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Symptoms of depression as reported by Norwegian adolescents on the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire  

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The present study investigated sex-differences in reports of depressive symptoms on a Norwegian translation of the short version of the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ). The sample comprised 9702 Norwegian adolescents (born 1993–1995, 54.9% girls), mainly attending highschool. A set of statistical analyses were run to investigate the dimensionality of the SMFQ. Girls scored significantly higher than boys on the SMFQ and used the most severe response-category far more frequently. Overall, the statistical analyses supported the essential unidimensionality of SMFQ. However, the items with the highest loadings according to the bifactor analysis, reflecting problems related to tiredness, restlessness and concentration difficulties, indicated that some of the symptoms may both be independent of and part of the symptomatology of depression. Measurement invariance analysis showed that girls scored slightly higher on some items when taking the latent variable into account; girls had a lower threshold for reporting mood problems and problems related to tiredness than boys, who showed a marginally lower threshold for reporting that no-one loved them. However, the effect on the total SMFQ score was marginal, supporting the use of the Norwegian translation of SMFQ as a continuous variable in further studies of adolescents.

Lundervold, Astri J.; Breivik, Kyrre; Posserud, Maj-Britt; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Hysing, Mari

2013-01-01

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Symptoms of depression as reported by Norwegian adolescents on the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire.  

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Full Text Available The present study investigated sex-differences in reports of depressive symptoms on a Norwegian translation of the short version of the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ. The sample comprised 9702 Norwegian adolescents (born 1993 to 1995, 54.9\\% girls, mainly attending highschool. A set of statistical analyses were run to investigate the dimensionality of the SMFQ. Girls scored significantly higher than boys on the SMFQ and used the most severe response-category far more frequently. Overall, the statistical analyses supported the essential unidimensionality of SMFQ. However, the items with the highest loadings according to the bifactor analysis, reflecting problems related to tiredness, restlessness and concentration difficulties, indicated that some of the symptoms may both be independent of and part of the symptomatology of depression. Measurement invariance analysis showed that girls scored slightly higher on some items when taking the latent variable into account; girls had a lower threshold for reporting mood problems and problems related to tiredness than boys, who showed a marginally lower threshold for reporting that no-one loved them. However, the effect on the total SMFQ score was marginal, supporting the use of the Norwegian translation of SMFQ as a continuous variable in further studies of adolescents.

AstriJohansenLundervold

2013-09-01

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Mood Induction in Depressive Patients: A Comparative Multidimensional Approach  

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Anhedonia, reduced positive affect and enhanced negative affect are integral characteristics of major depressive disorder (MDD). Emotion dysregulation, e.g. in terms of different emotion processing deficits, has consistently been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate mood changes in depressive patients using a multidimensional approach for the measurement of emotional reactivity to mood induction procedures. Experimentally, mood states can be altered using various mood ind...

2012-01-01

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Depressed Mood and Maternal Report of Child Behavior Problems: Another Look at the Depression-Distortion Hypothesis  

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Caregiver depression has been described as leading to overreport of child behavior problems. This study examines this "depression-distortion" hypothesis in terms of high-risk families of young adolescents. Questionnaire data were collected from mothers, teachers, and fathers, and self-report information was obtained from youth between ages 10 and…

Gartstein, Maria A.; Bridgett, David J.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Kaufman, Noah K.

2009-01-01

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Depressed Mood and Maternal Report of Child Behavior Problems: Another Look at the Depression–Distortion Hypothesis  

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Caregiver depression has been described as leading to overreport of child behavior problems. This study examines this “depression–distortion” hypothesis in terms of high-risk families of young adolescents. Questionnaire and diagnostic interview data were collected from mothers, teachers, and fathers, and self-report information was obtained from youth between ages 10 and 14 years. First, convergent and discriminant validity were demonstrated for internalizing and externalizing multiagen...

2009-01-01

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Vascular pacemakers of mood in manic depressive psychosis.  

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A daily longitudinal study enduring for more than two years was made of an ambulance patient whose mood changed predictably every 35 days from a profound retarded depression through euthymia up to hypomania and back to depression. The patient employed a self-reporting bipolar mood scale for this study. Weekly hour-long recordings of aspects of her vascular system were made of her electrocardiography, arterial pressures and electrical impedance plethysmography. Correlations were sought between mood scores and these physiological changes. Time series analysis of her auto-cross-correlograms indicated that the vascular elements preceded the mood change in a predictable sequence. Heart rate and percent rise time had the shortest cycles and were the earliest indices of change; amplitude and inflow angle, the next; while arterial pressures were the slowest. The genesis of mood change as an impedance function of the relationship of neurotransmitter to cerebral microvasculature is discussed. PMID:7448692

Lovett Doust, J W; Christie, H E

1980-12-01

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Depressed mood in the working population: associations with work schedules and working hours.  

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The impact of working time arrangements (WTA) on health has been studied extensively. Still, little is known about the interrelation between work schedules, working hours, and depressed mood. For work schedules, the underlying assumptions regarding depressed mood refer to a disturbance of social and biological rhythms, whereas for working hours, the assumptions relate to workload and work capacity. Conversely, depressed mood may urge an employee to adjust his/her work schedule and/or number of working hours/week (h/wk). The aim of this study was to assess the association between work schedule and working hours with depressed mood. Using baseline data from the Maastricht Cohort Study, depressed mood in day work was compared with depressed mood in different shiftwork schedules (n = 8843). Within day work, several categories of working h/wk were studied in association with depressed mood (n = 7217). The association between depressed mood and several aspects of overtime was assessed separately. Depressed mood was measured with a dichotomous item: "Did you feel down every day over the last two weeks?" Separate logistic regression analyses were conducted for men and women, with adjustments for potential confounders. The odds ratio (OR) for depressed mood was greater for men involved in shiftwork than for men only involved in day work (three-shift OR = 2.05 [95% confidence interval, CI 1.52-2.77]; five-shift OR = 1.34 [95% CI 1.00-1.80]; irregular-shift OR = 1.79 [95% CI 1.27-2.53]). In female employees, five-shift work was associated with a higher prevalence of depressed mood (OR = 5.96 [95% CI 2.83-12.56]). Regarding the number of working h/wk, men working <26 h/wk had a higher prevalence of depressed mood than men working 36-40 h/wk (OR = 2.73 [95% CI 1.35-5.52]). After conducting trend analyses, a significant decreasing trend was found in men, whereas an increasing trend was found in women working a high number of hours. Furthermore, a dose-response relationship was present in men regarding the number of overtime h/wk. This study showed that different work schedules and working hours are associated with depressed mood. Shiftwork was related to a higher prevalence of depressed mood than day work. The association was more pronounced for male employees. Regarding the number of working h/wk, male and female employees showed an opposite trend in depressed mood. Because of the possibility of a healthy worker effect and the possibility of a reciprocal relationship between WTA and depressed mood, the reported relation might be underestimated. This study has illustrated that occupational physicians, who deal with depressed mood among workers, should carefully consider the impact of WTA. PMID:20636216

Driesen, Karolien; Jansen, Nicole W H; Kant, Ijmert; Mohren, Danielle C L; van Amelsvoort, Ludovic G P M

2010-07-01

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Temporal Patterns of Anxious and Depressed Mood in Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Daily Diary Study  

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Research suggests that anxiety disorders tend to temporally precede depressive disorders, a finding potentially relevant to understanding comorbidity. The current study used diary methods to determine whether daily anxious mood also temporally precedes daily depressed mood. 55 participants with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and history of depressive symptoms completed a 21-day daily diary tracking anxious and depressed mood. Daily anxious and depressed moods were concurrently associated....

2012-01-01

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Mood and Global Symptom Changes among Psychotherapy Clients with Depressive Personality  

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The present study assessed the rate of depressive personality (DP), as measured by the self-report instrument depressive personality disorder inventory (DPDI), among 159 clients entering psychotherapy at an outpatient university clinic. The presenting clinical profile was evaluated for those with and without DP, including levels of depressed mood, other psychological symptoms, and global severity of psychopathology. Clients were followed naturalistically over the course of therapy, up to 40 w...

Maddux, Rachel E.; Lundh, Lars-gunnar

2012-01-01

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In the shadow of maternal depressed mood: experiences of parenthood during the first year after childbirth.  

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To study the period and point prevalence of maternal depressive mood at three occasions before and after childbirth, and the relationship to the parents' psychosocial conditions and experiences of parenthood during the first year after childbirth. In a longitudinal community-based study, 434 pregnant women were invited to complete the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) (cut-off score 9/10) at three time points. The parents' psychosocial conditions and experiences of parenthood were enquired at two months and at one year after childbirth, when the form Experience of Motherhood/Fatherhood Questionnaire (EMQ/EFQ) was applied. Three times measurement responses from both men and women were analyzed using non-parametric statistical methods and path-analysis. About 75% of the parents responded to the questionnaires. The period prevalence was 28%, and the point prevalence found on the three time points was EPDS I 21%, EPDS II 17% and EPDS III 12%. Correlations between antenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms were found, r = 0.61 and r = 0.45, respectively. Women, who experienced financial worries, lack of social support and losses and strains after childbirth showed more symptoms of depressed mood. The maternal depressive mood influenced negatively on breastfeeding and experiences of motherhood, but not on experiences of fatherhood. The partners of depressed women were neither more involved in childcare nor did they utilize paternal leave more than the other men. Both men and women reported the sexual life as negatively influenced by the women's depressed mood. PMID:15376402

Seimyr, L; Edhborg, M; Lundh, W; Sjögren, B

2004-03-01

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Does outdoor work during the winter season protect against depression and mood difficulties?  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

OBJECTIVE: At temperate latitudes, 1-5% of the population suffer from winter depression; during winter, mood difficulties tend to increase but may be alleviated by bright light therapy. Unlike indoor workers, outdoor workers are exposed to therapeutic levels of sunlight during winter. We hypothesized that outdoor work may protect against mood difficulties and depression. METHOD: We studied this hypothesis among 2910 civil servants from Ã?rhus, Denmark, who participated in a survey in January-February 2009. Mental symptoms (N=422) defined a common case category that we broke down into two parts: depression (N=66) and mood difficulties but no depression (N=356). A total of 222 controls were also sampled from the study population. All 644 participants reported the extent of outdoor work. RESULTS: The confounder-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mood difficulties showed a decreasing trend by increasing hours of outdoor work of borderline statistical significance. The OR was 0.63 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.34-1.18)] for those working outdoors for >2 hours a day. No such effect was suggested for depression. CONCLUSION: Our study is limited by its cross-sectional design and low statistical power but nevertheless suggests that outdoor work during winter may protect against mood difficulties. If this finding holds true it may have significant impact on workers' health as well as public health in general. Therefore, further studies are recommended.

Hahn, Ina H; Grynderup, Matias B

2011-01-01

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Sad Kids, Sad Media? Applying Mood Management Theory to Depressed Adolescents’ Use of Media  

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Mood management studies typically have found that adults will select media that enhance positive moods and reduce negative moods. In this study, adolescents diagnosed with major depressive disorder and control adolescents without psychiatric disorders were called on customized cell phones up to 4 times a day and asked about their current mood state and media use for five extended weekends across an 8-week period. Mood effects on subsequent media use, mood during media consumption, and media e...

Carpentier, Francesca R. Dillman; Brown, Jane D.; Bertocci, Michele; Silk, Jennifer S.; Forbes, Erika E.; Dahl, Ronald E.

2008-01-01

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Summer mood in winter depressives: validation of a structured interview.  

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Two structured interviews, the Hypomania Interview Guide (Including Hyperthymia), for Seasonal Affective Disorder (HIGH-SAD) and its successor, the Hypomania Interview Guide (Including Hyperthymia), Retrospective Assessment Version (HIGH-R), were validated for the assessment of nondepressed spring/summer mood states in patients with DSM-III-R or DSM-IV diagnoses of Recurrent Bipolar disorder (I, II or NOS) or Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder (MDD; unipolar), both with Seasonal Pattern, and in normal control subjects (HIGH-SAD only). The instruments retrospectively rate the frequency and severity of DSM diagnostic criterion features as well as several non-DSM features. Both instruments had high internal consistency. Normal controls had lower total scores than unipolar patients, who had lower scores than bipolar patients. Total score classified 85-91% of patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) into the correct unipolar or bipolar group. For boundary mood cases, small subsets of features provided better classification accuracy. Based on total score, MDD patients were divided into three subgroups: euthymes (normal mood), hyperthymes (slightly elevated mood), and high-hyperthymes (scores overlapping with hypomania). With the exception of sharpened thinking, DSM items dominated patient classifications. Distinct clusters of "positive" (pleasant, agreeable) or "negative" (impairing) features described the mood states. The HIGH-R and HIGH-SAD are useful for discriminating and classifying hypomania and mania in bipolar patients, and euthymia and hyperthymia in unipolar patients. PMID:10207664

Goel, N; Terman, M; Terman, J S; Williams, J B

1999-01-01

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The effects of cognitive-behavioural therapy on mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background A mood-related ruminative response style increases the risk of onset and persistence of depression. This preliminary study investigated whether, in depressed adolescents, cognitive-behaviour therapy reduces mood-related ruminative response style. Whether specific factors within the rumination scale were differentially affected by CBT is also reported. Methods 26 depressed adolescents were randomised to receiving serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRI plus psychosocial treatment as usual or SSRI and psychosocial treatment as usual plus CBT. Ruminative response style and depressive symptoms were measured at baseline and after 30 weeks of treatment, with the Responses to Depression Questionnaire and Mood and Feelings Questionnaire. Results There were significantly greater reductions in ruminations in the CBT group compared to the non-CBT group (p = .002. There was no significant difference in the reduction in self-reported depressive symptoms between the groups. Rumination was reduced to levels of never-depressed controls in adolescents who had recovered from depression and received CBT. There were greater falls in the CBT group in the more pathological 'brooding' factor of rumination. Conclusion These findings suggest that adding CBT to SSRI medication in the presence of active clinical care causes a greater reduction in mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents. This may reduce the risk of future relapse. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCNT83809224.

Goodyer Ian M

2008-01-01

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Dimensions of self-rated mood in depressed, manic, and normal subjects.  

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Self-rated scales allow the comparison of subjective mood across the spectrum of manic, depressive, and euthymic states. This study examined the self-reported mood of manic, depressed, and normal subjects using a 23-item research instrument based on the Carroll-Klein model of bipolar disorder. The Multiple Visual Analog Scale (MVAS) measures the following dimensions: consummatory reward (seven items), incentive reward (two items), psychomotor speed (seven items), and central pain (seven items). The MVAS was completed by 31 manic inpatients, 43 depressed inpatients, and 29 normal volunteer subjects. Total scores, average item scores, and total dimension scores were obtained. Subjects also completed a global mood VAS and the Carroll Depression Scale (CDS). Groups were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Bonferroni-Dunn methods. In a separate post hoc analysis, the group of manic patients was divided at the median CDS score into "pure" and "dysphoric" manic subgroups. We found excellent congruence of average 23-item total MVAS scores with global VAS and CDS scores. Dimension scores on the MVAS conformed to the predictions of the Carroll-Klein model. Depressed patients differed significantly from both manic and normal subjects on each dimension. MVAS dimension scores of normal subjects did not differ significantly from those of manic patients. On the dimension of central pain, normal subjects had significantly less inhibited scores than the "pure" subgroup of manics. The results confirmed that the dimensions of the Carroll-Klein model are bipolar and orthogonal. By the MVAS technique, the self-reported mood of normal subjects is similar to the self-reported mood of manic patients on all dimensions of the Carroll-Klein model of bipolar disorder. The positive scores of both groups are clearly distinguished from the negative scores of depressed patients. Average MVAS scores of normal subjects approximated the conventional zero score only on the dimension of central pain. Normal subjects exhibit megalothymic (hyperthymia) on most dimensions of subjective mood. The negative MVAS scores of depressed patients are even more deviant from normal than the conventional scoring system would suggest. PMID:11349237

Ahearn, E P; Cassidy, F; Kelley, L; Weisler, R H; Carroll, B J

2001-01-01

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Pick-a-mood; development and application of a pictorial mood-reporting instrument:  

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This paper presents ‘Pick-A-Mood’ (PAM), a cartoon-based pictorial instrument for reporting and expressing moods. The use of cartoon characters enables people to unambiguously and visually express or report their mood in a rich and easy-to-use way. PAM consists of three characters that each express eight different mood states, representing four main mood categories: energized-pleasant (excited and cheerful), energized-unpleasant (irritated and tense), calm-pleasant (relaxed and calm), and...

Desmet, P. M. A.; Vastenburg, M. H.; Bel, D.; Romero Herrera, N. A.

2012-01-01

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Clinical Comparison Between Adjustment Disorder with Depressive Mood and Major Depressive Disorder  

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Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare patients with major depressive disorder (MDD following a life event to those suffering from adjustment disorder (AD with depressed mood in terms of clinical features, nature of precipitating stress factors, and functioning. Met­hods: In this study, we included 32 individuals diagnosed as AD with depressed mood, 22 individuals diagnosed as MDD following a life event, and a control group of 30 individuals without any psychological or physical illness. The participants completed the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS, Hamilton Depression Scale (HDS, Rahe-Holmes Social Readjustment Rating Scale, Life Experiences Survey (LES, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF Scale and the Social Functioning Scale (SFS. Both patient groups have been evaluated prospectively for six months. The data were analyzed using Spearman’s rank correlation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance, chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests.Re­sults: The symptom profile of patients diagnosed as having AD with depressed mood was found to be similar to that of subjects with MDD. However, the patients suffering from AD with depressed mood had higher scores on HAS and HDS as compared to the individuals with MDD and, the functioning levels were lower in the MDD group than in the AD group. The severity of life event was related to the severity of psychopathology in the AD group, but this was not the case for the MD group. Conc­lu­si?on: Clinically, AD is quite similar to MDD. AD, a disorder related to life event, is less severe disorder than MDD in terms of symptom profile. At the same time, AD patients demonstrate higher level of functioning than MDD patients. The relationship between MDD and AD should be investigated with larger sample size and long prospective studies. (Arc­hi­ves of Neu­ropsy­chi­atry 2012; 49: 20-8

Gülcan Güleç

2012-03-01

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Impact of Nicotine Replacement Therapy on Post-Cessation Mood Profile by Pre-Cessation Depressive Symptoms  

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Full Text Available Abstract We evaluated the effects of Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT on the Profile of Mood States (POMS, testing whether pre-cessation depressive symptoms modify NRT's effects on POMS. Out of 608 smokers attempting to quit with NRT, this secondary analysis included 242 participants abstinent for at least two weeks. We measured pre-cessation depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. At 1, 7, and 14 post-cessation days we examined 6 self-reported POMS, i.e. feeling 'anxious', 'sad', 'confused', 'angry', 'energetic' and 'fatigue'. The results of the ANCOVA models suggested no NRT effects on feeling anxious, energetic or fatigue. We found that pre-cessation depression modified NRT effects in some specific mood states, such as depression by NRT- interaction effects on feeling confused and feeling angry. On average, the depressed participants in the placebo groups had the highest symptom scores. However, those depressed in NRT conditions did not have significantly higher symptom scores compared to the non-depressed groups. In treating those negative moods NRT may be particularly important for persons with depressive symptoms before cessation.

Kinnunen Taru H

2006-08-01

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Overt head movements moderate the effect of depressive symptoms on mood regulation.  

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A dysfunction in the regulation of negative mood states is one of the core symptoms of depression. Research has found that levels of depression are associated with the intensity of the mood-regulation deficit. The present study aimed to explore the role the body plays in mood-regulation processes. More specifically, we studied whether head movements can influence mood persistence in dysphoric states. Subsequent to a sad-mood induction, participants were presented with a set of positive pictures immediately after performing either vertical (i.e., nodding) or lateral (i.e., shaking) head movements. We considered changes in mood from before to after the experimental task as an index of the effectiveness of mood regulation. As expected, the results showed that higher initial levels of depressive symptoms were associated with greater persistence of sad mood. More importantly, this association was present in participants who shook their heads, but not in those who nodded. These results show that body movements can contribute to mood-regulation processes, thus expanding our knowledge of the psychopathology of mood disorders. PMID:24499062

Rahona, Juan J; Ruiz Fernández, Susana; Rolke, Bettina; Vázquez, Carmelo; Hervás, Gonzalo

2014-11-01

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Autobiographical Memory in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The role of Depressed Mood, Rumination, Working Memory and Theory of Mind  

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Autobiographical memory difficulties have been widely reported in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of the current study was to explore the potential correlates of autobiographical memory performance (including depressed mood, rumination, working memory and theory of mind) in adults with ASD, relative to a group of typical adults…

Crane, Laura; Goddard, Lorna; Pring, Linda

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
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Decisional balance of condom use and depressed mood among incarcerated male adolescents.  

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Full Text Available The association between depressed mood and condom use was examined among incarcerated male adolescents. One hundred and eighty male adolescents who were detained in Birmingham, Alabama in the United States were interviewed during a period of incarceration. Contrary to patterns generally found in adult samples, nearly 50% of this adolescent sample that did not use condoms regularly actually recognized the advantages of condom use. This behavior pattern was deemed "inconsistent," and those engaging in this "inconsistent" behavior pattern were found to have a higher score of depressed mood compared to participants with a "consistent" behavior pattern. As a result, a relationship between depressed mood and decisional balance for condom use within adolescents was evident. These findings suggest that assessment and treatment of depressed mood within this high-risk population could potentially contribute to a reduction in high-risk sexual behaviors.

Nagamune N

2002-12-01

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Mood Symptoms, Cognition, and Everyday Functioning: in Major Depression, Bipolar Disorder, and Schizophrenia  

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People with depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia manifest considerable cognitive deficits and impairments in everyday functional outcomes. The severity of current mood symptoms is associated with the severity of cognitive deficits in people with unipolar and bipolar disorder, but impairments are clearly still present in cases with minimal current mood symptoms. In people with schizophrenia, depression is less strongly associated with cognitive deficits on a cross-sectional basis, a...

Harvey, Philip D.

2011-01-01

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Sensorimotor modulation of mood and depression: In search of an optimal mode of stimulation  

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Full Text Available Depression involves a dysfunction in an affective fronto-limbic circuitry including the prefrontal cortices, several limbic structures including the cingulate cortex, the amygdala and the hippocampus as well as the basal ganglia. A major emphasis of research on the etiology and treatment of mood disorders has been to assess the impact of centrally generated (top-down processes impacting the affective fronto-limbic circuitry. The present review shows that peripheral (bottom-up unipolar stimulation via the visual and the auditory modalities as well as by physical exercise modulates mood and depressive symptoms in humans and animals and activates the same central affective neurocircuitry involved in depression. It is proposed that the amygdala serves as a gateway by articulating the mood regulatory sensorimotor stimulation with the central affective circuitry by emotionally labeling and mediating the storage of such emotional events in long-term memory. Since both amelioration and aggravation of mood is shown to be possible by unipolar stimulation, the review suggests that a psychophysical assessment of mood modulation by multi-modal stimulation may uncover mood ameliorative synergisms and serve as adjunctive treatment for depression. Thus, the integrative review not only emphasizes the relevance of investigating the optimal levels of mood regulatory sensorimotor stimulation, but also provides a conceptual springboard for related future research.

RESITCANBEYLI

2013-07-01

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Impact of Nicotine Replacement Therapy on Post-Cessation Mood Profile by Pre-Cessation Depressive Symptoms  

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We evaluated the effects of Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) on the Profile of Mood States (POMS), testing whether pre-cessation depressive symptoms modify NRT's effects on POMS. Out of 608 smokers attempting to quit with NRT, this secondary analysis included 242 participants abstinent for at least two weeks. We measured pre-cessation depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. At 1, 7, and 14 post-cessation days we examined 6 self-reported POMS, i.e. f...

Korhonen, Tellervo; Kinnunen, Taru H.; Garvey, Arthur J.

2006-01-01

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Patterns of symptomatic change in depressed patients in a private inpatient mood disorders program.  

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This naturalistic study of 352 depressed patients admitted to a mood disorders program in a private psychiatric hospital demonstrated that, for the majority of patients, combining cognitive group therapy with ongoing supportive individual, psychoeducational, milieu, and pharmacological interventions resulted in rapid overall improvement and discharge within a few weeks. Improvement was manifested across cognitive and vegetative factor scores of the Beck Depression Inventory. However, patterns of symptom remission differed for subgroups defined by different lengths of stay. For example, patients hospitalized for 4 weeks showed good initial response, followed by a plateau in improvement, and, finally, continued response. These patients eventually reached the same level of functioning at discharge as did more rapidly responding patients with briefer stays. In contrast, a subset of patients (10% of the sample) hospitalized 5 weeks or more showed less overall improvement (especially in vegetative symptoms), plateauing at a moderately symptomatic level. These data suggest that in a minority of depressed individuals, continuing physiological disturbances may underlie dysthymia or residual depression. However, in contrast to the high rates (20-30%) of chronicity reported from tertiary care settings, these data indicate the relatively good initial treatment response of depressed patients admitted to a private psychiatric hospital. PMID:8535385

Neimeyer, R A; Baker, K D; Haykal, R F; Akiskal, H S

1995-01-01

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Links between Antisocial Behavior and Depressed Mood: The Role of Life Events and Attributional Style  

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Comorbidity between antisocial behavior and depression in adolescence is widely recognized. This paper examines whether links with depressed mood differ among three subtypes of antisocial behavior: oppositionality, physical aggression and delinquency. In addition we examine two possible contributors to these links: negative life events that are…

Rowe, Richard; Maughan, Barbara; Eley, Thalia C.

2006-01-01

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Longitudinal characterization of depression and mood states beginning in primary HIV infection.  

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Though depression is known to frequently afflict those with chronic HIV, mood during the early course of HIV is not well characterized. In a prospective study we assessed mood during primary HIV infection [primary HIV infection (PHI), <1 year duration], its association with neuropsychological performance and markers of neurological disease, and its longitudinal course including effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Profile of Mood States (POMS) subscales were longitudinally administered prior to and after ART in PHI subjects. This evaluation of mood was done concurrently with blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuropsychological [total z and global deficit score (GDS)] evaluation at each visit. Analysis employed Spearman's rho, logistic regression, and linear mixed models. 47.7 % of the 65 men recruited at a median 3.5 months HIV duration met BDI criteria for clinical depression at baseline, classified as 'mild' (n = 11), 'moderate' (n = 11), or 'severe' (n = 9). Drug, alcohol, and depression history did not associate with BDI score. Proportional somatic-performance scores were worse than cognitive-affective scores (p = .0045). Vigor subscore of POMS was reduced compared to norms and correlated with total z (r = 0.33, p = 0.013) and GDS (r = -0.32, p = 0.016). BDI and POMS correlated with one another (r = 0.85, p < .0001), but not with CSF or plasma HIV RNA, WBC, albumin ratio or neopterin. Improvement was not observed in BDI and POMS over 330 total follow-up visits, even after initiation of ART. Depression was prevalent during PHI in our subjects, associated with abnormal somatic-performance and vigor scores. Neither neuropsychological performance nor disease biomarkers correlated with depressed mood. Mood indices did not improve over time in the presence of ART. PMID:24385231

Gold, Jessica A; Grill, Marie; Peterson, Julia; Pilcher, Christopher; Lee, Evelyn; Hecht, Frederick M; Fuchs, Dietmar; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Price, Richard W; Robertson, Kevin; Spudich, Serena

2014-06-01

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A prospective study of mental health care for comorbid depressed mood in older adults with painful osteoarthritis  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Comorbid depression is common among adults with painful osteoarthritis (OA. We evaluated the relationship between depressed mood and receipt of mental health (MH care services. Methods In a cohort with OA, annual interviews assessed comorbidity, arthritis severity, and MH (SF-36 mental health score. Surveys were linked to administrative health databases to identify mental health-related visits to physicians in the two years following the baseline interview (1996-98. Prescriptions for anti-depressants were ascertained for participants aged 65+ years (eligible for drug benefits. The relationship between MH scores and MH-related physician visits was assessed using zero-inflated negative binomial regression, adjusting for confounders. For those aged 65+ years, logistic regression examined the probability of receiving any MH-related care (physician visit or anti-depressant prescription. Results Analyses were based on 2,005 (90.1% individuals (mean age 70.8 years. Of 576 (28.7% with probable depression (MH score any MH care. The likelihood of receiving any MH care exhibited a significant interaction between MH score and self-reported health status (p = 0.0009; with good general health, worsening MH was associated with increased likelihood of MH care; as general health declined, this effect was attenuated. Conclusions Among older adults with painful OA, more than one-quarter had depressed mood, but almost half received no mental health care, suggesting a care gap.

Croxford Ruth

2011-09-01

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A Daily Diary Study of Co-Rumination, Stressful Life Events, and Depressed Mood in Late Adolescents  

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The purpose of this study was to extend the research on co-rumination and depressed mood by examining the impact of co-rumination on depressed mood on a daily basis while controlling for the effects of daily stress events in a sample of late adolescents. Two-hundred and seventy-nine predominantly Caucasian college students (95 male, 184 female)…

White, Megan E.; Shih, Josephine H.

2012-01-01

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Mood, depression, and reproductive hormones in the menopausal transition.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article focuses on a review of evidence related to the following 3 questions: (1) Does depression appear during the menopausal transition? (2) What factors influence the risk for depression during the menopausal transition? (3) Do age-related alterations in ovarian hormone secretion contribute to the development of depression in some middle-aged women? A brief background is provided on the importance of depressive disorders. Methodologic issues that have compromised previous studies investigating the possible relation between the menopausal transition and depression are discussed. Evidence is presented that suggests a relation between the perimenopause (the interval between the early menopausal transition and 1 year after the last menses), but not the postmenopause, and the onset of depressive illness. Finally, studies are reviewed that suggest an association between alterations in ovarian function and depression, including several randomized placebo-controlled trials examining the antidepressant efficacy of estradiol in depressed perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. PMID:16414327

Schmidt, Peter J

2005-12-19

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Internet-Based Recruitment to a Depression Prevention Intervention: Lessons From the Mood Memos Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Recruiting participants to randomized controlled trials of health interventions can be very difficult. Internet-based recruitment is becoming an increasingly important mode of recruitment, yet there are few detailed accounts of experiences recruiting participants to mental health interventions. Objective To report on our experience with Internet-based recruitment to an online depression prevention intervention and pass on lessons we learned. Methods Participants were recruited to the Mood Memos study, an online preventive depression intervention, purely through Internet-based sources. The study was targeted to adults with subthreshold depression symptoms from several English-speaking countries. A variety of online recruitment sources were trialed, including search engine advertising (Google, Yahoo!, Bing), Facebook advertising, posts in forums and online noticeboards, and promotion through relevant websites and email newsletters of mental health organizations. Results The study website received visits from 94,808 individuals over the 14-month recruitment period. The recruitment target was reached with 1699 individuals signing up to the randomized controlled trial and 1326 fully enrolling. Most visitors arrived via Google advertising, which promoted a depression-screening questionnaire. Google advertising accounted for nearly half of the total participants who signed up to the study, at an average cost of AUD $12 per participant. Promoting the study through trustworthy organizations and websites known to participants was also effective. Recruitment techniques that were less effective were contacting forums, email groups, and community noticeboards. Conclusions Several techniques, including Google advertising, were successful in recruiting participants to a trial evaluating an online depression intervention. Results suggest that Internet-based recruitment to mental health interventions is feasible and can be relatively affordable. Trial Registration ACTRN12609000925246

Jorm, Anthony Francis; Mackinnon, Andrew James

2013-01-01

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Measurement Equivalence Across Racial/Ethnic Groups of the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire for Childhood Depression  

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As research continues to document differences in the prevalence of mental health problems such as depression across racial/ethnic groups, the issue of measurement equivalence becomes increasingly important to address. The Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) is a widely used screening tool for child and adolescent depression. This study applied a differential item functioning (DIF) framework to data from a sample of 6th and 8th grade students in the Seattle Public School District (N=3,593) t...

2012-01-01

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Dejian Mind-Body Intervention on Depressive Mood of Community-Dwelling Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

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The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a short-term mind-body intervention program on improving the depressive mood of an adult community sample. Forty adult volunteers with various degrees of depressive mood were randomly assigned to the experimental group (Dejian Mind-Body Intervention, DMBI) and control group (Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, CBT). For each group, a total of four 90-min weekly sessions were conducted. Treatment-related changes were measured using the Beck Depression...

Chan, Agnes S.; Mei-chun Cheung; Tsui, Wilson J.; Sze, Sophia L.; Dejian Shi

2011-01-01

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Adolescent self-control predicts joint trajectories of marijuana use and depressive mood into young adulthood among urban African Americans and Puerto Ricans.  

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Previous studies have identified an association between depressive mood and marijuana use. We examined adolescent self-control as a predictor of membership in joint developmental trajectories of depressive mood and marijuana use from adolescence to young adulthood. Urban African Americans and Puerto Ricans (N = 838) were sampled when participants were on average 14, 19, 24, and 29 years old. Using growth mixture modeling, four joint trajectory groups of depressive mood and marijuana use were established: low marijuana use/low depressive mood, low marijuana use/intermediate depressive mood, high marijuana use/low depressive mood, and high marijuana use/high depressive mood. Weighted logistic regression analysis showed that self-control at age 14 distinguished the high marijuana use/high depressive mood group and the low marijuana use/low depressive mood group from each of the other groups. Findings show that the co-occurrence of high levels of marijuana use and depressive mood from adolescence into young adulthood is predicted by low levels of self-control in adolescence. On the other hand, high selfcontrol is associated with low marijuana use and low levels of depression over time. Thus, while deficits in self-control in adolescence constitute a significant risk for maladjustment over time, high self-control exerts a protective factor with regard to marijuana use and depressive mood into young adulthood. PMID:23670644

Pahl, Kerstin; Brook, Judith S; Lee, Jung Yeon

2014-08-01

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Changes in allergy symptoms and depression scores are positively correlated in patients with recurrent mood disorders exposed to seasonal peaks in aeroallergens.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although growing evidence supports an association between allergy, allergens and depression, it remains unknown if this relationship is between "states" (possible triggers) or "traits" (possible vulnerabilities). We hypothesized that patients with recurrent mood disorders who are sensitized to tree pollen (as determined by allergen specific IgE antibodies), in comparison to those who are not sensitized, would report larger negative changes in mood during exposure to tree pollen in spring. We also hypothesized that differences between high and low tree pollen periods in self reported allergy symptoms would correlate positively with differences in self reported depression scores. We present 1-year preliminary data on the first 51 patients with unipolar or bipolar disorder (age: 19-63 years, 65% female, twelve patients were tree-pollen IgE positive). Ratings of mood and allergic disease status were performed once during the peak airborne pollen counts and once during the period of low airborne pollen counts, as reported by two local pollen counting stations. Linear regression models were developed to examine associations of changes in depression scores (dependent variable) with tree pollen sensitization, changes in the allergy symptom severity score, adjusted for gender and order of testing. We did not confirm the hypothesized relationship between a specific tree pollen sensitization and changes in mood during tree pollen exposure. We did confirm the hypothesized positive relationship between the changes in allergy symptoms and changes in subjects' depression scores (adjusted ptree pollen. A relationship between changes in allergy symptom scores and changes in depression scores supports a state-level rather than only trait-level relationship, and thus lends optimism to future causality-testing interventional studies, which might then lead to novel preventative environmental interventions in mood disorders. PMID:18167612

Postolache, Teodor T; Lapidus, Manana; Sander, Evan R; Langenberg, Patricia; Hamilton, Robert G; Soriano, Joseph J; McDonald, Jessica S; Furst, Nancy; Bai, Jie; Scrandis, Debra A; Cabassa, Johanna A; Stiller, John W; Balis, Theodora; Guzman, Alvaro; Togias, Alkis; Tonelli, Leonardo H

2007-01-01

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[The trends of mood disorders in ICD-11: bipolar and depressive disorders].  

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The international classification of diseases 11th (ICD-11) revision is due by 2015. The ICD-11 beta draft has recently been released, which includes a prospective change in the content of mood disorders. The ICD-11 may separate the disorders into bipolar and depressive disorders as a consequence of an evaluation for the feasibility of a meta-structure for mental and behavioral disorders. In addition, the bipolar disorders may be divided into type I and II disorders. The depressive disorders may include new diseases, i. e., disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, mixed depressive anxiety, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Our epidemiological data from patients with mood disorders diagnosed using the ICD-10 or DSM-IV have proven their utility in clinical use, and suggested a required revision for the criteria of the diagnosis. A part of persistent mood disorders, such as cyclothymia and dysthymia, seem to be the prodromal state of bipolar disorders. For an accurate assessment of manic and hypomanic episodes, a precise estimation of the physiological effects of antidepressants as well as a sufficient review of clinical information from family members of patients are mandatory. The mixed affective episode may be deleted in the new version, because our data also indicate that this episode is a very rare clinical state. Moreover, it appears that inpatients with bipolar II disorder diagnosed by the DSM-IV in our hospital showed heterogeneous clinical properties, such as the onset age and interval between the first depressive and first hypomanic episode. After a worldwide and intensive discussion, it appears that the newly revised ICD-11 will be an advanced scientific tool for psychiatry. PMID:23691796

Kurumaji, Akeo

2013-01-01

37

Adolescent Males in Secondary School in Ireland: Alcohol Use and Depressed Mood  

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Per capita alcohol consumption by Irish teenagers has doubled over the past three decades. There has also been a doubling of the suicide rate among young men. The aim of this study was to measure the correlation between alcohol consumption and negative mood (as measured by elements of the Beck Depression Inventory) in a sample (n = 169) of final-year secondary school male students. A questionnaire was devised to ascertain frequency, type and quantity of alcohol consumed, as well as attitudes ...

2013-01-01

38

Association between depressive mood and cardiovascular disease: social disparities and role of education, lifestyle, and disabilities  

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Cardiovascular disease (CVD) may be associated with depressive mood (DM), with a range of confounding effects depending on socioeconomic factors. This study assessed the associations between DM and CVD, their social disparities and the impact of education, living alone, smoking, alcohol abuse, and physical and cognitive disabilities. Methods: A random sample of 6216 people (2959 men and 3257 women), aged 15 years or over in north-eastern France, completed a postal survey covering alcohol ...

2010-01-01

39

The examination of sport managers and coaches’ stress levels and depressed mood at work in Turkey  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper is an investigation of stress levels and depressed mood at work in sport managers and coaches. Three different questionnaires were applied to professional sport managers (n=60 and coaches (n=52 in Turkey to regard to potential sources of stress before, during and after competitions. This sample represented approximately 21% of the total professional football, basketball and volleyball clubs in Turkey. The questionnaires used are “Perceived Stress Questionnaire”, “Anxiety-Stress Questionnaire” and “Depressed Mood at Work Questionnaire”. Our findings indicated that: The aim of first questionnaire was to assess perceived stressful situations and results show that general stress levels of managers and coaches are under the average. When we examine the second questionnaire consisting of health, physical condition, tension caused by stress; it is seen that negative effects of these factors increase. At last; according to the depressed mood at work questionnaire which evaluates the physiological conditions related to stress; it’s found out that both managers and coaches aren’t satisfied with their working atmosphere and managers’ unhappiness levels are higher than coaches are.

