanics together with detailed solutions covering nearly 1000 pages on all aspects of quantum science. The material is largely new to the English-speaking audience. The problems have been collect...

Galitski, Victor; Kogan, Vladimir; Galitski, Victor Jr

2013-01-01

369

Cooperation between Russian research organizations and industrial companies: factors and problems  

OpenAIRE

The study is focused on the cooperation of Russian companies with research organizations in implementing R&D projects during technological innovation. Taking into account behavioral changes, authors carry out a micro-level analysis based on empirical data of executive survey of over 600 Russian industrial firms (2011—2012) and about 350 research organizations and universities (2012). The authors emphasize the key factors of firms’ demand for outsourcing R&D reveal the main barriers to the...

Simachev, Yuri; Kuzyk, Mikhail; Feygina, Vera

2014-01-01

370

Problem posing in teacher training and as a research object in didactics: two complementary perspectives.  

Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

Montréal : Université de Montréal, 2009, s. 357-360. ISSN 1592-5137. [Pre-Proceedings CIEAEM 61: Mathematical activity in classroom practice and as a research object in didactics: two complementary perspectives. For the Memory of Claude Janvier. Montréal (CA), 26.07.2009-31.07.2009] R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA406/08/0710 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : mathematical education * teacher training * subject didactical competence Subject RIV: AM - Education

Tichá, Marie

371

Teaching Nursing Research Using Large Data Sets.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes a process for teaching nursing research via secondary analysis of data sets from the National Center for Health Statistics. Addresses advantages, potential problems and limitations, guidelines for students, and evaluation methods. (Contains 32 references.) (SK)

Brosnan, Christine A.; Eriksen, Lillian R.; Lin, Yu-Feng

2002-01-01

372

Lunar Phases: Addressing Misconceptions  

Science.gov (United States)

This exercise was designed to address student misconceptions about why the Moon exhibits phases. Using a sketchbook, digital camera, or flex cam, a student sits at the center of a darkened room illuminated by a single light source in a stationary position. Stools are set up surrounding the student in the center and other students take those positions, always keeping their faces toward the center. The center student sketches or take pictures of the faces at each of the positions. Substituting a sphere (such as a ball) for the students' faces provides an even more vivid illustration of the shadowing of the sphere and connects directly to the rationale for lunar phases.

Philip Childs

373

Rural energy and the Third World: a review of social science research and technology policy problems. [Book: 150 annotated references  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Two long introductory chapters identifying a number of themes relevant to the understanding of the energy needs of rural people in the Third World and how these can be met are followed by an annotated bibliography, which provides critical reviews of more than 150 sources and a listing of 50 other sources. The literature sources emphasize the social-science aspects of the problem rather than discussing the technical or scientific sources. The research on which this book is based stems from a joint initiative of the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) of the United Kingdom and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) of Canada. The contents are grouped under: Rural Energy Needs and the Assessment of Technical Solutions; The Supply Side of the Technical Change Process; and the Selected Bibliography.

Barnett, A.; Bell, M.; Hoffman, K.

