WorldWideScience

Sample records for research cbpr approach

  1. An approach to assessing data quality in an area probability survey using CBPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, Dianne; Davis, Rochelle; Gomez, Guillermo; Flores, Jovita; Perez, Idida; Zanoni, Joseph

    2011-09-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches attempt to engage community members in all aspects of research conducted in the community. Proponents of CBPR suggest that among the many advantages to using CBPR is higher acceptance of and cooperation in research endeavors than is usually achieved through more traditional research approaches. Using secondary analysis of sample disposition data from two area probability surveys of the same community areas, one involving community interviewers in a fully collegial CBPR study and the other using professional interviewers, this study finds that data collected using CBPR techniques may lead to higher cooperation and lower refusal rates than data collected by professional interviewers. However, when compared to external population indicators such as census data, the sample produced by CBPR interviewers overrepresents certain population groups whereas the survey data produced by professional interviewers may underrepresent key population groups. PMID:21885704

  2. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) in South Africa: engaging multiple constituents to shape the research question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavel, Maghboeba; Simon, Christian; van Stade, Debbie; Buchbinder, Mara

    2005-12-01

    Community engagement is an on-going, arduous, and necessary process for developing effective health promotion programs. The challenges are amplified when the particular health issue or research question is not prominent in the consciousness of the targeted community. In this paper, we explore the community-based participatory research (CBPR) model as a means to negotiate a mutual agenda between communities and researchers. The paper is focused on the (perceived) need for cervical cancer screening in an under-resourced community in Cape Town, South Africa. Cervical cancer is a significant health problem in this community and elsewhere in South Africa. Unlike HIV-AIDS, however, many Black South Africans have not been educated about cervical cancer and the importance of obtaining screening. Many may not consider screening a priority in their lives. Our research included extensive consultations and informal interviews with diverse community and regional stakeholders. Following these, we conducted 27 focus groups and 106 demographic surveys with randomly selected youth, parents, local health care personnel, educators and school staff. Focus group data were summarized and analyzed cross-sectionally. Community stakeholders were involved throughout this research. Our consultations, interviews, and focus group data were key in identifying the concerns and priorities of the community. By engaging community stakeholders, we developed a research framework that incorporated the community's concerns and priorities, and stressed the intersecting roles of poverty, violence, and other cultural forces in shaping community members' health and wellbeing. Community members helped to refocus our research from cervical cancer to 'cervical health,' a concept that acknowledged the impact on women's bodies and lives of HIV-AIDS and STDs, sexual violence, poverty, and multiple social problems. We conclude that the research agenda and questions in community-based health research should not be considered immutable. They need to be open to negotiation, creativity, and constant reinvention. PMID:15955605

  3. TAKING IT TO THE PEWS: A CBPR-GUIDED HIV AWARENESS AND SCREENING PROJECT WITH BLACK CHURCHES

    OpenAIRE

    Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Bowe-Thompson, Carole; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Hawes, Starlyn; Moore, Erin; Williams, Eric; Martinez, David; Goggin, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach is a potentially effective strategy for exploring the development, implementation, and evaluation of HIV interventions in African American churches. This CBPR-guided study describes a church-based HIV awareness and screening intervention (Taking It to the Pews [TIPS]) that fully involved African American church leaders in all phases of the research project. Findings from the implementation and evaluation phases indicated that ...

  4. Stress and the Social Determinants of Maternal Health among Puerto Rican Women: A CBPR Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bermúdez-Millán, Angela; Damio, Grace; Cruz, Joan; D’Angelo, Karen; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Hromi-Fiedler, Amber; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative research project explores how poverty, the built environment, education, working conditions, health care access, food insecurity and perceived discrimination are experienced by Puerto Rican Latinas through the course of their lives. Five focus groups were conducted with the primary objective of documenting community experiences and perspectives regarding: 1) stress, including perceived discrimination based on race/ethnicity (racism); 2) the impact of stress on Puerto Rican wo...

  5. A community-based approach to translational research addressing breast cancer disparities

    OpenAIRE

    Yeary, Karen Hye-cheon Kim; Mason, Mondi; Turner, Jerome; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Chow, Marie; Hine, R. Jean; Henry-Tillman, Ronda; Greene, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Disparities in breast cancer survival rates suggest that biological processes contribute. Translational research addressing health disparities would benefit from using a community-based participatory approach (CBPR) to examine biological processes commonly seen as the proximal causes of illness as well as behavioral and social-ecological “causes of the causes” within an integrated conceptual framework. This paper describes a CBPR study that explored perceptions regarding breast cancer relevan...

  6. Anthropological Perspectives on Participation in CBPR: Insights From the Water Project, Maras, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Elizabeth; Schow, Diana

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we anthropologically explore one part of the process of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR): participation. Participation in CBPR is usually conceptualized as whether, and the degree to which, community members are involved in the research process. Our focus regarding participation is less on quantity and more on quality of the interaction between community members and researchers; within this context, we elaborate the concept of "bridging" as it is understood in CBPR. Using data from our ongoing "Water Project" in the Peruvian Andes, we explore how interaction, as a participative act of the research interview, creates the space for participating and imagining. Out of this interaction come data that are elaborated, contextualized, and, ultimately, from a CBPR perspective, made useful for meaningful engagement and community action. PMID:26613969

  7. Benevolent Paradox: Integrating Community-Based Empowerment and Transdisciplinary Research Approaches into Traditional Frameworks to Increase Funding and Long-Term Sustainability of Chicano-Community Research Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Adela

    2014-01-01

    Niños Sanos, Familia Sana (NSFS) is a 5-year multi-intervention study aimed at preventing childhood obesity among Mexican-origin children in rural California. Using a transdisciplinary approach and community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodology, NSFS's development included a diversely trained team working in collaboration with…

  8. Community research in other contexts: learning from sustainability science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silka, Linda

    2010-12-01

    In health research, community based participatory research (CBPR) has seen remarkable growth as an approach that overcomes many of the ethical concerns raised by traditional approaches. A community of CBPR scholars is now sharing ideas and devising new approaches to collaborative research. Yet, this is occurring in isolation from similar efforts using different nomenclature and occurring outside of health research areas. There is much to be gained by bringing these parallel discussions together. In sustainability science, for example, scholars are struggling with the question of how stakeholders and scientists can coproduce knowledge that offers useful solutions to complex and urgent environmental problems. Like CBPR in health, sustainability science is denigrated for perceived lack of rigor because of its applied problem focus and lack of positivist approach. Approaches to knowledge creation in sustainability science involve "new" ideas such as wicked problems and agent-based modeling, which would be equally applicable to CBPR. Interestingly, sustainability research is motivated less by recognition of the corrosive effects of the inequality of power than from frustration at how limited the impact of research has been, a perspective that might be useful in CBPR, particularly in conjunction with the use of some borrowed tools of sustainability science such as wicked problem analysis and agent-based modeling. Importantly, the example of sustainability science has the potential to keep CBPR from entering into a new orthodoxy of how research should be done. PMID:21133782

  9. A Case Study in Chamorro Community and Academic Engagement for a Community-Partnered Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisnado, Diana M.; Sablan-Santos, Lola; Guevara, Linda; Quitugua, Lourdes; Castro, Keith; Aromin, Jay; Quenga, Joey; Tran, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Objective We describe the development of a community and academic research partnership, share reflections on processes for collaborations, and identify key factors for establishing strong and effective relationships to foster high-quality research. Background A community-based participatory research (CBPR) effort evaluating a community-based patient navigation program assisting Chamorro women to access breast cancer services in Southern California served as the foundation for the development of the community-academic partnership. Methods Using a CBPR approach focusing on active involvement of community members, organizational representatives, and academic researchers in all aspects of research process, faculty from a research university and a local community-based organization were brought together to build a partnership. Community and academic partners engaged in a series of meetings where dialogue focused on developing and nurturing trust and shared values, respect for community knowledge, and establishing community-defined and prioritized needs and goals. Partners have also focused on defining and developing explicit structures and policies to implement an equal partnership. Results Experiences and lessons learned are shared, reflecting the processes of relationship building, and planning and implementing preliminary research steps. Lessons Learned Adequate time for relationship-building, open and honest communication, flexibility, and ongoing examination of assumptions are keys to developing successful CBPR partnerships.

  10. REDUCING SEXUAL RISK AMONG FILIPINA FEMALE BAR WORKERS: EFFECTS OF A CBPR-DEVELOPED STRUCTURAL AND NETWORK INTERVENTION

    OpenAIRE

    Morisky, Donald E; Malow, Robert M; Tiglao, Teodora V.; Lyu, Shu-Yu; Vissman, Aaron T.; Rhodes, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    The effects of three interventions designed to reduce sexual risk among Filipina female bar workers (FBWs) were compared with each other and with usual care (nonintervention). The interventions were developed iteratively by a community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership comprising lay community members, organizational representatives (including nongovernmental organizations), and academic researchers from the United States and the Philippines. Peer educators and bar managers from...

  11. Stakeholders' perspectives on community-based participatory research to enhance mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Andrew D; Byrd, Ronald; Claggett, Eddrena; DeVeaux, Sandra; Perkins, Reno; Huang, Cindy; Sernyak, Michael J; Steiner, Jeanne L; Cole, Robert; LaPaglia, Donna M; Bailey, Margaret; Buchanan, Candace; Johnson, Avon; Kaufman, Joy S

    2014-12-01

    Historically, consumers of mental health services have not been given meaningful roles in research and change efforts related to the services they use. This is quickly changing as scholars and a growing number of funding bodies now call for greater consumer involvement in mental health services research and improvement. Amidst these calls, community-based participatory research (CBPR) has emerged as an approach which holds unique promise for capitalizing on consumer involvement in mental health services research and change. Yet, there have been few discussions of the value added by this approach above and beyond that of traditional means of inquiry and enhancement in adult mental health services. The purpose of this paper is to add to this discussion an understanding of potential multilevel and multifaceted benefits associated with consumer-involved CBPR. This is accomplished through presenting the first-person accounts of four stakeholder groups who were part of a consumer-involved CBPR project purposed to improve the services of a local community mental health center. We present these accounts with the hope that by illustrating the unique outcomes associated with CBPR, there will be invigorated interest in CBPR as a vehicle for consumer involvement in adult mental health services research and enhancement. PMID:25245601

  12. A CBPR Partnership Increases HIV Testing among Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM): Outcome Findings from a Pilot Test of the "CyBER/Testing" Internet Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D.; Vissman, Aaron T.; Stowers, Jason; Miller, Cindy; McCoy, Thomas P.; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Wilkin, Aimee M.; Reece, Michael; Bachmann, Laura H.; Ore, Addison; Ross, Michael W.; Hendrix, Ellen; Eng, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    The Internet has emerged as an important tool for the delivery of health promotion and disease prevention interventions. Our community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership developed and piloted "CyBER/testing", a culturally congruent intervention designed to promote HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) within existing…

  13. Using community based participatory research to create a culturally grounded intervention for parents and youth to prevent risky behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez Parsai, Monica; Castro, Felipe González; Marsiglia, Flavio F; Harthun, Mary L; Valdez, Hector

    2011-03-01

    The principal goal of this article is to contribute to the field of prevention science by providing a sequential description of how Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) was used to develop a parent education curriculum aimed at preventing and decreasing adolescent drug use and risky sexual behaviors. CBPR principles are outlined, and information is provided on the unique contributions of researchers and community members who came together to develop this parent education program. Focus group information is presented as an exemplar to illustrate how thematic content from focus groups was used to inform the development of this parent education curriculum. A step by step description is given to facilitate replication of this process by other prevention researchers who are interested in applying this CBPR approach to develop a culturally responsive parent education intervention. PMID:21107693

  14. Critical incident technique: an innovative participatory approach to examine and document racial disparities in breast cancer healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonas, Michael A; Aronson, Robert; Schaal, Jennifer; Eng, Eugenia; Hardy, Christina; Jones, Nora

    2013-10-01

    Disproportionate and persistent inequities in quality of healthcare have been observed among persons of color in the United States. To understand and ultimately eliminate such inequities, several public health institutions have issued calls for innovative methods and approaches that examine determinants from the social, organizational and public policy contexts to inform the design of systems change interventions. The authors, including academic and community research partners in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) study, reflected together on the use and value of the critical incident technique (CIT) for exploring racial disparities in healthcare for women with breast cancer. Academic and community partners used initial large group discussion involving a large partnership of 35 academic and community researchers guided by principles of CBPR, followed by the efforts of a smaller interdisciplinary manuscript team of academic and community researchers to reflect, document summarize and translate this participatory research process, lessons learned and value added from using the CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. The finding of this article is a discussion of the process, strengths and challenges of utilizing CIT with CBPR. The participation of community members at all levels of the research process including development, collection of the data and analysis of the data was enhanced by the CIT process. As the field of CBPR continues to mature, innovative processes which combine the expertise of community and academic partners can enhance the success of such partnerships. This report contributes to existing literature by illustrating a unique and participatory research application of CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. Findings highlight the collaborative process used to identify and implement this novel method and the adaptability of this technique in the interdisciplinary exploration of system-level changes to understand and address disparities in breast cancer and cancer care. PMID:24000307

  15. Using community-based participatory research to advocate for homeless children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetherman, Debra L; Burke, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    The social determinants of health represent the societal and economic influences responsible for most health inequities. Advocacy to eliminate health inequities for homeless children oftentimes involves the use of community-based approaches. This article details the Floating Hospital's (TFH) community-based participatory research (CBPR) project that resulted in an advocacy brief. Within the project, the community practice concepts of a strengths perspective, empowerment, capacity building, and advocacy are embedded. The brief enhances TFH's capacity to advocate for the needs of homeless children. This example serves as a guide for social work and public health professionals to use CBPR to address health inequities within their communities. PMID:25317978

  16. A Cervical Cancer Community-Based Participatory Research Project in a Native American Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Suzanne; Gidley, Allison L.; Letiecq, Bethany; Smith, Adina; McCormick, Alma Knows His Gun

    2008-01-01

    The Messengers for Health on the Apsaalooke Reservation project uses a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach and lay health advisors (LHAs) to generate knowledge and awareness about cervical cancer prevention among community members in a culturally competent manner. Northern Plains Native Americans, of whom Apsaalooke women are a…

  17. A CBPR Partnership Increases HIV Testing among men who have sex with men (MSM): Outcome Findings from a Pilot Test of the CyBER/testing Internet Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Scott D; Vissman, Aaron T.; Stowers, Jason; Miller, Cindy; McCoy, Thomas P; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Wilkin, Aimee M.; Reece, Michael; Bachmann, Laura H.; Ore, Addison; Ross, Michael W; Hendrix, Ellen; Eng, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    The Internet has emerged as an important tool for the delivery of health promotion and disease prevention interventions. Our community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership developed and piloted CyBER/testing, a culturally congruent intervention designed to promote HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) within existing Internet chat rooms. Using a quasi-experimental, single-group study design, cross-sectional data were collected from chat room participants, known as “chat...

  18. Are Research Ethics Committees Prepared for Community-Based Participatory Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Leonardo; Medina, Heidy; Taylor, Janielle; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Kobetz, Erin; Palacio, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is challenging to research ethics committees (RECs). We reviewed the REC preparedness when reviewing CBPR projects. We searched the MEDLINE database and included qualitative studies of CBPR researchers or REC members about their experiences with RECs. The search yielded 107 studies, of which 10 met our criteria. Barriers were that the community is not prepared to conduct research, the reluctance of RECs to work outside the university, the difficulty RECs have understanding CBPR, and that REC forms evaluate individual rather than community risk. Facilitators were having a CBPR expert as an REC member and educating RECs. Therefore, RECs are not prepared to evaluate CBPR projects leading to unnecessary delays in the approval process. PMID:26527370

  19. Challenges and Facilitating Factors in Sustaining Community-Based Participatory Research Partnerships: Lessons Learned from the Detroit, New York City and Seattle Urban Research Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Israel, Barbara A.; Krieger, James; Vlahov, David; Ciske, Sandra; Foley, Mary; Fortin, Princess; Guzman, J. Ricardo; Lichtenstein, Richard; McGranaghan, Robert; Palermo, Ann-gel; Tang, Gary

    2006-01-01

    In order to address the social, physical and economic determinants of urban health, researchers, public health practitioners, and community members have turned to more comprehensive and participatory approaches to research and interventions. One such approach, community-based participatory research (CBPR) in public health, has received considerable attention over the past decade, and numerous publications have described theoretical underpinnings, values, principles and practice. Issues relate...

  20. Personalizing nutrigenomics research through community based participatory research and omics technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe-Sellers, Beverly; Lovera, Dalia; Nuss, Henry; Wise, Carolyn; Ning, Baitang; Teitel, Candee; Clark, Beatrice Shelby; Toennessen, Terri; Green, Bridgett; Bogle, Margaret L; Kaput, Jim

    2008-12-01

    Personal and public health information are often obtained from studies of large population groups. Risk factors for nutrients, toxins, genetic variation, and more recently, nutrient-gene interactions are statistical estimates of the percentage reduction in disease in the population if the risk were to be avoided or the gene variant were not present. Because individuals differ in genetic makeup, lifestyle, and dietary patterns than those individuals in the study population, these risk factors are valuable guidelines, but may not apply to individuals. Intervention studies are likewise limited by small sample sizes, short time frames to assess physiological changes, and variable experimental designs that often preclude comparative or consensus analyses. A fundamental challenge for nutrigenomics will be to develop a means to sort individuals into metabolic groups, and eventually, develop risk factors for individuals. To reach the goal of personalizing medicine and nutrition, new experimental strategies are needed for human study designs. A promising approach for more complete analyses of the interaction of genetic makeups and environment relies on community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodologies. CBPR's central focus is developing a partnership among researchers and individuals in a community that allows for more in depth lifestyle analyses but also translational research that simultaneously helps improve the health of individuals and communities. The USDA-ARS Delta Nutrition Intervention Research program exemplifies CBPR providing a foundation for expanded personalized nutrition and medicine research for communities and individuals. PMID:19040372

  1. Modeling the principles of community-based participatory research in a community health assessment conducted by a health foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Karen Jaynes; Gail Bray, Patricia; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Reisz, Ilana; Peranteau, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss strategies used and lessons learned by a health foundation during development of a community health assessment model incorporating community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches. The assessment model comprises three models incorporating increasing amounts of CPBR principles. Model A combines local-area analysis of quantitative data, qualitative information (key informants, focus groups), and asset mapping. Model B, a community-based participatory model, emphasizes participatory rural appraisal approaches and quantitative assessment using rapid epidemiological assessment. Model C, a modified version of Model B, is financially more sustainable for our needs than Model B. The authors (a) describe origins of these models and illustrate practical applications and (b) explore the lessons learned in their transition from a traditional, nonparticipatory, quantitative approach to participatory approaches to community-health assessment. It is hoped that this article will contribute to the growing body of knowledge of practical aspects of incorporating CBPR approaches into community health assessments. PMID:17652187

  2. Listening to Consumer Perspectives to Inform Addictions and Housing-Related Practice and Research

    OpenAIRE

    Farquhar, Stephanie A.; Ryder, Marianne; Henderlong, Derek; Lowe, Robert A.; Amann, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The study, funded by the Northwest Health Foundation of Portland, Oregon and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), was conducted as part of the HEARTH collaborative (Housing, Employment and Recovery Together for Health). HEARTH, established in 2010, is a community-academic partnership involving partners from Portland State University (PSU), Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), and Central City Concern (CCC). Using the approaches of community-based participatory research (CBPR),...

  3. Collaborative planning approach to inform the implementation of a healthcare manager intervention for hispanics with serious mental illness: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Cabassa Leopoldo J; Druss Benjamin; Wang Yuanjia; Lewis-Fernández Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study describes a collaborative planning approach that blends principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and intervention mapping to modify a healthcare manager intervention to a new patient population and provider group and to assess the feasibility and acceptability of this modified intervention to improve the physical health of Hispanics with serious mental illness (SMI) and at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods The proposed study uses ...

  4. “Boys Must be Men, and Men Must Have Sex with Women”: A Qualitative CBPR Study to Explore Sexual Risk among African American, Latino, and White Gay Men and MSM

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Scott D; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Vissman, Aaron T.; Stowers, Jason; Davis, A. Bernard; Hannah, Anthony; Alonzo, Jorge; MARSIGLIA, FLAVIO F.

    2010-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be disproportionately impacted by HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STD). This study was designed to explore sexual risk among MSM using community-based participatory research (CBPR). An academic-community partnership conducted nine focus groups with 88 MSM. Participants self-identified as African American/Black (n=28), Hispanic/Latino (n=33), white (n=21), and bi-racial/ethnic (n=6). Mean age was 27 (range 18–60) years. Grounded theory was use...

  5. 75 FR 32792 - Office of Public Health Support; Division of Planning, Evaluation & Research Native American...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ...scientifically meritorious research projects, including pilot research projects, and will be supported...community based participatory research (T/CBPR) is expected to...to selecting, adapting and testing an existing EBI for...

  6. Mixed Methods Approaches in Family Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plano Clark, Vicki L.; Huddleston-Casas, Catherine A.; Churchill, Susan L.; Green, Denise O'Neil; Garrett, Amanda L.

    2008-01-01

    The complex phenomena of interest to family scientists require the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Researchers across the social sciences are now turning to mixed methods designs that combine these two approaches. Mixed methods research has great promise for addressing family science topics, but only if researchers understand the…

  7. Videoethnographic approaches to audience research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildermuth, Norbert

    2007-01-01

      In my paper I will explore the methodological uses and epistemological consequences of videoethnography in audience studies. With reference to research done on young people and their media appropriations in Recife (Brazil), in December 2005, I will argue for the creative integration of video recordings in doing mediaethnographic audience research. Moreover, I will discuss the use and potentials of hypermedia in presenting the results of ethnographic audience research. Based on recent conceptua...

  8. Research Approaches in the Study of Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szocik Konrad

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite development of secular ideas and concepts in the Western world, we can observe increasing interest in the study of religion. However, this popularity of the study of religion and different research approaches has caused that in some sense scholars that were studying religion came to a dead point. Here I show that the most optimal research approach in the study of religion is pluralistic, integral paradigm which connects old traditional methods with naturalistic, cognitive and sometimes experimental approach.

  9. Practical Strategies for Promoting Full Inclusion of Individuals with Disabilities in Community-Based Participatory Intervention Research

    OpenAIRE

    Hassouneh, Dena; Alcala-Moss, Amana; McNeff, E.

    2011-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) with disability communities is directed toward facilitating full inclusion of individuals with disabilities and disability community organizations in all aspects of the research process. Within the CBPR framework, academic-disability community partners may value and wish to use experimental designs to test interventions. Being aware of and proactively addressing barriers and challenges to inclusion in the areas of human resources, training, produc...

  10. A call to engage youth in health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Tai J; Gagner, Noah E; Hunt, Quintin A

    2015-12-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is characterized by its collaborative efforts between professional researchers and lay community members to design, implement, and iteratively evaluate interventions. This approach creates knowledge and improves practice in ways that reflect the collective wisdom and expertise of all involved stakeholders. It represents a significant departure from conventional "top down" methods that define "collaboration" as professionals working with each other-but not with patients and families. It is our position, however, that these exciting developments are only most visible in adult medicine. We believe that it is important to engage youth in health-related CBPR for three primary reasons which are provided in this article. Examples of youth-engagement in health research are also provided. It is important that we do not leave our youth on the sidelines as we advance health care research. During this critical time in health care, we must endeavor to engage our youth as active stakeholders. As we use methods that bridge our professional expertise with teens' lived experience and wisdom, we can create sustainable interventions that are effective in preventing or mitigating the conditions that weigh most heavily on us all. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26641865

  11. Native Hawaiian Voices: Enhancing the Role of Cultural Values in Community Based Participatory Research

    OpenAIRE

    McMullin, Juliet; Bone, Momi; Pang, Jane Ka‘ala; Pang, Victor Kaiwi; McEligot, Archana

    2010-01-01

    Following the goals of Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR), this paper describes how Native Hawaiian values emerged as a methodology for the conduct of a study with Native Hawaiians residing in Southern California. The equitable placing of community values side by side with scientific values show that community concepts can parallel and extend CBPR premises and are more than a variable to be added in the analysis. The community partners, whose voices guide this paper, introduced the...

  12. USING QUALITATIVE APPROACH IN SPECIAL EDUCATION RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Natasa GALEVSKA

    1998-01-01

    The text deals with some methodological problems in special education research. The limits of purely positivistic, quantitative, experimental research in the area of special education lately are overcome with the use of qualitative approach. Qualitative research are flexibly designed. The data are descriptive and collected in natural setting. Characteristics of the qualitative research make them more appropriate for investigation of the phenomena in special education, considering the small nu...

  13. USING QUALITATIVE APPROACH IN SPECIAL EDUCATION RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasa GALEVSKA

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The text deals with some methodological problems in special education research. The limits of purely positivistic, quantitative, experimental research in the area of special education lately are overcome with the use of qualitative approach. Qualitative research are flexibly designed. The data are descriptive and collected in natural setting. Characteristics of the qualitative research make them more appropriate for investigation of the phenomena in special education, considering the small numbers of available subjects, heterogeneity, ethical and moral problems, etc.

  14. A Retrospective Analysis of the Capacity Built through a Community-Based Participatory Research Project Addressing Diabetes and Obesity in South and East Los Angeles

    OpenAIRE

    Kathryn Hillstrom; Valerie Ruelas; Anne Peters; Turusew Gedebu-Wilson; Ellen Iverson

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity, are more prevalent in low-income and minority communities. One promising method to understand and address these chronic conditions is through Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR). CBPR engages and empowers community members to identify risk factors and work toward solutions as equal partners with researchers. One positive and lasting outcome may be an increase in the community capacity which includes individual and community leadership ...

  15. Eight Years of Building Community Partnerships and Trust: The UCLA Family Medicine Community-Based Participatory Research Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Gerardo; Rodríguez, Michael A; Lopez, Glenn A.; Bholat, Michelle A.; Dowling, Patrick T.

    2009-01-01

    Acknowledging the growing disparities in health and health care that exist among immigrant families and minority populations in large urban communities, the UCLA Department of Family Medicine (DFM) sought a leadership role in the development of family medicine training and community-based participatory research (CBPR). Performing CBPR requires that academic medicine departments build sustainable and long-term community partnerships. The authors describe the eight-year (2000–2008) process of b...

  16. Interdisciplinary research approach for cultural heritage.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš; Minster, Ji?í

    Brusel : ECCREDI, 2003, s. 2-2 ISBN N. [FP6 Construction research in the enlarged European union. Warsaw (PL), 06.11.2003-07.11.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2071913 Keywords : cultural heritage * interdisciplinary approach * stone masonry Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  17. International Participatory Research Framework: triangulating procedures to build health research capacity in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rogério M; da Silva, Sueli Bulhões; Penido, Cláudia; Spector, Anya Y

    2012-12-01

    This study advances Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR) by presenting a set of triangulated procedures (steps and actions) that can facilitate participatory research in myriad international settings. By using procedural triangulation-the combination of specific steps and actions as the basis for the International Participatory Research Framework (IPRF)-our approach can improve the abilities of researchers and practitioners worldwide to systematize the development of research partnerships. The IPRF comprises four recursive steps: (i) contextualizing the host country; (ii) identifying collaborators in the host country; (iii) seeking advice and endorsement from gatekeepers and (iv) matching partners' expertise, needs and interests. IPRF includes the following sets of recursive participatory actions: (A(1)) becoming familiar with local languages and culture; (A(2)) sharing power, ideas, influence and resources; (A(3)) gathering oral and written information about partners; (A(4)) establishing realistic expectations and (A(5)) resolving personal and professional differences. We show how these steps and actions were used recursively to build a partnership to study the roles of community health workers (CHWs) in Brazil's Family Health Program (PSF). The research conducted using IPRF focused on HIV prevention, and it included nearly 200 CHWs. By using the IPRF, our partnership achieved several participatory outcomes: community-defined research aims, capacity for future research and creation of new policies and programs. We engaged CHWs who requested that we study their training needs, and we engaged CHWs' supervisors who used the data collected to modify CHW training. Data collected from CHWs will form the basis for a grant to test CHW training curricula. Researchers and community partners can now use the IPRF to build partnerships in different international contexts. By triangulating steps and actions, the IPRF advances knowledge about the use of CBPR methods/procedures for international health research. PMID:22144416

  18. Transformative research: definitions, approaches and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Trevors, J T; Pollack, Gerald H; Saier, Milton H (Jr); Masson, Luke

    2012-01-01

    In this perspective a definition of transformative research (TR) is proposed and discussed. We define TR as that which “transforms” or causes a major change in thought patterns concerning an area of scientific endeavor. This type of research is often elusive, requires different approaches and sometimes depends on a bit of luck. TR concerns intangibles such as human intuition, serendipity, unpredictable events, implausible hypotheses, a well-prepared mind and often interpersonal communications...

  19. Proteomic approaches in research of cyanobacterial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battchikova, Natalia; Angeleri, Martina; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is carried out by a fabulous pigment-protein machinery that is amazingly complicated in structure and function. Many different approaches have been undertaken to characterize the most important aspects of photosynthesis, and proteomics has become the essential component in this research. Here we describe various methods which have been used in proteomic research of cyanobacteria, and demonstrate how proteomics is implemented into on-going studies of photosynthesis in cyanobacterial cells. PMID:25359503

  20. An action research approach to curriculum development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Riding

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Action research has been used in many areas where an understanding of complex social situations has been sought in order to improve the quality of life. Among these are industrial, health and community work settings. Kurt Lewin, often cited as the originator of action research, used the methodology in his work with people affected by post- war social problems. Action research approaches to educational research were adopted in the late 60s and early 70s by the ?teacher- researcher? movement in the secondary education sector. This sought to bring the practising classroom teacher into the research process as the most effective person to identify problems and to find solutions.We believe that an action research approach can contribute very positively to activity within the tertiary sector concerned with teaching quality issues, and with national Teaching Quality Assessment initiatives. As 'reflective practitioners', we can achieve greater ownership of the evaluative process by becoming systematically self-assessing, alongside, and feeding into, external assessment processes.

  1. Dialectical approach to research and development planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.; Leschly, K.; Feinberg, A.; Smith, J.H.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reports on the methodology and an application of a dialectical approach to research and development planning. The methodology features a structured debate followed by augmentation analysis. The argumentation analysis in turn is followed by an assessment of the plausibility of the arguments. The application involved using the methodology to assess the level of funding for research and development for a transportation system that would employ advanced technology. The Dialectic Inquiry process, and specifically, the plausibility rating activity, were seen as valuable aids for policy analysis. 12 references, 6 figures.

  2. African American community leaders' policy recommendations for reducing racial disparities in HIV infection, treatment and care: results from a community-based participatory research project in Philadelphia, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Amy; Sanders, Julia; Carson, Lee; Thomas, Gladys; Cornwall, Alexandra; Towey, Caitlin; Lee, Hwajin; Tasco, Marian; Shabazz-El, Waheedah; Yolken, Annajane; Smith, Tyrone; Bell, Gary; Feller, Sophie; Smith, Erin; James, George; Dunston, Brenda Shelton; Green, Derek

    2015-01-01

    African Americans account for 45% of new HIV infections in the United States. Little empirical research investigates African American community leaders' normative recommendations for addressing these disparities. Philadelphia's HIV infection rate is five times the national average, nearly 70% of new infections are among African Americans, and 2% of African Americans in Philadelphia are living with HIV/AIDS. Using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, we convened focus groups among 52 African American community leaders from diverse backgrounds to solicit normative recommendations for reducing Philadelphia's racial disparities in HIV infection. Leaders recommended: 1) Philadelphia's city government should raise awareness about HIV/AIDS with media campaigns featuring local leaders; 2) Local HIV prevention interventions should address social and structural factors influencing HIV risks rather than focus exclusively on mode of HIV transmission; 3) Resources should be distributed to the most heavily impacted neighborhoods of Philadelphia; and 4) Faith institutions should play a critical role in HIV testing, treatment and prevention efforts. We developed a policy memo highlighting these normative recommendations for how to enhance local HIV prevention policy. This policy memo led to Philadelphia City Council hearings about HIV/AIDS in October 2010 and subsequently informed local HIV/AIDS prevention policy and development of local HIV prevention interventions. This CBPR case study offers important lessons for effectively engaging community leaders in research to promote HIV/AIDS policy change. PMID:24879446

  3. Research Notes ~ Selecting Research Areas and Research Design Approaches in Distance Education: Process Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Sudarshan Mishra; B. K. Passi

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the process used for selecting research areas and methodological approaches in distance education in India. Experts from the field of distance education in India were interviewed at length, with the aim of collecting qualitative data on opinions on process-issues for selecting areas for research, research design, and appropriate methodological approaches in distance education. Data collected from these interviews were subjected to content analysis; triang...

  4. Community-Based Participatory Research Conceptual Model: Community Partner Consultation and Face Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belone, Lorenda; Lucero, Julie E; Duran, Bonnie; Tafoya, Greg; Baker, Elizabeth A; Chan, Domin; Chang, Charlotte; Greene-Moton, Ella; Kelley, Michele A; Wallerstein, Nina

    2016-01-01

    A national community-based participatory research (CBPR) team developed a conceptual model of CBPR partnerships to understand the contribution of partnership processes to improved community capacity and health outcomes. With the model primarily developed through academic literature and expert consensus building, we sought community input to assess face validity and acceptability. Our research team conducted semi-structured focus groups with six partnerships nationwide. Participants validated and expanded on existing model constructs and identified new constructs based on "real-world" praxis, resulting in a revised model. Four cross-cutting constructs were identified: trust development, capacity, mutual learning, and power dynamics. By empirically testing the model, we found community face validity and capacity to adapt the model to diverse contexts. We recommend partnerships use and adapt the CBPR model and its constructs, for collective reflection and evaluation, to enhance their partnering practices and achieve their health and research goals. PMID:25361792

  5. Molecular biology approaches in bioadhesion research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of molecular biology tools in the field of bioadhesion is still in its infancy. For new research groups who are considering taking a molecular approach, the techniques presented here are essential to unravelling the sequence of a gene, its expression and its biological function. Here we provide an outline for addressing adhesion-related genes in diverse organisms. We show how to gradually narrow down the number of candidate transcripts that are involved in adhesion by (1 generating a transcriptome and a differentially expressed cDNA list enriched for adhesion-related transcripts, (2 setting up a BLAST search facility, (3 perform an in situ hybridization screen, and (4 functional analyses of selected genes by using RNA interference knock-down. Furthermore, latest developments in genome-editing are presented as new tools to study gene function. By using this iterative multi-technologies approach, the identification, isolation, expression and function of adhesion-related genes can be studied in most organisms. These tools will improve our understanding of the diversity of molecules used for adhesion in different organisms and these findings will help to develop innovative bio-inspired adhesives.

  6. Sustaining Community-University Partnerships: Lessons learned from a participatory research project with elderly Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XinQi Dong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The strength of community-engaged research has been well documented in public health literature. It is recognised as a useful approach for eliminating health disparities by linking research and practice. While the framework of community-engaged research encompasses a broad range of research collaborations, community-based participatory research (CBPR places most emphasis on involving the community as a full, equitable partner throughout the collaboration. Despite growing interest in and demand for community-university partnerships, less attention is given to the issue of partnership sustainability. The purpose of this article is to present the challenges faced in sustaining a community-university partnership when conducting a CBPR project with an elderly Chinese population in Chicago’s Chinatown. Lessons and strategies learned from the cultural and linguistic complexities of the Chinese community are also detailed. In addition, based on a well-accepted sustainability conceptual framework, we reflect on the initial stage, mid-term actions and long-term goals of developing partnership sustainability. Working with the Chinese community required trust and respect for its unique cultural values and diversity. The cultural, social and environmental contexts within which the partnership operated served as critical forces for long-term sustainability: a culturally sensitive approach is instrumental in sustaining community-university partnership. Also discussed are the significant implications for evidence-based, impact-driven partnerships to develop culturally appropriate strategies to meet the needs of diverse populations. Keywords Community-based participatory research, community health partnerships, health promotion, Chinese Americans, ageing

  7. Methodological approaches in the research of organizational culture

    OpenAIRE

    Jani?ijevi? Nebojša

    2011-01-01

    In the thirty-years-long research of organizational culture, two mutually opposed methodological approaches have emerged: objectivistic quantitative and subjectivistic-qualitative. These two approaches are based on opposite ontological and epistemological assumptions: they include different types of research, and use opposite, quantitative vs. qualitative, methods of research. Each of the methodological approaches has its advantages and disadvantages. For this reason a hybrid approach e...

  8. New Research Approach to Rebuild Sport Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Raiola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The game court of team sport, part of Sport Centre of Arturo Collana, was closed after structural accident in 2006 and the local administration is now designing the rebuilding of it. For this reason, it has already allocated economical resource to study a partial reconstruction of it to reutilize actual structure. The problem is how can satisfy the customers according to suggesting the old and new solutions. Approach: The aim is to recognize expected demand about the real choice of customers with the proposal for a various architectural aspects. A survey was carries out by using statistical model to correlate a demand of multi game sport relating to various hypotheses, already designed with a different solution. A sample of 100 customers that have submitted questionnaire with the specific parameters about the architecture and engine was taken to apply the qualitative research method to the market research. Results and Conclusion: The result of this study concludes that it is not possible to the partially construct but it is useful the plenty reconstruction of game court. The local organization of Coni (Italian National Olympic Committee designed a new project according to a specific parameter that follows the same characteristic of old game court without searching the other engineer and architectural solutions. Thus the question is a mix of engine and architectural aspects, economical and functional elements of it. The data showed association between demand of multisport and new architectonical hypothesis and the association between demand of single sport and old architectural structure. The percentage of multi sport demand is higher than single sport and this orientation has to follow to design a new sport facilities.

  9. Research Notes ~ Selecting Research Areas and Research Design Approaches in Distance Education: Process Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarshan Mishra

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the process used for selecting research areas and methodological approaches in distance education in India. Experts from the field of distance education in India were interviewed at length, with the aim of collecting qualitative data on opinions on process-issues for selecting areas for research, research design, and appropriate methodological approaches in distance education. Data collected from these interviews were subjected to content analysis; triangulation and peer consultation techniques were used for cross-checking and data verification. While the findings and recommendations of this study have limited application in that they can only be used in the specific context outlined in this paper, respondents in this study nonetheless revealed the pressing need for more process-oriented research in examining media and technology, learners and learning, and distance learning evaluation processes. Our research, which yielded interesting empirical findings, also determined that a mixed approach – one that involves both quantitative and qualitative methods – is more appropriate for conducting research in distance education in India. Qualitative evidence from our research also indicates that respondents interviewed felt that emphasis should be placed on interdisciplinary and systemic research, over that of traditional disciplinary research. Research methods such as student self-reporting, extensive and highly targeted interviews, conversation and discourse analysis, were determined to as useful for data collection for this study.

  10. Alternatives to peer review: novel approaches for research evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaksandr Birukou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review several novel approaches for research evaluation. We start with a brief overview of the peer review, its controversies, and metrics for assessing efficiency and overall quality of the peer review. We then discuss five approaches, including reputation-based ones, that come out of the research carried out by the LiquidPub project and research groups collaborated with LiquidPub. Those approaches are alternative or complementary to traditional peer review. We discuss pros and cons of the proposed approaches and conclude with a vision for the future of the research evaluation, arguing that no single system can suit all stakeholders in various communities.

  11. Collaborative planning approach to inform the implementation of a healthcare manager intervention for hispanics with serious mental illness: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabassa Leopoldo J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study describes a collaborative planning approach that blends principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR and intervention mapping to modify a healthcare manager intervention to a new patient population and provider group and to assess the feasibility and acceptability of this modified intervention to improve the physical health of Hispanics with serious mental illness (SMI and at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods The proposed study uses a multiphase approach that applies CBPR principles and intervention-mapping steps--an intervention-planning approach--to move from intervention planning to pilot testing. In phase I, a community advisory board composed of researchers and stakeholders will be assembled to learn and review the intervention and make initial modifications. Phase II uses a combination of qualitative methods--patient focus groups and stakeholder interviews--to ensure that the modifications are acceptable to all stakeholders. Phase III uses results from phase II to further modify the intervention, develop an implementation plan, and train two care managers on the modified intervention. Phase IV consists of a 12-month open pilot study (N = 30 to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the modified intervention and explore its initial effects. Lastly, phase V consists of analysis of pilot study data and preparation for future funding to develop a more rigorous evaluation of the modified intervention. Discussion The proposed study is one of the few projects to date to focus on improving the physical health of Hispanics with SMI and at risk for CVD by using a collaborative planning approach to enhance the transportability and use of a promising healthcare manager intervention. This study illustrates how blending health-disparities research and implementation science can help reduce the disproportionate burden of medical illness in a vulnerable population.

  12. Principles and approaches in ethics assessment : Research integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Collste, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research is a conscious and systematic approach to acquire knowledge, based on theories, methods and standards that have been developed through the history of scientific disciplines. The terms “research integrity” and “good research practice” refer to ideals for how research ought to be performed. In the 1940s the American sociologist Robert Merton proposed norms for scientific research that have influenced the discussion on research integrity since then. According to Merton good r...

  13. Research and research education in music – disciplinary or interdisciplinary approach?

    OpenAIRE

    Schei, Tiri Bergesen; Espeland, Magne; Stige, Brynjulf

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to contribute to a discussion about the future of research and research education in music. The multiple existing traditions of music research constitute a rich resource. Increasingly however, similar topics are researched from different angles, often with watertight bulkheads between such various music disciplines as, e.g. music education, musicology, music therapy and performance studies. Music is a common denominator in these disciplines and interdiscip...

  14. Moving Beyond the Systems Approach in SCM and Logistics Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Fredrik; Gammelgaard, Britta

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a paradigmatic reflection on theoretical approaches recently identified in logistics and supply chain management (SCM); namely complex adaptive systems and complexity thinking, and to compare it to the dominant approach in logistics and SCM research, namely the systems approach. By analyzing the basic assumptions of the three approaches, SCM and logistics researchers are guided in their choice of research approaches which increases their awareness of the consequences different approaches have on theory and practice. Design/methodology/approach – The point of departure for the research presented is conceptualization based on literature reviews. Furthermore, years of observations, discussions and empirical studies of logistics operations and management have also influenced the design of this research. Findings – With a discourse set in relation to the dominant approach in SCM and logistics research, the systems approach, it is concluded that the underlyingassumptions of complex adaptive systems and complexity thinking are more appropriate than systems approach for contemporary challenges of organizational complexity in SCM and logistics. It is found that the two complexity-based approaches can advance SCM and logistics research and practice especially when focusing on innovation, learning and sense-making. Research limitations/implications – Reflections of underlying assumptions when considering and selecting methodological approaches have implications for research results. This paper provides both a framework for and an analysis of such reflection which contributes to the further development of SCM and logistics research. Future research is needed to empirically provide insights on how complexity approaches can advance the area of SCM and logistics. Practical implications – For logistics researchers and practitioners dealing with creativity, innovation, learning and sense-making and other human-related aspects, the complexity approaches, with underlying assumptions, presented will provide reflection, inspiration and guidance for further development. Originality/value – This paper contributes to the further development of SCM and logistics research and practice by providing a reflective analysis and discussion of established and new research approaches with potential benefits for the SCM and logistics community.

  15. Perceptions That Influence the Maintenance of Scientific Integrity in Community-Based Participatory Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer Diaz, Anne E.; Spears Johnson, Chaya R.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific integrity is necessary for strong science; yet many variables can influence scientific integrity. In traditional research, some common threats are the pressure to publish, competition for funds, and career advancement. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) provides a different context for scientific integrity with additional and…

  16. Using a Participatory Approach to the Development of a School-Based Physical Activity Policy in an Indigenous Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Lindsay; Bengoechea, Enrique García; Salsberg, Jon; Jacobs, Judi; King, Morrison; Macaulay, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study is part of a larger community-based participatory research (CBPR) project to develop, implement, and evaluate the physical activity component of a school-based wellness policy. The policy intervention is being carried out by community stakeholders and academic researchers within the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention…

  17. Complexity and interdisciplinary approaches to environmental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2013-03-01

    The launch of volume 8 of Environmental Research Letters (ERL) comes at a critical time in terms of innovations and exciting areas of science, but particularly in the areas linking environmental research and action. The most recent climate change Conference of the Parties meeting (COP), in Doha in December 2012, has now come and gone. As has been dissected in the press, very little was accomplished. Some will see this as a failure, as I do, and others will reasonably enough note that this meeting, the 18th such COP was1 never intended to be a milestone moment. The current plan, in fact, is for a 'post-Kyoto' international climate agreement to be adopted only at the COP20 summit in December 2015. As we lead up to COP20, and potentially other regional or national approaches to climate protection, innovations in science, innovations in policy tools, and political commitment must come together. The science of climate change only continues to get clearer and clearer, and bleaker [1]. Later this year the IPCC will release its Fifth Assessment Report, AR5. The draft versions are out for review now. ERL has published a number of papers on climate change science, mitigation and adaptation, but one area where the world needs a particular focus is on the nexus of science and action. A summary of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's findings from the first assessment report (FAR; 1990) to the latest report is presented in figure 1. This graphic is specifically not about the scientific record alone. What is most important about this figure is the juxtaposition of the language of science and the language of ... language. Figure 1. Figure 1. A superposition of the state of climate science in three key data sets, and the dates of the first, second, third and fourth assessment reports (FAR, SAR, TAR, and AR4, respectively) plotted as vertical lines. On the right are the key statements from each of these reports, along with the conclusion of the Special Report on Renewable Energy (SRREN, completed in 2011) which found that up to an 80% decarbonization of the global economy was possible if we can enable and launch a large-scale transition to a clean energy system consistent with what a number of 'leading edge' cities, regions, and nations have already accomplished or started. Note, in particular, that as the physical climate change metrics have progressed, the words—shown on the right—have also progressed. In 1990, at the time of the FAR the strongest scientific consensus statement was that another decade of data would likely be needed to clearly observe climate change. Through the second to fourth (SAR, TAR, and AR4) reports, increasing clarity on the science of climate change translated into a consensus of overwhelming blame on human activities. The key statements from each report are not only about the growing evidence for anthropogenically driven climate change, but they have moved into the ecological and social impacts of this change. AR4 critically concluded that climate change would lead to climate injustice as the poor, globally, bear the brunt of the impacts. Despite this 'Rosetta Stone' translating science to language, we have failed to act collectively. One area where ERL can advance the overall conversation is on this science/action interface. As AR5 emerges, the climate change/climate response interface will need deep, substantive, action that responds rapidly to new ideas and opportunities. The rapid publication and open access features of ERL are particularly critical here as events a such as Hurricane Sandy, economic or political advances in climate response made by cities, regions or nations, all warrant assessment and response. This is one of many areas where ERL has been at the forefront of the conversation, through not only research letters, but also commentary-style Perspective pieces and the conversation that ERL's sister community website environmentalresearchweb can facilitate. This process of translating proposed solutions—innovations—between interest groups, has been in far too short supply rece

  18. Managing Cybersecurity Research and Experimental Development: The REVO Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Craigen; Drew Vandeth; D’Arcy Walsh

    2013-01-01

    We present a systematic approach for managing a research and experimental development cybersecurity program that must be responsive to continuously evolving cybersecurity, and other, operational concerns. The approach will be of interest to research-program managers, academe, corporate leads, government leads, chief information officers, chief technology officers, and social and technology policy analysts. The approach is compatible with international standards and procedures published by the...

  19. Nanotechnology-based approaches in anticancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Jabir NR; Tabrez S; Ashraf GM; Shakil S; Damanhouri GA; Kamal MA

    2012-01-01

    Nasimudeen R Jabir,1 Shams Tabrez,1 Ghulam Md Ashraf,2 Shazi Shakil,3 Ghazi A Damanhouri,4 Mohammad A Kamal11Metabolomics and Enzymology Unit, 2Proteomics and Structural Biology Unit, 3Enzoinformatics Unit, 4Hematology Research Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Cancer is a highly complex disease to understand, because it entails multiple cellular physiological systems. The most common cancer treatments are restricted to chemother...

  20. Seeking Constructive Synergy: Design Science and the Constructive Research Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piirainen, Kalle; Gonzalez, Rafael A.

    2013-01-01

    Information systems research and management science create knowledge which can be applied in organizations. Design science specifically aims at applying existing knowledge to solve interesting and relevant business problems and has been steadily gaining support in information systems research. However, design science is not the only design-oriented framework. Accordingly, this raises the question of whether it is possible to compare the results obtained from different brands of design-oriented research. This paper contributes to answering this question by comparing two research approaches, enabling mutual learning possibilities and suggesting improvements in transparency and rigor. The objective of this paper is to compare design science research with the constructive research approach. The conclusion is that the two approaches are compatible, save for details in practical requirements and partly underlying philosophical assumptions, but both have something to teach each other about how to define and executedesign-oriented research in information systems and management science.

  1. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  2. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B; Bosse, Jens B; Engel, Esteban A; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; Del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  3. New Research Approach to Rebuild Sport Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Gaetano Raiola; Tiziana D?Isanto

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The game court of team sport, part of Sport Centre of Arturo Collana, was closed after structural accident in 2006 and the local administration is now designing the rebuilding of it. For this reason, it has already allocated economical resource to study a partial reconstruction of it to reutilize actual structure. The problem is how can satisfy the customers according to suggesting the old and new solutions. Approach: The aim is to recognize expected ...