Bilge Donuk

2013-04-01

40

A gender comparison of cognitive vulnerability as a function of moderation and mediation between negative life events and depressive mood  

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The primary goal of this study was to examine gender differences in cognitive pathways to depression among a college student population. The moderating and mediating roles of dysfunctional attitudes and negative inferential styles in the relationship between negative life events and depressive mood were tested separately by gender. 306 undergraduate students (171 men and 135 women) who completed the Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II), Inventory to Diagnose Depression, Lifetime...

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
41

Combining an SSRI with an anticonvulsant in depressed patients with dysphoric mood: an open study  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Several patients with unipolar depression present with prominent dysphoric mood. We aimed at examining the effectiveness of the combination of an SSRI with an anticonvulsant in such patients. Methods Thirty-five newly admitted outpatients with substantial anger, irritability, aggressiveness or hostility who were diagnosed a DSM-IV unipolar depressive disorder were rated on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS, the Clinical Global Improvement (CGI scale, and a scale for the rapid dimensional assessment (SVARAD, were prescribed an SSRI and an anticonvulsant (usually valproate, and were followed up for 12 weeks. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test for within-subject changes in scale scores over time. Results Thirty-two and 23 patients attended the follow-up visits 4 and 12 weeks later, respectively. Significant decreases (p Conclusion Although our study has several limitations, we observed a remarkable improvement in most unipolar depressed outpatients with dysphoric mood treated with an SSRI and an anticonvulsant. The effectiveness of anticonvulsants might be linked to their action on symptoms of aggression and behavioural activation.

Cascavilla Isabella

2007-02-01

42

Individual, family, social, and cultural predictors of depressed mood in former Soviet immigrant couples.  

Science.gov (United States)

Gender differences in predictors of depression for married couples from the former Soviet Union were examined in a cross-sectional, descriptive analysis. Data were collected during a longitudinal study of post-migration health and adaptation. The sample included 308 men and women (154 couples), ages 40-79, who had lived in the US for an average of 6 years. Generativity, marital satisfaction and communication, social support, immigration challenges, and alienation were independent predictors of depressed mood. A gender interaction was found for generativity, indicating that diminished opportunities to guide the next generation and be productive members of society may have been more depressing for women. Interventions should attend to gender differences in developmental needs, reduce immigration-related challenges, and strengthen family and social support. PMID:23408500

Miller, Arlene M; Sorokin, Olga; Fogg, Louis

2013-06-01

43

The role of Personality, Mood, Subjective Health, and Stress in Depressive Symptoms among High School Students  

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Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Traditionally, depression among adolescents has been considered uncommon, with around 5% estimated to suffer from depressive disorder. The purpose is to investigate occurrence and psychological correlates for depressive symptoms in male and female high school adolescents in urban and rural settings. Methods: Participants were 1,069 high school students (response rate 92.0% with a mean age of 17.6 years. The instruments used were the Zung Depression Self-Rating Scale (SDS, Life Regard Index (LRI, the Neuroticism scale by Eysenck (EPQ-N, the Tension and Effort Stress Inventory (TESI, the Subjective Health Complaints scale (SHC, and the Sense of Humour Questionnaire (SHQ-6. Results: Analyzes of Variance showed sex and urban/rural main effects, and/or interactions (boys and rural students showing highest positive ratings. Stepwise regression analyzes on depression showed all but the TESI variables to significantly explain 41% of the variance in depression. The Sense of Humour and Life Regard Index were strong contributors to depression (55% of variation when effects of bodily complaints and scores on stressors and efforts were eliminated. Conclusions: The present study showed an unexpectedly high prevalence of severe (12.7% as well as moderate depressive symptoms (total of 49.2%. Therefore, the results indicate an increase of adolescent depression in recent years. Negative and positive mood, as well as sense of humour, goals in life, and fulfilment of goals seemed to be protecting. Prevalence of depressive symptoms in adolescents was shown to be higher than expected. Positive resource variables appeared to be protecting.

K. Gunnar Götestam

2008-09-01

44

The role of Personality, Mood, Subjective Health, and Stress in Depressive Symptoms among High School Students  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Spain | Language: English Abstract in english Background and Objectives: Traditionally, depression among adolescents has been considered uncommon, with around 5% estimated to suffer from depressive disorder. The purpose is to investigate occurrence and psychological correlates for depressive symptoms in male and female high school adolescents i [...] n urban and rural settings. Methods: Participants were 1,069 high school students (response rate 92.0%) with a mean age of 17.6 years. The instruments used were the Zung Depression Self-Rating Scale (SDS), Life Regard Index (LRI), the Neuroticism scale by Eysenck (EPQ-N), the Tension and Effort Stress Inventory (TESI), the Subjective Health Complaints scale (SHC), and the Sense of Humour Questionnaire (SHQ-6). Results: Analyzes of Variance showed sex and urban/rural main effects, and/or interactions (boys and rural students showing highest positive ratings). Stepwise regression analyzes on depression showed all but the TESI variables to significantly explain 41% of the variance in depression. The Sense of Humour and Life Regard Index were strong contributors to depression (55% of variation) when effects of bodily complaints and scores on stressors and efforts were eliminated. Conclusions: The present study showed an unexpectedly high prevalence of severe (12.7%) as well as moderate depressive symptoms (total of 49.2%). Therefore, the results indicate an increase of adolescent depression in recent years. Negative and positive mood, as well as sense of humour, goals in life, and fulfilment of goals seemed to be protecting. Prevalence of depressive symptoms in adolescents was shown to be higher than expected. Positive resource variables appeared to be protecting.

K., Gunnar Götestam; Sven, Svebak; Eva, Naper Jensen.

45

Memory mood congruency phenomenon in bipolar I disorder and major depression disorder patients  

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Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate memory performance in tasks with and without affective content (to confirm the mood congruency phenomenon in acutely admitted patients with bipolar I disorder (BD and major depression disorder (MDD and in healthy participants. Seventy-eight participants (24 BD, 29 MDD, and 25 healthy controls were evaluated. Three word lists were used as the memory task with affective content (positive, negative and indifferent. Psychiatric symptoms were also evaluated with rating scales (Young Mania Rating Scale for mania and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale for depression. Patients were selected during the first week of hospitalization. BD patients showed higher scores in the word span with positive tone than MDD patients and healthy controls (P = 0.002. No other difference was observed for tests with affective tone. MDD patients presented significantly lower scores in the Mini-Mental State Exam, logical memory test, visual recognition span, and digit span, while BD patients presented lower scores in the visual recognition test and digit span. Mood congruency effect was found for word span with positive tone among BD patients but no similar effect was observed among MDD patients for negative items. MDD patients presented more memory impairment than BD patients, but BD patients also showed memory impairment

V.B. Delgado

2012-09-01

46

Memory mood congruency phenomenon in bipolar I disorder and major depression disorder patients  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The objective of the present study was to evaluate memory performance in tasks with and without affective content (to confirm the mood congruency phenomenon) in acutely admitted patients with bipolar I disorder (BD) and major depression disorder (MDD) and in healthy participants. Seventy-eight parti [...] cipants (24 BD, 29 MDD, and 25 healthy controls) were evaluated. Three word lists were used as the memory task with affective content (positive, negative and indifferent). Psychiatric symptoms were also evaluated with rating scales (Young Mania Rating Scale for mania and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale for depression). Patients were selected during the first week of hospitalization. BD patients showed higher scores in the word span with positive tone than MDD patients and healthy controls (P = 0.002). No other difference was observed for tests with affective tone. MDD patients presented significantly lower scores in the Mini-Mental State Exam, logical memory test, visual recognition span, and digit span, while BD patients presented lower scores in the visual recognition test and digit span. Mood congruency effect was found for word span with positive tone among BD patients but no similar effect was observed among MDD patients for negative items. MDD patients presented more memory impairment than BD patients, but BD patients also showed memory impairment

Delgado, V.B.; Kapczinski, F.; Chaves, M.L.F..

47

Comparison of effects of bright light therapy alone or combined with fluoxetine on severity of depression, circadian rhythms, mood disturbance, and sleep quality, in patients with non-seasonal depression  

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Full Text Available Mehmet Yücel Agargün,1 Gokben Hizli Sayar,2 Hüseyin Bulut,3 Oguz Tan21Medipol University, Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Uskudar University, Neuropsychiatry Istanbul Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Büyükçekmece Government Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul, TurkeyPurpose: To compare effects of bright light therapy (BLT alone or combined with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI fluoxetine, on severity of depression, circadian rhythms, mood disturbance, and sleep quality, in patients with non-seasonal depression.Patients and methods: Drug-free patients who were administered 10,000 lux of BLT for 30 minutes for 7 days comprised the BLT group (n = 7, while patients who started fluoxetine as an add-on treatment day comprised the SSRI + BLT group (n = 8. The primary outcomes were severity of depression, measured using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; chronotype, measured using the Morningness Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ; mood disturbance, measured using the Profile of Mood States (POMS survey; and sleep quality, measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, before and after treatment in both groups.Results: All patients completed the study, and none reported obvious side effects. The mean onset age of depression was 26.1 years ± 5.3 years in the BLT group and 27 years ± 9.5 years in the SSRI + BLT group (P = 0.425. The number of past depressive episodes was 1.29 ± 0.76 in the BLT group, and 1.5 ± 0.8 in the SSRI + BLT group (P = 0.427. The difference between pre- and posttreatment scores revealed no significant difference between groups for the HAM-D scale, BDI, MEQ, POMS survey, and the PSQI.Conclusion: This study suggests that BLT is effective with respect to the severity of depression, circadian rhythms, mood disturbance, and sleep quality, in non-seasonal depression. However, there was no evidence in favor of adjunctive fluoxetine with BLT in the treatment of non-seasonal depression, for any of the rating scales used in our study.Keywords: bright light therapy, mood states, nonseasonal depression, sleep disorders, sleep quality

A?argün MY

2013-06-01

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Mood Reactivity Rather than Cognitive Reactivity Is Predictive of Depressive Relapse: A Randomized Study with 5.5-Year Follow-Up  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: The current study examined whether cognitive reactivity, cognitive extremity reactivity, and mood reactivity following mood provocation predicted relapse in depression over 5.5 years. Additionally, this study was the 1st to examine whether changes in cognitive reactivity and mood reactivity following preventive cognitive therapy (PCT)…

van Rijsbergen, Gerard D.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Burger, Huibert; Spinhoven, Philip; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Hollon, Steven D.; Schene, Aart H.

2013-01-01

49

Association between lifestyle activity and depressed mood among home-dwelling older people: a community-based study in Japan.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the community-based cross-sectional study, we investigated patterns of lifestyle activities among older people and examined the association between specific types of lifestyle activity and depressed mood status. The participants were 656 men and women aged 65 or older in 2004 who lived in a rural town in Japan, neither institutionalized nor hospitalized and who did not have symptoms of dementia. We found that less interaction with neighbors, society and friends was highly associated with depressed mood for men. Additionally, although they were physically active in gardening/farming, it did not necessarily mean that they were mentally healthy if they did not have close ties with friends, family and children/grandchildren. For women, it seemed important to engage in several types of activities relating to society, leisure and children/grandchildren to be in less depressed mood. Even if they were socially inactive, if they had frequent contact with family and children/grandchildren or going out for pleasure they were less likely to be depressed. Distinguishing gender differences in lifestyle activity patterns and the association of activities with depressed mood will help to guide the development of depression intervention programs. PMID:17882593

Arai, A; Ishida, K; Tomimori, M; Katsumata, Y; Grove, J S; Tamashiro, H

2007-09-01

50

Depressed mood, glycaemic control and functional capacity in overweight/obese men with and without type 2 diabetes  

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Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine whether there were differences in depressed mood between overweight/obese men with and without type 2 diabetes (T2DM and to examine any associations between depressed mood, physical functioning, and glycaemic control in overweight/obese men with and without T2DM. Methods Fifty seven overweight/obese men with (n?=?19, age?=?54.2?±?7.4 yrs, BMI?=?32.3?±?6.7 kg?m-2 and without T2DM (n?=?38, age?=?51.1?±?6.8 yrs, BMI?=?29.9?±?4.5kg?m-2, p?>?0.05 between groups participated. The men completed measures of depressed mood and health-related quality of life (HRQL and underwent the following assessments: fasting blood lipids and glucose, HbA1c, anthropometric measurements, VO2peak, muscle strength, and physical function. Results Compared to men without T2DM, men with T2DM had higher depressed mood (p?=?0.05, ?2?=?0.07, as well as lower perceived general health (p?2?=?0.24 and social functioning (p?=?.01, ?2?=?0.10. Men with T2DM also had lower VO2peak (21.8?±?5.3 versus 25.8?±?5.4 ml?kg-1?min-1, p?2?=?0.11 and muscle strength (3.3?±?0.8 versus 3.7?±?0.7 kg?kg-1, p?=?0.08, ?2?=?0.06, as well as being slower to complete physical performance tasks (27.2?±?5.2 versus 24.2?±?2.8 sec, p?2?=?0.13. In those with T2DM, depressed mood was highly correlated with most HRQL subscales. For the combined cohort, depressed mood was correlated with fasting glucose (r?=?0.31, p?=?0.012 but not the functional measures. Conclusions Men with T2DM have higher levels of depressed mood compared to men without T2DM. Glycaemic control, but not functional capacities, is associated with depressed mood in the study cohort.

Levinger Itamar

2012-11-01

51

Abnormal brain glucose metabolism and depressive mood in patients with pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease: SPM analysis of F-18 FDG positron emission tomography  

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The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive mood and pre-dialytic CKD, to localize and quantify depressive mood -related lesions in pre-dialytic CKD patients through statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of brain positron emission tomography (PET), and to examine the usefulness of brain PET for early detection and proper treatment of depressive mood. Twenty one patients with stage 5 CKD and 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed by depressive mood assessment and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of 18F-FDG PET. Depressive mood assessment was done by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The largest clusters were areas including precentral gyrus, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulated cortex of left hemisphere. Other clusters were left transverse temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46, 44), right inferior frontal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left angular gyrus. In addition, correlation was found between hypometabolized areas and HDRS scores of CKD patients in right prefrontal cortex (BA 11) and right anterior cingulated gyrus (BA 24). In conclusion, this study demonstrated specific depressive mood-related abnormal metabolic lesion. Interestingly, in CKD patients with severe depressive mood, cerebral metabolism was similar to that of MDD.

Jun, Sung Min; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01

52

Optimizing the ingredients for imagery-based interpretation bias modification for depressed mood: Is self-generation more effective than imagination alone??  

Science.gov (United States)

Negative interpretation is thought to be crucial in the development and maintenance of depression. Recently developed cognitive bias modification paradigms, intending to change these biases towards a more optimistic interpretation tendency (CBM-I), seem to offer new promising implications for cognitive therapy innovation. This study aimed to increase our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of action of imagery-based CBM-I in the context of depressed mood. We therefore compared the efficacy of CBM-I requiring participants to imagine standardized positive resolutions to a novel, more active training version that required participants to generate the positive interpretations themselves. Fifty-four participants were randomly allocated to (1) standardized CBM-I, (2) self-generation CBM-I or (3) a control group. Outcome measures included self-report mood measures and a depression-related interpretation bias measure. Both positive training variants significantly increased the tendency to interpret fresh ambiguous material in an optimistic manner. However, only the standardized imagery CBM-I paradigm positively influenced mood.

Rohrbacher, Heike; Blackwell, Simon E.; Holmes, Emily A.; Reinecke, Andrea

2014-01-01

53

Optimizing the ingredients for imagery-based interpretation bias modification for depressed mood: is self-generation more effective than imagination alone?  

Science.gov (United States)

Negative interpretation is thought to be crucial in the development and maintenance of depression. Recently developed cognitive bias modification paradigms, intending to change these biases towards a more optimistic interpretation tendency (CBM-I), seem to offer new promising implications for cognitive therapy innovation. This study aimed to increase our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of action of imagery-based CBM-I in the context of depressed mood. We therefore compared the efficacy of CBM-I requiring participants to imagine standardized positive resolutions to a novel, more active training version that required participants to generate the positive interpretations themselves. Fifty-four participants were randomly allocated to (1) standardized CBM-I, (2) self-generation CBM-I or (3) a control group. Outcome measures included self-report mood measures and a depression-related interpretation bias measure. Both positive training variants significantly increased the tendency to interpret fresh ambiguous material in an optimistic manner. However, only the standardized imagery CBM-I paradigm positively influenced mood. PMID:24113076

Rohrbacher, Heike; Blackwell, Simon E; Holmes, Emily A; Reinecke, Andrea

2014-01-01

54

Criterion validity of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire and one- and two-item depression screens in young adolescents  

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Abstract Background The use of short screening questionnaires may be a promising option for identifying children at risk for depression in a community setting. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ) and one- and two-item screening instruments for depressive disorders in a school-based sample of young adolescents. Methods Participants were 521 sixth-grade students attending public middle schools....

2010-01-01

55

Tinnitus Severity Is Reduced with Reduction of Depressive Mood – a Prospective Population Study in Sweden  

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Tinnitus, the perception of sound without external source, is a highly prevalent public health problem with about 8% of the population having frequently occurring tinnitus, and about 1–2% experiencing significant distress from it. Population studies, as well as studies on self-selected samples, have reported poor psychological well-being in individuals with tinnitus. However, no study has examined the long-term co-variation between mood and tinnitus prevalence or tinnitus severity. In this ...

2012-01-01

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Effects of Induced Rumination and Distraction on Mood and Overgeneral Autobiographical Memory in Adolescent Major Depressive Disorder and Controls  

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Background: In adults there is evidence that the affective-cognitive processes of rumination and overgeneral autobiographical memory retrieval may play a part in maintaining depression. This study investigated the effects of induced rumination as compared to distraction on mood and categoric overgeneral memory in adolescents with first episode…

Park, R. J.; Goodyer, I. M.; Teasdale, J. D.

2004-01-01

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Acceptability of Online Self-Help to People With Depression: Users' Views of MoodGYM Versus Informational Websites  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Little is known about the factors that influence acceptability of and adherence to online psychological interventions. Evidence is needed to guide further development of promising programs. Objective Our goal was to investigate users’ views of two online approaches to self-help for depression: computerized cognitive behavior therapy (cCBT) and informational websites, in a workplace context. Computerized CBT offers an inexpensive and accessible alternative to face-to-face therapy, and employers have an interest in reducing the working time lost to depression or stress. Yet little is known about how employees, who have actual experience of using online approaches, judge the intervention as a process. Methods The qualitative data reported here were collected within an online randomized controlled trial whose participants had diagnosable depression. The experimental intervention was a 5-week cCBT program called MoodGYM, and the control condition was five informational websites about mental health. Data were collected via online questionnaires. There was no evidence of the superiority of either in terms of treatment outcomes. In parallel, using brief rating scales and open-ended questions designed for this purpose, we examined the relative acceptability of each approach over time, including perceptions of cCBT compared to seeing a health care professional. Results At least 60% of participants held online therapy to be at least as acceptable as seeing a professional about mental health issues, and they were more likely to retain this opinion over time if they used the interactive program, MoodGYM, rather than informational websites alone. Barriers to cCBT use fell into four categories: intrinsic, intrapersonal problems; extrinsic technical problems; generic issues mostly pertaining to perceptions of cCBT; and specific issues about the intervention or control condition. These indicate strategies for improving engagement. Conclusions As first-aid for mild to moderate mental health problems, evidence-based computerized approaches have broad acceptability. This could be increased by attending to the barriers noted here and by proactively managing users’ expectations at individual and organizational levels. The findings have implications for occupational health providers and others addressing the needs of working-age adults with depression. They also raise methodological issues for online research. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 24529487; http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN24529487 (Archived by Webcite at http://www.webcitation.org/6O8cCL4mh).

Sarrami Foroushani, Pooria; Grime, Paul; Thornicroft, Graham

2014-01-01

58

Criterion validity of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire and one- and two-item depression screens in young adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The use of short screening questionnaires may be a promising option for identifying children at risk for depression in a community setting. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ) and one- and two-item screening instruments for depressive disorders in a school-based sample of young adolescents. Methods Participants were 521 sixth-grade students attending public middle schools. Child and parent versions of the SMFQ were administered to evaluate the child's depressive symptoms. The presence of any depressive disorder during the previous month was assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) as the criterion standard. First, we assessed the diagnostic accuracy of child, parent, and combined scores of the full 13-item SMFQ by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity. The same approach was then used to evaluate the accuracy of a two-item scale consisting of only depressed mood and anhedonia items, and a single depressed mood item. Results The combined child + parent SMFQ score showed the highest accuracy (AUC = 0.86). Diagnostic accuracy was lower for child (AUC = 0.73) and parent (AUC = 0.74) SMFQ versions. Corresponding versions of one- and two-item screens had lower AUC estimates, but the combined versions of the brief screens each still showed moderate accuracy. Furthermore, child and combined versions of the two-item screen demonstrated higher sensitivity (although lower specificity) than either the one-item screen or the full SMFQ. Conclusions Under conditions where parents accompany children to screening settings (e.g. primary care), use of a child + parent version of the SMFQ is recommended. However, when parents are not available, and the cost of a false positive result is minimal, then a one- or two-item screen may be useful for initial identification of at-risk youth.

2010-01-01

59

Criterion validity of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire and one- and two-item depression screens in young adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of short screening questionnaires may be a promising option for identifying children at risk for depression in a community setting. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ and one- and two-item screening instruments for depressive disorders in a school-based sample of young adolescents. Methods Participants were 521 sixth-grade students attending public middle schools. Child and parent versions of the SMFQ were administered to evaluate the child's depressive symptoms. The presence of any depressive disorder during the previous month was assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC as the criterion standard. First, we assessed the diagnostic accuracy of child, parent, and combined scores of the full 13-item SMFQ by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC, sensitivity and specificity. The same approach was then used to evaluate the accuracy of a two-item scale consisting of only depressed mood and anhedonia items, and a single depressed mood item. Results The combined child + parent SMFQ score showed the highest accuracy (AUC = 0.86. Diagnostic accuracy was lower for child (AUC = 0.73 and parent (AUC = 0.74 SMFQ versions. Corresponding versions of one- and two-item screens had lower AUC estimates, but the combined versions of the brief screens each still showed moderate accuracy. Furthermore, child and combined versions of the two-item screen demonstrated higher sensitivity (although lower specificity than either the one-item screen or the full SMFQ. Conclusions Under conditions where parents accompany children to screening settings (e.g. primary care, use of a child + parent version of the SMFQ is recommended. However, when parents are not available, and the cost of a false positive result is minimal, then a one- or two-item screen may be useful for initial identification of at-risk youth.

McCauley Elizabeth

2010-02-01

60

Usefulness of the Spanish version of the mood disorder questionnaire for screening bipolar disorder in routine clinical practice in outpatients with major depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background According to some studies, almost 40% of depressive patients – half of them previously undetected – are diagnosed of bipolar II disorder when systematically assessed for hypomania. Thus, instruments for bipolar disorder screening are needed. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ is a self-reported questionnaire validated in Spanish in stable patients with a previously known diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate in the daily clinical practice the usefulness of the Spanish version of the MDQ in depressive patients. Methods Patients (n = 87 meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for a major depressive episode, not previously known as bipolar were included. The affective module of the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID was used as gold standard. Results MDQ screened 24.1% of depressive patients as bipolar, vs. 12.6% according to SCID. For a cut-off point score of 7 positive answers, sensitivity was 72.7% (95% CI = 63.3 – 82.1 and specificity 82.9% (95% CI = 74.9–90.9. Likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests were 4,252 y 0,329 respectively. Limitations The small sample size reduced the power of the study to 62%. Conclusion Sensitivity and specificity of the MDQ were high for screening bipolar disorder in patients with major depression, and similar to the figures obtained in stable patients. This study confirms that MDQ is a useful instrument in the daily clinical assessment of depressive patients.

Montes José

2008-05-01

 
 
 
 
61

Correlations between regional cerebral blood flow and depression scale in the mood disorder. A study using {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT  

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Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was assessed on 26 mood disorder patients using {sup 123}I-iodoamphetamine and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and their correlations to depression scores of Hamilton`s Rating Scale for Depression were studied. Region of interest (ROI) was established on coronary images and used as an indicator. As a result, left hemisphere was suspected of a primary lesion in mood disorder, however, the relationship between clinical symptoms and various lesion areas were not clarified. Further studies with neuropsychological loading or pharmaceutical loading such as antidepressant are thus expected to clarify the etiology of mood disorders. (S.Y.).

Iidaka, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Toru; Ogikubo, Tetsuya; Fukuda, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Yoshio; Okazaki, Atsushi; Maehara, Tadayuki [Kanto Teishin Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shiraishi, Hiroyasu

1995-09-01

62

Influencia del estrés y el ánimo depresivo sobre la salud adolescente: análisis concurrente y prospectivo / Influence of Stress and Depressed Mood on Adolescent Health: Concurrent and Prospective Analysis  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Este estudio examinó las relaciones concurrentes y prospectivas entre los problemas de salud informados por adolescentes, y diversos factores emocionales, junto con las diferencias de género en dichas variables. Los participantes fueron 307 estudiantes de Concepción (Chile) con edades entre 14 y 19 [...] años. Los problemas de salud presentaron relaciones concurrentes significativas con los eventos estresantes experimentados, el estrés percibido y el ánimo depresivo. Además el ánimo depresivo fue un predictor significativo de los problemas de salud medidos 11 meses después. Comparadas con los hombres, las mujeres informaron mayores problemas de salud y obtuvieron puntajes significativamente mayores en todas las variables consideradas, con la excepción del número de eventos estresantes. Se proponen diversos factores para explicar los resultados obtenidos Abstract in english This study examined concurrent and prospective associations among adolescent's health problems and some emotional factors and to examine gender differences. Participants were 307 students, 14 to 19 years old, from Concepción (Chile). Results showed significant concurrent relationships of reported he [...] alth problems with stressful events, perceived stress and depressed mood. In the prospective analysis depressed mood was a significant predictor of reported health problems 11 month later. Compared to males, adolescent females reported higher levels of health problems and also higher scores in the other variables, except in the number of stressful events. Diverse explanatory factors for obtained results are proposed.

ENRIQUE, BARRA-AlMAGIA.

63

Internet-Based Motivation Program for Women With Eating Disorders: Eating Disorder Pathology and Depressive Mood Predict Dropout  

Science.gov (United States)

Background One of the main problems of Internet-delivered interventions for a range of disorders is the high dropout rate, yet little is known about the factors associated with this. We recently developed and tested a Web-based 6-session program to enhance motivation to change for women with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or related subthreshold eating pathology. Objective The aim of the present study was to identify predictors of dropout from this Web program. Methods A total of 179 women took part in the study. We used survival analyses (Cox regression) to investigate the predictive effect of eating disorder pathology (assessed by the Eating Disorders Examination-Questionnaire; EDE-Q), depressive mood (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), motivation to change (University of Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale; URICA), and participants’ age at dropout. To identify predictors, we used the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method. Results The dropout rate was 50.8% (91/179) and was equally distributed across the 6 treatment sessions. The LASSO analysis revealed that higher scores on the Shape Concerns subscale of the EDE-Q, a higher frequency of binge eating episodes and vomiting, as well as higher depression scores significantly increased the probability of dropout. However, we did not find any effect of the URICA or age on dropout. Conclusions Women with more severe eating disorder pathology and depressive mood had a higher likelihood of dropping out from a Web-based motivational enhancement program. Interventions such as ours need to address the specific needs of women with more severe eating disorder pathology and depressive mood and offer them additional support to prevent them from prematurely discontinuing treatment.

Hirschfeld, Gerrit; Rieger, Elizabeth; Schmidt, Ulrike; Kosfelder, Joachim; Hechler, Tanja; Schulte, Dietmar; Vocks, Silja

2014-01-01

64

Integrating treatment and education for mood disorders: an adolescent case report.  

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This case study illustrates one successful outcome of an intensive, outpatient, treatment project for adolescents with mood disorders. An 18-year-old female with symptoms across several DSM-IV Axis I classifications, including a depressive disorder, and her parents participated in a year-long, multimodal intervention that included mood-focused psychoeducation and coaching designed to impact on her, her family, school, and community systems. Self-report, clinician-driven, and ecologically valid measures were used to assess treatment effects on psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial functioning. Results on the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale demonstrated considerable gains in the following areas: Home, school/work, social behavior, self-harm, thinking/communication, and substance use. During the intervention, she went from failing several of her classes to graduating from high school. In addition, she made the Honours' List in her first semester at a local community college. A discussion of intervention pluses and pitfalls specific to the case highlight the necessity to influence the various spheres of the young person's life. PMID:17163224

Navalta, Carryl P; Goldstein, Jessica; Ruegg, Laura; Perna, David A; Frazier, Jean A

2006-10-01

65

Diurnal pattern of serum BDNF before partial sleep deprivation in stress-related mood disorders – an association with therapy response in major depression  

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Background : Depression is one of the most prevalent forms of mood disorders. Compelling evidence suggests that mood disorders are characterized by reduced neuronal plasticity, which can be brought about by exposure to stress. Furthermore, there is good agreement in considering key proteins such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), as a central player for the effects of stress on brain function and plasticity and psychopathological implications. Still, there is a high non-responde...

Maria Giese; Beck, J.; Serge Brand; Muheim, F.; Martin Hatzinger; Edith Holsboer-Trachsler; Anne Eckert

2012-01-01

66

Relationship of residual mood and panic–agoraphobic spectrum phenomenology to quality of life and functional impairment in patients with major depression  

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The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship of residual mood and panic–agoraphobic spectrum phenomenology to functional impairment and quality of life in 226 adult outpatients who had remitted from a major depressive episode. Quality of life and functioning were assessed using the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Mood and Panic–Agoraphobic Spectrum Questionnaires. Linear a...

Benvenuti, Antonella; Rucci, Paola; Calugi, Simona; Cassano, Giovanni B.; Miniati, Mario; Frank, Ellen

2010-01-01

67

Relation of depressive mood to plasminogen activator inhibitor, tissue plasminogen activator, and fibrinogen levels in patients with versus without coronary heart disease.  

Science.gov (United States)

The increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) associated with depression is well documented. We hypothesized that impaired fibrinolysis is involved in this link. To explore the association of depressive mood and/or vital exhaustion with various measurements of fibrinolysis activity, 231 men (40 to 65 years old; 123 without CHD and taking no medication and 108 with documented CHD), completed the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Maastricht Questionnaire for vital exhaustion. Using classic cut-off points (Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score >or=17, Maastricht Questionnaire score >or=8), 6.5% and 9.8% of subjects without CHD and 38% and 48.1% of those with CHD were classified as depressed and exhausted, respectively. Patients with CHD were older, had a higher body mass index, and higher levels of total cholesterol, glucose, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen, and fibrinogen; 47% were treated for hypertension. Depressed subjects had higher levels of PAI-1 activity (p = 0.006) and exhausted patients had higher levels of PAI-1 activity (p = 0.011) and fibrinogen (p = 0.009). After adjusting for clinical condition (with or without CHD), smoking, hypertension, triglyceride concentration, and body mass index, PAI-1 activity remained higher in depressed subjects (p = 0.03). This association persisted after further adjustment for vital exhaustion or for t-PA antigen and fibrinogen levels. t-PA antigen and fibrinogen levels were not associated with depressive mood in multivariate analyses. No fibrinolytic variable was associated with vital exhaustion in multivariate analyses. In conclusion, depressive mood, but not vital exhaustion, is associated with higher levels of PAI-1 activity, suggesting a possible impairment of fibrinolysis and indicating a potential additional mechanism by which depressive mood may act as a cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:16635597

Lahlou-Laforet, Khadija; Alhenc-Gelas, Martine; Pornin, Maurice; Bydlowski, Sarah; Seigneur, Etienne; Benetos, Athanase; Kierzin, Jean-Michel; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves; Ducimetiere, Pierre; Aiach, Martine; Guize, Louis; Consoli, Silla M

2006-05-01

68

The role of Personality, Mood, Subjective Health, and Stress in Depressive Symptoms among High School Students  

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Background and Objectives: Traditionally, depression among adolescents has been considered uncommon, with around 5% estimated to suffer from depressive disorder. The purpose is to investigate occurrence and psychological correlates for depressive symptoms in male and female high school adolescents in urban and rural settings. Methods: Participants were 1,069 high school students (response rate 92.0%) with a mean age of 17.6 years. The instruments used were the Zung Depression Self-Rating Scal...

Gunnar Go?testam, K.; Sven Svebak; Eva Naper Jensen

2008-01-01

69

Development of the Depressive Symptoms Questionnaire for Children  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study set out to develop a self-report instrument, the Depressive Symptoms Questionnaire (DSQ), for assessing depressed mood in school-aged children. Included were items based on research that reported symptoms of depressed mood in children, items related to negative psychosocial functioning, and items related to self-perceived…

Berg, Derek H.

2004-01-01

70

Self-reported depression and anti-depressant medication use in essential tremor: cross-sectional and prospective analyses in a population-based study.  

Science.gov (United States)

There are few data on the co-morbidity of essential tremor (ET) with depression. To assess the associations of ET with self-reported depression and antidepressant medication use. In a population-based study in central Spain, participants were evaluated at baseline (1994-1995) and 3 years later. Self-reported depression and use of antidepressant medications were evaluated at each assessment. In cross-sectional analyses, prevalent ET cases were twice more probably than controls to report depression [103 (43.8%) of 235 cases versus 1137 (26.0%) of 4379 controls; adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.66-2.93, P benign, ET seems to be associated with a mood disorder. Furthermore, as well as being a secondary response to disease manifestations, this mood disorder may be a primary feature of the underlying disease. PMID:17708753

Louis, E D; Benito-León, J; Bermejo-Pareja, F

2007-10-01

71

Mood disturbance in glioma patients.  

Science.gov (United States)

Patients diagnosed with primary brain tumors such as glioma experience psychological distress throughout the illness trajectory. Determining which patient characteristics are associated with more severe mood disturbance throughout the illness trajectory can help identify patients at risk and assist in developing targeted interventions based on these factors. Adult glioma patients were eligible for participation. Data collection tools included an investigator completed clinician assessment tool, patient completed demographic form and the Profile of mood states-short form. A multiple regression model was used to describe the relationship between the patient groups and clinical factors. The study enrolled 186 glioma patients of various tumor grades, who were categorized in three groups (newly diagnosed, on-treatment, follow-up) based on disease status at time of visit. Newly diagnosed patients experienced more total mood disturbance than all the other groups. Characteristics associated with more severe mood disturbance varied by patient group: newly diagnosed patients who were not on corticosteroids and were not married were more likely to have higher mood disturbance [R(2) = 0.27, F (2, 29) = 5.31, p < 0.02]. For those on treatment, the use of concomitant medications, having more than 1 recurrence and low income predicted higher mood disturbance [R(2) = 0.417, F (4, 67) = 11.98, p < 0.001]. For those not on active treatment, female sex, anti-depressant use and having a lower income was associated with higher mood disturbance [R(2) = 0.183, F (3, 55) = 4.11, p < 0.02]. Additionally, when compared to other cancer groups, glioma patients reported similar mood disturbance to those with breast cancer. Factors other than disease characteristics are associated with higher mood disturbance and vary according to current disease status. The use of concomitant medications, demographic factors, recurrence and income are associated with mood disturbance and interventions may need to be tailored to these underlying factors. PMID:23677748

Acquaye, A A; Vera-Bolanos, E; Armstrong, T S; Gilbert, M R; Lin, L

2013-07-01

72

Towards a glutamate hypothesis of depression: An emerging frontier of neuropsychopharmacology for mood disorders  

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Half a century after the first formulation of the monoamine hypothesis, compelling evidence implies that long-term changes in an array of brain areas and circuits mediating complex cognitive-emotional behaviors represent the biological underpinnings of mood/anxiety disorders. A large number of clinical studies suggest that pathophysiology is associated with dysfunction of the predominant glutamatergic system, malfunction in the mechanisms regulating clearance and metabolism of glutamate, and ...

Sanacora, Gerard; Treccani, Giulia; Popoli, Maurizio

2012-01-01

73

Chronobiology and mood disorders  

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The clinical observations of diurnal variation of mood and early morning awakening in depression have been incorporated into established diagnostic systems, as has the seasonal modifier defining winter depression (seasonal affective disorder, SAD). Many circadian rhythms measured in depressive patients are abnormal: earlier in timing, diminished in amplitude, or of greater variability. Whether these disturbances are of etiological significance for the role of circadian rhythms in mood disorde...

Wirz-justice, Anna

2003-01-01

74

Impact of group music therapy on the depression mood of college students  

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The goal of this study was to examine the effects of group music therapy on depression and mental health among college students. 80 students participated in this study, with 40 assigned to control group and other 40 assigned to experimental group. The results showed that after the group music therapy, for the experimental group, the depression scores have reduced significantly and the mental health scores have improved, while for the control group, no significant difference was obtained on th...

Jinliang Wang; Haizhen Wang; Dajun Zhang

2011-01-01

75

Comparative pain and mood effects in patients with comorbid fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder: secondary analyses of four pooled randomized controlled trials of duloxetine.  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this paper is to better understand the relationship of pain and mood in patients with fibromyalgia and comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD). Pooled data from 4 double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials of duloxetine hydrochloride 60-120mg/day in patients with fibromyalgia were included (N=1332). Of these, 350 (26% [147 placebo, 203 duloxetine]) had comorbid MDD (per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Text Revision criteria) and were included in these analyses. Primary measures included Brief Pain Inventory average pain; Hamilton Depression Rating Scale or Beck Depression Inventory. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the consistency of treatment effect across various subgroups. Path analysis was used to assess the effect of duloxetine on improvement in pain in the presence of improvement in mood and vice versa. Results indicated that 69% of improvement in pain was a direct effect of treatment, with improvement in mood accounting for 31% of pain response. In conclusion, consistent with our hypothesis, duloxetine produced a substantial direct effect on pain improvement and change in mood exerted a modest indirect effect on pain improvements in patients with fibromyalgia and MDD. Hence, both direct and indirect analgesic and antidepressant properties appear to be relevant for the treatment of these comorbid patients with duloxetine. PMID:20598442

Marangell, Lauren B; Clauw, Daniel J; Choy, Ernest; Wang, Fujun; Shoemaker, Scarlett; Bradley, Laurence; Mease, Philip; Wohlreich, Madelaine M

2011-01-01

76

The Effect of Eight Weeks of Aerobic Training on Reducing Mood Disorders, Depression And Mania in High School Students High School Boys  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study was to consider the effect of eight weeks of aerobic training on the reduction of mood disorders, depression and mania in boys' high school in Ilam-Iran. This was a quasi-experimental and field research taking the experimental and control groups into consideration. In this study, 60 students were randomly selected as the sample. In order to measure students' Depression and mania, multifaceted Minnesota questionnaire (MMPI-2 and depression and mania sub-scales were used. We applied both descriptive and inferential statistics using SPSS software for statistical analysis of data. The results showed that eight weeks of aerobic exercise had a significant effect on students` depressive disorders and mania. Eight weeks of aerobic exercise reduced depression and mania in experimental group of students.

Mohsen Piri

2012-01-01

77

Erythropoietin : a candidate treatment for mood symptoms and memory dysfunction in depression  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Current pharmacological treatments for depression have a significant treatment-onset-response delay, an insufficient efficacy for many patients and fail to reverse cognitive dysfunction. Erythropoietin (EPO) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions and improves cognitive function in animal models of acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions and in patients with cognitive decline.

Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Vinberg, Maj

2012-01-01

78

Anger, Stress Proliferation, and Depressed Mood among Parents of Children with ASD: A Longitudinal Replication  

Science.gov (United States)

"Stress proliferation" (the tendency for stressors to create additional stressors) has been suggested as an important contributor to depression among caregivers. The present study utilized longitudinal data from 90 parents of children with ASD to replicate and extend a prior cross-sectional study on stress proliferation by Benson (J Autism Develop…

Benson, Paul R.; Karlof, Kristie L.

2009-01-01

79

Ovariectomy Results in Variable Changes in Nociception, Mood and Depression in Adult Female Rats  

Science.gov (United States)

Decline in the ovarian hormones with menopause may influence somatosensory, cognitive, and affective processing. The present study investigated whether hormonal depletion alters the nociceptive, depressive-like and learning behaviors in experimental rats after ovariectomy (OVX), a common method to deplete animals of their gonadal hormones. OVX rats developed thermal hyperalgesia in proximal and distal tail that was established 2 weeks after OVX and lasted the 7 weeks of the experiment. A robust mechanical allodynia was also occurred at 5 weeks after OVX. In the 5th week after OVX, dilute formalin (5%)-induced nociceptive responses (such as elevating and licking or biting) during the second phase were significantly increased as compared to intact and sham-OVX females. However, chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve-induced mechanical allodynia did not differ as hormonal status (e.g. OVX and ovarian intact). Using formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA), which is believed to reflect the pain-related negative emotion, we further found that OVX significantly attenuated F-CPA scores but did not alter electric foot-shock-induced CPA (S-CPA). In the open field and forced swimming test, there was an increase in depressive-like behaviors in OVX rats. There was no detectable impairment of spatial performance by Morris water maze task in OVX rats up to 5 weeks after surgery. Estrogen replacement retrieved OVX-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity and depressive-like behaviors. This is the first study to investigate the impacts of ovarian removal on nociceptive perception, negative emotion, depressive-like behaviors and spatial learning in adult female rats in a uniform and standard way.

Li, Li-Hong; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

2014-01-01

80

Subjective experience of depressed mood among medical students at the University of Pretoria  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

INTRODUCTION: Following the suicide of a 4th-year medical student, questions were raised as to whether medical students are more vulnerable to depression and suicide than their counterparts studying other courses at the University of Pretoria. A literature search revealed that medical students and doctors run a higher risk for suicide than other students and professions. METHOD: A questionnaire was devised and distributed to medical students and a control group of other students, asking about...

Niekerk, L.; Viljoen, A. J.; Rischbieter, P.; Scribante, L.

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

Preventing mood and anxiety disorders in youth: a multi-centre RCT in the high risk offspring of depressed and anxious patients  

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Abstract Background Anxiety and mood disorders are highly prevalent and pose a huge burden on patients. Their offspring is at increased risk of developing these disorders as well, indicating a clear need for prevention of psychopathology in this group. Given high comorbidity and non-specificity of intergenerational transmission of disorders, prevention programs should target both anxiety and depression. Further, while the indication for preventive interventions is often eleva...

Nauta Maaike H; Festen Helma; Reichart Catrien G; Nolen Willem A; Stant A; Lh, Bockting Claudi; Ja, Wee Nic; Beekman Aartjan; Ah, Doreleijers Theo; Hartman Catharina A; de Jong Peter J; de Vries Sybolt O

2012-01-01

82

Suicidal ideations and attempts among adolescents subjected to childhood sexual abuse and family conflict/violence: the mediating role of anger and depressed mood.  

Science.gov (United States)

Based on a sample of 9085 16- to 19-year-old students attending all high schools in Iceland in 2004, the current study examines depressed mood and anger as potential mediators between family conflict/violence and sexual abuse, on the one hand, and suicidal ideations and suicide attempts on the other. Agnew's general strain theory provides the theoretical framework for the study. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was conducted allowing explicit modelling of both direct and mediating effects using observed and latent variables. The findings showed that both depressed mood and anger mediated the relationship between family conflict/violence and sexual abuse and suicidal attempts. However, when testing the mediating pathways between sexual abuse and family conflict/violence and suicidal ideations, only depressed mood but not anger turned out to be a significant mediator. The authors discuss how these finding may inform and facilitate the design and development of interventions to reduce the likelihood of suicide attempts among young people. PMID:24215969

Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Asgeirsdottir, Bryndis Bjork; Gudjonsson, Gisli H; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik

2013-12-01

83

Mood and cognitive function following repeated transcranial direct current stimulation in healthy volunteers: a preliminary report.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although mood and cognitive function have been reported to change following transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with neurological and psychiatric diseases, little is known about the effects of repeated tDCS on mood and cognition in healthy humans. We recruited 11 healthy male participants for this single-blind, sham-controlled crossover trial. We used Profile of Mood States, brief-form (POMS), and CogHealth (Detection Task, Identification Task, One Back Task, One Card Learning Task and Continuous Monitoring Task) to evaluate the changes in mood and cognitive function, respectively, before and immediately after 4-daily, 20 min, 1 mA sham or anodal tDCS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). While there were no significant changes in six factors of POMS and performance (speed and accuracy) of CogHealth between sham and anodal stimulation, the accuracy of One Card Learning was increased at the end of the experiment. Signal detection analyses revealed that both hit rate and discriminability were improved in this task. These results suggest that 4-daily anodal tDCS over left DLPFC may not change mood and cognitive function in healthy subjects, and further support the safety of tDCS. A slight improvement in a visual recognition and learning task at the end of experiment may be susceptible to practice effects. PMID:23811267

Motohashi, Nobutaka; Yamaguchi, Masayasu; Fujii, Tomokazu; Kitahara, Yuichi

2013-01-01

84

Condições ambientais associadas ao humor depressivo na adolescência / Environmental conditions associated with depressed mood in adolescence  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Portugal | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese O presente trabalho analisa a associação entre ambiente físico e social e a psicopatologia, nomeadamente depressão, numa amostra de 254 adolescentes, 82 do sexo masculino e 172 do sexo feminino, todos estudantes do ensino secundário de três escolas de uma zona perto de Lisboa, com uma média de idade [...] de 16,9 (DP = 1,48). A recolha de dados foi efetuada com recurso a um Questionário Demográfico, ao Inventário de Depressão Infantil - CDI (Kovacs, 1981) e ao Inventário de Sintomas Breve - BSI (Derogatis, 1982). Os resultados confirmaram a hipótese de uma associação entre sexo, grau de escolaridade, a ESE parental e as condições ambientais da habitação e do bairro. As implicações dos resultados são discutidas sobre os esforços para aumentar a prevenção de bem-estar e saúde mental durante a adolescência. Abstract in english The present work analyse the association of the social and physical environment and the psychopathology, namely depression, in a sample of 254 teenagers, 82 males and 172 females, all them high school students from three schools nearby area of Lisbon, with a average age of 16.9 (SD = 1.48). The data [...] collection included a Demographic Questionnaire, the Children´s Depression Inventory - CDI (Kovacs, 1981) and the Brief Symptom Inventory - BSI (Derogatis, 1982). Results confirmed the hypothesis of an association among gender, school grade, parental SES and the environmental conditions of the housing and neighbourhood. Implications of the results are discussed namely concerning preventing efforts to increase wellbeing and mental health during adolescence.

Anabela, Rosando; Margarida Gaspar de, Matos.

85

Mood self-assessment in bipolar disorder: a comparison between patients in mania, depression, and euthymia / Autoavaliação do estado de humor no transtorno bipolar: uma comparação entre pacientes em mania, depressão, e eutimia  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese CONTEXTO: Alguns estudos indicam que a capacidade de autoavaliação do estado de humor está mais comprometida em pacientes com transtorno bipolar na mania do que na depressão. OBJETIVO: Estudar variações na autoavaliação do humor em relação ao estado afetivo atual em indivíduos com transtorno bipolar [...] . MÉTODO: Um total de 165 pacientes com diagnóstico de transtorno bipolar tipo I ou tipo II tiveram seu estado afetivo avaliado utilizando os instrumentos Clinical Global Impressions Scale for use in bipolar illness (CGI-BP), Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) e Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Além disso, foi aplicada um instrumento de autoavaliação, a escala visual analógica do humor (EVAH). Os pacientes foram divididos em três grupos (eutimia, mania e depressão) e comparados quanto aos resultados da EVAH. RESULTADOS: Dos 16 itens da EVAH, 14 foram avaliados pelos pacientes em mania de forma semelhante aos pacientes em eutimia. Em contraste, em apenas dois itens, os deprimidos mostraram escores semelhantes aos eutímicos. CONCLUSÃO: Pacientes bipolares em mania, mas não os deprimidos, avaliam de forma não fidedigna seu estado afetivo, o que reforça o comprometimento do insight na síndrome maníaca. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Some studies indicate that mood self-assessment is more severely impaired in patients with bipolar disorder in a manic episode than in depression. OBJECTIVES: To investigate variations in mood self-assessment in relation to current affective state in a group of individuals with bipolar d [...] isorder. METHODS: A total of 165 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder type I or type II had their affective state assessed using the Clinical Global Impressions Scale for use in bipolar illness (CGI-BP), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). In addition, participants completed a self-report visual analog mood scale (VAMS). Patients were divided into three groups (euthymia, mania, and depression) and compared with regard to VAMS results. RESULTS: Manic patients rated their mood similarly to patients in euthymia in 14 out of 16 items in the VAMS. By contrast, depressed patients rated only two items similarly to euthymic patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with bipolar disorder in mania, but not those in depression, poorly evaluate their affective state, reinforcing the occurrence of insight impairment in the manic syndrome.

Silva, Rafael de Assis da; Mograbi, Daniel C.; Silveira, Luciana Angélica Silva; Nunes, Ana Letícia Santos; Novis, Fernanda Demôro; Cavaco, Paola Anaquim; Landeira-Fernandez, J.; Cheniaux, Elie.

86

Daily and Retrospective Mood and Physical Symptom Self-Reports and Their Relationship to the Menstrual Cycle.  

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The literature on the relationships between changes in mood and the menstrual cycle reveals many inconsistencies due to the absence of certain control procedures. Daily self-reports of moods and physical symptoms were collected from women with normal cycles, women using oral contraceptives, and men for 35 days in a camouflaged study. Retrospective…

Swandby, Janet R.

87

Efecto de diversas actividades físicas en el estado anímico depresivo en estudiantes universitarios costarricenses Effect of physical activities on depressive mood in Costa Rican university students  

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Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar el efecto de actividades físicas en el estado anímico depresivo de estudiantes universitarios costarricenses. Método: Participaron 522 estudiantes (259 mujeres y 263 hombres matriculados en la Universidad de Costa Rica. Se construyeron dos categorías según la finalidad del curso matriculado: a acondicionamiento físico (n = 208 y b actividad deportiva (n = 314. Los instrumentos: Perfil de Estados Anímicos (POMS y el Inventario de Depresión de Beck (BDI-II, se aplicaron al inicio, a la segunda semana y al final del curso. El programa fue de 12 semanas. Resultados: el 16.25% del estudiantado presentó síntomas depresivos entre leve y severo. Se encontró una correlación significativa entre el Índice de masa Corporal y los síntomas de depresión para quienes obtuvieron puntajes de depresión entre leve, moderada y severa (r = 0.224; p = 0.041. Se encontraron porcentajes de cambio diferentes para el constructo depresión cuando los participantes realizaron actividades deportivas o de acondicionamiento físico; sin embargo, éstos variaron según el instrumento utilizado. Con el BDI-II ambos grupos experimentaron reducción significativa en depresión (p Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of physical activities on the depressive mood of Costa Rican university students. Methods: Participants were 522 students (259 females and 263 males attending the University of Costa Rica. Two categories were constructed based on the registered course goal: a fitness class (n = 208 and b sports class (n= 314. The data collection instruments Profile of Mood States (POMS and Beck’s Depression Inventory II (BDI-II were filled out at the beginning of the semester, two-weeks after, and at the end of the course. The course duration was 12 weeks long. Results: 16.25% of the students showed light and severe depressive symptoms. A significant correlation between body mass index and depression symptoms was found among participants scoring light, moderate and severe depression mood (r =0.224; p = 0.041. Percentage change scores were found for the depression construct when participants performed sports or fitness activities; however, scores varied according to the measurement instrument used. When the BDI-II scale was used both groups showed a significant reduction in depression (p < 0.05 and when POMS scale was used the scores increased. Discussion: Finally, significant stability coefficients were found in the POMS subscales (p < 0.001 and an acceptable reliability coefficient was found for the BBI-II scale (r = 0.604; p < 0.001. In conclusion, in order to study the chronic effect of a physical activity intervention on depressive symptoms a measurement instrument such as the BDI-II is required.

Cinthya Campos Salazar

2012-06-01

88

Depression  

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Abstract Health Issue Depression causes significant distress or impairment in physical, social, occupational and other key areas of functioning. Women are approximately twice as likely as men to experience depression. Psychosocial factors likely mediate the risks for depression incurred by biological influences. Key Findings Data from the 1999 National Population Health Survey show that depression is more common among Canadian women, with an annual self-reported...

2004-01-01

89

Individual differences in the effects of mood on sexuality: the revised Mood and Sexuality Questionnaire (MSQ-R).  

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Previous research using the Mood and Sexuality Questionnaire (MSQ) has revealed substantial variability in how negative mood impacts sexual response and behavior. However, the MSQ does not address differences between desire for solo or partnered sexual activity, examine the effects of sexual activity on mood, or assess the effects of positive mood. This article presents the development and factor structure of the Revised Mood and Sexuality Questionnaire (MSQ-R). An exploratory factor analysis in a sample of heterosexual men, homosexual men, and heterosexual women (N = 1,983) produced eight factors. Considerable variability was found in how moods influence sexual desire and arousal, in the effects of mood on sexual behavior, and in the reciprocal effects of sexual activity on mood. Among other findings, heterosexual women were less likely than heterosexual men and homosexual men to experience increased sexual desire and arousal when anxious or stressed, whereas homosexual men and heterosexual women were less likely than heterosexual men to experience increased desire when sad or depressed. Heterosexual men and heterosexual women were more likely than homosexual men to report increased desire when in a positive mood. Intercorrelations and correlations with various sexual behaviors varied by group. Limitations and implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:22963331

Janssen, Erick; Macapagal, Kathryn R; Mustanski, Brian

2013-01-01

90

Individual Differences in the Effects of Mood on Sexuality: The Revised Mood and Sexuality Questionnaire (MSQ-R)  

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Previous research using the Mood and Sexuality Questionnaire (MSQ) has revealed substantial variability in how negative mood impacts sexual response and behavior. However, the MSQ does not address differences between desire for solo or partnered sexual activity, examine the effects of sexual activity on mood, or assess the effects of positive mood. This paper presents the development and factor structure of the Revised Mood and Sexuality Questionnaire (MSQ-R). An exploratory factor analysis in a sample of heterosexual men, homosexual men, and heterosexual women (N = 1983) produced 8 factors. Considerable variability was found in how moods influence sexual desire and arousal, in the effects of mood on sexual behavior, and in the reciprocal effects of sexual activity on mood. Among other findings, heterosexual women were less likely than heterosexual and homosexual men to experience increased sexual desire and arousal when anxious or stressed, whereas homosexual men and heterosexual women were less likely than heterosexual men to experience increased desire when sad or depressed. Heterosexual men and women were more likely than homosexual men to report increased desire when in a positive mood. Intercorrelations and correlations with various sexual behaviors varied by group. Limitations and implications of the findings are discussed.

Janssen, Erick; Macapagal, Kathryn R.; Mustanski, Brian

2013-01-01

91

Progress in understanding mood disorders: optogenetic dissection of neural circuits.  

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Major depression is characterized by a cluster of symptoms that includes hopelessness, low mood, feelings of worthlessness and inability to experience pleasure. The lifetime prevalence of major depression approaches 20%, yet current treatments are often inadequate both because of associated side effects and because they are ineffective for many people. In basic research, animal models are often used to study depression. Typically, experimental animals are exposed to acute or chronic stress to generate a variety of depression-like symptoms. Despite its clinical importance, very little is known about the cellular and neural circuits that mediate these symptoms. Recent advances in circuit-targeted approaches have provided new opportunities to study the neuropathology of mood disorders such as depression and anxiety. We review recent progress and highlight some studies that have begun tracing a functional neuronal circuit diagram that may prove essential in establishing novel treatment strategies in mood disorders. First, we shed light on the complexity of mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) responses to stress by discussing two recent studies reporting that optogenetic activation of midbrain DA neurons can induce or reverse depression-related behaviors. Second, we describe the role of the lateral habenula circuitry in the pathophysiology of depression. Finally, we discuss how the prefrontal cortex controls limbic and neuromodulatory circuits in mood disorders. PMID:23682971

Lammel, S; Tye, K M; Warden, M R

2014-01-01

92

MOOD PROFILING DURING OLYMPIC QUALIFYING JUDO COMPETITION: A CASE STUDY TESTING TRANSACTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS  

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Full Text Available This case study investigated relationships between personality, mood states changes, coping strategies, self-set goals, and self-efficacy in an elite judo player. A transactional perspective of psychological responses over time was used to guide data analysis. The ambient mood is proposed to contribute to the interpretation of, and reaction to, events during competition, which lead to subsequent emotional responses. A male international Judo player completed a number of self-report measures before and during a 4-contest tournament. Measures included the EPQ, MCOPE, Brunel Mood Scale, self-set goals, and self-efficacy for goal attainment. State measures were completed after every contest. Results indicated high scores of self-efficacy to achieve performance goals and outcome goals. Pre-competition mood results indicated high scores on the Vigor and Anger subscales with moderate scores for Tension, and zero scores for Depressed mood, a mood profile that remained relatively stable after winning his first two contests. After losing his third contest, he reported symptoms of Depressed mood and indicated using self-blame as coping strategy during the contest. Before the fourth contest, he coped by using planning and increasing effort. These coping strategies were associated with reductions in Depressed mood and increases in Vigor. After finding out his next contest was against a former World Championship bronze medalist, self-set goals became performance and process with no outcome goal. On losing this contest, scores on the Anger and Depression subscales increased sharply, Fatigue scores increased slightly and Tension and Vigor reduced. Self-blame was used as a coping strategy when experiencing unpleasant emotions. Findings suggest that self-blame was associated with negative psychological states comprising depressed mood. Increasing effort and planning were associated with positive psychological states. Collectively, findings emphasize the value of using a transactional design to explore mood changes over time, and future research should investigate the effectiveness of applied interventions

Matthew J. Stevens

2006-07-01

93

Anomalous Functional Brain Activation Following Negative Mood Induction in Children with Pre-School Onset Major Depression  

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While major depressive disorder has been shown to be a significant mental health issue for school-age children, recent research indicates that depression can be observed in children as early as the preschool period. Yet, little work has been done to explore the neurobiological factors associated with this early form of depression. Given research suggesting a relation between adult depression and anomalies in emotion-related neural circuitry, the goal of the current study was to elucidate chan...

Pagliaccio, David; Luby, Joan; Gaffrey, Mike; Belden, Andrew; Botteron, Kelly; Gotlib, Ian H.; Barch, Deanna M.

2012-01-01

94

Rumination, Mood and Cognitive Performance  

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Rumination, DEFINED AS REPETITIVE, RECURRENT AND UNCONTROLLABLE THINKING, has been implicated in cognitive impairments, particularly dysexecutive function, in people with depressed mood, what is now critical is an examination of the link between rumination and cognitive impairment independent of mood. Rumination’s direct relationship to basic cognitive functions may help explain the stability of rumination, and how it pre...

Brinker, Jay K.; Mel Campisi; Laura Gibbs; Rebekah Izzard

2013-01-01

95

Sociodemographic and Clinical Factors Associated with Depression in Epilepsy  

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The impact of mood disorders on patients with epilepsy is an important and growing area of research. If clinicians are adept at recognizing which patients with epilepsy are at risk for mood disorders, treatment can be facilitated and morbidity avoided. We completed a case-control study (80 depressed subjects, 141 non-depressed subjects) to determine the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with self-reported depression in people with epilepsy. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 wa...

Thompson, Alexander W.; Miller, John W.; Katon, Wayne; Chaytor, Naomi; Ciechanowski, Paul

2009-01-01

96

A Test of the Effects of Acute Sleep Deprivation on General and Specific Self-Reported Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms: An Experimental Extension  

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Evidence indicates acute sleep deprivation affects negative mood states. The present study experimentally tested the effects of acute sleep deprivation on self-reported symptoms of state anxiety and depression as well as general distress among 88 physically and psychologically healthy adults. As hypothesized, the effects of acute sleep deprivation increased state anxiety and depression, as well as general distress, relative to a normal night of sleep control condition. Based on the tripartite...

Babson, Kimberly A.; Trainor, Casey D.; Feldner, Matthew T.; Blumenthal, Heidemarie

2010-01-01

97

Mood changes following golf among senior recreational players.  

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Golf has been recommended as a relatively risk-free form of exercise for an ageing population. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of playing a round of golf on mood states in recreational players. Ageing male golfers (N = 34; Age: M = 68.7, SD = 5.4 years) completed a mood measure immediately before and after an 18-hole round of golf. Distance walked per game was measured using a pedometer. Results indicate reported scores on Anger, Depression, and Fatigue increased and Vigor reduced following the game. However, it should be noted that although there was an increase in unpleasant mood states, this should be seen in the context of the overall mood profile, which was positive. Pedometer results indicated golfers walked a mean distance of 10.21 km (± 1.11). Results show participants of this age-group engaged in a meaningful exercise session and that mood scores deteriorated following play. Findings from the present study show that elderly golfers experienced mood profiles following golf similar to younger athletes following competition. For golf to be recommended as an activity for promoting physical activity among an aging population, the player's ability to regulate unpleasant mood states should be considered. Future research should investigate the effects of experiencing negative mood states following golf on motivation to participate. Key PointsFindings show ageing male golfers engaged in a meaningful exercise session and that mood scores deteriorated following play.Mood profiles before and after playing golf for elderly golfers were similar to younger athletes following competition.For golf to be recommended as an activity for promoting physical activity among an aging population, the player's ability to regulate unpleasant mood states should be considered. PMID:24431960

Lane, Andrew M; Jarrett, Haydn

2005-03-01

98

Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial of an SSRI vs Bupropion: Effects on Suicidal Behavior, Ideation, and Mood in Major Depression  

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Randomized controlled trials in depressed patients selected for elevated suicidal risk are rare. The resultant lack of data leaves uncertainty about treatment in this population. This study compared a serotonin reuptake inhibitor with a noradrenergic/dopaminergic antidepressant in major depression with elevated suicidal risk factors. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, clinical pilot trial of paroxetine (N=36) or bupropion (N=38) in DSM IV major depression with a suicide attempt history ...

Grunebaum, Michael F.; Ellis, Steven P.; Duan, Naihua; Burke, Ainsley K.; Oquendo, Maria A.; John Mann, J.

2012-01-01

99

A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation for Work Stress, Anxiety and Depressed Mood in Full-Time Workers  

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Objective. To assess the effect of meditation on work stress, anxiety and mood in full-time workers. Methods. 178 adult workers participated in an 8-week, 3-arm randomized controlled trial comparing a “mental silence” approach to meditation (n = 59) to a “relaxation” active control (n = 56) and a wait-list control (n = 63). Participants were assessed before and after using Psychological Strain Questionnaire (PSQ), a subscale of the larger Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI), the State...

Manocha, R.; Black, D.; Sarris, J.; Stough, C.

2011-01-01

100

Mood congruence effect in autobiographical recall: Is mood a mediator?  

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Full Text Available In the present study we test the hypothesis that the effect of mood congruence in autobiographical recall is underlain by mood. Thirty-eight female participants were subjected to positive, negative and neutral mood inductions, and then asked to recall three personal memories. Participants’ mood was assessed using self-report questionnaires and by electromyograph (EMG measurements of corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major muscle activity. We replicated the congruence effect between the mood inductions and the valence of the participants’ recalled memories. Furthermore, this effect was mediated by mood, as measured by EMG and self-report questionnaires. The results suggest that mood influences the mood congruence effect in a way that cannot be explained by semantic priming alone.

Dra?e Saša

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
101

Mood-Stabilizers Target the Brain Arachidonic Acid Cascade  

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Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe psychiatric illness characterized by recurrent manic and depressive episodes, without a characteristic neuropathology or clear etiology. Drugs effective in BD target many key signaling pathways in animal and cell studies. However, their mode of action in the BD brain remains elusive. In the rat brain, some of the mood stabilizers effective in treating mania (lithium, carbamazepine, valproate) or depression (lamotrigine) in BD are reported to decrease transcri...

Rao, Jagadeesh S.; Rapoport, Stanley I.

2009-01-01

102

Testosterone and Depression  

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Full Text Available Androgens have various effects on human body and mood. Testosterone, a hormone mainly secreted from testes and adrenals, is one of the most potent androgens. Multiple studies have found that testosterone plays a role in regulating sexual activity, libido, social behaviors, aggression, cognitive functions, sleep control and well-being in men and women. Testosterone deficiency in hypogonadic or elderly men leads to neuropsychiatric problems, such as fatigue, loss of libido, irritability, insomnia and depressive mood. Testosterone replacement therapy consistently reverses these sequel in men. On the other hand, hyperandrogenic states in women are related to aggression and antisocial behavior, which might lead to depressive mood. Low testosterone levels may also result in depression among oophorectomized women. Because of such effects, a relationship between testosterone and depression has long been an issue of speculation, but yet very few studies have addressed this relation. Along with clinical studies, experimental and epidemiological studies show that testosterone is related to depression in men and women. But studies of testosterone concentrations in depression have yielded inconsistent results reporting low as well as high testosterone levels associated with depression. In this article, the physiological and psychological effects of testosterone and evidence regarding its relationship to depressive disorders and possible gender differences have been reviewed.

?ükrü Kartalc?

2010-12-01

103

Antidepressive therapy with escitalopram improves mood, cognitive symptoms, and identity memory for angry faces in elderly depressed patients  

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Depression is a common disorder in the elderly handicapping patients with affective and cognitive symptoms. Because of their good tolerability relative to the older tricyclic compounds, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are increasingly used for the treatment of depression in the elderly. Little is known about their effects on cognition in elderly patients. In the present 4-wk, single-centre, randomized, open-label trial we investigated the antidepressive effects of escitalopram...

2008-01-01

104

Major Depression in a Brazilian Amazon Woman with Down Syndrome: A Case Report  

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Full Text Available We report on a 28 years-old woman with Down syndrome and moderate intellectual disability that was referred to us with a 1-month history of progressive change from being cheerful and cooperative to becoming socially withdrawn, tearful, apathetic and disinterested in activities. She had also shown behavioral deterioration with loss of adaptive skills. Her appetite decreased, leading to a 10 kg weight loss, and she developed initial insomnia. The patient was treated with fluoxetine at 20 mg each day. She made a complete recovery over one month, and 15 months after the beginning of pharmacologic therapy, continued to be free of depressive symptoms. Although major depression is not commonly associated with Down’s syndrome, the diagnosis of this mood disorder must be considered when alterations of vegetative functions and activity are observed.

Dárcio Marcel Castelo de Souza

2008-01-01

105

Does the Use of an Automated Tool for Self-Reporting Mood by Patients With Bipolar Disorder Bias the Collected Data?  

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Abstract and Introduction Abstract Context Automating data collection from patients can improve data quality, enhance compliance, and decrease costs in longitudinal studies. About half of all households in industrialized countries now have a home computer. Objective While we previously validated the ChronoRecord software for self-reporting mood on a home computer with patients who have bipolar disorder, this study further investigates whether this technology created a bias in the collected data. Methods During the validation study, 80 of 96 (83%) patients returned 8662 days of data (mean, 114.7 ± 32.3 SD days). The patients' demographics were compared with those of similar longitudinal studies in which patients used paper-based data collection tools. In addition, because demographic characteristics may influence attitudes toward technology, observer-rated scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale were used to group patients by severity of illness, and the self-reported mood ratings were analyzed for evidence of bias from the patients' gender, ethnicity, diagnosis, age, disability status, or years of education. Analysis was performed using the 2-way analysis of variance and general linear model. Results The patients' demographic characteristics were very similar to those of patients with bipolar disorder who participated in comparable longitudinal studies using paper-based tools. After grouping the patients by severity of illness, none of the demographic variables had a significant effect on the patients' self-reported mood using the automated tool. Conclusion The use of a computer does not seem to bias sample data. As with studies using paper-based self-reporting, results from studies of patients using ChronoRecord software on a home computer to report mood can be generalized. Introduction Bipolar disorder is a leading cause of disability among both physical and psychiatric illnesses[1] and is the most expensive psychiatric diagnosis in the United States for patients and their insurance plans.[2] Bipolar disorder is difficult to study, as the course of disease is episodic, recurrent,[3] and characterized by both interindividual variation and heterogeneity among patients.[4–6] While the inherent complexity and chronicity make longitudinal studies an effective methodology, there are several problems with the paper-based instruments most common in these studies: the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) LifeChart Method[7]; the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) Mood Chart[8]; and the ChronoSheet.[9] Specifically: Data entry from paper-based forms is expensive, slow, and associated with high error rates that affect the quality of the data.Patients frequently complete paper-based forms sporadically,[10] often just before a study visit, and retrospective recall can be inaccurate.[11]Longitudinal studies are often associated with high rates of missing data and unbalanced numbers of observations from participants.[12]Patients with conditions, such as chronic pain or asthma, often prefer an automated approach, thereby increasing compliance with electronic rather than paper diaries.[13,14] To improve on the available paper-based tools, we developed an automated tool (ChronoRecord) for daily self-reporting of mood, sleep, and medications by patients with mood disorders.[15] In our validation study, 80 of 96 (83%) patients with bipolar disorder from 3 locations showed high acceptance of the computerized approach, entering 8662 days of data for a 3-month period (mean, 114.7 ± 32.3 SD days). The mean percentage of days missing for mood data was 6.1% ± 9.3 SD, which was equivalent to missing 7.3 of the 114.7 days. Concurrent validity was found between the observer ratings on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD)[16] and the self-reported ChronoRecord mood ratings. While it is generally accepted that using a paper-based data collection tool does not yield biased data from patients with bipolar disorder, automating self-reporting of m

Bauer, Michael; Rasgon, Natalie; Grof, Paul; Gyulai, Laszlo; Glenn, Tasha; Whybrow, Peter C.

2005-01-01

106

The Misdiagnosis of “Depression  

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The author employs recent diagnostic criteria to distinguish between depressive illness (major depressive episode) and other conditions involving depressive mood that more commonly present to the family physician. Relative indications for antidepressant medication and for two types of psychotherapy are discussed. The potential results of routinely prescribing antidepressants to patients who complain of depressive mood are outlined.

Steinberg, Paul Ian

1989-01-01

107

Temper outbursts in paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder and their association with depressed mood and treatment outcome.  

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Temper outbursts in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are a common source of concern, but remain poorly understood. This study examined a set of hypotheses related to: (a) the prevalence of temper outbursts in paediatric OCD, (b) the associations of temper outbursts with OCD severity and depressive symptoms; and (c) the influence of temper outbursts on treatment response.

Krebs, G.; Bolhuis, K.; Heyman, I.; Mataix-cols, D.; Turner, C.; Stringaris, A.

2013-01-01

108

Lifetime comorbidities between social phobia and mood disorders in the U.S. National Comorbidity Survey  

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Background. General population data were used to study co-morbidities between lifetime social phobia and mood disorders. Methods. Data come from the US National Comorbidity Survey (NCS). Results. Strong associations exist between lifetime social phobia and major depressive disorder (odds ratio 2·9), dysthymia (2·7) and bipolar disorder (5·9). Odds ratios increase in magnitude with number of social fears. Reported age of onset is earlier for social phobia than mood disorders in the va...

Kessler, Ronald C.; Stang, Paul; Wittchen, Hans-ulrich; Stein, Murray B.; Walters, Ellen E.

2013-01-01

109

Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium Cleptomanía, distúrbio do humor e lítio  

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Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.Os ...

Fábio Lopes Rocha; Maria Elizabete Guimarães Rocha

1992-01-01

110

Maternal mood, video-mediated cognitions, and daily stress during home-based, family interactions.  

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This article presents an in vivo investigation of maternal negative mood, maternal video-mediated cognitions, and daily stressors in families with young children. Specifically, it was hypothesized that greater levels of maternal depressed, anxious, and hostile mood states immediately prior to a daily, reportedly routine, stressful parent-child interaction would be significantly associated with higher percentages of dysfunctional and lower percentages of functional cognitions. Forty-five mothers of 2- to 5-year-old children participated in this study by rating their mood before being videotaped in a daily routine with their child they reported as recurrent and stressful (e.g., mealtime). Using video-mediated recall (VMR) methodology, mothers were instructed to recall their cognitions upon immediate video review. Results indicated that greater levels of negative mood were associated with a greater percentage of dysfunctional cognitions and a smaller percentage of functional cognitions. Levels of maternal depressed mood were significantly and independently associated with greater rates of dysfunctional and lower rates of functional cognitions. Negative mood states were not consistently associated with the amount of maternal self-reported general irrationality, pointing to the utility of the VMR to elicit maternal cognitions specific to the observed interaction, which may have more implications for clinical intervention than more general irrationality measures. Evaluating maternal mood and using video-mediated maternal cognitions regarding daily family stressors can precipitate clinical interventions meant to reduce family-related stress and potentially improve maternal and child mental health outcomes. PMID:20954773

Ohr, Phyllis S; Vidair, Hilary B; Gunlicks-Stoessel, Meredith; Grove, Allen B; La Lima, Candice

2010-10-01

111

Social Anxiety Disorder and Mood Disorders Comorbidity  

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Full Text Available Social Anxiety Disorder is a common disorder leading functional impairment. The comorbidity between mood disorders with social anxiety disorder is relatively common. This comorbidity impacts the clinical severity, resistance and functionality of patients. The systematic evaluation of the comorbidity in both patient groups should not be ignored and be carefully conducted. In general, social anxiety disorder starts at an earlier age than mood disorders and is reported to be predictor for subsequent major depression. The absence of comorbidity in patients with social anxiety disorder is a predictor of good response to treatment. In bipolar disorder patients with comorbid social anxiety disorder, there is an increased level of general psychopathology. Besides, they have poor outcome and increased risk of suicide. In this article, comorbidity between these two disorders has been evaluated in detail.

Zerrin Binbay

2012-03-01

112

A Pilot Evaluation of Associations Between Displayed Depression References on Facebook and Self-reported Depression Using a Clinical Scale  

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The objective of this study was to determine associations between displayed depression symptoms on Facebook and self-reported depression symptoms using a clinical screen. Public Facebook profiles of undergraduates from two universities were examined for displayed depression references. Profiles were categorized as depression symptom displayers or non-displayers. Participants completed an online PHQ-9 depression scale. Analyses examined associations between PHQ-9 score and depression symptom d...

Moreno, Megan Andreas; Christakis, Dimitri A.; Egan, Katie G.; Jelenchick, Lauren A.; Cox, Elizabeth; Young, Henry; Villiard, Hope; Becker, Tara

2012-01-01

113

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... millions of people every year. Depression has an impact on most aspects of everyday life. It affects ... of Depression Combination of genetic, psychological, and environmental factors can cause depression. Major depression is often associated ...

114

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... life. In addition, depression affects the people who love and care about the person who is depressed. ... guide you toward helping yourself or someone you love who may be suffering from depression. Depression Feeling ...

115

Yes, You Can Catch a Bad Mood on Facebook  

Science.gov (United States)

... Yes, You Can Catch a Bad Mood on Facebook Researchers report that emotions spread through online world, ... News) -- Before you post your latest mood on Facebook, consider whether it's a mood you want your ...

116

Benefits from aerobic exercise in patients with major depression: a pilot study  

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Background—Several reports indicate that physical activity can reduce the severity of symptoms in depressed patients. Some data suggest that even a single exercise bout may result in a substantial mood improvement.

Dimeo, F.; Bauer, M.; Varahram, I.; Proest, G.; Halter, U.

2001-01-01

117

The Influence of Caregiver Depressive Symptoms on Proxy Report of Youth Depressive Symptoms: A Test of the Depression-Distortion Hypothesis in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes  

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Objective?To test the depression-distortion hypothesis in pediatric type 1 diabetes.?Methods?In a sample of 187 youth with type 1 diabetes, caregivers completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI): parent proxy report. Youth completed the CDI. To test whether caregiver depressive symptoms (CES-D) moderated the proxy report of youth depressive symptoms (CDI:P), the CDI, CES-D, and their interactions were entered as p...

Hood, Korey K.

2009-01-01

118

Signs and Symptoms of Mood Disorders  

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... surrounding the illnesses or the fear associated with stigma. The following information can help you learn more ... the symptoms for the depressive phase of the illness are similar. People who ... mental activity and energy Heightened mood, exaggerated optimism and ...

119

Examining the effects of perceived social support on momentary mood and symptom reports in asthma and arthritis patients.  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: Social support has been linked to beneficial effects on health directly (main effect) and as a buffer to stress. Most research, however, has examined these relationships using global and retrospective assessments of health and stress, which may be subject to recall biases. This study used ambulatory ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods to test the main and stress-buffering effects of social support on the daily health and well-being of asthma and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Design: Community volunteers with asthma (n?=?97) or RA (n?=?31) responded to EMA prompts five times daily for one week. Main outcomes: Baseline perceived social support was obtained, and then, participants reported mood, stress and symptoms using EMA. Multilevel mixed-modelling examined whether social support predicted mood and symptoms directly or via stress-reducing effects. Results: Supporting a main effect, more perceived social support predicted decreased negative mood and stress severity. Supporting a stress-buffering effect, more perceived social support resulted in fewer reported symptoms when stress was present. Conclusion: Results suggest perceived social support directly relates to better ambulatory status and dynamically buffers individuals against the negative effects of stressors, and highlight the importance of studying social support across different temporal and contextual levels. PMID:24568534

Smyth, Joshua M; Zawadzki, Matthew J; Santuzzi, Alecia M; Filipkowski, Kelly B

2014-07-01

120

Restriction of meat, fish, and poultry in omnivores improves mood: A pilot randomized controlled trial  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Omnivorous diets are high in arachidonic acid (AA compared to vegetarian diets. Research shows that high intakes of AA promote changes in brain that can disturb mood. Omnivores who eat fish regularly increase their intakes of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, fats that oppose the negative effects of AA in vivo. In a recent cross-sectional study, omnivores reported significantly worse mood than vegetarians despite higher intakes of EPA and DHA. This study investigated the impact of restricting meat, fish, and poultry on mood. Findings Thirty-nine omnivores were randomly assigned to a control group consuming meat, fish, and poultry daily (OMN; a group consuming fish 3-4 times weekly but avoiding meat and poultry (FISH, or a vegetarian group avoiding meat, fish, and poultry (VEG. At baseline and after two weeks, participants completed a food frequency questionnaire, the Profile of Mood States questionnaire and the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales. After the diet intervention, VEG participants reduced their EPA, DHA, and AA intakes, while FISH participants increased their EPA and DHA intakes. Mood scores were unchanged for OMN or FISH participants, but several mood scores for VEG participants improved significantly after two weeks. Conclusions Restricting meat, fish, and poultry improved some domains of short-term mood state in modern omnivores. To our knowledge, this is the first trial to examine the impact of restricting meat, fish, and poultry on mood state in omnivores.