1982-01-01

374

Evidence-based policy-making: the implications of globally-applicable research for context-specific problem-solving in developing countries.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the past 15 or so years, the "evidence-based medicine" (EBM) framework has become increasingly institutionalized, facilitating its transfer across the globe. In the late 1990s, the basic principles of EBM began to have a marked influence in a number of non-clinical public policy arenas. Policy-makers working in these areas are now being urged to move away from developing policies according to political ideologies to a more legitimate approach based on "scientific fact," a process termed "evidence-based policy-making" (EBPM). The conceptual diffusion of EBM to non-clinical arenas has exposed epistemologically destabilizing views regarding the definition of "science," particularly as it relates to the demands of global versus national/sub-national policy-making. Using the maternal and neonatal subfield as an ethnographic case-study, this paper explores the effects of these divergences on EBPM in 5 developing countries (Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Malawi and Nepal). In doing so, our analysis aims to explain why EBPM has thus far had a limited impact in the area of context-specific programmatic policy-development and implementation at the national and sub-national levels. Results highlight that the political contexts in which EBPM is played out promote uniformity of methodological and policy approaches, despite the fact that disciplinary diversity is being called for repeatedly in the public health literature. Even in situations where national EBPM diverges from international priorities, national evidence-based policies are found to hold little weight in countering global policy interests, which some informants claim are themselves legitimated, rather than informed, by evidence. Informants also highlight the way interpretations of research findings are shaped by the broader political context within which donors set priorities and distribute limited resources - contexts that are driven by the need to provide generalisable research recommendations based on scientifically replicable methods. Added to this are clear rifts between senior and junior-level experts within countries that constrain national and sub-national research agendas from serving as tools for empowered knowledge production and problem-solving. We conclude by arguing for diverse forms of research that can more effectively address context-specific problems. While such diversity may render EBPM more conflict-ridden, debate is by no means an undesirable characteristic in any evolving system of knowledge, for it has the potential to foster critical insight and localized change. PMID:19781839

Behague, Dominique; Tawiah, Charlotte; Rosato, Mikey; Some, Télésphore; Morrison, Joanna

2009-11-01

375

Recommendations regarding problems of research policy relating to the establishment and operation of atomic power stations in Denmark  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report, which was submitted by the Danish Planning Council for Research to the Parliamentary Committee on Scientific Research, is based on reports from the DANISH Atomic Energy Commission. and on a sub-committee appointed by the Planning Council, as well as on the comments of the Danish Research Council on these reports. The Planning Council submit that: 1) the question of the introduction and scope of Danish utilization of atomic energy should be considered as a link in setting up a total plan for energy policy elucidating the possibilities in the energy field from both aspects of supply and demand, 2) that there is a continuous interaction between energy policy and research policy in the subject field 3) that the total resources for energy research and development should be considerably increased, 4) that investigations into the economy of atomic power should be intensified, and 5) that investigations of possibilities for long-term storage of radioactive waste in Denmark should be speeded up. Further, the Planning Council points out the need for research in areas such as a) wind and solar energy, b) the environmental impact of utilizing atomic power in relation to that of utilizing other forms of power, c) economic and social effects of different forms of energy supply, as well as the problems of siting, decision taking and public information and participation and finally, d) the utilization of the energy raw materials found in Greenland. (B.P.)

376

Research on Potential Problem based on Singular Decomposition and Boundary FM-BEM Algorithm  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In order to overcome the difficulties of low computational efficiency and high memory requirement in the conventional boundary element method for solving large-scale potential problems, a fast multipole boundary element method for the problems of Poisson equation is presented. First of all, through the multipole expansion and local expansion for the basic solution of the kernel function of the Poisson equation, the boundary integral equation of the fast multipole boundary element method for Poisson equation was obtained; secondly, the Laplasse transform is used for the Singularity processing treatment of Poisson equation; then, the realize the algorithm design of fast multipole boundary element method, the calculating flow of the algorithm is given; finally, a numerical example is given to verify the accuracy and the efficiency of the fast multipole boundary element method.

Chunfeng Liu

2014-01-01

377

Research on the Algorithm for Solving Unconstraint Optimization Problems Utilizing Knowledge Evolution Principle  

OpenAIRE

Based on the evolutionary epistemology idea, an algorithm called UOP-KEA for solving unconstraint optimization problems utilizing knowledge evolution principle is proposed in this study. The main idea of this algorithm can be described as follows. Firstly, an initial knowledge base is formed. The next work is to inherit excellent knowledge individuals by inheritance operator, produce new knowledge individuals by innovation operator, update knowledge base by update operator and accordingly the...