  4. Approaches to Work-Life Balance Research.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Formánková, Lenka

    Brno : Office of the Public Defender of Rights, 2015 - (Polák, P.; Kvasnicová, J.; Tichá, I.), s. 75-81 ISBN 978-80-87949-05-4. [Work-life balance. Brno (CZ), 23.10.2014-24.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : research strategy * family * work Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography

  5. CONFERENCE CHEVREUL Nutrition research: the industrial approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korver Onno

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of nutrition research in an industrial setting is the marketing of products. Since consumers cannot see from the product whether it is healthy, communication to the consumer about the nutritional and health values of the products is essential. Industrial nutrition research therefore has to provide the scientific dossier to underpin the claims and other communication on and around the product as well as the scientific basis for the communication. These two lines are illustrated in figure 1. For scientific audiences the steps to collect the scientific evidence are obvious: first screening for new ideas on the basis of scientific developments and business options, then identifying ingredients that can deliver the health benefit, followed by mechanistic and bioavailability studies and finally human intervention trials. The communication line is less obvious for most scientifically oriented audiences. Experience has shown that an information cascade has to be followed: during the execution of the research work close contact with academic experts (a true dialogue is essential, when the research data are available information of a wide selection of health professionals (e.g. physicians, dieticians, science journalists is taking place and only after this step communication to the consumer starts. The communication with the scientific experts (the first step of the cascade obviously has to be in the hands of the nutrition research group of the industry involved. In Unilever this is the Unilever Nutrition Centre based in Vlaardingen in the Netherlands. Their role in the scientific dialogue is outlined in figure 2. The fact that the “Medaille Chevreul” has been awarded twice to members of the Unilever Nutrition Centre in the last two decades, illustrates that the UNC is considered to be a group with a truly scientific tradition.

  6. A community based participatory approach to improving health in a Hispanic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urquieta de Hernandez Brisa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Charlotte-Mecklenburg region has one of the fastest growing Hispanic communities in the country. This population has experienced disparities in health outcomes and diminished ability to access healthcare services. This city is home to an established practice-based research network (PBRN that includes community representatives, health services researchers, and primary care providers. The aims of this project are: to use key principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR within a practice-based research network (PBRN to identify a single disease or condition that negatively affects the Charlotte Hispanic community; to develop a community-based intervention that positively impacts the chosen condition and improves overall community health; and to disseminate findings to all stakeholders. Methods/design This project is designed as CBPR. The CBPR process creates new social networks and connections between participants that can potentially alter patterns of healthcare utilization and other health-related behaviors. The first step is the development of equitable partnerships between community representatives, providers, and researchers. This process is central to the CBPR process and will occur at three levels -- community members trained as researchers and outreach workers, a community advisory board (CAB, and a community forum. Qualitative data on health issues facing the community -- and possible solutions -- will be collected at all three levels through focus groups, key informant interviews and surveys. The CAB will meet monthly to guide the project and oversee data collection, data analysis, participant recruitment, implementation of the community forum, and intervention deployment. The selection of the health condition and framework for the intervention will occur at the level of a community-wide forum. Outcomes of the study will be measured using indicators developed by the participants as well as geospatial modeling. On completion, this study will: determine the feasibility of the CBPR process to design interventions; demonstrate the feasibility of geographic models to monitor CBPR-derived interventions; and further establish mechanisms for implementation of the CBPR framework within a PBRN.

  7. (Post-)genomics approaches in fungal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Pontes, María Victoria; de Vries, Ronald P; Zhou, Miaomiao

    2014-11-01

    To date, hundreds of fungal genomes have been sequenced and many more are in progress. This wealth of genomic information has provided new directions to study fungal biodiversity. However, to further dissect and understand the complicated biological mechanisms involved in fungal life styles, functional studies beyond genomes are required. Thanks to the developments of current -omics techniques, it is possible to produce large amounts of fungal functional data in a high-throughput fashion (e.g. transcriptome, proteome, etc.). The increasing ease of creating -omics data has also created a major challenge for downstream data handling and analysis. Numerous databases, tools and software have been created to meet this challenge. Facing such a richness of techniques and information, hereby we provide a brief roadmap on current wet-lab and bioinformatics approaches to study functional genomics in fungi. PMID:25037051

  8. Hybrid soft computing approaches research and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Paramartha; Chakraborty, Susanta

    2016-01-01

    The book provides a platform for dealing with the flaws and failings of the soft computing paradigm through different manifestations. The different chapters highlight the necessity of the hybrid soft computing methodology in general with emphasis on several application perspectives in particular. Typical examples include (a) Study of Economic Load Dispatch by Various Hybrid Optimization Techniques, (b) An Application of Color Magnetic Resonance Brain Image Segmentation by ParaOptiMUSIG activation Function, (c) Hybrid Rough-PSO Approach in Remote Sensing Imagery Analysis,  (d) A Study and Analysis of Hybrid Intelligent Techniques for Breast Cancer Detection using Breast Thermograms, and (e) Hybridization of 2D-3D Images for Human Face Recognition. The elaborate findings of the chapters enhance the exhibition of the hybrid soft computing paradigm in the field of intelligent computing.

  9. Evaluation of a 'virtual' approach to commissioning health research

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan Philip A; McCourt Christine A; Youll Penny

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of a 'virtual' (computer-mediated) approach to health research commissioning. This had been introduced experimentally in a DOH programme – the 'Health of Londoners Programme' – in order to assess whether is could enhance the accessibility, transparency and effectiveness of commissioning health research. The study described here was commissioned to evaluate this novel approach, addressing these key questions. Me...

  10. Model-driven software development approaches in robotics research

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaswamy, Arun Kumar; Monsuez, Bruno; Tapus, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there is an encouraging trend in adopting model-driven engineering approaches for software development in robotics research. In this paper, currently available model-driven techniques in robotics are analyzed with respect to the domain-specific requirements. A conceptual overview of our software development approach called 'Self Adaptive Framework for Robotic Systems (SafeRobots)' is explained and we also try to position our approach within this model ecosystem.

  11. With the lifeworld as ground. A research approach for empirical research in education - the Gothenburg tradition

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jan, Bengtsson.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is intended as a brief introduction to the lifeworld approach to empirical research in education. One decisive feature of this approach is the inclusion of an explicit discussion of its ontological assumptions in the research design. This does not yet belong to the routines of empirical [...] research in education. Some methodological consequences of taking the lifeworld ontology as a ground for empirical research are discussed as well as the importance of creativity in the choice of method for particular projects. In this way, the lifeworld approach has its own particular perspective in phenomenological, empirical research in education. The article concludes with a description of an empirical study based on the lifeworld approach in order to illuminate the possibilities for empirical research in education as well as the significance of this approach for education.

  12. Interviewing for Education and Social Science Research: The Gateway Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Carolyn Lunsford

    2009-01-01

    This volume introduces a fresh approach to research, using strategies adapted from oral history and educational criticism to traverse the boundaries of human experience, and bring to light matters of concern to education and social science researchers. This narrator-centered method, a by-product of the author's award-winning investigation into the…

  13. Estranged Familiars: A Deweyan Approach to Philosophy and Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuffelton, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This essay argues that philosophy can be combined with qualitative research without sacrificing the aims of either approach. Philosophers and qualitative researchers have articulated and supported the idea that human meaning-constructions are appropriately grasped through close attention to "consequences incurred in action," in…

  14. Conjecture Mapping: An Approach to Systematic Educational Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, William

    2014-01-01

    Design research is strongly associated with the learning sciences community, and in the 2 decades since its conception it has become broadly accepted. Yet within and without the learning sciences there remains confusion about how to do design research, with most scholarship on the approach describing what it is rather than how to do it. This…

  15. Storytelling as Scholarship: A Writerly Approach to Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, Sondra; Counihan, Beth; McCormack, Tim; Schnee, Emily

    2007-01-01

    What does it mean to take a writerly approach to research? Sondra Perl and her co-authors have pondered this question over the past five years as they have each worked with her to design and draft dissertations that combine their work as literacy researchers with their love of writing. Each of them has moved toward storytelling as a compelling and…

  16. Measuring the Value of Research : A Generational Accounting Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmeister, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a generational accounting approach to valuating research. Based on the flow of scientific results, a value-added (VA) index is developed that can, in principle, be used to assign a monetary value to any research result and, by aggregation, on entire academic disciplines or sub-disciplines. The VA-index distributes the value of all applications that embody research to the works of research which the applications directly rely on, and further to the works of research of prev...

  17. Experience Sampling Methods: A Modern Idiographic Approach to Personality Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Tamlin S; Tennen, Howard; Fleeson, William; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2009-05-01

    Experience sampling methods are essential tools for building a modern idiographic approach to understanding personality. These methods yield multiple snapshots of people's experiences over time in daily life and allow researchers to identify patterns of behavior within a given individual, rather than strictly identify patterns of behavior across individuals, as with standard nomothetic approaches. In this article, we discuss the origin and evolution of idiographic methods in the field of personality and explain how experience sampling methods function as modern day idiographic methods in this field. We then review four primary ways in which experience sampling methods have been used to foster idiographic approaches in personality research. Specifically, we highlight approaches that examine individual differences in temporal and behavioral distributions, situation-behavior contingencies, daily processes, and the structure of daily experience. Following a brief methodology primer, we end by discussing future directions for idiographic experience sampling approaches in personality psychology and beyond. PMID:19898679

  18. Suc Khoe La Quan Trong Hon Sac Dep! Health is better than beauty! A community-based participatory research intervention to improve cancer screening among Vietnamese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh B; Belgrave, Faye Z

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines community-based participatory research (CBPR) intervention approaches in promoting cancer-relevant outcomes for 102 Vietnamese women. Results indicated that the intervention was effective in promoting breast and cervical cancer knowledge, positive attitudes towards breast cancer screening, and breast cancer screening. Collectivism moderated the effect of the intervention on attitudes towards breast cancer screening. The intervention led to more favorable attitudes towards breast cancer screening for women with high levels of collectivism but not for women with low levels. Ethnic identity moderated the effect of the intervention on breast cancer screening: the intervention program led to higher probability of getting a clinical breast exam; however, this effect was more pronounced for women with low ethnic identity than for those with high ethnic identity. The study provides evidence for the effectiveness of culturally-tailored strategies in developing cancer screening interventions for the Vietnamese American population. PMID:24858871

  19. A Research Strategy for Investigating Business Process Management Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gibson

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a revolution in industry which, if successful, will change forever how business systems are developed and the type of staff required. This paradigm shift has only recently become possible as business process conceptual understanding evolved, technologies have matured and higher abstraction levels have become possible. Industry leads Business Processing Systems research as it has the strategic imperative and resources to be effective. Academic research is faced with three challenges: firstly, how to do effective research in an area of such broad scope, secondly, how to make research relevant to practice, thirdly how to spend limited resources effectively. This paper defines the research framework for effective academic research at the University of Wollongong by the Software Effective Process group. Effective research is enabled by co-ordinating research based on the primacy of the business model and its resultant effective representation in executable systems. The framework aims to build a core research team, promote strong synergy with existing research areas, and create academic and industry relevant research.. We report on the results to date of our pilot program and seek feedback and advice to help us refine our approach. A major Australian project is utilising a new software development lifecycle for ‘system of systems’ development which has arisen out of this research strategy. Later papers will report on both the theoretical basis and practical impacts of this work and other research by the group.

  20. Experience Sampling Methods: A Modern Idiographic Approach to Personality Research

    OpenAIRE

    Tamlin S. Conner; Tennen, Howard; Fleeson, William; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2009-01-01

    Experience sampling methods are essential tools for building a modern idiographic approach to understanding personality. These methods yield multiple snapshots of people’s experiences over time in daily life and allow researchers to identify patterns of behavior within a given individual, rather than strictly identify patterns of behavior across individuals, as with standard nomothetic approaches. In this article, we discuss the origin and evolution of idiographic methods in the field of pers...

  1. Is dementia research ready for big data approaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The "big data" paradigm has gained a lot of attention recently, in particular in those areas of biomedicine where we face clear unmet medical needs. Coined as a new paradigm for complex problem solving, big data approaches seem to open promising perspectives in particular for a better understanding of complex diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. In this commentary, we will provide a brief overview on big data principles and the potential they may bring to dementia research, and - most importantly - we will do a reality check in order to provide an answer to the question of whether dementia research is ready for big data approaches. PMID:26099627

  2. Patenting at public research organisations: a multidisciplinary approach

    OpenAIRE

    Azagra Caro, Joaquín; Romero de Pablos, Ana

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we stress two points. First, analysis of public patenting should expand their focus from universities to Public Research Organisations (PRO). Second, a multidisciplinary approach allows for a richer view and interpretation of results. We adopt historical and economic perspectives to address these issues, with data from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), the largest PRO in Spain. We distinguish three periods in the history of CSIC, according to the political context: ...

  3. International health research monitoring: exploring a scientific and a cooperative approach using participatory action research

    OpenAIRE

    Chantler, T; Cheah, PY; Miiro, G; Hantrakum, V; Nanvubya, A; Ayuo, E; Kivaya, E; Kidola, J; KALEEBU, P; M.Parker; Njuguna, P; Ashley, E; Guerin, PJ; Lang, T.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and determine the value of monitoring models developed by the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Research Unit and the East African Consortium for Clinical Research, consider how this can be measured and explore monitors' and investigators' experiences of and views about the nature, purpose and practice of monitoring. RESEARCH DESIGN: A case study approach was used within the context of participatory action research because one of the aims was to guide and improve practice. 34 in...

  4. Managing Cybersecurity Research and Experimental Development: The REVO Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Craigen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a systematic approach for managing a research and experimental development cybersecurity program that must be responsive to continuously evolving cybersecurity, and other, operational concerns. The approach will be of interest to research-program managers, academe, corporate leads, government leads, chief information officers, chief technology officers, and social and technology policy analysts. The approach is compatible with international standards and procedures published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS. The key benefits of the approach are the following: i the breadth of the overall (cybersecurity space is described; ii depth statements about specific (cybersecurity challenges are articulated and mapped to the breadth of the problem; iii specific (cybersecurity initiatives that have been resourced through funding or personnel are tracked and linked to specific challenges; and iv progress is assessed through key performance indicators. Although we present examples from cybersecurity, the method may be transferred to other domains. We have found the approach to be rigorous yet adaptive to change; it challenges an organization to be explicit about the nature of its research and experimental development in a manner that fosters alignment with evolving business priorities, knowledge transfer, and partner engagement.

  5. Music Teacher Effectiveness: Selected Historical and Contemporary Research Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Manny

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews and analyzes selected past and current research approaches in the study of music teacher effectiveness. Early "teacher characteristic studies" are discussed along with the role of these first-generation studies in attempting to identify personal qualities and characteristics of apparently effective or ineffective teachers.…

  6. Narrative Inquiry: A Spiritual and Liberating Approach to Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Elizabeth McIsaac

    2008-01-01

    This article identifies various research characteristics of narrative inquiry including its holistic and creative approach and its emphases on experience, relationships and participation, subjectivity and consciousness-raising, commitment and resistance, ethical action, and claiming voice and power. The author suggests that these characteristics…

  7. NASA Research For Instrument Approaches To Closely Spaced Parallel Runways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Dawn M.; Perry, R. Brad

    2000-01-01

    Within the NASA Aviation Systems Capacity Program, the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Project is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological condition (IMC). The Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) research within TAP has focused on an airborne centered approach for independent instrument approaches to closely spaced parallel runways using Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) technologies. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), working in partnership with Honeywell, Inc., completed in AILS simulation study, flight test, and demonstration in 1999 examining normal approaches and potential collision scenarios to runways with separation distances of 3,400 and 2,500 feet. The results of the flight test and demonstration validate the simulation study.

  8. Case Studies Approach in Tourism Destination Branding Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeyinka-Ojo S.F.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of literature indicates that there are different types of qualitative research methods such as action research, content analysis, ethnography, grounded theory, historical analysis, phenomenology and case study. However, which approach is to be used depends on several factors such as the nature and objectives of the research. The aim of this paper is to focus on the research methodology aspects of applying case study as a research approach and its relevance in tourism destination branding research specifically on a single case study (SCS context. There are arguments that the SCS is a weak research strategy. Some of the potentials or shortcomings highlighted in the literature include the primitive nature of SCS, flexibility of sample technique, data collection method and data analysis. Others include lack of rigour, reliability, validity, credibility of findings and generalisation. This paper has adopted content analysis of the literature on tourism destination branding. Findings indicate that the quality of SCS can be verified using specific case study tactics for four design tests such as validity (construct, internal and external; and reliability using the case study protocol. Theoretical implication suggests that SCS is an empirical enquiry use to understand complex phenomena and favoured by practitioners.

  9. Reflections on the ethnographic approach in three research studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira Neiva Francenely Cunha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at analyzing three research studies that focused on the effects of the perception in adults´ attitudes with the purpose to improve the health care provided to children. Although each study had a distinct area of investigation, all of them adopted the ethnographic approach on the interaction between the adults and children. This work aimed at reporting the researchers' reflections with respect to: i the adoption of the ethnographic approach in Nursing studies; ii the theoretical perspectives that are relevant in the production of themes. Authors considered the value of this reflection after the research and its potential in order to understand how it can contribute to consolidate the health care theoretical frameworks in general, and the nursing care models, in particular.

  10. Approaches of researches in medical geography in Poland and Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantylej, Wiktoria

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the historical review of medical geography in the world, in Poland and in Ukraine. There are different approaches in medical geography: according to the research subject (ecological and economic approaches) and according to the current affairs of research (approach concerns sexuality, the age of the population and accordingly, accessibility of health care services to the population). To the author's mind, the most perspective approaches in medical geography in Poland and Ukraine are as follows: - integrative - dedicated to the health status of the population in connection with the quality and life level; - mathematical-statistical - connected with the problem of synthetic indexes of health status of the populations and factors influencing it, and with the problem of economic value of health and life of the population; - social-economic - the analysis of the influence of socioeconomic factors (such as wealth measure, rate of unemployment, work conditions and others) on public health; - ecological - connected with the researches dedicated to the analysis of environmental impact on public health status of the population; - demographical - the analysis of demographical factors of forming public health status; - social-psychological - health culture of the population, perception of the own health/morbidity and health care systems existing in different countries.

  11. Development of Digital MMIS for Research Reactors: Graded Approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though research reactors are small in size yet they are important in terms of industrial applications and R and D, educational purposes. Keeping the eye on its importance, Korean government has intention to upgrade and extend this industry. Presently, Korea is operating only HANARO at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and AGN-201K at Kyung Hee University (KHU), which are not sufficient to meet the current requirements of research and education. In addition, we need self-sufficiency in design and selfreliance in design and operation, as we are installing research reactors in domestic as well as foreign territories for instance Jordan. Based on these demands, KAERI and universities initiated a 5 year research project since December 2011 collaboratly, for the deep study of reactor core, thermal hydraulics, materials and instrumentation and control (I and C). This particular study is being carried out to develop highly reliable advanced digital I and C systems using a grading approach. It is worth mentioning that next generation research reactor should be equipped with advance state of the art digital I and C for safe and reliable operation and impermeable cyber security system that is needed to be devised. Moreover, human error is one of important area which should be linked with I and C in terms of Man Machine Interface System (MMIS) and development of I and C should cover human factor engineering. Presently, the digital I and C and MMIS are well developed for commercial power stations whereas such level of development does not exist for research reactors in Korea. Since the functional and safety requirements of research reactors are not so strict as commercial power plants, the design of digital I and C systems for research reactors seems to be graded based on the stringency of regulatory requirements. This paper was motivated for the introduction of those missions, so it is going to describe the general overview of digital I and C systems, the graded approaches, and future plans of the project

  12. The ethics of pharmaceutical research funding: a social organization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Garry C

    2013-01-01

    This paper advances a social organization approach to examining unethical behavior. While unethical behaviors may stem in part from failures in individual morality or psychological blind spots, they are both generated and performed through social interactions among individuals and groups. To illustrate the value of a social organization approach, a case study of a medical school professor's first experience with pharmaceutical-company-sponsored research is provided in order to examine how funding arrangements can constrain research integrity. The case illustrates three significant ways that institutional corruption can occur in the research process. First, conflicts of norms between pharmaceutical companies, universities, and affiliated teaching hospitals can result in compromises and self-censorship. Second, normal behavior is shaped through routine interactions. Unethical behaviors can be (or can become) normal behaviors when they are produced and reproduced through a network of social interactions. Third, funding arrangements can create networks of dependency that structurally distort the independence of the academic researcher in favor of the funder's interests. More broadly, the case study demonstrates how the social organization approach deepens our understanding of the practice of ethics. PMID:24088153

  13. An evaluation of the 'Designated Research Team' approach to building research capacity in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Dyas Jane; Nancarrow Susan; Cooke Jo; Williams Martin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper describes an evaluation of an initiative to increase the research capability of clinical groups in primary and community care settings in a region of the United Kingdom. The 'designated research team' (DRT) approach was evaluated using indicators derived from a framework of six principles for research capacity building (RCB) which include: building skills and confidence, relevance to practice, dissemination, linkages and collaborations, sustainability and infras...

  14. Evaluation of a 'virtual' approach to commissioning health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Philip A

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of a 'virtual' (computer-mediated approach to health research commissioning. This had been introduced experimentally in a DOH programme – the 'Health of Londoners Programme' – in order to assess whether is could enhance the accessibility, transparency and effectiveness of commissioning health research. The study described here was commissioned to evaluate this novel approach, addressing these key questions. Methods A naturalistic-experimental approach was combined with principles of action research. The different commissioning groups within the programme were randomly allocated to either the traditional face-to-face mode or the novel 'virtual' mode. Mainly qualitative data were gathered including observation of all (virtual and face-to-face commissioning meetings; semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of participants (n = 32/66; structured questionnaires and interviews with lead researchers of early commissioned projects. All members of the commissioning groups were invited to participate in collaborative enquiry groups which participated actively in the analysis process. Results The virtual process functioned as intended, reaching timely and relatively transparent decisions that participants had confidence in. Despite the potential for greater access using a virtual approach, few differences were found in practice. Key advantages included physical access, a more flexible and extended time period for discussion, reflection and information gathering and a more transparent decision-making process. Key challenges were the reduction of social cues available in a computer-mediated medium that require novel ways of ensuring appropriate dialogue, feedback and interaction. However, in both modes, the process was influenced by a range of factors and was not technology driven. Conclusion There is potential for using computer-mediated communication within the research commissioning process. This may enhance access, effectiveness and transparency of decision-making but further development is needed for this to be fully realised, including attention to process as well as the computer-mediated medium.

  15. Introducing new contraceptive methods: the three-stage research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Program of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction has developed a three-stage model for the introduction of new contraceptive methods that emphasizes both users' needs for additional contraceptive choices and the ability of the family planning service to provide these methods with suitable quality of care. The three stages of this approach, which has been field-tested in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, are: 1) assessment, 2) research to guide decision making about contraceptive introduction, and 3) use of research for policy and planning as the method is made more widely available. Assessment in the first stage is based on determining whether there is a need for a new contraceptive method, for improved use of existing methods, or for withdrawing methods whose safety and efficacy have not been established or have been replaced by improved formulations. Research in the second stage addresses the ability of the program to provide the method within the context of the current method mix and user attitudes toward both the method and the service delivery system. In the third stage, research activities are focused on ensuring that previous research findings are applied systematically to upgrade the quality of care, ensure contraceptive availability, and promote program sustainability. Advantages of this model over previous approaches include its orientation to the entire mix of methods provided and its recognition that methods must be matched with management capabilities to ensure they are provided appropriately. Also unique is its insistence that users as well as administrators should participate in the research and decision-making processes and that decisions should be driven by country needs rather than by donor priorities. PMID:12320517

  16. Phenomenological approach to profile impact of scientific research: Citation Mining

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. del Rio; Kostoff, R. N.; Garcia, E. O.; Ramirez, A.M.; Humenik, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present a phenomenological approach to describe a complex system: scientific research impact through Citation Mining. The novel concept of Citation Mining, a combination of citation bibliometrics and text mining, is used for the phenomenological description. Citation Mining starts with a group of core papers whose impact is to be examined, retrieves the papers that cite these core papers, and then analyzes the technical infrastructure (authors, jorunals, ins...

  17. Phenomenological approach to profile impact of scientific research Citation Mining

    CERN Document Server

    Río, J A; García, E O; Ramírez, A M; Humenik, J A

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a phenomenological approach to describe a complex system: scientific research impact through Citation Mining. The novel concept of Citation Mining, a combination of citation bibliometrics and text mining, is used for the phenomenological description. Citation Mining starts with a group of core papers whose impact is to be examined, retrieves the papers that cite these core papers, and then analyzes the technical infrastructure (authors, jorunals, institutions) of the citing papers as well as their thematic characteristics.

  18. Research facilities for International Fusion Energy Research Centre of Broader Approach Activities at Rokkasho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the Agreement Between the Government of Japan and the European Atomic Energy Community for the Joint Implementation of the Broader Approach (BA) Activities, a new research site has been developed in Rokkasho in Aomori prefecture of Japan. In this new site, two of the three projects of the BA activities will be implemented, namely, International Fusion Energy Research Center (IFERC) and Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility 'IFMIF/EVEDA'). The research facilities for the two projects will be also constructed in the new site. Specifications of the individual research facilities are described. (author)

  19. An evaluation of the 'Designated Research Team' approach to building research capacity in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyas Jane

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes an evaluation of an initiative to increase the research capability of clinical groups in primary and community care settings in a region of the United Kingdom. The 'designated research team' (DRT approach was evaluated using indicators derived from a framework of six principles for research capacity building (RCB which include: building skills and confidence, relevance to practice, dissemination, linkages and collaborations, sustainability and infrastructure development. Methods Information was collated on the context, activities, experiences, outputs and impacts of six clinical research teams supported by Trent Research Development Support Unit (RDSU as DRTs. Process and outcome data from each of the teams was used to evaluate the extent to which the DRT approach was effective in building research capacity in each of the six principles (as evidenced by twenty possible indicators of research capacity development. Results The DRT approach was found to be well aligned to the principles of RCB and generally effective in developing research capabilities. It proved particularly effective in developing linkages, collaborations and skills. Where research capacity was slow to develop, this was reflected in poor alignment between the principles of RCB and the characteristics of the team, their activities or environment. One team was unable to develop a research project and the funding was withdrawn at an early stage. For at least one individual in each of the remaining five teams, research activity was sustained beyond the funding period through research partnerships and funding successes. An enabling infrastructure, including being freed from clinical duties to undertake research, and support from senior management were found to be important determinants of successful DRT development. Research questions of DRTs were derived from practice issues and several projects generated outputs with potential to change daily practice, including the use of research evidence in practice and in planning service changes. Conclusion The DRT approach was effective at RCB in teams situated in a supportive organisation and in particular, where team members could be freed from clinical duties and management backing was strong. The developmental stage of the team and the research experience of constituent members also appeared to influence success. The six principles of RCB were shown to be useful as a framework for both developing and evaluating RCB initiatives.

  20. Research Approaches in Examining M-Government Services: An Investigation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Suriana Abu Bakar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mobile government, which is an emergent phenomenon, represents a solution for many countries to reach their citizens and to improve the services of government-to-citizens (G2C. Hence, most researchers have merely focused on the citizens’ adoption and usage issues, security, implementation and transformation, and the success factors of m-government services. However, in order to proceed with the study on examining the m-government services, it is vital to first analyze the most suitable research method that can be used. Thus, this paper investigated the research approaches used for examining m-government services by reviewing 37 papers that are related to this topic, which were retrieved from four online databases: a IEEE Xplore, b Science Direct, c Emerald, and d ACM Digital Library. Only papers from 2007 to 2014 were selected for further review. The findings suggested that the survey method was mostly used to examine the m-government services.

  1. Strategic approaches to CBRN decontamination research design and investment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research funding is society's investment in its future, but in difficult economic times, investment in anything with a less than immediate payoff can be a challenge. Making federal research investment decisions for large scale issues with political, social, and economic consequences has always involved competition for available resources played out in universities, Federal executive departments and agencies, and in the authorizing and appropriating committees and subcommittees of the legislature. Designing a research program that relates to the national need for a long-term strategic approach to consequence management is a challenge in the natural and social sciences as well as in political analysis. A successful effort must involve intensive interactions by research managers with consequence managers, evaluation of the relative cost and potential effectiveness of alternative research strategies, an estimation of time to completion and potential for success of research, and having a common understanding of roles and responsibilities of national and local governments, as well as private enterprise and affected individuals. All this must be undertaken in concert with the development of risk communication strategies that are science-based but deal with managing societal expectations based on the costs and practicality of potential alternative suites of solutions.(author)

  2. Respiratory sensitization and allergy: Current research approaches and needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are currently no accepted regulatory models for assessing the potential of a substance to cause respiratory sensitization and allergy. In contrast, a number of models exist for the assessment of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Research indicates that respiratory sensitizers may be identified through contact sensitization assays such as the local lymph node assay, although only a small subset of the compounds that yield positive results in these assays are actually respiratory sensitizers. Due to the increasing health concerns associated with occupational asthma and the impending directives on the regulation of respiratory sensitizers and allergens, an approach which can identify these compounds and distinguish them from contact sensitizers is required. This report discusses some of the important contrasts between respiratory allergy and ACD, and highlights several prominent in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches that are being applied or could be further developed to identify compounds capable of causing respiratory allergy. Although a number of animal models have been used for researching respiratory sensitization and allergy, protocols and endpoints for these approaches are often inconsistent, costly and difficult to reproduce, thereby limiting meaningful comparisons of data between laboratories and development of a consensus approach. A number of emerging in vitro and in silico models show promise for use in the characterization of contact sensitization potential and should be further explored for their ability to identify and differentiate contact and respiratory sensitizers. Ultimately, the development of a consistent, accurate and cost-effective model will likely incorporate a number of these approaches and will require effective communication, collaboration and consensus among all stakeholders

  3. Sowing the seeds for sustainable change: a community-based participatory research partnership for health promotion in Indiana, USA and its aftermath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkler, Meredith; Vásquez, Victoria Breckwich; Warner, Joanne Rains; Steussey, Helen; Facente, Shelley

    2006-12-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) increasingly is being used in both developed and developing countries to study and address community-identified issues through a collaborative and empowering action-oriented process. In 2003-2005, a study was undertaken to document the impacts of CBPR on healthy public policy in the US. From an initial review of 80 partnership efforts, 10 were selected as best capturing the range and diversity of projects meeting the study criteria, and were the subject of in-depth case study analysis. This article presents and analyzes one of these cases, a collaboration between researchers at the Indiana University School of Nursing and the Healthy Cities Committee of New Castle, IN, USA. With its action component still underway a decade after the formal study's completion, the partnership was selected to enable an examination of sustainable change through CBPR. Beginning with a participatory door-to-door health survey of 1000 households using a non-probability quota sampling strategy, the project involved community members in many stages of the research process. A smoking rate of twice the national average was among the study findings that helped to galvanize the community into action. A variety of health promoting environmental and 'small p policy' changes were undertaken ranging from a bill restricting indoor smoking in public places to an initiative to develop a system of trails throughout the county to promote physical fitness and decreased reliance on automobiles. This article examines the evolution of the original CBPR partnership, its research methods and findings, and the environmental changes it sought to promote healthier lifestyles. Success factors, barriers and sustainability benchmarks are discussed. The case study offers an example of the potential of CBPR for helping to lay the groundwork for long-term sustainable change in support of healthier communities. PMID:16873393

  4. Designing intervention in educational game research : developing methodological approaches for ‘Design-Based Participatory Research'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; SØrensen, Birgitte Holm

    2010-01-01

    The international focus on the learning potential of games in recent years has led to a boost in both academic research interest and the development of game formats. Numerous educational computer games are available for today's teachers, but the implementation of games in everyday teaching is often problematic. In this paper, we argue that the focus on designing and implementing game-based learning environments in educational settings implies a need to rethink methodological questions on how to apply and study educational designs. We review the methodological approaches of design-based research and action research and discuss some of the implications of applying these methods to game research. Both methods involve combining empirical educational research with the theory-driven design of learning environments. However, whereas action research aims at changing attitudes or behavior by involving participants in the different phases of designing environments for change, design-based research has a strong focus ontheory-based design and implementation of technologies and artifacts as part of the learning environment. In this paper, we present data from a study involving the design and implementation of game technology in educational settings: the game Global Conflict: Latin America, which is a role-playing game, set in a 3D environment. In the game, students play a freelance journalist who has to investigate particular issues or conflicts in the Latin American region. The game is designed to teach different subjects that involve social studies, such as geography, Danish, and history in secondary and upper secondary schools. In the first case, we conducted a study of how it is possible to integrate the game Global Conflict: Latin America in a local school practice. The involvement of game developers, researchers, students, and teachers in the different phases of the game-based educational scenario is discussed. The teacher involvement in the various design phases and student approaches and practices observed within the classes playing the games are compared as well as possibilities for the future integration of design. The case is discussed in relation to the methodological approaches of action research and design-based research. With the aim of developing approaches to modulate and integrate new game designs into school education, we suggest a design-based research approach inspired by action research with a focus on inviting teachers and players into the various phases of development of designs, intervention, redesigns, and analysis of design interventions.

  5. The Challenges of Collaboration for Academic and Community Partners in a Research Partnership: Points to Consider1

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Lainie Friedman; Loup, Allan; Nelson, Robert M.; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Kost, Rhonda; Smith, George R.; Gehlert, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    the philosophical underpinning of Community-Engaged Research (CEnR) entails a collaborative partnership between academic researchers and the community. The Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) model is the partnership model most widely discussed in the CEnR literature and is the primary model we draw upon in this discussion of the collaboration between academic researchers and the community. In CPBR, the goal is for community partners to have equal authority and responsibility with t...

  6. Constructive Synergy in Design Science Research: A Comparative Analysis of Design Science Research and the Constructive Research Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piirainen, Kalle; Gonzalez, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    Information systems research is focused on creating knowledge which can be applied in organizations. Design science research, which specifically aims at applying existing knowledge to solve interesting and relevant business problems, has been steadily gaining support in information systems research. However, design science research is not the only design-oriented research framework available. Accordingly, this raises the question of whether there is something to learn between the different approaches. This paper contributes to answering this question by comparing design science research with the constructive research approach. The conclusion is that the two approaches are similar and compatible, save for details in practical requirements and partly underlying philosophical assumptions. The main finding that arises from the comparison is, however, that there is a potential problem in claiming knowledge contribution from evaluation of the utility of an artifact. That is, utility-based evaluation often builds the argument on adoption of the artifact, assuming that adoption and utility in general validates also claims to knowledge contribution. We show that this mode of evaluation has philosophical and practical problems that need addressing in further research.

  7. An integrative approach to research of deforestation under concession management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodological approach integrating questionnaire research of tropical foresters with analyses of the actual patterns of concession logging and land use activities portrayed on various types of satellite imagery is discussed. The imagery analysis is necessary to: document the location place and magnitude of forest utilization and change in concession areas; confirm that responses vis-a-vis deforestation in the questionnaire correspond to observable behaviors as evidenced by the actual patterns of logging activities; and document the postharvest land utilization and conversion to other land uses. It is argued that this approach will link the process and pattern of logging activities to reveal the main factors leading to deforestation under the concession system of management. 20 refs

  8. An evaluation approach for research project pilot technological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino-Jesus, Elsa; Sarraipa, Joao; Jardim-Goncalves, Ricardo

    2013-10-01

    In a world increasingly more competitive and in a constantly development and growth it's important that companies have economic tools, like frameworks to help them to evaluate and validate the technology development to better fits in each company particular needs. The paper presents an evaluation approach for research project pilot applications to stimulate its implementation and deployment, increasing its adequacy and acceptance to their stakeholders and consequently providing new business profit and opportunities. Authors used the DECIDE evaluation framework as a major guide to this approach, which was tested in the iSURF project to support the implementation of an interoperability service utility for collaborative supply chain planning across multiple domains supported by RFID devices.

  9. Community Health Workers Support Community-based Participatory Research Ethics:: Lessons Learned along the Research-to-Practice-to-Community Continuum

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Selina A; Blumenthal, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    Ethical principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR)— specifically, community engagement, mutual learning, action-reflection, and commitment to sustainability—stem from the work of Kurt Lewin and Paulo Freire. These are particularly relevant in cancer disparities research because vulnerable populations are often construed to be powerless, supposedly benefiting from programs over which they have no control. The long history of exploiting minority individuals and communities for ...

  10. Agricultural risk management : experiences from an action research approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mogens; Oksen, Arne

    2005-01-01

    A new model for risk management in agriculture is described in the paper. The risk model is constructed as a context dependent process, which includes four main phases. The model is aimed at agricultural advisors, who wish to facilitate and disseminate risk management to farmers. It is developed and tested by an action research approach in an attempt to make risk management more applicable on family farms. Our obtained experiences indicate that farmers don’t apply probabilistic thinking and other concepts according to formal decision theory.

  11. A Design Approach to Research and a Landscape Approach to Design

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, J

    2010-01-01

    Koh (pp. 91-100) outlines similarities and differences between landscape design and architectural design, as in particular in the modernist period landscape design was influenced a lot by an architectural approach. As landscape design deals with different issues however, it has generated its own strategies and methods. In particular the connection between research and design seems to be underdeveloped and needs more attention. Koh shows how this is done at the Wageningen University and presen...

  12. Current trends in antimicrobial agent research: chemo- and bioinformatics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Riadh; Fliss, Ismail

    2010-07-01

    Databases and chemo- and bioinformatics tools that contain genomic, proteomic and functional information have become indispensable for antimicrobial drug research. The combination of chemoinformatics tools, bioinformatics tools and relational databases provides means of analyzing, linking and comparing online search results. The development of computational tools feeds on a diversity of disciplines, including mathematics, statistics, computer science, information technology and molecular biology. The computational approach to antimicrobial agent discovery and design encompasses genomics, molecular simulation and dynamics, molecular docking, structural and/or functional class prediction, and quantitative structure-activity relationships. This article reviews progress in the development of computational methods, tools and databases used for organizing and extracting biological meaning from antimicrobial research. PMID:20546918

  13. Toward Rigorous Data Harmonization in Cancer Epidemiology Research: One Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Betsy; Reid, Suzanna; Stelling, Deanna; Warnick, Greg; Thornquist, Mark; Feng, Ziding; Potter, John D

    2015-12-15

    Cancer epidemiologists have a long history of combining data sets in pooled analyses, often harmonizing heterogeneous data from multiple studies into 1 large data set. Although there are useful websites on data harmonization with recommendations and support, there is little research on best practices in data harmonization; each project conducts harmonization according to its own internal standards. The field would be greatly served by charting the process of data harmonization to enhance the quality of the harmonized data. Here, we describe the data harmonization process utilized at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (Seattle, Washington) by the coordinating centers of several research projects. We describe a 6-step harmonization process, including: 1) identification of questions the harmonized data set is required to answer; 2) identification of high-level data concepts to answer those questions; 3) assessment of data availability for data concepts; 4) development of common data elements for each data concept; 5) mapping and transformation of individual data points to common data elements; and 6) quality-control procedures. Our aim here is not to claim a "correct" way of doing data harmonization but to encourage others to describe their processes in order that we can begin to create rigorous approaches. We also propose a research agenda around this issue. PMID:26589709

  14. Base technology approaches in materials research for future nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the development of advanced nuclear systems for future, majority of critical issues in material research and development are more or less related with the effects of neutron irradiation. The approaches to those issues in the past have been mainly concerned with interpretation of the facts and minor modification of existing materials, having been inevitably of passive nature. In combating against predicted complex effects arising from variety of critical parameters, approaches must be reviewed more strategically. Some attempts of shifting research programs to such a direction have been made at JAERI in the Base (Common) Technology Programs either by adding to or restructuring the existing tasks. Major tasks currently in progress after the reorientation are categorized in several disciplines including new tasks for material innovation and concept development for neutron sources. The efforts have been set forth since 1988, and a few of them are now mature to transfer to the tasks in the projects of advanced reactors. The paper reviews the status of some typical activities emphasizing the effects of the reorientation and possible extensions of the outcomes to future applications. (author)

  15. A New Approach to Commercialization of NASA's Human Research Program Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposal describes, "A New Approach to Commercialization of NASA's Human Research Program Technologies." NASA has a powerful research...

  16. Approaches in Synesthesia Research: Neurocognitive Aspects and Diagnostic Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mikus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Synesthesia is a fairly rare phenomenon in which the subject in contact with certain stimulus in one modality experiences unusual extra sensations in other modalities, such as seeing or feeling colours while listening to music or personifying of letters and numbers. The phenomenon was long perceived to be merely a product of imagination and associations. Latest research, however, is based on a multidisciplinary approach, which includes first-hand synesthetic reports, neuroimaging and behavioural tests used in confirming and explaining the phenomenon’s presence as well as its neurophysiological foundations. This article presents an overview of such investigations through the lens of cognitive and psychophysical paradigms, neural models and genetic studies of synesthesia.

  17. The personnel economics approach to public workforce research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This article argues that the relatively new field of personnel economics (PE) holds strong potential as a tool for studying public sector workforces. This subfield of labor economics is based on a strong foundation of microeconomics, which provides a robust theoretical foundation for studying workforce and organizational design issues. PE has evolved on this foundation to a strong practical emphasis, with theoretical insights designed for practical use and with strong focus on empirical research. The field is also characterized by creative data entrepreneurship. The types of datasets that personnel economists use are described. If similar datasets can be obtained for public sector workforces, PE should be a very useful approach for studying them. PMID:19829236

  18. Nursing research education in the United States of America: One approach

    OpenAIRE

    M Poggenpoel

    1991-01-01

    In addressing nursing research education in the United States of America a short overview of the development of nursing research will be given and then one specific approach to nursing research education will be discussed fully.

  19. Community-based participatory research projects and policy engagement to protect environmental health on St Lawrence Island, Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Pamela K.; Viola Waghiyi; Gretchen Welfinger-Smith; Samuel Carter Byrne; Jane Kava; Jesse Gologergen; Lorraine Eckstein; Ronald Scrudato; Jeff Chiarenzelli; CARPENTER, David O.; Samarys Seguinot-Medina

    2013-01-01

    Objectives . This article synthesizes discussion of collaborative research results, interventions and policy engagement for St Lawrence Island (SLI), Alaska, during the years 2000–2012. Methods . As part of on-going community-based participatory research (CBPR) studies on SLI, 5 discrete exposure-assessment projects were conducted: (a) a biomonitoring study of human blood serum; (b–d) 3 investigations of levels of contaminants in environmental media at an abandoned military site...

  20. Arts-Based Research: Trojan Horses and Shibboleths. The Liabilities of a Hybrid Research Approach. "What Hath Eisner Wrought?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, David

    2009-01-01

    The term "arts-based research" has been debated for some time now. In an article strongly in favor of this approach Bean (2007) identifies three species: "Research on the arts (italics in the original) (art history, visual and cultural studies, media studies etc.)...Research for the arts, refers to research into applied techniques, materials and…

  1. Novel approaches to HIV prevention and sexual health promotion among Guatemalan gay and bisexual men, MSM, and transgender persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D; Alonzo, Jorge; Mann, Lilli; Downs, Mario; Simán, Florence M; Andrade, Mario; Martinez, Omar; Abraham, Claire; Villatoro, Guillermo R; Bachmann, Laura H

    2014-08-01

    The burden of HIV is disproportionate for Guatemalan sexual minorities (e.g., gay and bisexual men, men who have sex with men [MSM], and transgender persons). Our bi-national partnership used authentic approaches to community-based participatory research (CBPR) to identify characteristics of potentially successful programs to prevent HIV and promote sexual health among Guatemalan sexual minorities. Our partnership conducted Spanish-language focus groups with 87 participants who self-identified as male (n=64) or transgender (n=23) and individual in-depth interviews with ten formal and informal gay community leaders. Using constant comparison, an approach to grounded theory, we identified 20 characteristics of potentially successful programs to reduce HIV risk, including providing guidance on accessing limited resources; offering supportive dialogue around issues of masculinity, socio-cultural expectations, love, and intimacy; using Mayan values and images; harnessing technology; increasing leadership and advocacy skills; and mobilizing social networks. More research is clearly needed, but participants reported needing and wanting programming and had innovative ideas to prevent HIV exposure and transmission. PMID:25068181

  2. Creating Community–Academic Partnerships for Cancer Disparities Research and Health Promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Meade, Cathy D; Menard, Janelle M.; Luque, John S.; Martinez-Tyson, Dinorah (Dina); Gwede, Clement K.

    2009-01-01

    To effectively attenuate cancer disparities in multiethnic, medically underserved populations, interventions must be developed collaboratively through solid community–academic partnerships and driven by community-based participatory research (CBPR). The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) has been created to identify and implement interventions to address local cancer disparities in partnership with community-based nonprofit organizations, faith-based groups, community health centers, ...

  3. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J.; Law, G. L.; McDermott, Jason E.; Proll, Sean; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-02-01

    The 20th century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and water borne illnesses are frequent, multi-drug resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the past—including the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biology—have not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the 21st century has seen remarkable innovations in technology and computational methods. These new tools provide nearly comprehensive views of complex biological systems and can provide a correspondingly deeper understanding of pathogen-host interactions. To take full advantage of these innovations, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently initiated the Systems Biology Program for Infectious Disease Research. As participants of the Systems Biology Program we think that the time is at hand to redefine the pathogen-host research paradigm.

  4. A horizon of medical education research approach in 21st century

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhendu Dutta

    2014-01-01

    The author is a reviewer of various peer reviewed journals and during the review of the medical education research manuscript was observed that many novice of the field of medical education research do not follow the scientific steps of the medical education research. Therefore, this paper is aimed to reflect the essence of medical education research approach and to help the novice medical education research investigators to design the project in scientific approach. An intensive review is ma...

  5. Developing a family-based HIV prevention intervention in rural Kenya: challenges in conducting community-based participatory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Eve S; Pian, Jessica; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Ogwang-Odhiambo, Rose A; Broverman, Sherryl A

    2013-04-01

    Community-Based Participatory research (CBPR) introduces new ethical challenges for HIV prevention studies in low-resource international settings. We describe a CBPR study in rural Kenya to develop and pilot a family-based HIV prevention and mental health promotion intervention. Academic partners (APs) worked with a community advisory committee (CAC) during formative research, intervention development, and a pilot trial. Ethical challenges emerged related to: negotiating power imbalances between APs and the CAC; CAC members' shifting roles as part of the CAC and wider community; and anticipated challenges in decision making about sustainability. Factors contributing to ethical dilemmas included low access to education, scarcity of financial resources, and the shortage of HIV-related services despite high prevalence. PMID:23651936

  6. Safety Approach of BORAX Type Accidents in French Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of pool type French research reactors are designed to withstand an explosive BORAX accident, defined as a pressure load on the pool walls. The purpose of this paper is to present the approach implemented at IRSN to analyse this accident by linking safety assessment and supporting studies. Examples of recent work on Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) and ORPHEE will be presented. Although all aspects of the accident are addressed, we will focus on the first two frames of the transient: the reactivity insertion and the consequences on the core. The first step of the BORAX analysis is to identify the most penalizing plausible reactivity insertion. This means characterising the sequences of events that can induce a reactivity surge and evaluate the worth of such variation. Neutronic computations are then required to quantify the reactivity increase. To comply with the geometrical specificities of research reactors, IRSN chose to use the homemade Monte Carlo code MORET5. The control rod worth calculations on the JHR were in good agreement with the operator results, whereas in ORPHEE, IRSN demonstrated that the beam channels reactivity worth was largely. In both cases the obtained results allowed an interesting dialogue with the operator and were used in the conclusions of the safety assessment. Following the accidental sequence of events, the second stage analysed by IRSN is the power transient occurring in the core and the consequences on the fuel. IRSN applied on JHR a homemade simplified model based on point kinetics and standard thermal balance equations to compute power evolution taking into account the temperatures of the fuel for feedback reactivity. As heat exchange coefficients between cladding and water for such fast transients are unknown, IRSN took the conservative hypothesis of adiabatic heating of the plates. The comparison the JHR power pulse calculation results against SPERT experimental measurements enabled IRSN to be optimistic about the possibility that a slow reactivity insertion would not lead to severe consequences on the core. It also highlighted a lack of knowledge about fast transient physical processes and the need of validated tools if a refined simulation is to be carried out. (author)

  7. Physician participation in clinical research and trials: issues and approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Sayeeda; Majumder, Md Anwarul Azim; Sami F Shaban; Rahman, Nuzhat; Ahmed, Moslehuddin; Abdulrahman, Khalid Bin; D’Souza, Urban JA

    2011-01-01

    The rapid development of new drugs, therapies, and devices has created a dramatic increase in the number of clinical research studies that highlights the need for greater participation in research by physicians as well as patients. Furthermore, the potential of clinical research is unlikely to be reached without greater participation of physicians in research. Physicians face a variety of barriers with regard to participation in clinical research. These barriers are system-or organization-rel...

  8. Biotechnological Approaches as the New Paradigm for Insect Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diganggana Talukdar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To meet the growing demand for food it is essential to increase the production of food. Insect pests are major constraints to global production for food and fibre that can be reduced utilizing modern biotechnological tools. In insect research field, the biotechnological tools have been applied to study various issues such as insect identification, insect control and insect genetic relationships. It has a significant role in improving efficacy effectiveness and in expanding the markets for the bio insecticides. Molecular techniques employed for identifying and monitoring establishment and dispersal of specific biotypes of natural enemies. Production, formulation and storage of entomopathogenic fungi can be dramatically improved through biotechnology and genetic engineering. Proteinaceous insect toxins (scorpion toxin, mite toxin, trypsin inhibitor, hormones (eclosion hormone, diuretic hormone and metabolic enzymes (juvenile hormone esterase introduced into NPV and GV genome virus to increase its efficacy to kill insect. Genetic manipulation of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt genes encoding for proteins toxic to insects offers an opportunity to produce genetically modified strains with more potent and transgenic plant expressing Bt toxin. In 2011, planting of Bt cotton in India surpassed the historical milestone of 10 million hectare for the first time and occupied 88% of the recorded 12.1 million hectare cotton crops. However, field resistance of Bt crops to various insects have been noticed and to combat this problem two approaches namely refuge and pyramiding were recently introduced. The development of cryobiological method for preserving embryos of insects can significantly save the rearing costs, and the valuable collection of insect natural enemies could be maintained indefinitely. RNAi technology enables engineering of a new generation of pest-resistant GM crops. Insect control strategies that integrate advance knowledge in biotechnology with traditional wisdom and technology will contribute to the sustainability of agriculture.