Beezhold Bonnie L

2012-02-01

 
 
 
 
121

Nutrition health issues in self-reported postpartum depression  

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Aim In this retrospective survey women with and without self-reported postpartum depression (PPD) were compared in regards to consumption-frequency of foods and supplements rich in nutrients beneficial to nervous system (NS) health, in regards to consumption-frequency of compounds which may counteract the effect of the above and in regards to nutritional support provided to them during a pregnancy between 2003 and 2008. Background Postpartum depression (PPD) is defined as a major depressive episode that begins within 1 month of delivery and is experienced by roughly 13% of mothers. Patients and methods Four Hundred participants were recruited through the internet. Data gathered via multiple choice questionnaires was statistically analyzed using SPSS and Statistical software; statistical procedures included discriminant analysis, Pearson's product moment correlation, independent t-test and cross-tabulations. Results Out of 400 participants 83 (20.8%) were affected by self-reported depression after a pregnancy between 2003 and 2008. Depressed subjects consumed oily fish and offal significantly more often than non depressed subjects. Depression was more prevalent among women with vegetarian diets. No significant difference concerning food group intake or the ratios between foods rich in nutrients beneficial to NS health and foods rich in compounds antagonising their effect were found between depressed and non depressed subjects. Iron supplementation correlated positively with zinc supplementation in both groups. Roughly 70% of women reported to have received no information about n-3 fatty acid fish oils during pregnancy; informed subjects consumed fish oils more often. The majority of subjects with self-reported depression described nutritional support during pregnancy as inadequate. Conclusion Within this Austrian sample, the prevalence rate of postpartum depression was high; while the consumption of oily fish and vegetarian diets negatively correlated with depression, Patient information positively correlated with the consumption of fish oil supplements. These results indicate that further studies will be required in order to establish the exact relationship between nutrition and mental health during and after pregnancy.

Mortimore, Denise; Snow, Sarah

2011-01-01

122

Job strain and the risk of depression: is reporting biased?  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

It is unknown whether the relation between job strain and depression reflects causal characteristics of the working environment or reporting bias. The authors investigated reporting bias by analyzing individual versus work-unit measures of job strain and the risk of depressive symptoms (n = 287) and a diagnosis of depression (n = 97) among 4,291 employees within 378 work units in Aarhus, Denmark, 2007. All participants reported psychological demands and decision latitude, and the authors estimated mean values for each work unit. The odds ratios predicting depressive symptoms or a diagnosis of depression for the highest versus the lowest levels of individual, self-reported high psychological demands and low decision latitude were significantly increased above 2.5. When participants were classified by the work-unit mean levels, these associations were substantially smaller. For depressive symptoms, the odds ratios were 1.49 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88, 2.53) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.84, 1.39), respectively, for psychological demands and decision latitude. For a diagnosis of depression, the odds ratios were 1.33 (95% CI: 0.57, 3.09) and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.68, 1.56), respectively, for psychological demands and decision latitude. These findings indicate that reporting bias inflates associations between job strain and the occurrence of depression, if studies rely on individual self-reports

Kolstad, H. A.; Hansen, A. M.

2011-01-01

123

Mood Changes during the Internship.  

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A prospective study using two standardized psychological tests, the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), was conducted to quantify the emotional changes experienced by internal medicine house staff during the internship. (Author/MLW)

Uliana, Regina L.; And Others

1984-01-01

124

Mood Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

... nature of this and other mood disorders, effective intervention early in life may help reduce future burden and ... other early indicators that can be used for early treatment or prevention. ... than weeks. Recent findings suggest these and other medications may have fast acting ...

125

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... Causes of Depression Combination of genetic, psychological, and environmental factors can cause depression. Major depression is often ... The diagnosis includes a physical examination, a complete history of symptoms, and a mental status examination. Diagnosis ...

126

Reproductive Hormones and Mood Disorders  

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Full Text Available During the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and breast-feeding periods, as well as in menopausal and post-menopausal periods, the physiological and psychological processes that change according to the hormonal fluctuations influence every women similarly and each one differently. These physiological processes are controlled by neuroendocrine sequences, of which the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis are the most important ones. The hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis affects mood, anxiety, cognition and pain. The interaction of these hormones with mood and behavior is bidirectional. The differences in phenomenology and epidemiology of mood disorders with regards to gender can be explained with the effects of hormones. All of the periods mentioned above are related with mood disorders at terms of risk factors, disease symptoms, progress of disease and response to treatment. Epidemiologic data supports the relationship between the mood disorders and reproductive processes. The prevalence of major depression increases in women with the menarche and ceases in post- menopausal period. Similarly, the initial symptoms of bipolar disorder begins around the menarche period in 50% of the cases. Despite proper treatment, some female patients with major depression experience recurrence during the premenstrual period of their menstrual cycles. The conformity and change in a woman’s brain during pregnancy is controlled dominantly by the neuroendocrine systems, while it is controlled by the external stimuli actively related to the baby during nursing period. The changes that occur are closely related to postpartum mood disorders. Again, all the changes and suspension of medication during this procedure are risk factors for early depressive and dysphoric situations. Variables of a wide range, from follicle stimulating hormone, melatonin, and sleep to body mass index interact with mood disorders in menopausal and post-menopausal periods. Interest on the effects of gonadal steroids on the central nervous system has grown parallel with our increasing knowledge. In the last decade, the place of hormonal treatments in the treatment of mood disorders have been discussed continously. During this period, along with the anti-depressant efficacy of estrogen, anti-manic efficacy of tamoxifen was also demonstrated in several studies. In this paper, the complex relationship between the physiological changes and the mood disorders during a menstrual cycle, pregnancy, nursing, menopausal and post-menopausal periods are briefly reviewed and discussed over the reproductive hormones in the context of etiology, phenomenology and treatment.

Sermin Kesebir

2010-12-01

127

Spotlight on depression: a Pharma Matters report.  

Science.gov (United States)

Depression represents a huge pharmaceutical market opportunity. There are approximately 350 million people worldwide with depression, and it is the leading cause of disability in the world. In the U.S., 9.1% of the population suffers from depression. Globally, fewer than half of depression sufferers receive treatment for their illness, and in some countries this figure falls to fewer than 1 in 10. The high incidence rate, combined with limited market penetration, makes depression a high potential market for pharmaceuticals. However, companies developing drugs for depression also face a number of serious challenges. Psychosocial treatment options remain the preferred first-line therapy ahead of medication-and when it comes to drug treatment, the abundance of generic options available has significantly contributed to halving the value of the branded antidepressant market over recent years. Another hurdle faced by new drugs is the requirement that all antidepressants carry a black-box warning regarding the increased risk of suicide in children, adolescents and young adults, which limits their use in this population. Switching between medications presents both an opportunity and a challenge, as a significant number of patients will switch away from their first medication within the first year of treatment. The lack of complete understanding of why depression occurs also makes this area a difficult one, although it opens the door for the development of drugs with novel mechanisms of action. PMID:24696870

D'Souza, P; Jago, C

2014-03-01

128

Can mood disorder in women with breast cancer be identified preoperatively?  

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The Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale, a self-report questionnaire, was tested as a method of identifying mood disorder among patients with operable breast cancer during the year after diagnosis. In a cohort of 91 patients anxiety and depression were assessed preoperatively, and at 3 and 12 months post-operatively, using a standardised psychiatric interview and diagnostic rating criteria. The patients also completed the HAD scale at each assessment. Fifty out of 91 (55%) patients we...

Ramirez, A. J.; Richards, M. A.; Jarrett, S. R.; Fentiman, I. S.

1995-01-01

129

USE OF TRANYLCYPROMINE IN SEVERE RESISTANT DEPRESSION : A CASE REPORT  

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This case report describes the improvement obtained by using tranylcypromine in a patient of severe treatment resistant depression. The adverse effects faced and steps taken to overcome them have also been discussed.

Maulik, Pallab K.; Das, Sudipto; Saxena, Shekhar

1999-01-01

130

Rumination, anxiety, depressive symptoms and subsequent depression in adolescents at risk for psychopathology: a longitudinal cohort study  

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Background A ruminative style of responding to low mood is associated with subsequent high depressive symptoms and depressive disorder in children, adolescents and adults. Scores on self-report rumination scales correlate strongly with scores on anxiety and depression symptom scales. This may confound any associations between rumination and subsequent depression. Methods Our sample comprised 658 healthy adolescents at elevated risk for psychopathology. This study applied ordinal item (non-linear) factor analysis to pooled items from three self-report questionnaires to explore whether there were separate, but correlated, constructs of rumination, depression and anxiety. It then tested whether rumination independently predicted depressive disorder and depressive symptoms over the subsequent 12 months, after adjusting for confounding variables. Results We identified a single rumination factor, which was correlated with factors representing cognitive symptoms of depression, somatic symptoms of depression and anxiety symptoms; and one factor representing adaptive responses to low mood. Elevated rumination scores predicted onset of depressive disorders over the subsequent year (p?=?0.035), and levels of depressive symptoms 12 months later (p?depressive and anxiety symptoms. Conclusion High rumination predicts onset of depressive disorder in healthy adolescents. Therapy that reduces rumination and increases distraction/problem-solving may reduce onset and relapse rates of depression.

2013-01-01

131

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... the people who love and care about the person who is depressed. There are several available treatment ... of recovery. Symptoms Sadness becomes depression when a person feels sad all the time. His or her ...

132

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... cause depression. Major depression is often associated with changes in the brain. The brain controls all of ... let your doctor know. He or she may change the dosage or the medication. Do NOT stop ...

133

Depressants  

Science.gov (United States)

... Downloads Drugs Back To Drugs Search Depressants Includes barbiturates (barbs), benzodiazepines (benzos) and sedative-hypnotics. Overview Depressants ... relieve anxiety and muscle spasms, and prevent seizures.Barbiturates are older drugs and include butalbital (Fiorina®), phenobarbital, ...

134

Protocol for a randomised controlled trial investigating self-help email messages for sub-threshold depression: the Mood Memos study  

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Abstract Background Sub-threshold depression is common, impairs functioning, and increases the risk of developing major depression. Although psychological treatments have been investigated for sub-threshold depression, they are costly. A less costly alternative could be an educational health promotion campaign about effective self-help for depression symptoms. The aim of the study is to test the efficacy of a low-cost email-based mental health promotion campaign in changing s...

Morgan Amy J; Jorm Anthony F; Mackinnon Andrew J

2011-01-01

135

Clinical, physical and lifestyle indicators and relationship with cognition and mood in aging: a cross-sectional analysis of distinct educational groups  

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Full Text Available It is relevant to unravel the factors that may mediate the cognitive decline observed during aging. Previous reports indicate that education has a positive influence on cognitive performance, while age, female gender and, especially, depressed mood were associated with poorer performances across multiple cognitive dimensions (memory and general executive function. Herein, the present study aimed to characterize the cognitive performance of community-dwelling individuals within distinct educational groups categorized by the number of completed formal school years: “less than 4”, “4, completed primary education”, and “more than 4”. Participants (n = 1051 were randomly selected from local health registries and representative of the Portuguese population for age and gender. Neurocognitive and clinical assessments were conducted in local health care centers. Structural equation modeling was used to derive a cognitive score, and hierarchical linear regressions were conducted for each educational group. Education, age and depressed mood were significant variables in directly explaining the obtained cognitive score, while gender was found to be an indirect variable. In all educational groups, mood was the most significant factor with effect on cognitive performance. Specifically, a depressed mood led to lower cognitive performance. The clinical disease indices cardiac and stroke associated with a more negative mood, while moderate increases in BMI, alcohol consumption and physical activity associated positively with improved mood and thus benefitted cognitive performance. Results warrant further research on the cause-effect (longitudinal relationship between clinical indices of disease and risk factors and mood and cognition throughout aging.

NadineCorreiaSantos

2014-02-01

136

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... for your specific condition. ©1995-2013, The Patient Education Institute, Inc. www.X-Plain.com mh010106 Last reviewed: 07/28/2013 2 Causes of Depression Combination of genetic, psychological, and environmental factors can cause depression. Major depression is often ...

137

Epidemiology and treatment of mood disorders in a day hospital setting from 1996 to 2007: an Italian study  

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Full Text Available Maria Luca,1 Giuseppa Prossimo,1 Vincenzo Messina,1 Antonina Luca,2 Salvatore Romeo,1 Carmela Calandra11Department of Medical and Surgery Specialties, Psychiatry Unit, 2Department of Neuroscience, University Hospital Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, Catania, Sicily, ItalyBackground: The present study aimed: to assess prescribing patterns in the treatment of major depression, bipolar disorder type I, cyclothymia, and dysthymia from 1996 to 2007 in a day hospital setting; to evaluate the prevalence of the above-mentioned mood disorders and gender distribution; and to relate familiality, comorbidity, and marital status to each diagnosis.Methods: Medical records for 777 day hospital patients with a diagnosis of major depression, bipolar disorder type I, cyclothymia, or dysthymia were grouped into two 6-year periods so as to compare the prescribing patterns of tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, first-generation antipsychotics, second-generation antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers. Gender, prevalence, familiality, comorbidity, and marital status were related to each diagnosis.Results: The most common mood disorder, with a female preponderance, was major depression, regardless of marital status. High percentages of familiality and comorbidity were found for major depression, while a reduction was found in the utilization of tricyclic antidepressants. There was no statistically significant difference in rates of prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, but some irregularities were found upon evaluating each diagnosis (eg, increased utilization of these agents in dysthymia and major depression, respectively. There was an increase in prescriptions for serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, but no marked differences in utilization of noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, which remained basically low. There was no significant difference in prescribing of first-generation antipsychotic agents, although a reduction was found. There was a significant increase in utilization of second-generation antipsychotics and mood stabilizers.Conclusion: Our epidemiological findings are consistent with data reported in the literature regarding the high prevalence of major depression among the mood disorders, as well as the impact of familiality and comorbidity. Analysis of prescribing patterns for antidepressants, antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers in the treatment of mood disorders shows a shift from older to newer drugs, and wider use of mood stabilizers.Keywords: antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, prescribing patterns, mood disorders, treatment

Luca M

2013-02-01

138

Mood after stroke: a case control study of biochemical, neuro-imaging and socio-economic risk factors for major depression in stroke survivors  

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Abstract Background Though vascular factors may be important in the aetiology of late-life depression, it is not clear whether they have a major effect on the risk of depression after a stroke. We investigated the relationship between physiological, biochemical, neuro-imaging and socio-economic factors and late-phase post-stroke depression in a cross-sectional case-control study. Methods People living at home at least 9 months after a stroke were interviewed usi...

2010-01-01

139

Hypomania spectrum disorder in adolescence : a 15-year follow-up of non-mood morbidity in adulthood  

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Background: We investigated whether adolescents with hypomania spectrum episodes have an excess risk of mental and physical morbidity in adulthood, as compared with adolescents exclusively reporting major depressive disorder (MDD) and controls without a history of adolescent mood disorders. Methods: A community sample of adolescents (N = 2 300) in the town of Uppsala, Sweden, was screened for depressive symptoms. Both participants with positive screening and matched controls (in total 631) we...

Pa?a?ren, Aivar; Bohman, Hannes; Von Knorring, Anne-liis; Von Knorring, Lars; Olsson, Gunilla; Jonsson, Ulf

2014-01-01

140

Screening for depressed mood in an adolescent psychiatric context by brief self-assessment scales – testing psychometric validity of WHO-5 and BDI-6 indices by latent trait analyses  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depressive disorder is prevalent in the adolescent psychiatric clinical setting and often comorbid with other primary psychiatric diagnoses such as ADHD or social anxiety disorder. Systematic manual-based diagnostic procedures are recommended to identify such comorbidity but they are time-consuming and often not fully implemented in clinical practice. Screening for depressive symptoms in the child psychiatric context using brief, user-friendly and easily managed self-assessment scales may be of clinical value and utility. The aim of the study is to test the psychometric validity of two such scales, which may be used in a two-step screening procedure, the WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5 and the six-item version of Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI-6. Method 66 adolescent psychiatric patients with a clinical diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD, 60 girls and 6 boys, aged 14–18 years, mean age 16.8 years, completed the WHO-5 scale as well as the BDI-6. Statistical validity was tested by Mokken and Rasch analyses. Results The correlation between WHO-5 and BDI-6 was ?0.49 (p=0.0001. Mokken analyses showed a coefficient of homogeneity for the WHO-5 of 0.52 and for the BDI-6 of 0.46. Rasch analysis also accepted unidimensionality when testing males versus females (p > 0.05. Conclusions The WHO-5 is psychometrically valid in an adolescent psychiatric context including both genders to assess the wellness dimension and applicable as a first step in screening for MDD. The BDI-6 may be recommended as a second step in the screening procedure, since it is statistically valid and has the ability to unidimensionally capture the severity of depressed mood.

Blom Eva Henje

2012-12-01

 
 
 
 
141

Screening for depressed mood in an adolescent psychiatric context by brief self-assessment scales -- testing psychometric validity of WHO-5 and BDI-6 indices by latent trait analyses  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder is prevalent in the adolescent psychiatric clinical setting and often comorbid with other primary psychiatric diagnoses such as ADHD or social anxiety disorder. Systematic manual-based diagnostic procedures are recommended to identify such comorbidity but they are time-consuming and often not fully implemented in clinical practice. Screening for depressive symptoms in the child psychiatric context using brief, user-friendly and easily managed self-assessment scales may be of clinical value and utility. The aim of the study is to test the psychometric validity of two such scales, which may be used in a two-step screening procedure, the WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5) and the six-item version of Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-6). METHOD: 66 adolescent psychiatric patients with a clinical diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD), 60 girls and 6 boys, aged 14--18 years, mean age 16.8 years, completed the WHO-5 scale as well as the BDI-6. Statistical validitywas tested by Mokken and Rasch analyses. RESULTS: The correlation between WHO-5 and BDI-6 was -0.49 (p=0.0001). Mokken analyses showed a coefficient of homogeneity for the WHO-5 of 0.52 and for the BDI-6 of 0.46. Rasch analysis also accepted unidimensionality when testing males versus females (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The WHO-5 is psychometrically valid in an adolescent psychiatric context including both genders to assess the wellness dimension and applicable as a first step in screening for MDD. The BDI-6 may be recommended as a second step in the screening procedure, since it is statistically valid and has the ability to unidimensionally capture the severity of depressed mood.

Blom, Eva Henje; Bech, Per

2012-01-01

142

Magnetic resonance imaging of a randomized controlled trial investigating predictors of recovery following psychological treatment in adolescents with moderate to severe unipolar depression: study protocol for Magnetic Resonance-Improving Mood with Psychoanalytic and Cognitive Therapies (MR-IMPACT)  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Major depressive disorders (MDD) are a debilitating and pervasive group of mental illnesses afflicting many millions of people resulting in the loss of 110 million working days and more than 2,500 suicides per annum. Adolescent MDD patients attending NHS clinics show high rates of recurrence into adult life. A meta-analysis of recent research shows that psychological treatments are not as efficacious as previously thought. Modest treatment outcomes of approximately 65% of cases responding suggest that aetiological and clinical heterogeneity may hamper the better use of existing therapies and discovery of more effective treatments. Information with respect to optimal treatment choice for individuals is lacking, with no validated biomarkers to aid therapeutic decision-making. Methods/Design Magnetic resonance-Improving Mood with Psychoanalytic and Cognitive Therapies, the MR-IMPACT study, plans to identify brain regions implicated in the pathophysiology of depressions and examine whether there are specific behavioural or neural markers predicting remission and/or subsequent relapse in a subsample of depressed adolescents recruited to the IMPACT randomised controlled trial (Registration # ISRCTN83033550). Discussion MR-IMPACT is an investigative biomarker component of the IMPACT pragmatic effectiveness trial. The aim of this investigation is to identify neural markers and regional indicators of the pathophysiology of and treatment response for MDD in adolescents. We anticipate that these data may enable more targeted treatment delivery by identifying those patients who may be optimal candidates for therapeutic response. Trial registration Adjunctive study to IMPACT trial (Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN83033550).

2013-01-01

143

Mood and anxiety disorders in women with PCOS.  

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Women with polycystic ovary syndrome have gynecologic, reproductive and metabolic co-morbidities that span their entire lifespan. More recently a higher risk of mood and anxiety disorders has been reported in women with PCOS. Women with PCOS have higher depression scores and a higher risk of depression independent of BMI. Although clinical features of hyperandrogenism affect health related quality of life, the association between hirsutism, acne, body image and depression is currently unclear. Similarly there is limited data on the association between variables such as biochemical hyperandrogenism or infertility and depression. Women with PCOS are also at risk for symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder. There is insufficient data examining the risk of other anxiety disorders such as social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorders and panic disorder. In a number of patients some of these disorders coexist increasing the health burden. These data underscore the need to screen all women with PCOS for mood and anxiety disorders and adequately treat women who are diagnosed with these conditions. PMID:22178257

Dokras, Anuja

2012-03-10

144

Testosterone and mood dysfunction in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome compared to subfertile controls.  

Science.gov (United States)

Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) have been found to suffer from fertility problems and mood dysfunction. To control for any effect of fertility problems, the present study compared mood dysfunction in women with PCOS to non-PCOS women with fertility problems. Seventy-six women with PCOS and 49 subfertile controls reported their anxiety, depression and aggression levels, and the relationship between mood and testosterone (T) was assessed. Controlling for age and BMI using MANCOVA, women with PCOS were significantly more neurotic (had difficulty coping with stress) than controls, had more anger symptoms, were significantly more likely to withhold feelings of anger and had more quality of life problems related to the symptoms of their condition (acne, hirsutism, menstrual problems and emotions). In a subgroup of 30 women matched on age, BMI and ethnicity, it was found that women with PCOS were significantly more anxious and depressed than controls. T was not generally correlated with mood states. This is the first study to identify problems with neuroticism and withholding anger in women with PCOS. These mood problems appear to be mainly attributable to PCOS symptoms, though other factors, such as hypoglycaemia, cannot be ruled out. PMID:21473679

Barry, John A; Hardiman, Paul J; Saxby, Brian K; Kuczmierczyk, Andrew

2011-06-01

145

Evaluation of the mood repair hypothesis of compulsive buying  

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Full Text Available Compulsive buying (CB is a proposed disorder of dysregulated buying behaviour that is associated with high rates of Axis I comorbidity, particularly depression and anxiety. It has been proposed that purchasing behaviours may serve as a maladaptive means of alleviating negative affect in vulnerable individuals. The aim of the current study was to experimentally manipulate affect to test this mood repair hypothesis. Compulsive buyers (n = 26 and pathological gamblers (n = 23 diagnosed using structured clinical interviews (SCID and healthy controls (n = 24 were randomly assigned to either a negative or positive mood-induction procedure (MIP and participated in an experimental buying task. Results revealed that, irrespective of mood induction condition, compulsive buyers reported a greater urge to acquire items, purchased more items, and spent a greater total amount of money during the buying task when compared to the healthy control group. Compulsive buyers were also faster than pathological gamblers in making decisions to purchase, even after controlling for motor impulsivity (BIS. There was, however, no main effect of mood-induction condition or group by condition interaction. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

Alishia D. Williams

2012-04-01

146

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... strong that a depressed person may even consider suicide. Suicide and attempted suicide are very tragic consequences of depression. If a ... you realize that a loved one is contemplating suicide, you should contact a doctor immediately. The same ...

147

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... for your specific condition. ©1995-2010, The Patient Education Institute, Inc. www.X-Plain.com mh010105 Last reviewed: 9/1/2010 3 Depression is usually triggered by a known personal problem; however, some people become depressed with no known ...

148

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... may think that by ignoring depression, it will take care of itself and go away. However, since depression ... starting the urinary stream • Sexual ... counseling is also helpful to allow patients to understand and accept the initial cause of ...

149

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... www.X-Plain.com mh010105 Last reviewed: 9/1/2010 1 The earlier depression is diagnosed and ... www.X-Plain.com mh010105 Last reviewed: 9/1/2010 2 Causes of Depression Combination of genetic, ...

150

Depression  

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... Depressive illnesses are disorders of the brain. Longstanding theories about depression suggest that important neurotransmitters—chemicals that ... change—when boys and girls are forming an identity apart from their ... from normal social situations. The warning adds that families and caregivers ...

151

Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormones and cortisol in both menstrual phases of women with chronic fatigue syndrome and effect of depressive mood on these hormones  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a disease which defined as medically unexplained, disabling fatigue of 6 months or more duration and often accompanied by several of a long list of physical complaints. We aimed to investigate abnormalities of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis hormones and cortisol concentrations in premenopausal women with CFS and find out effects of depression rate on these hormones. Methods We examined follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, estradiol, progesterone and cortisol concentrations in 43 premenopausal women (mean age: 32.86 ± 7.11 with CFS and compared matched 35 healthy controls (mean age: 31.14 ± 6.19. Patients were divided according to menstrual cycle phases (follicular and luteal and compared with matched phase controls. Depression rate was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and patients with high BDI scores were compared to patients with low BDI scores. Results There were no significant differences in FSH, LH, estradiol and progesterone levels in both of menstrual phases of patients versus controls. Cortisol levels were significantly lower in patients compared to controls. There were no significant differences in all hormone levels in patients with high depression scores versus patients with low depression scores. Conclusion In spite of high depression rate, low cortisol concentration and normal HPG axis hormones of both menstrual phases are detected in premenopausal women with CFS. There is no differentiation between patients with high and low depression rate in all hormone levels. Depression condition of CFS may be different from classical depression and evaluation of HPG and HPA axis should be performed for understanding of pathophysiology of CFS and planning of treatment.

Nas Kemal

2004-12-01

152

Medically unexplained pain complaints are associated with underlying unrecognized mood disorders in primary care  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with chronic pain frequently display comorbid depression, but the impact of this concurrence is often underestimated and mistreated. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of unrecognized major depression and other mood disorders and comorbid unexplained chronic pain in primary care settings and to explore the associated factors. Also, to compare the use of health services by patients with unexplained chronic pain, both with and without mood disorder comorbidity. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of primary care centers. 3189 patients consulting for "unexplained chronic pain" were assessed by the Visual Analogue Scales (VAS and the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD questionnaire. Results We report: a a high prevalence of unrecognized mood disorders in patients suffering from unexplained chronic pain complaints (80.4%: CI 95%: 79.0%; 81.8%; b a greater susceptibility of women to mood disorders (OR adjusted = 1.48; CI 95%:1.22; 1.81; c a direct relationship between the prevalence of mood disorders and the duration of pain (OR adjusted = 1.01; CI 95%: 1.01; 1.02 d a higher comorbidity with depression if the pain etiology was unknown (OR adjusted = 1.74; CI 95%: 1.45; 2.10 and, e an increased use of health care services in patients with such a comorbidity (p Conclusions The prevalence of undiagnosed mood disorders in patients with unexplained chronic pain in primary care is very high, leading to dissatisfaction with treatment processes and poorer outcomes. Consequently, it seems necessary to explore this condition more regularly in general practice in order to reach accurate diagnoses and to select the appropriate treatment.

Díaz-Fernández Paula

2010-03-01

153

Mood and the menopausal transition.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study determined which variables affect women's mood state during the menopausal transition by using six prospective annual assessments of a community-based sample of 354 Australian mid-aged women. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of covariance found that negative mood scores decreased significantly over time and were not related to natural menopausal transition, follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol, inhibin, age, or education. The magnitude of negative mood was significantly predicted by baseline reporting of premenstrual complaints, negative attitudes to ageing and menopause, and parity of one. During follow-up, the magnitude of negative mood was significantly adversely affected by: prior experience of negative mood, experience of bothersome symptoms, poor self-rated health, negative feelings for partner, no partner, current smoking, low exercise, daily hassles, and high stress. Negative mood was reduced by decreasing symptoms, improving health, positive feelings for partner, gaining a partner, and reducing stress. The menopausal transition had an indirect effect in amplifying the effect of reducing paid work, poor health, and daily hassles. PMID:10579597

Dennerstein, L; Lehert, P; Burger, H; Dudley, E

1999-11-01

154

Influence of postpartum onset on the course of mood disorders  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background To ascertain the impact of postpartum onset (PPO on the subsequent time course of mood disorders. Methods This retrospective study compared per year rates of excited (manic or mixed and depressive episodes between fifty-five women with bipolar (N = 22 or major depressive (N = 33 disorders with first episode occurring postpartum (within four weeks after childbirth according to DSM-IV definition and 218 non-postpartum onset (NPPO controls. Such patients had a traceable illness course consisting of one or more episodes alternating with complete symptom remission and no additional diagnoses of axis I disorders, mental retardation or brain organic diseases. A number of variables reported to influence the course of mood disorders were controlled for as possible confounding factors Results Bipolar women with postpartum onset disorder had fewer excited episodes (p = 0.005 and fewer episodes of both polarities (p = 0.005 compared to non-postpartum onset subjects. No differences emerged in the rates of depressive episodes. All patients who met criteria for rapid cycling bipolar disorder (7 out of 123 were in the NPPO group. Among major depressives, PPO patients experienced fewer episodes (p = 0.016. With respect to clinical and treatment features, PPO-MDD subjects had less personality disorder comorbidity (p = 0.023 and were less likely to be on maintenance treatment compared to NPPO comparison subjects (p = 0.002 Conclusion Such preliminary findings suggest that PPO mood disorders may be characterized by a less recurrent time course. Future research in this field should elucidate the role of comorbid personality disorders and treatment. Moreover it should clarify whether PPO disorders are also associated with a more positive outcome in terms of social functioning and quality of life.

Olgiati Paolo

2006-01-01

155

[Endogenous cannabinoid system and depression].  

Science.gov (United States)

Endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS) is highly conserved during evolution of the body's endocrine network. It is a regulator of mood, cognitive, autonomic nervous system and movement control system. ECS dysfunction can promote the progress and maintain of depression, phobia, and extreme anxiety. The antidepressant drugs to enhance the activity of ECS may represent a new direction, but rarely reported research in this regard. PMID:23189618

Yu, Hai-Ling; Zhang, Feng; Quan, Zhe-Shan

2012-08-01

156

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... depression is often associated with changes in the brain. The brain controls all of our activities. It controls how ... our emotions and feelings. The cells of the brain, known as neurons, communicate with each other using ...

157

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... in life. Some examples of situations that may lead to sadness or feeling blue include: • Losing someone ... also. Drinking alcohol and using illicit drugs can lead to depression, since drugs and alcohol affect the ...

158

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... of depression may not necessitate any medications, only psychotherapy. This document is for informational purposes and is ... a hospital and treatment with medications. Counseling and psychotherapy can be very helpful in treating mild cases ...

159

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... able to make healthy changes that can reduce stress and maintain a more balanced outlook on life. ... stable relationships are all very helpful in keeping stress low and reducing the chances of feeling depressed ...

160

The influence of rumination and distraction on depressed and anxious mood: a prospective examination of the response styles theory in children and adolescents  

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Abstract The present study sought to test predictions of the response styles theory in a sample of children and adolescents. More specifically, a ratio approach to response styles was utilized to examine the effects on residual change scores in depression and anxiety. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires including measures of rumination, distraction, depression, and anxiety at baseline (Time 1) and 8–10 weeks follow-up (Time 2). Results showed that the ratio score ...

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

The influence of rumination and distraction on depressed and anxious mood: a prospective examination of the response styles theory in children and adolescents  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The present study sought to test predictions of the response styles theory in a sample of children and adolescents. More specifically, a ratio approach to response styles was utilized to examine the effects on residual change scores in depression and anxiety. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires including measures of rumination, distraction, depression, and anxiety at baseline (Time 1) and 8–10 weeks follow-up (Time 2). Results showed that the ratio score of rumination and di...

Roelofs, Jeffrey; Rood, Lea; Meesters, Cor; Dorsthorst, Vale?rie; Bo?gels, Susan; Alloy, Lauren B.; Nolen-hoeksema, Susan

2009-01-01

162

The influence of rumination and distraction on depressed and anxious mood: A prospective examination of the Response Styles Theory in children and adolescents  

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The present study sought to test predictions of the response styles theory in a sample of children and adolescents. More specifically, a ratio approach to response styles was utilized to examine the effects on residual change scores in depression and anxiety. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires including measures of rumination, distraction, depression, and anxiety at baseline (Time 1) and 8–10 weeks follow-up (Time 2). Results showed that the ratio score of rumination and dis...

Roelofs, Jeffrey; Rood, Lea; Meesters, Cor; Te Dorsthorst, Vale?rie; Bo?gels, Susan; Alloy, Lauren B.; Nolen-hoeksema, Susan

2009-01-01

163

Recent progress in mood disorder research  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

When papers published in highly-prestigious journals in 2010 and 2011 were categorized, the number of papers on genestic studies was found to be the largest, followed by papers on brain imaging, postmortem brain studies, and animal model studies. Follow-up studies of the findings of initial genome-wide association analyses constitute a major part of genetic studies. Recent brain imaging studies were found to integrate previous findings that indicated altered responces of prefrontal cortex to cognitive stimuli and enhanced responces of amygdala to emotional faces. Reduced size of the hippocampus is reportedly not a result of stress but perhaps a vulnerability factor. Among animal model studies, molecular mechanisms underlying rapid anti-depressive effects of ketamine are drawing attention. The role of neurogenesis in fear memory and depression is complex, and a link between psychopathology and neuroscience may be needed to understand the roles of neurogenesis. Postmortem brain analyses are currently used to investigate several pathophysiological hypotheses related to the roles of monoamine, neuroplasticity, and neuroinflammation in depression, as well as the roles of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons and mitochondria in bipolar disorder. Several studies are integrating postmortem brain analysis and animal model studies. Genetic and neuroimaging studies of mood disorders have advanced, and neurobiological basis of the findings of these studies should be further elucidated in animal models and postmortem brains. (author)

2012-02-01

164

The impact of a multidimensional exercise program on self-reported anxiety and depression in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: A phase II study  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Little is known about the role of exercise in improving cancer patients' mood while undergoing chemotherapy. In this phase II study changes in self-reported anxiety and depression and fitness (VO2max) are reported in relation to a 6-week, 9 h weekly, multidimensional exercise program. A total of 91 patients receiving chemotherapy, between 18 and 65 years old, completed a Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Questionnaire (HADS; response rate 91%, adherence rate 78%). Anxiety (p < 0.001) and depression (p = 0.042) was significantly reduced. The mean ± SD of the change was [minus sign]1.14 ± 2.91 for anxiety and [minus sign]0.44 ± 2.77 for depression. Improvements in fitness were correlated with improvements in depression, [chi]2(1) = 3.966, p = 0.046, but not with improvements in anxiety, [chi]2(1) = 0.540, p = 0.462. The research suggests that exercise intervention may have a beneficial impact on psychological distress for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with low to moderate levels of baseline psychomorbidity. The study furthermore indicates that changes in distress may be associated with disease status and levels of physical activity undertaken during disease. The study is followed up by an ongoing randomized clinical controlled trial to evaluate potential causal effects of exercise intervention on psychological distress and fitness in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Klausen, Julie Midtgaard; Rørth, Mikael Rahbek

2005-01-01

165

Independent Dimensions of Depression: A Factor Analysis of Three Self-Report Depression Measures  

Science.gov (United States)

An examination of the specific areas of agreement and disagreement among the Beck Depression Inventory (DI), the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), and the Lubin Depression Adjective Check Lists (DACL) was made to see if all three measured the same aspects of depressive behavior and how they could be used together to optimize assessment of…

Giambra, Leonard M.

1977-01-01

166

Sensitivity and specificity of the Major Depression Inventory in outpatients  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is a new, brief, self-report measure for depression based on the DSM-system, which allows clinicians to assess the presence of a depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV, but also to assess the severity of the depressive symptoms. Methods We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and psychometric qualities of the MDI in a consecutive sample of 258 psychiatric outpatients. Of these patients, 120 had a mood disorder (70 major depression, 49 dysthymia. A total of 139 subjects had a comorbid axis-I diagnosis, and 91 subjects had a comorbid personality disorder. Results Crohnbach's alpha of the MDI was a satisfactory 0.89, and the correlation between the MDI and the depression subscale of the SCL-90 was 0.79 (p Conclusion The MDI is an attractive, brief depression inventory, which seems to be a reliable tool for assessing depression in psychiatric outpatients.

Noteboom Annemieke

2007-08-01

167

The Impact of Child Symptom Severity on Depressed Mood among Parents of Children with ASD: The Mediating Role of Stress Proliferation  

Science.gov (United States)

"Stress proliferation" (the tendency of stressors to engender additional stressors in other life domains) is explored in a sample of 68 parents of children identified with ASD. Regression analyses showed that parent depression was predicted by both child symptom severity and by stress proliferation and that stress proliferation partially mediated…

Benson, Paul R.

2006-01-01

168

Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

... with life's struggles. Treatment for depression might include talk therapy, medication, or a combination of both. Sometimes, therapists might recommend daily exercise, exposure to daylight, or better ways of eating. A therapist might teach relaxation skills to help someone get a good ...

169

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... have them also. Drinking alcohol and using illicit drugs can lead to depression, since drugs and alcohol affect the chemicals in the brain. ... the patient to stop using alcohol or illicit drugs. Some medications, especially blood pressure medications, can lead ...

170

Depression  

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Full Text Available ... way to treat severe depression. This is vagal nerve stimulation. The vagal nerve is a nerve that goes from the brain to the heart, chest and abdomen. Stimulating this nerve with a low current may help some severe ...

171

Stress and Mood  

Science.gov (United States)

Home » Stress & Mood Stress & Mood Many people who go back to smoking do it when they are feeling down or stressed out. This ... Smokers Shouldn’t Use Cigarettes to Deal With Stress & Moods Read full story: 4 Reasons Why Smokers ...

172

Mania: not the opposite of depression, but an extension? Neuronal plasticity and polarity.  

Science.gov (United States)

What underlies bipolar disorder? What pathophysiologic process can produce symptoms that are apparently polar opposites? Recent studies of neuronal plasticity suggest a mechanism. Both zinc deficiency and social isolation impair neuronal plasticity; both are associated with major depression. Yet when zinc deficiency and social isolation occur together, they are associated with aggression, not with depression. On that basis, and according to additional findings in rats reported herein, it was inferred that moderate impairment of neuronal plasticity induces a depressive state, but that further impairment of neuronal plasticity induces not more depression, but a manic state. However, not only neuronal plasticity, but also some kind of load toward neuronal function can influence polarity or symptoms of mood disorder. Our hypothesis is that mania is an extension of depression from the perspective of neuronal plasticity, and that multiaxial evaluation by neuronal plasticity and neuronal load is useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of mood disorder. Using this hypothesis, many clinical aspects that have been heretofore difficult to interpret can be understood. A mood stabilizer or electric convulsive therapy is often used for the treatment of mood disorder, but it has remained unclear why such therapies are useful for both mania and depression. This hypothesis can explain how mood stabilizers or electric convulsive therapy can improve both mania and depression through the recovery of neuronal plasticity. It is difficult to explain the pathophysiology of manic switching by antidepressants solely from the perspective of the impairment of neuronal plasticity. To interpret this phenomenon, the action of antidepressants to neuronal load should be regarded as the other axis from neuronal plasticity. Based on this hypothesis, it is expected that the pathophysiology of mood disorder and clinical mechanism of mood stabilizers and antidepressants can be understood in an integrated manner. PMID:23759354

Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Omata, Naoto; Murata, Tetsuhito; Mitsuya, Hironori; Maruoka, Nobuyuki; Mita, Kayo; Kiyono, Yasushi; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Wada, Yuji

2013-08-01

173

Estrogen-related mood disorders: reproductive life cycle factors.  