Yan Taishan; Cui Duwu

2010-01-01

378

Overview of research trends and problems on Cr-Mo low alloy steels for pressure vessel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Cr-Mo low alloy steels have been used for a long time for pressure vessel due to its excellent corrosion resistance, high temperature strength and toughness. The paper reviewed the latest trends on material development and some problems on Cr-Mo low alloy steel for pressure vessel, such as elevated temperature strength, hardenability, synergetic effect between temper and hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen attack and hydrogen induced disbonding of overlay weld-cladding

379

State and problems of scientific research automation in radiation damage physics in KFTI  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Problems of automatization of theoretical and experimental investigations into physics of radiation damages at KhFTI of UkSSR Academy of Sciences have been considered. Main peculiarity is a complex approach to the automatization of experiment on materials technology envisaging the modelling of radiation effects, monitoring and control of materials irradiation at accelerators, centralized experimental data processing and interpretation of the results using mathematical models

380

The global social problem : challenges for a research school like CERES  

OpenAIRE

The text starts with a reminder of the historical roots of the debate about the social problem in early industrial England, and connects it with the current debate about social exclusion and poverty, with an example from South Africa. Poverty issues should be related to the debates about labour conditions and labour rewards and about the variety of capitalist transformations taking place in the era of globalisation and of global social polarisation. But understanding poverty also demands a mu...

Dietz, A. J.

2003-01-01

381

High-level-waste containment for a thousand years: unique technical and research problems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In the United States the present policy for disposal of high level nuclear wastes is focused on isolation of solidified wastes in a mined geologic repository. Safe isolation is to be achieved by utilizing both natural and man-made barriers which will act in concert to assure the overall conservative performance of the disposal system. The incorporation of predictable man-made barriers into the waste disposal strategy has generated some new and unique problems for the scientific community

382

Research on problems in nuclear accident emergency rescue for nuclear power submarine  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper presents a description of nuclearpowered submarine accident types and an analysis of accident emergency rescue characteristics, including a special number of problems associated with emergencyrescue, such as emergency situation and emergency planning zone, technical rescue resources and task, protection against compound radiation inside and outside port plume zone, on-sea nuclear rescue equipment and technical assurance capacity, and other problesms related to in-accident nuclear submarine disposal. (authors)

383

Research on the Problems and Countermeasures of China's Service Trade in the New Era  

OpenAIRE

Since the 21st century, global trade competitions focus point has shifted from commodity trade to service trade. International trade in services shows some new trends. Although China's service trade has obtained fast development in recent years, they also have many problems. To adapt to the new trend of the development of international service trade, China should take some countermeasures to promote China's service trade has a high level of development. These countermeasures include accelerat...

Zhijun Sheng; Kuo Wang

2012-01-01

384

Problem-Based Learning Research in Anesthesia Teaching: Current Status and Future Perspective  

OpenAIRE

The teaching curriculum in anesthesia involves traditional teaching methods like topic-based didactic lectures, seminars, and journal clubs; intraoperative apprenticeship; and problem-based learning (PBL) and simulation. The advantages of incorporating PBL in anesthesia teaching include development of skills like clinical reasoning, critical thinking, and self-directed learning; in addition it also helps in developing a broader perspective of case scenarios. The present paper discusses the ch...

Chilkoti, G.; Mohta, M.; Wadhwa, R.; Saxena, A. K.

2014-01-01

385

Way Search to Research: from Academic Exercises in Architecture to Scientific Investigations into Actual Problems  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract. An interest in doctoral studies reflects the overall status of the scientist in the country in general and the role of science in the architect profession in particular. The article analyses the basic channels of how the students of architecture search for and find the ways to transfer themselves from the study area into an academic research environment. In order to figure out general trends and to outline the differences and similarities of doctoral studies that could further facilitate cooperation, the paper presents the thematic outputs of doctoral programmes in architecture schools in Vilnius, Riga, Venice, Jelgava and Weimar. With reference to the example of the Faculty of Architecture, VGTU, the trends towards developing research activities are analysed taking into account three interconnected branches of architecture: urban design, building architecture and landscape architecture. The cooperation and coordination of academic and research activities in wider European space is taking place upon common interest based on the specificities of each school and priorities of the chosen region. The awareness of global and regional processes in architectural research is an important point for the present and coming generations of researchers in Europe as they are building their careers on the basis of investigation into the options of the local applications of global competences in a cross-professional and inter-disciplinary way.