  9. New approaches to the economic evaluation of fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic evaluation of fusion research to date has focussed on the benefits of essentially unlimited energy for future generations. In this paper it is shown that energy research in general, and fusion research in particular, also provides benefits in the short term, benefitting us today as well as future generations. Short-term benefits are the result of two distinct aspects of fusion research. First, fusion research provides information for decision making on both the continuing fusion research efforts and on other energy research programs. Second, fusion research provides an expectation of a future energy source thereby promoting accelerated consumption of existing fossil fuels today. Both short-term benefits can be quantitatively evaluated and both are quite substantial. Together, these short-term benefits form the primary economic rationale for fusion research

  10. Systems approaches in global change and biogeochemistry research

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Pete; Albanito, Fabrizio; Bell, Madeleine; Bellarby, Jessica; Blagodatskiy, Sergey; Datta, Arindam; Dondini, Marta; Fitton, Nuala; Flynn, Helen; Hastings, Astley; Hillier, Jon; Jones, Edward O.; Kuhnert, Matthias; Nayak, Dali R.; Pogson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Systems approaches have great potential for application in predictive ecology. In this paper, we present a range of examples, where systems approaches are being developed and applied at a range of scales in the field of global change and biogeochemical cycling. Systems approaches range from Bayesian calibration techniques at plot scale, through data assimilation methods at regional to continental scales, to multi-disciplinary numerical model applications at country to global scales. We provid...

  11. Framing design research for service orientation through PSS approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakao, Tomohiko; Sandström, Gunilla Ölundh; Matzen, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    In order to respond to the industrial trend towards service design and delivery, design research must address a vast area partially related to value creation, marketing and network theories. However, compared to the space to be explored, there is little insight available. Thus, this paper, as a first step, proposes a way to frame such design research. First, an extensive literature review is performed of over 100 articles on not only PSS-design research but also on related research in fields as ...

  12. Framing design research for service orientation through PSS approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Sakao, Tomohiko; Sandström, Gunilla Ölundh; Matzen, Detlef

    2008-01-01

    In order to respond to the industrial trend towards service design and delivery, design research must address a vast area partially related to value creation, marketing and network theories. However, compared to the space to be explored, there is little insight available. Thus, this paper, as a first step, proposes a way to frame such design research. First, an extensive literature review is performed of over 100 articles on not only PSS-design research but also on related research in fields ...

  13. Research in Distance Education: A System Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Farhad; Twitchell, David

    This demonstration of the use of a computer simulation research method based on the System Dynamics modeling technique for studying distance education reviews research methods in distance education, including the broad categories of conceptual and case studies, and presents a rationale for the application of systems research in this area. The…

  14. The nucleus and pilot farm research approach: experiences from The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Langeveld, J.W.A.; Keulen, H., van; Haan, J.J., de; Kroonen-Backbier, B.; Oenema, J

    2005-01-01

    High application levels of fertilisers and agro-chemicals in The Netherlands have provoked increasingly stringent environmental policies. The development and evaluation of these policies have led to a shift in agricultural research. Starting in a tradition of factorial research, a systems-oriented approach was adopted. Building on results of earlier systems-oriented experimental research in the 1980s, an approach was developed where research on experimental farms increasingly became linked to...

  15. Physician participation in clinical research and trials: issues and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Sayeeda; Majumder, Md Anwarul Azim; Shaban, Sami F; Rahman, Nuzhat; Ahmed, Moslehuddin; Abdulrahman, Khalid Bin; D'Souza, Urban Ja

    2011-01-01

    The rapid development of new drugs, therapies, and devices has created a dramatic increase in the number of clinical research studies that highlights the need for greater participation in research by physicians as well as patients. Furthermore, the potential of clinical research is unlikely to be reached without greater participation of physicians in research. Physicians face a variety of barriers with regard to participation in clinical research. These barriers are system-or organization-related as well as research-and physician-related. To encourage physician participation, appropriate organizational and operational infrastructures are needed in health care institutes to support research planning and management. All physicians should receive education and training in the fundamentals of research design and methodology, which need to be incorporated into undergraduate medical education and postgraduate training curricula and then reinforced through continuing medical education. Medical schools need to analyze current practices of teaching-learning and research, and reflect upon possible changes needed to develop a 'student-focused teaching-learning and research culture'. This article examines the barriers to and benefits of physician participation in clinical research as well as interventions needed to increase their participation, including the specific role of undergraduate medical education. The main challenge is the unwillingness of many physicians and patients to participate in clinical trials. Barriers to participation include lack of time, lack of resources, trial-specific issues, communication difficulties, conflicts between the role of clinician and scientist, inadequate research experience and training for physicians, lack of rewards and recognition for physicians, and sometimes a scientifically uninteresting research question, among others. Strategies to encourage physician participation in clinical research include financial and nonfinancial incentives, adequate training, research questions that are in line with physician interests and have clear potential to improve patient care, and regular feedback. Finally, encouraging research culture and fostering the development of inquiry and research-based learning among medical students is now a high priority in order to develop more and better clinician-researchers. PMID:23745079

  16. Framing design research for service orientation through PSS approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakao, Tomohiko; Sandström, Gunilla Ölundh

    2009-01-01

    In order to respond to the industrial trend towards service design and delivery, design research must address a vast area partially related to value creation, marketing and network theories. However, compared to the space to be explored, there is little insight available. Thus, this paper, as a first step, proposes a way to frame such design research. First, an extensive literature review is performed of over 100 articles on not only PSS-design research but also on related research in fields as PSS in general, service design, innovation, and business models in a broad view. Based on the literature analysis, the authors present three crucial dimensions for service oriented design research, i.e. an offer dimension representing products and services, a provider dimension, and a customer/user dimension. In addition, three research targets are proposed; PSS-offer modelling, PSS development, and PSS potential. Furthermore, several promising future research directions are identified. These include evaluating economic consequences or environmental benefits, establishing terminology, organizational issues, and developing methods and tools to support designers. The boundaries to other research fields are getting blurry and many aspects of other professionalisms must be taken into account. Thus, there is especially need in future research to open towards other research areas.

  17. Mobile Data Services Usage - a Methodological Research Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadopoulos Homer

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper classifies the existing research methods that are used to study mobile services and applications wishing to put things into an order. The paper examines these methods and proposes a combined methodological technique. This technique has been used as a research tool in a research study which explored mobile data services adoption of different features by existing users and usage process. Mobile networked technologies and mobile data services have become inextricable part of people’s daily lives since they are accessible anytime anywhere throughout a day. Conventional research methods that are used to study the use of mobile devices and applications are unable to collect useful fieldwork data in versatile use situations and thus methodological challenges still exist. Researchers have responded to these challenges by developing research methods that enable new ways of collecting data concerning mobile technology use. The research method presented here is based on conventional research methods, on the use of mobile phone camera for capturing video and photographs during the use of mobile data services and on a commercial application to establish communication contact between users and researchers. The paper suggests that simple commercial systems can be used by researchers to conduct field studies.

  18. Assessing quality in European educational research indicators and approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Åström, Fredrik; Hansen, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Competition-based models for research policy and management have an increasing influence throughout the research process, from attracting funding to publishing results. The introduction of quality control methods utilizing various forms of performance indicators is part of this development. The authors presented in this volume deal with the following questions: What counts as ‘quality’ and how can this be assessed? What are the possible side effects of current quality control systems on research conducted in the European Research Area, especially in the social sciences and the humanities?

  19. A Semantic Approach to Cross-Disciplinary Research Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens De Vocht

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The latest developments in ICT, more specifically Social Media and Web 2.0 tools, facilitate the use of online services in research and education. This is also known as Research 2.0 and Technology Enhanced Learning. Web 2.0 tools are especially useful in cases where experts from different disciplines want to collaborate. We suggest an integrated method that embeds these services in research and learning processes, because it is a laborious task for researchers and learners to check and use all varying types of tools and services. We explain a flexible model that uses state-of-the-art semantic technologies to model both structured and unstructured research data. The research data is extracted from many online resources and Social Media. We implement learning objects as an abstraction of the semantically modeled research data. We propose an environment that improves the scientific research and learning process by allowing researchers to efficiently browse the information and concepts represented as learning objects.

  20. Personal Reflections on Observational and Experimental Research Approaches to Childhood Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    The past 50 years have seen dramatic changes in childhood psychopathology research. The goal of this overview is to contrast observational and experimental research approaches; both have grown more complex such that the boundary between these approaches may be blurred. Both are essential. Landmark observational studies with long-term follow-up…

  1. The Ethics of Digital Writing Research: A Rhetorical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Heidi; Porter, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The study of writers and writing in digital environments raises distinct and complex ethical issues for researchers. Rhetoric theory and casuistic ethics, working in tandem, provide a theoretical framework for addressing such issues. A casuistic heuristic grounded in rhetorical principles can help digital writing researchers critically…

  2. The Research Roadmap: A Primer to the Approach and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Philip E.; Rogerson, Lynda; Maffei, Francis R., III.

    2010-01-01

    Performing research can be an overwhelming and challenging endeavor. It's easy to get confused just from collecting, reading and deciphering textbooks and journal articles. Getting organized and mapping out the entire process would be extremely helpful and more importantly provide a path for accomplishing the research project. This paper will…

  3. Teaching Historical Research Skills to Generation Y: One Instructor's Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Valerie S.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author offers a summary of the major research assignment she has developed for HIST 100, as well as the successes and struggles she has had along the way. The project requires students to experience research as a difficult process that demands their patience, perseverance, and assiduousness. Group work in class clearly plays…

  4. Research Priorities in Vocational Special Needs Education: A Delphi Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Meers, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    A three-round Delphi technique elicited responses from 18 vocational special needs personnel regarding research needs and priorities for the next 10 years. A high degree of consensus was achieved on 57 percent of 91 research statements. Critical issues identified were transition and at-risk students. (SK)

  5. Measuring Quality in Universities: An Approach to Weighting Research Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Print, Murray; Hattie, John

    1997-01-01

    A study tested a procedure to identify and weigh various indicators of college faculty research productivity, as one measure of program quality. Eighty-six faculty in 34 Australian schools of education were surveyed. Highly valued indicators of research productivity included refereed journal articles, peer reviewed books, and major competitive…

  6. Action Research Approach on Mobile Learning Design for the Underserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses an action research study focused on developing a mobile learning model of literacy development for underserved migrant indigenous children in Latin America. The research study incorporated a cyclical action model with four distinctive stages (Strategize, Apply, Evaluate, and Reflect) designed to guide constituencies involved…

  7. Statistical approaches to orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders research

    CERN Document Server

    Manfredini, Daniele; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Carrozzo, Eleonora; Salmaso, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the biostatistical methods utilized to interpret and analyze dental research in the areas of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders. It will guide practitioners in these fields who would like to interpret research findings or find examples on the design of clinical investigations. After an introduction dealing with the basic issues, the central sections of the textbook are dedicated to the different types of investigations in sight of specific goals researchers may have. The final section contains more elaborate statistical concepts for expert professionals. The field of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders is emerging as one of the most critical areas of clinical research in dentistry. Due to the complexity of clinical pictures, the multifactorial etiology, and the importance of psychosocial factors in all aspects of the TMD practice, clinicians often find it hard to appraise their modus operandi, and researchers must constantly increase their knowledge in epidemiology and ...

  8. Physician participation in clinical research and trials: issues and approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami F Shaban

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sayeeda Rahman1, Md Anwarul Azim Majumder1, Sami F Shaban2, Nuzhat Rahman3, Moslehuddin Ahmed4, Khalid Bin Abdulrahman5, Urban JA D’Souza61Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford, UK; 2Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates; 3Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 4Department of Community Medicine, Uttara Adhunik Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 5Department of Family Medicine and Medical Education, College of Medicine, Al-Imam University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 6Department of Post Graduate Studies, School of Medicine, University Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, MalaysiaAbstract: The rapid development of new drugs, therapies, and devices has created a dramatic increase in the number of clinical research studies that highlights the need for greater participation in research by physicians as well as patients. Furthermore, the potential of clinical research is unlikely to be reached without greater participation of physicians in research. Physicians face a variety of barriers with regard to participation in clinical research. These barriers are system- or organization-related as well as research- and physician-related. To encourage physician participation, appropriate organizational and operational infrastructures are needed in health care institutes to support research planning and management. All physicians should receive education and training in the fundamentals of research design and methodology, which need to be incorporated into undergraduate medical education and postgraduate training curricula and then reinforced through continuing medical education. Medical schools need to analyze current practices of teaching–learning and research, and reflect upon possible changes needed to develop a ‘student-focused teaching–learning and research culture’. This article examines the barriers to and benefits of physician participation in clinical research as well as interventions needed to increase their participation, including the specific role of undergraduate medical education. The main challenge is the unwillingness of many physicians and patients to participate in clinical trials. Barriers to participation include lack of time, lack of resources, trial-specific issues, communication difficulties, conflicts between the role of clinician and scientist, inadequate research experience and training for physicians, lack of rewards and recognition for physicians, and sometimes a scientifically uninteresting research question, among others. Strategies to encourage physician participation in clinical research include financial and nonfinancial incentives, adequate training, research questions that are in line with physician interests and have clear potential to improve patient care, and regular feedback. Finally, encouraging research culture and fostering the development of inquiry and research-based learning among medical students is now a high priority in order to develop more and better clinician-researchers.Keywords: physician, clinical research, clinical trial, medical education

  9. Process diary as methodological approach in longitudinal phenomenological research

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Heidi, Woll.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the process diary as a qualitative instrument in phenomenological research. The first part of the article provides a brief historical review on the use of diaries in social and health research. The second part of the article presents an example of how the process diary may be [...] used based on the profile of a participant in the study "Aging with Cerebral Palsy". The third part of the article deals with the challenges of analyzing the data provided by process diaries and discusses the strengths and weaknesses of this method. The article concludes with a brief discussion concerning the kinds of situations where the process diary is a suitable research instrument. This section of the article also touches upon the ethical challenges involved in using the process diary in longitudinal phenomenological research.

  10. Undergraduate Research and Economic Development: A Systems Approach in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Galen, Dean; Schneider-Rebozo, Lissa; Havholm, Karen; Andrews, Kris

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents the state of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin System as an ongoing case study for best practices in systematic, intentional, statewide programming and initiatives connecting undergraduate research and economic development.

  11. New approaches to social and economic research on schistosomiasis in TDR

    OpenAIRE

    Carol Vlassoff

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes new approaches to social and economic research being developed by the Social and Economic Research component of the Special Programme for Research and Trainning in Tropical Diseases of the World Health Organization. One of these is a study to acess the possibility of identifying high risk communities for urinary schistosomiasis through a "mailed"questionaire approach distributed through an existing administrative system, thereby eliminating the need for face-to-face inter...

  12. Book review: Research design: creating robust approaches for the social sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    "Research Design: Creating Robust Approaches for the Social Sciences." Stephen Gorard. SAGE Publications. February 2013. --- Research design is of critical importance in social research, despite its relative neglect in many methods resources. This book discusses the nature of design, offers a flexible approach to new designs, and looks at a range of standard design models. Stephen Gorard‘s book is illustrated with case studies of real work and concludes with suggested readings and topics for ...

  13. Positioning audience research for public dialogue : a double dialogical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kruger, Jenni; Fourie, Ina; Dick, Archie L.

    2013-01-01

    Public dialogue can widen the knowledge base for decision making to make public policy and programmes more effective and accountable, in line with citizens’ priorities. Audience research can enhance the relevance of a communication strategy to its objectives and to participants’ needs and communication preferences. Audience research designs based on diffusion models of communication are, however, inadequate for the participatory objectives of public dialogue. This article, base...

  14. Seeking Constructive Synergy: Design Science and the Constructive Research Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piirainen, Kalle; Gonzalez, Rafael A.

    2013-01-01

    Information systems research and management science create knowledge which can be applied in organizations. Design science specifically aims at applying existing knowledge to solve interesting and relevant business problems and has been steadily gaining support in information systems research. However, design science is not the only design-oriented framework. Accordingly, this raises the question of whether it is possible to compare the results obtained from different brands of design-oriented r...

  15. Approach for a joint global registration agency for research data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brase, Jan; Farquhar, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The scientific and information communities have largely mastered the presentation of, and linkages between, text-based electronic information by assigning persistent identifiers to give scientific literature unique identities and accessibility. Knowledge, as published through scientific literature, is often the last step in a process originating from scientific research data. Today scientists are using simulation, observational, and experimentation techniques that yield massive quantities of research data. These data are analyzed, synthesized, interpreted, and the outcome of this process is generally published as a scientific article. Access to the original data as the foundation of knowledge has become an important issue throughout the world and different projects have started to find solutions. Global collaboration and scientific advances could be accelerated through broader access to scientific research data. In other words, data access could be revolutionized through the same technologies used to make textual literature accessible. The most obvious opportunity to broaden visibility of and access to research data is to integrate its access into the medium where it is most often cited: electronic textual information. Besides this opportunity, it is important, irrespective of where they are cited, for research data to have an internet identity. Since 2005, the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB) has offered a successful Digital Object Identifier (DOI) registration service for persistent identification of research data. In this white paper we discuss the possibilities to open this registration to a global consortium of information institutes and libraries.

  16. EPA ORD RISK MANAGEMENT APPROACH TO DRINKING WATER RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    The approach to managing the risks associated with many environmental concerns has changed over the last five years with more emphasis being placed on integrating sound science into the more complex mix of socio-economic considerations facing American society today. This paper g...

  17. Emerging Approaches to Counseling Intervention: Theory, Research, Practice, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Nancy L.; Duan, Changming; Nilsson, Johanna E.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the major contribution that presents three emerging approaches to counseling: narrative therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy. The three theoretical systems were chosen because they are current, for the most part not addressed in the mainstream counseling psychology…

  18. Bridging the Gap: Cognitive and Social Approaches to Research in Second Language Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulstijn, Jan H.; Young, Richard F.; Ortega, Lourdes; Bigelow, Martha; DeKeyser, Robert; Ellis, Nick C.; Lantolf, James P.; Mackey, Alison; Talmy, Steven

    2014-01-01

    For some, research in learning and teaching of a second language (L2) runs the risk of disintegrating into irreconcilable approaches to L2 learning and use. On the one side, we find researchers investigating linguistic-cognitive issues, often using quantitative research methods including inferential statistics; on the other side, we find…

  19. Charting the Impact of Federal Spending for Education Research: A Bibliometric Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, Carolina; Brown, Kevin L.; Hawkley, Louise; Dropkin, Eric; Schneider, Barbara L.

    2014-01-01

    Impact evaluation plays a critical role in determining whether federally funded research programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics are wise investments. This paper develops quantitative methods for program evaluation and applies this approach to a flagship National Science Foundation-funded education research program, Research

  20. Regulatory research for waste disposal - Objectives and international approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of active involvement of nuclear regulatory and supervisory bodies in research and development (R and D) projects has become a topic of increasing interest in recent years. The way in which research is included in regulatory activities varies from country to country, ranging from countries with no regulatory R and D activities to countries with extensive activities which are often carried out by independent research organisations acting on behalf of the regulatory body. The present report outlines (part 1) the potential merits of R and D work carried out by the regulator, and summarizes (part 2) the results of a questionnaire that was circulated among the members of the Regulators' Forum of NEA's Radioactive Waste Management Committee in 2009. Part 3 presents the conclusions of discussions within the RWMC-RF. The detailed answers to the questionnaire are also provided

  1. Introduction to quantitative research methods an investigative approach

    CERN Document Server

    Balnaves, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods is a student-friendly introduction to quantitative research methods and basic statistics. It uses a detective theme throughout the text and in multimedia courseware to show how quantitative methods have been used to solve real-life problems. The book focuses on principles and techniques that are appropriate to introductory level courses in media, psychology and sociology. Examples and illustrations are drawn from historical and contemporary research in the social sciences. The multimedia courseware provides tutorial work on sampling, basic statistics, and techniques for seeking information from databases and other sources. The statistics modules can be used as either part of a detective games or directly in teaching and learning. Brief video lessons in SPSS, using real datasets, are also a feature of the CD-ROM.

  2. Building technology transfer within research universities an entrepreneurial approach

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shea, Rory P

    2014-01-01

    For the past number of years, academic entrepreneurship has become one of the most widely studied topics in the entrepreneurship literature. Yet, despite all the research that has been conducted to date, there has not been a systematic attempt to analyze critically the factors which lie behind successful business spin-offs from university research. In this book, a group of academic thought-leaders in the field of technology transfer examine a number of areas critical to the promotion of start-ups on campus. Through a series of case studies, they examine current policies, structures, program initiatives and practices of fourteen international universities to develop a theory of successful academic entrepreneurship, with the aim of helping other universities to enhance the quality of their university transfer programs. This book is a valuable resource for researchers and graduate students working on innovation, entrepreneurship and technology transfer, as well as senior managers and policymakers.

  3. Comparative research on spatial quality in Europe: motivation and approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijkamp, P.; Bergh, J. van den; Verhoef, E. [Free Univ., Dept. of Spatial Economics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents the structure of the ESF-founded TERM research project 'Environment Quality in European Space', and serves as the introduction to the special issue presenting the results of this project. The aim of the project was to organise existing European research teams in the area of spatial sustainability, focusing on two themes: 'transport and environment', and 'energy efficiency and spatial sustainability'. A number of criteria are identified for the comparison and evaluation of research in these areas for 12 European countries: UK, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Finland, Ireland, Sweden, Denmark, Russia, Israel and Austria. These criteria involve 'intrinsic characteristics' (problem definition, policy options, theoretical assumptions, method and data) and 'meta characteristics' (scientific innovation and contribution to real policy-making). (Author)

  4. SEM in applied marketing research : Towards more liberalised modelling approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SØrensen, Bjarne Taulo; Tudoran, Ana Alina

    In this paper we discuss two SEM approaches: an exploratory structural equation modelling based on a more liberalised and inductive philosophy versus the classical SEM based on the traditional hypothetical-deductive approach. We apply these two modelling techniques to data from a consumer survey and compare them based on several criteria, such as coefficients, parsimony, model fit, plausibility, and consistency with the theory. A comparison of the estimates obtained from the two models clearly indicates that it is not at all a trivial matter whether cross-loadings are allowed in a measurement model or not. These results shed serious doubt on the generally accepted rule of thumb according to which (cross) loadings can safely be ignored if they do not have a “practically significant” loading with an absolute value of at least 0.30 or 0.40.

  5. Process Diary as Methodological Approach in Longitudinal Phenomenological Research

    OpenAIRE

    Woll, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the process diary as a qualitative instrument in phenomenological research. The first part of the article provides a brief historical review on the use of diaries in social and health research. The second part of the article presents an example of how the process diary may be used based on the profile of a participant in the study “Aging with Cerebral Palsy”. The third part of the article deals with the challenges of analyzing the data provided by process diaries and d...

  6. Approaching Quality in Survey Research: Towards a Comprehensive Perspective.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krej?í, Jind?ich

    2010-01-01

    Ro?. 46, ?. 6 (2010), s. 1011-1033. ISSN 0038-0288 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA09010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : survey research methods * survey accuracy * total survey error Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.389, year: 2010 http://sreview.soc.cas.cz/uploads/59721bea5c0b259680447db14fee230ccf19f1ce_KREJCI%20SC2010-6-2.pdf

  7. Research on Metaphorical Approach in Economic Vocabulary Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Youwen

    2014-01-01

    This paper based on conceptual metaphor theory (CMT) aims at exploring the classification and organization of inflation-related metaphors. We have three findings: firstly, orientational metaphors and structural metaphors are the main groups, compared with ontological metaphors; secondly, these source domains tend to share similarities, though different from each other; thirdly, INFLATION IS ENEMY is the dominant classification. The metaphorical exploring may provide an efficient approach with...

  8. The image of the algorithmic city: a research approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin Hamilton; Karrie Karahalios; Christian Sandvig; Cedric Langbort

    2014-01-01

    Design for civic participation in the “smart” city requires examination of the algorithms by which computational processes organize and present geospatial information to inhabitants. How does awareness of these algorithms positively or negatively affect use? A renewed approach to one popular twentieth-century model for city design reveals potential paths for answering this question. The paper examines the contemporary “algorithmic” city using Kevin Lynch’s prescriptions for livable urban desi...

  9. In Search of Holy Transcripts: Approaches to Researching Religious Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, David

    2012-01-01

    I raise the problem that religious effects on the education practices of Australian religious schooling have not been measured, despite many claims and the critical size of the sector. The paper seeks to suggest factors to be considered in shaping methodologies for researching this area. Identifying four ways that religious schooling has been…

  10. Adaptive E-Learning Environments: Research Dimensions and Technological Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bitonto, Pierpaolo; Roselli, Teresa; Rossano, Veronica; Sinatra, Maria

    2013-01-01

    One of the most closely investigated topics in e-learning research has always been the effectiveness of adaptive learning environments. The technological evolutions that have dramatically changed the educational world in the last six decades have allowed ever more advanced and smarter solutions to be proposed. The focus of this paper is to depict…

  11. Family Planning Research in a Developing Area: A Different Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Asghar; Watson, Walter B.

    The authors discuss the difficulties in adapting American methods of field work to the cultural conditions in pre-industrial societies, in this case a pilot study on family planning in a Middle Eastern Moslem country. It is demonstrated that if the researcher is native and has kinship ties in a traditional community, he can use these assets: (1)…

  12. Electronic media: the problem of choosing research approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurgaleeva L. V.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mediatization of society is one of the main factors of structural changes in the design and construction of cultural experiences. It is a transdisciplinary research object of interest. Electronic media are considered in the context of problem study of the mechanisms of medial reflection.

  13. Three Diagnostic Approaches to Asperger Syndrome: Implications for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klin, Ami; Pauls, David; Schultz, Robert; Volkmar, Fred

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the implications for research of the use of three alternative definitions for Asperger syndrome (AS). Differences across the three nosologic systems were examined in terms of diagnostic assignment, IQ profiles, comorbid symptoms, and familial aggregation of social and other psychiatric symptoms. Method: Standard data on…

  14. Defining and Measuring Entrepreneurship for Regional Research: A New Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    In this dissertation, I develop a definition and regional measure of entrepreneurship that will aid entrepreneurship research and economic development policy. My new indicators represent an improvement over current measures of entrepreneurship. The chief contribution of these new indicators is that they incorporate innovation, which others ignore.…

  15. Multiscale approach to research, education and promotion of polymeric materials.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raab, Miroslav

    Praha : Ústav makromolekulární chemie AV ?R, 2005. ML10. ISBN 80-85009-51-X. [Discussion Conference, Current and Future Trends in Polymeric Materials /23./. 26.6.2005-30.6.2005, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymeric materials * structure * end-use properties Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  16. Writing business research article abstracts: A genre approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Piqué-Noguera

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A great deal has been published about oral and written genres in business (e.g., letters, research articles, oral presentations, etc., and less attention has been paid to business research article abstracts as a written genre, as many experts would argue. This research intends to raise rhetorical awareness about the role of abstracts in today’s academic world. To this effect, the abstracts of two official publications of the Association of Business Communication, Journal of Business Communication and Business Communication Quarterly, have been analyzed and compared in terms of structure and content according to models published in the specialized literature. The results show an irregular and inconsistent presentation of abstracts, a good number of them following no set pattern and thus lacking in important information for researchers. These findings suggest, first of all, that abstracts have a specific mission to fulfil and should not be disregarded; and, secondly, that journal guidelines for authors should be more explicit in their instructions on how to write and structure abstracts.

  17. The Vocational Guidance Research Database: A Scientometric Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Buils, Raquel; Gil-Beltran, Jose Manuel; Caballer-Miedes, Antonio; Martinez-Martinez, Miguel Angel

    2012-01-01

    The scientometric study of scientific output through publications in specialized journals cannot be undertaken exclusively with the databases available today. For this reason, the objective of this article is to introduce the "Base de Datos de Investigacion en Orientacion Vocacional" [Vocational Guidance Research Database], based on the use of…

  18. [Health services research in general practice. A new approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, W; Hummers-Pradier, E; Kochen, M M

    2006-02-01

    Competence networks in medicine, involving departments of general practice (www.kompetenznetze-medizin.de), as well as a large research support program "General Practice" funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (www.gesundheitsforschung-bmbf.de/de/439.php) mirror the increasing importance of academic general practice for health services research. The use and benefit of computerized medical records is exemplified by the classification of therapeutic measures and prevalence estimates of diseases. Computerized medical records from 134 practices could be extracted via the BDT (BehandlungsDatenTräger) interface. Using SQL (structured query language) queries, we identified patients with urinary tract infection (UTI), airway obstruction and chronic heart failure and the therapeutic management for these illnesses. Age and sex of the patients were nearly completely documented in the BDT data. Patients with UTI (6,239 consultations) received most often cotrimoxazole (69%) and fluoroquinolone (15%), less often trimethoprim (9%) and herbal UTI drugs (4%). About half of the 2,714 patients with asthma received inhaled steroids, to a somewhat lesser degree than patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (50 vs 53%). In a subsample of practices (n=44), we identified 4,120 patients with a diagnosis of chronic heart failure. Using refined analysis tools, computerized medical records from general practices may be helpful to answer relevant questions of health services research and contribute to quality assurance in ambulatory patient care. PMID:16429308

  19. Reviewing CSR management and marketing communication research: A discourse approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ellerup; Thomsen, Christa

    To judge from the rapidly growing body of research in the field of corporate social responsibility (CSR) management and marketing communication, there is an increasing interest in exploring the role of communication along with the transmission from implicit towards explicit CSR in the European context (Matten & Moon 2008). Many corporations today are concerned with gaining legitimacy through integrating the expectations of their stakeholders (employees, customers, NGOs, activists, government institutions, institutions of international governance) in the overall company strategy. This also includes stakeholders in or around business units established in developing countries and emerging markets (e.g. Jamali 2010; Reimann 2012). Along with the growing pressure on corporations to engage in CSR a seemingly growing number of these are concerned with disclosure, reporting, reputation, etc. issues, and act on them through different CSR communication initiatives, channels and technology, e.g. mass media and social media. However, in spite of the growing attention on adopting CSR communication strategies and tactics, there does not seem to be a common understanding and consensus of how and to which extent CSR communication may contribute to influence stakeholders’ perception of corporations’ CSR performance. At best, some studies hold that there is a general recognition of CSR communication as a potential reputation enhancer, but also that if addressed inappropriately, CSR communication cause more damage than glory to a company. Other studies focus on CSR communication as inevitable hypocrisy (Christensen et al. 2011) and as an embedded ‘promotional dilemma’ emerging when stakeholders claim CSR information, while rejecting companies who practice it as overly self-promotion (Coombs & Holladay 2012). Consequently, CSR management and marketing communication research contains understandings that point in different directions, calling for more substantial explorations of the underlying discourse arsenal that CSR researchers and practitioners draw on. Institutional theory is one way of investigating how companies deal with social change processes such as the insisting concern with CSR communication. According to institutionalists, corporations are social institutions that require institutional legitimacy in order to survive. Within an institutional framework, organizational change is addressed as a product of institutions’ pressure on companies to adopt similar practices in a given societal context (DiMaggio & Powel 1983). Considering CSR communication under the lens of insitutional theory opens for understanding the diversity and dynamics of CSR (Brammer et al. 2012).Moreover, the institutionalizing processes of CSR and related concepts enables us to explore emerging discourses, institutionalized through research and best practices of CSR. Accordingly, we address how the emergence of discourse from CSR as accountancy and transparency invites and legitimizes a new social order in which CSR is addressed as a forum for mutual understanding, recognition, negotiation and co-creation amongst stakeholders. The aim of this paper is thus to investigate the discourse construction of CSR communication on the basis of how researchers frame corporations’ CSR doings and saying within marketing and management streams of CSR research. The purpose of this investigation is to analyze how the role of communication and interaction is conceptualized in specific social contexts such as managing and marketing corporations through CSR. Many researchers argue that CSR communication is likely to increase stakeholder engagement, corporate reputation and value creation (e.g. Porter & Kramer 2006; Du et al. 2010). By looking at the rapidly growing body of research in the field of CSR management and marketing communication, the paper focuses on the positions, arguments, con?icts and actors of CSR communication across specific CSR topics and initiatives e.g. disclosure, reporting, reputation, message, channel, etc. This research is evaluated from an o

  20. Comparative research and the business system approach : an introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Robson Silva

    2003-01-01

    This paper has two distinct aims. First, I would like to present and discuss the nationalbusiness systems (NBS) framework ( Whitley, 1992,1992a,1996,1997). NBS frameworkconcerns how national variations in economic co-ordination and control systemsfacilitate and constrain organisational change. The NBS is not widely known in the LatinAmerica countries, and this paper intends to shortly present it The second aim is toquestion, based on the NBS approach, some of the assumptions about the diffusion of anew universal template for organising work (Lean Production) and its agent, themultinational corporation.

  1. Learning discourse discursive approaches to research in mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    Kieran, C

    2007-01-01

    Guest Editorial. Acknowledgements. There is more to discourse than meets the ears: Looking at thinking as communicating to learn more about mathematical learning; A. Sfard. Educational forms of initiation in mathematical culture; B. van Oers. Cultural, discursive psychology: A socio-cultural approach to studying the teaching and learning of mathematics; S. Lerman. The multiple voices of a mathematics classroom community; E. Forman, E. Ansell. 'Can any fraction be turned into a decimal?' A case study of a mathematical group discussion; M.C. O'Connor. The mathematical discourse of 13-ye

  2. Rheumatic fever pathogenesis: Approach in research needs change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Tandon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite identifying that rheumatic fever (RF is the result of an immunological reaction following group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection, the pathogenesis remains elusive. RF has been incorrectly designated as causing pancarditis, since it does not cause myocarditis. Research directed toward myocarditis, targeting myosin to unravel the pathogenesis has not succeeded in more than 60 years. RF causes permanent damage to cardiac valves. The mitral valve (MV, derived from the wall of the left ventricle, is composed of a central core of connective tissue, covered on both sides by endothelium. The left ventricle does not have either myocardial or intermyocardial connective tissue involvement in RF. By exclusion, therefore, the primary site of RF damage appears to be the endothelium. Evaluation of the histopathology and immunopathology indicates that RF is a disease of the valvular and vascular endothelium. It is not a connective tissue disorder. Research to identify pathogenesis needs to be focused toward valvular endothelium.

  3. Arguing for a Contextual Approach to European Media Education Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Martens

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we focus on how various historical, contextual, and idiosyncratic factors shape the aims and methods of current European media educational practice. We start by briefly situating the history of European media education research and policymaking. We then discuss in more detail three important strands of media literacy initiatives within the Flemish Community (Belgium. While each of these diverging types of media education partly mirrors broader trends in European media research and policymaking, their aims and instructional methods also reveal the specificity of the Flemish media literacy context. In our discussion, we draw upon these findings to pinpoint a number of key determinants which may help to better understand similarities and differences within the European Union.

  4. Building Virtual Collaborative Research Community Using Knowledge Management Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Ling Shih

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Many online communities nowadays are emphasized more on peer interactions and information sharing among members; very few online communities are built with knowledge management in nature supported by knowledge management system (KMS. This study aims to present a community of practice on how to effectively adopt a knowledge management system (KMS to neutralize a cyber collaborative learning community for a research lab in a higher education setting. A longitudinal case for 7 years was used to analyze the retention and extension of participants? community of practice experiences. Interviews were conducted for the comparison between experiences and theories. It was found that the transformations of tacit and explicit knowledge are in accordance with the framework of Nonaka?s model of knowledge management from which we elicit the strategies and suggestions to the adoption and implementation of virtual collaborative research community supported by KMS.

  5. Disclosure of Individualized Research Results: A Precautionary Approach

    OpenAIRE

    David B. Resnik

    2011-01-01

    Assessing and managing risks to participants is a central point of contention in the debate about disclosing individualized research results. Those who favor disclosure of only clinically significant results think that disclosing clinically insignificant results is risky and costly, and that harm prevention should take precedence over other ethical considerations. Those who favor giving participants the option of full disclosure regard these risks as insubstantial, and think that obligations ...

  6. Biotechnological Approaches as the New Paradigm for Insect Research

    OpenAIRE

    Diganggana Talukdar

    2014-01-01

    To meet the growing demand for food it is essential to increase the production of food. Insect pests are major constraints to global production for food and fibre that can be reduced utilizing modern biotechnological tools. In insect research field, the biotechnological tools have been applied to study various issues such as insect identification, insect control and insect genetic relationships. It has a significant role in improving efficacy effectiveness and in expanding the mar...

  7. Reviewing CSR management and marketing communication research: A discourse approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ellerup; Thomsen, Christa

    2013-01-01

    To judge from the rapidly growing body of research in the field of corporate social responsibility (CSR) management and marketing communication, there is an increasing interest in exploring the role of communication along with the transmission from implicit towards explicit CSR in the European context (Matten & Moon 2008). Many corporations today are concerned with gaining legitimacy through integrating the expectations of their stakeholders (employees, customers, NGOs, activists, government ins...

  8. Theoretical Approach of Network Communication and Collaboration in Research.

    OpenAIRE

    Acs, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration and cooperation in the virtual surround is one of the key elements in international cooperation research. This paper is about understanding functions of the virtual tools with the help of the Participation Theory of Communication (PTC). Various forms of the phenomena described as communication can all be characterized as being rooted in the need of the agents to recognize and/or to solve problems. Communication is a way of understanding the agent's behaviour as the potential abi...

  9. Changing approaches towards open education and research in tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liburd, Janne J.; Hjalager, Anne-Mette

    2010-01-01

    There is a widely held assumption that the Internet provides opportunities to rethink and reorganise the knowledge ineraction and dissemination between industry, education and research. Web 2.0 technologies are emerging as teaching and learning tools, but there is still no striking evidence to support the above-mentioned assumption. Accordingly, the puposes of this article are to, first, discuss the challenges in tourism education and address in brief the declining role of universities as learni...

  10. Approach for a joint global registration agency for research data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brase, Jan; Farquhar, Adam; Gastl, Angela; Gruttenmeier, Herbert; Heijne, Maria; Heller, Alfred; Piquet, Arlette; Rombouts, Jeroen; Sandfær, Mogens; Sens, Irena

    2009-01-01

    The scientific and information communities have largely mastered the presentation of, and linkages between, text-based electronic information by assigning persistent identifiers to give scientific literature unique identities and accessibility. Knowledge, as published through scientific literature, is often the last step in a process originating from scientific research data. Today scientists are using simulation, observational, and experimentation techniques that yield massive quantities of res...

  11. [Patents and scientific research: an ethical-legal approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darío Bergel, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to review the relationship between patents and scientific research from an ethical point of view. The recent developments in the law of industrial property led in many cases to patent discoveries, contributions of basic science, and laws of nature. This trend, which denies the central principles of the discipline, creates disturbances in scientific activity, which requires the free movement of knowledge in order to develop their potentialities. PMID:25845205

  12. CHIMERA: a service oriented computing approach for archaeological research

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Stuart; Gold, Nicolas; Hughes, Lorna

    2008-01-01

    Archaeological data is available in greater complexity and volume than ever before, which presents significant challenges and opportunities. In this position paper, we describe how a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) could be deployed not only to bring federated resources together with a unified searching capability, but also how those capabilities could themselves be used to create a ‘bottom up’ domain ontology for the resources’ subject area or areas. By linking with Virtual Research Envi...

  13. SOCIAL MARKETING : A NEW APPROACH IN MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, S.C.

    1998-01-01

    Social marketing has a proven role in marketing and many manufacturing establishments/ organizations have been marketing their products incorporating social marketing research. Social marketing has its root in the ground fact that the perceptions and expectations of the consumers are important in influencing buying behaviour. The principles of social marketing, therefore, have been extensively utilized in the areas of consumer products. These are also used in several other fields for modifyin...

  14. Improving product development practice: An action-research based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne

    1994-01-01

    In studies of new product development it has often been concluded that to a large extent new product suc-cess is tunder the influence of companies and long lists of direct norma-tive guide-lines have been formulated. Nevertheless descriptive studi that deve-lopment practice is still far from the widely published normative advice. While there may be several reasons for discrepancies between research results and prac-tice this paper focuses on problems of implementation of the identified success f...

  15. Interdisciplinary approach to disaster resilience education and research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Michael Havbro; Giuliani, Luisa; Revez, A.; Jayasena, S.; Sparf, J.; Mendez, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on the results of a survey on “Interdisciplinary working in disaster resilience” conducted by the WP4 work group of the ANDROID Network. The survey had the aim of gathering information on the state of art and practice in the field of disaster resilience and promoting co-operation and interdisciplinary methodologies in research and education. The survey has been carried out by means of a questionnaire focusing on disaster-resilience projects and on the main challenges faced in...

  16. Pronunciation in EFL instruction a research-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Szpyra-Kozlowska, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    In view of recent debates on the global spread of English and its international lingua franca role, what pronunciation models are appropriate for millions of EFL learners? Which aspects of English phonetics should be taught to foreign students and which can be neglected with little loss to successful communication? How can English pronunciation be taught in an interesting and effective way which is both learner- and teacher-friendly, in accordance with the latest scholarly and technological achievements? This research-based book addresses these and many other fundamental issues that are curren

  17. Research of nuclear engineering project management based on split package approach and multiple package approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the exploration of different models of nuclear engineering project management containing the different construction patterns of split package approach and multiple package approach in China, aiming at the construction patterns, this paper introduces a kind of typical construction of project management model by analyzing the relationship of commission and agency between the proprietor of the nuclear plants and the specialized nuclear engineering company. According to the specific characteristics of nuclear engineering, this paper designs the organization system of project management and illustrates the various responsibilities of the proprietors, nuclear engineering companies and other major partners. (authors)

  18. The lexical approach to personality: A historical review of trait taxonomic research

    OpenAIRE

    John, Oliver P.; Angleitner, Alois; Ostendorf, Fritz

    1988-01-01

    We review research aimed at the development of a compelling taxonomy of personality-descriptive terms. We identify five issues central to the construction of personality taxonomies and discuss the advantages and limitations of the lexical approach. Our review of research stimulated by this approach begins with Allport and Odbert’s trait names, retraces the procedures that led to Cattell’s personality factors, and summarizes contemporary work in English and in Dutch. Taxonomers and lay people ...

  19. Dadirri: Using a Philosophical Approach to Research to Build Trust between a Non-Indigenous Researcher and Indigenous Participants

    OpenAIRE

    Megan Marie Stronach; Daryl Adair

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This article focuses on a philosophical approach employed in a PhD research project that set out to investigate sport career transition (SCT) experiences of elite Indigenous Australian sportsmen. The research was necessary as little is known about the transition of this cohort to a life after sport, or their experiences of retirement. A key problem within the SCT paradigm is a presumption that an end to elite sport requires a process of adjustment that is common to all sportspeople—...

  20. Explaining the Epistemological Belief System: Introducing the Embedded Systemic Model and Coordinated Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schommer-Aikins, Marlene

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the basic paradigm of the epistemological belief system and to offer new ideas about the conception and study of personal epistemology, namely an embedded systemic model and coordinated teams approach to research. The epistemological belief system approach to personal epistemology is distinguished from…

  1. Communities of Practice: A Research Paradigm for the Mixed Methods Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denscombe, Martyn

    2008-01-01

    The mixed methods approach has emerged as a "third paradigm" for social research. It has developed a platform of ideas and practices that are credible and distinctive and that mark the approach out as a viable alternative to quantitative and qualitative paradigms. However, there are also a number of variations and inconsistencies within the mixed…

  2. Application of Person-Centered Approaches to Critical Quantitative Research: Exploring Inequities in College Financing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcom-Piqueux, Lindsey

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses the utility of person-centered approaches to critical quantitative researchers. These techniques, which identify groups of individuals who share similar attributes, experiences, or outcomes, are contrasted with more commonly used variable-centered approaches. An illustrative example of a latent class analysis of the college…

  3. Epidemiology program at the Savannah River Plant: a tiered approach to research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidemiology program at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) uses a tiered approach to research. As research progresses from lower through higher tiers, there is a corresponding increase in study complexity, cost, and time commitment. The approach provides a useful strategy for directing research efforts towards those employee subgroups and health endpoints that can benefit most from more in-depth studies. A variety of potential exposures, health endpoints, and employee subgroups have been and continued to be studied by research groups such as Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Los Alamos National Laboratories, Centers for Disease Control, SRP's Occupational Health Technology, and the Du Pont Company's corporate Epidemiology Section. These studies are discussed in the context of a tiered approach to research

  4. Integrating medical and research information: a big data approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilve Álvarez, Carlos M; Ayora Pais, Alberto; Ruíz Romero, Cristina; Llamas Gómez, Daniel; Carrajo García, Lino; Blanco García, Francisco J; Vázquez González, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Most of the information collected in different fields by Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de A Coruña (INIBIC) is classified as unstructured due to its high volume and heterogeneity. This situation, linked to the recent requirement of integrating it to the medical information, makes it necessary to implant specific architectures to collect and organize it before it can be analysed. The purpose of this article is to present the Hadoop framework as a solution to the problem of integrating research information in the Business Intelligence field. This framework can collect, explore, process and structure the aforementioned information, which allow us to develop an equivalent function to a data mart in an Intelligence Business system. PMID:25991244

  5. The Romanian Consumer And Online Marketing – An Exploratory Research Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantea Carmen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, online marketing has been quickly overtaking the traditional means of marketing due to several reasons, such as: low costs, the growing number of internet users and the long lasting relationship developed with them, the effortless usage of the web and of the online marketing tools. Online marketing is done by those individuals or organizations which exchange ideas and offers by using computers, online networks and interactive media, in order to reach their marketing objectives. The results of an exploratory research in terms of the consumers’ exposure, their behavior in relationship with the specific campaigns oriented toward them and the future of the online and offline direct communication at the level of the pre-defined target segments are presented in a comparative manner: online versus offline direct communication tools.

  6. Constructive Synergy in Design Science Research: A Comparative Analysis of Design Science Research and the Constructive Research Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piirainen, Kalle; Gonzalez, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    Information systems research is focused on creating knowledge which can be applied in organizations. Design science research, which specifically aims at applying existing knowledge to solve interesting and relevant business problems, has been steadily gaining support in information systems research. However, design science research is not the only design-oriented research framework available. Accordingly, this raises the question of whether there is something to learn between the different appro...

  7. DNA Microarray Technologies: A Novel Approach to Geonomic Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinman, R.; Thrall, B.; Wong, K,

    2002-01-01

    A cDNA microarray allows biologists to examine the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously. Researchers may analyze the complete transcriptional program of an organism in response to specific physiological or developmental conditions. By design, a cDNA microarray is an experiment with many variables and few controls. One question that inevitably arises when working with a cDNA microarray is data reproducibility. How easy is it to confirm mRNA expression patterns? In this paper, a case study involving the treatment of a murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) was used to obtain a rough estimate of data reproducibility. Two trials were examined and a list of genes displaying either a > 2-fold or > 4-fold increase in gene expression was compiled. Variations in signal mean ratios between the two slides were observed. We can assume that erring in reproducibility may be compensated by greater inductive levels of similar genes. Steps taken to obtain results included serum starvation of cells before treatment, tests of mRNA for quality/consistency, and data normalization.

  8. Interdisciplinary approach to disaster resilience education and research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Michael Havbro; Giuliani, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on the results of a survey on “Interdisciplinary working in disaster resilience” conducted by the WP4 work group of the ANDROID Network. The survey had the aim of gathering information on the state of art and practice in the field of disaster resilience and promoting co-operation and interdisciplinary methodologies in research and education. The survey has been carried out by means of a questionnaire focusing on disaster-resilience projects and on the main challenges faced in interdisciplinary working. The results of the questionnaire, which collected 57 answers from more than 20 European countries and few extra European countries as well, allow for three main considerations: i) projects involved 5 different disciplines as average and geography and sociology were present in the majority of the projects; ii) the level of interconnection between disciplines seems intermediate, meaning that information and methods are exchanged, but a full integration of methods and concepts into a common shared language and system of axioms is missing; iii) the lack of a common framework and common terminology represents a major barrier to good interdisciplinary work. The results highlight the role played in disaster-resilience design by social and cultural aspects, which are instead not often adequately considered in the practice. The establishment of an education on resilient design of urban system, which includes both social and technological aspects, emerges as a possible solution to overcome barriers to interdisciplinary work and improve the efficacy and quality of resilience design.

  9. Community-based participatory research projects and policy engagement to protect environmental health on St Lawrence Island, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela K. Miller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives . This article synthesizes discussion of collaborative research results, interventions and policy engagement for St Lawrence Island (SLI, Alaska, during the years 2000–2012. Methods . As part of on-going community-based participatory research (CBPR studies on SLI, 5 discrete exposure-assessment projects were conducted: (a a biomonitoring study of human blood serum; (b–d 3 investigations of levels of contaminants in environmental media at an abandoned military site at Northeast Cape – using sediment cores and plants, semi-permeable membrane devices and blackfish, respectively; and (e a study of traditional foods. Results . Blood serum in residents of SLI showed elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs with higher levels among those exposed to the military site at Northeast Cape, an important traditional subsistence-use area. Environmental studies at the military site demonstrated that the site is a continuing source of PCBs to a major watershed, and that clean-up operations at the military site generated PCB-contaminated dust on plants in the region. Important traditional foods eaten by the people of SLI showed elevated concentrations of PCBs, which are primarily derived from the long-range transport of persistent pollutants that are transported by atmospheric and marine currents from more southerly latitudes to the north. Interventions . An important task for all CBPR projects is to conduct intervention strategies as needed in response to research results. Because of the findings of the CBPR projects on SLI, the CBPR team and the people of the Island are actively engaging in interventions to ensure cleanup of the formerly used military sites; reform chemicals policy on a national level; and eliminate persistent pollutants internationally. The goal is to make the Island and other northern/Arctic communities safe for themselves and future generations. Conclusions . As part of the CBPR projects conducted from 2000 to 2012, a series of exposure assessments demonstrate that the leaders of SLI have reason to be concerned about the health of people due to the presence of carcinogenic chemicals as measured in biomonitoring and environmental samples and important traditional foods.