Science.gov (United States)

Women are at higher risk throughout their reproductive lives than are men for major depression. Numerous molecular and clinical studies have implicated estrogen in modulating brain function including that related to mood. In an attempt to present a conceptual model, the literature of the past 30 years on mood and well-being throughout reproductive life is reviewed as it relates to activity of endogenous, bio-identical, and synthetic estrogen in women. Results indicate that sudden estrogen withdrawal, fluctuating estrogen, and sustained estrogen deficit are correlated with significant mood disturbance. Clinical recovery from depression postpartum, perimenopause, and postmenopause through restoration of stable/optimal levels of estrogen has been noted. PMID:16292022

Douma, S L; Husband, C; O'Donnell, M E; Barwin, B N; Woodend, A K

2005-01-01

174

Treatment of self-reported depression among Hispanics and African Americans.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study applied the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations framework to examine the correlates of depression and the receipt of medical treatment among low-income Hispanics and African Americans residing in public housing. We compared three groups: those who reported (1) self-diagnosed but without physician-diagnosed depression, (2) depression diagnosed by a physician but who did not receive pharmaceutical treatment, and (3) depression diagnosed by a physician and antidepressant pharmacotherapy consumed by patient. Random samples of 287 adults from three public housing communities were surveyed. Over 48% of this sample reported that they were suffering from depression. One out of three people who reported being depressed also said that a physician had never diagnosed his or her condition. Only 40% of those who said that a physician had diagnosed depression also reported taking antidepressant medication. Untreated depression among underserved racial and ethnic minorities is alarming and points to an urgent need for intervention. PMID:15937396

Bazargan, Mohsen; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Baker, Richard S

2005-05-01

175

Electrophysiological evidence of the time course of attentional bias in non-patients reporting symptoms of depression with and without co-occurring anxiety  

Science.gov (United States)

Anxiety is characterized by attentional biases to threat, but findings are inconsistent for depression. To address this inconsistency, the present study systematically assessed the role of co-occurring anxiety in attentional bias in depression. In addition, the role of emotional valence, arousal, and gender was explored. Ninety-two non-patients completed the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (Meyer et al., 1990; Molina and Borkovec, 1994) and portions of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (Watson et al., 1995a,1995b). Individuals reporting high levels of depression and low levels of anxiety (depression only), high levels of depression and anxiety (combined), or low levels of both (control) completed an emotion-word Stroop task during event-related brain potential recording. Pleasant and unpleasant words were matched on emotional arousal level. An attentional bias was not evident in the depression-only group. Women in the combined group had larger N200 amplitude for pleasant than unpleasant stimuli, and the combined group as a whole had larger right-lateralized P300 amplitude for pleasant than unpleasant stimuli, consistent with an early and later attentional bias that is specific to unpleasant valence in the combined group. Men in the control group had larger N200 amplitude for pleasant than unpleasant stimuli, consistent with an early attentional bias that is specific to pleasant valence. The present study indicates that the nature and time course of attention prompted by emotional valence and not arousal differentiates depression with and without anxiety, with some evidence of gender moderating early effects. Overall, results suggest that co-occurring anxiety is more important than previously acknowledged in demonstrating evidence of attentional biases in depression.

Sass, Sarah M.; Heller, Wendy; Fisher, Joscelyn E.; Silton, Rebecca L.; Stewart, Jennifer L.; Crocker, Laura D.; Edgar, J. Christopher; Mimnaugh, Katherine J.; Miller, Gregory A.

2014-01-01

176

Effects of Pharmacologically Induced Hypogonadism on Mood and Behavior in Healthy Young Women  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective The relationship between depression and estrogen withdrawal remains controversial. The authors examined the effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced ovarian suppression on mood, sleep, sexual function, and nighttime hot flushes. They focused on whether participating women experienced clinically significant depressive symptoms and whether specific symptoms associated with hypogonadism (nighttime hot flushes and disturbed sleep) increased susceptibility to depression. Method Participants were 72 healthy pre-menopausal women, ages 19–52 years, with no current or past axis I psychiatric diagnosis or gynecological or other medical illness. After 2 months of baseline screening, women received monthly injections of leuprolide acetate (3.75 mg) for 2–3 months. Outcomes were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and a daily rating scale measuring the severity of several affective and behavioral symptoms. Data were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance using PROC MIXED (for mixed models). Results BDI scores ?10 were reported in four of the 72 women (5.6%). Relative to baseline, induced hypogonadism was associated with significantly decreased sexual interest, disturbed sleep, and more severe nighttime hot flushes, but no significant change in any mood-related symptom score. Hot flush severity was significantly correlated with disturbed sleep. Conclusions These data demonstrate that clinically significant depressive symptoms were rare accompaniments of short-term estradiol withdrawal and induced hypogonadism in healthy premenopausal women. Additionally, neither nighttime hot flushes nor disturbed sleep were sufficient to cause depressive symptoms in hypogonadal women.

Ben Dor, Rivka; Harsh, Veronica L.; Fortinsky, Paige; Koziol, Deloris E.; Rubinow, David R.; Schmidt, Peter J.

2014-01-01

177

Short-term duloxetine administration affects neural correlates of mood-congruent memory  

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Abstract It is unknown how antidepressants reverse a mood-congruent memory bias, a cognitive core factor causing and maintaining depression. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over design, we investigated the effect of a short-term treatment (14 days) with the dual reuptake inhibitor Duloxetine on neural correlates of mood-congruent and mood-incongruent memory formation and retrieval in healthy volunteers who underwent a sad mood induction procedure. Duloxetine d...

2011-01-01

178

Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 in the Etiology and Treatment of Mood Disorders  

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The mood disorders major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder are prevalent, are inadequately treated, and little is known about their etiologies. A better understanding of the causes of mood disorders would benefit from improved animal models of mood disorders, which now rely on behavioral measurements. This review considers the limitations in relating measures of rodent behaviors to mood disorders, and the evidence from behavioral assessments indicating that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (...

Jope, Richard Scott

2011-01-01

179

The need to consider mood disorders, and especially chronic mania, in cases of Diogenes syndrome (squalor syndrome).  

Science.gov (United States)

We report the case of a 69 year-old female patient who was hospitalized for Diogenes syndrome, defined by marked self-neglect, social withdrawal and excessive hoarding, leading to squalor. Somatic causes were eliminated. Her personal history showed an eight-year depressive episode followed by a 20-year hypomanic episode without remission, followed by a persistent manic episode associated with Diogenes syndrome for four years. The Diogenes syndrome was successfully treated with mood stabilizers. Mood disorders - in particular chronic mania (i.e. a manic episode lasting more than two years) - should be considered in cases of Diogenes syndrome and in current classifications. PMID:20836916

Fond, G; Jollant, F; Abbar, M

2011-04-01

180

Forecasting depression in bipolar disorder.  

Science.gov (United States)

Bipolar disorder is characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression and affects about 1% of the adult population. The condition can have a major impact on an individual's ability to function and is associated with a long-term risk of suicide. In this paper, we report on the use of self-rated mood data to forecast the next week's depression ratings. The data used in the study have been collected using SMS text messaging and comprises one time series of approximately weekly mood ratings for each patient. We find a wide variation between series: some exhibit a large change in mean over the monitored period and there is a variation in correlation structure. Almost half of the time series are forecast better by unconditional mean than by persistence. Two methods are employed for forecasting: exponential smoothing and Gaussian process regression. Neither approach gives an improvement over a persistence baseline. We conclude that the depression time series from patients with bipolar disorder are very heterogeneous and that this constrains the accuracy of automated mood forecasting across the set of patients. However, the dataset is a valuable resource and work remains to be done that might result in clinically useful information and tools. PMID:22855220

Moore, Paul J; Little, Max A; McSharry, Patrick E; Geddes, John R; Goodwin, Guy M

2012-10-01

 
 
 
 
181

Emotional recognition in depressed epilepsy patients.  

Science.gov (United States)

The current study examined the relationship between emotional recognition and depression using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Second Edition (MMPI-2), in a population with epilepsy. Participants were a mixture of surgical candidates in addition to those receiving neuropsychological testing as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Results suggested that patients with epilepsy reporting increased levels of depression (Scale D) performed better than those patients reporting low levels of depression on an index of simple facial recognition, and depression was associated with poor prosody discrimination. Further, it is notable that more than half of the present sample had significantly elevated Scale D scores. The potential effects of a mood-congruent bias and implications for social functioning in depressed patients with epilepsy are discussed. PMID:19393764

Brand, Jesse G; Burton, Leslie A; Schaffer, Sarah G; Alper, Kenneth R; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William B

2009-07-01

182

Local cerebral glucose metabolism (LCMRGlc) in mood disorders  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

PET studies (LCMRGlc units of ..mu.. moles/min/100g and errors in std. dev.) were performed in patients with unipolar depression (n=11), bipolar depression (n=8), hypomania (n=8) and bipolar mixed states (n=3) in drug free states as well as during spontaneous or drug induced changes in mood, and age/sex matched normals (n=9). The major findings were: bipolar depressed patients had lower (P<0.001) supratentorial CMRGlc (16.7 +- 3.7) than normals (23.6 +- 1.9), hypomanic bipolars (24.7 + 44.6) or unipolars (24.5 +- 3.0). Bipolar mixed (16.4 +- 4.8) were not different from bipolar depressed but were different from all other states (P<0.02). Bipolar depressed and mixed showed increased (30%) supratentorial CMRGlc (P<0.05) with elevated mood (euthymic or hypomanic). Three rapid cycling bipolar patients (2 studies depressed and 1 hypomanic) also showed consistent increases (35%) in supratentorial CMRGlc from depressed to elevated mood state. Unipolar depressed patients had a low LCMRGlc ratio of caudate to hemispheric (c/Hem) (1.18 +- 0.09) compared to bipolar depression (1.30 +- 0.13) or normals (1.32 +- 0.07). Four unipolar patients studied after drug induced recovery showed corresponding return of Cd/Hem ratio to normal. Results of these studies show; delineation of bipolar depressed from unpolar depressed and normals. Separation of mixed biopolar from unipolar and correspondence of the former with bipolar rather than unipolar depression (controversial characterization by other diagnostic criteria), separation of unipolar from normal and bipolar by reduced LCMRGlc of caudate, and direct correspondence of changes in mood state with changes in LCMRGlc independent of whether changes in mood were drug induced or spontaneous.

Phelps, M.E.; Baxter, L.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Schwartz, J.M.; Gerner, R.H.

1985-05-01

183

Local cerebral glucose metabolism (LCMRGlc) in mood disorders  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

PET studies (LCMRGlc units of ? moles/min/100g and errors in std. dev.) were performed in patients with unipolar depression (n=11), bipolar depression (n=8), hypomania (n=8) and bipolar mixed states (n=3) in drug free states as well as during spontaneous or drug induced changes in mood, and age/sex matched normals (n=9). The major findings were: bipolar depressed patients had lower (P<0.001) supratentorial CMRGlc (16.7 +- 3.7) than normals (23.6 +- 1.9), hypomanic bipolars (24.7 + 44.6) or unipolars (24.5 +- 3.0). Bipolar mixed (16.4 +- 4.8) were not different from bipolar depressed but were different from all other states (P<0.02). Bipolar depressed and mixed showed increased (30%) supratentorial CMRGlc (P<0.05) with elevated mood (euthymic or hypomanic). Three rapid cycling bipolar patients (2 studies depressed and 1 hypomanic) also showed consistent increases (35%) in supratentorial CMRGlc from depressed to elevated mood state. Unipolar depressed patients had a low LCMRGlc ratio of caudate to hemispheric (c/Hem) (1.18 +- 0.09) compared to bipolar depression (1.30 +- 0.13) or normals (1.32 +- 0.07). Four unipolar patients studied after drug induced recovery showed corresponding return of Cd/Hem ratio to normal. Results of these studies show; delineation of bipolar depressed from unpolar depressed and normals. Separation of mixed biopolar from unipolar and correspondence of the former with bipolar rather than unipolar depression (controversial characterization by other diagnostic criteria), separation of unipolar from normal and bipolar by reduced LCMRGlc of caudate, and direct correspondence of changes in mood state with changes in LCMRGlc independent of whether changes in mood were drug induced or spontaneous

1985-05-01

184

[Rubidium chloride in the treatment of major depression].  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study evaluated 20 patients (18 females and 2 males: mean age 55 +/- 8.8 years) suffering from major depression who had been treated with 360/720 mg/die rubidium chloride for 60 days. A gradual and significant improvement in depressive symptoms (HDRS and Zung Scale) and anxiety (Stai X1 and HamARS) was reported. Serum levels were not correlated to clinical improvement. Slight adverse effects were also observed (diarrhea and skin rashes). Rubidium chloride showed a marked and rapid anti-depressive action which was particularly evident in relation to mood, anti-conservative ideas, work, occupational interests and psychomotory slowing-down. It is clear that these symptoms represent the most important aspects of the polymorphous depressive syndrome and, in some ways, this improvement should be interpreted as the effective influence of the drug on the biological contest of mood changes. PMID:8412574

Torta, R; Ala, G; Borio, R; Cicolin, A; Costamagna, S; Fiori, L; Ravizza, L

1993-06-01

185

Effects of SuperUlam on Supporting Concentration and Mood: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background. SuperUlam is a proprietary blend of natural ingredients aimed at supporting brain health. We aimed to evaluate the effect of SuperUlam on attention and mood in healthy adults. Methods. Twenty healthy individuals aged 35–65 were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Study duration was 3 weeks and consisted of 3 visits. Measurement of cognitive function included computer-based testing of reaction time, complex attention, working memory, sustained attention, and executive functioning. Mood testing was performed via the profile of mood states (POMS) survey and the Chalder fatigue scale. Results. Cognitive function testing demonstrated a significant improvement from baseline in executive functioning, cognitive flexibility, reaction time, and working memory in the product group only (P < 0.05). When comparing the study product to placebo, the data demonstrated a significant decrease in tension, depression, and anger (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the product and placebo in the other measures of mood, including vigor, fatigue, confusion, and total mood disturbance. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions. Supplementation with SuperUlam is safe to consume with potential benefits to cognitive function and mood.

Udani, Jay K

2013-01-01

186

Effects of SuperUlam on Supporting Concentration and Mood: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Study.  

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Background. SuperUlam is a proprietary blend of natural ingredients aimed at supporting brain health. We aimed to evaluate the effect of SuperUlam on attention and mood in healthy adults. Methods. Twenty healthy individuals aged 35-65 were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Study duration was 3 weeks and consisted of 3 visits. Measurement of cognitive function included computer-based testing of reaction time, complex attention, working memory, sustained attention, and executive functioning. Mood testing was performed via the profile of mood states (POMS) survey and the Chalder fatigue scale. Results. Cognitive function testing demonstrated a significant improvement from baseline in executive functioning, cognitive flexibility, reaction time, and working memory in the product group only (P < 0.05). When comparing the study product to placebo, the data demonstrated a significant decrease in tension, depression, and anger (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the product and placebo in the other measures of mood, including vigor, fatigue, confusion, and total mood disturbance. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions. Supplementation with SuperUlam is safe to consume with potential benefits to cognitive function and mood. PMID:24371452

Udani, Jay K

2013-01-01

187

[Idiopathic Bilateral Basal Ganglia Calcification (Fahr's Disease) Presenting with Psychotic Depression and Criminal Violence: A Case Report With Forensic Aspect].  

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Fahr's disease is a rare neuropsychiatric disease characterized by bilateral intracranial calcification, primarily in the basal ganglia. The more general term, Fahr's syndrome, is used for primary and secondary basal ganglia calcification, regardless of the etiology, but the term Fahr's disease is used to describe primary, idiopathic cases. Fahr's disease may present with neurological symptoms, such as parkinsonism and extrapyramidal symptoms, dysarthria, paresis, convulsion, and syncope. Psychiatric disorders, including behavioral disorders, psychosis, and mood disorders, as well as cognitive disorders can occur. CT is useful for the diagnosis of Fahr's disease. Herein we present a patient diagnosed as Fahr's disease that presented with symptoms of depression, delusions, and auditory hallucinations. The 47-year-old male patient was hospitalized in a forensic psychiatry inpatient clinic due to aggressive behavior and was subsequently diagnosed with major depressive disorder with psychotic features. While hospitalized he was treated with antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs, as well as electroconvulsive therapy, resulting in significant improvement in his symptoms. As bilateral basal ganglia calcification was observed via CT, the patient was diagnosed as Fahr's disease. This case report emphasizes the importance of cranial imaging and detailed laboratory examination when evaluating patients with psychosis and affective symptoms. Pathologies such as Fahr's disease must be included in the differential diagnosis, especially in cases with neurological symptoms and cranial imaging findings. PMID:24936761

Ozer, Urün; Görgülü, Yasemin; Can Güngör, Ferda; Gençtürk, Mert

2014-01-01

188

Depression as an initial feature of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus? A case report  

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Many patients with chronic illnesses suffer from clinical depression (with percentages reported by clinical studies ranging from 15 to 60); even depression is more common in people with chronic medical illnesses, (e.g. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus) than in the general population. However, not every patient with a chronic illness suffers from depression. It is well known that some people think the persons who suffer from a chronic illness have a reason to be depressed, so, there is no need to ...

2010-01-01

189

Responses to Positive Affect: A Self-Report Measure of Rumination and Dampening  

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Rumination in response to dysphoric moods has been linked to the onset and maintenance of depressive symptoms; however, responses to positive moods have received less attention despite the theoretical roles of both positive and negative affect in mood disorders. The purpose of the present study was to develop a self-report measure of ruminative and dampening Responses to Positive Affect (RPA), which we called the RPA Questionnaire. In two psychometric studies, the three subscales of the RPA (...

Feldman, Greg C.; Joormann, Jutta; Johnson, Sheri L.

2008-01-01

190

A Review of Postpartum Depression  

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Postpartum depression (PPD) is an irritable, severely depressed mood that occurs within 4 weeks of giving birth and possibly as late as 30 weeks postpartum. Manifestations include crying spells, insomnia, depressed mood, fatigue, anxiety, and poor concentration. Patients may experience mild, moderate, or severe symptoms. Many psychosocial stressors may have an impact on the development of PPD. Recent studies conclude that the majority of factors are largely social in nature. The greatest risk...

Andrews-fike, Christa

1999-01-01

191

Diurnal variation of depressive symptoms  

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Diurnal variation of depressive symptoms appears to be part of the core of depression. Yet longitudinal investigation of an individual's pattern regularity, relation to clinical state, and clinical improvement reveals little homogeneity. Morning lows, afternoon slump, evening worsening - all can occur during a single depressive episode. Mood variability, or the propensity to produce mood swings, appears to be the characteristic that most predicts capacity to respond to treatment. Laboratory s...

Wirz-justice, Anna

2008-01-01

192

PSYCHOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION  

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Full Text Available Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV, postpartum depression may include any nonpsychotic depressive disorder during the first four weeks of postpartum, according to research criteria during the first year after birth. The exact cause of postpartum depression is not yet known, and most researchers believe that postpartum depression is a bio-psycho-social problem. So far, the biological aspect of the disease is explained by changing the levels of estrogen and progesterone during pregnancy, and by decrease of hormone levels after birth. Psychological correlates are often associated with low selfesteem, pessimism as a personality trait, bad strategies of coping with stress, mood swings and emotional reactions. The social aspect of the disease is associated with the existential conditions of pregnant woman, support of partners and education level. This paper will include issues like hereditary causes and possible psychological factors of postpartum depression prevention. Nowadays, it is estimated that on average 15% of women, regardless of the pregnancy outcome, are suffering from postpartum depression. However, this information includes only those women who were diagnosed with postpartum depression and who themselves reported about it. Almost every woman receives basic care during pregnancy to prevent complications in the physiological level. This paper has shown possible psychological factors of postpartum depression prevention, the impact of optimism, self-esteem and coping skills.

Anida Fazlagi?

2011-12-01

193

Mood disorders in Asians.  

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Mood disorders are disorders that have a disturbance in mood as the predominant feature. They are common psychiatric disorders and are associated with significant distress and functional impairment. As the theory of mood disorders is based on the philosophy of mind/body dichotomy in the West, it contradicts the holistic tradition of medicine in the East. This may partially explain why many Asians with mood disorders emphasize their physical symptoms in discussions with their treatment providers. In the development of the DSM and ICD diagnostic systems, it is presumed that the diagnostic categories are applicable to all races and ethnicities. Similarly, many consider pharmacological and psychological treatment approaches to mood disorders universally applicable. To effectively treat Asians with mood disorders, clinicians need to customize biological and psychosocial interventions in consideration of patients' potential genetic and cultural differences. PMID:24524714

Yeung, Albert; Chang, Doris

2014-02-01

194

Adult separation anxiety in patients with complicated grief versus healthy control subjects: relationships with lifetime depressive and hypomanic symptoms  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Around 9% to 20% of bereaved individuals experience symptoms of complicated grief (CG that are associated with significant distress and impairment. A major issue is whether CG represents a distinctive nosographic entity, independent from other mental disorders, particularly major depression (MD, and the role of symptoms of adult separation anxiety. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical features of patients with CG versus a sample of healthy control subjects, with particular focus on adult separation anxiety and lifetime mood spectrum symptoms. Methods A total of 53 patients with CG and 50 healthy control subjects were consecutively recruited and assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I disorders (SCID-I/P, Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG, Adult Separation Anxiety Questionnaire (ASA-27, Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS and Mood Spectrum-Self Report (MOODS-SR lifetime version. Results Patients with CG reported significantly higher scores on the MOODS-SR, ASA-27, and WSAS with respect to healthy control subjects. The scores on the ASA-27 were significantly associated with the MOODS-SR depressive and manic components amongst both patients and healthy control subjects, with a stronger association in the latter. Conclusions A major limitation of the present study is the small sample size that may reduce the generalizability of the results. Moreover, lifetime MOODS-SR does not provide information about the temporal sequence of the manic or depressive symptoms and the loss. The frequent comorbidity with MD and the association with both depressive and manic lifetime symptoms do not support the independence of CG from mood disorders. In our patients, CG is associated with high levels of separation anxiety in adulthood. However, the presence of lifetime mood instability, as measured by the frequent presence of depressive and hypomanic lifetime symptoms, suggests that cyclothymia might represent the common underlying feature characterizing the vulnerability to both adult separation anxiety and CG.

Dell'Osso Liliana

2011-10-01

195

Asthma and Mood Disorders  

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The high rate of comorbidity of asthma and mood disorders would imply the possibility of potential shared pathophysiologic factors. Proposed links between asthma and mood disorders include a vulnerability (trait) and state connection. Vulnerability for both asthma and mood disorders may involve genetic and early developmental factors. State-related connections may include obstructive factors, inflammatory factors, sleep impairment, psychological reactions to chronic medical illness, as well a...

2008-01-01

196

Effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy for severe mood disorders in an acute psychiatric naturalistic setting: a benchmarking study.  

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The current study examined the effectiveness of brief cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for severe mood disorders in an acute naturalistic setting. The sample included 951 individuals with either major depressive disorder (n = 857) or bipolar disorder with depressed mood (n = 94). Participants completed a battery of self-report measures assessing depression, overall well-being, and a range of secondary outcomes both before and after treatment. We found significant reductions in depressive symptoms, worry, self-harm, emotional lability, and substance abuse, as well as significant improvements in well-being and interpersonal relationships, post-treatment. Comparable to outpatient studies, 30% of the sample evidenced recovery from depression. Comparison of findings to benchmark studies indicated that, although the current sample started treatment with severe depressive symptoms and were in treatment for average of only 10 days, the overall magnitude of symptom improvement was similar to that of randomized controlled trials. Limitations of the study include a lack of control group, a limitation of most naturalistic studies. These findings indicate that interventions developed in controlled research settings on the efficacy of CBT can be transported to naturalistic, "real world" settings, and that brief CBT delivered in a partial hospital program is effective for many patients with severe depressive symptoms. PMID:24679127

Björgvinsson, Thröstur; Kertz, Sarah J; Bigda-Peyton, Joseph S; Rosmarin, David H; Aderka, Idan M; Neuhaus, Edmund C

2014-09-01

197

Comparison of effects of bright light therapy alone or combined with fluoxetine on severity of depression, circadian rhythms, mood disturbance, and sleep quality, in patients with non-seasonal depression  

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Mehmet Yücel Agargün,1 Gokben Hizli Sayar,2 Hüseyin Bulut,3 Oguz Tan21Medipol University, Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Uskudar University, Neuropsychiatry Istanbul Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Büyükçekmece Government Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul, TurkeyPurpose: To compare effects of bright light therapy (BLT) alone or combined with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine, on severity of depression, circadian ...

My, Ag?arg Uuml N.; H?zl? Sayar G; Bulut H; Tan O

2013-01-01

198

Quality improvement in depression care in the Netherlands: the Depression Breakthrough Collaborative. A quality improvement report  

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Full Text Available Background: Improving the healthcare for patients with depression is a priority health policy across the world. Roughly, two major problems can be identified in daily practice: (1 the content of care is often not completely consistent with recommendations in guidelines and (2 the organization of care is not always integrated and delivered by multidisciplinary teams. Aim: To describe the content and preliminary results of a quality improvement project in primary care, aiming at improving the uptake of clinical depression guidelines in daily practice as well as the collaboration between different mental health professionals. Method: A Depression Breakthrough Collaborative was initiated from December 2006 until March 2008. The activities included the development and implementation of a stepped care depression model, a care pathway with two levels of treatment intensity: a first step treatment level for patients with non-severe depression (brief or mild depressive symptoms and a second step level for patients with severe depression. Twelve months data were measured by the teams in terms of one outcome and several process indicators. Qualitative data were gathered by the national project team with a semi-structured questionnaire amongst the local team coordinators. Results: Thirteen multidisciplinary teams participated in the project. In total 101 health professionals were involved, and 536 patients were diagnosed. Overall 356 patients (66% were considered non-severely depressed and 180 (34% patients showed severe symptoms. The mean percentage of non-severe patients treated according to the stepped care model was 78%, and 57% for the severely depressed patient group. The proportion of non-severely depressed patients receiving a first step treatment according to the stepped care model, improved during the project, this was not the case for the severely depressed patients. The teams were able to monitor depression symptoms to a reasonable extent during a period of 6 months. Within 3 months, 28% of monitored patients had recovered, meaning a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score of 10 and lower, and another 27% recovered between 3 and 6 months. Conclusions and discussion: A stepped care approach seems acceptable and feasible in primary care, introducing different levels of care for different patient groups. Future implementation projects should pay special attention to the quality of care for severely depressed patients. Although the Depression Breakthrough Collaborative introduced new treatment concepts in primary and specialty care, the change capacity of the method remains unclear. Thorough data gathering is needed to judge the real value of these intensive improvement projects.

Gerdien Franx

2009-06-01

199

Gliogenesis and Glial Pathology in Depression  

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Recent research has changed the perception of glia from being no more than silent supportive cells of neurons to being dynamic partners participating in brain metabolism and communication between neurons. This discovery of new glial functions coincides with growing evidence of the involvement of glia in the neuropathology of mood disorders. Unanticipated reductions in the density and number of glial cells are reported in fronto-limbic brain regions in major depression and bipolar illness. Mor...

Rajkowska, G.; Miguel-hidalgo, J. J.

2007-01-01

200

Vegetarian diets are associated with healthy mood states: a cross-sectional study in Seventh Day Adventist adults  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The physical health status of vegetarians has been extensively reported, but there is limited research regarding the mental health status of vegetarians, particularly with regard to mood. Vegetarian diets exclude fish, the major dietary source of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, critical regulators of brain cell structure and function. Omnivorous diets low in EPA and DHA are linked to impaired mood states in observational and experimental studies. Methods We examined associations between mood state and polyunsaturated fatty acid intake as a result of adherence to a vegetarian or omnivorous diet in a cross-sectional study of 138 healthy Seventh Day Adventist men and women residing in the Southwest. Participants completed a quantitative food frequency questionnaire, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS, and Profile of Mood States (POMS questionnaires. Results Vegetarians (VEG:n = 60 reported significantly less negative emotion than omnivores (OMN:n = 78 as measured by both mean total DASS and POMS scores (8.32 ± 0.88 vs 17.51 ± 1.88, p = .000 and 0.10 ± 1.99 vs 15.33 ± 3.10, p = .007, respectively. VEG reported significantly lower mean intakes of EPA (p p p p p p p p p p Conclusions The vegetarian diet profile does not appear to adversely affect mood despite low intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids.

Johnston Carol S

2010-06-01

 
 
 
 
201

The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in mood disorders.  

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This article has demonstrated that stress and HPA axis activation affect the reproductive axis. Despite similarities in the HPA axis picture between women with major depression and those with hypothalamic amenorrhea and exercise or nutritional amenorrhea, no abnormalities in LH secretion have been documented in major depression. Lower estradiol in the follicular phase in depressed women and lower testosterone in depressed men however, have been observed [81, 92]. Although PMS would appear to be the best candidate for a mood disorder associated with abnormalities in reproductive hormones, no abnormalities in LH, estradiol or progesterone have been documented in PMS either [62]. Similarly, blockade of progesterone appears to be ineffective as a treatment for PMS [79]. Complete elimination of monthly cycling with leuprolide improves mood, however. No published studies have examined women with major depression to determine whether leuprolide will exacerbate or improve depressive symptoms. Some studies suggest beneficial effects of estrogen on mood in postmenopausal women, but no placebo controlled studies have explored estrogen augmentation in the treatment of major depression in either post- or premenopausal women, although estrogen is beneficial in women with perimenopause-related mood disorders [78]. PMID:12055991

Young, Elizabeth A; Korszun, Ania

2002-03-01

202

Asthma and Mood Disorders.  

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The high rate of comorbidity of asthma and mood disorders would imply the possibility of potential shared pathophysiologic factors. Proposed links between asthma and mood disorders include a vulnerability (trait) and state connection. Vulnerability for both asthma and mood disorders may involve genetic and early developmental factors. State-related connections may include obstructive factors, inflammatory factors, sleep impairment, psychological reactions to chronic medical illness, as well as exacerbation of asthma in individuals with chronic stress. Treatment for asthma may also exacerbate mood disorders. New research suggests involvement of the central nervous system in asthma and allergy. Further characterization of clinical, psychological, cellular and molecular interconnections between asthma and mood disorders is needed to better evaluate and treat these patients. A close collaboration between mental health professionals and allergists could result in improved symptom control, quality of life, overall functioning and ultimately, decreased mortality. PMID:19180246

Kewalramani, Anupama; Bollinger, Mary E; Postolache, Teodor T

2008-01-01

203

Adult mood disorders and childhood psychological trauma  

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Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between adult mood disorders and childhood psychological trauma in a developing country. METHOD: Adults with and without mood disorders were assessed in a case-control study using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Assessment of childhood trauma included physical and sexual abuse, frequent exposure to violence, and parental loss. RESULTS: In two independent multivariate analyses, after adjusting for potential confounding factors, we found a higher odds ratio for frequent exposure to violence in the community (p = .037 and for physical abuse by parents or caregivers during childhood/adolescence (p = .012 in the group with mood disorders than in the control group. In secondary analyses splitting the mood disorder group in two subgroups (manic episode, and major depressive episodes/ dysthymia, only manic patients showed significantly higher rates of frequent exposure to violence in the community (p = 0.01 and physical abuse during childhood (p = 0.02 than did patients in the control group. In addition, maniac patients had significantly higher rates of sexual abuse than did controls (p = .03. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings document an association between violence during childhood and adult mood disorders, especially for manic patients, in a developing country.

Zavaschi Maria Lucrécia Scherer

2006-01-01

204

The role of the self-concept in the relationship of menstrual symptom attitudes and negative mood  

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Full Text Available Background: A relationship between symptom attitudes and negative affect has consistently been found in a range of different symptom domains. Little is known, however, about the role of different aspects of the self in this rela-tionship. We explored the mediating role of in-terferences of symptom with the self-concept in the association of menstrual symptom attitudes and depressive mood. Methods: Eighty-one women completed an online survey on men-strual symptom attitudes, perceived interfer-ences of symptoms with various self-aspects and negative mood states. We tested our hy-pothesis in a mediation analysis. Results: We found a complete mediation of the relationship of symptom attitudes and depressive mood by interferences of symptoms with self-aspects. However, interferences with self-aspects did not play a role in the association of anxious mood and symptom report. Conclusion: The self- concept should receive greater attention in re-search on symptom attitudes and psychological well-being. This would be particularly important in research on medically unexplained symptom report.

Tilman Eckloff

2011-06-01

205

Optimal management of perimenopausal depression.  

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Only recently has the perimenopause become recognized as a time when women are at risk for new onset and recurrence of major depression. Untreated depression at this time not only exacerbates the course of a depressive illness, but also puts women at increased risk for sleep disorders, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Although antidepressant medication is the mainstay of treatment, adjunctive therapy, especially with estrogen replacement, may be indicated in refractory cases, and may speed the onset of antidepressant action. Many, but not all, studies, report that progesterone antagonizes the beneficial effects of estrogen. Although some antidepressants improve vasomotor symptoms, in general they are not as effective as estrogen alone for relieving these symptoms. Estrogen alone, however, does not generally result in remission of major depression in most (but not all) studies, but may provide benefit to some women with less severe symptoms if administered in therapeutic ranges. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in addition to estrogen are usually more beneficial in improving mood than SSRIs or estrogen treatment alone for major depression, whereas the selective norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors do not require the addition of estrogen to exert their antidepressant effects in menopausal depression. In addition to attention to general health, hormonal status, and antidepressant treatment, the optimal management of perimenopausal depression also requires attention to the individual woman's psychosocial and spiritual well being. PMID:21072307

Parry, Barbara L

2010-01-01

206

Allergic Rhinitis: Relationships with Anxiety and Mood Syndromes  

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In this article, the authors examine the preponderance of publications pertaining to relationships between allergies and anxiety and mood syndromes. Through a review of the relevant articles in the PubMed and PsycINFO databases, the authors found that the majority of studies (9 of 11 studies on anxiety syndromes, 10 of 12 studies on depressive syndromes) indicate associations between allergies and anxiety/mood syndromes, despite a number of methodological variances. In addition, there appear ...

Sansone, Randy A.; Sansone, Lori A.

2011-01-01

207

Improving Mood with Psychoanalytic and Cognitive Therapies (IMPACT): A pragmatic effectiveness superiority trial to investigate whether specialised psychological treatment reduces the risk for relapse in adolescents with moderate to severe unipolar depression: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial  

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Abstract Background Up to 70% of adolescents with moderate to severe unipolar major depression respond to psychological treatment plus Fluoxetine (20-50 mg) with symptom reduction and improved social function reported by 24 weeks after beginning treatment. Around 20% of non responders appear treatment resistant and 30% of responders relapse within 2 years. The specific efficacy of different psychological therapies and the moderators and mediators that influence risk for relapse are unclear. T...

Goodyer, Ian M.; Tsancheva, Sonya; Byford, Sarah; Dubicka, Bernadka; Hill, Jonathan; Kelvin, Raphael; Reynolds, Shirley; Roberts, Christopher; Senior, Robert; Suckling, John; Wilkinson, Paul; Target, Mary; Fonagy, Peter

2011-01-01

208

A Cross-Cultural Study of Self-Report Depressive Symptoms among College Students.  

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A study of self-report depressive symptoms measured by the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale was conducted in Korea, the Philippines, Taiwan, and the United States with 953 college students. There are marked differences among countries in symptoms reported. Research designs and measurement strategies for cross-cultural research are discussed. (SLD)

Crittenden, Kathleen S.; And Others

1992-01-01

209

Effectiveness of an online group course for adolescents and young adults with depressive symptoms: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

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Abstract Background Depression is a common condition whose first onset is usually in late adolescence or early adulthood. Internet-based interventions are an effective treatment approach to depression. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of a Dutch online cognitive-behavioural group course known as Master Your Mood (Grip op Je Dip) for young people reporting depressive symptoms. Secondary research questions involve maintenance of effect at 6 mon...

2011-01-01

210

KLEPTOMANIA PRESENTING WITH MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER : A CASE REPORT  

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A 35 year old, married, educated woman of well to do economic condition who was referred by court for psychiatric opinion was found to suffer from “Kleptomania” with “recurrent major depressive disorder.” The patient had been stealing and hoarding (at times giving away when caught) defective and useless objects for the past 3 years .mostly during periods of depression and had been arrested twice for stealing. Her kleplomanic symptoms improved moderately when her depression lifted with...

Sharma, R. C.

1996-01-01

211

Smoking and Mood  

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... common sadness. As many as one in five teens experience depression. Depression interferes with other parts of your life, ... intended to provide a medical diagnosis of major depression. It cannot take the ... include: School demands and frustration Feeling bad about ...

212

The Arabic Mood and Feelings Questionnaire: psychometrics and validity in a clinical sample.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to provide clinicians in the Arab World with a child and adolescent depression screening tool. Child and parent versions of the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (CMFQ and PMFQ respectively) were translated to Arabic and administered along with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) to 30 children and adolescents and with mood disorders and 76 children and adolescents with other psychiatric disorders seeking treatment at a child and adolescent psychiatry clinic. DSM-IV diagnoses were generated through clinical interviews by a psychiatrist blinded to self-reports. Internal consistency for both versions was excellent with moderate inter-informant agreement and good convergent validity with the SDQ emotional symptoms subscales on the child and parent forms. The CMFQ and PMFQ significantly differentiated between currently depressed participants and those with other psychiatric disorders. CMFQ scores were a stronger predictor of categorization into depressed and non-depressed groups than the PMFQ. Two modes of cutoffs were calculated with one favoring sensitivity (a score of 26 for the CMFQ and 22 for the PMFQ) and another favoring specificity (a score of 31 for the CMFQ and 28 for the PMFQ). PMID:24081605

Tavitian, Lucy; Atwi, Mia; Bawab, Soha; Hariz, Nayla; Zeinoun, Pia; Khani, Munir; Maalouf, Fadi T

2014-06-01

213

Development of a Patient-Report Measure of Psychotherapy for Depression  

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Despite clear indications of need to improve depression treatment, practical tools that efficiently measure psychotherapy are not available. We developed a patient-report measure of psychotherapy for depression that assesses Cognitive Behavioral (CBT), Interpersonal (IPT), and Psychodynamic therapies. 420 patients with depression from a large managed behavioral health care organization completed the measure. The three subscales measuring CBT, IPT, and Psychodynamic Therapy showed good interna...

Miranda, Jeanne; Hepner, Kimberly A.; Azocar, Francisca; Greenwood, Greg; Ngo, Victoria; Burnam, M. Audrey

2010-01-01

214

Development of a Clinician Report Measure to Assess Psychotherapy for Depression in Usual Care Settings  

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Although mental health policy initiatives have called for quality improvement in depression care, practical tools to describe the quality of psychotherapy for depression are not available. We developed a clinician-report measure of adherence to three types of psychotherapy for depression—cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, and psychodynamic therapy. A total of 727 clinicians from a large, national managed behavioral health care organization responded to a mail survey. The m...