Gintaras Stauskis

2012-05-01

386

Research on the Optimal Layout Problem for NC Machining Based on Improved Genetic Algorithm  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the process of NC machining, the optimization processing of graphic layout is a well-studied problem which has practical application value for improving the utilization rate of raw materials and saving the cost of production. In this paper, a new design of genetic algorithm (GA is proposed for solving this problem. This improved genetic algorithm combines GA with the improved crossover operator and mutation operator. Moreover, the best individual preservation method is integrated into the algorithm. The improved genetic algorithm expands the search space and enhances the GA’s search capabilities. Furthermore, the maximum matching algorithm is proposed based on the lowest horizontal line algorithm, which effectively avoids blind elevating horizontal lines and improves the utilization rate of the lowest horizontal line. It is integrated with the improved genetic algorithm to solve the two-dimensional rectangular parts optimal layout problem which combines the advantages of two kinds of algorithms. The experimental results show that the algorithm can get a good optimization result.    

Wang Shuqing

2013-11-01

387

Benefiting from 'evil': an incipient moral problem in human stem cell research.  

Science.gov (United States)

When does benefiting from others' wrongdoing effectively make one a moral accomplice in their evil deeds? If stem cell research lives up to its therapeutic promise, this question (which has previously cropped up in debates over fetal tissue research or the use of Nazi research data) is likely to become a central one for opponents of embryo destruction. I argue that benefiting from wrongdoing is prima facie morally wrong under any of three conditions: (1) when the wrongdoing is one's agent; (2) when acceptance of benefit directly encourages the repetition of the wrongful deed (even though no agency relationship is involved); and (3) when acceptance of a benefit legitimates a wrongful practice. I conclude by showing that, because of the ways in which most embryonic stem cell lines come into being, people who oppose embryo destruction may use human embryonic stem cells without incurring moral blame. PMID:12474822

Green, Ronald M

2002-11-01

388

Addressing mixed waste in plutonium processing  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The overall goal is the minimization of all waste generated in actinide processing facilities. Current emphasis is directed toward reducing and managing mixed waste in plutonium processing facilities. More specifically, the focus is on prioritizing plutonium processing technologies for development that will address major problems in mixed waste management. A five step methodological approach to identify, analyze, solve, and initiate corrective action for mixed waste problems in plutonium processing facilities has been developed

389

Radiobiological research for improving cancer therapy in India: rationale, problems and prospects  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Cancer is emerging as a very important health hazard in India. According to recent studies by the Indian Council of Medical Research, about 2.25 million patients are presently suffering from different types of cancer in India. Approximately one million new cases are diagnosed, and nearly 0.3 million deaths occur every year on account of this disease. About 2/3rd of the cancers are at an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. However, the allocation of funds for healthcare in India to support the research efforts for developing more potent radio-chemotherapy protocols for cancer treatment is too little. Studies by the W.H.O. have estimated that less developed countries including India use less than 5% of world resources destined for cancer control. It follows from the above discussions that it is imperative to further encourage and diversify the radiobiological research in India. This can be achieved by creating radiobiological research facilities, mainly in all the cancer centers and post graduate medical institutions, and further expanding the upcoming laboratories in the universities such as Bikaner. Collaborative research programs between laboratories at different centers could facilitate systematic evaluation of various pharmacological agents and neutraceuticals for potential application for treatment of different cancers. Our studies on combination of radiation with temozolomide and certain adjuvants with selective effects on brain tumour cells will be very bricts on brain tumour cells will be very briefly discussed in this presentation. Finally the possible administrative set up and multi dimensional collaborations for cost effective utilization of existing resources to further augment radiation biology research will also be discussed

390

Research versus Advocacy in the Allocation of Resources: Problems, Causes, Solutions.  