  10. Experience Exchange Group (EEG) Approach as a Means for Research to be rooted in Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to clarify if and how an Experience Exchange Group(EEG) can be involved in a research process in the area of industrial management. For exemplification of the topic an ongoing research in global manufacturing is referred to. In this research it was after a series of preliminary studies found interesting to set up an EEG composed of representatives from industry and a researcher. In the paper some general research methods pertinent to the area industrial management are discussed. The EEG concept is introduced and characterised in comparison with the other methods. EEG activities are described and a tentative coupling to the phases in a research process is proposed. Following this is a discussion of methodological and quality requirements. It is considered how EEG activities could possibly contribute to an industrial rooted research. The paper ends up looking at future research areas and research methods, including application of the EEG approach.

  11. Exploring Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Approaches to Business Communication Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope-Ruark, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    With our core focus on teaching and scholarship, business communication teacher-scholars are well placed to become leaders in the international Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) movement. In this article, SoTL is defined and contextualized, three SoTL research approaches are introduced, and disciplinary research projects are suggested. A…

  12. Feminist Approaches to Triangulation: Uncovering Subjugated Knowledge and Fostering Social Change in Mixed Methods Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the deployment of triangulation in the service of uncovering subjugated knowledge and promoting social change for women and other oppressed groups. Feminist approaches to mixed methods praxis create a tight link between the research problem and the research design. An analysis of selected case studies of feminist praxis…

  13. Approaches and Methodological As Well As Interpretative Issues in Quality of Life Research in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Hasanah, C. I.

    2003-01-01

    Quality of life measures are designed to enable patients’ perspectives on the impact of health and healthcare interventions on their lives to be assessed and taken into account in clinical decision-making and research. This paper discusses some approaches, methodological as well as interpretative issues of health related quality of life research.

  14. Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches: Some Arguments for Mixed Methods Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Thorleif

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present paper is to elaborate 4 general advantages of the mixed methods approach. Another purpose is to propose a 5-phase evaluation design, and to demonstrate its usefulness for mixed methods research. The account is limited to research on groups in need of treatment, i.e., vulnerable groups, and the advantages of mixed methods…

  15. Sailing between Scylla and Charybdis: Incorporating Qualitative Approaches into Child Psychotherapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    Starting from the acknowledged gap between research and practice in child psychotherapy, this paper offers an historical perspective on the relation between these two activities, and suggests that qualitative approaches to research may offer new ways of bringing them together. After introducing the fundamental concepts of qualitative analysis,…

  16. Developing and Managing University-Industry Research Collaborations through a Process Methodology/Industrial Sector Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbin, Simon P.

    2010-01-01

    A management framework has been successfully utilized at Imperial College London in the United Kingdom to improve the process for developing and managing university-industry research collaborations. The framework has been part of a systematic approach to increase the level of research contracts from industrial sources, to strengthen the…

  17. Current Cognitive Distortion Theory and Research: An Internalist Approach to Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    This review examines contemporary cognitive distortion theory and research relating to sexual offenders. In particular, this review highlights that researchers--to date--have tended to adopt an internalist approach to sexual offenders' cognition which views offence-supportive cognitive activity as occurring solely within the mind. This review…

  18. Understanding neighbourhoods, communities and environments: new approaches for social work research

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Sally; Burgess, Stephen; Grogan-Kaylor, Andy; DELVA, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses some new ways in which social work research can explore the interaction between neighbourhoods and child and adult wellbeing. The authors note that social work practices are often criticised for taking an individualistic approach and paying too little attention to the service user’s environment. The article uses examples of research projects from Chile, the United States of America and Wales, to discuss the use of spatially oriented research methods for understanding ne...

  19. Meaning: lost, found or 'made' in translation? : A hermeneutical approach to cross-language interview research.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fersch, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative research that includes interviews in languages foreign to the researcher(s) has become increasingly common. However, there is surprisingly little reflection on the methodological implications of such research practices. Furthermore, strategies on how to analyse cross- and multi-language interview material are lacking. The aim of this article is to present possible ways of handling these challenges, focusing mainly on analysis. I propose a hermeneutical approach to the issue. First, I will discuss the epistemological/methodological foundations of the approach before proposing some 'tools' to help practically tackle the 'problem' of analysis using the chosen methodological perspective. Rather than ignoring or trying to circumvent the question of foreign language and/or translation, in the proposed approach linguistic questions and questions of translation are the central focus.

  20. Meaning: lost, found or 'made' in translation? : A hermeneutical approach to cross-language interview research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fersch, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative research that includes interviews in languages foreign to the researcher(s) has become increasingly common. However, there is surprisingly little reflection on the methodological implications of such research practices. Furthermore, strategies on how to analyse cross- and multi-language interview material are lacking. The aim of this article is to present possible ways of handling these challenges, focusing mainly on analysis. I propose a hermeneutical approach to the issue. First, I will discuss the epistemological/methodological foundations of the approach before proposing some 'tools' to help practically tackle the 'problem' of analysis using the chosen methodological perspective. Rather than ignoring or trying to circumvent the question of foreign language and/or translation, in the proposed approach linguistic questions and questions of translation are the central focus.

  1. Using qualitative inquiry and participatory research approaches to develop prevention research: validating a life course perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Janna; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Application of life course theory (LCT) holds promise for advancing knowledge toward the elimination of health disparities. This article validates the usefulness of employing a life course perspective when conducting health disparities research. We provide an overview of LCT as it applies to our research program in prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among Latino teen parents. We illustrate the goodness-of-fit of our research with the basic premises of LCT. Though early adverse life experiences impact health over the lifespan, strength-based HIV prevention programs designed for Latino teen parents that recognize the reality of their lives may alter their health trajectory. PMID:23168344

  2. How Psychical Researchers Construct Their Research as Scientific: A Discursive Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Loraine, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Many academics have attempted to resolve the demarcation problem through boundary work. Due to this problem, it is difficult to distinguish between Science and Non-Science. Even some reasoned Science, such as Psychology, are accused of being unscientific. This investigation looks at how the designated Pseudoscience of Psychical research constructs its research as scientific when widely believed to investigate “non-science”. By analysing this construction through discourse analysis, a better u...

  3. How to conduct research on burnout: advantages and disadvantages of a unidimensional approach in burnout research

    OpenAIRE

    Brenninkmeijer, V; VanYperen, N

    2003-01-01

    When conducting research on burnout, it may be difficult to decide whether one should report results separately for each burnout dimension or whether one should combine the dimensions. Although the multidimensionality of the burnout concept is widely acknowledged, for research purposes it is sometimes convenient to regard burnout as a unidimensional construct. This article deals with the question of whether and when it may be appropriate to treat burnout as a unidimensional variable, and pres...

  4. Integrating relationship- and research-based approaches in Australian health promotion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinner, Christiane; Carter, Stacy M; Rychetnik, Lucie; Li, Vincy; Daley, Michelle; Zask, Avigdor; Lloyd, Beverly

    2015-12-01

    We examine the perspectives of health promotion practitioners on their approaches to determining health promotion practice, in particular on the role of research and relationships in this process. Using Grounded Theory methods, we analysed 58 semi-structured interviews with 54 health promotion practitioners in New South Wales, Australia. Practitioners differentiated between relationship-based and research-based approaches as two sources of knowledge to guide health promotion practice. We identify several tensions in seeking to combine these approaches in practice and describe the strategies that participants adopted to manage these tensions. The strategies included working in an evidence-informed rather than evidence-based way, creating new evidence about relationship-based processes and outcomes, adopting 'relationship-based' research and evaluation methods, making research and evaluation useful for communities, building research and evaluation skills and improving collaboration between research and evaluation and programme implementation staff. We conclude by highlighting three systemic factors which could further support the integration of research-based and relationship-based health promotion practices: (i) expanding conceptions of health promotion evidence, (ii) developing 'relationship-based' research methods that enable practitioners to measure complex social processes and outcomes and to facilitate community participation and benefit, and (iii) developing organizational capacity. PMID:24800758

  5. A problem-based approach to teaching research methodology to medical graduates in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Jalalian Hosseini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Physicians are reticent to participate in research projects for avariety of reasons. Facilitating the active involvement ofdoctors in research projects is a high priority for the IranianBlood Transfusion Organization (IBTO. A one-month trainingcourse on research methodology was conducted for a groupof physicians in Mashhad, in northeast Iran. The participantswere divided in ten groups. They prepared a researchproposal under the guidance of a workshop leader. Thequality of the research proposals, which were prepared by allparticipants, went beyond our expectations. All of theresearch proposals were relevant to blood safety. In this briefreport we describe our approach.

  6. Modeling and Analysis of Multidiscipline Research Teams at NASA Langley Research Center: A Systems Thinking Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Multidisciplinary analysis and design is inherently a team activity due to the variety of required expertise and knowledge. As a team activity, multidisciplinary research cannot escape the issues that affect all teams. The level of technical diversity required to perform multidisciplinary analysis and design makes the teaming aspects even more important. A study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a model of multidiscipline teams that can be used to help understand their dynamics and identify key factors that influence their effectiveness. The study sought to apply the elements of systems thinking to better understand the factors, both generic and Langley-specific, that influence the effectiveness of multidiscipline teams. The model of multidiscipline research teams developed during this study has been valuable in identifying means to enhance team effectiveness, recognize and avoid problem behaviors, and provide guidance for forming and coordinating multidiscipline teams.

  7. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J; Law, G. Lynn; McDermott, Jason G.; Proll, Sean C.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; KATZE, MICHAEL G.

    2011-01-01

    The twentieth century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and waterborne illnesses are frequent, multidrug-resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the past—including the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biology—have not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the twen...

  8. Towards Principles-Based Approaches to Governance of Health-related Research using Personal Data

    OpenAIRE

    Laurie, Graeme; Sethi, Nayha

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances in the quality, availability and linkage potential of health data for research make the need to develop robust and effective information governance mechanisms more pressing than ever before; they also lead us to question the utility of governance devices used hitherto such as consent and anonymisation. This article assesses and advocates a principles-based approach, contrasting this with traditional rule-based approaches, and proposes a model of principled proportionate...

  9. Utilization of the Building-Block Approach in Structural Mechanics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Marshall; Jegley, Dawn C.; McGowan, David M.; Bush, Harold G.; Waters, W. Allen

    2005-01-01

    In the last 20 years NASA has worked in collaboration with industry to develop enabling technologies needed to make aircraft safer and more affordable, extend their lifetime, improve their reliability, better understand their behavior, and reduce their weight. To support these efforts, research programs starting with ideas and culminating in full-scale structural testing were conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. Each program contained development efforts that (a) started with selecting the material system and manufacturing approach; (b) moved on to experimentation and analysis of small samples to characterize the system and quantify behavior in the presence of defects like damage and imperfections; (c) progressed on to examining larger structures to examine buckling behavior, combined loadings, and built-up structures; and (d) finally moved to complicated subcomponents and full-scale components. Each step along the way was supported by detailed analysis, including tool development, to prove that the behavior of these structures was well-understood and predictable. This approach for developing technology became known as the "building-block" approach. In the Advanced Composites Technology Program and the High Speed Research Program the building-block approach was used to develop a true understanding of the response of the structures involved through experimentation and analysis. The philosophy that if the structural response couldn't be accurately predicted, it wasn't really understood, was critical to the progression of these programs. To this end, analytical techniques including closed-form and finite elements were employed and experimentation used to verify assumptions at each step along the way. This paper presents a discussion of the utilization of the building-block approach described previously in structural mechanics research and development programs at NASA Langley Research Center. Specific examples that illustrate the use of this approach are included from recent research and development programs for both subsonic and supersonic transports.

  10. Perspectives on a Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Implementation of Planned Emergent Use Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racedo Africano, Carlos J; Gallo de Moraes, Alice; Smischney, Nathan J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the viewpoints of three members of a research team, on the approach to teamwork in the development of an emergent use clinical trial when dealing with diversity of opinions, in order to facilitate stakeholder buy-in. We also discuss a specific approach to the coordination of the team members, which in our opinion had a positive impact on the implementation of the project. We also comment on the influence of the team organization in the timeline and completion of a clinical trial. We hope to start a conversation on team dynamics in the design of clinical trials, especially in the context of emergent use research. PMID:26386913

  11. Dadirri: Using a Philosophical Approach to Research to Build Trust between a Non-Indigenous Researcher and Indigenous Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Marie Stronach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article focuses on a philosophical approach employed in a PhD research project that set out to investigate sport career transition (SCT experiences of elite Indigenous Australian sportsmen. The research was necessary as little is known about the transition of this cohort to a life after sport, or their experiences of retirement. A key problem within the SCT paradigm is a presumption that an end to elite sport requires a process of adjustment that is common to all sportspeople—a rather narrow perspective that fails to acknowledge the situational complexity and socio-cultural diversity of elite athletes. With such a range of personal circumstances, it is reasonable to suppose that athletes from different cultural groups will have different individual SCT needs. The researcher is non-Indigenous and mature aged: she encountered a number of challenges in her efforts to understand Indigenous culture and its important sensitivities, and to build trust with the Indigenous male participants she interviewed. An Indigenous philosophy known as Dadirri, which emphasises deep and respectful listening, guided the development of the research design and methodology. Consistent with previous studies conducted by non-Indigenous researchers, an open-ended and conversational approach to interviewing Indigenous respondents was developed. The objective was for the voices of the athletes to be heard, allowing the collection of rich data based on the participants’ perspectives about SCT. An overview of the findings is presented, illustrating that Indigenous athletes experience SCT in complex and distinctive ways. The article provides a model for non-Indigenous researchers to conduct qualitative research with Indigenous people.

  12. Toward an integrated approach to nutritional quality, environmental sustainability, and economic viability: research and measurement gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herforth, Anna; Frongillo, Edward A; Sassi, Franco; Mclean, Mireille Seneclauze; Arabi, Mandana; Tirado, Cristina; Remans, Roseline; Mantilla, Gilma; Thomson, Madeleine; Pingali, Prabhu

    2014-12-01

    Nutrition is affected by numerous environmental and societal causes. This paper starts with a simple framework based on three domains: nutritional quality, economic viability, and environmental sustainability, and calls for an integrated approach in research to simultaneously account for all three. It highlights limitations in the current understanding of each domain, and how they influence one another. Five research topics are identified: measuring the three domains (nutritional quality, economic viability, environmental sustainability); modeling across disciplines; furthering the analysis of food systems in relation to the three domains; connecting climate change and variability to nutritional quality; and increasing attention to inequities among population groups in relation to the three domains. For an integrated approach to be developed, there is a need to identify and disseminate available metrics, modeling techniques, and tools to researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. This is a first step so that a systems approach that takes into account potential environmental and economic trade-offs becomes the norm in analyzing nutrition and food-security patterns. Such an approach will help fill critical knowledge gaps and will guide researchers seeking to define and address specific research questions in nutrition in their wider socioeconomic and environmental contexts. PMID:25351044

  13. Towards Principles-Based Approaches to Governance of Health-related Research using Personal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Graeme; Sethi, Nayha

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances in the quality, availability and linkage potential of health data for research make the need to develop robust and effective information governance mechanisms more pressing than ever before; they also lead us to question the utility of governance devices used hitherto such as consent and anonymisation. This article assesses and advocates a principles-based approach, contrasting this with traditional rule-based approaches, and proposes a model of principled proportionate governance. It is suggested that the approach not only serves as the basis for good governance in contemporary data linkage but also that it provides a platform to assess legal reforms such as the draft Data Protection Regulation. PMID:24416087

  14. USING FORMATIVE RESEARCH TO DEVELOP A CONTEXT-SPECIFIC APPROACH TO INFORMED CONSENT FOR CLINICAL TRIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Corneli, Amy L; Bentley, Margaret E.; Sorenson, James R.; Henderson, Gail E; van der Horst, Charles; Moses, Agnes; Nkhoma, Jacqueline; TENTHANI, Lyson; Ahmed, Yusuf; Heilig, Charles M; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2006-01-01

    Participant understanding is of particular concern when obtaining informed consent. Recommendations for improving understanding include disclosing information using culturally appropriate and innovative approaches. To increase the effectiveness of the consent process for a clinical trial in Malawi on interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV during breastfeeding, formative research was conducted to explore the community’s understanding of medical research as well as how to ...

  15. New approaches to social and economic research on schistosomiasis in TDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Vlassoff

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes new approaches to social and economic research being developed by the Social and Economic Research component of the Special Programme for Research and Trainning in Tropical Diseases of the World Health Organization. One of these is a study to acess the possibility of identifying high risk communities for urinary schistosomiasis through a "mailed"questionaire approach distributed through an existing administrative system, thereby eliminating the need for face-to-face interviews by the research or disease control team. This approach, developed by the Swiss Tropical Institute in Ifakara, Tanzania, i s currently being tested in seven other African countries. The paper also describes a change of emphasis of economic research on schistosomiasis, focusing on the intra-household effects of the disease on rural households, rather than, as previously done, studying the impact of the disease on the productivity of individual wage labourers. Other priorities involve the identification of epidemiological information neede for improoved decision-making regarding acceptable treatment strategies in endemic areas with limited financial capacity, as well as research on how the adverse effects of economic development projects can be alleviated.

  16. New approaches to social and economic research on schistosomiasis in TDR

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Carol, Vlassoff.

    Full Text Available This paper describes new approaches to social and economic research being developed by the Social and Economic Research component of the Special Programme for Research and Trainning in Tropical Diseases of the World Health Organization. One of these is a study to acess the possibility of identifying [...] high risk communities for urinary schistosomiasis through a "mailed"questionaire approach distributed through an existing administrative system, thereby eliminating the need for face-to-face interviews by the research or disease control team. This approach, developed by the Swiss Tropical Institute in Ifakara, Tanzania, i s currently being tested in seven other African countries. The paper also describes a change of emphasis of economic research on schistosomiasis, focusing on the intra-household effects of the disease on rural households, rather than, as previously done, studying the impact of the disease on the productivity of individual wage labourers. Other priorities involve the identification of epidemiological information neede for improoved decision-making regarding acceptable treatment strategies in endemic areas with limited financial capacity, as well as research on how the adverse effects of economic development projects can be alleviated.

  17. Commentary: Evaluating faculty productivity in research: an interesting approach, but questions remain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Keith A

    2009-11-01

    Academic institutions must have strategies for evaluating research productivity by faculty. Such strategies are useful in guiding resource allocations for the research enterprise, for decisions on faculty promotions, and for broader institutional planning, including program development. Commonly, decisions about research space utilization, and funding to support the space, are considered within the purview of the institutional administration. Peer review, in manuscript and grant submissions and the promotions process, is more commonly used to evaluate the impact of faculty research. The article by Iyengar et al in this issue of Academic Medicine takes an interesting approach to evaluate research productivity of individual faculty by integrating benchmarks for research funding and publication impact. The strategy of using these benchmarks to partition faculty into quadrants to guide faculty development activities is clever and useful. Less clear are the philosophy and long-term utility of the approach. The applicability to the stated goal of promoting multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary translational research is not obvious, nor is it apparent that faculty will continue to view decisions as transparent and fair over the longer term. Nevertheless, the authors' article is a welcome contribution at a time when many institutions are struggling with issues of evaluating faculty investigators and allocating resources for research. PMID:19858795

  18. Sustaining a Regional Emerging Infectious Disease Research Network: A Trust-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornpit Silkavute

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Asia Partnership on Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (APEIR was initiated in 2006 to promote regional collaboration in avian influenza research. In 2009, the partnership expanded its scope to include all emerging infectious diseases. APEIR partners include public health and animal researchers, officials and practitioners from Cambodia, China, Lao PDR, Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. APEIR has accomplished several major achievements in three key areas of activity: (i knowledge generation (i.e., through research; (ii research capacity building (e.g., by developing high-quality research proposals, by planning and conducting joint research projects, by adopting a broader Ecohealth/OneHealth approach; and (iii policy advocacy (e.g., by disseminating research results to policy makers. This paper describes these achievements, with a focus on the partnership's five major areas of emerging infectious disease research: wild migratory birds, backyard poultry systems, socio-economic impact, policy analysis, and control measures. We highlight two case studies illustrating how the partnership's research results are being used to inform policy. We also highlight lessons learned after five years of working hard to build our partnership and the value added by a multi-country, multi-sectoral, multi-disciplinary research partnership like APEIR.

  19. Sustaining a regional emerging infectious disease research network: a trust-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkavute, Pornpit; Tung, Dinh Xuan; Jongudomsuk, Pongpisut

    2013-01-01

    The Asia Partnership on Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (APEIR) was initiated in 2006 to promote regional collaboration in avian influenza research. In 2009, the partnership expanded its scope to include all emerging infectious diseases. APEIR partners include public health and animal researchers, officials and practitioners from Cambodia, China, Lao PDR, Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. APEIR has accomplished several major achievements in three key areas of activity: (i) knowledge generation (i.e., through research); (ii) research capacity building (e.g., by developing high-quality research proposals, by planning and conducting joint research projects, by adopting a broader Ecohealth/OneHealth approach); and (iii) policy advocacy (e.g., by disseminating research results to policy makers). This paper describes these achievements, with a focus on the partnership's five major areas of emerging infectious disease research: wild migratory birds, backyard poultry systems, socio-economic impact, policy analysis, and control measures. We highlight two case studies illustrating how the partnership's research results are being used to inform policy. We also highlight lessons learned after five years of working hard to build our partnership and the value added by a multi-country, multi-sectoral, multi-disciplinary research partnership like APEIR. PMID:23362419

  20. Action Research as an Approach to Integrating Sustainability into MBA Programs: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Suzanne; Dunphy, Dexter

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory project that employed an action research approach to integrating sustainability into core subjects in the MBA program at an Australian university. It documents the change methodology used, the theoretical basis for this choice, and the project outcomes. It then identifies some key enabling factors and…

  1. Antecedents and Consequences of Service Quality in a Higher Education Context: A Qualitative Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Parves; Wong, Ho Yin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to report on the perception of students in regard to critical antecedents, dimensions and consequences of service quality with an aim to develop a theoretical model in the context of a university in Australia. Design/methodology/approach: This research used focus group discussions with 19 students who had been…

  2. From a Disciplinary to an Interdisciplinary Design Research: Developing an Integrative Approach for Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen Huei; Wong, Ju-Joan

    2015-01-01

    As the new generation of designers face more complex design issues, the forms of design research start to shift towards a user-centred approach to problem-solving. The cooperation and communication among various fields and specialisations are becoming more complex; in many practical design cases, in particular, technology developers face…

  3. Christian Faculty Teaching Reflective Practice: An Action Research Approach to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arch Chee Keen

    2009-01-01

    The article reports the final results of a collaborative action research project that devised a reflective approach to theological education. This project lives within the tension between prescribing and implementing a model of theological education and working at the level of applied understanding. Living within this tension are six professors in…

  4. Narratives as Zones of Dialogic Constructions: A Bakhtinian Approach to Data in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitanova, Gergana

    2013-01-01

    Narratives have become increasingly important in the field of applied linguistics, as recent publications have illustrated, yet narrative analysis could still be considered undertheorized. This article outlines a specific, dialogical approach to the narrative analysis of data in qualitative research. Building on Bakhtin's notion of dialogue,…

  5. Developing Digital Courseware for a Virtual Nano-Biotechnology Laboratory: A Design-Based Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Hsiu-Ping; Chen, Tzy-Ling; Lin, Weijane; Sheen, Horn-Jiunn

    2014-01-01

    This paper first reviews applications of multimedia in engineering education, especially in laboratory learning. It then illustrates a model and accreditation criteria adopted for developing a specific set of nanotechnology laboratory courseware and reports the design-based research approach used in designing and developing the e-learning…

  6. Strategic Management Approaches Preference in Turkish Industry: A Research on ISO 1000 Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Erol

    Full Text Available Positioning school approach that gives prominence to the effect of positioning and environmental powers in industry and resource-based approach that emphasize the importance of firm’s resource, capabilities and competences are two basic approaches that express firms’ performance differences in strategic management field. Which one of these basic approaches will be chosen occupies an important place in strategic management subjects. Purpose of this study is to reveal preferences of managers and accordingly firms about strategic management approaches in branch of Turkish industry and to determine whether positioning school approach or resource-based approach is efficient and predominant in success of firms from the viewpoints of managers. The research was carried out upon the first 500 big industrial enterprises and second 500 big industrial enterprises carrying on their business in industrial sector in Turkey as published by Istanbul Chamber of Industry (ISO. As a result of the analysis of the acquired data, it has been precipitated that in Turkey, managers of the biggest 1000 industrial enterprises, accordingly firms, adopt positioning school approach.

  7. The Idiographic Approach in Psychological Research. The Challenge of Overcoming Old Distinctions Without Risking to Homogenize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca Picione, Raffaele

    2015-09-01

    In this paper I discuss the relevance of the single-case approach in psychological research. Based upon work by Hurtado-Parrado and López-López (Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science, 2015), who outlined the possibility that Single-Case Methods (SCMs) could be a valid alternative to Null Hypothesis Significance Testing (NHST), I introduce the idiographic approach (Salvatore and Valsiner Theory & Psychology, 20(6), 817-833, 2010; Valsiner Cultural & Psychology, 20(2), 147-159, 2014; Salvatore Culture & Psychology, 20(4), 477-500, 2014) based on the logic of abductive generalization, rather than the logic of inductive generalization. I present the theoretical, epistemological and methodological assumptions that this approach proposes; in particular, I discuss the re-conceptualization of some now obsolete rigid opposition, the inconsistency of sample use in psychological research, the relationship between uniqueness and general, the relationship between theory and phenomena, and finally the validation process. PMID:25939530

  8. THE TEACHING RESEARCH FOCUSED ON THE MOVEMENT: HEURISTIC APPROACHES AND ELEMENTS OF COMPLEXITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AIELLO PAOLA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The teaching research in the motor field that investigates the different features and the specificity of the teaching of the movement activities should fix methodological strategies based on some ontological considerations. The object of this theoretical-argumentative work is a possible definition of a specific field of research on the movement activities, trying to explain their original and exclusive elements which require a selection of some methods of educational research based on precise ontological positions.The method adopted has required a review of literature for a critical exam of the main methodological approaches used to study the movement activities, combining it with some philosophical considerations whichguided the different approaches of the educational research.The results led to the conclusion that it can be necessary an epistemological consideration to assume clear ontological positions to deal with the methodological research on the teaching of the motor activities in the educational field. The methodological complexity demanded by the heuristic activity in the motor field requires amethodology of research based on the interpretative methods and techniques used by the educational research, which have to be shaped according to the main issues of the teaching of the movement, requiring as well the inclusion of specific protocols, techniques and tools which are indispensable to the observation, the analysis andthe evaluation

  9. Evaluating a team-based approach to research capacity building using a matched-pairs study design

    OpenAIRE

    Holden Libby; Pager Susan; Golenko Xanthe; Ware Robert S; Weare Robyn

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is a continuing need for research capacity building initiatives for primary health care professionals. Historically strategies have focused on interventions aimed at individuals but more recently theoretical frameworks have proposed team-based approaches. Few studies have evaluated these new approaches. This study aims to evaluate a team-based approach to research capacity building (RCB) in primary health using a validated quantitative measure of research capacity in...

  10. Quantitative and qualitative approaches in educational research — problems and examples of controlled understanding through interpretive methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Karl

    1987-06-01

    In the methodological discussion of recent years it has become apparent that many research problems, including problems relating to the theory of educational science, cannot be solved by using quantitative methods. The multifaceted aspects of human behaviour and all its environment-bound subtle nuances, especially the process of education or the development of identity, cannot fully be taken into account within a rigid neopositivist approach. In employing the paradigm of symbolic interactionism as a suitable model for the analysis of processes of education and formation, the research has generally to start out from complex reciprocal social interactions instead of unambigious connections of causes. In analysing several particular methodological problems, the article demonstrates some weaknesses of quantitative approaches and then shows the advantages in and the necessity for using qualitative research tools.

  11. A Review of Approaches of Resource-based Empirical Research in Banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Gao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This research reviews the approaches employed in banking empirical studies that use the resource-based view as a core theoretical anchor to relate bank resources to performance outcomes. The review dwelt on measurement issues and strategies for controlling confounding factors. Six approaches of measuring bank resources are identified as: indirect assessment through the use of observable attributes, direct assessment through output counts, direct assessment by top managers, direct assessment by customers, direct assessment by experts and indirect assessment through inductive case studies. Three approaches to measuring bank performance are identified as: the use of only financial measures, the use of only nonfinancial measures and the use of a mix of financial and nonfinancial measures. Overall, approaches that relate bank resources, strategy and performance have great potential to advance the resource-based view theory from being a mere theoretical framework to being a practical framework for practicing managers in banking firms.

  12. Community health workers support community-based participatory research ethics: lessons learned along the research-to-practice-to-community continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Selina A; Blumenthal, Daniel S

    2012-11-01

    Ethical principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR)--specifically, community engagement, mutual learning, action-reflection, and commitment to sustainability--stem from the work of Kurt Lewin and Paulo Freire. These are particularly relevant in cancer disparities research because vulnerable populations are often construed to be powerless, supposedly benefiting from programs over which they have no control. The long history of exploiting minority individuals and communities for research purposes (the U.S. Public Health Service Tuskegee Syphilis Study being the most notorious) has left a legacy of mistrust of research and researchers. The purpose of this article is to examine experiences and lessons learned from community health workers (CHWs) in the 10-year translation of an educational intervention in the research-to-practice-to-community continuum. We conclude that the central role played by CHWs enabled the community to gain some degree of control over the intervention and its delivery, thus operationalizing the ethical principles of CBPR. PMID:23124502

  13. Preparatory and field work phases in the qualitative empirical research process in management: the case studies approach

    OpenAIRE

    Rua, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to promote qualitative methodology within the scientific community of management. The specific objective is oriented to propose an empirical research process based on case study method. This is to ensure rigor in the empirical research process, that future research may follow a similar procedure to that is proposed. Design/methodology/approach: Following a qualitative methodological approach, we propose a research process that develops according to four ph...

  14. Synthesizing Marketing, Community Engagement, and Systems Science Approaches for Advancing Translational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Shawn M; Leeman, Jennifer; McCall, Pamela; Hassmiller-Lich, Kristen; Bobashev, Georgiy; Schwartz, Todd A; Gilmore, Robert; Riggan, Scott; Gil, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The adoption and implementation of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) are the goals of translational research; however, potential end-users' perceptions of an EBI value have contributed to low rates of adoption. In this article, we describe our application of emerging dissemination and implementation science theoretical perspectives, community engagement, and systems science principles to develop a novel EBI dissemination approach. Using consumer-driven, graphics-rich simulation, the approach demonstrates predicted implementation effects on health and employment outcomes for socioeconomically disadvantaged women at the local level and is designed to increase adoption interest of county program managers accountable for improving these outcomes in their communities. PMID:26244479

  15. Social media targeting of health messages. A promising approach for research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsch, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    In their contribution, Remschmidt and colleagues (1) put forward an innovative approach for recruiting female, German study participants from diverse social and ethnical backgrounds to assess their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding HPV vaccination. The approach involves placing advertisements on the social media platform Facebook that specify tags for not only the sought after socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender) but also self-relevant aspects of the target group. These tags determine which Facebook users will see the ad. By sequentially adjusting the tags, the researchers were able to recruit different sub-populations, resulting in a final sample similar to a representative German sample for a particular age group. PMID:25483481

  16. Processes of international collaboration in management research : A reflexive, autoethnographic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsen, Karsten; Butler, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Scientists and academics increasingly work on collaborative projects and write papers in international research teams. This trend is driven by greater publishing demands in terms of the quality and breadth of data and analysis methods, which tend to be difficult to achieve without collaborating across institutional and national boundaries. Yet, our understanding of the collaborative processes in an academic setting and the potential tensions associated with them remains limited. We use a reflexive, autoethnographic approach to explicitly investigate our own experiences of international collaborative research. We offer systematic insights into the social and intellectual processes of academic collaborative writing, identifying six lessons and two key tensions that influence the success of international research teams. Our findings may benefit the formation of future coauthor teams, the preparation of research proposals, and the development of PhD curricula.

  17. Forging New Service Paths: Institutional Approaches to Providing Research Data Management Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Raboin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper describes three different institutional experiences in developing research data management programs and services, challenges/opportunities and lessons learned.Overview: This paper is based on the Librarian Panel Discussion during the 4th Annual University of Massachusetts and New England Region e-Science Symposium. Librarians representing large public and private research universities presented an overview of service models developed at their respective organizations to bring support for data management and eScience to their communities. The approaches described include two library-based, integrated service models and one collaboratively-staffed, center-based service model.Results: Three institutions describe their experiences in creating the organizational capacity for research data management support services. Although each institutional approach is unique, common challenges include garnering administrative support, managing the integration of services with new or existing staff structures, and continuing to meet researchers needs as they evolve.Conclusions: There is no one way to provide research data management services, but any staff position, committee, or formalized center reflects an overarching organizational commitment to data management support.

  18. A cloud-based data network approach for translational cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Tsoumakos, Dimitrios; Ghanem, Moustafa

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new model and associated technology for constructing and managing self-organizing data to support translational cancer research studies. We employ a semantic content network approach to address the challenges of managing cancer research data. Such data is heterogeneous, large, decentralized, growing and continually being updated. Moreover, the data originates from different information sources that may be partially overlapping, creating redundancies as well as contradictions and inconsistencies. Building on the advantages of elasticity of cloud computing, we deploy the cancer data networks on top of the CELAR Cloud platform to enable more effective processing and analysis of Big cancer data. PMID:25417028

  19. Local IT infrastructure assessment methodologies and approach in large enterprises : research project scope - branch office consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    Achonu, Davids

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to develop a model for assessing information technology infrastructure in large enterprises/organisations. The key components of this thesis are: first, to develop a generic assessment process approach that can be applied in IT enterprises, and secondly, to evaluate the practical application of these assessment processes and methods within an infrastructure transformation project in a large enterprise. The study covers theoretical research which gathers info...

  20. The Impact of Task-based Approach on Iranian EFL Learners’ Motivation in Writing Research Abstracts

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Khalili Sabet; Abdorreza Tahriri; Eshrat Bazarmaj Haghi

    2014-01-01

    Writing as a complex activity requires systematic attention to motivational conditions (Bruning and Horn, 2000). This study aimed at examining whether there is a relationship between EFL learners’ motivation and their performance in writing research abstracts as well as the impact of task- based approach on the participants’ motivation. For these aims, sixty-eight EFL university students at intermediate level of proficiency participated in this study. Thirty-two of the participati...

  1. A multimodel approach to building thermal simulation for design and research purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer, Harry; Garde, Francois; Gatina, Jean-Claude; Brau, Jean

    1998-01-01

    The designers pre-occupation to reduce energy consumption and to achieve better thermal ambience levels, has favoured the setting up of numerous building thermal dynamic simulation programs. The progress in the modelling of phenomenas and its transfer into the professional field has resulted in various numerical approaches ranging from softwares dedicated to architects for design use to tools for laboratory use by the expert thermal researcher. This analysis shows that each ...

  2. Surgical Approaches to Vascular Access for Large-Caliber Devices in Preclinical Research Models

    OpenAIRE

    Barka, Noah; Rakow, Nancy; Lentz, Linnea; Kopcak, Michael; Wika, Kent; Menk, Ana; Green, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous vascular access options in preclinical models are often smaller than the relevant structures in humans or undersized for early-prototype research devices. Here we describe the surgical approaches and results for surgical vascular access sites in preclinical swine and sheep models. Fourteen adult miniature swine underwent successful 18-French vascular access by means of thoracotomy to the brachiocephalic artery. In addition, 11 swine and 10 sheep underwent successful 22-French vas...

  3. Canadian Experience in Application of Graded Approach for Safety Assessment of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Research reactors are typically used for basic and applied research, education and training, production of isotopes, material testing, neutron activation analysis and other purposes. Most research reactors have a small potential for hazard to the public compared with power reactors. Safety assessment for the research reactors needs to be undertaken to evaluate compliance with safety requirements and to determine the measures to ensure reactor safety. Considering the different types of research reactors and their associated utilization, safety assessment should be commensurate with the potential hazard, ensuring that the design and operation of each reactor lead to adequate safety and defence in depth. The scope of presentation will cover the following topics: - Canadian regulatory framework for licensing research reactors; - Graded approach applied to safety assessment of the research reactors; - Use of graded approach to safety assessment of SLOWPOKE and NRU reactors. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has developed a regulatory framework for licensing small reactor facilities (including research reactors) that sets out requirements for the safety analysis and reactor design. CNSC staff considers each application individually in determining how much rigour and stringency are required for the safety assessment. All important factors affecting the overall reactor safety, such as safety system design, inherent safety features, the amount of fissile and fissionable materials, and the source terms are considered. The graded approach introduced, allows safety requirements to be implemented in such way that the level of safety assessment is proportional to the potential hazards posed by the research reactor. Licensing requirements vary with the type of facility and they may be applied in a graded fashion based on overall risk. Graded approach can be applied to all components of safety assessment including radiation risk, safety functions, defence in depth, engineering aspects, site characteristics and safety analysis. Examples of application of this approach to safety assessment of the Canadian research reactors, Slowpoke and NRU, are presented. The SLOWPOKE reactor (20 kW) has inherent reactivity control by design, since any increase in core temperature has a negative reactivity effect causing a passive reduction of reactor power to limit any temperature excursion. The NRU reactor (135 MW) operates at low pressure and low temperature (except for the experimental loops) and it is used for material testing and isotope production. For SLOWPOKE reactors, less detailed assessment of radiation risk is needed in comparison to the NRU due to a smaller amount of fission product inventory in the core. Full assessment of defence in depth is required for the high power, complex NRU reactor. However, assessment of means to mitigate severe accidents may not be needed for SLOWPOKE reactors due to their inherent reactivity characteristics. A design of any reactor facility must provide the fundamental safety functions during and following postulated accident events. The extent and rigour for demonstrating that such safety functions are fulfilled can be graded and vary depending on the reactor design. In general, basic safety function related to control reactivity cannot be graded. However, the grading can be applied to SLOWPOKE reactors since they exhibit inherent self-limiting power levels, which physically limit the amount of positive reactivity that can be inserted in the core. Assessments of safety functions relevant to the reactor core cooling and confinement could be less extensive for the SLOWPOKE reactors since their cooling systems are less complex than those of NRU. Very small source terms of the SLOWPOKE reactors do not require a confinement system to be as stringent as those used in large research reactors. If the research reactor is designed without a confinement system (e.g., NRU), it must be justified to show that there is no potential release of radioactive materials out of the facility for any accident condi

  4. Food and physical activity environments: an energy balance approach for research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economos, Christina D; Hatfield, Daniel P; King, Abby C; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Ann Pentz, Mary

    2015-05-01

    Increases in the prevalence of overweight and obesity are a function of chronic, population-level energy imbalance, whereby energy intakes exceed energy expenditures. Although sometimes viewed in isolation, energy intakes and expenditures in fact exist in a dynamic interplay: energy intakes may influence energy expenditures and vice versa. Obesogenic environments that promote positive energy balance play a central role in the obesity epidemic, and reducing obesity prevalence will require re-engineering environments to promote both healthy eating and physical activity. There may be untapped synergies in addressing both sides of the energy balance equation in environmentally focused obesity interventions, yet food/beverage and physical activity environments are often addressed separately. The field needs design, evaluation, and analytic methods that support this approach. This paper provides a rationale for an energy balance approach and reviews and describes research and practitioner work that has taken this approach to obesity prevention at the environmental and policy levels. Future directions in research, practice, and policy include moving obesity prevention toward a systems approach that brings both nutrition and physical activity into interdisciplinary training, funding mechanisms, and clinical and policy recommendations/guidelines. PMID:25891062

  5. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  6. Community-Based Participatory Research; an approach to Deal with Social Determinants of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Majdzadeh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nIn Iran, Population Research Centers, which were established in medical universities in 2001, were working for the aim of health promotion in particular and human development in general. These centers were based on community participation in their activities to develop the necessary capacity to allow people "more control over their own health and development". Iran's experience reveals that Community-Based Participatory Research is an approach that uses community knowledge and local resources. Its objective is to empower all stakeholders of development. The priority in local communities and the grass-root of health problems were mainly social determinants of health. On the other hand, both approaches of top-down and bottom-up approaches must be simultaneously considered for dealing with these determinants. Establishment of such centers can create good opportunities for developing original solutions for dealing with social determinants of health. The success of Population Research Centers depends on policy makers' concepts and attitude toward social determinants of health and the role of community participation in this regard. It seems that a more extensive engagement of different sectors including universities, governmental and non-governmental organizations is also vital for such movements.

  7. Community-researcher liaisons: The pathways to Resilience Project advisory panel

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Linda C, Theron.

    Full Text Available The Pathways to Resilience Project is an ongoing, community-based participatory research (CBPR) project. Its express focus is the exploration of how at-risk youths use formal services and/or informal, naturally occurring resources to beat the odds that have been stacked against them, with the intent [...] of partnering with communities to promote youth resilience. As part of this exploration, project researchers partnered with representatives of participating communities, or advisory panels (AP). However, in literature documenting the worth of participatory methodologies in knowledge generation and social change, there is little mention of how partnerships with AP support communities build on existing knowledge to effect meaningful change. Therefore, the aim of this article is to report the instrumental case study of the AP to the South African Pathways to Resilience Project, between 2008 and the present, in order to foreground the research-informing, knowledge-generating, and practice-shaping value of collaboration with an AP. Simultaneously, this case showcases the complexity of AP-researcher partnerships in order to sensitise CBPR researchers to the need for reflexive, flexible cooperations if communities are to cogenerate and implement local knowledge in enabling ways.

  8. A generalizable pre-clinical research approach for orphan disease therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaulieu Chandree L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the advent of next-generation DNA sequencing, the pace of inherited orphan disease gene identification has increased dramatically, a situation that will continue for at least the next several years. At present, the numbers of such identified disease genes significantly outstrips the number of laboratories available to investigate a given disorder, an asymmetry that will only increase over time. The hope for any genetic disorder is, where possible and in addition to accurate diagnostic test formulation, the development of therapeutic approaches. To this end, we propose here the development of a strategic toolbox and preclinical research pathway for inherited orphan disease. Taking much of what has been learned from rare genetic disease research over the past two decades, we propose generalizable methods utilizing transcriptomic, system-wide chemical biology datasets combined with chemical informatics and, where possible, repurposing of FDA approved drugs for pre-clinical orphan disease therapies. It is hoped that this approach may be of utility for the broader orphan disease research community and provide funding organizations and patient advocacy groups with suggestions for the optimal path forward. In addition to enabling academic pre-clinical research, strategies such as this may also aid in seeding startup companies, as well as further engaging the pharmaceutical industry in the treatment of rare genetic disease.

  9. Researching emotional labour among Public Relations consultants in the UK: a social phenomenological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz YEOMANS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ‘Social phenomenology’ (Schütz, 1970; 1978 and its concept of the ‘lifeworld’ has received limited attention in the research methods literature. Few contemporary researchers, with the exception of Aspers (2006a; 2006b; 2009 and Svensson (2007 have developed procedures for undertaking social phenomenological research in occupational settings. I developed a social phenomenological approach to explore, from an emotional labour perspective, how public relations (PR consultants experienced, practised and understood their everyday interactions with clients, colleagues and journalists (Hochschild, 1983. If emotion is understood as a relational practice, the analysis of socially-constructed discourse is essential to access emotional meaning structures within occupational cultures such as public relations. I adopted an iterative analytical process whereby I interviewed, twice, a sample of six participants. From transcript analysis I produced a ‘description of practice’ document for participants to check (Aspers, 2006a; 2009. ‘Bracketing’ (Husserl, 1963/1913 involved writing self-memos throughout the research process, and finally, a self-reflexive account. Thematic analysis of findings resulted in a rich understanding of emotion management and identity work in public relations. This paper demonstrates that an iterative and reflexive analytical process that involves participants in co-creating social reality, is a compelling approach to understand the ‘lifeworld’ of social actors in occupational settings.

  10. Promising ethical arguments for product differentiation in the organic food sector. A mixed methods research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Katrin; Stolz, Hanna; Hamm, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    Ethical consumerism is a growing trend worldwide. Ethical consumers' expectations are increasing and neither the Fairtrade nor the organic farming concept covers all the ethical concerns of consumers. Against this background the aim of this research is to elicit consumers' preferences regarding organic food with additional ethical attributes and their relevance at the market place. A mixed methods research approach was applied by combining an Information Display Matrix, Focus Group Discussions and Choice Experiments in five European countries. According to the results of the Information Display Matrix, 'higher animal welfare', 'local production' and 'fair producer prices' were preferred in all countries. These three attributes were discussed with Focus Groups in depth, using rather emotive ways of labelling. While the ranking of the attributes was the same, the emotive way of communicating these attributes was, for the most part, disliked by participants. The same attributes were then used in Choice Experiments, but with completely revised communication arguments. According to the results of the Focus Groups, the arguments were presented in a factual manner, using short and concise statements. In this research step, consumers in all countries except Austria gave priority to 'local production'. 'Higher animal welfare' and 'fair producer prices' turned out to be relevant for buying decisions only in Germany and Switzerland. According to our results, there is substantial potential for product differentiation in the organic sector through making use of production standards that exceed existing minimum regulations. The combination of different research methods in a mixed methods approach proved to be very helpful. The results of earlier research steps provided the basis from which to learn - findings could be applied in subsequent steps, and used to adjust and deepen the research design. PMID:23207189

  11. ENFOQUES DE ESTUDIO DE CASOS EN LA INVESTIGACIÓN DE ENFERMERÍA / CASE STUDY APPROACHES IN NURSING RESEARCH

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    EUGENIA, URRA MEDINA; ROCÍO, NÚÑEZ CARRASCO; CARMEN, RETAMAL VALENZUELA; LUCY, JURE CARES.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Los estudios de casos han sido usados en una variedad de disciplinas en las ciencias sociales y salud, al tener cualidades para comprender en profundidad un fenómeno en variados contextos y situaciones naturales. Sin embargo, su uso ha sido confuso por las diferentes visiones de los investigadores. [...] Este artículo tiene como propósito hacer una distinción de los estudios de casos: con perspectiva cualitativa y como un diseño de investigación. Los estudios de casos cualitativos se originan por la forma particular de ver el caso como un todo: su contexto y sus límites, con análisis intensivo del caso o casos colectivos, y siempre bajo la concepción de su idiosincrasia y sin generalización. El diseño de estudios de casos como parte de una estrategia investigativa busca dar respuesta a una pregunta de investigación que permite usar diferentes métodos para hacer constantes comparaciones múltiples. En síntesis, los estudios de casos son usados en ambas formas por los investigadores y tienen un potencial de utilidad en situaciones y contextos de enfermería y salud. Abstract in english Case studies have been used into social sciences and health disciplines because of their properties to understand complex phenomena in a variety of contexts and situations. However, its use has been confusing because of the different researcher's perspectives. This article aims to distinguish two ty [...] pes of two types of case studies approaches: the one with a qualitative perspective and as a design research strategy. The qualitative case study are originated by the particular way of seing the case as a whole: its contexts and limits, intensive case analysis or collective cases, and always under the conception of their idiosyncrasy without generalization. In a research design, case study is a research strategy that tries to answer a research question by applying different methods for data collection and analyzing by using constant comparison. Currently, both approaches of case studies are used by researchers, having a potential benefit for nursing and health settings and contexts.

  12. The Impact of Task-based Approach on Iranian EFL Learners’ Motivation in Writing Research Abstracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Khalili Sabet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Writing as a complex activity requires systematic attention to motivational conditions (Bruning and Horn, 2000. This study aimed at examining whether there is a relationship between EFL learners’ motivation and their performance in writing research abstracts as well as the impact of task- based approach on the participants’ motivation. For these aims, sixty-eight EFL university students at intermediate level of proficiency participated in this study. Thirty-two of the participating students were involved in the class based on Task-based Language Teaching (TBLT where three phases of pre-task, task- cycle and post-task as suggested by Swan (2005 were used and students had the opportunity to do tasks in groups. Thirty-six of them participated in Presentation-Practice-Production (PPP approach where the teaching was divided into presentation, practice and production phases and students had to do the activities individually. After receiving treatment for eight sessions, students were asked to write an abstract for a research article. Furthermore, a motivation questionnaire adopted from Lam and Law (2007 was distributed among the participants which included the following motivational constructs: challenge, real life significance, curiosity, autonomy; recognition and evaluation. The findings demonstrated that students’ motivation is positively related to their abstract writing performance. Moreover, results of Independent-Sample T- Test showed that Task-based approach was motivating for the students. Therefore, the data suggested that students with higher motivation can have better performance in writing abstracts and students’ motivation can be enhanced by the teaching approach in use. Finally, several implications that may help guide future research are offered.

  13. A framing approach to cross-disciplinary research collaboration: experiences from a large-scale research project on adaptive water management

    OpenAIRE

    Tharsi Taillieu; Claudia Pahl-Wostl; Greet François; Art Dewulf

    2007-01-01

    Although cross-disciplinary research collaboration is necessary to achieve a better understanding of how human and natural systems are dynamically linked, it often turns out to be very difficult in practice. We outline a framing approach to cross-disciplinary research that focuses on the different perspectives that researchers from different backgrounds use to make sense of the issues they want to research jointly. Based on interviews, participants’ evaluations, and our own observations...