Hepner, Kimberly A.; Azocar, Francisca; Greenwood, Gregory L.; Miranda, Jeanne; Burnam, M. Audrey

2010-01-01

215

Congenital depressed skull fracture in the absence of trauma: case report and literature review  

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Zulma S Tovar-Spinoza, Peter D KimDepartment of Neurosurgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse NYAbstract: There are limited reports of neonatal depressed skull fractures in the absence of any known trauma or obvious risk factors. Here we describe a male neonate with a significant frontal nontraumatic depressed fracture, his course of treatment, and a literature review. A male neonate was attended for a significant congenital depressed skull fracture in the left frontal bone. He was ...

2012-01-01

216

Music feels like moods feel  

Science.gov (United States)

While it is widely accepted that music evokes moods, there is disagreement over whether music-induced moods are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music as such. The arguments against the aesthetic relevance of music-induced moods are: (1) moods cannot be intentionally directed at the music and (2) music-induced moods are highly subjective experiences and are therefore a kind of mind-wandering. This paper presents a novel account of musical moods that avoids these objections. It is correct to say that a listener’s entire mood is not relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. However, the experience of mood consists of having different feelings. Music induces feelings that are intentionally directed at the music and clusters of these feelings can be recognized as typical of a specific mood. Therefore, mood-feelings are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music.

Goffin, Kris

2014-01-01

217

Music feels like moods feel.  

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While it is widely accepted that music evokes moods, there is disagreement over whether music-induced moods are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music as such. The arguments against the aesthetic relevance of music-induced moods are: (1) moods cannot be intentionally directed at the music and (2) music-induced moods are highly subjective experiences and are therefore a kind of mind-wandering. This paper presents a novel account of musical moods that avoids these objections. It is correct to say that a listener's entire mood is not relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. However, the experience of mood consists of having different feelings. Music induces feelings that are intentionally directed at the music and clusters of these feelings can be recognized as typical of a specific mood. Therefore, mood-feelings are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. PMID:24795677

Goffin, Kris

2014-01-01

218

Music feels like moods feel  

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Full Text Available While it is widely accepted that music evokes moods, there is disagreement over whether music-induced moods are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music as such. The arguments against the aesthetic relevance of music-induced moods are: (1 moods cannot be intentionally directed at the music and (2 music-induced moods are highly subjective experiences and are therefore a kind of mind-wandering. This paper presents a novel account of musical moods that avoids these objections. It is correct to say that a listener's entire mood is not relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. However, the experience of mood consists of having different feelings. Music induces feelings that are intentionally directed at the music and clusters of these feelings can be recognized as typical of a specific mood. Therefore, mood-feelings are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music.

KrisGoffin

2014-04-01

219

The increasing burden of depression  

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Full Text Available Jean-Pierre Lépine1, Mike Briley21Hôpital Lariboisière Fernand Widal, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris Unité INSERM 705 CNRS UMR 8206, Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France; 2NeuroBiz Consulting and Communication, Castres, FranceAbstract: Recent epidemiological surveys conducted in general populations have found that the lifetime prevalence of depression is in the range of 10% to 15%. Mood disorders, as defined by the World Mental Health and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, have a 12-month prevalence which varies from 3% in Japan to over 9% in the US. A recent American survey found the prevalence of current depression to be 9% and the rate of current major depression to be 3.4%. All studies of depressive disorders have stressed the importance of the mortality and morbidity associated with depression. The mortality risk for suicide in depressed patients is more than 20-fold greater than in the general population. Recent studies have also shown the importance of depression as a risk factor for cardiovascular death. The risk of cardiac mortality after an initial myocardial infarction is greater in patients with depression and related to the severity of the depressive episode. Greater severity of depressive symptoms has been found to be associated with significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality including cardiovascular death and stroke. In addition to mortality, functional impairment and disability associated with depression have been consistently reported. Depression increases the risk of decreased workplace productivity and absenteeism resulting in lowered income or unemployment. Absenteeism and presenteeism (being physically present at work but functioning suboptimally have been estimated to result in a loss of $36.6 billion per year in the US. Worldwide projections by the World Health Organization for the year 2030 identify unipolar major depression as the leading cause of disease burden. This article is a brief overview of how depression affects the quality of life of the subject and is also a huge burden for both the family of the depressed patient and for society at large.Keywords: epidemiology, DALY, mortality risk, economic burden, family burden, depression

Lépine J-P

2011-05-01

220

Uncontrolled Self-Medication with Venlafaxine in a Patient with Major Depressive Disorder  

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Antidepressants are known to have no significant ability to cause addiction. However, a recent study showed many individuals with mood disorders self-medicated with antidepressants to relieve symptoms. We report here a male physician, diagnosed five years ago with major depressive disorder, with insomnia, anxiousness, and chest heaviness. He began self-medicating with 150 mg of venlafaxine daily, without any monitoring. During his most recent severe depressive episode, he was taking up to 1,5...

Song, Ji-hye; Yu, Bum-hee; Lee, Dongsoo; Yoon, Se Chang; Jeon, Hong Jin

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
221

Can Reporting Heterogeneity Explain Differences in Depressive Symptoms across Europe?  

Science.gov (United States)

Depression is one of the leading causes of disability in the developed world. Previous studies have shown varying depression prevalence rates between European countries, and also within countries, between socioeconomic groups. However, it is unclear whether these differences reflect true variations in prevalence or whether they are attributable to…

Kok, Renske; Avendano, Mauricio; d'Uva, Teresa Bago; Mackenbach, Johan

2012-01-01

222

The depression report: a new deal for depression and anxiety disorders  

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Crippling depression and chronic anxiety are the biggest causes of misery in Britain today. They are the great submerged problem, which shame keeps out of sight. But if you mention them, you soon discover how many families are affected. According to the respected Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, one in six of us would be diagnosed as having depression or chronic anxiety disorder, which means that one family in three is affected. That is the bad news. The good news is that we now have evidence-ba...

2006-01-01

223

Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium / Cleptomanía, distúrbio do humor e lítio  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Os autores descrevem e comentam o caso de uma paciente com Distúrbio de Humor Bipolar e Cleptomanía (DSM-III-R) que apresentou remissão de seu quadro compulsivo após instituição de litioterapia. Discutem a possibilidade de tratamento medicamentoso para este distúrbio e apontam para a necessidade de [...] estudos que estabeleçam a eventual relação entre cleptomania, distúrbios do humor e litioterapia. Abstract in english Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the [...] possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.

Rocha, Fábio Lopes; Rocha, Maria Elizabete Guimarães.

224

Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium Cleptomanía, distúrbio do humor e lítio  

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Full Text Available Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.Os autores descrevem e comentam o caso de uma paciente com Distúrbio de Humor Bipolar e Cleptomanía (DSM-III-R que apresentou remissão de seu quadro compulsivo após instituição de litioterapia. Discutem a possibilidade de tratamento medicamentoso para este distúrbio e apontam para a necessidade de estudos que estabeleçam a eventual relação entre cleptomania, distúrbios do humor e litioterapia.

Fábio Lopes Rocha

1992-12-01

225

Gender differences in mental health service utilization among respondents reporting depression in a national health survey  

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Full Text Available This study examined whether people who self-reported depression sought mental health treatment in the year after being interviewed, and how gender affected utilization. Depression data were obtained from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2000-01, and linked to medical records in Ontario (n = 24,677. Overall, women had higher rates of mental health service utilization, but there were no gender differences in rates of specialist care. The gender difference in mental health contact was greater for those without depression, as opposed to those with depression. Among those without depression, women were significantly more likely than men to use mental health services; however, rates were similar for women and men with depression. This finding suggests that men may be more likely than women to delay seeing a doctor for minor mental health concerns, but will seek help once a problem reaches a threshold.

Katherine L. W. Smith

2013-09-01

226

Psychometric data for a Farsi translation of the Trait Meta-Mood Scale.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of a Farsi version of the Trait Meta-Mood Scale, with a sample of 306 undergraduate students (123 men, 183 women) ages 18 to 51 years. Participants completed Farsi versions of the Trait Meta-Mood Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Analysis confirmed the preliminary reliabilities and construct validity of the Trait Meta-Mood Scale. PMID:19810447

Bayani, Ali Asghar

2009-08-01

227

Distinct profiles of behavioral inhibition and activation system sensitivity in unipolar vs. bipolar mood disorders.  

Science.gov (United States)

Psychiatric outpatients with mood disorders (n=275) and community controls (n=733) completed a measure of Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) and Behavioral Activation System (BAS) sensitivity; psychiatric outpatients also completed measures of mood symptom severity. All patients scored higher on BIS compared to controls; patients with bipolar disorders scored higher on BAS scales compared to patients with depressive disorders. BIS and BAS demonstrated unique patterns of association with mood symptoms. Results support the clinical utility of the BIS/BAS. PMID:24857564

Quilty, Lena C; Mackew, Laura; Bagby, R Michael

2014-09-30

228

The Role of the Tripartite Glutamatergic Synapse in the Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Mood Disorders  

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Bipolar disorder (BPD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are common, chronic, and recurrent mood disorders that affect the lives of millions of individuals worldwide. Growing evidence suggests that glutamatergic system dysfunction is directly involved in mood disorders. This article describes the role of the “tripartite glutamatergic synapse”, comprising presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons and glial cells, in the pathophysiology and therapeutics of mood disorders. Glutamatergic neurons...

Machado-vieira, Rodrigo; Manji, Husseini K.; Zarate, Carlos A.

2009-01-01

229

Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms in Lesbian Birth Mothers and Comothers  

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Despite the frequency of postpartum depression, little is known about the experiences of lesbian birth mothers and their female partners, or comothers. In this modest yet important exploratory investigation, 20 lesbian mothers completed a survey of self-reported postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS) and related risk factors. Results indicate that…

Maccio, Elaine M.; Pangburn, Jaimee A.

2012-01-01

230

Sleep deprivation in depression  

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Full Text Available Ten patients diagnosed as suffering from depressive illness were treated with 2 consecutive nights of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was effective in both types of depression viz. endoge-nous and reactive. The improvement was greater and seemed to last longer in endogenous depression as compared to reactive depression at the time of evaluation, 7 days after completion of sleep deprivation. Depressed mood, suicidal tendencies and retard-ation seemed to show the greatest improvement while insight and gastro-intestinal and somatic symptoms, improved the least.

Doongaji D

1979-01-01

231

Pharmacotherapy for Mood Disorders in Pregnancy  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective Pharmacotherapy for mood disorders during pregnancy is often complicated by pregnancy-related pharmacokinetic changes and the need for dose adjustments. The objectives of this review are to summarize the evidence for change in perinatal pharmacokinetics of commonly used pharmacotherapies for mood disorders, discuss the implications for clinical and therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), and make clinical recommendations. Methods The English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE/PubMed was searched for original observational studies (controlled and uncontrolled, prospective and retrospective), case reports, and case series that evaluated or described pharmacokinetic changes or TDM during pregnancy or the postpartum period. Results Pregnancy-associated changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination may result in lowered psychotropic drug levels and possible treatment effects, particularly in late pregnancy. Mechanisms include changes in both phase 1 hepatic cytochrome P450 and phase 2 uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase enzyme activities, changes in hepatic and renal blood flow, and glomerular filtration rate. Therapeutic drug monitoring, in combination with clinical monitoring, is indicated for tricyclic antidepressants and mood stabilizers during the perinatal period. Conclusions Substantial pharmacokinetic changes can occur during pregnancy in a number of commonly used antidepressants and mood stabilizers. Dose increases may be indicated for antidepressants including citalopram, clomipramine, imipramine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, nortriptyline, paroxetine, and sertraline, especially late in pregnancy. Antenatal dose increases may also be needed for lithium, lamotrigine, and valproic acid because of perinatal changes in metabolism. Close clinical monitoring of perinatal mood disorders and TDM of tricyclic antidepressants and mood stabilizers are recommended.

Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Byatt, Nancy; Freeman, Marlene P.

2014-01-01

232

Reproductive hormonal treatments for mood disorders in women  

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There has been a century-long view in medicine that reproductive function in both men and women is intimately involved with mood regulation. The 19th century witnessed a proliferation of medical reports documenting beneficial effects on mood and behavior after medical or surgical manipulations of women's reproductive functíon. More recently, the results of several studies suggest that gonadal steroids do regulate mood in some women. Thus, there is considerable interest in the potential role ...

2002-01-01

233

Mood disorders and complementary and alternative medicine: a literature review  

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Full Text Available Naseem Akhtar Qureshi,1 Abdullah Mohammed Al-Bedah21General Administration for Research and Studies, Sulaimania Medical Complex, 2National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Mood disorders are a major public health problem and are associated with considerable burden of disease, suicides, physical comorbidities, high economic costs, and poor quality of life. Approximately 30%–40% of patients with major depression have only a partial response to available pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has been used either alone or in combination with conventional therapies in patients with mood disorders. This review of the literature examines evidence-based data on the use of CAM in mood disorders. A search of the PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Quertile databases using keywords was conducted, and relevant articles published in the English language in the peer-reviewed journals over the past two decades were retrieved. Evidence-based data suggest that light therapy, St John's wort, Rhodiola rosea, omega-3 fatty acids, yoga, acupuncture, mindfulness therapies, exercise, sleep deprivation, and S-adenosylmethionine are effective in the treatment of mood disorders. Clinical trials of vitamin B complex, vitamin D, and methylfolate found that, while these were useful in physical illness, results were equivocal in patients with mood disorders. Studies support the adjunctive role of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid in unipolar and bipolar depression, although manic symptoms are not affected and higher doses are required in patients with resistant bipolar depression and rapid cycling. Omega-3 fatty acids are useful in pregnant women with major depression, and have no adverse effects on the fetus. Choline, inositol, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, and N-acetylcysteine are effective adjuncts in bipolar patients. Dehydroepiandrosterone is effective both in bipolar depression and depression in the setting of comorbid physical disease, although doses should be titrated to avoid adverse effects. Ayurvedic and homeopathic therapies have the potential to improve symptoms of depression, although larger controlled trials are needed. Mind-body-spirit and integrative medicine approaches can be used effectively in mild to moderate depression and in treatment-resistant depression. Currently, although CAM therapies are not the primary treatment of mood disorders, level 1 evidence could emerge in the future showing that such treatments are effective.Keywords: complementary and alternative medicine, mood disorders, Ayurveda, homeopathy, integrative medicine

Qureshi NA

2013-05-01

234

Core Depressive Symptoms In Depressed Cancer OutpatientsB  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of core depressive symptoms among cancer outpatients diagnosed with depressive or adjustment disorders with depressed mood. We also aimed to detect potential differences between patient self-assessment and psychiatrist evaluation in classifying the severity of depression. Methods: Fifty-two outpatients diagnosed with solid tumor malignancy and depressive or adjustment disorder with depressed mood were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) (and its shortened version the HAMD-7) and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZSDS) (and its shortened version BZSDS). Results: Based on HAMD-7 results, the prevalence of moderate depression was low (7.7%); using the BZSDS moderate depression was absent. Mild depression was identified in 82.3% and 73% of our subjects using the HAMD-7 and the BZSDS, respectively. The strength of agreement between psychiatrist and patients’ self-evaluation for mild depression was “slight”, employing the original and the abbreviated versions of both scales. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the prevalence of core depressive symptoms is very low in cancer patients diagnosed with depressive disorder. The lack of a strong agreement between psychiatrist and patient in classifying the severity of depression highlights the importance of factors such as well-being and functional status among depressed cancer patients in their self assessment of depression.

Pasquini, Massimo; Berardelli, Isabella; Cabra, Ambra; Maraone, Annalisa; Matteucci, Gabriella; Biondi, Massimo

2011-01-01

235

The impact of antiepileptic polytherapy on mood and cognitive function.  

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This retrospective study was performed to reevaluate the effect of polytherapy on mood and cognitive function. 139 patients with refractory epilepsy were screened with a neuropsychological test battery and a depression score. Our regression model with age at admission, duration of the disorder and number of antiepileptic drugs as independent variables had a significant influence on 10 out of 11 neuropsychological parameters but not on depression. Looking at the significance of each predictor variable the number of antiepileptic drugs had a significant effect only on the estimation of the fluid intelligence. A significant effect on five neuropsychological parameters was found for the predictor variable duration of the disorder. Therefore our data do not support the commonly reported hypothesis that antiepileptic polytherapy itself is a substantial risk factor for cognitive deficits or depression in patients with refractory epilepsy. But there may be an influence of accumulative drug load during the course of the disorder as reflected by the effect of the duration of the disorder on five neuropsychological parameters. PMID:21510230

Rösche, Johannes; Kundt, Günther; Weber, Raimund; Fröscher, Walter; Uhlmann, Carmen

2011-03-01

236

Cobalamin deficiency manifested with seizures, mood oscillations, psychotic features and reversible dementia in the absence of typical neurologic and hematologic signs and symptoms: a case report.  

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Cobalamin deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of hematologic, neurologic, gastroenterologic and psychiatric disorders or symptoms. We report a case of a 50-year-old man with complex partial seizures with secondary generalization, mood oscillations and psychotic symptoms alternating with confusion and reversible dementia secondary to cobalamin deficiency in the absence of typical neurologic and/or hematologic symptoms and signs. Exclusion of epilepsy, acute, atrophic or expansive lesion of central nervous system and usual etiology associated with reversible dementia (infectious diseases, an endocrine etiology and deficiency of vitamins other than cobalamin); finding of cobalamin deficiency only and complete neuropsychiatric recovery after substitution, confirmed etiology. Typical and atypical psychiatric manifestations due to cobalamin deficiency that precede neurologic and/or hematologic signs and symptoms can recover completely after adequate replacement therapy. PMID:23697293

Vilibi?, Maja; Juki?, Vlado; Vidovi?, Andelko; Breci?, Petrana

2013-03-01

237

Cyclic mood disorder heralding adult-onset autosomal dominant leucodystrophy: a clinical masquerader.  

Science.gov (United States)

Leucodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of progressive white matter diseases which may be inherited in dominant, recessive or X-linked fashion depending on the type. Adrenoleucodystrophy (ALD) and metachromatic leucodystrophy (MLD) are rather commoner forms of leucodystrophies whereas krabbes disease, alexander disease, cannavans disease etc. are of less common type. Adult-onset autosomal dominant leucodystrophy (ADLD) is a lately described rarer form of leucodystrophy with perhaps no case report from India. Various leucodystrophies may have different clinical presentations, ranging from subtle cognitive and psychiatric manifestations to gross motor disabilities, visual impairment and seizure. Psychiatric manifestations in the form of psychoses and frank schizophrenia are commonly described in MLD. Depression though uncommonly reported in MLD, cyclic mood disorders have been rarely described in any form of leucodystrophies. We are reporting an eye opener, a case of ADLD which masqueraded as a rapid cyclic mood disorder for initial four years, later to be followed by progressive neurological signs and symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is perhaps the first case report of ADLD presenting as rapid cyclic mood disorder in the world literature. PMID:24813031

Jain, Rajendra S; Prakash, Swayam; Raghavendra, B S; Nagpal, Kadam; Handa, Rahul

2014-06-01

238

Dimensions of Adolescent Alcohol Involvement as Predictors of Young-Adult Major Depression*  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective Adolescent alcohol involvement may increase risk for young-adult depression; however, findings are mixed and important questions remain unanswered. Because alcohol involvement among teens is multidimensional, this study examined the extent to which four different adolescent alcohol dimensions (i.e., frequency of alcohol use, quantity of consumption, frequency of heavy episodic drinking, and frequency of problem use) were predictive of young-adult major depressive disorder (MDD). Method Participants in this prospective longitudinal study, which extended from age 11 to age 22, were 429 rural teens (including 222 girls) and their families. Self-reports of each dimension of adolescent alcohol involvement were obtained at ages 16 and 18. Depression diagnoses were obtained at age 22, using a structured interview. Analyses included adolescent depressed mood, measured via self-report at ages 16 and 18. Data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Results The multidimensional nature of adolescent alcohol involvement was best represented by a first-order problem-use factor and a second-order alcohol-intake factor comprised of quantity, frequency, and heavy drinking. After controlling for gender and depressed mood, adolescent problem use, but not alcohol intake, was a significant positive predictor of young-adult MDD. Conclusions Findings help clarify the link between alcohol involvement and depression and suggest that harm-reduction strategies may help prevent later mood disorders.

Mason, W. Alex; Kosterman, Rick; Haggerty, Kevin P.; Hawkins, J. David; Redmond, Cleve; Spoth, Richard L.; Shin, Chungyeol

2010-01-01

239

Changes in mood status and neurotic levels during a 20-day bed rest  

Science.gov (United States)

This study evaluated changes of mood status and depressive and neurotic levels in nine young male subjects during a 20-day 6° head-down tilting bed rest and examined whether exercise training modified these changes. Participants were asked to complete psychometrical inventories on before, during, and after the bed rest experiment. Depressive and neurotic levels were enhanced during bed rest period according to the Japanese version of Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale and the Japanese version of the General Health Questionnaire. Mood state "vigor" was impaired and "confusion" was increased during bed rest and recumbent control periods compared to pre-bed rest and ambulatory control periods according to the Japanese version of Profiles of Mood State, whereas the mood "tension-anxiety", "depression-dejection", "anger-hostility" and "fatigue" were relatively stable during experiment. Isometric exercise training did not modify these results. Microgravity, along with confinement to bed and isolation from familiar environments, induced impairment of mental status.

Ishizaki, Yuko; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Kim, Chang-Sun; Fujita, Masayo; Maegawa, Yuko; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Katsura, Taisaku; Suzuki, Yoji; Gunji, Atsuaki

2002-04-01

240

Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients  

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Abstract Distinction between true negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia is difficult. In the present study we seek to establish the psychological profile of depression-prone schizophrenic patients. We addressed the issue by comparing the expression of psychological indices, such as the feelings of being in control of events, anxiety, mood, and the style of coping with stress in depressive and non-depressive schizophrenics. We also analyzed the strength of the association...

Gozdzik-Zelazny A; Borecki L; Pokorski M

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
241

Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients  

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Distinction between true negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia is difficult. In the present study we seek to establish the psychological profile of depression-prone schizophrenic patients. We addressed the issue by comparing the expression of psychological indices, such as the feelings of being in control of events, anxiety, mood, and the style of coping with stress in depressive and non-depressive schizophrenics. We also analyzed the strength of the association of these indices w...

Gozdzik-zelazny, A.; Borecki, L.; Pokorski, M.

2011-01-01

242

Mood disorders in childhood and adolescence  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The identification and treatment of mood disorders in children and adolescents has grown over the last decades. Major depression is one of the most common and debilitating disorders worldwide, imposing a massive burden to the youth population. Bipolar disorder is being increasingly recognized as hav [...] ing its roots early in life, and its presentation during childhood and adolescence has been submitted to extensive research. This review aims to highlight clinical aspects of the current knowledge on mood disorders in the pediatric population, presenting updated information on epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and management strategies. Limitations of available evidence and future directions of research in the field are also discussed.

Rocha, Thiago Botter Maio; Zeni, Cristian Patrick; Caetano, Sheila Cavalcante; Kieling, Christian.

243

Three types of self-efficacy associated with medication adherence in patients with co-occurring HIV and substance use disorders, but only when mood disorders are present  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Susan Reif,1 Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell,1,2 Jia Yao,1 Sara LeGrand,1,2 Anna Uehara,2 Edgar Asiimwe,2 Evelyn Byrd Quinlivan31Duke Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, 2Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, 3Center for Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Adherence with medication regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a life-saving behavior for people with HIV infection, yet adherence is challenging for many individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. Medication-taking self-efficacy, which is the confidence that one can take one's medication as prescribed, is associated with better adherence with HIV medication. However, little is known about the influence that other kinds of self-efficacy have on adherence with HIV medication, especially among HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. We sought to examine the relationship between adherence with HIV medication among substance users and three specific kinds of self-efficacy, ie, one's confidence that one can communicate with medical providers, get support, and manage one's mood. We further sought to examine whether symptoms of depression and anxiety moderate these relationships.Methods: Patients were recruited from three HIV clinics in the southeastern United States as part of an integrated study of treatment for HIV and substance use.Results: We interviewed 154 patients with HIV and substance use who reported taking HIV medications. Based on symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, 63% had probable depression and/or anxiety. Higher levels of self-efficacy in provider communication (? = 3.86, P < 0.01, getting needed support (? = 2.82, P < 0.01, and mood management (? = 2.29, P < 0.05 were related to better self-reported adherence with HIV medication among study participants with probable depression and/or anxiety. The three kinds of self-efficacy were not associated with medication adherence among participants with HIV and substance use only.Conclusion: In the search for mutable factors to improve medication adherence among individuals triply diagnosed with HIV, substance use, and mood disorders, these findings support previous research indicating the benefit of enhancing self-efficacy, and further point to three specific kinds of self-efficacy that may benefit medication adherence, ie, provider communication, getting support, and mood management.Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus, self-efficacy, substance use, depression, anxiety, interventions

Reif S

2013-06-01

244

Tightly Linked Systems: Reciprocal Relations Between Maternal Depressive Symptoms And Maternal Reports of Adolescent Externalizing Behavior  

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The frequently observed link between maternal depressive symptoms and heightened maternal reporting of adolescent externalizing behavior was examined from an integrative, systems perspective using a community sample of 180 adolescents, their mothers, fathers, and close peers, assessed twice over a three-year period. Consistent with this perspective, the maternal depression-adolescent externalizing link was found to reflect not simply maternal reporting biases, but heightened maternal sensitiv...

Allen, Joseph P.; Manning, Nell; Meyer, Jess

2010-01-01

245

Resilience and Unemployment: Exploring Risk and Protective Influences for the Outcome Variables of Depression and Assertive Job Searching  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined adult resilience in the context of the adversity of unemployment. Seventy-seven unemployed job seekers completed a self-report survey containing the Resilience Scale (G. M. Wagnild & H. M. Young, 1993), Centre for Epidemiologic Studies-Depressed Mood Scale (L. S. Radloff, 1977), and the Assertive Job Hunting Survey (H. A.…

Moorhouse, Anne; Caltabiano, Marie L.

2007-01-01

246

Ruminative Responses to Negative and Positive Affect Among Students Diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder  

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Rumination in response to negative affect has been found to predict the onset, severity, and duration of depressive symptoms. Few researchers, however, have considered rumination within bipolar disorder, nor have studies considered parallel responses that might intensify positive affect. The current study examined self-reported rumination in response to both negative and positive affect among people diagnosed via the SCID with BPD (n = 28), major depressive disorder (MDD; n = 35), or no mood ...

Johnson, Sheri L.; Mckenzie, Gavin; Mcmurrich, Stephanie

2008-01-01

247

Smoking Cessation with E-Cigarettes in Smokers with a Documented History of Depression and Recurring Relapses  

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The association between nicotine dependence and affective disorders, particularly major depressive disorder (MDD), is well known with high prevalence rates being reported for smokers. The reason for this association is not clear, but, it has been argued that smoking may help individuals to cope with stress or medicate depressed mood. Smoking cessation programs are useful in helping smokers to quit, but smoking is a very difficult addiction to break, especially for people suffering from depres...

Pasquale Caponnetto; Riccardo Polosa; Roberta Auditore; Cristina Russo; Davide Campagna

2011-01-01

248

Oral perceptions of fat and taste stimuli are modulated by affect and mood induction.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the impact of three clinical psychological variables (non-pathological levels of depression and anxiety, as well as experimentally manipulated mood) on fat and taste perception in healthy subjects. After a baseline orosensory evaluation, 'sad', 'happy' and 'neutral' video clips were presented to induce corresponding moods in eighty participants. Following mood manipulation, subjects rated five different oral stimuli, appearing sweet, umami, sour, bitter, fatty, which were delivered at five different concentrations each. Depression levels were assessed with Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) and anxiety levels were assessed via the Spielberger's STAI-trait and state questionnaire. Overall, subjects were able to track the concentrations of the stimuli correctly, yet depression level affected taste ratings. First, depression scores were positively correlated with sucrose ratings. Second, subjects with depression scores above the sample median rated sucrose and quinine as more intense after mood induction (positive, negative and neutral). Third and most important, the group with enhanced depression scores did not rate low and high fat stimuli differently after positive or negative mood induction, whereas, during baseline or during the non-emotional neutral condition they rated the fat intensity as increasing with concentration. Consistent with others' prior observations we also found that sweet and bitter stimuli at baseline were rated as more intense by participants with higher anxiety scores and that after positive and negative mood induction, citric acid was rated as stronger tasting compared to baseline. The observation that subjects with mild subclinical depression rated low and high fat stimuli similarly when in positive or negative mood is novel and likely has potential implications for unhealthy eating patterns. This deficit may foster unconscious eating of fatty foods in sub-clinical mildly depressed populations. PMID:23755167

Platte, Petra; Herbert, Cornelia; Pauli, Paul; Breslin, Paul A S

2013-01-01

249

MOOD DISTURBANCE DURING CYCLING PERFORMANCE AT EXTREME CONDITIONS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of extreme environments on mood state changes in hypoxic conditions and cold conditions in comparison to baseline conditions. The research design involved participants completing a two-hour stationary cycle ergometer ride at a simulated altitude of 2,500 metres, O°C, and normal laboratory conditions at a pace equivalent of lactate threshold. Eight male elite cyclists (Age: M = 26.23 yrs., SD = 6.74 completed the hypoxia- normal cycling trials. Ten male highly trained cyclists (Age: M = 23.34 yrs., SD = 5.45 participated in the cold-normal trials. Mood was assessed before, after one hour, and after two hours using the 24-item Brunel Mood Scale. MANOVA results indicated no significant interaction effect for mood changes over time by environment condition (Wilks' Lambda = .73, p = .32, Eta2 = .05, a significant main effect for mood changes over time (Wilks' Lambda = .61. p < .001, Partial Eta2 = .15 and a significant main effect for differences in mood by condition (Wilks' Lambda = .72, p < .000, Partial Eta2 = .15. Results indicated that increased anger, depression and fatigue were associated with performing at altitude, particularly after two hours of exercise. Collectively, results lend support to the notion that altitude is associated with negative mood states, although it should be noted that environment conditions did not affect the change in mood states over time. We suggest that further research is needed to explore mechanisms that individuals use to regulate negative mood during strenuous exercise.

Matthew Wilson

2005-03-01

250

Depression and Insomnia Among Adolescents: A Prospective Perspective  

Science.gov (United States)

Background No studies of adolescents have examined the prospective, reciprocal association between insomnia and major depression. Methods A two-wave, community-based cohort of 3,134 youths aged 11–17 at baseline. Major depression was assessed using DSM-IV criteria. Three measures of insomnia were used also following DSM-IV: P1, any symptom of insomnia; P2, any symptom plus impairment; P3, P2 with no comorbid mood, anxiety or substance use disorders. Results In general, the association between insomnia and depression was stronger and more consistent for major depression than for symptoms of depression. Baseline insomnia (P1 and P2) increased subsequent risk of major depression 2–3-fold and P1 2-fold in multivariate analyses. Major depression increased risk for subsequent insomnia 2–3-fold for P1 and P2 2-fold for P2 in multivariate analyses. Results varied by measure of insomnia used. Limitations Only symptoms of insomnia were assessed, so we could not examine the effects of comorbid sleep disorders nor did we have objective or biological measures of disturbed sleep. We also did not collect data on parental reports of youth depression nor insomnia or sleep problems. Conclusion Our results provide the first prospective data on insomnia and major depression among adolescents indicating the two are reciprocally related. More studies are needed examining trajectories of insomnia and major depression in childhood and adolescence.

Roberts, Robert E.; Duong, Hao T.

2013-01-01

251

Depression predicts self-reported disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.  

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Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can significantly impact both physiological and psychological functioning. In order to examine the relationship between psychological functioning and disease activity in SLE, we administered instruments that collected sociodemographic information and measured indices of disease activity and psychosocial functioning from 125 adult Hispanic and White patients with SLE. Patients were recruited from four healthcare settings in the greater Southern California area. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between depression and disease activity were evaluated. Cross-sectional findings revealed that depression and ethnicity were independently correlated with self-reported disease activity. Longitudinally, depression alone predicted self-reported disease activity. These data suggest that depression may play a significant role in the health status of SLE patients and serve as an important target for clinical intervention. PMID:20937622

Carr, F N; Nicassio, P M; Ishimori, M L; Moldovan, I; Katsaros, E; Torralba, K; Shinada, S; Cooray, D; Wallace, D J; Finck, S; Jolly, M; Wilson, A L; Weisman, M H

2011-01-01

252

Sex Differences on Depression Self-Rating Scale in Two Populations: Research Report  

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The self-report of depressive symptoms of high school adolescents from two populations were compared. The study aims to find out whether or not; 1) there are significant sex differences between two communities and 2) with regard to the same-sex, there are significant differences between two communities. Nine hundred and twenty eight adolescents from London and 2012 adolescents from six cities from Iran were requested to fill in the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS). The results showed that ...

Salimi Seyed-Hossein; Tagavi Mohamad-Reza; Azad-Fallah Parviz; Karaminia Reza; Tayebi, A.

2007-01-01

253

Glycogen synthase kinase-3 in the etiology and treatment of mood disorders  

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Full Text Available The mood disorders major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder are prevalent, are inadequately treated, and little is known about their etiologies. A better understanding of the causes of mood disorders would benefit from improved animal models of mood disorders, which now rely on behavioral measurements. This review considers the limitations in relating measures of rodent behaviors to mood disorders, and the evidence from behavioral assessments indicating that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3 dysregulation promotes mood disorders and is a potential target for treating mood disorders. The classical mood stabilizer lithium was identified by studying animal behaviors and later was discovered to be an inhibitor of GSK3. Several mood-relevant behavioral effects of lithium in rodents have been identified, and most have now been shown to be due to its inhibition of GSK3. An extensive variety of pharmacological and molecular approaches for manipulating GSK3 are discussed, the results of which strongly support the proposal that inhibition of GSK3 reduces both depression-like and manic-like behaviors. Studies in human postmortem brain and peripheral cells also have identified correlations between alterations in GSK3 and mood disorders. Evidence is reviewed that depression may be associated with impaired inhibitory control of GSK3, and mania by hyper-stimulation of GSK3. Taken together, these studies provide substantial support for the hypothesis that inhibition of GSK3 activity is therapeutic for mood disorders. Future research should identify the causes of dysregulated GSK3 in mood disorders and the actions of GSK3 that contribute to these diseases.

RichardScottJope

2011-08-01

254

Effects of Mood on Learning in the Serial Reaction Time Task  

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After a brief overview of existing research on the relationship between mood and implicit learning, some methodological concerns are addressed and an empirical study is reported. Participants (N = 80) were trained on a serial reaction time (SRT) task. Mood was induced by the target stimuli being pictures of human faces expressing happiness (positive mood condition) or sadness (negative mood condition). Response stimulus interval (RSI) was 0 or 500 ms, traditionally associ...

Jones, Emma Marie

2011-01-01

255

Effects of Mood on Learning in the Serial Reaction Time Task  

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After a brief overview of existing research on the relationship between mood and implicit learning, some methodological concerns are addressed and an empirical study is reported. Participants (N = 80) were trained on a serial reaction time (SRT) task. Mood was induced by the target stimuli being pictures of human faces expressing happiness (positive mood condition) or sadness (negative mood condition). Response stimulus interval (RSI) was 0 or 500 ms, traditionally associated with implicit an...

Jones, Emma Marie

2011-01-01

256

Basic concepts of depression  

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This paper reviews concepts of depression, including history and classification. The original broad concept of melancholia included all forms of quiet insanity. The term depression began to appear in the nineteenth century as did the modern concept of affective disorders, with the core disturbance now viewed as one of mood. The 1930s saw the introduction of defined criteria into official diagnostic schemes. The modern separation into unipolar and bipolar disorder was introduced following empi...

Paykel, Eugene S.

2008-01-01

257

A direct method of assessing underlying cognitive risk for adolescent depression.  

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An enduring tendency towards negative thinking is thought to increase vulnerability for future depression. However, it has not been possible to assess this tendency in non-depressed mood states. We examined if response latency to endorse dysfunctional attitudes is associated with depressive outcomes in a longitudinal study. A sample of young people at familial risk of depression (N?=?252, aged 10-19, 56.3 % female) completed a computer-administered dysfunctional attitude scale. The main outcome measure was the difference in reaction time to agree versus disagree with dysfunctional attitudes. Cross-sectional differences between current and previous depression and no psychiatric disorder groups as well as longitudinal associations with depressive symptoms were examined. Young people with current and previous depression were quicker to agree with dysfunctional attitudes than those without disorder. In young people free from depressive disorder, faster agreements with dysfunctional attitudes were specifically associated with increased depressive symptoms over time. Self-reported dysfunctional attitudes did not differentiate the formerly depressed and no disorder groups and showed a longitudinal association with depressive symptoms for older adolescents only. Reaction time to endorse dysfunctional attitudes may indicate changes in affective processing that represent an early risk for future depression that is not indexed by self-report measures of negative thought. PMID:23702578

Rawal, Adhip; Collishaw, Stephan; Thapar, Anita; Rice, Frances

2013-11-01

258

Red blood cell folate levels in pregnant women with a history of mood disorders: a case series  

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Objective Maternal folate supplementation reduces offspring risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) and other congenital abnormalities. Maternal red blood cell (RBC) folate concentrations of >906nmol/L have been associated with the lowest risk of having an NTD affected pregnancy. Mood disorders (e.g. depression, bipolar disorder) are common among women and can be associated with folate deficiency. Thus, pregnant women with histories of mood disorders may be prone to RBC folate levels insufficient to provide optimal protection against NTDs. While previous studies have assessed RBC folate concentrations in pregnant women from the general population, none have looked specifically at a group of pregnant women who have a history of a mood disorder. Methods We collected data about RBC folate concentrations and folic acid supplement intake during early pregnancy (906nmol/L, despite all participants reporting current daily use of folic acid supplements. Data regarding offspring were available for 22 women: birthweights ranged from 2296g to 4819g, and congenital abnormalities were identified in two (hypoplastic left heart, annular pancreas). Conclusion Data from this exploratory case series suggest a need for future larger scale controlled studies investigating RBC folate concentrations in early pregnancy and offspring outcomes among women with and without histories of mood disorders.

Yaremco, Elyse; Inglis, Angela; Innis, Sheila M.; Hippman, Catriona; Carrion, Prescilla; Lamers, Yvonne; Honer, William G.; Austin, Jehannine

2014-01-01

259

Improvement of Depression after Treatment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: A Case Report and a Review  

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Patients with dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) in the transverse-sigmoid sinus suffer from several symptoms: bruit, headache, visual impairment, and so on. But depression is rare in patients with DAVF. The authors reported a rare case presenting the improvement of depression after the treatment of a dural arteriovenous fistula in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus. A 46-year-old male had suffered from depression and was treated with antidepressants at a local hospital for four years. The patient was temporarily laid off due to his depression. Afterwards, he had Gerstmann's syndrome and came to our hospital. A DAVF in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus was demonstrated on the angiogram. The DAVF was successfully treated with endovascular surgery, coil embolization of the isolated diseased sinus through the mastoid emissary vein which was a draining vein from the fistula. After this treatment, his depression as well as Gerstmann's syndrome was improved and the quantity of the antidepressants decreased. The patient returned to work without any antidepressant two years after the treatment. DAVFs might be one of the causes of depression. It may be necessary to evaluate cerebral vessels in patients suffering from depression by using MRA or 3D-CTA even if there are not any abnormal findings on plain CT scans.