Science.gov (United States)

This commentary on EC 231 901 discusses whether resource allocations and service policies for mentally retarded individuals should be based upon purported findings of scientific theory or the purported needs of service systems. The paper calls for improved research utilization and understanding of what makes a social movement work. (JDD)

Menolascino, Frank J.; Stark, Jack A.

1990-01-01

391

Children's Media Use and Sleep Problems: Issues and Unanswered Questions. Research Brief  

Science.gov (United States)

Research shows that most children and adolescents do not get enough high-quality sleep, and that their sleep times appear to have declined over the last two decades. Coinciding with this trend has been the rise in popularity of new media forms including the Internet, video games, cell phones and DVDs. Because of the immediacy and interactivity of…

Zimmerman, Frederick J.

2008-01-01

392

Mutation research with ionizing radiations and chemicals using drosophila: problems, results and perspectives  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The results of mutagenesis studies with Drosophila are examined in order to inquire the extent to which the genetic responses to ionizing radiations and to chemical mutagens share common features, to identify those findings that may have validity beyond the confines of this species, and to assess the contributions and implications of Drosophila results to the problems of mutagenicity testing and of the evaluation of genetic hazards to man from exposure to environmental chemicals. The results obtained in the studies permit the estimation of X-irradiation equivalent doses of EMS for the induction of sex-linked recessive lethals and specific locus mutations in mature spermatozoa. (Auth.)

393

Case-control research. Temporal precedence and other problems of the exposure-disease relationship.  

Science.gov (United States)

We assessed the principle of temporal precedence in recent case-control studies demonstrating the alleged associations between tampon use and toxic shock syndrome and between aspirin use and Reye's syndrome. For both relationships, we considered four components of the exposure-disease association, including: (1) establishing that the agent preceded the disease, (2) selecting an index time, (3) defining criteria for classifying a patient as "exposed," and (4) avoiding the bias that occurs when use of the etiologic agent was influenced by an early manifestation of the disease. The problems can be minimized by interviewing patients early during the course of their illness and by improving strategies for data analysis. PMID:6732381

Horwitz, R I; Feinstein, A R; Harvey, M R

1984-06-01

394

Nuclear pressure boundary materials problems and proposed solutions  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The paper discusses several important materials problems facing LWR operation and some of the research programs that have been formulated at EPRI to address these problems. The problems include steam generator corrosion damage, BWR pipe cracking, BWR nozzle corner cracking, and radiation induced embrittlement. LWR materials problems are complex and will not easily yield to solution. However, the economic rewards for the solutions are great. (Auth.)

395

Adolescent Mental Health, Behavior Problems, and Academic Achievement  

OpenAIRE

Prior research on the association of mental health and behavior problems with academic achievement is limited because it does not consider multiple problems simultaneously, take co-occurring problems into account, and control for academic aptitude. We addressed these limitations using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 6,315). We estimated the associations of depression, attention problems, delinquency, and substance use with two indicators of academic achieve...

Mcleod, Jane D.; Uemura, Ryotaro; Rohrman, Shawna

2012-01-01

396

Problem-Based and Project-Oriented Learning. An Efficient Way to Implement Research Based Teaching in Power Electronic  

Science.gov (United States)

Power electronics is an emerging technology. New applications are added every year as well as the power handling capabilities is steadily increasing. One example is renewable energy, which is efficiently enabled by power electronics. The demands to the education of engineers in this field are also increasing. Generally, the content of the curriculum should be more expanded without extra study time. This paper presents a teaching approach, which very fast makes it possible for the students to obtain in-depth skills into new research areas, and this method is the problem-oriented and project-based learning. The necessary skills for power electronic engineers are outlined that is followed up by a description on how the problem-oriented and project-based learning are implemented. A complete curriculum in power electronics and drives at Aalborg University is presented where different power electronics related projects at different study levels are finally presented.