  14. Authentic And Concurrent Evaluation-refining : An Evaluation Approach In Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Carina Ihlström; Åkesson, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for more detailed accounts for evaluation in design science research literature. By revisiting a design project regarding the future e-newspaper we give detailed descriptions of its authentic and concurrent evaluation approach by illustrating the what, why and how of all evaluation activities throughout the whole project. The project produced seven different design artifacts that were evaluated. The utility and theoretical outcomes of the evaluation activities clearly influenced design decisions regarding newspaper design, user value and business model design as well as decisions on strategic levels. We emphasize a holistic and concurrent approach to evaluation compared to the general design science research thinking and argue that reflecting on how to seek authenticity is important. By authenticity we refer to the notion of how closely an evaluation captures the context and actual use of an artifact. With the holistic approach we encourage evaluation to be inclusive of different aspects and relationships between stakeholder groups in the evaluation activities. Further we think that concurrency is not narrowed to evaluation but also regards theorizing. While it makes sense for planning to distinguish between phases and stages of evaluation and theorizing, in practice they are intrinsically interlinked and concurrent.

  15. The Public Health Exposome: A Population-Based, Exposure Science Approach to Health Disparities Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Juarez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The lack of progress in reducing health disparities suggests that new approaches are needed if we are to achieve meaningful, equitable, and lasting reductions. Current scientific paradigms do not adequately capture the complexity of the relationships between environment, personal health and population level disparities. The public health exposome is presented as a universal exposure tracking framework for integrating complex relationships between exogenous and endogenous exposures across the lifespan from conception to death. It uses a social-ecological framework that builds on the exposome paradigm for conceptualizing how exogenous exposures “get under the skin”. The public health exposome approach has led our team to develop a taxonomy and bioinformatics infrastructure to integrate health outcomes data with thousands of sources of exogenous exposure, organized in four broad domains: natural, built, social, and policy environments. With the input of a transdisciplinary team, we have borrowed and applied the methods, tools and terms from various disciplines to measure the effects of environmental exposures on personal and population health outcomes and disparities, many of which may not manifest until many years later. As is customary with a paradigm shift, this approach has far reaching implications for research methods and design, analytics, community engagement strategies, and research training.

  16. Presence Personalization and Persistence: A New Approach to Building Archives to Support Collaborative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss approaches to building archives that support the way most science is done. Today research is done in formal teams and informal groups. However our on-line services are designed to work with a single user. We have begun prototyping a new approach to building archives in which support for collaborative research is built in from the start. We organize the discussion along three elements that we believe to be necessary for effective support: We must enable user presence in the archive environment; users must be able to interact. Users must be able to personalize the environment, adding data and capabilities useful to themselves and their team. These changes must be persistent: subsequent sessions must be able to build upon previous sessions. In building the archive we see the large multi-player interactive games as a paradigm of how this approach can work. These three 'P's are essential in gaming as well and we shall use insights from the gaming world and virtual reality systems like Second Life in our prototype.

  17. Advanced Pre-clinical Research Approaches and Models to Studying Pediatric Anesthetic Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChengWang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in pediatric and obstetric surgery have resulted in an increase in the duration and complexity of anesthetic procedures. A great deal of concern has recently arisen regarding the safety of anesthesia in infants and children. Because of obvious limitations, it is not possible to thoroughly explore the effects of anesthetic agents on neurons in vivo in human infants or children. However, the availability of some advanced pre-clinical research approaches and models, such as imaging technology both in vitro and in vivo, stem cell and nonhuman primate experimental models, have provided potentially invaluable tools for examining the developmental effects of anesthetic agents. This review discusses the potential application of some sophisticaled research approaches, e.g., calcium imaging, in stem cell-derived in vitro models, especially human embryonic neural stem cells, along with their capacity for proliferation and their potential for differentiation, to dissect relevant mechanisms underlying the etiology of the neurotoxicity associated with developmental exposures to anesthetic agents. Also, this review attempts to discuss several advantages for using the developing rhesus monkey models (in vivo, when combined with dynamic molecular imaging approaches, in addressing critical issues related to the topic of pediatric sedation/anesthesia. These include the relationships between anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity, dose response, time-course and developmental stage at time of exposure (in vivo studies, serving to provide the most expeditious platform toward decreasing the uncertainty in extrapolating pre-clinical data to the human condition.

  18. The Application of a Multiphase Triangulation Approach to Mixed Methods: The Research of an Aspiring School Principal Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Howard; Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    Mixed methods research has emerged as a credible alternative to unitary research approaches. The authors show how a combination of a triangulation convergence model with a triangulation multilevel model was used to research an aspiring school principal development pilot program. The multilevel model is used to show the national and regional levels…

  19. Engendering Change within a Water Infrastructure Client Organisation: A Participatory Action Research Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Potts

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuing demands by stakeholders for improved service delivery has caused Infrastructure Client Organisations (ICO in the UK to embark upon organisational restructuring. It is expected that such restructuring would enhance cost-effectiveness and quality in asset management and service delivery. However, this change, if not properly managed and sustained, could result in the inability of the ICO to achieve these targets. This study outlines the use of systemic thinking and Participatory Action Research (PAR in driving and managing such change within a UK-based Water and Wastewater ICO (UK WASC. Besides highlighting the context for change in response to policy, austerity and regulatory pressures, this study portrays how the PAR approach can assist in the management of change within ICOs. Furthermore, it provides an insight into the evolution of an external researcher, from novice to expert within the ICO, imbued with the required knowledge to encourage other stakeholders to participate in driving the change management process. Preliminary findings indicate the usefulness of this phased approach toward PAR. This study provides a platform for researchers wishing to engage with ICOs to improve service delivery, identifying the value of engagement, change and systemic thinking.

  20. Individual Differences in Approach-Avoidance Aptitude: Some Clues from Research on Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Costa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Approach and avoidance are two basic behavioral aptitudes of humans whose correct balance is critical for successful adaptation to the environment. As the expression of approach and avoidance tendencies may differ significantly between healthy individuals, different psychobiological factors have been posited to account for such variability. In this regard, two main issues are still open that refers to i the role played by dopamine neurotransmission and ii the possible influence of cognitive characteristics, particularly executive functioning. The aim of the present paper was to highlight the contribution of research on Parkinson’s disease (PD to our understanding of the above issues. In particular, we here reviewed PD literature to clarify whether neurobiological and neuropsychological modifications due to PD are associated to changes in approach-avoidance related personality features. Available data indicate that PD patients may show and approach-avoidance imbalance as documented by lower novelty-seeking and higher harm-avoidance behaviors, possibly suggesting a relationship with neurobiological and neurocognitive PD-related changes. However, the literature that directly investigated this issue is still sparse and much more work is needed to better clarify it.

  1. How desertification research is addressed in Spain? Land versus Soil approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero Sierra, Celia; Marques, María Jose; Ruiz, Manuel; Escadafal, Richard; Exbrayat, Williams; Akthar-Schuster, Mariam; El Haddadi, Anass

    2013-04-01

    This study intend to understand how desertification research is organised in a south Mediterranean country, as is Spain. It is part of a larger work addressing soil and land research and its relationships with stakeholders. This wider work aims to explain the weakness of the United Nation Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), which devoid of a scientific advisory panel. Within this framework, we assume that a fitting coordination between scientific knowledge and a better flow of information between researchers and policy makers is needed in order to slow down and reverse the impacts of land degradation on drylands. With this purpose we conducted an in-depth study at national level in Spain. The initial work focused on a small sample of published references in scientific journals indexed in the Web of Science. It allowed us to identify the most common thematic approaches and working issues, as well as the corresponding institutions and research teams and the relationships between them. The preliminary results of this study pointed out that two prevalent approaches at this national level could be identified. The first one is related to applied science being sensitive to socio-economic issues, and the second one is related to basic science studying the soil in depth, but it is often disconnected from socio-economic factors. We also noticed that the Spanish research teams acknowledge the other Spanish teams in this subject, as frequent co-citations are found in their papers, nevertheless, they do not collaborate. We also realised that the Web of Science database does not collect the wide spectrum of sociology, economics and the human implications of land degradation which use to be included in books or reports related to desertification. A new wider database was built compiling references of Web of Science related to "desertification", "land", "soil", "development" and "Spain" adding references from other socioeconomic databases. In a second stage we used bibliometric techniques through the Tetralogie software and network analysis using UCINET software, to proceed to: 1. Identify the most referred themes based on the keywords provided by the authors and by the Web of Science platform itself. 2. Identify the relationships between the different topics being addressed and their approach to the desertification from a basic scientific vision (soil degradation) and/or from an applied science vision (land degradation). 3. Identify and evaluate the strenght of possible networks and links established between institutions and/or research teams.

  2. Surgical approaches to vascular access for large-caliber devices in preclinical research models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barka, Noah; Rakow, Nancy; Lentz, Linnea; Kopcak, Michael; Wika, Kent; Menk, Ana; Green, Mike

    2010-07-01

    Percutaneous vascular access options in preclinical models are often smaller than the relevant structures in humans or undersized for early-prototype research devices. Here we describe the surgical approaches and results for surgical vascular access sites in preclinical swine and sheep models. Fourteen adult miniature swine underwent successful 18-French vascular access by means of thoracotomy to the brachiocephalic artery. In addition, 11 swine and 10 sheep underwent successful 22-French vascular access by means of retroperitoneal laparotomy to the abdominal aorta. The relevancy of approach angles and vessel tortuosity should be considered when selecting appropriate preclinical models and techniques. The techniques described are effective for delivery of large-caliber devices in preclinical testing. PMID:20819395

  3. The Delphi Technique in nursing research - Part 1. The classical methodological approach and its main modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Theofanidis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Delphi Technique (DT is a research methodology that uses turns or rounds between the researcher and a group of experts, until a desired level of agreement or consensus between the members of the expert panel has been reached with regards to the question in hand. Despite its popular use in the social sciences' domain and its progressive adoption by nurse-researchers internationally, in Greece, there is a lack of its application; its comprehension, usage, and methodological merits are still in question within the Greek nursing research community. Aim: To provide a detailed presentation of the epistemological and practical value of the DT, through a series of four consecutive papers which expand on the following: i the classical methodological approach and its main modifications, ii the methodological reflections iii analysis and presentation of results, and iv the use and usefulness of the method in application to nursing research. The first of the four papers provides a description and a comparative assessment of the main variations of the DT. Results: A review of the literature elucidated three main sub-types of technique: the Classic or Conventional Delphi, the Policy Delphi and the Decision Delphi Technique. Nevertheless, due to many variations of the basic philosophy of the method and the many differentiations in its application, it is quite difficult to classify each study that used Delphi, with precision. The main methodological differences that can challenge the researcher are discussed and finally, examples that show the advantages and the usefulness of the individual Delphi techniques are given. Conclusions: Use of the DT in research has many advantages and it can become exceptionally useful once the content of the method and its practical applications are fully understood.

  4. A research and professional approach to independent work in Cuban polytechnic school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro, Zita Elaine

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The potentials and shortcomings of independent work in the teachers of polytechnic school training process are an indication of the need of devising a methodology based on a research and professional approach linked to professional performance. The integrative character of academic and non-academic tasks in the process is examined from its planning stage from the perspective of a diversity of professional performance contexts. The findings were appraised by means of expertise valuation and by means of a controlled experiment. Palabras clave: Trabajo independiente, enfoque profesional, enseñanza técnica y profesional.

  5. Health-related quality of life research and the capability approach of Amartya Sen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerk, M A; Busschbach, J J; Karssing, E D

    2001-01-01

    Standardised health-related quality of life questionnaires play an increasing role as measures of outcome in the evaluation of health care interventions. However, problems can arise when the selected functions or dimensions of such standardised measures are not in line with the intervention that is the focus of the research. Furthermore, the subjective element of quality of life makes standardised questionnaires vulnerable to the coping mechanism, thereby decreasing their sensitivity. The capability approach of the economist and philosopher Amartya Sen offers a descriptive concept that contributes to a better understanding of these problems. This article provides an introduction to the ideas of Sen for researchers who wish to go beyond the traditional framework of measuring health-related quality of life. PMID:11508475

  6. An automated calibration laboratory for flight research instrumentation: Requirements and a proposed design approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneill-Rood, Nora; Glover, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (Ames-Dryden), operates a diverse fleet of research aircraft which are heavily instrumented to provide both real time data for in-flight monitoring and recorded data for postflight analysis. Ames-Dryden's existing automated calibration (AUTOCAL) laboratory is a computerized facility which tests aircraft sensors to certify accuracy for anticipated harsh flight environments. Recently, a major AUTOCAL lab upgrade was initiated; the goal of this modernization is to enhance productivity and improve configuration management for both software and test data. The new system will have multiple testing stations employing distributed processing linked by a local area network to a centralized database. The baseline requirements for the new AUTOCAL lab and the design approach being taken for its mechanization are described.

  7. Operationalising the capability approach for outcome measurement in mental health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Judit; Anand, Paul; Gray, Alastair; Rugkåsa, Jorun; Yeeles, Ksenija; Burns, Tom

    2013-12-01

    Amartya Sen's multidimensional capability approach focuses on the importance of freedoms to be or do things people have reason to value. It is an alternative to standard utilitarian welfarism, the theoretical approach to quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and cost-utility analyses. Despite the limitations of the utility approach in capturing non-health benefits and broader welfare inequalities, there have been very limited applications of the capability approach in the mental health context where these issues are imperative. We report the development and application of a multidimensional instrument, the OxCAP-MH, which aims to operationalise the capability approach for outcome measurement in mental health research. The study was carried out as part of an ongoing programme on community coercion experienced by service users with severe and enduring mental illness being treated using Community Treatment Orders. Capabilities data were collected at baseline in the OCTET RCT for 333 'revolving door' mental health service users who were in involuntary hospital treatment at the time of recruitment in England (2008-2011). The research focused on the identification of capabilities domains most affected by mental illness and their association with socio-demographic and clinical factors and other measures of well-being such as the EQ-5D and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scales. The OxCAP-MH item response rate was 90%-68%. There were significant correlations between service users' overall capability scores and the GAF, EQ-5D VAS and EQ-5D-3L utilities (corr = 0.249, 0.514, 0.415, respectively). The most affected capability domains were: 'Daily activities', 'Influencing local decisions', 'Enjoying recreation', 'Planning one's life' and 'Discrimination'. Age had a mixed effect, while female service users and those with a primary diagnosis of schizophrenia or longer illness duration reported significantly lower capability scores. The results support the feasibility and validity of directly measuring human capabilities for the mentally ill and the potential for applying the approach to outcome measurement. PMID:24331898

  8. The Synergetic Approach to Effective Teachers' Research Education: An Innovative Initiative for Building Educational Research Capacity in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Tsan Pierre; Ward, Hsuying C.; Overton, Terry; Shin, Yousun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the synergetic approach to research education for graduate students in a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI). A group of cross-disciplinary faculty members developed a series of graduate-level research methods-related workshops for pre- and in-service teachers. The investigators…

  9. SINGLE MOLECULE APPROACHES TO BIOLOGY, 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27-JULY 2, 2010, ITALY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor William Moerner

    2010-07-09

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Single-Molecule Approaches to Biology focuses on cutting-edge research in single-molecule science. Tremendous technical developments have made it possible to detect, identify, track, and manipulate single biomolecules in an ambient environment or even in a live cell. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are addressed, and new knowledge derived from these approaches continues to emerge. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of biomolecular machines: what they do, how they work individually, how they work together, and finally, how they work inside live cells. The burgeoning use of single-molecule methods to elucidate biological problems is a highly multidisciplinary pursuit, involving both force- and fluorescence-based methods, the most up-to-date advances in microscopy, innovative biological and chemical approaches, and nanotechnology tools. This conference seeks to bring together top experts in molecular and cell biology with innovators in the measurement and manipulation of single molecules, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and to exchange ideas with leaders in the field. A number of excellent poster presenters will be selected for short oral talks. Topics as diverse as single-molecule sequencing, DNA/RNA/protein interactions, folding machines, cellular biophysics, synthetic biology and bioengineering, force spectroscopy, new method developments, superresolution imaging in cells, and novel probes for single-molecule imaging will be on the program. Additionally, the collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings in the beauty of the Il Ciocco site in Tuscany, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to interact and brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations directed toward compelling biological problems.

  10. La investigación clínica. Un primer acercamiento / The Clinical Research. A first approach

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Tatiana, Marañon Cardonne; Rosario, León Robaina.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available La investigación clínica es la actividad encaminada a conocer el resultado de una intervención o un producto para el diagnóstico o la terapéutica en los seres humanos. El ensayo clínico es el principal exponente de la investigación clínica y toda evaluación experimental de una sustancia o medicament [...] o en seres humanos. En Cuba, existe un desarrollo importante de la biotecnología y de los centros de investigación que necesitan de ensayos clínicos según estándares nacionales e internacionales. En el presente trabajo se exponen aspectos relacionados con la evolución histórica de la Investigación Clínica, el Ensayo Clínico y su contexto en el país como un primer acercamiento al tema. Abstract in english Clinical research is just that activity to know the potential diagnostic or therapeutic nature of an intervention or a product in humans. The clinical trial is the leading exponent of clinical research and the whole experimental evaluation of a substance or drug in humans and has revolutionized medi [...] cal practice around the mundo.Sus precursors date back to the XVII and XVIII centuries and evolved since this methodology until the randomized controlled clinical trial. From the fifties significant regulatory and ethical changes appear. In Cuba, there is a significant development of biotechnology and research institutions that require clinical trials to national and international standards. This paper aims to clarify aspects of the historical development of Clinical Research, Clinical Trial in Cuba and its context as a first approach to the subject.

  11. An asset-based approach of the Romanian research-development and innovation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steliana SANDU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper experiments a new model of analysis for the Research-Development and Innovation (RDI field of research, namely the Asset-Based Development strategy or Appreciative Planning and Action, which unfolds at the community level the same core principle that Appreciative Inquiry Methods at the organizational level: strengths elevating, strengths combining, strengths extending systems. Following the four “D stages” (Discovery, Dream, Design and Destiny/ Deliver pattern, the authors outlined many strengths and achievements of the Romanian RDI system in order to depict the positive trends, structures and mechanism, as well as to map out the main routes towards fulfilling a new vision. Building upon ideas, opinions, studies, interviews of different representatives of the research community (managers, scientists, professors, users etc expressed in specialised literature, newspapers, journals, or in direct contact and dialogue with them, we intended this approach encompass the appreciative contributions of the main stakeholders: universities, public and private research institutes, the business sector, public policy-makers. In this complex and rather rigid RDI system, whose elements are heterogeneous institutions and communities, that interacting each other in a special environment such as a network structure, effective change is still to be brought by individuals who possess the necessary power to continue transform their mind and attitudes and thus to initiate, diffuse change and, influencing the RDI environment. This might be a viable way to improve, in a positive manner, the RDI system’s efficiency.

  12. Clustering Methods with Qualitative Data: a Mixed-Methods Approach for Prevention Research with Small Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, David; Dymnicki, Allison B; Mohatt, Nathaniel; Allen, James; Kelly, James G

    2015-10-01

    Qualitative methods potentially add depth to prevention research but can produce large amounts of complex data even with small samples. Studies conducted with culturally distinct samples often produce voluminous qualitative data but may lack sufficient sample sizes for sophisticated quantitative analysis. Currently lacking in mixed-methods research are methods allowing for more fully integrating qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques. Cluster analysis can be applied to coded qualitative data to clarify the findings of prevention studies by aiding efforts to reveal such things as the motives of participants for their actions and the reasons behind counterintuitive findings. By clustering groups of participants with similar profiles of codes in a quantitative analysis, cluster analysis can serve as a key component in mixed-methods research. This article reports two studies. In the first study, we conduct simulations to test the accuracy of cluster assignment using three different clustering methods with binary data as produced when coding qualitative interviews. Results indicated that hierarchical clustering, K-means clustering, and latent class analysis produced similar levels of accuracy with binary data and that the accuracy of these methods did not decrease with samples as small as 50. Whereas the first study explores the feasibility of using common clustering methods with binary data, the second study provides a "real-world" example using data from a qualitative study of community leadership connected with a drug abuse prevention project. We discuss the implications of this approach for conducting prevention research, especially with small samples and culturally distinct communities. PMID:25946969

  13. Robotic collaborative technology alliance: an open architecture approach to integrated research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Robert Michael S.; DiBerardino, Charles A.

    2014-06-01

    The Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA) seeks to provide adaptive robot capabilities which move beyond traditional metric algorithms to include cognitive capabilities [1]. Research occurs in 5 main Task Areas: Intelligence, Perception, Dexterous Manipulation and Unique Mobility (DMUM), Human Robot Interaction (HRI), and Integrated Research (IR). This last task of Integrated Research is especially critical and challenging. Individual research components can only be fully assessed when integrated onto a robot where they interact with other aspects of the system to create cross-Task capabilities which move beyond the State of the Art. Adding to the complexity, the RCTA is comprised of 12+ independent organizations across the United States. Each has its own constraints due to development environments, ITAR, "lab" vs "real-time" implementations, and legacy software investments from previous and ongoing programs. We have developed three main components to manage the Integration Task. The first is RFrame, a data-centric transport agnostic middleware which unifies the disparate environments, protocols, and data collection mechanisms. Second is the modular Intelligence Architecture built around the Common World Model (CWM). The CWM instantiates a Common Data Model and provides access services. Third is RIVET, an ITAR free Hardware-In-The-Loop simulator based on 3D game technology. RIVET provides each researcher a common test-bed for development prior to integration, and a regression test mechanism. Once components are integrated and verified, they are released back to the consortium to provide the RIVET baseline for further research. This approach allows Integration of new and legacy systems built upon different architectures, by application of Open Architecture principles.

  14. A socio-economic approach to One Health policy research in southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim A. Kayunze

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One-health approaches have started being applied to health systems in some countries in controlling infectious diseases in order to reduce the burden of disease in humans, livestock and wild animals collaboratively. However, one wonders whether the problem of lingering and emerging zoonoses is more affected by health policies, low application of one-health approaches, or other factors. As part of efforts to answer this question, the Southern African Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance (SACIDS smart partnership of human health, animal health and socio-economic experts published, in April 2011, a conceptual framework to support One Health research for policy on emerging zoonoses. The main objective of this paper was to identify which factors really affect the burden of disease and how the burden could affect socio-economic well-being. Amongst other issues, the review of literature shows that the occurrence of infectious diseases in humans and animals is driven by many factors, the most important ones being the causative agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites, etc. and the mediator conditions (social, cultural, economic or climatic which facilitate the infection to occur and hold. Literature also shows that in many countries there is little collaboration between medical and veterinary services despite the shared underlying science and the increasing infectious disease threat. In view of these findings, a research to inform health policy must walk on two legs: a natural sciences leg and a social sciences one.

  15. A socio-economic approach to One Health policy research in southern Africa

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Kim A., Kayunze; Angwara D., Kiwara; Eligius, Lyamuya; Dominic M., Kambarage; Jonathan, Rushton; Richard, Coker; Richard, Kock; Mark M., Rweyemamu.

    Full Text Available One-health approaches have started being applied to health systems in some countries in controlling infectious diseases in order to reduce the burden of disease in humans, livestock and wild animals collaboratively. However, one wonders whether the problem of lingering and emerging zoonoses is more [...] affected by health policies, low application of one-health approaches, or other factors. As part of efforts to answer this question, the Southern African Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance (SACIDS) smart partnership of human health, animal health and socio-economic experts published, in April 2011, a conceptual framework to support One Health research for policy on emerging zoonoses. The main objective of this paper was to identify which factors really affect the burden of disease and how the burden could affect socio-economic well-being. Amongst other issues, the review of literature shows that the occurrence of infectious diseases in humans and animals is driven by many factors, the most important ones being the causative agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites, etc.) and the mediator conditions (social, cultural, economic or climatic) which facilitate the infection to occur and hold. Literature also shows that in many countries there is little collaboration between medical and veterinary services despite the shared underlying science and the increasing infectious disease threat. In view of these findings, a research to inform health policy must walk on two legs: a natural sciences leg and a social sciences one.

  16. Multivariate non-normally distributed random variables in climate research – introduction to the copula approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Friederichs

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Probability distributions of multivariate random variables are generally more complex compared to their univariate counterparts which is due to a possible nonlinear dependence between the random variables. One approach to this problem is the use of copulas, which have become popular over recent years, especially in fields like econometrics, finance, risk management, or insurance. Since this newly emerging field includes various practices, a controversial discussion, and vast field of literature, it is difficult to get an overview. The aim of this paper is therefore to provide an brief overview of copulas for application in meteorology and climate research. We examine the advantages and disadvantages compared to alternative approaches like e.g. mixture models, summarize the current problem of goodness-of-fit (GOF tests for copulas, and discuss the connection with multivariate extremes. An application to station data shows the simplicity and the capabilities as well as the limitations of this approach. Observations of daily precipitation and temperature are fitted to a bivariate model and demonstrate, that copulas are valuable complement to the commonly used methods.

  17. Community-academic partnerships in HIV-related research: a systematic literature review of theory and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Brizay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community involvement in HIV research has increased over recent years, enhancing community-academic partnerships. Several terms have been used to describe community participation in research. Clarification is needed to determine whether these terms are synonymous or actually describe different research processes. In addition, it remains unclear if the role that communities play in the actual research process follows the recommendations given in theoretical frameworks of community-academia research. Objectives: The objective of this study is to review the existing terms and definitions regarding community-academic partnerships and assess how studies are implementing these in relation to conceptual definitions. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed. Two reviewers independently assessed each article, applying the following inclusion criteria: the article must be published in English before 2013; it must provide an explicit definition and/or defining methodology for a term describing research with a community component; and it has to refer to HIV or AIDS, reproductive health and/or STDs. When disagreements about the relevance of an article emerged, a third reviewer was involved until concordance was reached. Data were extracted by one reviewer and independently verified by a second. Qualitative data were analyzed using MaxQDA for content and thematic analyses while quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Community feedback on data analysis and presentation of results was also incorporated. Results: In total, 246 articles were retrieved, 159 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The number of studies that included community participation in the field of HIV research increased between 1991 and 2012, and the terms used to describe these activities have changed, moving away from action research (AR to participatory action research (PAR, community-based research (CBR and community-based participatory research (CBPR, with the latter being the most commonly used term. While definitions of all terms had common characteristics (e.g. participation of community in research process, they varied with regard to the emphasis placed on these characteristics. The nature of community participation in reviewed studies differed considerably from that described in theoretical models. Conclusions: This study indicates the increase of participatory approaches in HIV research and underlines the need for clarification of terms and a framework providing orientation to community-academia partnerships.

  18. Teaching Writing Skills Based on a Genre Approach to L2 Primary School Students: An Action Research

    OpenAIRE

    Hyejeong Ahn

    2012-01-01

    This article, based on research findings, examines the effect of implementing a genre approach to develop writing competency of Year 5 and 6 L2 primary school students. Using action research, the genre approach was implemented over a 10-week term with two lessons per week in a culturally and linguistically diverse ESL class in a South Australian public metropolitan primary school. Two specific genres, Report and Essay writing, were taught using a three-staged teaching and learning cycle (TLC)...

  19. Employer Practices in Improving Employment Outcomes for People with Disabilities: A Transdisciplinary and Employer-Inclusive Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Linda; Bruyère, M.; Waelder, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Share new knowledge about workplace practices related to employer success in hiring, retaining, and promoting people with disabilities, and promote use of findings to employers and service providers. Design: A transdisciplinary and multifaceted data gathering approach. Results: Provides an overview of the research approach taken and the…

  20. A Developmental Intervention Science (DIS) Outreach Research Approach to Promoting Youth Development: Theoretical, Methodological, and Meta-Theoretical Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Marilyn J.; Kurtines, William M.; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Berman, Steven L.; Lorente, Carolyn Cass; Briones, Ervin; Silverman, Wendy; Ritchie, Rachel; Eichas, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes work directed toward creating community-supported positive youth development interventions that draw on a developmental intervention science outreach research approach. With respect to developmental interventions, this approach focuses on creating evidence-based longitudinal change intervention strategies for promoting…

  1. Subjective well-being capabilities: Bridging the gap between the capability approach and subjective well-being research

    OpenAIRE

    Binder, Martin

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the disenchantment with traditional income-based measures of welfare, alternative welfare measures have gained increasing attention in recent years. Two of the most prominent measures of well-being come from subjective well-being research and the (objective) capability approach. Despite their promising features, both approaches have a number of weaknesses when considered on their own. This paper sets out to examine to what extent a fusion between both approaches can overcome th...

  2. Video Games as a Multifaceted Medium: A Review of Quantitative Social Science Research on Video Games and a Typology of Video Game Research Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Ivory

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a vast and useful body of quantitative social science research dealing with the social role and impact of video games, it is difficult to compare studies dealing with various dimensions of video games because they are informed by different perspectives and assumptions, employ different methodologies, and address different problems. Studies focusing on different social dimensions of video games can produce varied findings about games’ social function that are often difficult to reconcile— or even contradictory. Research is also often categorized by topic area, rendering a comprehensive view of video games’ social role across topic areas difficult. This interpretive review presents a novel typology of four identified approaches that categorize much of the quantitative social science video game research conducted to date: “video games as stimulus,” “video games as avocation,” “video games as skill,” and “video games as social environment.” This typology is useful because it provides an organizational structure within which the large and growing number of studies on video games can be categorized, guiding comparisons between studies on different research topics and aiding a more comprehensive understanding of video games’ social role. Categorizing the different approaches to video game research provides a useful heuristic for those critiquing and expanding that research, as well as an understandable entry point for scholars new to video game research. Further, and perhaps more importantly, the typology indicates when topics should be explored using different approaches than usual to shed new light on the topic areas. Lastly, the typology exposes the conceptual disconnects between the different approaches to video game research, allowing researchers to consider new ways to bridge gaps between the different approaches’ strengths and limitations with novel methods.

  3. A structured approach to introduce knowledge management practice in a national nuclear research institution in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2002, the Government of Malaysia has launched the Knowledge Management Master Plan with the aim to transform Malaysian from a production-based economy to a knowledge-based economy. In June 2003, the 2nd National Science and Technology policy was launched. The policy puts in place programmes, institutions and partnerships to enhance Malaysian economic position. Several initiatives developed emphasize on the important roles of national nuclear research institutions in the knowledge based economy. The Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) as a national nuclear research institution is thus expected to make significant contributions to the knowledge economy. To a certain extent MINT has been successful in knowledge acquisition and exploitation from more advanced countries as well as in knowledge generation and in the knowledge application and diffusion to the socio-economic sectors. This paper describes a structured approach to introduce the knowledge management practices or initiatives in MINT. It also describes some of the challenges foreseen in adopting the practices. (author)

  4. Participatory research approaches in the development of improved management practices in indigenous chickens production systems with smallholder farmers in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Ndegwa, Joseph Mutitu

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with development of improved management practices in indigenous chicken production systems in a research process that includes participatory approaches with smallholder farmers and other stakeholders in Kenya. The research process involved a wide range of activities that included on-station experiments, field surveys, stakeholder consultations in workshops, seminars and visits, and on-farm farmer participatory research to evaluate the effect of some improved managemen...

  5. A Partnership Approach to Promoting Information Literacy for Higher Education Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Goldstein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The promotion of information literacy in the UK higher education research sector has traditionally been the preserve of academic libraries. However, other professional groups have obvious interests in this area, and there is a strong case for providing a framework which enables different parties with a stake in information literacy to work together in order to reach practical objectives. In the UK, a coalition of partners has been set up to provide this collective framework and to provide synergy. This paper sets out the rationale for this approach, sets out the sort of activities that the coalition has fostered since its inception in late 2009 and reflects on whether it might serve as an example for other parts of Europe or for transnational collaborations.

  6. Methodological lessons in neurophenomenology: Review of a baseline study and recommendations for research approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bockelman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurophenomenological methods integrate objective and subjective data in ways that retain the statistical power of established disciplines (like cognitive science while embracing the value of first-person reports of experience. The present paper positions neurophenomenology as an approach that pulls from traditions of cognitive science but includes techniques that are challenging for cognitive science in some ways. A baseline study is reviewed for “lessons learned”, that is, the potential methodological improvements that will support advancements in understanding consciousness and cognition using neurophenomenology. These improvements, we suggest, include (1 addressing issues of interdisciplinarity by purposefully and systematically creating and maintaining shared mental models among research team members; (2 making sure that neurophenomenological experiments include high standards of experimental design and execution to achieve variable control, reliability, generalizability, and replication of results; and (3 conceiving of phenomenological interview techniques as placing the impetus on the interviewer in interaction with the experimental subject.

  7. iSPHERE - A New Approach to Collaborative Research and Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ubaidi, T.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Kallio, E. J.; Harry, A.; Alexeev, I. I.; Vázquez-Poletti, J. L.; Enke, H.; Magin, T.; Mair, M.; Scherf, M.; Poedts, S.; De Causmaecker, P.; Heynderickx, D.; Congedo, P.; Manolescu, I.; Esser, B.; Webb, S.; Ruja, C.

    2015-10-01

    The project iSPHERE (integrated Scientific Platform for HEterogeneous Research and Engineering) that has been proposed for Horizon 2020 (EINFRA-9- 2015, [1]) aims at creating a next generation Virtual Research Environment (VRE) that embraces existing and emerging technologies and standards in order to provide a versatile platform for scientific investigations and collaboration. The presentation will introduce the large project consortium, provide a comprehensive overview of iSPHERE's basic concepts and approaches and outline general user requirements that the VRE will strive to satisfy. An overview of the envisioned architecture will be given, focusing on the adapted Service Bus concept, i.e. the "Scientific Service Bus" as it is called in iSPHERE. The bus will act as a central hub for all communication and user access, and will be implemented in the course of the project. The agile approach [2] that has been chosen for detailed elaboration and documentation of user requirements, as well as for the actual implementation of the system, will be outlined and its motivation and basic structure will be discussed. The presentation will show which user communities will benefit and which concrete problems, scientific investigations are facing today, will be tackled by the system. Another focus of the presentation is iSPHERE's seamless integration of cloud computing resources and how these will benefit scientific modeling teams by providing a reliable and web based environment for cloud based model execution, storage of results, and comparison with measurements, including fully web based tools for data mining, analysis and visualization. Also the envisioned creation of a dedicated data model for experimental plasma physics will be discussed. It will be shown why the Scientific Service Bus provides an ideal basis to integrate a number of data models and communication protocols and to provide mechanisms for data exchange across multiple and even multidisciplinary platforms.

  8. A Holistic Approach to Climate and Health Research: Respiratory and Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrar, G.; Alonoso, W.; McCormick, B.; Schuck-Paim, C.; Miller, M.

    2014-12-01

    The link between climate variability and change, especially extreme conditions, is well documented in both environmental and health literature. The focus of research in the recent past, and current studies, is to understand causal relationships between the disease agents and environmental conditions, based on post-hoc analysis of observed cases to develop predictive models for advance warning of public by health authorities. A combination of the isolated examination of individual diseases and routes of infection (e.g. respiratory system, skin, digestive tract, etc.) and reliance mostly on correlative evidence from past occurrences have restricted public health progress (e.g. compared to experimental evidence of the quantitative balance of different transmission routes) and the utility of knowledge gained from such studies (e.g. reliably predicting seasonal outbreaks is no longer an advance). We propose a shift from focusing on the prediction of individual disease pattern(s) to a more holistic identification and mitigation of broader vulnerabilities within the provision of public health. Such an approach has the potential to account for and reveal health vulnerabilities common to a broader range of health stresses, thus facilitating a more holistic response to health challenges. The human health fragilities associated with respiratory diseases caused by a combination of natural (i.e dust, pollen, etc.) and industrial particulates (i.e. soot, aerosols, etc.) and other infectious airborne agents, for example, and their adverse impact on human health such as respiratory, gastrointestinal, etc. is an ideal candidate for such a holistic approach to environment and health research.

  9. An Affordable, Low-Risk Approach to Launching Research Spacecraft as Tertiary Payloads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pranajaya, F.M.; Zee, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid and affordable access to space for university researchers and educators has always been a challenge. Despite the availability of lower-cost (e.g. Russian) launch vehicles, launching payloads 20 kg or less typically involves a certain minimum cost that necessitates a cost sharing arrangement among numerous parties and the handling of complex export control issues. In turn, this complicates mission scheduling and increases the risk of missing launch deadlines. The University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Space Flight Laboratory (UTIAS/SFL) has taken a leading role in addressing this challenge, and has successfully led a group of international spacecraft developers in manifesting one 1-kg Canadian spacecraft, two 1-kg Danish spacecraft, and one 3-kg American spacecraft on a 2003 Eurockot launch. This paper outlines the approach taken by UTIAS/SFL in negotiating and securing launches for its own spacecraft in collaboration with other spacecraft developers. A summary of how this approach is applied in planning and coordinating the June 2003 Eurockot launch is also presented.

  10. User-based and Cognitive Approaches to Knowledge Organization : A Theoretical Analysis of the Research Literature.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    HjØrland, Birger

    2013-01-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s, forms of user-based and cognitive approaches to knowledge organization came to the forefront as part of the overall development in library and information science and in the broader society. The specific nature of userbased approaches is their basis in the empirical studies of users or the principle that users need to be involved in the construction of knowledge organization systems. It might seem obvious that user-friendly systems should be designed on user studies or user involvement, but extremely successful systems such as Apple’s iPhone, Dialog’s search system and Google’s PageRank are not based on the empirical studies of users. In knowledge organization, the Book House System is one example of a system based on user studies. In cognitive science the important WordNet database is claimed to be based on psychological research. This article considers such examples. The role of the user is often confused with the role of subjectivity. Knowledge organization systems cannot be objective and must therefore, by implication, be based on some kind of subjectivity. This subjectivity should, however, be derived from collective views in discourse communities rather than be derived from studies of individuals or from the study of abstract minds.

  11. An integrated, ontology-driven approach to constructing observational databases for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, William; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Chien, Aichi; Pablo Villablanca, J; Pajukanta, Päivi; Viñuela, Fernando; Bui, Alex A T

    2015-06-01

    The electronic health record (EHR) contains a diverse set of clinical observations that are captured as part of routine care, but the incomplete, inconsistent, and sometimes incorrect nature of clinical data poses significant impediments for its secondary use in retrospective studies or comparative effectiveness research. In this work, we describe an ontology-driven approach for extracting and analyzing data from the patient record in a longitudinal and continuous manner. We demonstrate how the ontology helps enforce consistent data representation, integrates phenotypes generated through analyses of available clinical data sources, and facilitates subsequent studies to identify clinical predictors for an outcome of interest. Development and evaluation of our approach are described in the context of studying factors that influence intracranial aneurysm (ICA) growth and rupture. We report our experiences in capturing information on 78 individuals with a total of 120 aneurysms. Two example applications related to assessing the relationship between aneurysm size, growth, gene expression modules, and rupture are described. Our work highlights the challenges with respect to data quality, workflow, and analysis of data and its implications toward a learning health system paradigm. PMID:25817919

  12. Radon entry into basements: Approach, experimental structures, and instrumentation of the small structures research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, W.J.; Modera, M.P.; Sextro, R.G.; Garbesi, K.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Nuzum, T.; Tsang, Y.W.

    1992-02-01

    We describe the experimental approach, structures, and instrumentation of a research project on radon generation and transport in soil and entry into basements. The overall approach is to construct small precisely-fabricated basements in areas of different geology and climate, to control the pressures and ventilation rates in the structures, and to monitor radon concentrations and other relevant parameters over a period of one year or more. Two nearly air-tight structures have been constructed at the first site. The floor of each structure contains adjustable-width slots that serve as the only significant pathway for advective entry of radon. A layer of gravel underlays the floor of one structure; otherwise they are identical. The structures are instrumented for continuous or periodic monitoring of soil, structural, and meteorological parameters that affect radon entry. The pressure difference that drives advective radon entry can be maintained constant or varied over time. Soil gas and radon entry rates and associated parameters, such as soil gas pressures and radon concentrations, have been monitored for a range of steady-state and time-varying pressure differences between the interior of the structure and the soil. Examples of the experimentally-measured pressure and permeability fields in the soil around a structure are presented and discussed.

  13. Conceptualizing and Researching the Body: A Comparison Between the Psychological and the Cultural Studies Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei HOLMAN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Given the multiplication of social science investigations on the body, the topics of research and the interpretation grids employed have become more and more diverse. We compare two major perspectives on the body–related experiences and behaviors – the psychological and the cultural studies approaches – emphasizing a set of important differences in the topics that have drawn the scholars’ interest and, in general, in the manners of conceptualizing the body. We present the core conceptual networks of each approach and some of the illustrative investigations carried out so far in the respective areas. Both highlight a set of significant differences on several layers, such as the external / internal localization of relevant factors of body-related experiences, the neutral / pathologically – oriented discourse on these experiences, the degree of exploration of their phenomenological realm, the more or less extended focus on the aesthetic evaluation of one’s body and the prevalent search for causes / purposes of the body experiences and uses.

  14. CRITIQUE OF SOME TRADITIONAL APPROACHES TO RESEARCH IN THE FIELD OF ASYMMETRY CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutnik B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the number papers presented at the Conference “MODERN TRENDS IN THE STUDY OF FUNCTIONAL INTERHEMISPHERIC ASYMMETRY AND PLASTICITY OF THE BRAIN ” (MoscowDecember 2-3, 2010 and is generalization of the of the results of a long period research, conducting by the authors which studied manual , sensory-motor, structural-anatomical and cognitive asymmetries . The article is devoted to the comparative evaluation of methods for testing the asymmetry of the human brain, including and its manual derivative. This article discusses some approaches that used traditional methods of determination of the dominant and subdominant limbs and also domination in activation of the sensory organs as well. It is clear shown that in the existed studies of asymmetry there is still no any standardization of the basic principles of lateralization. The conventional approach to manual and other forms of asymmetry is largely contrary to the basic principles of “physiology of functional systems” and “physiology of activity” which was established by Bernstein. According to abovementioned basic principles the control of motor and sensory systems largely depends upon the physiological states on the «periphery». The authors are not able to give satisfactory answers to the issues put in this article yet. Nevertheless, in their work, they set the foundation for future studies of asymmetry as an integral and multifacet occurrence, which can not be completely divorced from the theory of functional systems. However, even these results may form the starting point for development of more reliable approaches for assessing of functional asymmetry of a human body. The authors hope that their findings and conclusions will be useful for to specialists in the field of physiology, neurology, psychiatry and psychology.

  15. Adopting a farming systems research approach to carry out an economic and environmental analysis of food supply chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena; Pedersen, SØren Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural systems are complex, because managers need to cope with interlinked and dynamic ecological, social, political and economic aspects. Understanding and analysing such systems requires researchers to adopt a holistic approach to grasp the links between those aspects. Holistic approaches within agricultural research - known as Farming Systems Research (FSR) support researchers in sharing knowledge and different perspectives concerning the research process and problems. Sharing knowledge and perspectives enables to holistically understand and conceptualise complex systems, as well as to structure and manage research projects. The aim of this paper is to suggest and present a guideline for agricultural researchers to carry out an economic and environmental analysis of food supply chains with a FSR approach. We describe how participants of the EU-project SOLIBAM (Strategies for Organic and Low-input Integrated Breeding and Management) used the guideline to structure, manage and carry out an economic and environmental analysis of the food supply chains of concern. The FSR approach enabled the participants to jointly define and model the structure of the supply chains, identify the requirements for data collection and collect data.

  16. A qualitative approach to Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training development: identification of metacognitive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligyte, Vykinta; Marcy, Richard T; Sevier, Sydney T; Godfrey, Elaine S; Mumford, Michael D

    2008-03-01

    Although Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training is common in the sciences, the effectiveness of RCR training is open to question. Three key factors appear to be particularly important in ensuring the effectiveness of ethics education programs: (1) educational efforts should be tied to day-to-day practices in the field, (2) educational efforts should provide strategies for working through the ethical problems people are likely to encounter in day-to-day practice, and (3) educational efforts should be embedded in a broader program of on-going career development efforts. This article discusses a complex qualitative approach to RCR training development, based on a sensemaking model, which strives to address the afore-mentioned training concerns. Ethnographic observations and prior RCR training served the purpose of collecting information specific to a multi-disciplinary and multi-university research center with the goal of identifying metacognitive reasoning strategies that would facilitate ethical decision-making. The extensive qualitative analyses resulted in the identification of nine metacognitive reasoning strategies on which future RCR training will be developed. The implications of the findings for RCR training in the sciences are discussed. PMID:17899449

  17. Introduction to the Special Series on Research Synthesis: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lisa A; Hammitt, James K

    2015-06-01

    To estimate the effects of a policy change, analysts must often rely on available data as time and resource constraints limit their ability to commission new primary research. Research synthesis methods-including systematic review, meta-analysis, and expert elicitation-play an important role in ensuring that this evidence is appropriately weighed and considered. We present the conclusions of a multidisciplinary Harvard Center for Risk Analysis project that evaluated and applied these methods, and introduce the resulting series of articles. The first step in any analysis is to clearly define the problem to be addressed; the second is a systematic review of the literature. Whether additional analysis is needed depends on the quality and relevance of the available data to the policy question, and the likely effect of uncertainty on the policy decision. Meta-analysis promotes understanding the variation between studies and may be used to combine the estimates to develop values for application in policy analysis. Formal, structured expert elicitation promotes careful consideration of the evidence when data are limited or inconsistent, and aids in extrapolating to the policy context. Regardless of the methods used, clear communication of the approach, assumptions, and uncertainty is essential. PMID:26081936

  18. Leveraging a clinical research information system to assist biospecimen data and workflow management: a hybrid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Large multi-center clinical studies often involve the collection and analysis of biological samples. It is necessary to ensure timely, complete and accurate recording of analytical results and associated phenotypic and clinical information. The TRIBE-AKI Consortium http://www.yale.edu/tribeaki supports a network of multiple related studies and sample biorepository, thus allowing researchers to take advantage of a larger specimen collection than they might have at an individual institution. Description We describe a biospecimen data management system (BDMS) that supports TRIBE-AKI and is intended for multi-center collaborative clinical studies that involve shipment of biospecimens between sites. This system works in conjunction with a clinical research information system (CRIS) that stores the clinical data associated with the biospecimens, along with other patient-related parameters. Inter-operation between the two systems is mediated by an interactively invoked suite of Web Services, as well as by batch code. We discuss various challenges involved in integration. Conclusions Our experience indicates that an approach that emphasizes inter-operability is reasonably optimal in allowing each system to be utilized for the tasks for which it is best suited. PMID:21884570

  19. IMPLEMENTING THE SYSTEMATIC SYNERGETIC APPROACH IN MANAGEMENT PRACTICES RELATED TO THE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION NETWORK DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Davydova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the research and education network management regarded by the author as a dynamic set of interrelated agents – scientific, educational, social and cultural institutions including their units and creative teams, as well as innovative infrastructure elements and industrial enterprises anxious about educational system developments. The given network operates as a virtual organization and implements the innovative projects in educational sphere with the efficient objective coordination and resource integration achieved by creating the nationwide informational environment, which results both in collective intellectual property developments in the given sphere and the rise of the external effect.The author considers the essence of systematic synergetic approach applied to the educational system management, and observes the work experience of the research and education network of innovative educational institutions in the Ural region. The paper specifies the transition of educational institutions to the self-development mode on the principle of transparency and diversity. In this regard, the key network characteristics include: the expanding informational educational environment that makes it possible to describe the variety of horizontal and vertical interactions within the network; information that reveals the content of interactions in question; and the time demonstrating the logic of the network development. The main implementation outcomes of the innovative educational projects within the given network include fostering the academic staff’s innovative behavior and capability to operate effectively in situations of uncertainty. 

  20. A confirmatory research approach to the measurement of EMI/RFI in commercial nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting confirmatory research on the measurement of electromagnetic/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) in nuclear power plants. While it makes a good beginning, the currently available research data are not sufficient to characterize the EMI/RFI environment of the typical nuclear plant. Data collected over several weeks at each of several observation points are required to meet this need. To collect the required data, several approaches are examined, the most promising of which is the relatively new technology of application specific spectral receivers. While several spectral receiver designs have been described in the literature, none is well suited for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. This paper describes the development of two receivers specifically designed for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. One receiver surveys electric fields between 5 MHz and 8 GHz, while the other surveys magnetic fields between 305 Hz and 5 MHz. The results of field tests at TVA`s Bull Run Fossil Plant are reported.