Nakagawa, Minoru; Sugiu, Kenji; Tokunaga, Koji; Sakamoto, Chihoko; Fujiwara, Kenjiro

2012-01-01

260

Fat food for a bad mood. Could we treat and prevent depression in Type 2 diabetes by means of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids?: A review of the evidence  

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Abstract Aims Evidence strongly suggests that depression is a common complication of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is considerable room to improve the effectiveness of pharmacological antidepressant agents, as in only 50-60% of the depressed subjects with diabetes does pharmacotherapy lead to remission of depression. The aim of the present paper was to review whether polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the omega-3 family could be used for the prevention and treatment of depressio...

Pouwer, F.; Nijpels, M. G. A. A. M.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Dekker, J. M.; Dam, R. M.; Heine, R. J.; Snoek, F. J.

2005-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Mood alterations in mindful versus aerobic exercise modes.  

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The results of most recent studies have generally indicated an improvement in mood after participation in aerobic exercise. However, only a few researchers have compared mindful modes of exercise with aerobic exercise to examine the effect of 1 single session of exercise on mood. In the present study, the authors assessed state anxiety, depressive mood, and subjective well-being prior to and following 1 class of 1 of 4 exercise modes: yoga, Feldenkrais (awareness through movement), aerobic dance, and swimming; a computer class served as a control. Participants were 147 female general curriculum and physical education teachers (mean age = 40.15, SD = 0.2) voluntarily enrolled in a 1-year enrichment program at a physical education college. Analyses of variance for repeated measures revealed mood improvement following Feldenkrais, swimming, and yoga but not following aerobic dance and computer lessons. Mindful low-exertion activities as well as aerobic activities enhanced mood in 1 single session of exercise. The authors suggest that more studies assessing the mood-enhancing benefits of mindful activities such as Feldenkrais and yoga are needed. PMID:14629072

Netz, Yael; Lidor, Ronnie

2003-09-01

262

Bupropion XL use in comorbidity of depression and restless leg syndrome: a case report  

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Full Text Available Restless leg syndrome (RLS is a sensorimotor disorder with symptoms including uncomfortable subjective sensations in the legs and the urge to move them. This common disorder affects 10% of the population and may reduce quality of life. The pathophysiology of RLS is not well understood but dysfunction of dopaminergic pathways is the most prominent theory. Antidepressants, especially SSRIs, can aggravate the symptoms of RLS. Here we present a 42 year old woman diagnosed with major depressive disorder and comorbid RLS and who had been treated with paroxetine 20 mg/day for 2 months who benefited from switching to bupropion treatment. In this case the RLS symptoms had existed for approximately 3 years but were milder before paroxetine treatment. The patient met the diagnostic criteria for RLS. We used the International Restless Legs Scale (IRLS and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS to measure the patient’s symptom severity. The severity of her depressive symptoms was similar to baseline despite the two month paroxetine treatment. Due to symptoms of RLS and her ongoing depressive complaints, we decided to switch from paroxetine to bupropion. With 150 mg/day bupropion XL treatment, her RLS symptoms improved substantially at a one month follow-up while her depression severity was not changed significantly. Due to inadequate response for depression, bupropion XL was titrated to 300 mg/day. Her depressive symptoms improved significantly at a further one month follow-up. Comorbidity of RLS and depression was found to be as a frequent occurence reported in the literature. We concluded that bupropion, as a selective noradrenergic-dopaminergic reuptake inhibitor can be a good alternative to the SSRIs for patients, who suffer from both depression and RLS.

onur durmaz

2014-01-01

263

Influence of the modern light environment on mood.  

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Humans and other organisms have adapted to a consistent and predictable 24-h solar cycle, but over the past ~130 years the widespread adoption of electric light has transformed our environment. Instead of aligning behavioral and physiological processes to the natural solar cycle, individuals respond to artificial light cycles created by social and work schedules. Urban light pollution, night shift work, transmeridian travel, televisions and computers have dramatically altered the timing of light used to entrain biological rhythms. In humans and other mammals, light is detected by the retina and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells project this information both to the circadian system and limbic brain regions. Therefore, it is possible that exposure to light at night, which has become pervasive, may disrupt both circadian timing and mood. Notably, the rate of major depression has increased in recent decades, in parallel with increasing exposure to light at night. Strong evidence already links circadian disruption to major depression and other mood disorders. Emerging evidence from the past few years suggests that exposure to light at night also negatively influences mood. In this review, we discuss evidence from recent human and rodent studies supporting the novel hypothesis that nighttime exposure to light disrupts circadian organization and contributes to depressed mood. PMID:23711982

Bedrosian, T A; Nelson, R J

2013-07-01

264

Predictors of depression and anxiety in first-year veterinary students: a preliminary report.  

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Historically, veterinary medical students' mental health has rarely been investigated, but recently there has been renewed interest in this topic. The present study evaluated depression and anxiety levels in a cross-sectional investigation of 93 first-year veterinary medical students enrolled at Kansas State University (KSU). During their first semester, students completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and the Mental Health Inventory's Anxiety Scale (MHI-A). Results indicate that 32% of these first-year KSU veterinary students were experiencing clinical levels of depressive symptoms. Additionally, students reported elevated anxiety scores. Predictors of depression and anxiety levels include homesickness, physical health, and unclear instructor expectations. Areas of intervention with a focus on improving veterinary medical student well-being are discussed. PMID:17035221

Hafen, McArthur; Reisbig, Allison M J; White, Mark B; Rush, Bonnie R

2006-01-01

265

Building a new Rasch-based self-report inventory of depression  

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Full Text Available Michela Balsamo,1 Giuseppe Giampaglia,2 Aristide Saggino11DiSPUTer, Department of Psychological Sciences, Humanities and Territory, “G d'Annunzio” University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy; 2Department of Economics and Statistics, “Federico-II” University, Naples, ItalyAbstract: This paper illustrates a sequential item development process to create a new self-report instrument of depression refined with Rasch analysis from a larger pool of potential diagnostic items elicited through a consensus approach by clinical experts according to the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for major depression. A 51-item pool was administered to a sample of 529 subjects (300 healthy community-dwelling adults and 229 psychiatric outpatients. Item selection resulted in a 21-item set, named the Teate Depression Inventory, with an excellent Person Separation Index and no evidence of bias due to an item–trait interaction (?2=147.71; df =168; P=0.48. Additional support for the unidimensionality, local independence, appropriateness of the response format, and discrimination ability between clinical and nonclinical subjects was provided. No substantial differential item functioning by sex was observed. The Teate Depression Inventory shows considerable promise as a unidimensional tool for the screening of depression. Finally, advantages and disadvantages of this methodology will be discussed in terms of subsequent possible mathematical analyses, statistical tests, and implications for clinical investigations.Keywords: depression, scale development, self-report scales, Rasch analysis

Balsamo M

2014-01-01

266

Relationships between Exercise as a Mood Regulation Strategy and Trait Emotional Intelligence  

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Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between perception of emotional intelligence and beliefs in the extent to which exercising leads to mood-enhancement. Methods Volunteer participants (N=315) completed a 33-item self-report measure of trait emotional intelligence and an exercise-mood regulation scale. Results Emotional intelligence significantly correlated with beliefs that exercise could be used to regulate mood (r =0.45, P<0 .01). Conclusion Findings demonstrate that using exercise to regulate mood relates significantly to emotional intelligence and suggest that individuals who use exercise to enhance mood report higher scores of emotional intelligence.

Solanki, Dharmendra; Lane, Andrew M.

2010-01-01

267

Is Chronic Inflammation a Possible Cause of Obesity-Related Depression?  

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Adult obesity has been associated with depression, especially in women. Whether depression leads to obesity or obesity causes depression is unclear. Chronic inflammation is observed in obesity and depression. In 63 obese women without additional diseases depression level was assessed with the Beck's questionnaire. After evaluation of depression level study group was divided into groups according to the mood status (A—without depression, B—mild depression, and C—severe depression), and s...

Magdalena Olszanecka-Glinianowicz; Barbara Zahorska-Markiewicz; Piotr Koce?ak; Joanna Janowska; Bieta Semik-grabarczyk, El X. C.; Tomasz Wikarek; Wojciech Gruszka; Browski, Piotr D.

2009-01-01

268

Social disability of Brazilian mood disorder patients  

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Full Text Available Mood disorders cause many social problems, often involving family relationships. Few studies are available in the literature comparing patients with bipolar, unipolar, dysthymic, and double depressive disorders concerning these aspects. In the present study, demographic and disease data were collected using a specifically prepared questionnaire. Social adjustment was assessed using the Disability Adjustment Scale and family relationships were evaluated using the Global Assessment of Relational Functioning Scale. One hundred patients under treatment for at least 6 months were evaluated at the Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic of the Botucatu School of Medicine, UNESP. Most patients were women (82% more than 50 (49% years old with at least two years of follow-up, with little schooling (62% had less than 4 years, and of low socioeconomic level. Logistic regression analysis showed that a diagnosis of unipolar disorder (P = 0.003, OR = 0.075, CI = 0.014-0.403 and dysthymia (P = 0.001, OR = 0.040, CI = 0.006-0.275 as well as family relationships (P = 0.002, OR = 0.953, CI = 0914-0.992 played a significant role in social adjustment. Unipolar and dysthymic patients presented better social adjustment than bipolar and double depressive patients (P < 0.001, results that were not due to social class. These patients, treated at a teaching hospital, may represent the severest mood disorder cases. Evaluations were made knowing the diagnosis of the patients, which might also have influenced some of the results. Social disabilities among mood disorder patients are very frequent and intensive.

Tucci A.M.

2004-01-01

269

Selegiline remarkably improved stage 5 treatment-resistant major depressive disorder: a case report  

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Full Text Available Yuji Kitaichi,1 Takeshi Inoue,1 Nobuyuki Mitsui,1 Shin Nakagawa,1 Rie Kameyama,1 Yoshiyuki Hayashishita,1 Tohru Shiga,2 Ichiro Kusumi,1 Tsukasa Koyama1 1Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan; 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan Abstract: We report a case in which selegiline, an irreversible monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B inhibitor, greatly improved depressive symptoms in an adult with stage 5 treatment-resistant major depressive disorder. Four antidepressants and four augmentation therapies had previously been ineffective or intolerable, and electroconvulsive therapy had only a temporary effect. After 20 weeks of treatment with selegiline (10 mg/day, the patient's score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS had decreased from 19 to 4 points. [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET showed increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral basal ganglia after initiating selegiline treatment; blood dopamine levels were also increased after selegiline treatment. These results raise the possibility that selegiline enhances dopaminergic neural transmission in treatment-resistant depression, thus leading to an improvement in depressive symptoms. Keywords: treatment-resistant depression, FDG-PET, glucose metabolism, basal ganglia

Kitaichi Y

2013-10-01

270

Congenital depressed skull fracture in the absence of trauma: case report and literature review  

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Full Text Available Zulma S Tovar-Spinoza, Peter D KimDepartment of Neurosurgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse NYAbstract: There are limited reports of neonatal depressed skull fractures in the absence of any known trauma or obvious risk factors. Here we describe a male neonate with a significant frontal nontraumatic depressed fracture, his course of treatment, and a literature review. A male neonate was attended for a significant congenital depressed skull fracture in the left frontal bone. He was born full term after an uncomplicated delivery to a multiparous mother who was a human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV-positive immigrant from sub-Saharan Africa. The pregnancy was otherwise uncomplicated. There was no history of trauma to the mother during the pregnancy or delivery. Ultrasonography had been unremarkable. No other abnormalities were noted. The patient was brought to the operating room at the age of 13 days for elevation of his fracture due to its nonreducible nature. A small linear incision was made just posterior to the coronal suture. The dura mater was stripped and a combination of Penfield and periostial elevators was used to elevate the depressed fracture. Nontraumatic depressed skull fractures are uncommon in neonates. The cause of this entity has not been identified, and many theories about its origin have been proposed. Treatment can be either surgical or conservative.Keywords: neonatal, congenital, depressed fracture, spontaneous, nontraumatic

Tovar-Spinoza ZS

2012-02-01

271

Current Status of Co-Occurring Mood and Substance Use Disorders: A New Therapeutic Target  

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Mood and substance use disorders commonly co-occur, yet there is little evidence-based research to guide the pharmacologic management of these comorbid disorders. The authors review the existing empirical findings, some of which may call into question current clinical pharmacotherapy practices for treating co-occurring mood and substance use disorders. The authors also highlight knowledge gaps that can serve as a basis for future research. The specific mood disorders reviewed are bipolar and major depressive disorders (either one co-occurring with a substance use disorder). Overall, findings from the relatively small amount of available data indicate that pharmacotherapy for managing mood symptoms can be effective in patients with substance dependence, although results have not been consistent across all studies. Also, in most studies, medications for managing mood symptoms did not appear to have an impact on the substance use disorder. In a recent trial for comorbid major depression and alcohol dependence, combination treatment with a medication for depression and another for alcohol dependence was found to reduce depressive symptoms and excessive drinking simultaneously. However, research has only begun to address optimal pharmacologic management of co-occurring disorders. In addition, current clinical treatment for alcohol and drug dependence often excludes new pharmacotherapies approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating certain types of addiction. With new data becoming available, it appears that we need to revisit current practice in the pharmacological management of co-occurring mood and substance use disorders.

Pettinati, Helen M.; O'Brien, Charles P.; Dundon, William D.

2013-01-01

272

Treatment of Bipolar Depression  

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Full Text Available Depressive episodes are significant in bipolar illness since patients can spend up to one-third of their lives in depression. Although the treatment of bipolar depression remains an understudied area, new data from randomized, controlled trials and naturalistic studies expanded the range of treatments avaliable. The main aim in the treatment of bipolar depression is the prevention of the patient switching to mania and cycle acceleration, and antidepressant therapy may be contraindicated because of the risk for switching. Guidelines for the acute treatment of the bipolar depression emphasize treatment with a mood stabilizer, of which lithium has been the most thoroughly studied in randomized, controlled trials in acute bipolar depression. Lamotrigine had found significant ellicacy in recent studies as well and got FDA approval for its effect on preventing new episodes.

Kür?at Alt?nta?

2005-01-01

273

PERSONALITY DOES NOT INFLUENCE EXERCISE-INDUCED MOOD ENHANCEMENT AMONG FEMALE EXERCISERS  

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Full Text Available The present study investigated the influence of personality on exercise-induced mood changes. It was hypothesised that (a exercise would be associated with significant mood enhancement across all personality types, (b extroversion would be associated with positive mood and neuroticism with negative mood both pre- and post-exercise, and (c personality measures would interact with exercise-induced mood changes. Participants were 90 female exercisers (M = 25.8 yr, SD = 9.0 yr who completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI once and the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS before and after a 60-minute exercise session. Median splits were used to group participants into four personality types: stable introverts (n = 25, stable extroverts (n = 20, neurotic introverts (n = 26, and neurotic extroverts (n = 19. Repeated measures MANOVA showed significant mood enhancement following exercise across all personality types. Neuroticism was associated with negative mood scores pre- and post-exercise but the effect of extroversion on reported mood was relatively weak. There was no significant interaction effect between exercise-induced mood enhancement and personality. In conclusion, findings lend support to the notion that exercise is associated with improved mood. However, findings show that personality did not influence this effect, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood

Andrew M. Lane

2005-09-01

274

Hypohydration and acute thermal stress affect mood state but not cognition or dynamic postural balance.  

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Equivocal findings have been reported in the few studies that examined the impact of ambient temperature (T a) and hypohydration on cognition and dynamic balance. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of acute exposure to a range of ambient temperatures (T(a) 10-40 °C) in euhydration (EUH) and hypohydration (HYP) states on cognition, mood and dynamic balance. Thirty-two men (age 22 ± 4 years, height 1.80 ± 0.05 m, body mass 85.4 ± 10.8 kg) were grouped into four matched cohorts (n = 8), and tested in one of the four T(a) (10, 20, 30, 40 °C) when EUH and HYP (-4 % body mass via exercise-heat exposure). Cognition was assessed using psychomotor vigilance, 4-choice reaction time, matching to sample, and grammatical reasoning. Mood was evaluated by profile of mood states and dynamic postural balance was tested using a Biodex Balance System. Thermal sensation (TS), core (T core) and skin temperature (T(sk)) were obtained throughout testing. Volunteers lost -4.1 ± 0.4 % body mass during HYP. T sk and TS increased with increasing T(a), with no effect of hydration. Cognitive performance was not altered by HYP or thermal stress. Total mood disturbance (TMD), fatigue, confusion, anger, and depression increased during HYP at all T(a). Dynamic balance was unaffected by HYP, but 10 °C exposure impaired balance compared to all other T(a). Despite an increase in TMD during HYP, cognitive function was maintained in all testing environments, demonstrating cognitive resiliency in response to body fluid deficits. Dynamic postural stability at 10 °C appeared to be hampered by low-grade shivering, but was otherwise maintained during HYP and thermal stress. PMID:23064870

Ely, Brett R; Sollanek, Kurt J; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Lieberman, Harris R; Kenefick, Robert W

2013-04-01

275

[Attempted suicide and depression].  

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The frequency of depressive illness was investigated in 195 patients who had been referred consecutively after attempted suicide during the period 15. February 1989-15, October 1989. A total of 130 of these patients were admitted to hospital while the remainder were treated in the psychiatric emergency room or admission department. Registration of depressive symptoms on admission revealed that 85% had depressed mood and other depressive symptoms. According to the criteria established by Feighner et al. 51% suffered from definite depressive disease on admission. According to Zung's Depression Scale, 60% were depressed. On the basis of observations during hospitalization, 25% suffered from depressive disease according to the criteria established by Feighner et al. 19% of these patients suffered from endogenic depression according to the Newcastle I scale which corresponds to 5% of all the hospitalized patients with attempted suicide. Approximately 10% were treated with antidepressives. Only 8% were discharged with the diagnoses of endogenic or reactive psychoses (ICD-8). It is concluded that depressive symptoms occur in the majority of patients with attempted suicide but that slight non-endogenic depressive states are most commonly concerned and that many of these improve rapidly during hospitalization without medicinal treatment. Restraint should be observed in prescription of antidepressive medicine to patients with attempted suicide until the diagnosis of depressive disease is verified. PMID:2014567

Stenager, E N; Christensen, L L; Jepsen, I M; Krarup, G; Petersen, P; Rasmussen, G T; Benjaminsen, S

1991-03-18

276

Self-compassion as an emotion regulation strategy in major depressive disorder.  

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Cognitive reappraisal and acceptance are two presumably adaptive emotion regulation strategies in depression. More recently, self-compassion has been discussed as another potentially effective strategy for coping with depression. In the present study, we compared the effectiveness of self-compassion with a waiting condition, reappraisal, and acceptance in a clinically depressed sample, and tested the hypothesis that the intensity of depressed mood would moderate the differential efficacy of these strategies. In an experimental design, we induced depressed mood at four points in time in 48 participants meeting criteria for major depressive disorder. After each mood induction, participants were instructed to wait, reappraise the situation, accept their negative emotions, or employ self-compassion to regulate their depressed mood. Self-ratings of depressed mood were assessed before and after each mood induction and regulation phase. Results showed that the reduction of depressed mood was significantly greater in the self-compassion condition than in the waiting condition. No significant differences were observed between the self-compassion and the reappraisal condition, and between the self-compassion and the acceptance condition in patients' mood ratings. However, the intensity of self-rated depressed mood at baseline was found to moderate the comparative effectiveness of self-compassion and reappraisal with a trend of self-compassion being more effective than reappraisal in high depressed mood at baseline. These findings support the use of self-compassion as another adaptive emotion regulation strategy for patients with major depressive disorder, especially for those suffering from high levels of depressed mood. PMID:24929927

Diedrich, Alice; Grant, Michaela; Hofmann, Stefan G; Hiller, Wolfgang; Berking, Matthias

2014-07-01

277

The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism does not moderate the effect of self-reported physical activity on depressive symptoms in midlife.  

Science.gov (United States)

The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met single nucleotide polymorphism may be associated with clinical and subsyndromal depression, but physical activity improves mood and increases BDNF expression. The aim of the study was to examine whether the BDNF polymorphism moderates an effect of physical activity on depressive symptoms. BDNF genotype, physical activity measured by the Paffenbarger Questionnaire, and depressive symptoms using the Center for Epidemiology Depression Scale (CES-D) were collected on 1072 participants (mean age=44). Multiple linear regression was used to examine the association between BDNF genotype, physical activity, and depressive symptoms. After adjusting for family income, age, and education, depressive symptoms were higher in Met carriers compared to Val homozygotes (p=0.03), but this was only significant in men. Physical activity was associated with fewer depressive symptoms, but only in women (p=0.01). BDNF genotype did not moderate the effect of physical activity on depressive symptoms (p=0.94). In midlife, the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism neither attenuates nor magnifies the effect of physical activity on depressive symptoms. PMID:24745471

Gujral, Swathi; Manuck, Stephen B; Ferrell, Robert E; Flory, Janine D; Erickson, Kirk I

2014-08-15

278

Role of estrogen in the treatment of depression.  

Science.gov (United States)

The role of estrogen in the treatment of depression is reviewed. The relation is examined in studies of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with depressed mood, in studies of depressive disorders, and in studies of estrogen as an adjunct to antidepressant medication. The literature has many methodologic shortcomings, including combining women of various ages, failure to confirm life stage, the use of different types of estrogens, the inclusion of women with a range of mood disturbances, and the enrollment of women with concurrent psychiatric illness. There are few controlled evaluations of the use of estrogen to supplement ongoing antidepressant treatment. Estrogen alone seems to be beneficial for improving mood in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Estrogen is superior to placebo for reproductive-related mood disorders, including postpartum depression and mild depressive disorders during perimenopause. Replication is necessary, especially in moderate to severe levels of major depression. Estrogen may augment antidepressant treatment. Assessment and treatment implications are discussed. PMID:12424508

Grigoriadis, Sophie; Kennedy, Sidney H

2002-01-01

279

Play Practices and Play Moods  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The aim of this article is to develop a view of play as a relation between play practices and play moods based on an empirical study of children's everyday life and by using Bateson's term of â??framingâ?? [(1955/2001). In Steps to an ecology of mind (pp. 75â??80). Chicago: University of Chicago Press], Schmidt's notion of â??commonnessâ?? [(2005). Om respekten. København: Danmarks Pædagogiske Universitets Forlag; (2011). On respect. Copenhagen: Danish School of Education University Press] and Heidegger's term â??moodâ?? [(1938/1996). Time and being. Cornwall: Wiley-Blackwell.]. Play mood is a state of being in which we are open and ready, both to others and their production of meaning and to new opportunities for producing meaning. This play mood is created when we engage with the world during play practices. The article points out four types of play moods â?? devotion, intensity, tension and euphorica â?? which show an affiliation with four types of play practices such as sliding, shifting, displaying and exceeding. Though play practices and play moods become possible, this conceptual framework makes it possible to highlight three features of play â?? first, moods are essential to play; second, moods are always in plural and finally, different moods describe different ways of being in play which means different ways of engaging with the world and the people around us.

Karoff, Helle Skovbjerg

2013-01-01

280

Influences of lobar gray matter and white matter lesion load on cognition and mood  

Science.gov (United States)

Depressed mood is a frequent co-morbidity of dementia suggesting that they might share a common neuropathological substrate. Gray matter (GM) atrophy and white matter lesions (WML) have been described in both conditions. Our aims were to determine the relationship of GM and WML with cognition and depressed mood in the same population. Structural brain images were obtained from 42 controls, 20 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients and 32 subjects with cognitive impairment/dementia due to subcortical cerebrovascular disease (vascCIND/IVD) and segmented to obtain lobar GM, white matter and WML volumes. Lobar WML had a negative effect on GM in all lobes in controls, on frontal, parietal and occipital GM in AD and on frontal GM in vascCIND/IVD. Frontal, temporal and hippocampal GM were associated with cognitive functions and frontal WML load with depressed mood. Cognitive function is associated with GM atrophy and depressed mood is associated with frontal WML. This indicates that although both often occur together depressed mood and cognitive impairment are caused by different pathological correlates.

Mueller, Susanne G.; Mack, Wendy J; Mungas, Dan; Kramer, Joel H.; Cardenas-Nicolson, Valerie; Lavretsky, Helen; Greene, Maxwell; Schuff, Norbert; Chui, Helena C.; Weiner, Michael W.

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
281

Review of a nursing research report. Young people with depression: review of a nursing research report.  

Science.gov (United States)

McCann's et al. (2012) research study revealed several adverse effects that depression can have on young adults. The findings showed that depression in young adults can be life-threatening if not treated (McCann et al., 2012). One implication for evidenced-based nursing practice would be to educate family and friends on the signs of depression and how to respond to them. A suggestion for future research would be to conduct a study showing the effectiveness of different treatment methods (e.g., therapy, medications) on adolescent depression. PMID:24260845

Collins, Janay

2013-01-01

282

Drug abuse as self-medication for depression: an empirical study.  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors empirically studied the self-medication hypothesis of drug abuse by examining drug effects and motivation for drug use in 494 hospitalized drug abusers. Most patients reported that they used drugs in response to depressive symptoms and experienced mood elevation, regardless of their drug of choice. Drug use to relieve depressive symptoms was far more likely in men if they had major depression, but was equally common in women with and without major depression. Information regarding a history of self-medication may thus be more helpful in diagnosing major depression in men than in women. Difficulties in diagnosing psychiatric disorders in substance abusers are discussed, as are the limitations of obtaining retrospective data on drug-using behavior. The implications of these limitations on the generalizability of the findings are reviewed. PMID:1562010

Weiss, R D; Griffin, M L; Mirin, S M

1992-01-01

283

Recurrence of major depressive disorder following a switch from escitalopram to St. John’s Wort: a case report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Hypericum perforatum extracts, popularly known as St. John’s wort (known as “sar? kantaron” in Turkish are widely used for the treatment of major depression, especially in German speaking countries. Data on the effectiveness of such extracts for the maintenance treatment of major depression is limited. In this case report, a female patient who was euthymic under escitalopram treatment and experienced a recurrence of depression following a switch to St. John’s wort will be described.

erhan ertekin

2014-01-01

284

Stigma and Discrimination in People Suffering with a Mood Disorder: A Cross-Sectional Study  

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Background. Much research is done on the stigma of mental illness, but little research has been done to characterize these phenomena from the perspective of people with mood disorders. Objective. To characterize the extent to which individuals with bipolar disorder and depression are stigmatized, determine factors related to higher levels of stigmatization, and assess the reliability of the Inventory of Stigmatizing Experiences in a population of people with a mood disorder. Methods. Two hund...

Lazowski, L.; Koller, M.; Stuart, H.; Milev, R.

2012-01-01

285

Mood distinction for a non-clinical population addressed at risk for cyclothymic temperament  

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The primary objective of this study concerns itself with the identification of moods most distinguishable for cyclothymic temperament as moods serve as a major component in the understanding of affective as well as subsyndromal disorders. This study involves a random, non-clinical population consisting of older adolescents (17-19) and young adults (20-24). All participating subjects were appropriately assigned to one of three groups (cyclothymic temperament, depressed temperament or control...

Pheasant, Brian Lee

2004-01-01

286

Psychiatric problems in fibromyalgia: clinical and neurobiological links between mood disorders and fibromyalgia  

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Objectives. To review the literature addressing the relationship between mood disorders and fibromyalgia/chronic pain and our current understanding of overlapping pathophysiological processes and pain and depression circuitry. Methods. We selectively reviewed articles on the co-occurrence of mood disorders and fibromyalgia/chronic pain published between 1990 and July 2012 in PubMed. Bibliographies and cross references were considered and included when appropriate. Result...

Alciati, A.; Sgiarovello, P.; Atzeni, F.; Sarzi-puttini, P.

2012-01-01

287

Rapid Emotion Regulation After Mood Induction: Age and Individual Differences  

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Previous research has suggested that emotion regulation improves with age. This study examined both age and individual differences in online emotion regulation after a negative mood induction. We found evidence that older adults were more likely to rapidly regulate their emotions than were younger adults. Moreover, older adults who rapidly regulated had lower trait anxiety and depressive symptoms and higher levels of optimism than their same-age peers who did not rapidly regulate. Measuring m...

Larcom, Mary Jo; Isaacowitz, Derek M.

2009-01-01

288

Relationship between cognitive appraisals of symptoms and negative mood for subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The onset and course of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS are strongly influenced by psychological factors, and treatment often includes cognitive-behavioral therapy. We conducted a study of the relationships between cognitive appraisal of IBS symptoms and negative mood for the subtypes of IBS. Method The participants were 1087 college students who completed a set of questionnaires that included the Rome II Modular Questionnaire, Self-reported IBS Questionnaire, Cognitive Appraisal Rating Scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results The participants included 206 individuals with IBS; 61 had diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBSD and 45 had constipation-predominant IBS (IBSC. The overall IBS group scored higher on anxiety and depression than the control group. The IBSD and IBSC groups each had significantly higher scores for anxiety but did not significantly differ from the control group in scores for depression. There were no significant differences between the IBSD and IBSC groups in their cognitive appraisal of IBS symptoms. For the IBSD group, anxiety was significantly, positively correlated with commitment, effect, and threat, and depression was significantly, negatively correlated with controllability. In contrast, there were no significant correlations between mood and cognitive appraisal for the IBSC group. Multiple regression analyses with abdominal symptoms as dependent variables and cognitive appraisals as independent variables showed that for the IBSD group, abdominal pain was significantly, positively correlated with commitment, and abdominal discomfort was significantly, positively correlated with appraisal of effect and threat. For the IBSC group, abdominal pain and hard stool were significantly, positively correlated with commitment, and abdominal discomfort was significantly, positively correlated with appraisal of effect and threat. Conclusion IBS patients as a general group report high levels of anxiety and depression. However, IBSD and IBSC were both associated only with high anxiety, but not depression, when compared to the non-IBS control group. For the IBSD group, anxiety was associated with cognitive appraisals, but this association was not found for the IBSC group. These groups did not differ in their associated cognitive appraisals, and are similar in terms of the positive relationship between abdominal pain and discomfort and the cognitive appraisals of coping.

Nomura Shinobu

2008-04-01

289

Measuring consistency of autobiographical memory recall in depression.  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

Autobiographical amnesia assessments in depression need to account for normal changes in consistency over time, contribution of mood and type of memories measured. We report herein validation studies of the Columbia Autobiographical Memory Interview - Short Form (CAMI-SF), exclusively used in depressed patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) but without previous published report of normative data. The CAMI-SF was administered twice with a 6-month interval to 44 healthy volunteers to obtain normative data for retrieval consistency of its Semantic, Episodic-Extended and Episodic-Specific components and assess their reliability and validity. Healthy volunteers showed significant large decreases in retrieval consistency on all components. The Semantic and Episodic-Specific components demonstrated substantial construct validity. We then assessed CAMI-SF retrieval consistencies over a 2-month interval in 30 severely depressed patients never treated with ECT compared with healthy controls (n=19). On initial assessment, depressed patients produced less episodic-specific memories than controls. Both groups showed equivalent amounts of consistency loss over a 2-month interval on all components. At reassessment, only patients with persisting depressive symptoms were distinguishable from controls on episodic-specific memories retrieved. Research quantifying retrograde amnesia following ECT for depression needs to control for normal loss in consistency over time and contribution of persisting depressive symptoms.

Semkovska, Maria

2012-05-15

290

The Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Autogenic Relaxation on Young Soccer Players' Mood States  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Purpose: This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR and autogenic relaxation (AGR on moods of young soccer players. Methods: Sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3 received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States-Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Results: Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. Conclusions: These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players' mood states.

Hazwani Hanafi@Ahmad Yusof

2011-06-01

291

Evidence for Transcriptional Factor Dysregulation in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus of Patients with Major Depressive Disorder  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Extensive evidence implicates dysfunction in serotonin (5-HT) signaling in the etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) is a major source of serotonin in the brain, and previous studies have reported within it alterations in 5-HT-related gene expression, protein levels, receptor binding, and morphological organization in mood disorders. In the present study, we utilized in situ hybridization-guided laser capture microdissection to harvest tissue samples from the ...

Kerman, Ilan A.; Bernard, Rene?; Bunney, William E.; Jones, Edward G.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Myers, Richard M.; Barchas, Jack D.; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.; Thompson, Robert C.

2012-01-01

292

The prevalence of depression in older U.S. women: 2006 behavioral risk factor surveillance system.  

Science.gov (United States)

Depression, a type of mood disorder, is associated with psychological distress and suffering, and it can lead to impairments in physical, mental, and social functioning. The goal of this commentary is to provide an estimate of the prevalence of current depression and lifetime diagnosis for 14,425 community-dwelling U.S. women aged 65 and older. Using information from the 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), participants reported their lifetime diagnosis of depression and completed the Patient Health Questionnaire 8 to assess current depression and its severity. Our findings indicate that 5.9% of women 65 years old and older have current depression, 94.1% reported either no depressive symptoms or mild depressive symptoms, and 12.3% reported a lifetime diagnosis of depression. Mental health is integral to overall health and well-being and should be treated in older women with the same urgency as physical health. Depression is a mental health issue of particular concern for women, given their increasing numbers, higher proportion in the US population, and role as caregivers. Continued surveillance from a system such as the BRFSS is needed to track changes in the mental health of older adults. PMID:18447758

McGuire, Lisa C; Strine, Tara W; Vachirasudlekha, Stephanie; Mokdad, Ali H; Anderson, Lynda A

2008-05-01

293

Hyperthyroidism–cause of depression and psychosis: a case report  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Psychiatric symptoms have been reported quite frequently in certain thyroid diseases, but more frequently in association with hypothyroidism. Thyrotoxicosis can be associated with various psychiatric symptoms, such as emotional lability, anxiety, restlessness and rarely frank psychosis. Psychotic symptoms in the context of hyperthyroidism typically present as an affective psychosis. The link between psychosis and hyperthyroidism is poorly understood. Because of thi...

Marian, G.; Nica, Ae; Ionescu, Be; Ghinea, D.

2009-01-01

294

[Clinico-nosographic considerations on the relation of depression and alcoholism in a population of 450 hospitalized alcoholics].  

Science.gov (United States)

The presence of depressive symptomatology in alcoholics has frequently been encountered in clinical practice, but the relationship running between the two pathologies remains a subject for discussion. The methodological difficulty of this evaluation is seen in a major discordance of reported data. Against this background, a group of subjects hospitalized in a neuropsychiatric environment has been assessed for incidence of alcoholic and depressive pathologies and their possible correlations. Of 428 hospitalizations for alcoholism, 350 (82%) presented a depressive pathology. These patients were distinguished by DSM III into three groups [a) adaptation disturbance with depressed mood; b) dysthymic disturbance; c) atypical depression]. Within these groups, the incidence of prior stress-inducing psychosocial events was assessed according to the criterion of growing seriousness of DSM III. The results after statistical processing are discussed and compared with reported data. PMID:2336029

Angelini, G; Bogetto, F; Borio, R; Meluzzi, A; Mucci, P; Patria, D; Ricciardi, G; Torta, R

1990-01-01

295

Effects of frontal transcranial direct current stimulation on emotional processing and mood in healthy humans  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The prefrontal cortex is involved in mood and emotional processing. In patients suffering from depression, the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is hypoactive, while activity of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is enhanced. Counterbalancing these pathological excitability alterations by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS improves mood in these patients. In healthy subjects, however, rTMS of the same areas has no major effect, and the effects of tDCS are mixed. We aimed to evaluate the effects of prefrontal tDCS on mood and mood-related cognitive processing in healthy humans. In a first study, we administered excitability-enhancing anodal, excitability-diminishing cathodal and placebo tDCS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, combined with antagonistic stimulation of the right frontopolar cortex, and tested acute mood changes by an adjective checklist. Subjective mood was not influenced by tDCS. Emotional face identification, however, which was explored in a second experiment, was subtly improved by a tDCS-driven excitability modulation of the prefrontal cortex, markedly by anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for positive emotional content. We conclude that tDCS of the prefrontal cortex improves mood processing in healthy subjects, but does not influence subjective mood state.

MichaelA.Nitsche

2012-06-01

296

Sex Differences on Depression Self-Rating Scale in Two Populations: Research Report  

Science.gov (United States)

The self-report of depressive symptoms of high school adolescents from two populations were compared. The study aims to find out whether or not; 1) there are significant sex differences between two communities and 2) with regard to the same-sex, there are significant differences between two communities. Nine hundred and twenty eight adolescents from London and 2012 adolescents from six cities from Iran were requested to fill in the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS). The results showed that significant differences between two sexes in each population. All girls had higher mean scores on all items on DSRS than boys. With regard to the same-sex, significant differences were found between either female or male populations in two communities. The research showed that female adolescents from Iran were significantly experienced more depressive symptoms than the Londoners. Similar results were repeated for the male groups. In conclusion, female adolescents are vulnerable to life stressors and tend to experience more negative feedback and interpretations than boys. Moreover, social roles and limitations, particularly for Iranian adolescents, may influence female adolescents to demonstrate depression symptoms.

Seyed-Hossein, Salimi; Mohamad-Reza, Tagavi; Parviz, Azad-Fallah; Reza, Karaminia; Tayebi, A.

297

Sex Differences on Depression Self-Rating Scale in Two Populations: Research Report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The self-report of depressive symptoms of high school adolescents from two populations were compared. The study aims to find out whether or not; 1 there are significant sex differences between two communities and 2 with regard to the same-sex, there are significant differences between two communities. Nine hundred and twenty eight adolescents from London and 2012 adolescents from six cities from Iran were requested to fill in the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS. The results showed that significant differences between two sexes in each population. All girls had higher mean scores on all items on DSRS than boys. With regard to the same-sex, significant differences were found between either female or male populations in two communities. The research showed that female adolescents from Iran were significantly experienced more depressive symptoms than the Londoners. Similar results were repeated for the male groups. In conclusion, female adolescents are vulnerable to life stressors and tend to experience more negative feedback and interpretations than boys. Moreover, social roles and limitations, particularly for Iranian adolescents, may influence female adolescents to demonstrate depression symptoms.

Salimi Seyed-Hossein

2007-01-01

298

Eating Disorders and Major Depression: Role of Anger and Personality  

Science.gov (United States)

This study aimed to evaluate comorbidity for MD in a large ED sample and both personality and anger as clinical characteristics of patients with ED and MD. We assessed 838 ED patients with psychiatric evaluations and psychometric questionnaires: Temperament and Character Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. 19.5% of ED patients were found to suffer from comorbid MD and 48.7% reported clinically significant depressive symptomatology: patients with Anorexia Binge-Purging and Bulimia Nervosa were more likely to be diagnosed with MD. Irritable mood was found in the 73% of patients with MD. High Harm Avoidance (HA) and low Self-Directedness (SD) predicted MD independently of severity of the ED symptomatology, several clinical variables, and ED diagnosis. Assessing both personality and depressive symptoms could be useful to provide effective treatments. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the pathogenetic role of HA and SD for ED and MD.