Blaabjerg, Frede; Teodorescu, Remus; Chen, Zhe

397

The efficiency of the production – the analyse of problems based on the literature research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: The production efficiency is one of the most important problems of the present-day logistics, both at operational as well as strategic levels. Increasing the level of the efficiency of the production process can be achieved in many ways. The reason of the selection of the issues covering the problems of the production efficiency is the lack of a comprehensive model for analyzing the efficiency of the production process, both in the scientific literature and in the business practice. Methods: The main aim of this paper is to systematize the process of obtaining input data for the assessment model of the production efficiency. The methodology for building the assessment model of production efficiency at the initial stage of the analysis was presented.  Results and conclusions:  The basic goal of a preliminary analysis of the model is to coordinate decision-making targets at all levels of the management. The presented assumptions should be regarded as a preliminary analysis, indispensable for the multivariate analysis of the production process efficiency, focused on the operational level.  

2012-06-01

398

Parental Attachment Style and Severity of Emotional/Behavioral Problems in Toddlerhood Research Article  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between maternal and paternal attachment style and severity of emotional and behavioral problem severity in toddlers and to explore the effect of toddlers’ gender, presence of autism, and parental depression on this relation.Methods: All patients (n=103 (male=75; female=28 younger than 43 months old (range: 14-43, mean: 30.93±8.26 months were included from a clinical sample. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR, Beck Depression Inventory, and Adult Attachment Scale (AAS were used for assessing mothers and fathers; the Child Behavior Checklist/ 2-3 (CBCL and Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC were applied to evaluate associated psychopathology in toddlers.Results: Both maternal and paternal AAS-avoidance scores were found to be significantly correlated with ABC-hyperactivity and ABC-irritability scores of the toddler (p<.001. A multiple regression model significantly predicted ABC-hyperactivity scores, F(4.47=5.74, p<.001, with two variables (higher paternal BDI score, and maternal insecure attachment style significantly contributing to the prediction.Conclusion: The overall results of this study indicate that maternal (but not paternal insecure attachment style is significantly associated with the severity of toddlers’ emotional and behavioral problems, such as hyperactivity, and irritability. Especially when combined with paternal depression, this association becomes stronger. (Archives of Neuropsychiatry 2011; 48: 147-54

Koray Karabekiro?lu

2011-06-01

399

Significant problems in FITS limit its use in modern astronomical research  

CERN Document Server

The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) standard has been a great boon to astronomy, allowing observatories, scientists and the public to exchange astronomical information easily. The FITS standard is, however, showing its age. Developed in the late 1970s the FITS authors made a number of implementation choices for the format that, while common at the time, are now seen to limit its utility with modern data. The authors of the FITS standard could not appreciate the challenges which we would be facing today in astronomical computing. Difficulties we now face include, but are not limited to, having to address the need to handle an expanded range of specialized data product types (data models), being more conducive to the networked exchange and storage of data, handling very large datasets and the need to capture significantly more complex metadata and data relationships. There are members of the community today who find some (or all) of these limitations unworkable, and have decided to move ahead with storin...

Thomas, Brian; Economou, Frossie; Greenfield, Perry; Hirst, Paul; Berry, David S; Bray, Erik; Gray, Norman; Turner, Demitri Muna James; Borro, Miguel de Val; Vela, Juande Santander; Shupe, David; Good, John; Berriman, G Bruce