  1. A confirmatory research approach to the measurement of EMI/RFI in commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting confirmatory research on the measurement of electromagnetic/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) in nuclear power plants while it makes a good beginning, the currently available research data are not sufficient to characterize the EMI/RFI environment of the typical nuclear plant. Data collected over several weeks at each of several observation points are required to meet this need. To collect the required data, several approaches are examined, the most promising of which is the relatively new technology of application specific spectral receivers. While several spectral receiver designs have been described in the literature, none is well suited for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. This paper describes the development of two receivers specifically designed for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. One receiver surveys electric fields between 5 MHz and 8 GHz, while the other surveys magnetic fields between 305 Hz and 5 MHz. The results of field tests at TVA's Bull Run Fossil Plant are reported

  2. Concepts and approaches for marine ecosystem research with reference to the tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wolff

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article gives an overview on the leading concepts and modelling approaches for marine ecosystems’ research including (1 The trophodynamic theory of pelagic ecosystems, (2 Compartment/network models, (3 Mesocosm experiments and (4 Individual based modelling approaches and virtual ecosystems (VE. The main research questions addressed, as well as the potential and limits of each approach, are summarized and discussed and it is shown how the concept of ecosystem has changed over time. Aquatic biomas spectra (derived from the theory of pelagic ecosystems can give insight into the trophic structure of different systems, and can show how organism sizes are distributed within the system and how different size groups participate in the system’s metabolism and production. Compartment/network models allow for a more detailed description of the trophic structure of ecosystems and of the energy/biomass fluxes through the explicit modelling of P/B-and food consumption rates and biomasses for each system compartment. Moreover, system indices for a characterization and comparison with other systems can be obtained such as average trophic efficiency, energy throughput, and degree of connectivity, degree of maturity, and others. Recent dynamic extensions of trophic network models allow for exploring past and future impacts of fishing and environmental disturbances as well as to explore policies such as marine protected areas. Mesocosm experiments address a multitude of questions related to aquatic processes (i.e. primary production, grazing, predation, energy transfer between trophic levels etc. and the behaviour of organisms (i.e. growth, migration, response to contaminants etc. under semi-natural conditions. As processes within mesocosms often differ in rate and magnitude from those occurring in nature, mesocosms should be viewed as large in vitro experiments designed to test selected components of the ecosystem and not as an attempt to enclose a multitude of interacting processes. Models that use individual organisms as units can provide insight into the causes of natural variability within populations (growth, phenotype, behaviour and into the role of intraspecific variation for interspecific processes, succession, and feedback mechanisms. In biological oceanography, interdisciplinary research is increasingly using "Virtual Ecosystems" to simulate non-linear interactions between the dynamics of fluctuating ocean circulation, the physics of air-sea interaction, turbulence and optics, biogeochemistry, and the physiology and behaviour of plankton, which can be compared with real observations. The different approaches available for the analysis of aquatic ecosystems should be seen as complementary ways for the description and understanding of ecosystems. The modern view of marine ecosystems, as has emerged from ecosystem analysis over the last decades, is that of a composite of loosely coupled subsystems of desynchron dynamics which through their combined action maintain the fundamental structure and function of the wholeEste artículo es una revisión de los conceptos y enfoques predominantes en la modelación e investigación de los ecosistemas marinos, tales como: (1 la Teoría Trofodinámica de ecosistemas pelágicos, (2 modelos de compartimentos/ red (compartment/network models, (3 experimentos de mesocosmos, y (4 modelos basados en enfoques individuales y ecosistemas virtuales. Se resumen y discuten preguntas relevantes para la investigación así como las limitaciones de cada enfoque, y se muestra como el concepto de ecosistema ha cambiado a través del tiempo. El espectro de biomasa acuática (obtenido de la teoría de ecosistemas pelágicos puede revelar la estructura trófica de los diferentes ecosistemas; puede mostrar como el tamaño de los organismos se distribuyen dentro del ecosistema y como los diferentes grupos, de acuerdo al tamaño, participan en el metabolismo y producción del mismo. Los modelos de compartimentos/redes permiten describir más detalladamente la estructura trófica y

  3. Multidisciplinary Approaches to Educational Research: Case Studies from Europe and the Developing World. Routledge Research in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Sadaf, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This book provides an original perspective on a range of controversial issues in educational and social research through case studies of multi-disciplinary and mixed-method research involving children, teachers, schools and communities in Europe and the developing world. These case studies from researchers "across continents" and "across…

  4. Writing Abstracts for MLIS Research Proposals Using Worked Examples: An Innovative Approach to Teaching the Elements of Research Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrusek, Anita L.; Thiele, Harold E.; Yang, Changwoo

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined abstracts written by graduate students for their research proposals as a requirement for a course in research methods in a distance learning MLIS program. The students learned under three instructional conditions that involved varying levels of access to worked examples created from abstracts representing research in the LIS…

  5. The KNOO research consortium: work package 3 - an integrated approach to waste immobilisation and management - 16375

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Keeping the Nuclear Option Open (KNOO) research consortium is a four-year research council funded initiative addressing the challenges related to increasing the safety, reliability and sustainability of nuclear power in the UK. Through collaboration between key industrial and governmental stakeholders, and with international partners, KNOO was established to maintain and develop skills relevant to nuclear power generation. Funded by a research grant of Pounds 6.1 M from the 'Towards a Sustainable Energy Economy Programme' of the UK Research Councils, it represents the single largest university-based nuclear research programme in the UK for more than 30 years. The programme is led by Imperial College London, in collaboration with the universities of Manchester, Sheffield, Leeds, Bristol, Cardiff and the Open University. These universities are working with the UK nuclear industry, who contributed a further Pounds 0.4 M in funding. The industry/government stakeholders include AWE, British Energy, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the Environment Agency, the Health and Safety Executive, Doosan Babcock, the Ministry of Defence, Nirex, AMEC NNC, Rolls-Royce PLC and the UK Atomic Energy Authority. Work Package 3 of this consortium, led by the University of Leeds, concerns 'An Integrated Approach to Waste Immobilisation and Management', and involves Imperial College London, and the Universities of Manchester and Sheffield. The aims of this work package are: to study the re-mobilisation, transport, solid-liquid separation and immobilisation of particulate wastes; to develop predictive models for particle behaviour based on atomic scale, thermodynamic and process scale simulations; to develop a fundamental understanding of selective adsorption of nuclides onto filter systems and their immobilisation; and to consider mechanisms of nuclide leaving and transport. The paper describes highlights from this work in the key areas of multi-scale modeling (using atomic scale, thermodynamic and process scale models), the engineering properties of waste (linking microscopic and macroscopic behaviour, and transport and rheology), and waste reactivity (considering waste hosts and wasteforms, generation IV wastes, and waste interactions). (authors)

  6. How desertification research is addressed in Argentina? Land versus Soil approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Laura; Abraham, Elena M.; Barbero, Celia; Marques, Maria J.; Ruiz, Manuel; Escadafal, Richard; Exbrayat, Williams

    2013-04-01

    Recommendations are not enough to solve problems of desertification. In certain areas, soil degradation and poverty establish a vicious circle that may be broken if political, social, economic and natural visions are considered as a whole. Nevertheless, usually the scientific framework to combat land degradation is only associated with the protection of natural resources - the "soil approach"-, and weak attention is paid on the social sciences - the "land approach". The success in the adoption of mitigation measures to combat dryland degradation depends on the dialogue between research institutes, policy makers, land users and funding agencies. The structure of desertification research and its implementation in Argentina is addressed in this study. It is one part of a wider framework of analysis that is simultaneously carried out in other different regions under the umbrella of a Task Force on Land and Soil promoted by DesertNet International. The ultimate goal of this Task Force is the achievement of an informed analysis to support the need of a scientific panel to answer the needs of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification. The features and orientation of such a panel to be truly effective may be established from the results of the analysis of the different ways to meet the challenge of combating desertification in different regions of the world and their success or failure. The method is based on the analysis of scientific journals indexed in the Web of Science using different searching criteria with different groups of keywords. The analysis of papers addresses three main criteria: the disciplines involved, the type of study and finally the range of the study in order to know the level of applicability. In order to compute and visualise clusters of elements bibliometric methods will be used. Positive signs have been recognised in Argentina in recent years trough the increase of governmental and non governmental organisation that are involved in the adoption of measures to solve natural and social issues. This paper seeks to examine the current structure of the research conducted in the area to acknowledge the results of these changes.

  7. How Iranian Medical Trainees Approach their Responsibilities in Clinical Settings; A Grounded Theory Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Asemani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: It seems we are now experiencing “responsibility problems” among medical trainees (MTs and some of those recently graduated from medical schools in Iran. Training responsible professionals have always been one of the main concerns of medical educators. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of research in the literature on “responsibility” especially from the medical education point of view. Therefore, the present study was carried out with the aim of presenting a theoretical based framework for understanding how MTs approach their responsibilities in educational settings. Method: This qualitative study was conducted at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS using the grounded theory methodology. 15 MTs and 10 clinical experts and professional nurses were purposefully chosen as participants. Data was analyzed using the methodology suggested by Corbin and Strauss, 1998. Results: “Try to find acceptance toward expectations”, “try to be committed to meet the expectations” and “try to cope with unacceptable expectations” were three main categories extracted based on the research data. Abstractly, the main objective for using these processes was “to preserve the integrity of student identity” which was the core category of this research too. Moreover, it was also found that practically, “responsibility” is considerably influenced by lots of positive and negative contextual and intervening conditions. Conclusion: “Acceptance” was the most decisive variable highly effective in MTs’ responsibility. Therefore, investigating the “process of acceptance” regarding the involved contextual and intervening conditions might help medical educators correctly identify and effectively control negative factors and reinforce the constructive ones that affect the concept of responsibility in MTs.

  8. Developing a web-based information resource for palliative care: an action-research inspired approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gliddon Terry

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General Practitioners and community nurses rely on easily accessible, evidence-based online information to guide practice. To date, the methods that underpin the scoping of user-identified online information needs in palliative care have remained under-explored. This paper describes the benefits and challenges of a collaborative approach involving users and experts that informed the first stage of the development of a palliative care website 1. Method The action research-inspired methodology included a panel assessment of an existing palliative care website based in Victoria, Australia; a pre-development survey (n = 197 scoping potential audiences and palliative care information needs; working parties conducting a needs analysis about necessary information content for a redeveloped website targeting health professionals and caregivers/patients; an iterative evaluation process involving users and experts; as well as a final evaluation survey (n = 166. Results Involving users in the identification of content and links for a palliative care website is time-consuming and requires initial resources, strong networking skills and commitment. However, user participation provided crucial information that led to the widened the scope of the website audience and guided the development and testing of the website. The needs analysis underpinning the project suggests that palliative care peak bodies need to address three distinct audiences (clinicians, allied health professionals as well as patients and their caregivers. Conclusion Web developers should pay close attention to the content, language, and accessibility needs of these groups. Given the substantial cost associated with the maintenance of authoritative health information sites, the paper proposes a more collaborative development in which users can be engaged in the definition of content to ensure relevance and responsiveness, and to eliminate unnecessary detail. Access to volunteer networks forms an integral part of such an approach.

  9. LA FORMACIÓN INTEGRAL: UNA APROXIMACIÓN DESDE LA INVESTIGACIÓN / WHOLE EDUCATION: AN APPROACH FROM RESEARCH

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ana Elsy, Díaz Monsalve; Ruth Elena, Quiroz Posada.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se exponen los resultados de la investigación en la que se indagó acerca de las representaciones que tienen los docentes de inglés de educación básica primaria, en algunas instituciones públicas de Medellín, Colombia, acerca del ideal de formación integral. A partir de un enfoque de [...] investigación cualitativa, se implementó una encuesta con preguntas abiertas aplicadas a diecinueve docentes y, posteriormente, se realizó una entrevista a profundidad a cinco de los encuestados. La información recogida fue sometida a la técnica del análisis crítico del discurso propuesta por Teun Van Dijk (2003). Los principales hallazgos permiten reconocer que dichas representaciones reflejan cinco líneas temáticas principales: (1) Formación integral de un ser humano multidimensional; (2) Formación de un ser humano valioso; (3) Formación integral, aprendizaje de una lengua extranjera y acercamiento a diferentes culturas; (4) Formación integral, enseñanza de las lenguas extranjeras y personas autónomas; (5) Formación integral y competencia comunicativa en lengua extranjera. Se encontró que las representaciones de los docentes, sobre la formación integral, poseen un marcado énfasis ético -moral, valores y normas- y que esta, analizada desde la enseñanza de la lengua extranjera, no debe reducirse al uso de estructuras lingüísticas básicas, en contextos de comunicación inmediatos y cotidianos. Abstract in english In this article, the results of a research inquiring about representations that primary education English teachers from some public institutions in the city of Medellin, Colombia have about ideal of comprehensive education are presented. From a qualitative research approach, an open-ended question s [...] urvey was implemented to 19 teachers and subsequently an in-depth interview was carried out to 5 teachers. Information collected was subject to the technique of critical discourse analysis by Teun Van Dijk (2003). The main findings revealed that these representations show five main thematic areas: (1) whole education for a multidimensional human being; (2) education of a valuable human being; (3) whole education, foreign language learning and different culture approaching; (4) whole education, foreign language teaching and autonomous people; (5) whole education and communicative competence in foreign language. It was found that teachers' representations about whole education have a marked ethic and moral, values and rules emphasis-and that it, being analyzed from foreign language teaching, must not be limited to basic linguistic structures usage in daily and immediate communication contexts.

  10. The Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory: A Student Team Approach to the Fourth-Year Research Thesis Project Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Boyd, Cleo; Barzda, Virginijus; Gradinaru, Claudiu C.; Krull, Ulrich J.; Stefanovic, Sasa; Stewart, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The advanced interdisciplinary research laboratory (AIRLab) represents a novel, effective, and motivational course designed from the interdisciplinary research interests of chemistry, physics, biology, and education development faculty members as an alternative to the independent thesis project experience. Student teams are assembled to work…

  11. Biodiesel exhaust: the need for a systematic approach to health effects research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcombe, Alexander N; Kicic, Anthony; Mullins, Benjamin J; Knothe, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    Biodiesel is a generic term for fuel that can be made from virtually any plant or animal oil via transesterification of triglycerides with an alcohol (and usually a catalyst). Biodiesel has received considerable scientific attention in recent years, as it is a renewable resource that is directly able to replace mineral diesel in many engines. Additionally, some countries have mandated a minimum biodiesel content in all diesel fuel sold on environmental grounds. When combusted, biodiesel produces exhaust emissions containing particulate matter, adsorbed chemicals and a range of gases. In many cases, absolute amounts of these pollutants are lower in biodiesel exhaust compared with mineral diesel exhaust, leading to speculation that biodiesel exhaust may be less harmful to health. Additionally, engine performance studies show that the concentrations of these pollutants vary significantly depending on the renewable oil used to make the biodiesel and the ratio of biodiesel to mineral diesel in the fuel mix. Given the strategic and legislative push towards the use of biodiesel in many countries, a concerning possibility is that certain biodiesels may produce exhaust emissions that are more harmful to health than others. This variation suggests that a comprehensive, systematic and comparative approach to assessing the potential for a range of different biodiesel exhausts to affect health is urgently required. Such an assessment could inform biodiesel production priorities, drive research and development into new exhaust treatment technologies, and ultimately minimize the health impacts of biodiesel exhaust exposure. PMID:26179557

  12. An integrated metabolomics approach for the research of new cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieragostino, Damiana; D'Alessandro, Michele; di Ioia, Maria; Rossi, Claudia; Zucchelli, Mirco; Urbani, Andrea; Di Ilio, Carmine; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Sacchetta, Paolo; Del Boccio, Piero

    2015-06-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MuS) is a disease caused due to an autoimmune attack against myelin components in which non proteic mediators may play a role. Recent research in metabolomics and lipidomics has been driven by rapid advances in technologies such as mass spectrometry and computational methods. They can be used to study multifactorial disorders like MuS, highlighting the effects of disease on metabolic profiling, regardless of the multiple trigger factors. We coupled MALDI-TOF-MS untargeted lipidomics and targeted LC-MS/MS analysis of acylcarnitines and aminoacids to compare cerebrospinal fluid metabolites in 13 MuS subjects and in 12 patients with Other Neurological Diseases (OND). After data processing and statistical evaluation, we found 10 metabolites that significantly (p mass spectrometry approach showed high potentiality to find metabolic alteration in cerebrospinal fluid. These data, if confirmed in a wider clinical study, could open the door for the discovery of novel candidate biomarkers of MuS. PMID:25690641

  13. Opening Up Climate Research: A Linked Data Approach to Publishing Data Provenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Shaon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the formal scientific output in most fields of natural science has been limited to peer-reviewed academic journal publications, with less attention paid to the chain of intermediate data results and their associated metadata, including provenance. In effect, this has constrained the representation and verification of the data provenance to the confines of the related publications. Detailed knowledge of a dataset’s provenance is essential to establish the pedigree of the data for its effective re-use, and to avoid redundant re-enactment of the experiment or computation involved. It is increasingly important for open-access data to determine their authenticity and quality, especially considering the growing volumes of datasets appearing in the public domain. To address these issues, we present an approach that combines the Digital Object Identifier (DOI – a widely adopted citation technique – with existing, widely adopted climate science data standards to formally publish detailed provenance of a climate research dataset as an associated scientific workflow. This is integrated with linked-data compliant data re-use standards (e.g. OAI-ORE to enable a seamless link between a publication and the complete trail of lineage of the corresponding dataset, including the dataset itself.

  14. Research approaches, adaptation strategies, and knowledge gaps concerning the impacts of climate change on plant diseases

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Raquel, Ghini; Emília, Hamada; Francislene, Angelotti; Lúcio B., Costa; Wagner, Bettiol.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the present trends in studies on the impacts of climate change on plant diseases. Firstly, the approaches used for studying the potential effects of altered temperature, water availability, CO2 and O3 air concentrations, and UV-B radiation on components of the disease cycle are [...] explained and discussed. Next, the impact of changes in climate patterns on the geographic and temporal distribution of diseases by integrating biological and epidemiological models into geographic and climate databases are assessed. Finally, adaptation strategies are discussed and areas where there is a recognized lack of knowledge are highlighted. The literature shows that different pathosystems respond in different ways to climate change. Thus, case-by-case studies on the responses of crop species or varieties and their diseases to climate change are necessary. In addition to that, wide-scale projections of disease risk are necessary in order to identify research priorities, whereas industry must be strategically directed and public policies developed to establish adaptation measures and to prevent potential food security crisis. Only by conducting long-term and multidisciplinary studies can we reduce the uncertainty regarding the effects of climate change on plant diseases.

  15. An epidemiological approach to welfare research in zoos: the Elephant Welfare Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlstead, Kathy; Mench, Joy A; Meehan, Cheryl; Brown, Janine L

    2013-01-01

    Multi-institutional studies of welfare have proven to be valuable in zoos but are hampered by limited sample sizes and difficulty in evaluating more than just a few welfare indicators. To more clearly understand how interactions of husbandry factors influence the interrelationships among welfare outcomes, epidemiological approaches are needed as well as multifactorial assessments of welfare. Many questions have been raised about the housing and care of elephants in zoos and whether their environmental and social needs are being met in a manner that promotes good welfare. This article describes the background and rationale for a large-scale study of elephant welfare in North American zoos funded by the (U.S.) Institute of Museum and Library Services. The goals of this project are to document the prevalence of positive and negative welfare states in 291 elephants exhibited in 72 Association of Zoos and Aquariums zoos and then determine the environmental, management, and husbandry factors that impact elephant welfare. This research is the largest scale nonhuman animal welfare project ever undertaken by the zoo community, and the scope of environmental variables and welfare outcomes measured is unprecedented. PMID:24079487

  16. Concepts and approaches for marine ecosystem research with reference to the tropics

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Matthias, Wolff.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo es una revisión de los conceptos y enfoques predominantes en la modelación e investigación de los ecosistemas marinos, tales como: (1) la Teoría Trofodinámica de ecosistemas pelágicos, (2) modelos de compartimentos/ red (compartment/network models), (3) experimentos de mesocosmos, y (4 [...] ) modelos basados en enfoques individuales y ecosistemas virtuales. Se resumen y discuten preguntas relevantes para la investigación así como las limitaciones de cada enfoque, y se muestra como el concepto de ecosistema ha cambiado a través del tiempo. El espectro de biomasa acuática (obtenido de la teoría de ecosistemas pelágicos) puede revelar la estructura trófica de los diferentes ecosistemas; puede mostrar como el tamaño de los organismos se distribuyen dentro del ecosistema y como los diferentes grupos, de acuerdo al tamaño, participan en el metabolismo y producción del mismo. Los modelos de compartimentos/redes permiten describir más detalladamente la estructura trófica y el flujo de energía-/ biomasa en los ecosistemas, particularmente, con el modelamiento explícito de P/B y las tasas de consumo de alimento y biomasa de cada compartimento. Además, se pueden obtener índices para la caracterización y comparación entre sistemas, como por ejemplo la eficiencia trófica promedio, el rendimiento energético, los grados de conectividad y de madurez, y otros. Novedosas ampliaciones dinámicas de los modelos tróficos de red, permiten explorar los impactos pasados y futuros de las pesquerías y de las perturbaciones ambientales, así como sondear políticas de manejo como por ejemplo, las áreas marinas protegidas. Los experimentos de mesocosmos tratan con una multitud de preguntas relacionadas con procesos acuáticos (i.e. producción primaria, pastoreo, depredación, paso de energía entre niveles tróficos, etc.) y el comportamiento de los organismos (i.e. crecimiento, migración, reacción a los contaminantes, etc.) bajo condiciones seminaturales. Como los procesos dentro del mesocosmos frecuentemente difieren de los naturales en tasa y magnitud, éstos deberán ser considerados como grandes experimentos in vitro, diseñados para probar selectos componentes del ecosistema y no como intentos de abarcar múltiples procesos interactivos. Los modelos que utilizan organismos individuales como unidades, pueden revelar las causas de la variabilidad natural dentro de las poblaciones (crecimiento, fenotipo, comportamiento) y del papel de la variación intraespecífica de los procesos interespecíficos, de la sucesión y de los mecanismos retroactivos. Los ecosistemas virtuales están siendo utilizados ampliamente en la investigación interdisciplinaria dentro de la oceanografía biológica para simular interacciones no lineares entre las fluctuaciones dinámicas de la circulación oceánica, la física de las interacciones aire- mar, turbulencia y óptica, biogeoquímica, y en la fisiología y comportamiento del plancton. Todos estos aspectos pueden ser comparados con observaciones reales. Los diferentes enfoques disponibles para el análisis de ecosistemas acuáticos deberán ser considerados como medios complementarios para la descripción y comprensión de los ecosistemas. La perspectiva actual de los ecosistemas marinos es el resultado del análisis de ecosistemas durante las últimas décadas, y es la de un compuesto de subsistemas poco acoplados de dinámicas desincronizadas que mantienen la función y estructura fundamental del todo a través de la acción combinada Abstract in english The present article gives an overview on the leading concepts and modelling approaches for marine ecosystems’ research including (1) The trophodynamic theory of pelagic ecosystems, (2) Compartment/network models, (3) Mesocosm experiments and (4) Individual based modelling approaches and virtual ecos [...] ystems (VE). The main research questions addressed, as well as the potential and limits of each approach, are summarized and discussed and it is shown how the concept of ecosystem has chang

  17. The Second Life Researcher Toolkit - An Exploration of Inworld Tools, Methods and Approaches for Researching Educational Projects in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschini, Elena

    Academics are beginning to explore the educational potential of Second LifeTM (SL) by setting up inworld educational activities and projects. Given the relative novelty of the use of virtual world environments in higher education many such projects are still at pilot stage. However the initial pilot and experimentation stage will have to be followed by a rigorous evaluation process as for more traditional teaching projects. The chapter addresses issues about SL research tools and research methods. It introduces a "researcher toolkit" that includes: the various stages in the evaluation of SL educational projects and the theoretical framework that can inform such projects; an outline of the inworld tools that can be utilised or customised for academic research purposes; a review of methods for collecting feedback from participants and of the main ethical issues involved in researching virtual world environments; a discussion on the technical skills required to operate a research project in SL. The chapter also offers an indication of the inworld opportunities for the dissemination of SL research findings.

  18. Decommissioning of Small Medical, Industrial and Research Facilities: A Simplified Stepwise Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides practical information, experience and assistance to practitioners who are faced with decommissioning of a small nuclear facility, yet have limited or no previous experience. In such circumstances, it is also conceivable that newcomers to decommissioning may be faced with inadequate financial and scientific resources to complete the task; making it all the more important to avoid costly errors. Furthermore, it is also possible that a worker may need some guidance in starting the process of obtaining finance and resources to progress with the task of decommissioning. The aim of this report is to provide useful practical advice to newcomers to decommissioning to aid them in the planning and management of hands-on decommissioning technologies for small nuclear facilities, using a step wise approach, through to facility and site release. This report breaks down the process of decommissioning into a number of manageable stages, such that the inexperienced practitioner has the opportunity to build confidence as they progress with each stage. Whilst acknowledging that there may be a wide diversity of regulatory licence termination conditions throughout the world, the generic stages of decommissioning will broadly be the same, such that this report should be a basic handbook of use in all instances of small facility decommissioning. This text emphasizes, at each stage, the importance of appropriate interface and dialogue with the Regulatory Body and other stakeholders, not only as a means of advancing any regulatory permission required for decommissioning and licence termination, but also for the many benefits gained by early and ongoing dialogue. This report covers the practical aspects of decommissioning of small nuclear facilities typically found in medical, research and industrial applications. Power reactors, prototype and demonstration reactors, larger research reactors, fuel processing and reprocessing plants and their associated large chemical facilities, and all forms of waste disposal are outside the scope of this report and have been covered adequately elsewhere. Typical facilities covered by this report include: - Medical facilities with radiography and radiotherapy units and those using radioisotopes; - Industrial facilities, such as those producing radioisotopes, using irradiation and radiography devices, and manufacturing products incorporating radioactive materials; - Research facilities such as particle accelerators, and those associated with the nuclear industry (e.g. critical assemblies or zero-power reactors), pharmaceuticals and medicine; - Laboratories in universities and hospitals. This publication has been structured as a series of sequential actions, and is supported by tables identifying lessons learned during decommissioning of small facilities. This should assist the inexperienced worker in following a logical stepwise approach to decommissioning. Whereas it is not possible to include all the specific detail of every aspect of decommissioning in this report, a number of useful references are included at each stage, thereby directing the reader to further information. This report is structured as a number of practical stages, some of which can be initiated in parallel rather than sequentially, taking note that many factors under consideration may change throughout the decommissioning process up to achievement of release conditions. An accompanying CD includes a range of practical examples of decommissioning projects from around the world in the annexes, specifically providing details of project planning and implementation, along with lessons learned. (author)

  19. Improving maternity care in the Dominican Republic: a pilot study of a community-based participatory research action plan by an international healthcare team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jennifer; Gossett, Sarah; Burgos, Rosa; Cáceres, Ramona; Tejada, Carmen; Dominguez García, Luis; Ambrosio Rosario, Angel; Almonte, Asela; Perez, Lydia J

    2015-05-01

    This article is a report of the process and results of a feasibility pilot study to improve the quality of maternity care in a sample of 31 women and their newborns delivering in a public, tertiary hospital in the Dominican Republic. The pilot study was the first "action step" taken as a result of a formative, community-based participatory research (CBPR) study conducted between 2008 and 2010 by an interdisciplinary, international partnership of U.S. academic researchers, Dominican medical/nursing personnel, and Dominican community health workers. Health personnel and community health workers separately identified indicators most important to measure quality of antepartum maternity care: laboratory and diagnostic studies and respectful, interpersonal communication. At the midpoint and the completion of data collection, the CBPR team evaluated the change in quality indicators to assess improvement in care. The pilot study supports the idea that joint engagement of community health workers, health personnel, and academic researchers with data creation and patient monitoring is motivating for all to continue to improve services in the cultural context of the Dominican Republic. PMID:24793488

  20. Operationalising the capability approach for outcome measurement in mental health research.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, J.; Anand, P; Gray, A.; Rugkåsa, J; Yeeles, K; Burns, T.

    2013-01-01

    Amartya Sen's multidimensional capability approach focuses on the importance of freedoms to be or do things people have reason to value. It is an alternative to standard utilitarian welfarism, the theoretical approach to quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and cost-utility analyses. Despite the limitations of the utility approach in capturing non-health benefits and broader welfare inequalities, there have been very limited applications of the capability approach in the mental health context ...

  1. Re-Imagining "Bildung Zur Humanität": How I Developed the Dialogos Approach to Practical Philosophy through Action Inquiry Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helskog, Guro Hansen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an account of how I developed the Dialogos approach to practical philosophy through action inquiry research. The process of development is understood as a contribution to the reconstruction of the notion "Bildung zur Humanität" as an ideal in education. Core perspectives, traditions and purposes involved in the action…

  2. A Comprehensive Framework Approach using Content, Context, Process Views to Combine Methods from Operations Research for IT Assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Bernroider, Edward; Koch, Stefan; Stix, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by IT evaluation problems identified in a large public sector organization, we propose how evaluation requirements can be supported by a framework combining different models and methods from IS evaluation theory. The article extends the content, context, process (CCP) perspectives of organizational change with operations research techniques and demonstrates the approach in practice for an Enterprise Resource Planning evaluation. (authors' abstract)

  3. Applying Research to Teacher Education: The University of Utah's Collaborative Approach. First Year Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Amy

    In 1983, the National Institute of Education funded the Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development to conduct a study, Applying Research to Teacher Education (ARTE) Research Utilization in Elementary Teacher Education (RUETE). The ARTE:RUETE study's purpose is to develop preservice instruction incorporating current research

  4. Evaluating the Impact of Collaborative Action Research on Teachers: A Quantitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John A.; Bruce, Catherine D.

    2012-01-01

    The authors extend findings from qualitative research on the effects of action research by reporting two linked quantitative studies (N = 80 and 105). They found that teachers who participated in collaborative action research experienced statistically significant improvements in attitudes to educational research and teacher efficacy. The pre-post…

  5. Analyzing the limitations and possibilities of education policy research under the positivist, phenomenological and dialectical materialistic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Abreu de Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to instigate discussions about the construction of educational research for policy and practices. This will be done considering three different categories: epistemological perspective, epistemological positioning and epistemethodological approach by Tello (2012. Moreover, this article will consider the contributions of Mainardes and Ball (2011, Lima (2010, Alves-Mazzotti (2003, Masson (2013, among others, in order to analyze the context of dialectical materialism, the impact of positivist approaches, phenomenological and materialist dialectics. The latter especially analyzed with regard to qualitative research. In addition, we seek to understand the epistemological nature of such approaches, considering their possibilities and limitations to the process of scientific knowledge production, as well as to contribute to the field of studies on educational policies consolidation.

  6. BLOOD PRESSURE IS IMPROVED IN RURAL MISSISSIPPI RESIDENTS BY A COMMUNITY-BASED NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity requires non-traditional approaches to address its causes. One goal of the Fit For Life Steps program is to develop interventions, using Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR), to reduce obesity and its co-morbidities. University partners provided the research framework for the interv...

  7. Development Approach for the Accommodation of Materials Science Research for the Materials Science Research Facility on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D. A.; Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) is a modular facility comprised of autonomous Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR's) for research in the microgravity environment afforded by the International Space Station (ISS). The initial MSRF concept consists of three Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR-1, MSRR-2, and MSRR-3) which will be developed for a phased deployment beginning on the third Utilization Flight (UF-3). The facility will house materials processing apparatus and common subsystems required for operating each device. Each MSRR is a stand alone autonomous rack and will be comprised of either on-orbit replaceable Experiment Modules, Module Inserts, investigation unique apparatus, and/or multiuser generic processing apparatus. Each MSRR will support a wide range of materials science themes in the NASA research program and will use the ISS Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS). MSRF is being developed for the United States Laboratory Module and will provide the apparatus for satisfying near-term and long-range Materials Science Discipline goals and objectives.

  8. Using Photovoice as a Community Based Participatory Research Tool for Changing Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Behaviours in Usoma, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisung, Elijah; Elliott, Susan J; Abudho, Bernard; Karanja, Diana M; Schuster-Wallace, Corinne J

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increase in the use of community based participatory research (CBPR) tools for understanding environment and health issues and facilitating social action. This paper explores the application and utility of photovoice for understanding water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) behaviours and catalysing community led solutions to change behaviours. Between June and August 2013, photovoice was conducted with eight (8) women in Usoma, a lakeshore community in Western Kenya with a follow-up community meeting (baraza) in May 2014 to discuss findings with the community members and government officials. In the first part of the study, photovoice one-on-one interviews were used to explore local perceptions and practices around water-health linkages and how the ecological and socio-political environment shapes these perceptions and practices. This paper, which is the second component of the study, uses photovoice group discussions to explore participants' experiences with and (re)action to the photographs and the photovoice project. The findings illustrate that photovoice was an effective CBPR methodology for understanding behaviours, creating awareness, facilitating collective action, and engaging with local government and local health officials at the water-health nexus. PMID:26380305

  9. The Biological Efficiency of the Petten Research Reactor Beam on Human Lymphocytes (Methodological Approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present preliminary results of examination of the biological efficiency of the Petten Research Reactor mixed beam with respect to 250 kV X-rays for the induction of DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes. Human blood samples or isolated lymphocytes were irradiated by the beam from Research Reactor in ECN Petten, Netherlands and dose response relationships for the level of damage induced were investigated. In order to check any enhancement effect due to the process of boron neutron capture, chemical pretreatment with boric acid or mercaptoborane (containing boron-10 ions) was done. The estimation of the DNA damage was done with the use of a single cell gel-electrophoresis method (SCGE), to asses the frequency of chromosomal aberrations culturing of lymphocytes for the evaluation of cytogenetic damage was performed. Abnormal behavior of blood samples during a culture procedure and abnormally low metaphases frequency was noticed. During the analysis of DNA damage by SCGE assay we have also found the abnormalities in shapes and brightness of investigated comets. Part of the studied lymphocytes was bigger than others and had much bigger fraction of the DNA in tail. Very poor dose response relationship was observed in those results. From this reason, our paper presents the methodological approach and discussion of the results obtained and also studies on the parameters reflecting the level of the DNA in human lymphocytes. In order to eliminate outstanding comets (fluffy) we measured for all our results the relation of the fraction of DNA in tail to the length of the comet tail. The value of this ratio usually fluctuated in range of 0.1 to 0.70. For the fluffy comets mentioned before the tDNA/TL ratio was generally about 0.9, or even more than 1.0 that means that the percentage of fraction of DNA in tail was higher than in usually seen comets with such a tail length. After analysis of distribution of frequency cells with various tDNA/TL ratio, we decided to establish 0.8 as cut off value for the filtration software to eliminate the outstanding results. Elimination of the fluffy comets corrected our results and let observe various dose response relationships for various treatments (X-rays, modified beam of reactor neutrons in normal and boron pretreated cells). Applied correction usually leaded to improvement of statistics. Our additional studies showed that appearance of outstanding comets is also observed as results of disturbance of suspension medium. We have achieved the similar fluffy comets studying with application of the Comet assay the influence of hypotonic solution in cell suspension on comets shape after electrophoresis. (author)

  10. Experience Exchange Group (EEG) Approach as a Means for Research to be rooted in Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to clarify if and how an Experience Exchange Group(EEG) can be involved in a research process in the area of industrial management. For exemplification of the topic an ongoing research in global manufacturing is referred to. In this research it was after a series of preliminary studies found interesting to set up an EEG composed of representatives from industry and a researcher. In the paper some general research methods pertinent to the area industrial management ...

  11. Book review: introduction to social research: quantitative and qualitative approaches, third edition, by Keith F Punch

    OpenAIRE

    Lecheler, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    In Introduction to Social Research, Keith F. Punch wants to ‘demystify’ and ‘simplify’ the research process, in an attempt to show that quality research can always be achieved. With its straightforward language, an intuitive structure, and well-defined learning objectives, this book does just that, finds Sophie Lecheler. This third edition features a number of interesting updates, such as chapters on research ethics and conducting research online.

  12. Human Health Research Program: Approaches for evaluating public health outcomes of risk management decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research to develop tools to link the enactment and implementation of environmental risk mitigation actions such as rules, regulations, or educational outreach to measurable changes in exposure to toxicants and subsequent health effects. Research in this area includes the develo...

  13. Science of learning is learning of science: why we need a dialectical approach to science education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-06-01

    Research on learning science in informal settings and the formal (sometimes experimental) study of learning in classrooms or psychological laboratories tend to be separate domains, even drawing on different theories and methods. These differences make it difficult to compare knowing and learning observed in one paradigm/context with those observed in the other. Even more interestingly, the scientists studying science learning rarely consider their own learning in relation to the phenomena they study. A dialectical, reflexive approach to learning, however, would theorize the movement of an educational science (its learning and development) as a special and general case—subject matter and method—of the phenomenon of learning (in/of) science. In the dialectical approach to the study of science learning, therefore, subject matter, method, and theory fall together. This allows for a perspective in which not only disparate fields of study—school science learning and learning in everyday life—are integrated but also where the progress in the science of science learning coincides with its topic. Following the articulation of a contradictory situation on comparing learning in different settings, I describe the dialectical approach. As a way of providing a concrete example, I then trace the historical movement of my own research group as it simultaneously and alternately studied science learning in formal and informal settings. I conclude by recommending cultural-historical, dialectical approaches to learning and interaction analysis as a context for fruitful interdisciplinary research on science learning within and across different settings.

  14. The intersubjective endeavor of psychopathology research: methodological reflections on a second-person perspective approach

    OpenAIRE

    Galbusera, Laura; Fellin, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Research in psychopathology may be considered as an intersubjective endeavor mainly concerned with understanding other minds. Thus, the way we conceive of social understanding influences how we do research in psychology in the first place. In this paper, we focus on psychopathology research as a paradigmatic case for this methodological issue, since the relation between the researcher and the object of study is characterized by a major component of “otherness.” We critically review different ...

  15. Linking research and education to promote an integrated approach to sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    CAMINO, Elena; PERAZZONE, Anna; COLUCCI GRAY, LAURA

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, researchers from various disciplines (biology, physics, geology, economics, sociology, linguistics, psychology and science education) founded the Centre IRIS – Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Sustainability (www.iris.unito.it) based at the University of Torino (Italy). IRIS links research in science with educational practice: as new conceptual tools are produced and research findings are published, they are discussed within the group and ‘metabolised’, turned into literacy an...

  16. An Engineering Approach to Management of Occupational and Community Noise Exposure at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    1997-01-01

    Workplace and environmental noise issues at NASA Lewis Research Center are effectively managed via a three-part program that addresses hearing conservation, community noise control, and noise control engineering. The Lewis Research Center Noise Exposure Management Program seeks to limit employee noise exposure and maintain community acceptance for critical research while actively pursuing engineered controls for noise generated by more than 100 separate research facilities and the associated services required for their operation.

  17. A strategy to apply a graded approach to a new research reactor I and C design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A project for the development of a new research reactor (NRR) was launched by KAERI in 2012. It has two purposes: 1) providing a facility for radioisotope production, neutron transmutation doping, and semiconductor wafer doping, and 2) obtaining a standard model for exporting a research reactor (RR). The instrumentation and control (I and C) design should reveal an appropriate architecture for the NRR export. The adoption of a graded approach (GA) was taken into account to design the I and C and architecture. Although the GA for RRs is currently under development by the IAEA, it has been recommended and applied in many areas of nuclear facilities. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission allows for the use of a GA for RRs to meet the safety requirements. Germany applied the GA to a decommissioning project. It categorized the level of complexity of the decommissioning project using the GA. In the case of 10 C.F.R. Part 830 830.7, a contractor must use a GA to implement the requirements of the part, document the basis of the GA used, and submit that document to U.S. DOE. It mentions that a challenge is the inconsistent application of GA on DOE programs. RG 1.176 states that graded quality assurance brings benefits of resource allocation based on the safety significance of the items. The U.S. NRC also applied the GA to decommissioning small facilities. The NASA published a handbook for risk informed decision making that is conducted using a GA. ISATR67.04.09 2005 supplements ANSI/ISA.S67.04.01. 2000 and ISA RP67.04.02 2000 in determining the setpoint using a GA. The GA is defined as a risk informed approach that, without compromising safety, allows safety requirements to be implemented in such a way that the level of design, analysis, and documentation are commensurate with the potential risks of the reactor. The IAEA is developing a GA through DS351 and has recommended applying it to a reactor design according to power and hazarding level. Owing to the wide range of RR utilization, the safety requirements for RRs may not be required to be applied to every RR in the same way. DS351 also states that the way in which the requirements are demonstrated to be met for a multipurpose and high power RR might be very different from the way in which the requirements are demonstrated to be met for a RR with very low power and very low associated radiological hazards to the facility staff, the public, and the environment. The GA should not compromise safety or waive the safety requirements. The GA is not a quantitative method but rather a qualitative method to determine the scope and level of application of the safety requirements to the design of a RR. It adopts a systematic approach and engineering judgment for the determination. The GA is applicable in all stages of the RR lifetime. Any grading during the lifetime should ensure that safety functions are maintained and that there are no radiological hazards to the operators and public. The grading activities should be based on a safety analysis, regulatory requirements, and engineering judgment. In DS351, the GA activities consist of two steps: 1) categorizing a facility into a range of the highest to the lowest risk, which is an initial grading of the facility, and 2) grading the system, structure, and components important to safety, which is a more detailed grading of the facility. As an example of the GA, fewer inspections and hold points for a 100 kW RR than those for a 5 MW RR can be determined. For the application of the GA to the I and C design of an RR, Rah man proposed the GA to develop the digital MMIS (Man Machine Interface System) for RRs regarding cyber security, software V and V, and human factors engineering. However, it did not show the specific design decisions. Suh presented the overall I and C architecture for the NRR, but it has a lack of rationale for the design decision making. This paper presents a strategy to make a design decision for NRR I and C systems. According to the characteristics and safety analysis of the NRR, the proper design level should be determin

  18. Development of a method for research in sports policy in Brazil: an approach to method of mixed research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Marinho Mezzadri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a method of mixed research for the study of Sport public policy in Brazil. To reach the result, the text was divided into two phases. In the first, it presents a conceptual model for the qualitative analysis of Brazilian public policies directed to the sport. This phase will still be divided into two stages. The first is the construction of a theoretical framework for the interpretation of the study on public policies and the other one demonstrates a conceptual methodological contribution based on the sociology of Pierre Bourdieu. In the second phase it is developed an analysis of the quantitative part which aims to interpret the data that were collected in the empirical part of the research. Later, it will be possible to produce a model of assessment, monitoring, and, especially, the improvement of public policies for Brazilian sport.

  19. The research rotation: competency-based structured and novel approach to research training of internal medicine residents

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrov Vihren; Valerio Jose A; Erickson Savil N; Deng Changchun; Kanna Balavenkatesh; Soni Anita

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In the United States, the Accreditation Council of graduate medical education (ACGME) requires all accredited Internal medicine residency training programs to facilitate resident scholarly activities. However, clinical experience and medical education still remain the main focus of graduate medical education in many Internal Medicine (IM) residency-training programs. Left to design the structure, process and outcome evaluation of the ACGME research requirement, residency-t...

  20. Approach of Case Base Reasoning in Handling the Unavailable information Based on Real Integrated Price Language in a Marketing Research Tool

    OpenAIRE

    MANOJ, RINKAL, VIVEK, MOHIT

    2013-01-01

    Abstract:This research effort aims to use a Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) approach for the unavailable information in a marketing research tool language based on real integrated price and attempts to investigate its advantages over traditional expert systems approach. Marketing research tool divided into the different parts language Scripting Editor, language debugger, Web Interface. is an application for writing script for collecting the information for Marketing research tools. The collect the...

  1. Knowledge Asymmetries Between Research and Practice : A Social Systems Approach to Implementation Barriers in Organic Arable Farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Egon; AlrØe, Hugo Fjelsted

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the problem of implementing scientific knowledge in practice. The discussion is based on a case study of barriers to implementing research-based principles of sustainable organic arable farming. The current literature tends to see this problem either as a dissemination issue (the linear approach) or as a failure of science to address real-world problems (the co-constructive approach). We argue that Luhmann's theory of social systems offers a way to understand the shortcomings of existing approaches and enables us to identify knowledge gaps that have often been overlooked so far. This theoretical claim is substantiated by an empirical analysis based on 10 in-depth interviews with owners of organic arable farms. The farmers were interviewed about barriers to the implementation of research-based knowledge in practice. The analysis points to the operational closure and the observational blindness of both research systems and farming systems as the keys to understanding knowledge gaps and suggests new ways of dealing with the problems of implementing research knowledge in practice.

  2. The professional research support in the 21st century : A Danish approach to professionalisation – and some future trends in the research support profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinstrup, Anya BjØrn

    Denmark has experienced a development of the profession of research management and fundraising in the last few years. The development from one-man-armies to large units within research management has been fast and the building of a professional identity is dashing along. The globalized environment for research is becoming increasingly competitive and there is significant political influence on the scope and scale of funding programmes. This along with the ever more complicated and varied administrative procedures and demands for compliance both with pre-award and postaward activities has led to a growing demand for a professional approach in those areas. How is the professionalisation coming along, and what are the focus areas in the building of a new profession? The focal points in the development of a professional research support are pointed out – and an overview and extrapolation of tendencies are sought. Where is the profession heading in Denmark? Five key trends and challenges are elaborated on; • The fact that the research management profession is in a state of GROWTH, at both the CENTRAL and decentralised level. • Employees that are working across many professional boundaries bridging the gap between different researchers and professions and INTEGRATING disciplines throughout the entire value chain. • A profession that is only incipient regarding a formalised TRAINING but where there still are very high demands and expectations to their professional act. • IT is playing an increasing role in communication, in knowledge-sharing and in different software applications to which critical decision-making is vital

  3. Indicators of radioecological sensitivity of contaminated territories: a proactive and participatory research approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Financed partly by the French ministry in charge of environment, PRIME is a participative research coordinated by IRSN. The aim is to develop with stakeholders and experts a prospective method to build a multicriteria decision tool for ranking specificities of territories which identifies its vulnerability in case of nuclear accident. The method is elaborated through the participation of experts, decision-makers and local actors in order to enable the risk managers to choose the appropriate strategy in case of an accident involving radioactive substances. The method establishes the hierarchy of factors of the sensitivity of a territory to radioactive pollution. The studied zone is situated within the radius of about 50 km around three nuclear sites in the South of France. The main questions of this project are the following: Does the sensitivity of the territory of 50 km radius around a nuclear site depend only on the distance from the source or, alternatively, can it vary depending on the type and the use of the soils? Which criteria are important for the people living in the area and how are they balanced? Which of them would be particularly useful for decision-making? Can the multi criteria method be an appropriate tool to treat the data and make them visible and accessible? The characteristic of the project is to combine different opinion of the vulnerability of a territory in a participatory approach. The first step is to identify, alongside with stakeholders, the factors of the sensitivity of a territory and to establish correlation between them. The second step is to provide the managers and people who have to decide in such case with data necessary for working out the preparation and action plans for rationalizing the decision-making in the field of post-accidental management. As expected results, we hope to simplify the representation about territorial consequences of radiological contamination and to elaborate management tools common for different actors who a priori speak different 'languages', tools showing the evaluation of radio ecological sensitivity of a territory for further exploration. We will also share the main findings concerning the way to manage such a challenging social process. (author)

  4. Pathways to Energy from Inertial Fusion. An Integrated Approach. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2006-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has continuously demonstrated its commitment to supporting the development of safe and environmentally clean nuclear fusion energy. Statistics show that at the current rate of energy consumption, fusion energy would remain an inexhaustible energy source for humankind for millions of years. Furthermore, some of the existing and foreseen risks - such as nuclear waste disposal and rising greenhouse gas emissions from the use of fossil fuels - can also be reduced. In the quest for fusion energy, two main lines of research and development are currently being pursued worldwide, namely the inertial and the magnetic confinement fusion concepts. For both approaches, the IAEA has conducted coordinated research activities focusing on specific physics and technological issues relevant the establishment of the knowledge base and foundation for the design and construction of fusion power plants. This report describes the recent research and technological developments and challenges in inertial fusion energy within the framework of such a coordinated research effort. The coordinated research project on Pathways to Energy from Inertial Fusion: An Integrated Approach was initiated in 2006 and concluded in 2010. The project involved experts and institutions from 16 Member States, addressing issues relevant to advancing inertial fusion energy research and development in its practical applications. The key topics addressed include: (i) high repetition rate, low cost, high efficiency ignition drivers; (ii) beam-matter/beam-plasma interaction related to inertial fusion target physics; (iii) target fusion chamber coupling and interface; and (iv) integrated inertial fusion power plant design. Participants in this coordinated research project have contributed 17 detailed research and technology progress reports of work performed at national and international levels. This report compiles all these reports while highlighting the various achievements.

  5. A New Educational Scaffolding Approach to Support Authentic Solar Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, N.; Walker, C. E.; Isbell, D. M.; Pompea, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRBSE) is a multi-year teacher professional development program sponsored by NSF and administered through the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). The program reaches the formal education community through a national audience of well-trained and supported middle- and high-school teachers. Every year, a new cohort of teachers prepare for research through an on-line course in the spring. In the summer they conduct astronomy research at NOAO, working with astronomer-mentors to gather and analyze their data. They then return to their classrooms and engage their students in inquiry-based astronomy research using this authentic data. TLRBSE has much to offer teachers both inside and outside the program who wish to initiate research in the classroom. However, the activation energy to conduct authentic research is high. To address the needs of a wider audience of teachers and students, steps have been taken to supply web-based foundational resources for the solar research program. Teachers can use this "solar scaffolding" to support the implementation of authentic solar research in the classroom. The scaffolding files on the webpage will serve as a template for other TLRBSE research strands, as well as enable non-TLRBSE middle and high school teachers to download and use TLRBSE data in their own classrooms. The resultant webpage has links to high quality, vetted resources (webpages, interactives, movies, etc.) that provide content background and lesson plans relevant to solar research. Tools on presenting research, print resources, sample articles on research, videos, DVDs, and posters are included. Powerpoint presentations have been provided with lecture notes on themes ranging from "Why Study the Sun" to "The Nature of Light." Sample teaching materials give examples for a calendar to implement the research project, a daily point sheet, a rubric for a student poster evaluation, a student research project description and a student self evaluation. Various background activities help to pave the way to more challenging solar research projects. As a culminating feature, the website includes several downloadable support files from the TLRBSE solar research project, as well as the solar data files and software programs. These scaffolding resources and future directions will be described in detail. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. For further information on the TLRBSE.

  6. Using global positioning systems in health research a practical approach to data collection and processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Duncan, Scott; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2011-01-01

    The use of GPS devices in health research is increasingly popular. There are currently no best-practice guidelines for collecting, processing, and analyzing GPS data. The standardization of data collection and processing procedures will improve data quality, allow more-meaningful comparisons across studies and populations, and advance this field more rapidly. This paper aims to take researchers, who are considering using GPS devices in their research, through device-selection criteria, device se...