2015-01-01

400

El planteamiento del problema en el proyecto de investigación en ingeniería / A guide for problem definition in engineering research projects  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available La realización de investigaciones en Ingeniería no está exenta de requisitos formales; un adecuado trabajo de investigación en Ingeniería es aquel que no sólo se valora en términos de su contenido sino también en lo que a la organización, estructuración y calidad del manuscrito se refiere. En este a [...] rtículo se presentará una propuesta metodológica para el planteamiento del problema en proyectos de investigación en Ingeniería. Se dará un panorama integral sobre los aspectos resaltantes que guían el correcto planteamiento del problema, aportándose algunos ejemplos de redacciones apropiadas que ilustran lo que debe y no debe hacerse cuando se elabora el texto contentivo del problema. Finalmente, se introducirán algunos aspectos de importancia radical que permiten evaluar la redacción, estructura y la adecuación del planteamiento del problema de acuerdo a los criterios que dicha tarea exige. Abstract in english Conducting research in engineering is not free from formal requirements, a good research work in engineering is one which is not only valued in terms of its content but also in the organization, structure and quality of the manuscript is concerned. In this article we present a methodology for the pr [...] oblem in research projects in engineering. It will give a comprehensive picture of outstanding issues that guide the proper approach to the problem, and some examples of appropriate compositions that illustrate what should and should not be made when preparing the text which contains the problem. Finally, we introduce some aspects of radical importance to evaluate the language, structure and appropriateness of the approach to the problem according to the criteria which the task demands.

María, Itriago C; Carlos E, Zerpa.

2011-09-01

401

Guidance and Research Centers (GRC) Managers' Perceptions of Problems Encountered in the Identification, Placement-Follow up, Individualized Education Program (IEP) Development and Integration Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of the study is to determine of the Guidance and Research Center (GRC) managers' opinions about unexpected problems of identification, placement-follow up, IEP development, and integration practicing. Being a descriptive study, the research data are collected from 116 managers of GRC. The inquiry form, which is developed by the researcher,…

Avcioglu, Hasan

2012-01-01

402

Research and technology strategy to help overcome the environmental problems in relation to transport  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report has been prepared for the Strategic Analysis in Science and Technology Unit (SAST) of the Directorate-General for Science, Research and Development of the Commission of the European Communities. The background of the project to which this report contributes is a recognition of the growing impact of transportation on the environment, both as a function of growth in trade and as a leisure activity. The project is directed towards the elucidation of the many interactions between technology, transport and environment, in order to provide the Commission with (a) recommendations on the priorities for Community research and development in transport technology and other related areas of technology, and (b) an understanding of the implications of technological change on policy options, within the Community with regard to transport and environment and other related areas, such as energy and regional planning

403

Problems with step-wise regression in research on aging and recommended alternatives.  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of step-wise regression techniques in aging research brings with it certain interpretative difficulties. Both geometric and algebraic approaches are used to demonstrate that although step-wise procedures pose little difficulty if predictors are orthogonal, these same procedures, when used with correlated predictors, can lead to poor tests of the predictor regression weights. Techniques that are useful in the detection of multicollinearity are discussed. Principal components regression, ridge regression, and hierarchical regression are evaluated as potential techniques for assessing the relative importance of predictors when these variables are correlated, as is common in aging research. Hierarchical regression is the most recommended technique in that it is theory-driven rather than dependent on empirical relations that may be sample-specific and unstable. PMID:3680874

Scialfa, C T; Games, P A

1987-11-01

404

Problems studied within the state research project New Methods of Nondestructive Materials Testing Using Ionizing Radiation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A state research project is described divided into ten subprojects, viz.: New trends of ionizing radiation detection using television technology in nondestructive testing; the application of accelerators for thick-walled product testing; the atlas of butt welds of medium thicknesses; the application of radioanalytical methods in testing the wear of gearboxes and other components of instrument parts; multielemental analyses of combustion engine wear using radionuclides; the application of radioisotope methods in research into wear of antifriction bearings of trucks and railway cars; the application of radionuclides in assessing corrosion resistance of steels and corrosion protection systems; the application of radionuclide methods in improving the quality of high-grade steel production; the selection and testing of radionuclide instruments for building production control, intermediate and acceptance checks; and radioisotope methods for building machine and equipment control. (M.S.)