  7. Kawasaki disease: an evidence based approach to diagnosis, treatment, and proposals for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Brogan, P.; Bose, A; Burgner, D; Shingadia, D; Tulloh, R; MICHIE, C.; Klein, N.; Booy, R.; Levin, M; Dillon, M.

    2002-01-01

    This article proposes a clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of Kawasaki disease in the UK based on the best available evidence to date, and highlights areas of practice where evidence is anecdotal or based on retrospective data. Future research as proposed by the London Kawasaki Disease Research Group is outlined, and clinicians are invited to prospectively enrol their suspected cases into this collaborative research project.

  8. Sustaining a Regional Emerging Infectious Disease Research Network: A Trust-Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Pornpit Silkavute; Dinh Xuan Tung; Pongpisut Jongudomsuk

    2013-01-01

    The Asia Partnership on Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (APEIR) was initiated in 2006 to promote regional collaboration in avian influenza research. In 2009, the partnership expanded its scope to include all emerging infectious diseases. APEIR partners include public health and animal researchers, officials and practitioners from Cambodia, China, Lao PDR, Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. APEIR has accomplished several major achievements in three key areas of activity: (i) knowledge gene...

  9. Integrated approaches in physics education: A graduate level course in physics, pedagogy, and education research

    OpenAIRE

    Michael C. Wittmann; Thompson, John R

    2006-01-01

    We describe a course designed to help future educators build an integrated understanding of the different elements of physics education research (PER), including: research into student learning, content knowledge from the perspective of how it is learned, and reform-based curricula together with evidence of their effectiveness. Course elements include equal parts of studying physics through proven curricula and discussion of research results in the context of the PER literat...

  10. Approaches of national 3D mapping: Research results and standardisation in practice:

    OpenAIRE

    Stoter, J.E.; Streilein, A.; Pla, M.; Baella, B.; Capstick, D.; Home, R.; Roensdorf, C.; Lagrange, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past ten years technologies for generating, maintaining and using 3D geo-information have matured. For national mapping agencies one of the challenges is how to best extend 2D data into 3D data, making best use of research results and available technologies. Some mapping organisations are making serious progress. The question addressed in this paper is how research results achieved in the past ten years are applied in practice and what research problems remain. In addition, the paper...

  11. Needs Assessment in Health Research Projects: A New Approach to Project Management in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Niloofar Peykari; Parviz Owlia; Hossein Malekafzali; Mostafa Ghanei; Abdolreza Babamahmoodi; Shirin Djalalinia

    2013-01-01

    Background: The science and technology health plan has defined the outline of health research to the national vision of Iran by 2025. The aim of this study was to focus on the process of needs assessment of health research projects also health research priority setting in Iran.Methods: The project management life cycle has four phases: Initiation, Planning, Execution and Closure. Based on abovementioned points we conducted the study.Results: Focusing on the needs assessment led to systematic ...

  12. Detailed Clinical Modelling Approach to Data Extraction from Heterogeneous Data Sources for Clinical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Lim Choi Keung, Sarah N.; ZHAO, LEI; Rossiter, James; McGilchrist, Mark; Culross, Frank; Ethier, Jean-François; BURGUN, Anita; Verheij, Robert A.; Khan, Nasra; Taweel, Adel; Curcin, Vasa; Delaney, Brendan C; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.

    2014-01-01

    The reuse of routinely collected clinical data for clinical research is being explored as part of the drive to reduce duplicate data entry and to start making full use of the big data potential in the healthcare domain. Clinical researchers often need to extract data from patient registries and other patient record datasets for data analysis as part of clinical studies. In the TRANSFoRm project, researchers define their study requirements via a Query Formulation Workbench. We use a standardis...

  13. ‘Third generation’ conversations – A partnership approach to embedding research and learning skills development in the first year. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Taib

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This Practice Report offers a strategic approach to making research and learning skills explicit within the curriculum of first year core units, by enabling a systematic process of pedagogical conversations between teaching faculty, learning skills advisers and librarians. It reports on a collaborative project between staff of Monash Library and academic staff of the faculties of Business and Economics and Information Technology. It offers tools and protocols for the review and renewal of curricula and co-curricula practice within a partnership model, informed by the Research Skills Development (RSD Framework. It takes into account teaching and learning approaches, intervention and support strategies, assessment, and feedback mechanisms.  It also responds to emerging trends in higher education delivery such as blended learning and the flipped classroom model (Baker, 2000.

  14. Manipulative Experimental Approaches to Addressing Geobiological Questions in Microbial Mat and Stromatolite Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, I. Lee

    2005-01-01

    We will present a short synopsis of experimental approaches using greenhouse flume systems to address questions of biogeochemical cycling, mineral formation and 3-d structure for Guerrero Negro microbial mats and Highborne Cay Stromatolites.

  15. Enhancing Interdisciplinary Human System Risk Research Through Modeling and Network Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Shelhamer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) supports research to reduce human health and performance risks inherent in future human space exploration missions. Understanding risk outcomes and contributing factors in an integrated manner allows HRP research to support development of efficient and effective mitigations from cross-disciplinary perspectives, and to enable resilient human and engineered systems for spaceflight. The purpose of this work is to support scientific collaborations and research portfolio management by utilizing modeling for analysis and visualization of current and potential future interdisciplinary efforts.

  16. Air pollution control system research: An iterative approach to developing affordable systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Lewis C.; Cannon, Fred S.; Heinsohn, Robert J.; Spaeder, Timothy A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) funded project led jointly by the Marine Corps Multi-Commodity Maintenance Centers, and the Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL) of the USEPA. The research focuses on paint booth exhaust minimization using recirculation, and on volatile organic compound (VOC) oxidation by the modules of a hybrid air pollution control system. The research team is applying bench, pilot and full scale systems to accomplish the goals of reduced cost and improved effectiveness of air treatment systems for paint booth exhaust.

  17. On the Contributions of a Network Approach to Personality Theory and Research

    OpenAIRE

    Furr, R. Michael; Fleeson, William; Anderson, Michelle; Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield

    2012-01-01

    Understanding personality structure and processes is one of the most fundamental goals in personality psychology. The network approach presented by Cramer et al. represents a useful path toward this goal, and we address two facets of their approach. First, we examine the possibility that it solves the problem of breadth, which has inhibited the integration of trait theory with social cognitive theory. Second, we evaluate the value and usability of their proposed method (qgraph), doing so by c...

  18. Estimation of the correlation coefficient using the Bayesian Approach and its applications for epidemiologic research

    OpenAIRE

    England Lucinda J; Moysich Kirsten B; Schisterman Enrique F; Rao Malla

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background The Bayesian approach is one alternative for estimating correlation coefficients in which knowledge from previous studies is incorporated to improve estimation. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the utility of the Bayesian approach for estimating correlations using prior knowledge. Methods The use of the hyperbolic tangent transformation (? = tanh ? and r = tanh z) enables the investigator to take advantage of the conjugate properties of the normal distribution, w...

  19. Decomposed Approach of Market Orientation and Marketing Mix Capability: Research on Their Relationships with Firm Performance in the Korean Context

    OpenAIRE

    Sohyoun Shin

    2011-01-01

    The notion that market orientation provides firms a source of competitive advantage seems to be widely accepted since the effects of market orientation on business performance have been extensively researched and many studies have confirmed their affirmative relationships. However, aggregated approach of market orientation as one single construct has left the detailed investigations yet unexplored despite its tremendous contribution in marketing strategy arena. Thus, decomposed properties of ...

  20. Preliminary Characterization and Analysis of the Designs and Research-Manufacturing Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Swartz; Gwendolyn Cheney; Williams Dawson; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Bob Remick; Harlan Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Aaron Crumm; John Holloran; Tim Armstrong

    2000-10-30

    This report summarizes the results of Phase I of a study entitled, Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells. The work was carried out by a group called the Multilayer Fuel Cell Alliance (MLFCA) led by NexTech Materials and including Adaptive Materials, Advanced Materials Technologies (AMT), Cobb & Co., Edison Materials Technology Center, Iowa State University, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Northwestern University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Ohio State University, University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR), and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The objective of the program is to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. In the Phase I effort, five approaches were considered: two based on NexTech's planar approach using anode and cathode supported variations, one based on UMR's ultra-thin electrolyte approach, and two based on AMI's co-extrusion technology. Based on a detailed manufacturing cost analysis, all of the approaches are projected to result in a significantly reduced production cost. Projected costs range from $139/kW to $179/kW for planar designs. Development risks were assessed for each approach and it was determined that the NexTech and UMR approaches carried the least risk for successful development. Using advanced manufacturing methods and a proprietary high power density design, the team estimated that production costs could be reduced to $94/kW.

  1. Seeing beyond fertiliser trees : a case study of a community based participatory approach to agroforestry research and development in western Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Kiptot, E.

    2007-01-01

    Key words: village committee approach, agroforestry, improved tree fallows, biomass transfer, realist evaluation, soil fertility, adoption, dissemination.   The thesis explores and describes various processes that take place in the implementation of a community based participatory initiative known as the village committee approach by a collaborative agroforestry programme between the Kenya Forestry Research Institute (KEFRI), Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) and the World Agrofore...

  2. Using Community-Based Participatory Research to Develop the PARTNERS Youth Violence Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Stephen S.; Thomas, Duane E.; Vaughn, Nicole A.; Thomas, Nicole A.; MacEvoy, Julie Paquette; Freedman, Melanie A.; Abdul-Kabir, Saburah; Woodlock, Joseph; Guerra, Terry; Bradshaw, Ayana S.; Woodburn, Elizabeth M.; Myers, Rachel K.; Fein, Joel A.

    2011-01-01

    Background School-based violence prevention programs have shown promise for reducing aggression and increasing children’s prosocial behaviors. Prevention interventions within the context of urban after-school programs provide a unique opportunity for academic researchers and community stakeholders to collaborate in the creation of meaningful and sustainable violence prevention initiatives. Objectives This paper describes the development of a collaborative between academic researchers and community leaders to design a youth violence prevention/leadership promotion program (PARTNERS Program) for urban adolescents. Employing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) model, this project addresses the needs of urban youth, their families, and their community. Methods Multiple strategies were used to engage community members in the development and implementation of the PARTNERS Program. These included focus groups, pilot testing the program in an after-school venue, and conducting organizational assessments of after-school sites as potential locations for the intervention. Results Community members and academic researchers successfully worked together in all stages of the project development. Community feedback helped the PARTNERS team redesign the proposed implementation and evaluation of the PARTNERS Program such that the revised study design allows for all sites to obtain the intervention over time and increases the possibility of building community capacity and sustainability of programs. Conclusion Despite several challenges inherent to CBPR, the current study provides a number of lessons learned for the continued development of relationships and trust among researchers and community members, with particular attention to balancing the demand for systematic implementation of community-based interventions while being responsive to the immediate needs of the community. PMID:20729611

  3. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended

  4. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess-Herbert, Sarah L., E-mail: sarah.burgess@alum.mit.edu [American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 2009–10 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended.

  5. A confirmatory research approach to the measurement of EMI/RFI in commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting confirmatory research on the measurement of electromagnetic/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) in nuclear power plants. Confirmatory research is needed to validate that safety-related issues concerning the installation of instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in the electromagnetic environment of commercial nuclear power plants are being addressed adequately

  6. Technical and Policy Approaches to Balancing Patient Privacy and Data Sharing in Clinical and Translational Research

    OpenAIRE

    Malin, Bradley; Karp, David; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers need to share data to support scientific validation and information reuse, and to comply with a host of regulations and directives from funders. Various organizations are constructing informatics resources in the form of centralized databases to ensure widespread availability of data derived from sponsored research. The widespread use of such open databases is contingent on the protection of patient privacy.

  7. AN APPROACH TO MEASURE RESEARCH RELATED DOMAINS USING WEB-MINING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr vijay Singh Rathore

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available As the time passes by, people are seeing more and more research activities in various fields including medicine, pure science, and technology and so on. The research works are published by the researchers in various journals and conferences, which are made publically available by the publishers. Though such research is spread all over the world, there should be a distinct pattern for this, which suggest that different geographical areas observes distinct trend towards particular direction of research. Government and the other state organizations periodically need adaptation of certain new technology or process for improving or implementing certain policies. Such new requirements are generally met by calling for researchers to join in hand with the organization with their proposal. Filtering such proposals also takes a hectic schedule and thorough understanding of the researchers profile and to gauge his ability to complete the work. In order to solve this problem we emphasize on extracting meaningful information from the web through web mining techniques that helps understanding the region wise trends in research domain activities and further extract more meaningful information like patterns that suggest the progress in a particular area and prominent contributors in the area.

  8. Teaching versus research: A multi-tasking approach to multi-department universities

    OpenAIRE

    Gautier, Axel; Wauthy, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    We study the possible implications of incentive schemes as a tool to promote ef?ciency in the management of universities. In this paper, we show that by designing internal ?nancial rules which create yardstick competition for research funds, a multi-department university may induce better teaching quality and research, as compared to the performance of independent departments.

  9. In Search of an Ecological Approach to Research: A Meditation on Topos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivnick, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Ecophilosophers suggest that the achievement of environmental sustainability requires a transformation in worldview, from a modern to an ecological worldview. This suggestion poses a very interesting challenge for researchers in environmental disciplines. What would research look like that is grounded in an ecological worldview? What would it mean…

  10. Exploring a Sociocultural Approach to Writing Strategy Research: Mediated Actions in Writing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiao

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to the traditional cognitive view of writing strategies, this study explores English as a foreign language (EFL) learners' writing strategy use within the Activity Theory framework, adding to the growing body of writing strategy research and sociocultural research on writing and second language acquisition (SLA). Drawing on data…

  11. Challenges in cancer research and multifaceted approaches for cancer biomarker quest.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martinková, Ji?ina; Gadher, S. J.; Hajduch, M.; Ková?ová, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 583, - (2009), s. 1772-1784. ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : cancer research * proteomics * genomics Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.541, year: 2009

  12. HIV/AIDS and Employment Research: A Need for an Integrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyers, Liza Marie

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a reflection on the three articles that compose the Major Contribution on HIV/AIDS and employment research. It highlights the merits of the contribution in the broader context of HIV/AIDS employment research and recommends future directions for this area of inquiry, including theory integration, an investigation of HIV health…

  13. Community-Involved Learning to Expand Possibilities for Vulnerable Children: A Critical Communicative, Sen's Capability, and Action Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hi

    2014-01-01

    This research, based on a case study of vulnerable children in Korea, used a mixed methods transformative approach to explore strategies to support and help disadvantaged children. The methodological approach includes three phases: a mixed methods contextual analysis, a qualitative dominant analysis based on Sen's capability approach and…

  14. Exploring multiple intelligences theory in the context of science education: An action research approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnough, Karen Catherine

    2000-10-01

    Since the publication of Frames of Mind: The Theory in Practice, multiple intelligences, theory (Gardner, 1983) has been used by practitioners in a variety of ways to make teaching and learning more meaningful. However, little attention has been focused on exploring the potential of the theory for science teaching and learning. Consequently, this research study was designed to: (1) explore Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences (1983) and its merit for making science teaching and learning more meaningful; (2) provide a forum for teachers to engage in critical self-reflection about their theory and practice in science education; (3) study the process of action research in the context of science education; and (4) describe the effectiveness of collaborative action research as a framework for teacher development and curriculum development. The study reports on the experiences of four teachers (two elementary teachers, one junior high teacher, and one high school teacher) and myself, a university researcher-facilitator, as we participated in a collaborative action research project. The action research group held weekly meetings over a five-month period (January--May, 1999). The inquiry was a qualitative case study (Stake, 1994) that aimed to understand the perspectives of those directly involved. This was achieved by using multiple methods to collect data: audiotaped action research meetings, fieldnotes, semi-structured interviews, journal writing, and concept mapping. All data were analysed on an ongoing basis. Many positive outcomes resulted from the study in areas such as curriculum development, teacher development, and student learning in science. Through the process of action research, research participants became more reflective about their practice and thus, enhanced their pedagogical content knowledge (Shulman, 1987) in science. Students became more engaged in learning science, gained a greater understanding of how they learn, and experienced a science curriculum that was more relevant and personalized. In addition, the action research process provided a feasible and effective forum for both curriculum development and professional development.

  15. The benefits of anthropological approaches for health promotion research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumeich, A; Weijts, W; Reddy, P; Meijer-Weitz, A

    2001-04-01

    In recent years health education practitioners have been looking for ways to extend the social psychological analysis of human behavior with approaches that focus on the cultural and social context of human behavior. In this article the value of the 'thick description' approach, borrowed from anthropology, is explored by examples from the Caribbean and South Africa. It demonstrates that an anthropological approach has much to offer as a basis for sound interventions for understanding human behavior. However, although an anthropological approach offers valuable starting points for interventions, its broad scope exceeds the traditional goals of health education (changing health beliefs, health counseling). Interventions will not aim at informing individuals, but at improving cultures. They may concern the change of basic cultural and social structures such as gender roles. To limit the risk of ethnocentrism, adequate ways need to be developed to make optimal use of the information thick description offers, while avoiding ethnocentrism. The article ends with a discussion concerning the assets of a dialogical approach towards health promotion. A dialogue between health promoters and their target population may help solve the problem of ethnocentrism in broadly scoped interventions. PMID:11345657

  16. An eight component decision-making model for problem gambling: a systems approach to stimulate integrative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, David; Honarmand, Kimia; Govoni, Richard; Kalahani-Bargis, Martina; Bass, Stephanie; Ni, Xinqun; Laforge, Kaitlyn; Burden, Andrea; Romero, Kristoffer; Basarke, Sonya; Courbasson, Christine; Deamond, Wade

    2011-12-01

    Problem Gambling (PG) represents a serious problem for affected individuals, their families and society in general. Previous approaches to understanding PG have been confined to only a subset of the psychobiological factors influencing PG. We present a model that attempts to integrate potential causal factors across levels of organization, providing empirical evidence from the vast literature on PG and complimentary literatures in decision-making and addiction. The model posits that components are arranged systematically to bias decisions in favor of either immediately approaching or avoiding targets affording the opportunity for immediate reward. Dopamine, Testosterone and Endogenous Opioids favor immediate approach, while Serotonin and Cortisol favor inhibition. Glutamate is involved in associative learning between stimuli and promotes the approach response through its link to the DA reward system. GABA functions to monitor performance and curb impulsive decision-making. Finally, while very high levels of Norepinephrine can induce arousal to an extent that is detrimental to sound decision-making, the reactivity of the Norepinephrine system and its effects of Cortisol levels can shift the focus towards long-term consequences, thereby inhibiting impulsive decisions. Empirical evidence is provided showing the effects of each component on PG and decision-making across behavioural, neuropsychological, functional neuroimaging and genetic levels. Last, an effect size analysis of the growing pharmacotherapy literature is presented. It is hoped that this model will stimulate multi-level research to solidify our comprehension of biased decision-making in PG and suggest pharmacological and psychological approaches to treatment. PMID:21191637

  17. Flight management research utilizing an oculometer. [pilot scanning behavior during simulated approach and landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spady, A. A., Jr.; Kurbjun, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the flight management work being conducted using NASA Langley's oculometer system. Tests have been conducted in a Boeing 737 simulator to investigate pilot scan behavior during approach and landing for simulated IFR, VFR, motion versus no motion, standard versus advanced displays, and as a function of various runway patterns and symbology. Results of each of these studies are discussed. For example, results indicate that for the IFR approaches a difference in pilot scan strategy was noted for the manual versus coupled (autopilot) conditions. Also, during the final part of the approach when the pilot looks out-of-the-window he fixates on his aim or impact point on the runway and holds this point until flare initiation.

  18. Gathering Evidence of Benefits: A Structured Approach from the Jisc Managing Research Data Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Molloy, Laura; Hodson, Simon; Poschen, Meik; Tedds, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The work of the Jisc Managing Research Data programme is – along with the rest of the UK higher education sector – taking place in an environment of increasing pressure on research funding. In order to justify the investment made by Jisc in this activity – and to help make the case more widely for the value of investing time and money in research data management – individual projects and the programme as a whole must be able to clearly express the resultant benefits to the host institutions a...

  19. Integrated approaches in physics education: A graduate level course in physics, pedagogy, and education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Michael C.; Thompson, John R.

    2008-07-01

    We describe a course designed to help future educators develop an integrated understanding of different elements of physics education research (PER), including research into student learning, content knowledge from the perspective of how it is learned, and reform-based curricula, together with evidence of their effectiveness. Course elements include equal parts of physics study through proven curricula and discussion of research results in the context of the PER literature. We provide examples of the course content and structure and representative examples of student learning in the class.

  20. Integrated approaches in physics education: A graduate level course in physics, pedagogy, and education research

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmann, M C; Thompson, John R.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a course designed to help future educators build an integrated understanding of the different elements of physics education research (PER), including: research into student learning, content knowledge from the perspective of how it is learned, and reform-based curricula together with evidence of their effectiveness. Course elements include equal parts of studying physics through proven curricula and discussion of research results in the context of the PER literature. We provide examples of the course content and structure as well as representative examples of student learning in the class.

  1. Keeping research reactors relevant: a pro-active approach for SLOWPOKE-2 at RMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2001, the Royal Military College of Canada replaced its aging analogue SLOWPOKE-2 reactor control system with a digital control system. The system was successfully commissioned and has provided a renewed platform for student learning and research. An upgrade to the digital control and instrumentation system has been completed and will be installed in October 2010. The upgrade includes new computer hardware, updated software and a simulation and training system that will enhance training, education and research by licensed operators, students and researchers.

  2. On the Contributions of a Network Approach to Personality Theory and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, R Michael; Fleeson, William; Anderson, Michelle; Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield

    2012-07-01

    Understanding personality structure and processes is one of the most fundamental goals in personality psychology. The network approach presented by Cramer et al. represents a useful path toward this goal, and we address two facets of their approach. First, we examine the possibility that it solves the problem of breadth, which has inhibited the integration of trait theory with social cognitive theory. Second, we evaluate the value and usability of their proposed method (qgraph), doing so by conducting idiographic analyses of the symptom structure of Borderline Personality Disorder. PMID:24707074

  3. Some research results by risk-inform approaches for NPP safety and operational efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Article is the presentation of the same name monograph, which is planned to be issued. In the article the perspective problems of further development risk-oriented approach (ROA) for the grounding and realization of measures on increase of safety and operational efficiency of NPP are considered. Unlike the traditional approach for the ROA, mean due the definition of probabilistic and/or deterministic methods of risk parameters, as criterion functions essence and the measure of the estimation are defined by the solution of specific problem in nuclear field. The ROA application allows essentially expanding opportunities of the substantiations and realizations of measures on safety and operational efficiency increase of NPP

  4. Multi-method and innovative approaches to researching the learning and social practices of young digital users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vittadini, Nicoletta; Carlo, Simone

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges in researching the social aspects of contemporary societies is to adapt the methodological approach to complex digital media environments. Learning processes take place in this complex environment, and they include formal and informal experiences (learning in school, home, and real-virtual communities), peer cultures and inter-generational connections, production and creation as relevant activities, and personal interests as a focal point. Methods used in the study of learning and the social practices of young people must take into account four key issues: boundaries between online and offline experiences are blurring; young people act performatively, knowingly, or reflexively; and their activities cannot be understood through the use of a single method, but require the use of multiple tools of investigation. The article discusses three methodological issues: research design aimed at following people along their transmedia paths, the relevance of participatory research, and the epistemological implications of multi-method research. The article presents a theoretical discussion of the research issues and some examples of research projects for each topic.

  5. The North American Fetal Therapy Network (NAFTNet): a new approach to collaborative research in fetal diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark Paul

    2010-02-01

    In August 2004, the National Institutes of Health organized a 'Workshop on Fetal Therapy' to develop a plan for the maternal-fetal, surgical, and neonatal evaluation and treatment of pregnancies that might benefit from in-utero therapy. At the completion of the workshop several recommendations were made, foremost of which was the 'formation of a cooperative group of clinical investigators to help set a national agenda for research and clinical progress in the field of fetal therapy'. Somewhat by coincidence, a multidisciplinary 'Fetal Therapy Working Group' that had been formed earlier in the year was well-positioned to accept this national mandate and proposed development of a North American Fetal Therapy Network (NAFTNet) to foster collaborative research between active fetal diagnosis and treatment centers in both the USA and Canada, develop a peer review mechanism for study proposals, explore ways to centralize data collection and study development, and establish an educational agenda for medical professionals and the public as well as training of future leaders in the field. NAFTNet represents a new paradigm and approach to international collaborative research. Early success has resulted in the recognition of the power of collaborative research efforts in studying rare congenital anomalies and intervention strategies to improve outcomes and survivals in such limited populations. By abandoning 'competitive research' for a cooperative, collaborative environment of research partnership, NAFTNet strives to be more responsible and effective in using limited resources and improving care for pregnancies and children born with congenital anomalies. PMID:19556173

  6. Using global positioning systems in health research a practical approach to data collection and processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Duncan, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The use of GPS devices in health research is increasingly popular. There are currently no best-practice guidelines for collecting, processing, and analyzing GPS data. The standardization of data collection and processing procedures will improve data quality, allow more-meaningful comparisons across studies and populations, and advance this field more rapidly. This paper aims to take researchers, who are considering using GPS devices in their research, through device-selection criteria, device settings, participant data collection, data cleaning, data processing, and integration of data into GIS. Recommendations are outlined for each stage of data collection and analysis and indicates challenges that should be considered. This paper highlights the benefits of collecting GPS data over traditional self-report or estimated exposure measures. Information presented here will allow researchers to make an informed decision about incorporating this readily available technology into their studies. This work reflects the state of the art in 2011.

  7. Pre-clinical research in small animals using radiotherapy technology. A bidirectional translational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillner, Falk; Buetof, Rebecca [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Thute, Prasad [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Krause, Mechthild [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Enghardt, Wolfgang [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiooncology

    2014-07-01

    For translational cancer research, pre-clinical in-vivo studies using small animals have become indispensable in bridging the gap between in-vitro cell experiments and clinical implementation. When setting up such small animal experiments, various biological, technical and methodical aspects have to be considered. In this work we present a comprehensive topical review based on relevant publications on irradiation techniques used for pre-clinical cancer research in mice and rats. Clinical radiotherapy treatment devices for the application of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy as well as dedicated research irradiation devices are feasible for small animal irradiation depending on the animal model and the experimental goals. In this work, appropriate solutions for the technological transfer of human radiation oncology to small animal radiation research are summarised. Additionally, important information concerning the experimental design is provided such that reliable and clinically relevant results can be attained.

  8. Adopting a constructivist approach to grounded theory: implications for research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jane; Bonner, Ann; Francis, Karen

    2006-02-01

    Grounded theory is a popular research methodology that is evolving to account for a range of ontological and epistemological underpinnings. Constructivist grounded theory has its foundations in relativism and an appreciation of the multiple truths and realities of subjectivism. Undertaking a constructivist enquiry requires the adoption of a position of mutuality between researcher and participant in the research process, which necessitates a rethinking of the grounded theorist's traditional role of objective observer. Key issues for constructivist grounded theorists to consider in designing their research studies are discussed in relation to developing a partnership with participants that enables a mutual construction of meaning during interviews and a meaningful reconstruction of their stories into a grounded theory model. PMID:16403191

  9. Building National Capacity for Research Mentor Training: An Evidence-Based Approach to Training the Trainers

    OpenAIRE

    Pfund, Christine; Spencer, Kimberly C.; Asquith, Pamela; House, Stephanie C.; MILLER, SARAH; Sorkness, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, evaluation, and impact of a train-the-trainer workshop designed to promote widespread dissemination of an evidence-based research mentor training curriculum.

  10. Building Bridges, Breaking Barriers. The Smart Approach to Distance Between Disciplines in Research Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Shahin, Jamal; Meyer, Trisha; Kloza, Dariusz; Biedenkopf, Katja

    2014-01-01

    This study, requested by the European Commission, addresses the challenge of multiple disciplinary interactions in Horizon 2020 projects, specifically in those with relevance to the Digital Agenda for Europe. It makes a series of recommendations that are aimed at improving the relevance, effectiveness, and appropriateness of multiple disciplinary interactions. The study is addressed to the European Commission, national research councils and other scientific funding agencies, the research comm...

  11. RA research reactor in 'Vinca' Institute-approach to the decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper short overview of decommissioning process of research reactors according to IAEA standards and world practice is given. Basic technical characteristics and details of operational history of the RA research reactor in Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences are present. The main nuclear and radiation safety problems related to the RA reactor facility are defined and the outlines of the future decommissioning project are proposed. (author)

  12. Teaching versus research: a multitasking approach to multi-department universities

    OpenAIRE

    Gautier, Axel; Wauthy, Xavier

    2003-01-01

    The budget of a university essentially depends on the number of students it enrols. In multidepartment universities resources created in one department may be redistributed to other departments. This redistribution affects the way academics share their working time between research and teaching activities. Redistribution creates free-riding on teaching efforts. In this paper, we show that by designing internal financial rules which create yardstick competition for research funds, a multi-depa...

  13. Using an Ethnographic Approach to Collect Emotional Data in Affective Learning Research

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaomei Tao; Qinzhou Niu; Mike Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Affective computing is an interdisciplinary research field that has made plentiful and substantial achievements in this decade. In previous Artificial Intelligence research, computers are expected to be endowed with intelligence analogous to human intelligence. In affective computing, computers are expected to be endowed with Emotional Intelligence, which means that the computer can recognize and interpret the emotional states of humans and adapt its behavior to give an appropriate response t...

  14. Is systems biology a promising approach to resolve controversies in cancer research?

    OpenAIRE

    Soto Ana M; Sonnenschein Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Abstract At the beginning of the 21st century cancer research has reached an impasse similar to that experienced in developmental biology in the first decades of the 20th century when conflicting results and interpretations co-existed for a long time until these differences were resolved and contradictions were eliminated. In cancer research, instead of this healthy "weeding-out" process, there have been attempts to reach a premature synthesis, while no hypothesis is being rejected. Systems B...

  15. Subnational governance approaches on the rise : reviewing a decade of Eastern European regionalization research

    OpenAIRE

    Pitschel, Diana; Bauer, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the past decade of decentralization and regionalization research on the new Eastern European member states of the EU (EU-10). We classify the existing literature according to focus of analysis, explanatory programme and methodological preferences, and propose a distinction between three different research agendas: system transformation, EU conditionality and subnational governance. We argue that with respect to the EU-10, scholarly interest in the perspectives of state tr...

  16. Research on psychoneuroimmunology: tai chi as a stress management approach for individuals with HIV disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jo Lynne W. Robins; Nancy L. McCain; Gray, D. Patricia; Elswick, R K; Walter, Jeanne M; McDade, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a framework for mind–body practice and research that combines cutting-edge scientific exploration with holistic philosophy to appreciate and understand stress responses. The rapidly growing research literature provides a foundation for building an integrative stress management model with the potential to positively influence the stress–disease relationship and, ultimately, health outcomes. This article introduces a novel tai chi intervention and provides quantitative ...

  17. Dimensional approaches to psychiatric classification: refining the research agenda for DSM-V: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Darrel A

    2007-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) will publish the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), in 2012. This paper reviews the extended, multi-faceted research planning preparations that APA has undertaken, several in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Institutes of Health, to assess the current state of diagnosis-relevant research and to generate short- and long-term recommendations for research needed to enrich DSM-V and future psychiatric classifications. This research review and planning process has underscored widespread interest among nosologists in the US and globally regarding the potential benefits for research and clinical practice of incorporating a dimensional component into the existing categorical, or binary, classification system in the DSM. Toward this end, the APA and its partners convened an international conference in July 2006 to critically appraise the use of dimensional constructs in psychiatric diagnostic systems. Resultant papers appear in this issue of International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research and in a forthcoming monograph to be published by APA. PMID:17623390

  18. A practical approach to risk-benefit estimation in pediatric drug research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Gideon

    2015-02-01

    One of the most difficult challenges in pediatric drug research is in exposing children to risk, often without a balanced chance of benefits. While the concept of risk is similar in adult research, the adult patient can decide for himself/herself on an acceptable level of risk, whereas children have to accept the decisions of their guardians. This paper attempts to put the complexities of estimating risk in pediatric drug research into their practical perspective, and to familiarize the reader with the way such processes are conducted in different parts of the world. Although there are regional differences, all authorities typically quantify risks of pediatric research in general, and drug research in particular, in three levels: those experienced in day-to-day life; risks slightly above this 'baseline' risk; and risks substantially above 'baseline risk'. Proportionally, the diligence of the ethics process depends on these levels, as well as on the potential benefits (or lack of) to the child involved in the research. Importantly, risk is context dependent, and a particular intervention may be effective or safe in one setting but not in another, based on local experience, staffing levels, and similar variabilities. PMID:25408294

  19. Taxonomy, Definition, Approaches, Benefits, Reusability Levels, Factors and Adaption of Software Reusability: A Review of the Research Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraheem Y.Y. Ahmaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Software reusability is an attribute that refers to the expected reuse potential of a software component. Software reuse not only improves productivity but also has a positive impact on the quality and maintainability of software products. The move toward reuse is becoming so widespread that it has even changed software industry ’s vocabulary. This study reviews the research literature on the concept of Software Reusability (SR. This study was conducted to provide a systematic review of the literature identify the definition, approaches, benefits, reusability levels, factors and adaption of software reusability. A systematic review was carried out of the research dealing with the content of software reusability, a literature search was conducted on several electronic databases. Studies published from the years 1977-2013 were considered and were selected if they described an evaluation of information and communication technology intervention to software reusability. In addition to that, a systematic review has been investigated on software reusability approaches and benefits. A deep investigation has been conducted on the definition, approaches, benefits, reusability levels, factors and adaption of software reusability. The concept of software reusability comprised of 11 approaches includes, design patterns, component-based development, application frameworks, legacy system wrapping, service-oriented systems, application product lines, COTS integration, program libraries, program generators, aspect-oriented software development and configurable vertical applications. Despite the rapid advancement in information and communication technology over the last decade, there is a limited evidence suggesting the adaption of software reusability. This study will help the information and communication technology industry to clarify how software reusability can benefit them by adapting the software reusability approaches.

  20. Adopting a Blended Learning Approach: Challenges Encountered and Lessons Learned in an Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Jane; Newcombe, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Adopting a new teaching approach is often a daunting task especially if one is an early adopter in a limited-resource environment. This article describes the challenges encountered and the strategies used in pilot testing a blended instructional method in a large size class within the college of education at a medium-sized university. The main…

  1. Research on the Acquirement Approach of Enterprise Competitiveness Based on the Network View

    OpenAIRE

    Shuzhen Chu; Zhijun Han

    2009-01-01

    Under the market situation of economic globalization, the premise of enterprise existence and development is to foster the competitiveness of enterprise. Starting from the network view, this article will confirm the interest relatives of enterprise and systematically discuss the approach of enterprise competitiveness through such aspects as the formation of enterprise competitive potential, the increase of enterprise competitiveness and the continual renovation of competitiveness.

  2. Personal selling constructs and measures: Emic versus etic approaches to cross-national research

    OpenAIRE

    Herché, J.; Swenson, M.J.; Verbeke, W.J.M.I.

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates transportability of personal selling measures across cultural boundaries. Concept of measurement development; Emic and etic approaches to developing measures for cross-cultural applications; Cross-national dimensionality, reliability and construct validity of adaptive selling (ADAPTS) and customer-oriented selling (SOCO).

  3. Measuring Wage and Occupational Discrimination: A Comprehensive Approach. Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Randall S.; And Others

    Many economists have tried to explain existing wage differentials between men and women. A new approach compares the relative importance of occupational discrimination with that of wage discrimination. This model allows for variation both in occupational distribution and in wages resulting from differences in job qualifications and productivity…

  4. Exploring Gender and Self-Confidence in Engineering Students: A Multi-Method Approach. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachra, Debbie; Kilgore, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Despite generally higher academic achievement, female students display lower academic self-confidence than males. Of particular interest to engineering educators is the difference in confidence in mathematical, scientific and problem-solving skills. Using a multi-method approach that utilizes the rich dataset of the Academic Pathways Study, the…

  5. Ethical Responsibility of Neuromarketing Companies in Harnessing the Market Research – a Global Exploratory Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Al. Pop

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge in the 21st century is identifying how to satisfy consumers’ needs in the best manner possible, whilst ensuring companies’ financial profitability. Scientists play a major role in achieving this goal, as research methods, techniques and tools have continuously evolved. In the last two decades, the development of these instruments has seen an important boost, as neuromarketing methods and techniques added depth and accuracy to traditional studies. The main aim of this paper is to highlight the role and importance of neuromarketing research techniques in the evolution of neurosciences and to explain how these techniques are used in market research. One of the most important challenges for companies who offer neuromarketing services is to stick to ethical principles when performing the investigations. This is an obligation they have both towards the beneficiaries – the companies providing products or services – and towards their consumers as well. This challenge has always been a subject of dispute between the advocates and critics of neuromarketing. Thus, this paper deals with this and other controversial topics. It starts with analysing a traditional persuasion model that has inherently been influenced by the neuromarketing research features. Then, it addresses the positive and negative aspects that subjects might have to face throughout neuromarketing studies, always bearing in mind the current Ethical Code of Conduct issued by the Neuromarketing Science and Business Association (NMSBA. An exploratory online research helped the authors test several hypotheses on ethical issues that neuromarketing companies have to handle. The research was performed on 67 neuromarketing companies from around the world that are members of the NMSBA. The findings are relevant both to researchers and neuromarketing companies, even the Romanian ones, who can use them used as insights.

  6. Integrated Approach to Dense Magnetized Plasmas Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2007-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA promotes the development and application of nuclear technologies in Member States. The scientific and technical knowledge required for the construction and operation of large nuclear fusion research facilities, including ITER and the Laser Megajoule in France, and the Z machine and the National Ignition Facility in the United States of America, necessitates several accompanying research and development programmes in physics and technology. This is particularly true in the areas of materials science and fusion technology. Hence, the long standing IAEA effort to conduct coordinated research projects (CRPs) in these areas is aimed at: (i) the development of appropriate technical tools to investigate the issue of materials damage and degradation in a fusion plasma environment; and (ii) the emergence of a knowledge based understanding of the various processes underlying materials damage and degradation, thereby leading to the identification of suitable candidate materials fulfilling the stringent requirements of a fusion environment in any next step facility. Dense magnetized plasma (DMP) devices serve as a first test bench for testing of fusion relevant plasma facing materials, diagnostic development and calibration, technologies and scaling to conceptual principles of larger devices while sophisticated testing facilities such as the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) are being designed. The CRP on Integrated Approach to Dense Magnetized Plasmas Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology described herein was initiated in 2007 with the participation of 12 research institutions in 8 Member States and was concluded in 2011. It was designed with specific research objectives falling into two main categories: support to mainstream fusion research and development of DMP technology. This publication is a compilation of the individual reports submitted by the 12 CRP participants. These reports discuss and present results of the research work undertaken as well as further expected, important spin-off applications of DMP devices.

  7. Keeping research reactors relevant: A pro-active approach for SLOWPOKE-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLOWPOKE is a small, inherently safe, pool-type research reactor that was engineered and marketed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in the 1970s and 80s. The original reactor, SLOWPOKE-1, was moved from Chalk River to the University of Toronto in 1970 and was operated until upgraded to the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in 1973. In all, eight reactors in the two versions were produced and five are still in operation today, three having been decommissioned. All of the remaining reactors are designated as SLOWPOKE-2 reactors. These research reactors are prone to two major issues: aging components and lack of relevance to a younger audience. In order to combat these problems, one SLOWPOKE -2 facility has embraced a strategy that involves modernizing their reactor in order to keep the reactor up to date and relevant. In 2001, this facility replaced its aging analogue reactor control system with a digital control system. The system was successfully commissioned and has provided a renewed platform for student learning and research. The digital control system provides a better interface and allows flexibility in data storage and retrieval that was never possible with the analogue control system. This facility has started work on another upgrade to the digital control and instrumentation system that will be installed in 2010. The upgrade includes new computer hardware, updated software and a web-based simulation and training system that will allow licensed operators, students and researchers to use an online simulation tool for training, education and research. The tool consists of: 1) A dynamic simulation for reactor kinetics (e.g., core flux, power, core temperatures, etc). This tool is useful for operator training and student education; 2) Dynamic mapping of the reactor and pool container gamma and neutron fluxes as well as the vertical neutron beam tube flux. This research planning tool is used for various researchers who wish to do irradiations (e.g., neutron activation analysis, neutron radiography or in-pool mixed field irradiations); and 3) On-line viewing of archived data (temperatures, neutron flux, rod position, etc). This modernized digital control system, along with new tools for training, education and research will ensure a viable platform for teaching and research while at the same time reduce vulnerability due to an aging control system. (author)

  8. A Needs-Driven and Responsive Approach to Supporting the Research Endeavours of Academic Librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken N. Meadows

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors describe a grassroots model for research support and explore the success and evolving directions of this model based on three iterative needs assessments administered by the Librarian and Archivist Research Support Network (LARSN Steering Committee at The University of Western Ontario. Needs assessments were identified as a critical tool to ensure that LARSN programming is relevant to librarians’ and archivists’ changing research needs. In the first four years of LARSN, three needs assessments were administered: in fall 2007, fall 2009, and spring 2011. The iterative needs assessments aimed to capture how the environment and research needs were evolving over time and the ways in which LARSN might continue to support a healthy and productive research environment. LARSN is faced with challenges that include a diversity of needs within its community, inconsistent participation levels in LARSN initiatives, and the inability to be all things to all people at all times. Still, LARSN is well received overall and rated positively by its community members. This is, in large part, because it has stayed true to its original mission to be needs-driven and responsive.

  9. Scientometrical approach of the definition of a research domain using scientific journals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this thesis is to analyse how the academic domain of a research entity can be defined by a panel of scientific journals. The aim of this work is to contribute to the creation of information tools as a help in research management. The first part gives an analysis of the scientific journals as markers of the scientific development: the production and diffusion of scientific journals and their ''scientometrical'' analysis (references, citation reports, citation indexes etc..). In the second part, a research unit is analyzed according to its related scientific journals and to its research domain. The SPAM (Photons, Atoms and Molecules Service) of the CEA was chosen for this task (main journals and co-publications network, specialization, main topics, collaborations and competition). The OST (Observatory of Sciences and Techniques) has in charge the production of scientific and technical indicators for research operators. The third part evaluates the methods used by the OST (analyses of reviews and journals) to provide a documentary corpus, taking the topic of the environment as an example. Finally the relevance of the information products obtained is evaluated. (J.S.)

  10. Approaches to natural resource inventory and analysis on the Oak Ridge Environmental Research Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchings, J. T.; Mann, L. K.; Joslin, D. J.; Bunnell, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The principal effort of the Department of Energy's Environmental Research Park program on the Oak Ridge Reservation is directed at identification and preservation of a diverse assortment of natural communities representative of the Appalachian region of East Tennessee. Designation of natural areas provides a degree of protection for unique plant and animal species. Concommitantly, establishment of research reference areas provides sites which will be used to evaluate changes brought about in similar natural communities as a result of activities related to energy-producing technologies. Agglomerative cluster analysis of 184 continuous forest inventory (CFI) plots on the Reservation initially was used to objectively define forest types. Thus, types identified by cluster analysis formed a basis for determining what forest elements were present and which were representative of the Appalachian region. Subsequently, cluster analysis similarly was used within these research areas to define the overstory, understory, and shrub structure of the particular forest community.

  11. As pesquisas sobre professores iniciantes: algumas aproximações / Researches about inexperienced teachers: some approaches

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Silmara de Oliveira Gomes, Papi; Pura Lúcia Oliver, Martins.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto tem como foco as investigações sobre professores iniciantes e faz um balanço do tema a partir de pesquisas realizadas no Brasil, tendo em vista a atual tendência dos estudos sobre essa etapa do desenvolvimento profissional do professor. Para tanto, são analisados os trabalhos aprese [...] ntados nas reuniões da ANPEd, nos anos de 2005, 2006 e 2007, e as pesquisas disponíveis no banco de teses da CAPES - 2000 a 2007 (mestrado e doutorado). Também é analisada a pesquisa de Brzezinski (2006), em que foi apresentado o estado do conhecimento sobre a formação de profissionais da educação. O estudo evidencia que a maioria das pesquisas analisa o professor, focando sua prática pedagógica, a construção de sua identidade, a socialização profissional e as dificuldades encontradas. Demonstra também a quase inexistência de ações de formação para esses professores e a necessidade das pesquisas brasileiras se dedicarem mais ao tema, que é pouco explorado, se considerada a relevância dessa etapa profissional. Abstract in english The following text focuses on the investigation into "Inexperienced Teachers" and ponders on the theme based on researches conducted in Brazil, regarding current trends about this stage of the teacher's professional development. In order to accomplish this objective, we analyzed the work presented a [...] t the ANPEd meetings in the years of 2005, 2006 and 2007 and the researches available at the CAPES Thesis Bank from 2000 to 2007 (for mastering and doctorate degrees). The research carried out by Brzezinski (2006) was also taken as an object of analysis In this research, the state of knowledge on the development of professionals working with education was presented. The study reveals that most of the researchers analyzed the teachers, focusing on their pedagogic practice, identity construction, and professional socialization, as well as on the difficulties found. It also demonstrates the nearly inexistence of development actions for those teachers and the need for further research by Brazilian specialists, since this issue has been poorly explored considering its relevance.

  12. As pesquisas sobre professores iniciantes: algumas aproximações Researches about inexperienced teachers: some approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara de Oliveira Gomes Papi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto tem como foco as investigações sobre professores iniciantes e faz um balanço do tema a partir de pesquisas realizadas no Brasil, tendo em vista a atual tendência dos estudos sobre essa etapa do desenvolvimento profissional do professor. Para tanto, são analisados os trabalhos apresentados nas reuniões da ANPEd, nos anos de 2005, 2006 e 2007, e as pesquisas disponíveis no banco de teses da CAPES - 2000 a 2007 (mestrado e doutorado. Também é analisada a pesquisa de Brzezinski (2006, em que foi apresentado o estado do conhecimento sobre a formação de profissionais da educação. O estudo evidencia que a maioria das pesquisas analisa o professor, focando sua prática pedagógica, a construção de sua identidade, a socialização profissional e as dificuldades encontradas. Demonstra também a quase inexistência de ações de formação para esses professores e a necessidade das pesquisas brasileiras se dedicarem mais ao tema, que é pouco explorado, se considerada a relevância dessa etapa profissional.The following text focuses on the investigation into "Inexperienced Teachers" and ponders on the theme based on researches conducted in Brazil, regarding current trends about this stage of the teacher's professional development. In order to accomplish this objective, we analyzed the work presented at the ANPEd meetings in the years of 2005, 2006 and 2007 and the researches available at the CAPES Thesis Bank from 2000 to 2007 (for mastering and doctorate degrees. The research carried out by Brzezinski (2006 was also taken as an object of analysis In this research, the state of knowledge on the development of professionals working with education was presented. The study reveals that most of the researchers analyzed the teachers, focusing on their pedagogic practice, identity construction, and professional socialization, as well as on the difficulties found. It also demonstrates the nearly inexistence of development actions for those teachers and the need for further research by Brazilian specialists, since this issue has been poorly explored considering its relevance.

  13. An Approach to Learning Research with a Wireless Sensor Network in an Outdoor Setting

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Tom Adam Frederic

    2008-01-01

    Automated collection of environmental data may be accomplished with wireless sensor networks (WSNs). In this paper, a general discussion of WSNs is given for the gathering of data for educational research. WSNs have the capability to enhance the scope of a researcher to include multiple streams of data: environmental, location, cyberdata, video, and RFID. The location of data stored in a database can allow reconstruction of the learning activity for the evaluation of significance at a later time. A brief overview of the technology forms the basis of an exploration of a setting used for outdoor learning.

  14. Cognitive development in introductory physics: A research-based approach to curriculum reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, Raluca Elena

    This project describes the research on a classification of physics problems in the context of introductory physics courses. This classification, called the Taxonomy of Introductory Physics Problems (TIPP), relates physics problems to the cognitive processes required to solve them. TIPP was created for designing and clarifying educational objectives, for developing assessments that can evaluate individual component processes of the problem-solving process, and for guiding curriculum design in introductory physics courses, specifically within the context of a "thinking-skills" curriculum. TIPP relies on the following resources: (1) cognitive research findings adopted by physics education research, (2) expert-novice research discoveries acknowledged by physics education research, (3) an educational psychology taxonomy for educational objectives, and (4) various collections of physics problems created by physics education researchers or developed by textbook authors. TIPP was used in the years 2006--2008 to reform the first semester of the introductory algebra-based physics course (called Phys 11) at The George Washington University. The reform sought to transform our curriculum into a "thinking-skills" curriculum that trades "breadth for depth" by focusing on fewer topics while targeting the students' cognitive development. We employed existing research on the physics problem-solving expert-novice behavior, cognitive science and behavioral science findings, and educational psychology recommendations. Our pedagogy relies on didactic constructs such as the GW-ACCESS problem-solving protocol, learning progressions and concept maps that we have developed and implemented in our introductory physics course. These tools were designed based on TIPP. Their purpose is: (1) to help students build local and global coherent knowledge structures, (2) to develop more context-independent problem-solving abilities, (3) to gain confidence in problem solving, and (4) to establish connections between everyday phenomena and underlying physics concepts. We organize traditional and research-based physics problems such that students experience a gradual increase in complexity related to problem context, problem features and cognitive processes needed to solve the problem. The instructional environment that we designed allows for explicit monitoring, control and measurement of the cognitive processes exercised during the instruction period. It is easily adaptable to any kind of curriculum and can be readily adjusted throughout the semester. To assess the development of students' problem-solving abilities, we created rubrics that measure specific aspects of the thinking involved in physics problem solving. The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) was administered pre- and post-instruction to determine students' shift in dispositions towards learning physics. The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) was administered pre- and post-instruction to determine students' level of conceptual understanding. The results feature improvements in students' problem-solving abilities and in their attitudes towards learning physics.

  15. Ethical considerations of research policy for personal genome analysis: the approach of the Genome Science Project in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minari, Jusaku; Shirai, Tetsuya; Kato, Kazuto

    2014-12-01

    As evidenced by high-throughput sequencers, genomic technologies have recently undergone radical advances. These technologies enable comprehensive sequencing of personal genomes considerably more efficiently and less expensively than heretofore. These developments present a challenge to the conventional framework of biomedical ethics; under these changing circumstances, each research project has to develop a pragmatic research policy. Based on the experience with a new large-scale project-the Genome Science Project-this article presents a novel approach to conducting a specific policy for personal genome research in the Japanese context. In creating an original informed-consent form template for the project, we present a two-tiered process: making the draft of the template following an analysis of national and international policies; refining the draft template in conjunction with genome project researchers for practical application. Through practical use of the template, we have gained valuable experience in addressing challenges in the ethical review process, such as the importance of sharing details of the latest developments in genomics with members of research ethics committees. We discuss certain limitations of the conventional concept of informed consent and its governance system and suggest the potential of an alternative process using information technology. PMID:26085440

  16. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  17. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berges, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaizot, J. -P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gelis, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  18. Development of an Integrated Metabolomic Profiling Approach for Infectious Diseases Research

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Haitao; Hung, Chia S; Chaturvedi, Kaveri S.; Hooton, Thomas M; Henderson, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling offers direct insights into the chemical environment and metabolic pathway activities at sites of human disease. During infection, this environment may receive important contributions from both host and pathogen. Here we apply untargeted metabolomics approach to identify compounds associated with an E. coli urinary tract infection population. Correlative and structural data from minimally processed samples were obtained using an optimized LC-MS platform capable of resolv...

  19. Organizations in context: proposal for a new theoretical approach in prescriptive accident research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhrberg, Mette Bang; Jensen, Per Langå

    2004-01-01

    Lately, requests have been made for including the contexts of enterprises in models to prevent accidents at work. This paper/article presents different contextual theories in order to prove/analyze whether this type of theories could be a way to introduce the context. A differentiation is made between understanding the processes in the enterprises and understanding the contextual relations. Decision-making theories are used to explain the internal processes. And regulatory approaches are used to...

  20. Leonardo on hydrostatic force: a research engineering approach towards the idea of hydrostatic pressure?

    OpenAIRE

    Cavagnero, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    As evidenced by many scholars, hydraulics was one of the main interests of Leonardo da Vinci; his manuscripts are full of drawings and projects on water, accompanied by a variety of notes, subtle meditations, and some remarkable considerations. Leonardo's expertise in this field surely comes, first of all, from the well-established technical tradition of his time. But the particular approach that he often adopts to study and solve the problems encountered in his activity as an engineer someti...

  1. Development of a physical activity program for children and youth with autism :an action research approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinhans, Karin

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the implementation of strategies for the development of a physical activity program for children and youth with autism. The aim of the study was the collaborative development of a sustainable physical activity program with families with children with autism. A phenomenological approach was employed in the study, which used participant observation that included conversations to obtain the lived experiences of the participants. Close observations were made of the interaction...

  2. Researching Student Experiences of Digital Workshops in Art Gallery Education : A Q Methodological Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobbernagel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In the development of methods to explore student views on creative learning processes using digital media, Q methodology and its applications offer a promising framework. The method addresses the complexity of subjective viewpoints by applying a technique and analysis that combine materials to investigate shared patterns among students’ experiences. The integration of a qualitative approach with quantitative technique provides a special interview and ensures that the analysis remains focused on the students’ perspective. This approach offers a way to overcome problems with weak links between data materials in mixed-method studies, as the viewpoints expressed by study participants are initially mapped by a quantification procedure designed to integrate open-ended questioning and survey technique. The study presented here illustrates the use of this approach in an enquiry into students’ experiences of activities in digital media workshops in a Danish museum of contemporary art. Data were collected from 85 students, who participated in three types of workshops, and the results show a typology of four distinct views regarding three interrelated aspects: (1) views on art, which entail students’ general attitudes about art; (2) use of digital media for the creation of audio or animated cartoon digital files; and (3) reflective thinking during and after the workshop.

  3. Research on the Rapid and Accurate Positioning and Orientation Approach for Land Missile-Launching Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kui; Wang, Lei; Lv, Yanhong; Gao, Pengyu; Song, Tianxiao

    2015-01-01

    Getting a land vehicle's accurate position, azimuth and attitude rapidly is significant for vehicle based weapons' combat effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach to acquire vehicle's accurate position and orientation is proposed. It uses biaxial optical detection platform (BODP) to aim at and lock in no less than three pre-set cooperative targets, whose accurate positions are measured beforehand. Then, it calculates the vehicle's accurate position, azimuth and attitudes by the rough position and orientation provided by vehicle based navigation systems and no less than three couples of azimuth and pitch angles measured by BODP. The proposed approach does not depend on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), thus it is autonomous and difficult to interfere. Meanwhile, it only needs a rough position and orientation as algorithm's iterative initial value, consequently, it does not have high performance requirement for Inertial Navigation System (INS), odometer and other vehicle based navigation systems, even in high precise applications. This paper described the system's working procedure, presented theoretical deviation of the algorithm, and then verified its effectiveness through simulation and vehicle experiments. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed approach can achieve positioning and orientation accuracy of 0.2 m and 20? respectively in less than 3 min. PMID:26492249

  4. Research on the Rapid and Accurate Positioning and Orientation Approach for Land Missile-Launching Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kui; Wang, Lei; Lv, Yanhong; Gao, Pengyu; Song, Tianxiao

    2015-01-01

    Getting a land vehicle’s accurate position, azimuth and attitude rapidly is significant for vehicle based weapons’ combat effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach to acquire vehicle’s accurate position and orientation is proposed. It uses biaxial optical detection platform (BODP) to aim at and lock in no less than three pre-set cooperative targets, whose accurate positions are measured beforehand. Then, it calculates the vehicle’s accurate position, azimuth and attitudes by the rough position and orientation provided by vehicle based navigation systems and no less than three couples of azimuth and pitch angles measured by BODP. The proposed approach does not depend on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), thus it is autonomous and difficult to interfere. Meanwhile, it only needs a rough position and orientation as algorithm’s iterative initial value, consequently, it does not have high performance requirement for Inertial Navigation System (INS), odometer and other vehicle based navigation systems, even in high precise applications. This paper described the system’s working procedure, presented theoretical deviation of the algorithm, and then verified its effectiveness through simulation and vehicle experiments. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed approach can achieve positioning and orientation accuracy of 0.2 m and 20? respectively in less than 3 min. PMID:26492249

  5. Stem cell research and therapies in Argentina: the legal and regulatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arzuaga, Fabiana C

    2013-12-01

    Argentina has a significant number of researchers in public and private institutions conducting research in regenerative medicine and stem cells. There is not specific legislation in this area; however, the National Ministry of Health has issued regulations under the scope of the Transplant Act and the Medicines Act. Alongside the groups doing research, it is possible to find professionals offering experimental stem cell therapies to patients. These professionals take refuge in the term "medical practice" and sell experimental treatment to patients with no guarantee of safety and security given that they were not tested in clinical research. These practices offered to patients in a scheme, apparently legal, are generating an important number of judicial actions requesting the payment of said treatments. The decisions of the courts ordering payment in most cases are generating a transfer of funds from patients, social welfare systems, and the state to medical centers offering stem cell experimental therapies. This article describes the current regulations as well as the course of action to solve the emerging problems of these new technologies at legislative level. PMID:24304074

  6. Transferring Chemical Research to a Spin-Off Initiative in Health Care: The Lipidomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreri, Carla; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Ferreri, Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging discipline in life sciences related to the lipid metabolism of living organisms. In the last decade chemical and biological research has attributed very important roles to membrane phospholipids in relationship to free radical stress and metabolic situations. An entrepreneurial initiative for diagnostic tools and health…

  7. Nigeria research reactor (NIRR-1) conversion programme implementation - A regulatory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigeria is embarking on a fuel conversion programme in view of her being a signatory to the Non-Proliferation Treaty and by extension, acceptance of the non-proliferation programme which encompasses a global effort to convert her type of research reactor to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The Nigeria Research Reactor (NIRR-1) is a 31kW miniature neutron source reactor situated at the Centre for Energy Research and Training (CERT) Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. The reactor was acquired through the tripartite project and supply agreement between the Federal Government of Nigeria, International Atomic Energy Agency and China Institute of Atomic Energy. The reactor attained criticality on the 3rd February 2004 and has since been used for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Experiments and Training in Nuclear Science and Technology. NIRR-1 uses U-235 fuel enriched to about 90.2%. This paper analyzes the status of NIRR-1 conversion programme from a regulatory perspective, especially the major milestones fulfilled towards the submission/review of the feasibility/LEU conversion report. The paper considers the legal framework including the Act, Regulations and guidance documents developed or in the process of development for effective regulation of the conversion from project schedule to shipping requirements. The various international instruments endorsed by Nigeria as a demonstration of her commitment to conversion programme in form of Treaties, Conventions and Agreements are highlighted. The status of the draft Regulations on Research Reactors and the key elements of the Regulations are discussed.

  8. An integrated, semi-automated approach to thermochemical conversion research for sustainable farming systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    An integrated, semi-automated system is presented for the rapid and efficient testing and production of research-scale quantities of biochar. This biochar, produced from agricultural waste materials, can easily be incorporated in future sustainable livestock farming systems. These farming systems wi...

  9. Approaches to Art Therapy for Cancer Inpatients: Research and Practice Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nainis, Nancy A.

    2008-01-01

    Common symptoms reported by cancer patients include pain, fatigue, breathlessness, insomnia, lack of appetite, and anxiety. A study conducted by an interdisciplinary research team (Nainis et al., 2006) demonstrated statistically significant reductions in these cancer symptoms with the use of traditional art therapy methods. The study found a…

  10. Using Popular Media and a Collaborative Approach to Teaching Grounded Theory Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Elizabeth G.; Ghoston, Michelle R.; Drape, Tiffany; Ruff, Chloe; Mukuni, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Popular movies were used in a doctoral-level qualitative research methods course as a way to help students learn about how to collect and analyze qualitative observational data in order to develop a grounded theory. The course was designed in such a way that collaboration was central to the generation of knowledge. Using media depictions had the…

  11. When she earns enough…’ The biographic research approach to gender diversity in the management of organisations.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    K?ížková, Alena

    Brno : Akademické nakladatelství CERM, 2011, s. 70-81. ISBN 978-80-7204-775-8 R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP404/10/0021; GA ?R GA403/09/1839 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : gender diversity * gender in organisations * women in management Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography

  12. From Archive to Awards Ceremony: An Approach for Engaging Students in Historical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erekson, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent literature on history teaching has emphasized "doing history"--whether as "active learning", cognitive science, or with simple photocopies of primary sources. This article extends the discussion of a "signature pedagogy" of history to include all aspects of the work of historians, from archival research through public presentation. It…

  13. A Qualitative Experiment: Research on Mediated Meaning Construction Using a Hybrid Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sue; Mendelson, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a hybrid methodological technique that fuses elements of experimental design with qualitative strategies to explore mediated communication. Called the "qualitative experiment," this strategy uses focus groups and in-depth interviews "within" randomized stimulus conditions typically associated with experimental research. This…

  14. Introverted Approaches to Instructional Media Research: Eliciting Perceptual Processes Which Contribute to Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, Ronald J.

    Meanings given to the term "perception" are discussed in this paper and two categories of perception theories having implications for instructional media research are identified. One category is described as extroverted because it includes theories primarily concerned with characteristics of external stimuli and the influence that the…

  15. Research for the Classroom: To Read or Not to Read--Five Approaches to Teaching Shakespeare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    How teachers can use such materials as parallel-text editions, graphic novels, and film adaptations to increase students' understanding of and interest in Shakespeare was the impetus for a classroom action research project that examined the effects of teaching methods on student comprehension and engagement. The author of this article…

  16. A Comparable Wage Approach to Geographic Cost Adjustment. Research and Development Report. NCES-2006-321

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lori L.; Fowler, William J. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Geographic cost differences present many complications when researchers attempt to make systematic comparisons of educational resources, and failure to address such differences can undermine the equity and adequacy goals of school finance formulas. Therefore, there is considerable interest in developing measures of the cost of education that can…

  17. MIRACLE Approaches to Multilingual Information Retrieval: A Baseline for Future Research

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Fernández, José Luis; Villena Román, Julio; Fombella Mourelle, Jorge; García Serrano, Ana; Martínez Fernández, Paloma; Goñi Menoyo, José Miguel; González Cristóbal, José Carlos

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the first set of experiments defined by the MIRACLE (Multilingual Information RetrievAl for the CLEf campaign) research group for some of the cross language tasks defined by CLEF. These experiments combine different basic techniques, linguistic-oriented and statistic-oriented, to be applied to the indexing and retrieval processes.

  18. BOOK REVIEW: ESTUARINE SCIENCE: A SYNTHETIC APPROACH TO RESEARCH AND PRACTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book is the product of fifty leading estuarine scientists most of whom attended a workshop convened for the purpose of "put[ting] together the case for synthesis of estuarine data and to show the capabilities of synthetic methods of research" (p. 2). The editor, John E. Hob...

  19. TickNET—A Collaborative Public Health Approach to Tickborne Disease Surveillance and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckley, Alison; Hook, Sarah; Beard, C. Ben

    2015-01-01

    TickNET, a public health network, was created in 2007 to foster greater collaboration between state health departments, academic centers, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on surveillance and prevention of tickborne diseases. Research activities are conducted through the Emerging Infections Program and include laboratory surveys, high-quality prevention trials, and pathogen discovery. PMID:26291549

  20. EXPERIMENTAL ACIDIFICATION OF LITTLE ROCK LAKE (WISCONSIN): FISH RESEARCH APPROACH AND EARLY RESPONSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    One goal of research at Little Rock Lake, Wisconsin, is to enhance understanding of lake acidification effects on warm- and cool-water fishery resources. he Little Rock Lake fish assemblage is characteristic of many acid sensitive waters in North America and is dominated by yello...

  1. L'approache ethnographique comme Methodologie de recherche dans l'examen du processus de construction identitaire (The Ethnographic Approach as Research Methodology in the Investigation of the Process of Identity Construction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin-Lajoie, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates how qualitative research, specifically ethnograhy, constitutes an effective means of investigating identity construction, particularly as identity is manifested through language practices. This approach illuminates the complexity of the interaction between language practices and identity. (Author/VWL)

  2. An Activity-based Approach to the Learning and Teaching of Research Methods: Measuring Student Engagement and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eimear Fallon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a research project carried out with 82 final and third year undergraduate students, learning Research Methods prior to undertaking an undergraduate thesis during the academic years 2010 and 2011. The research had two separate, linked objectives, (a to develop a Research Methods module that embraces an activity-based approach to learning in a group environment, (b to improve engagement by all students. The Research Methods module was previously taught through a traditional lecture-based format. Anecdotally, it was felt that student engagement was poor and learning was limited. It was believed that successful completion of the development of this Module would equip students with a deeply-learned battery of research skills to take into their further academic and professional careers. Student learning was achieved through completion of a series of activities based on different research methods. In order to encourage student engagement, a wide variety of activities were used. These activities included workshops, brainstorming, mind-mapping, presentations, written submissions, peer critiquing, lecture/seminar, and ‘speed dating’ with more senior students and self reflection. Student engagement was measured through a survey based on a U.S. National Survey of Student Engagement (2000. A questionnaire was devised to establish whether, and to what degree, students were engaged in the material that they were learning, while they were learning it. The results of the questionnaire were very encouraging with between 63% and 96% of students answering positively to a range of questions concerning engagement. In terms of the two objectives set, these were satisfactorily met. The module was successfully developed and continues to be delivered, based upon this new and significant level of student engagement.

  3. Institutional Infrastructure for Broader Impacts Engagement - Showcasing Effective Strategies and Approaches from a Large Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A. U.; Sullivan, S. B.; Smith, L. K.; Lynds, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The need for robust scientific and especially climate literacy is increasing. Funding agencies mandate that scientists make their findings and data publically available. Ideally, this mandate is achieved by scientists and educators working together to translate research findings into common knowledge. The Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) is the largest research institute at the University of Colorado and home institute to over 500 scientists. CIRES provides an effective organizational infrastructure to support its scientists in broadening their research impact. Education specialists provide the necessary experience, connections, logistical support, and evaluation expertise to develop and conduct impactful education and outreach efforts. Outreach efforts are tailored to the project needs and the scientists' interests. They span from deep engagement efforts with a high time commitment by the scientist thus a high dosage to short presentations by the scientists that reach many people without stimulating a deep engagement and have therefore a low dosage. We use three examples of current successful programs to showcase these different engagement levels and report on their impact: i) deep transformative and time-intensive engagement through a Research Experience for Community College students program, ii) direct engagement during a teacher professional development workshop centered around a newly developed curriculum bringing authentic climate data into secondary classrooms, iii) short-time engagement through a virtual panel discussion about the state of recent climate science topics, the recordings of which were repurposed in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). In this presentation, we discuss the challenges and opportunities of broader impacts work. We discuss successful strategies that we developed, stress the importance of robust impact evaluation, and summarize different avenues of funding outreach efforts.

  4. RESEARCH: Assessment of Nonpoint Source Pollution from Inactive Mines Using a Watershed-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso; Ward

    1998-03-01

    / A watershed-based approach for screening-level assessment of nonpoint source pollution from inactive and abandoned metal mines was developed and illustrated. The methodology was designed to use limited stream discharge and chemical data from synoptic surveys to derive key information required for targeting impaired waterbodies and critical source areas for detailed investigation and remediation. The approach was formulated based on the required attributes of an assessment methodology, information goals for targeting, attributes of data that are typical of basins with inactive mines, and data analysis methods that were useful for the case study. The methodology is presented as steps in a framework including evaluation of existing data/information and identification of data gaps; definition of assessment information goals for targeting and monitoring design; data collection, management, and analysis; and information reporting and use for targeting. Information generated includes the type and extent of and critical conditions for water-quality impairment, concentrations in and loadings to streams, differences between concentrations in and loadings to streams, and risks of exceeding target concentrations and loadings. Data from the Cement Creek Basin, located in the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, USA, were used to help develop and illustrate application of the methodology. The required information was derived for Cement Creek and used for preliminary targeting of locations for detailed investigation and remediation. Application of the approach to Cement Creek was successful in terms of cost-effective generation of information and use for targeting.KEY WORDS: Water quality assessment; Nonpoint source pollution; Inactive mines; Watershed PMID:9465132

  5. A Survey & Current Research Challenges in Meta Learning Approaches based on Dataset Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Bhatt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Classification is a process that predicts class of objects whose class label is unknown. According to No Free Lunch (NFL theorem, there is no single classifier that performs better on all datasets. Meta learning is one of the approaches that acquired knowledge based on the past experience. The knowledge in Meta-Learning is acquired from a set of meta-examples which stores the features of the problem and the performance obtained by executing a set of candidate algorithms on Meta Features. Based on the experience acquired by the system during training phase, ranking of the classifiers is provided based on considering various measures of classifiers.

  6. Approach to the research and the situation of Public Relations in Europe. Comparative study between German and Spanish cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dra. María Isabel Míguez González

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of bring near to the spanish academic field the european approaches of Public Relations, this article makes a compared revision of the situation of this subject and profession in Germany and Spain. This revision shows important resemblances on the use of the term “public relations”, the confusion of this subject with other communicative activities, the professional development and the problems of the field in both countries. However, it also shows that Germany has more tradition on public relations research than Spain and, therefore, it has a more extensive corpus of theories about this subject. For this reason, since important resemblances exist in other aspects, german research on public relations could be interesting for the spanish academic field both to explain the situation of public relations in Spain and to motivate theoretical development in our country.

  7. Ethics of clear health communication: applying the CLEAN Look approach to communicate biobanking information for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskan, Alexis; Arevalo, Mariana; Gwede, Clement K; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa A; Luque, John S; Wells, Kristen J; Meade, Cathy D

    2012-11-01

    Cancer innovations, such as biobanking technologies, are continuously evolving to improve our understanding and knowledge about cancer prevention and treatment modalities. However, the public receives little communication about biobanking and is often unaware about this innovation until asked to donate biospecimens. It is the researchers' ethical duty to provide clear communications about biobanking and biospecimen research. Such information allows the public to understand biobanking processes and facilitates informed decision making about biospecimen donation. The aims of this paper are 1) to examine the importance of clear communication as an ethical imperative when conveying information about cancer innovations and 2) to illustrate the use of an organizing framework, the CLEAN ( C ulture, L iteracy, E ducation, A ssessment, and N etworking) Look approach for creating educational priming materials about the topic of biobanking. PMID:23124500

  8. Research requirements for a unified approach to modelling chemical effects associated with radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of a review of the current modelling, laboratory experiments and field experiments being conducted in the United Kingdom to aid understanding and improve prediction of the effects of chemistry on the disposal of radioactive wastes. The aim has been to summarise present work and derive a structure for future research effort that would support the use of probabilistic risk assessment (pra) methods for the disposal of radioactive wastes. The review was conducted by a combination of letter and personal visits, and preliminary results were reported to a plenary meeting of participants held in April, 1986. Following this meeting, copies of the report were circulated to participants at draft stage, so that the finalised report should be taken to provide as far as possible a consensus of opinion of research requirements. (author)

  9. Three-level approach to quality programs for research, development and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary mission of the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to develop nuclear weapons systems for the Department of Defense. The activities included in this effort cover a broad spectrum, ranging from pure research to routine production. In order to provide a workable framework for a comprehensive quality assurance program for these varied activities, we have proposed a three-level structure of quality plans, corresponding to a rough classification of the weapons work into three general categories. These categories are: (1) research into materials and processes, and preliminary development; (2) design, development, and fabrication of prototype components; (3) routine production, analysis, or refinement activities. The first category requires a quality program to assure the validity, reliability, and retrievability of the information developed; this is accomplished by a conscientious application of what is generally recognized as good laboratory practice. The second category requires in addition a strong emphasis on design review and inspection. For the third category, a comprehensive quality program is appropriate

  10. ISO-9001: An approach to accreditation for an MTR facility: SAFARI-1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SAFARI-1 Research Reactor obtained ISO-9001 accreditation via the South African Bureau of Standards in September 1998. In view of the commercial applications of the reactor, the value of acquisition of the accreditation was considered against the cost of implementation of the Quality System. The criteria identified in the ISO-9001 standard were appraised and a superstructure derived for management of the generation and implementation of a suitable Quality Management System (QMS) for the fairly unique application of a nuclear research reactor. A Quality Policy was established, which formed the basis of the QMS against which the various requirements and/or standards were identified. In addition, since it was considered advantageous to incorporate the management controls of Conventional and Radiological Safety as well as Plant Maintenance and Environmental Management (ISO 14001), these aspects were included in the QMS. (author)

  11. Videoethnographic approaches to audience research : questions of exploration, authorship and multimodal presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildermuth, Norbert

      In my paper I will explore the methodological uses and epistemological consequences of videoethnography in audience studies. With reference to research done on young people and their media appropriations in Recife (Brazil), in December 2005, I will argue for the creative integration of video recordings in doing mediaethnographic audience research. Moreover, I will discuss the use and potentials of hypermedia in presenting the results of ethnographic audience research. Based on recent conceptualisations and theories of hypermodality and multimodal ethnography (Lemke, 2002; Idema, 2003; Dicks and Mason, 1998; Dicks, Soyinka and Coffey, 2006) I will seek to show, by help of my own material, that the creative integration of different media may offer the reader and analyst a more adequate approximation of the richness of mediaethnographic knowledge than conventional textual presentations.                       Hypermediated forms of presentation afford not just a capability for accommodating non-sequentiality,polyphony and multi-perspectivalism, I will argue, but acknowledge and foreground the inevitable processes of selection and interpretation which lies at the heart of each and every practice of  ‘authoring'. Finally, considerations regarding a planned hypermediated presentation of my research project in Recife, will be related to the experiences made with video as tool of mediaethnographic investigation and analysis. How the potential of non-sequentiality enshrined in hypermedia applications can be accommodated with a continued commitment to the production of a form of authoring which maintains intellectual coherence, is thereby at the focus of the preliminary assessment of the potential of hypermediated forms of academic authoring that this paper seeks to contribute to.

  12. Statistical Genetics Concepts and Approaches in Schizophrenia and Related Neuropsychiatric Research

    OpenAIRE

    SCHORK, NICHOLAS J.; Greenwood, Tiffany A; BRAFF, DAVID L.

    2006-01-01

    Statistical genetics is a research field that focuses on mathematical models and statistical inference methodologies that relate genetic variations (ie, naturally occurring human DNA sequence variations or “polymorphisms”) to particular traits or diseases (phenotypes) usually from data collected on large samples of families or individuals. The ultimate goal of such analysis is the identification of genes and genetic variations that influence disease susceptibility. Although of extreme interes...

  13. The Six Identities of Marketing: A Vector Quantization of Research Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Franke, Nikolaus; Mazanec, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides an empirical identification of groups of marketing scholars who share common beliefs about the role of science and the logic of scientific discovery. Design: We use Topology Representing Network quantization to empirically identify classes of marketing researchers within a representative sample of marketing professors. Findings: We find six distinct classes of marketing scholars. They differ with regard to popularity (size) and productivity (level...

  14. Integration of Research Into Science-outreach (IRIS): A Video and Web-based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, P. L.; O'Driscoll, B.

    2013-12-01

    The development of the IRIS (Integration of Research Into Science-outreach) initiative is aimed at using field- and laboratory- based videos and blog entries to enable a sustained outreach relationship between university researchers and local classrooms. IRIS seeks to communicate complex, cutting-edge scientific research in the Earth and Planetary sciences to school-aged children in a simple and interesting manner, in the hope of ameliorating the overall decline of children entering into science and engineering fields in future generations. The primary method of delivery IRIS utilizes is the media of film, ';webinars' and blog entries. Filmed sequences of laboratory work, field work, science demos and mini webinars on current and relevant material in the Earth and Planetary sciences are ';subscribed' to by local schools. Selected sequences are delivered in 20-30 minute film segments with accompanying written material. The level at which the subject matter is currently geared is towards secondary level school-aged children, with the purpose of inspiring and encouraging curiosity, learning and development in scientific research. The video broadcasts are supplemented by a hands-on visit 1-2 times per year by a group of scientists participating in the filmed sequences to the subscribing class, with the objective of engaging and establishing a natural rapport between the class and the scientists that they see in the broadcasts. This transgresses boundaries that traditional 'one off' outreach platforms often aren't able to achieve. The initial results of the IRIS outreach initiative including successes, problems encountered and classroom feedback will be reported.

  15. Ethical Responsibility of Neuromarketing Companies in Harnessing the Market Research – a Global Exploratory Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolae Al. Pop; Dan-Cristian Dabija; Ana Maria Iorga

    2014-01-01

    A key challenge in the 21st century is identifying how to satisfy consumers’ needs in the best manner possible, whilst ensuring companies’ financial profitability. Scientists play a major role in achieving this goal, as research methods, techniques and tools have continuously evolved. In the last two decades, the development of these instruments has seen an important boost, as neuromarketing methods and techniques added depth and accuracy to traditional studies. The main aim of...

  16. The use of grey literature in historical journals and historical research: A bibliometric and qualitative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Blaaij, Cees de (ZEBI); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2007-01-01

    Grey literature is generally accepted as an important part of scholarly communication especially in the "hard" sciences. Since little is known about the use and nature of grey literature in the humanities and specifically in the discipline of history, a systematic analysis was done to characterize the bibliographic references appearing in ten core history journals. Methods: references from all research articles published in ten core history journals in 2005 were analyzed – five printed and fi...

  17. SOME APPROACHES TO THE EXPERIMENTAL METHOD IN THE SCIENTIFIC ECONOMIC RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Camelia DRAGOMIR STEFANESCU

    2006-01-01

    Used on a wide scale in the natural sciences, the experimental method wasaccepted and used in the research field of the economic sciences much laterand with a lot of restraint. Although the application of the experiment in thefield of the economic sciences implies a lot of real problems, the experimentalmethod is, today, a proceeding used in the scientific economic investigations,having an important role both in verification and demonstration of the causalhypothesis and in the improvement and...

  18. Visual search and analysis in Complex information spaces : approaches and research challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Landesberger, Tatiana von; Schreck, Tobias; Fellner, Dieter; Kohlhammer, Jörn

    2012-01-01

    One of the central motivations for visual analytics research is the so-called information overload – implying the challenge for human users in understanding and making decisions in presence of too much information [37]. Visual-interactive systems, integrated with automatic data analysis techniques, can help in making use of such large data sets [35]. Visual Analytics solutions not only need to cope with data volumes that are large on the nominal scale, but also with data that show high comple...

  19. Politics and power within multinational corporations: Mainstream studies, emerging critical approaches and suggestions for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Geppert, M; Dörrenbächer, C

    2014-01-01

    Given the increased public interest in the use and misuse of power in multinationals in the aftermath of the financial crisis, it is notable that power relations in multinational corporations (MNCs) have not gained enhanced attention in the academic community. What is missing so far in the study of MNCs is a systematic examination of how power and politics within multinational corporations have been addressed in mainstream International Business (IB) and sociological research studying the MNC...

  20. "Rencontre sur les lieux": memory construction in urban ambiances - A video-based research approach

    OpenAIRE

    Runkel, Simon; Wesener, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses the place-bound construction of individual and collective memories. The question is to what extent atmospheres assist in processes of remembering and/or are remembered themselves. The paper discusses the advantages and challenges of using video analysis techniques. It suggests a framework for empirical research encompassing the analysis of immediate and reflected memory construction, and the role of urban ambiances in memory construction.

  1. Quantitative approaches to linguistic variation in IRC : implications for qualitative research

    OpenAIRE

    Siebenhaar, Beat

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative analysis of code choice, code switching, and language style in Internet Relay Chat (IRC) can shed light on functional-pragmatic aspects of the use of different linguistic varieties. However, in a qualitative analysis, the status of varieties within a channel or for a single chatter can only be guessed at. Moreover, qualitative research on linguistic variation in IRC often fails to generalize its findings due to a restricted database or a restricted view of a database. This article...

  2. Approaching a Conceptual Framework for Research on Sustainability Performance in Corporate Value Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The literature on sustainability in supply chains is growing rapidly, leading to the manifestation of conceptualizations like Sustainable Supply Chain Management. More recently the concept of Sustainable Value Chain Management has emerged, extending the view to included suppliers in multiple tiers and corporate engagement with other primary and secondary stakeholders. Conducting research on Supply Chain Management is challenging and adding the ambiguously defined concept of sustainability and a ...

  3. A knowledge system approach to the multinational company :conceptual grounding and implications for research

    OpenAIRE

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Santos, José

    2009-01-01

    The role of knowledge, organizational learning, and innovation as levers of competitive advantage is now a commonly acknowledged insight in research in international management. However, while the agglomeration of insights of described as the “knowledge-based view” is a promising theoretical lens, insights are not organized into a unifying framework and there are significant holes in the understanding of how knowledge may be turned into a source of competitive advantage for MNCs. In o...

  4. One Health approach to identify research needs in bovine and human babesioses: workshop report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McElwain Terry F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Babesia are emerging health threats to humans and animals in the United States. A collaborative effort of multiple disciplines to attain optimal health for people, animals and our environment, otherwise known as the One Health concept, was taken during a research workshop held in April 2009 to identify gaps in scientific knowledge regarding babesioses. The impetus for this analysis was the increased risk for outbreaks of bovine babesiosis, also known as Texas cattle fever, associated with the re-infestation of the U.S. by cattle fever ticks. Results The involvement of wildlife in the ecology of cattle fever ticks jeopardizes the ability of state and federal agencies to keep the national herd free of Texas cattle fever. Similarly, there has been a progressive increase in the number of cases of human babesiosis over the past 25 years due to an increase in the white-tailed deer population. Human babesiosis due to cattle-associated Babesia divergens and Babesia divergens-like organisms have begun to appear in residents of the United States. Research needs for human and bovine babesioses were identified and are presented herein. Conclusions The translation of this research is expected to provide veterinary and public health systems with the tools to mitigate the impact of bovine and human babesioses. However, economic, political, and social commitments are urgently required, including increased national funding for animal and human Babesia research, to prevent the re-establishment of cattle fever ticks and the increasing problem of human babesiosis in the United States.

  5. One Health approach to identify research needs in bovine and human babesioses: workshop report

    OpenAIRE

    McElwain Terry F; Cochran Matt H; Bent Stephen J; Bowers Edwin J; Hewitt David G; Ortega-Santos Alfonso; Teel Pete D; Duhaime Roberta A; Ugstad Paul O; Messenger Matthew T; Hillman Robert; Almazán Consuelo; Wagner Gale G; Miller Ryan S; Wikel Stephen K

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Babesia are emerging health threats to humans and animals in the United States. A collaborative effort of multiple disciplines to attain optimal health for people, animals and our environment, otherwise known as the One Health concept, was taken during a research workshop held in April 2009 to identify gaps in scientific knowledge regarding babesioses. The impetus for this analysis was the increased risk for outbreaks of bovine babesiosis, also known as Texas cattle fever,...

  6. An Affordable, Low-Risk Approach to Launching Research Spacecraft as Tertiary Payloads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pranajaya, F.M.; Zee, R.E.; Thomsen, Per Lundahl; Blanke, Mogens; Wisniewski, Rafal; Franklin, L.; Puig-Suari, J.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid and affordable access to space for university researchers and educators has always been a challenge. Despite the availability of lower-cost (e.g. Russian) launch vehicles, launching payloads 20 kg or less typically involves a certain minimum cost that necessitates a cost sharing arrangement among numerous parties and the handling of complex export control issues. In turn, this complicates mission scheduling and increases the risk of missing launch deadlines. The University of Toronto Insti...

  7. An Approach for Comparative Research Between Ontology Building & Learning Tools for Information Extraction & Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Suresh Jain C. S. Bhatia Dharmendra Gupta Sumit Jain Bharat Pahadiya

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Information available on the web is huge & it covers diversified fields. Nowadays most of search engines use essentially keyword based search techniques. We simply specify a set of keywords or query as a request and a reference we get a list of pages, ranked based on similarity of query. Currently searching web face with one problem that many times outcome is not satisfactory because of irrelevance of the information. Searching the exact information from such a huge repository of unstructured web data is still main area of research interest. One solution to achieve this is Semantic Web. Ontology is an effective concept commonly used for the Semantic Web. Ontology is “an explicit specification of a conceptualization”. There are two main pillars of semantic Web one is Problem Solving Methods & another is Ontology. Ontology building is a tedious job and a time consuming task for user. The quality of ontology plays an important role in information retrieval application .This paper deals with features & familiarity with different Ontology building & learning tools. After all the preliminary knowledge about all tools & software we have made research about specific features & services provided by some tools & identified the optimum tool in all respect for particularly for our further research project.

  8. Quantitative Risk reduction estimation Tool For Control Systems, Suggested Approach and Research Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Mark Flynn; Sam Alessi

    2006-03-01

    For the past year we have applied a variety of risk assessment technologies to evaluate the risk to critical infrastructure from cyber attacks on control systems. More recently, we identified the need for a stand alone control system risk reduction estimation tool to provide owners and operators of control systems with a more useable, reliable, and credible method for managing the risks from cyber attack. Risk is defined as the probability of a successful attack times the value of the resulting loss, typically measured in lives and dollars. Qualitative and ad hoc techniques for measuring risk do not provide sufficient support for cost benefit analyses associated with cyber security mitigation actions. To address the need for better quantitative risk reduction models we surveyed previous quantitative risk assessment research; evaluated currently available tools; developed new quantitative techniques [17] [18]; implemented a prototype analysis tool to demonstrate how such a tool might be used; used the prototype to test a variety of underlying risk calculational engines (e.g. attack tree, attack graph); and identified technical and research needs. We concluded that significant gaps still exist and difficult research problems remain for quantitatively assessing the risk to control system components and networks, but that a useable quantitative risk reduction estimation tool is not beyond reach.

  9. Approaches of National 3d Mapping: Research Results and Standardisation in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoter, J. E.; Streilein, A.; Pla, M.; Baella, B.; Capstick, D.; Home, R.; Roensdorf, C.; Lagrange, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    Over the past ten years technologies for generating, maintaining and using 3D geo-information have matured. For national mapping agencies one of the challenges is how to best extend 2D data into 3D data, making best use of research results and available technologies. Some mapping organisations are making serious progress. The question addressed in this paper is how research results achieved in the past ten years are applied in practice and what research problems remain. In addition, the paper explores the potentials of the OGC 3D standard (i.e. CityGML) for 3D national mapping and what developments are further required to make the standard better fit for this purpose. The main conclusions of the paper are that 3D data is more and more available but still suffers from a low level of usage (mainly visualisation) and standards and formats based on CityGML have been stabilised although software support is still in the early stage. Several recommendations are made to meet these problems, including the definition of European CityGML profiles (as the INSPIRE Building profile) to harmonise 3D needs and standardise 3D implementations at international level.

  10. Research and development status on fusion DEMO reactor design under the Broader Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobita, Kenji, E-mail: tobita.kenji30@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Rokkasho (Japan); Federici, Gianfranco [Fusion for Energy, Garching (Germany); Okano, Kunihiko [International Fusion Energy Research Centre (IFERC), Rokkasho (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Latest status of the DEMO design activity under the Broader Approach. •Start points of DEMO parameter scoping study. •DEMO divertor study aiming at detached plasma with impurity injection and magnetic flux tube expansion by advanced divertor configurations. •Assessment of possible remote maintenance schemes for DEMO. -- Abstract: The main objective of DEMO design activity under the Broader Approach is to develop pre-conceptual design of DEMO options by addressing key design issues on physics, technology and system engineering. This paper describes the latest results of the design activity, including DEMO parameter study, divertor and remote maintenance. DEMO parameter study has recently started with “pulsed” DEMO having a major radius (R{sub p}) of 9 m, and “steady state” DEMO of R{sub p} = 8.2 m or more. Divertor design study has focused on a computer simulation of fully detached plasma under DEMO divertor conditions and the assessment of advanced divertor configuration such as super-X. Comparative study of various maintenance schemes for DEMO and narrowing down the schemes is in progress.

  11. Research and development of safety approach and safety assessment for the next generation SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary safety assessments have been conducted on the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor during 2005-2010 as a part of the FaCT (Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development) project. The main conclusions and achievements related to safety were that 1) the safety analyses results that the key safety-related parameters satisfy the design limits for the anticipated operational occurrences and design accidents; 2) passive reactor shutdown mechanism [i.e. Self-Actuated Shutdown System] for the prevention of severe accidents and an in-vessel retention concept for reactor core material retention for the mitigation of severe accidents were built-in the JSFR design, 3) the core damage frequency was assessed to be less than 10-5/site-year, and risk target for earthquakes was assessed to meet the design conditions as of 2007. In the light of TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accidents, the next target safety-related R and D will be focused on acquiring safer and more robust SFR system: 1) In-detail Level-1 PRA on loss of heat sink type severe accidents, 2) Unreliability factor evaluations on passive safety mechanism/system, 3) Accident scenario initiated by external events, with due consideration on SFR system pro/con features, 4) Risk-informed approach to extreme external hazards by utilizing hazard curves for clarifying reasonable design margins and 5) Establishment of harmonized safety design approach/criteria based on fundamental SFR characteristics. (author)

  12. How can the functioning and effectiveness of networks in the settings approach of health promotion be understood, achieved and researched?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietscher, Christina

    2013-09-19

    Networks in health promotion (HP) have, after the launch of WHO's Ottawa Charter [(World Health Organization (WHO) (eds). (1986) Ottawa Charter on Health Promotion. Towards A New Public Health. World Health Organization, Geneva], become a widespread tool to disseminate HP especially in conjunction with the settings approach. Despite their allegedly high importance for HP practice and more than two decades of experiences with networking so far, a sound theoretical basis to support effective planning, formation, coordination and strategy development for networks in the settings approach of HP (HPSN) is still widely missing. Brößkamp-Stone's multi-facetted interorganizational network assessment framework (2004) provides a starting point but falls short of specifying the outcomes that can be reasonably expected from the specific network type of HPSN, and the specific processes/strategies and structures that are needed to achieve them. Based on outcome models in HP, on social, managerial and health science theories of networks, settings and organizations, a sociological systems theory approach and the capacity approach in HP, this article points out why existing approaches to studying networks are insufficient for HPSN, what can be understood by their functioning and effectiveness, what preconditions there are for HPSN effectiveness and how an HPSN functioning and effectiveness framework proposed on these grounds can be used for researching networks in practice, drawing on experiences from the 'Project on an Internationally Comparative Evaluation Study of the International Network of Health Promoting Hospitals and Health Services' (PRICES-HPH), which was coordinated by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Health Promotion in Hospitals and Health Services (Vienna WHO-CC) from 2008 to 2012. PMID:24052333

  13. Ecology and biology of paddlefish in North America: historical perspectives, management approaches, and research priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Cecil A.; Zigler, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula, Polyodontidae) are large, mostly-riverine fish that once were abundant in medium- to large-sized river systems throughout much of the central United States. Concern for paddlefish populations has grown from a regional fisheries issue to one of national importance for the United States. In 1989, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) was petitioned to list paddlefish as a federally threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The petition was not granted, primarily because of a lack of empirical data on paddlefish population size, age structure, growth, or harvest rates across the present 22-state range. Nonetheless, concern for paddlefish populations prompted the USFWS to recommend that paddlefish be protected through the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The addition of paddlefish to Appendix II of CITES, which was approved in March 1992, provides a mechanism to curtail illegal trade in paddlefish and their parts and supports a variety of conservation plans. Paddlefish populations have been negatively affected by overharvest, river modifications, and pollution, but the paddlefish still occupies much of its historic range and most extant populations seem to be stable. Although many facets of paddlefish biology and ecology are well understood, the lack of information on larval and juvenile ecology, mechanisms that determine recruitment, population size and vital rates, interjurisdictional movements, and the effects of anthropogenic activities present significant obstacles for managing paddlefish populations. Questions about the size and structure of local populations, and how such populations are affected by navigation traffic, dams, and pollution are regarded as medium priority areas for future research. The availability of suitable spawning habitat and overall reproductive success in impounded rivers are unknown and represent critical areas for future research. Research on reproductive and recruitment success in impounded rivers have significant implications for managing paddlefish, as rivers are modified further for human use.

  14. An Adoption of Semantic Web from the Perspective of Technology Innovation: A Qualitative Research Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo, Jaehun

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available What factors affect the adoption and diffusion of Semantic Web innovation? This paper answers this question using multiple case studies. The case study as a qualitative approach is appropriate to achieve this, because the Semantic Web is at the early introduction stage. Data was gathered from seven out of nine organizations adopting the Semantic Web in Korea. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Three factors affecting adoption of the Semantic Web were identified. The first factor is demand pull including requirements for solving search and integration problems of the existing systems and for creating new services. Second, environmental conduciveness, potential business value, government sponsorship programs, and active roles of suppliers affect the adoption of the Semantic Web from the perspective of technology push. Finally, absorptive capacity is an important role of the adoption. Four propositions are derived from this case study.

  15. Multiplexed Isobaric Tagging Protocols for Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Approaches to Auditory Research

    OpenAIRE

    Vetter, Douglas E.; Basappa, Johnvesly; Turcan, Sevin

    2009-01-01

    Modern biologists have at their disposal a large array of techniques used to assess the existence and relative or absolute quantity of any molecule of interest in a sample. However, implementing most of these procedures can be a daunting task for the first time, even in a lab with experienced researchers. Just choosing a protocol to follow can take weeks while all of the nuances are examined and it is determined whether a protocol will (a) give the desired results, (b) result in interpretable...

  16. A discussion of the evidence based approach in research of the singing voice

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, M

    2006-01-01

    A summary of two Cochrane reviews on voice is presented:The first review focuses on surgical versus non surgical vocal fold nodules.Using the methods of the Cochrane collaboration there is no evidence documenting the effects of surgical removal of vocal nodules. There is a lack of prospective randomized studies with adequate control groups and follow-up.The second review focuses on acid reflux treatment for hoarseness.Even if a few studies were found with the correct research model the critic...

  17. Integration of nuclear spectrometry methods as a new approach to material research. Final report of a coordinated research project 2006-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2006, the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) on 'Unification of Nuclear Spectrometries: Integrated Techniques as a New Tool for Material Research' as one of the elements of a project on 'Improvements in Nuclear Spectrometry Applications'. The major objective was to assist laboratories in Member States in enhancing proper utilization of nuclear analytical methods and to help them develop nuclear instruments for special applications. An overall objective of the CRP was to help Member States to improve characterization of materials by the effective utilization of nuclear spectrometry instruments and techniques as well as by developing integrated/unified instruments and analytical methodologies in support of environmental pollution monitoring, industry, study of cultural heritage, human health, agriculture, etc. These techniques can be used in small laboratories as well as in state of the art synchrotron sources. The specific research objectives of the CRP included development (or upgrading) of integrated multifunctional instruments based on nuclear spectrometries and related techniques as well as development of software for the handling and operation of integrated multifunctional instruments, including data acquisition. The CRP also covered: development (or upgrading) of integrated analytical approaches/methodologies and software for processing and presentation of data collected by multifunctional instruments; extension of the applications of integrated/unified instruments; and synergistic and complementary use of nuclear spectrometries, with the aim of assisting end users of nuclear spectrometries in various fields. The CRP covered a period of four years (2006-2009). Twelve laboratories from both developed and developing Member States and the IAEA's Laboratories participated. The first research coordination meeting (RCM) was held in Vienna, from 16 to 20 April 2007. The participants presented progress reports, reviewed the status of the instrumentation and methodologies available, and agreed on a detailed work plan for the CRP. The second (final) RCM was held in Athens, Greece, from 11 to 15 May 2009. The participants reviewed and summarized the overall research results of the CRP, assessed the impact of the CRP and identified outstanding research related to integration of nuclear spectrometry techniques and analytical methodologies. This publication presents the results of the CRP.

  18. Comparing the percentage of non-overlapping data approach and the hierarchical linear modeling approach for synthesizing single-case studies in autism research

    OpenAIRE

    Heyvaert, Mieke; Saenen, Lore; Maes, Bea; Onghena, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We examined the performance of two approaches for synthesizing single-case experimental data: the percentage of non-overlapping data (PND) approach and the hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) approach. The comparison was performed by analyzing an empirical dataset on behavioral interventions for reducing challenging behavior in persons with autism by means of the two approaches. We compared the findings of both approaches for analyzing the outcomes of the behavioral interventions as well as fo...

  19. Stress management interventions for HIV-infected individuals: review of recent intervention approaches and directions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown JL

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer L Brown1,2, Peter A Vanable3 1Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, 2Center for AIDS Research, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Department of Psychology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA Abstract: To promote psychological wellbeing and adaptive coping among people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (PLWHA, a number of stress management interventions have been designed and evaluated. This paper reviews recent stress management intervention approaches designed to improve the coping skills of PLWHA and reduce psychological distress. First, a summary of findings from previous narrative reviews and meta-analyses of the stress management intervention literature for PLWHA is provided. Next, recent stress management interventions for PLWHA that fall into one of four categories are reviewed: (a interventions to improve coping and modify other health behaviors (ie, highly active antiretroviral medication adherence, sexual behaviors, (b meditation, mindfulness, and relaxation-based stress management approaches, (c computer-delivered interventions, and (d interventions that target specific populations including older individuals, individuals with childhood sexual abuse histories, and women. A critique of recent stress management interventions for PLWHA is provided as well as directions for future research. Keywords: stress management intervention, stress, coping, cognitive behavioral stress management, review, HIV, HIV-positive, HIV-infected, AIDS

  20. USO DEL ENFOQUE POR PROCESOS EN LA ACTIVIDAD INVESTIGATIVA / USE OF THE APPROACH BY PROCESSES IN THE RESEARCH ACTIVITY

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jorge Iván, Pérez Rave; Jairo Antonio, Ruiz Córdoba; Carlos Mario, Parra Mesa.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La realización de una investigación no sólo comprende actividades propias del campo de conocimiento de donde proviene la idea, sino también labores de gestión que permitan llevar a cabo de manera efectiva todas las etapas investigativas. Estas labores, en la mayoría de los casos subvaloradas en el c [...] ampo investigativo, pero bien apreciadas en el contexto empresarial, son determinantes en el éxito de un proyecto de investigación. El enfoque por procesos constituye una de las principales bases de las prácticas de gestión que caracterizan a exitosas organizaciones empresariales y, en esta oportunidad, se exhibe la experiencia de aplicarlo al trabajo de campo de la investigación realizada por un grupo de la Universidad de Antioquia (Colombia). Este artículo pretende motivar y potenciar el desarrollo y/o la adaptación de modelos y técnicas de gestión en el ámbito investigativo, que propicien un desarrollo más eficaz y eficiente de las labores de investigación. En esta experiencia se define la misión del trabajo de campo, se identifican los procesos clave, se describe y se documenta cada uno de ellos y se realiza sensibilización y capacitación del equipo investigador en tales temas. Abstract in english Research requires management tasks that allow effective execution of all the research stages. In most cases, these activities, which are decisive for the success of the project, are undervalued in the research context, but well appreciated in the enterprise context. The approach by processes is one [...] of the main foundations of successful enterprise management practices. In this opportunity, the use of the aforementioned approach in the fieldwork stage of the research performed by a group of the Universidad de Antioquia (Colombia) is shown. This article intends to motivate and promote the development and/or adaptation of management models and tools, which will lead to a better development of the research. The mission of the fieldwork stage is defined, and the key processes are identified, described, and documented. Additionally, the research team is brought into awareness and trained in these topics.