Giovanni, Abbate-Daga; Carla, Gramaglia; Enrica, Marzola; Federico, Amianto; Maria, Zuccolin; Secondo, Fassino

2011-01-01

299

Does treatment of subsyndromal depression improve depression and diabetes related outcomes: protocol for a randomised controlled comparison of psycho-education, physical exercise and treatment as usual  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of mood difficulties in persons with diabetes is approximately twice that in the general population, affecting the health outcomes and patients' quality of life in an undesirable way. Although subsyndromal depression is an important predictor of a more serious clinical depression, it is often overlooked. This study aims to compare the effects of two non-pharmacological interventions for subsyndromal depression, psychoeducation and physical exercise, with diabetes treatment as usual on mood- and diabetes-related outcomes. Methods and Design Type 2 diabetic patients aged 18-65 yrs. who report mood difficulties and the related need for help in a mail survey will be potential participants. After giving informed consent, they will be randomly assigned to one of the three groups (psychoeducation, physical activity, treatment as usual. Depressive symptoms, diabetes distress, health-related quality of life and diabetes self-care activities will be assessed at baseline, at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months. A structured clinical interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I will be performed at baseline and at one-year follow-up in order to determine the clinical significance of the patients' depressive symptoms. Disease-related data will be collected from patients' files and from additional physical examinations and laboratory tests. The two interventions will be comparable in terms of format (small group work, duration (six sessions and approach (interactive learning; supporting the participants' active roles. The group treated as usual will be informed about their screening results and about the importance of treating depression. They will be provided with brief re-education on diabetes and written self-help instructions to cope with mood difficulties. Primary outcomes will be depressive symptoms. Secondary outcomes will be glycaemic control, diabetes-related distress, self-management of diabetes and health-related quality of life. Tertiary outcomes will be biochemical markers reflecting common pathophysiological processes of insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative damage that are assumed to be intertwined in both diabetes and depression. The mixed-effect linear model will be used to compare the outcome variables. Power analysis has indicated that the two intervention groups and the control group should comprise 59 patients to enable detection of clinically meaningful differences in depressive symptoms with a power of 80% and alpha = 0.05. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN05673017

Lovren?i? Marijana

2011-01-01

300

CNS depression in an infant after the ingestion of tobacco: a case report.  

Science.gov (United States)

An 8-month-old female infant was brought in after ingesting cigarette butts. Upon presentation to the ED approximately 2.5 hr post-ingestion, the child was very lethargic and respirations were depressed. She was intubated and a NG tube was placed. Gastric lavage was performed, after which activated charcoal and sorbitol were given. Atropine was administered to treat excessive secretions. The patient became progressively more obtunded throughout the emergency department stay. Upon admission to the PICU she was minimally responsive. The urine tox screen was positive only for nicotine. The patient gradually improved with supportive care and was sent home on the third hospital day. Although the effects of Nicotine are well documented, few cases have been reported of severe toxicity in pediatric patients. We believe this to be the only reported case of severe CNS depression secondary to the ingestion of cigarette butts in a pediatric patient. PMID:3354177

Borys, D J; Setzer, S C; Ling, L J

1988-02-01

 
 
 
 
301

Migraine and depression comorbidity: antidepressant options.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Migraine and mood depression demonstrate a high clinical relation and share, also with pain, neurobiological mechanisms, particularly neuro-transmettitorial and phlogistic ones. The choice of an antidepressant to treat both depression and migraine is determined by its efficacy, safety, and tolerability. Antidepressants

Torta, Riccardo; Ieraci, Valentina

2012-01-01

302

Metabolic syndrome among psychiatric outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Few studies have simultaneously compared the impacts of pharmacotherapy and mental diagnoses on metabolic syndrome (MetS) among psychiatric outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of pharmacotherapy and mental diagnoses on MetS and the prevalence of MetS among these patients. Methods Two-hundred and twenty-nine outpatients (men/women?=?85/144) were enrolled from 1147 outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders by systematic sampling. Psychiatric disorders and MetS were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR and the new International Diabetics Federation definition, respectively. The numbers of antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants being taken were recorded. Logistic regression was used to investigate the impacts of pharmacotherapy and psychiatric diagnoses on MetS. Results Among 229 subjects, 51 (22.3%) fulfilled the criteria for MetS. The prevalence of MetS was highest in the bipolar I disorder (46.7%) patients, followed by bipolar II disorder (25.0%), major depressive disorder (22.0%), anxiety-only disorders (16.7%), and no mood and/or anxiety disorders (14.3%). The percentages of MetS among the five categories were correlated with those of the patients being treated with antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Use of antipsychotics and/or mood stabilizers independently predicted a higher risk of MetS after controlling for demographic variables and psychiatric diagnoses. When adding body mass index (BMI) as an independent variable in the regression model, BMI became the most significant factor to predict MetS. Conclusion BMI was found to be an important factor related to MetS. Pharmacotherapy might be one of underlying causes of elevated BMI. The interactions among MetS, BMI, pharmacotherapy, and psychiatric diagnoses might need further research.

2014-01-01

303

Managing mood disorders in patients attending pulmonary rehabilitation clinics  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Colleen Doyle,1–3 David Dunt,2 David Ames,1 Suganya Selvarajah11National Ageing Research Institute, Royal Melbourne Hospital Royal Park Campus, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 2Centre for Health Policy, Programs and Economics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 3Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: There is good evidence for the positive benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR in the prevention of hospital admissions, lower mortality, and improved health-related quality of life. There is also increasing evidence about the impact of PR on mental health and, in particular, mood disorders. We aimed to identify how depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients in Victoria, Australia, is being managed in PR, to identify the prevalence of depressive symptoms among COPD patients who attend PR, and to determine whether patients with depressive symptoms or anxiety symptoms dropped out of PR early.Method: Of 61 PR clinics, 44 were invited and 22 agreed to participate. Telephone interviews were conducted to see how depression and anxiety in COPD patients were being recognized and managed in these clinics. A total of 294 questionnaires were distributed to patients by clinic coordinators to determine the prevalence of anxiety/depression, as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Coordinators were contacted to provide information on whether respondents dropped out of rehabilitation early or continued with their treatment at 2–4 months post program.Results: Seven clinics were not aware of local guidelines on assessment/treatment/management of mood. Four clinics did not use any screening tools or other aids in the recognition and management of depression and/or anxiety. Overall, eight clinics participating in this study requested advice on suitable screening tools. The patient survey indicated that the mean depression score on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was 5.0 (standard deviation 3.0, range 1–13. The mean anxiety score was 5.5 (standard deviation 3.4, range 0–18. There was no evidence of a link between failure to complete rehabilitation and depression or anxiety scores, as only three of 105 patients failed to complete their rehabilitation.Discussion: Awareness of management guidelines for depression and anxiety in COPD patients was variable across the clinics recruited into our study. We found no link between compliance with rehabilitation and depression, but our sample had limitations.Conclusion: Future research needs to investigate how best to encourage more use of available guidelines regarding integrating psychological and psychosocial support to supplement the exercise and education that are currently offered routinely by all PR clinics studied in Victoria, Australia.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression, anxiety, pulmonary rehabilitation

Selvarajah S

2013-01-01

304

Selegiline remarkably improved stage 5 treatment-resistant major depressive disorder: a case report  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Yuji Kitaichi,1 Takeshi Inoue,1 Nobuyuki Mitsui,1 Shin Nakagawa,1 Rie Kameyama,1 Yoshiyuki Hayashishita,1 Tohru Shiga,2 Ichiro Kusumi,1 Tsukasa Koyama1 1Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan; 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan Abstract: We report a case in which selegiline, an irreversible monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor, greatly improved depressive symptoms in an adult wi...

Kitaichi Y; Inoue T; Mitsui N; Nakagawa S; Kameyama R; Hayashishita Y; Shiga T; Kusumi I; Koyama T

2013-01-01

305

Winter Fatigue and Winter Depression : Prevalence and Treatment with Bright Light  

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The aim of this thesis is to study prevalence of winter depressive mood and treatment effects of bright light for persons with winter fatigue and winter depression. Study I is a cross-sectional survey of a random sample (N=1657) from the general population between 18-65 years of age in Dalarna, Sweden (latitude 60°N). Study II is a similar survey of 17-18 year old students (N=756) in the municipality of Falun. Approximately 20% of both samples report seasonal symptoms, mainly fatigue, lowere...

Rastad, Cecilia

2009-01-01

306

Somatic symptoms in depression  

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Both painful and nonpainful somatic symptoms essentially characterize clinical states of depressive mood. So far, this well-established psychopathological knowledge has been appreciated only insufficiently by the official diagnostic sys-terms of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text Revision (DSM-IVTR) and the ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders. Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines (ICD-10). From a perspective of primary ...

2006-01-01

307

Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents: Associations with White Matter Volume and Marijuana Use  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Depressed mood has been associated with decreased white matter and reduced hippocampal volumes. However, the relationship between brain structure and mood may be unique among adolescents who use marijuana heavily. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between white matter and hippocampal volumes and depressive symptoms…

Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Park, Ann; McQueeny, Tim; Tapert, Susan F.

2007-01-01

308

A Study of Candidate Genes in Depression and Disturbed Sleep  

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Depression is a complex psychiatric disorder that comprises a variety of symptoms. In addition to depressed mood state, depression has symptoms of disturbed sleep such as early morning awakenings and fatigue. Poor sleep has been demonstrated to be one of the modifiable risk factors in the onset of depression. However, the mechanisms remain largely unknown. In the present study, depressive patients from the Finnish population-based samples were grouped according to the presence or absence of d...

Utge, Siddheshwar J.

2012-01-01

309

Analysis of depression in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.  

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It is well known that depression and sense of hopelessness worsen the quality of life in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients receiving dialysis. However, the characteristics of depression in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients have not been analyzed in detail. We performed this study to investigate the severity of depression and the factors affecting depression in CAPD patients. With 96 CAPD patients, we evaluated each patient's depressive mood and hopelessness with ...

2002-01-01

310

Relationships between Exercise as a Mood Regulation Strategy and Trait Emotional Intelligence  

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Purpose:The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between perception of emotional intelligence and beliefs in the extent to which exercising leads to mood-enhancement. Methods: Volunteer participants (N= 315) completed a 33-item self-report measure of trait emotional intelligence and an exercise-mood regulation scale.Results: Emotional intelligence significantly correlated with beliefs that exercise could be used to regulate mood (r =0.45, P<0 .01).Conclusion: Findings demonst...

2010-01-01

311

Acute effects of beta blockade and exercise on mood and anxiety.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

OBJECTIVE: To measure the previously reported beta blocker induced adverse changes in mood state and anxiety measures, and to determine if prolonged aerobic exercise attenuates such mood modifications. METHODS: After 4 days of drug treatment with comparable doses of propranolol (40 and 80 mg), metoprolol (50 and 100 mg), or placebo, mood (POMS) and anxiety states (STAI) were assessed in healthy volunteers, before and after 1 h of treadmill walking exercise at 50% maximum oxygen uptake. RESULT...

Head, A.; Kendall, M. J.; Ferner, R.; Eagles, C.

1996-01-01

312

The Ecology of Youth Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

Historically, teen depression has been seen as a symptom of other problems such as anxiety, irritability, mood swings, somatic complaints, substance use, and poor school performance. These symptoms were often considered as part of "adolescent turmoil"--a normal, understandable, and even expected phenomenon. For a long time, this viewpoint masked…

Kim, Kee Jeong

2012-01-01

313

Psychiatric problems in fibromyalgia: clinical and neurobiological links between mood disorders and fibromyalgia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objectives. To review the literature addressing the relationship between mood disorders and fibromyalgia/chronic pain and our current understanding of overlapping pathophysiological processes and pain and depression circuitry. Methods. We selectively reviewed articles on the co-occurrence of mood disorders and fibromyalgia/chronic pain published between 1990 and July 2012 in PubMed. Bibliographies and cross references were considered and included when appropriate. Results. Forty-nine out of 138 publications were retained for review. The vast majority of the studies found an association between depression and fibromyalgia. There is evidence that depression is often accompanied by symptoms of opposite polarity characterised by heights of mood, thinking and behaviour that have a considerable impact on pharmacological treatment. Recent developments support the view that the high rates of fibromyalgia and mood disorder comorbidity is generated by largely overlapping pathophysiological processes in the brain, that provide a neurobiological basis for the bidirectional, mutually exacerbating and disabling relationship between pain and depression. Conclusions. The finding of comparable pathophysiological characteristics of pain and depression provides a framework for understanding the relationship between the two conditions and sheds some light on neurobiological and therapeutic aspects.

F. Atzeni

2012-09-01

314

Persistent akathisia masquerading as agitated depression after use of ziprasidone in the treatment of bipolar depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Thomas M Penders,1 Salina Agarwal,2 Rachel Rohaidy11Department of Psychiatric Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA; 2Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: There has been increasing recognition that the second-generation antipsychotic drugs can produce extrapyramidal side effects. This case reports the development of severe akathisia in a patient being treated with ziprasidone for bipolar depression. The case illustrates that this symptom can be easily mistaken for worsening agitated depression. Akathisia may produce considerable distress and elevate suicide risk. Such symptoms may persist for weeks and be refractory to discontinuation of the offending agent or to pharmacological interventions commonly used to mitigate this reaction.Keywords: extrapyramidal, second-generation, affective, antipsychotic, suicide, mood disorder

Penders TM

2013-04-01

315

Ethnicity, sleep, mood, and illumination in postmenopausal women  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined how ethnic differences in sleep and depression were related to environmental illumination and circadian rhythms. Methods In an ancillary study to the Women's Health Initiative, 459 postmenopausal women were recorded for one week in their homes, using wrist monitors. Sleep and illumination experience were estimated. Depression was self-rated with a brief adjective check list. Affective diagnoses were made using the SCID interview. Sleep disordered breathing was monitored with home pulse oximetry. Results Hispanic and African-American women slept less than European-American women, according to both objective recordings and their own sleep logs. Non-European-American women had more blood oxygen desaturations during sleep, which accounted for 26% of sleep duration variance associated with ethnicity. Hispanic women were much more depressed. Hispanic, African-American and Native-American women experienced less daily illumination. Less daily illumination experience was associated with poorer global functioning, longer but more disturbed sleep, and more depression. Conclusions Curtailed sleep and poor mood were related to ethnicity. Sleep disordered breathing was a factor in the curtailed sleep of minority women. Less illumination was experienced by non-European-American women, but illumination accounted for little of the contrasts between ethnic groups in sleep and mood. Social factors may be involved.

Tuunainen Arja

2004-04-01

316

Alcoholism and Inflammation: Neuroimmunology of Behavioral and Mood Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

Alcohol abuse changes behavior and can induce major mood disorders such as depression. Recent evidence in pre-clinical rodent models and humans now supports the conclusion that the innate immune system is an important physiological link between alcoholism and major depressive disorders. Deficiency of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a protein that has been known to immunologists for 50 years, not only prevents lipopolysaccaride (LPS)-induced sickness behavior but recently has been demonstrated to induce resistance to chronic alcohol ingestion. Activation of the immune system by acute administration of LPS, a TLR4 agonist, as well as chronic infection with Bacille Calmette-Guérin, (BCG) causes development of depressive-like behaviors in pre-clinical rodent models. Induction of an enzyme expressed primarily in macrophages and microglia, 2,3 indoleamine dioxygenase, shunts tryptophan catabolism to form kynurenine metabolites. This enzyme is both necessary and sufficient for expression of inflammation-induced depressive-like behaviors in mice. New findings have extended these concepts to humans by showing that tryptophan catabolites of 2,3 indoleamine dioxygenase are elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of cancer patients treated with the recombinant cytokine interferon-?. The remarkable conservation from mice to humans of the impact of inflammation on mood emphasizes the ever-expanding role for cross-talk among diverse physiological symptoms that are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of alcohol abuse. These findings present new and challenging opportunities for scientists who are engaged in brain, behavior and immunity research.

Kelley, Keith W.; Dantzer, Robert

2011-01-01

317

Coma blisters after poisoning caused by central nervous system depressants: case report including histopathological findings.  

Science.gov (United States)

Blister formation and eccrine sweat gland necrosis is a cutaneous manifestation associated with states of impaired consciousness, most frequently reported after overdoses of central nervous system depressants, particularly phenobarbital. The case of a 45-year-old woman who developed "coma blisters" at six distinct anatomic sites after confirmed (laboratory) phenobarbital poisoning, associated with other central nervous system depressants (clonazepam, promethazine, oxcarbazepine and quetiapine), is presented. A biopsy from the left thumb blister taken on day 4 revealed focal necrosis of the epidermis and necrosis of sweat gland epithelial cells; direct immunofluorescence was strongly positive for IgG in superficial blood vessel walls but negative for IgM, IgA, C3 and C1q. The patient was discharged on day 21 with no sequelae. PMID:22892778

Branco, Maira Migliari; Capitani, Eduardo Mello De; Cintra, Maria Letícia; Hyslop, Stephen; Carvalho, Adriana Camargo; Bucaretchi, Fabio

2012-01-01

318

Social disability of Brazilian mood disorder patients  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Mood disorders cause many social problems, often involving family relationships. Few studies are available in the literature comparing patients with bipolar, unipolar, dysthymic, and double depressive disorders concerning these aspects. In the present study, demographic and disease data were collect [...] ed using a specifically prepared questionnaire. Social adjustment was assessed using the Disability Adjustment Scale and family relationships were evaluated using the Global Assessment of Relational Functioning Scale. One hundred patients under treatment for at least 6 months were evaluated at the Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic of the Botucatu School of Medicine, UNESP. Most patients were women (82%) more than 50 (49%) years old with at least two years of follow-up, with little schooling (62% had less than 4 years), and of low socioeconomic level. Logistic regression analysis showed that a diagnosis of unipolar disorder (P = 0.003, OR = 0.075, CI = 0.014-0.403) and dysthymia (P = 0.001, OR = 0.040, CI = 0.006-0.275) as well as family relationships (P = 0.002, OR = 0.953, CI = 0914-0.992) played a significant role in social adjustment. Unipolar and dysthymic patients presented better social adjustment than bipolar and double depressive patients (P

A.M., Tucci; F., Kerr-Corrêa; R.S., Dias.

319

Genetic polymorphisms in glutathione-S-transferases are associated with anxiety and mood disorders in nicotine dependence  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Nicotine dependence is associated with an increased risk of mood and anxiety disorders and suicide. The primary hypothesis of this study was to identify whether the polymorphisms of two glutathione-S-transferase enzymes (GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes) predict an increased risk of mood and anxiety disorders in smokers with nicotine dependence. Materials and methods Smokers were recruited at the Centre of Treatment for Smokers. The instruments were a sociodemographic questionnaire, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, diagnoses of mood disorder and nicotine dependence according to DSM-IV (SCID-IV), and the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test. Anxiety disorder was assessed based on the treatment report. Laboratory assessment included glutathione-S-transferases M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1), which were detected by a multiplex-PCR protocol. Results Compared with individuals who had both GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes, a higher frequency of at least one deletion of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes was identified in anxious smokers [odds ratio (OR)=2.21, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.05–4.65, P=0.034], but there was no association with bipolar and unipolar depression (P=0.943). Compared with nonanxious smokers, anxious smokers had a greater risk for mood disorders (OR=4.67; 95% CI=2.24–9.92, P<0.001), lung disease (OR=6.78, 95% CI=1.95–23.58, P<0.003), and suicide attempts (OR=17.01, 95% CI=2.23–129.91, P<0.006). Conclusion This study suggests that at least one deletion of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes represents a risk factor for anxious smokers. These two genes may modify the capacity for the detoxification potential against oxidative stress.

Pizzo de Castro, Marcia Regina; Ehara Watanabe, Maria Angelica; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Odebrecht Vargas, Heber; Vissoci Reiche, Edna Maria; Kaminami Morimoto, Helena; Dodd, Seetal; Berk, Michael

2014-01-01

320

The effect of prenatal Hatha yoga on affect, cortisol and depressive symptoms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Perinatal depression impacts maternal and child health, and little is known about effective interventions. The effects of prenatal Hatha yoga on cortisol, affect and depressive symptoms were investigated in 51 women. Twice during pregnancy, yoga group participants reported on affect and provided a saliva sample before and after a 90-min prenatal Hatha yoga session. Corresponding measures were obtained from yoga and control group participants on days of usual activity. Depressive symptoms were assessed in pregnancy and post partum. Cortisol was lower (p yoga compared to usual activity days. Negative affect and contentment (p yoga session. Yoga group participants showed fewer postpartum (p yoga may improve current mood and may be effective in reducing postpartum depressive symptoms. PMID:24767955

Bershadsky, Svetlana; Trumpfheller, Linda; Kimble, Holly Beck; Pipaloff, Diana; Yim, Ilona S

2014-05-01

 
 
 
 
321

Lower-leg symptoms in peripheral arterial disease are associated with anxiety, depression, and anhedonia  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) report diverse clinical manifestations that are not always consistent with classic intermittent claudication. We examined the degree to which atypical exertional leg symptoms, intermittent claudication, and exertional leg symptoms that begin at rest were associated with mood states such as anxiety, depressive symptoms, and anhedonia (i.e. lack of positive affect). A cohort of consecutive PAD patients (n = 628) from the Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the San Diego Claudication questionnaire. The ankle-brachial index and clinical factors were assessed in all patients at baseline. Anxiety was present in 29%, depressive symptoms in 30%, and anhedonia in 28% of patients. Pain at rest was independently associated with anxiety, depressive symptoms, and anhedonia (ORs between 2.5 and 4.0, p

Smolderen, Kim G; Hoeks, Sanne E

2009-01-01

322

Early Detection of Post-Stroke Depression  

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In the first two years after stroke approximately one-third of the patients suffer from depression, also referred to as post-stroke depression (PSD). Patients with PSD suffer from symptoms, such as a diminished interest or pleasure (anhedonia), depressed mood, sleep disturbances, loss of energy, changes in appetite, feelings of inappropriate guilt, concentration difficulties, psychomotor retardation or agitation, and suicidal thoughts. PSD aggravates the burden of physical, psychological and ...

Man-van Ginkel, J. M.

2012-01-01

323

Chronic inhalant dependence with early onset cognitive impairment, depression and psychotic disorders: a case report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Inhalant substance dependence is generally seen at 14-15 years of age and its prevalence decreases in adulthood. Inhalant use is common among disadvantaged groups, street children, people with history of crime, depression, suicide, antisocial attitudes, history of abuse, violence and any other drug dependence. Psychosocial factors are important in the beginning of inhalant dependence. Medical and neurological problems are frequently seen in chronic inhalant users. The duration of inhalant use is positively correlated with morbidity and mortality. In this report, medical and neuropsychiatric results of chronic inhalant dependence will be discussed. In our patient, chronic inhalant use caused central and peripheral neuropathy, cognitive impairment, depression, psychotic disorder, upper motor neuron type destruction in muscles and mild anemia. Neuropsychiatric destructive effects are prominent in chronic abuse. Mirtazapine and olanzapine treatment decreased depressive and psychotic symptoms, but cognitive impairment, neuropathy, upper motor neuron type destruction didn?t recover completely. Given serious and sometimes irreversible consequences of chronic inhalant dependence, early medical and psychosocial interventions seem very important.

Safiye Gürel

2011-01-01

324

Influence of paroxetine and cognitive/behavioral strategies in neurocardiogenic syncope and depression: a case report  

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Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS is a condition where the patient has a temporary loss of consciousness or feelings of weakness and fatigue. There are triggers such as prolonged sitting or standing, pain, and heavy exercise, but often episodes are random. Treatments are limited and the use of specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI have had mixed results, but a limited number of studies have suggested that paroxetine may be effective in improving the symptoms of NCS. METHODS: This is a single case report of a 20-year old female who was diagnosed with NCS by a tilt test and treated conservatively with increased fluid and salt intake, and counter-pressure maneuvers. She was given one dose of sertraline, but immediately experienced disturbing visual images. She presented at the Depression Center with moderate depressive symptoms and was started on paroxetine and given cognitive/behavioral strategies to manage the NCS. RESULTS: Since the patient had a negative experience with a prior SSRI, she was started on a low dose of paroxetine and omega-3 fatty acids. She also was given a detailed explanation of NCS and a number of cognitive/behavioral strategies such as deep breathing, progressive relaxation, imagery, and sleep. CONCLUSION: After 2-weeks of the multi-faceted treatment approach, she had a significant decrease in her depressive symptoms. After 6-months, the patient had no episodes of syncope and no depressive symptoms. She was able to stand for long periods and exercise without feelings of weakness and fatigue. A multimodal approach may offer the best treatment strategy to achieve full remission in patients with NCS.

Reg Arthur Williams

2011-10-01

325

Depression, possibilities, and competence: A phenomenological perspective  

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Competent decision-making is required for informed consent. In this paper, I aim, from a phenomenological perspective, to identify the specific facets of competent decision-making that may form a challenge to depressed patients. On a phenomenological account, mood and emotions are crucial to the way in which human beings encounter the world. More precisely, mood is intimately related to the options and future possibilities we perceive in the world around us. I examine how possibilities should...

2011-01-01

326

Therapist Strategies for Building Involvement in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined predictive relations between 9 therapist behaviors and client involvement in manual-guided, cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescent depression. Analyses included 42 adolescents who met criteria for a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, or adjustment disorder with depressed mood) and who were…

Jungbluth, Nathaniel J.; Shirk, Stephen R.

2009-01-01

327

The Mood Disorder Questionnaire: A Simple, Patient-Rated Screening Instrument for Bipolar Disorder  

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Bipolar disorder is frequently encountered in primary care settings, often in the form of poor response to treatment for depression. Although lifetime prevalence of bipolar I disorder is 1%, the prevalence of bipolar spectrum disorders (e.g., bipolar I, bipolar II, and cyclothymia) is much higher, especially among patients with depression. The consequences of misdiagnosis can be devastating. One way to improve recognition of bipolar spectrum disorders is to screen for them. The Mood Disorder ...

Hirschfeld, Robert M. A.

2002-01-01

328

Serum S100B represents a new biomarker for mood disorders.  

Science.gov (United States)

Recently, mood disorders have been discussed to be characterized by glial pathology. The protein S100B, a growth and differentiation factor, is located in, and may actively be released by astro- and oligodendrocytes. This protein is easily assessed in human serum and provides a useful parameter for glial activation or injury. Here, we review studies investigating the glial marker S100B in serum of patients with mood disorders. Studies consistently show that S100B is elevated in mood disorders; more strongly in major depressive than bipolar disorder. Consistent with the glial hypothesis of mood disorders, serum S100B levels interact with age with higher levels in elderly depressed subjects. Successful antidepressive treatment has been associated with serum S100B reduction in major depression, whereas there is no evidence of treatment effects in mania. In contrast to the glial marker S100B, the neuronal marker protein neuron-specific enolase is unaltered in mood disorders. Recently, serum S100B has been linked to specific imaging parameters in the human white matter suggesting a role for S100B as an oligodendrocytic marker protein. In sum, serum S100B can be regarded as a promising in vivo biomarker for mood disorders deepening the understanding of the pathogenesis and plasticity-changes in these disorders. Future longitudinal studies combining serum S100B with other cell-specific serum parameters and multimodal imaging are warranted to further explore this serum protein in the development, monitoring and treatment of mood disorders. PMID:23701298

Schroeter, Matthias L; Sacher, Julia; Steiner, Johann; Schoenknecht, Peter; Mueller, Karsten

2013-10-01

329

Mindfulness and Emotion Regulation in Depression and Anxiety: Common and Distinct Mechanisms of Action  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The current study seeks to investigate the mechanisms through which mindfulness is related to mental health in a clinical sample of adults by examining a) whether specific cognitive emotion regulation strategies (rumination, reappraisal, worry, and non-acceptance) mediate associations between mindfulness and depression and anxiety, respectively, and b) whether these emotion regulation strategies operate uniquely or transdiagnostically in relation to depression and anxiety. Methods Participants were 187 adults seeking treatment at a mood and anxiety disorders clinic in Connecticut. Participants completed a battery of self-report measures that included assessments of depression and anxiety (Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire), and emotion regulation (Ruminative Response Scale, Penn State Worry Questionnaire, Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale). Results Simple mediation analyses indicated that rumination and worry significantly mediated associations between mindfulness and anxiety symptoms, while rumination and reappraisal significantly mediated associations between mindfulness and depressive symptoms. Multiple mediation analyses showed that worry significantly mediated associations between mindfulness and anxiety symptoms and rumination and reappraisal significantly mediated associations between mindfulness and depressive symptoms. Conclusion Findings suggest that mindfulness operates through distinct and common mechanisms depending on clinical context.

Desrosiers, Alethea; Vine, Vera; Klemanski, David H.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

2014-01-01

330

Is positive affect in pregnancy protective of postpartum depression?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the predictive/protective role of negative affect/positive affect in late pregnancy on the outcome of postpartum depression. METHODS: A total of 491 pregnant women participated in the study. The participants were asked to fill out a series of questionnaires, which included the Profile of Mood States, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, psychosocial variables and socio-demographic characteristics and were asked to participate in a psychiatric interview. After delivery, 272 mothers participated again in the study and filled out a similar series of questionnaires. RESULTS: Negative affect was associated with more intense depressive symptomatology, more self-perceived stress, lower self-reported social support, lower quality of life and perception of having a more difficult infant. By contrast, positive affect was negatively associated with these variables. Negative affect in late pregnancy increased the likelihood of experiencing postpartum depression (DSM-IV/OR = 2.1, 95%CI = 1.3-3.4, p = .003; ICD-10/OR = 2.1, 95%CI = 1.5-3.0, p < .001, while positive affect increased the odds of not having this condition (DSM-IV/OR = 2.0, 95%CI = 1.5-2.7, p = .042. CONCLUSION: In pregnancy, negative affect was a predictor of postpartum depression, whereas positive affect showed a protective role. Future studies are required to explore whether psychotherapeutic strategies focusing on decreasing negative affect and enhancing positive affect in the last trimester of pregnancy can reduce the risk of postpartum depression.

Sandra Carvalho Bos

2013-03-01

331

Retrospective reports of behavioral inhibition and young adults' current symptoms of social anxiety, depression, and anxious arousal  

Science.gov (United States)

The primary goal of this study was to investigate the specificity of the social versus nonsocial components of self-reported behavioral inhibition during childhood with young adults’ current symptoms of anhedonic depression, social anxiety, and anxious arousal. As hypothesized, the social component of BI demonstrated some specificity for symptoms of social anxiety versus other internalizing disorders. Furthermore, results support the hypothesis that the relationship between BI and depressive symptoms is mediated by levels of social anxiety and anxious arousal.

Schofield, Casey A.; Coles, Meredith E.; Gibb, Brandon E.

2014-01-01

332

Severe Aripiprazole-Induced Extrapyramidal Parkinsonian Features In A Patient With Psychotic Depression On Sertraline: A Case Report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aripiprazole is a third generation antipsychotic with partial dopaminergic activity. In addition to its proven antipsychotic effects, it has become more widely accepted at the clinical level. It is FDA-approved as an adjunctive therapy for depression with or without psychotic features. This case report concerns the development of severe Parkinsonian features in a depressed psychotic patient following the addition of aripiprazole to his sertraline treatment.

Ahmed Rady

2011-01-01

333

Treatment resistant adolescent depression with upper airway resistance syndrome treated with rapid palatal expansion: a case report  

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Abstract Introduction To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of treatment-resistant depression in which the patient was evaluated for sleep disordered breathing as the cause and in which rapid palatal expansion to permanently treat the sleep disordered breathing produced a prolonged symptom-free period off medication. Case presentation An 18-year-old Caucasian man presented to our sleep disorders center with chronic severe depression th...

Miller Paul; Iyer Mala; Gold Avram R

2012-01-01

334

Hierarchical Clustering of Music towards Human Mood  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper presents the methods for mining the music, based on mood dimension. Mood is an emerging metadata type and access point in music digital libraries (MDL) and online music repositories.There is a growing interest in developing and evaluating Music Information Retrieval (MIR) systems that can provide automated access to the mood dimension of music. Music is nice thing to all. Mood as a music access feature that is not well understood as well as not standardized. To better understanding...

2010-01-01

335

Responses to Positive Affect Predict Mood Symptoms in Children under Conditions of Stress: A Prospective Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Rumination to negative affect has been linked to the onset and maintenance of mood disorders in adults as well as children. Responses to positive affect have received far less attention thus far. A few recent studies in adults suggest that responses to positive affect are involved in the development of both depressive and hypomanic symptoms, but…

Bijttebier, Patricia; Raes, Filip; Vasey, Michael W.; Feldman, Gregory C.

2012-01-01

336

Smoking Cessation with E-Cigarettes in Smokers with a Documented History of Depression and Recurring Relapses  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The association between nicotine dependence and affective disorders, particularly major depressive disorder (MDD, is well known with high prevalence rates being reported for smokers. The reason for this association is not clear, but, it has been argued that smoking may help individuals to cope with stress or medicate depressed mood. Smoking cessation programs are useful in helping smokers to quit, but smoking is a very difficult addiction to break, especially for people suffering from depression, and the need for novel and effective approaches to smoking cessation interventions for this special population is unquestionable. The e-cigarette is a battery-powered electronic nicotine delivery device (ENDD, which may help smokers to remain abstinent during their quit attempt. Here, we report for the first time objective measures of smoking cessation in two heavy smokers, suffering from depression, who experimented the e-cigarette.

Pasquale Caponnetto

2011-07-01

337

Diagnosis and management of mood disorders during the menopausal transition.  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent census data indicate that, in the United States, an increasing number of women--almost 1.5 million each year--are reaching menopause. The menopausal transition is marked by intense hormonal fluctuations, and may be accompanied by vasomotor complaints, sleep disturbances, changes in sexual function, and increased risk for osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. In addition, there is evidence of increased risk for developing depression, even among women who never experienced depressive symptoms before. Thus depression during the perimenopause may have a substantial impact on personal, family, and professional spheres of life. A challenge to clinicians and health professionals lies in the identification of the most tolerable treatments to manage depression and improve quality of life in an aging population. Any treatment strategy should take into account not only the spectrum of side effects that may complicate treatment but also other menopause-related factors (e.g., vasomotor symptoms, psychosocial stressors) that may modulate risk for the development of mood disturbance. This article reviews the current literature on the prevalence and risk factors associated with depression during the menopausal transition. The benefits and risks of using hormonal and nonhormonal strategies for the management of depression and other menopause-related somatic symptoms are critically reviewed. PMID:16414333

Cohen, Lee S; Soares, Claudio N; Joffe, Hadine

2005-12-19

338

A Prospective Cohort Study Investigating Factors Associated with Depression during Medical Internship  

Science.gov (United States)

Context Although the prevalence of depression among medical interns substantially exceeds that of the general population, the specific factors responsible are not well understood. Recent reports of a moderating effect of a genetic polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in the serotonin transporter protein gene on the likelihood that life stress will precipitate depression may help to understand the development of mood symptoms in medical interns. Objective To identify psychological, demographic and residency program factors that associate with depression among interns and use medical internship as a model to study the moderating effects of this polymorphism using a prospective, within-subject design that addresses the design limitations of earlier studies. Design Prospective cohort study Setting 13 United States hospitals Participants 740 interns entering participating residency programs Main outcome measures Subjects were assessed for depressive symptoms using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), a series of psychological traits and 5-HTTLPR genotype prior to internship and then assessed for depressive symptoms and potential stressors at 3-month intervals during internship. Results The PHQ-9 depression score increased from 2.4 prior to internship to a mean of 6.4 during internship (pmedical education, difficult early family environment, history of major depression, lower baseline depressive symptom score and higher neuroticism) and during internship (increased work hours, perceived medical errors and stressful life events) were associated with a greater increase in depressive symptoms during internship. In addition, subjects with at least one copy of a less transcribed 5-HTTLPR allele reported a greater increase in depressive symptoms under the stress of internship (p=0.002). Conclusions There is a marked increase in depressive symptoms during medical internship. Specific individual, internship and genetic factors are associated with the increase in depressive symptoms.

Sen, Srijan; Kranzler, Henry R.; Krystal, John H.; Speller, Heather; Chan, Grace; Gelernter, Joel; Guille, Constance

2014-01-01

339

The opposite effects of fluvoxamine and sertraline in the treatment of psychotic major depression: a case report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychotic major depression is a clinical subtype of major depressive disorder. A number of clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of the combination of an antidepressant (for example, a tricyclic antidepressant or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI and an atypical antipsychotic or electroconvulsive therapy (ECT in treating psychotic major depression. In several studies, monotherapy of SSRIs such as fluvoxamine has been shown to be effective in the treatment of psychotic major depression. Methods We report on a 36-year-old Japanese woman in whom fluvoxamine (a SSRI with sigma-1 receptor agonist and sertraline (a SSRI with sigma-1 receptor antagonist showed the opposite effects on psychotic symptoms in the treatment of psychotic major depression. Results Symptoms of depression and psychosis in the patient who was non-respondent to antipsychotic drugs improved after fluvoxamine monotherapy. At 3 years later, a switch to sertraline from fluvoxamine dramatically worsened the psychotic symptoms in the patient. Then, a switch back to fluvoxamine from sertraline improved these symptoms 1 week after fluvoxamine treatment. Conclusion Doctors should consider the monotherapy of sigma-1 receptor agonist fluvoxamine as an alternative approach to treating psychotic major depression.

Kitagaki Tetsuno

2010-05-01

340

Hierarchical Clustering of Music towards Human Mood  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper presents the methods for mining the music, based on mood dimension. Mood is an emerging metadata type and access point in music digital libraries (MDL and online music repositories.There is a growing interest in developing and evaluating Music Information Retrieval (MIR systems that can provide automated access to the mood dimension of music. Music is nice thing to all. Mood as a music access feature that is not well understood as well as not standardized. To better understanding we develop method to evaluate automated mood access techniques. This paper explore the relationships that mood has with genre, artist and usage metadata. There is an important consistency within the genre-mood and artist-mood relationships. These consistencies lead to us to develop a cluster based approach by creating a relatively small set of data derived. The emotional component of music has been recognized as the most important factor. Music information behavior studies have also identified music mood as an important criterion used by people in music. Music evokes various human emotions or creates music moods through low level musical features. In fact, typical music consists of one or more moods and this can be used as an important factor for determining the similarity between music. In this paper, we propose a new music retrieval scheme based on the mood change pattern.

D. Rajesh

2010-12-01

 
 
 
 
341

Causal Attribution of Mood in the Climacterium.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examined attributions used by pre- and postmenopausal women (N=105) to explain mood. After reading a diary written by a middle-aged woman, participants rated menopausal symptoms, environment, and age as likely causes of the woman's mood. Menopausal symptoms were rated as a salient source of attribution for negative mood. (NRB)

Lyon, Bernadette M.

1985-01-01

342

Parent Prediction of Child Mood and Emotional Resilience: The Role of Parental Responsiveness and Psychological Control  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Research consistently shows low to moderate agreement between parent and child reports of child mood, suggesting that parents are not always the best predictors of child emotional functioning. This study examines parental responsiveness and psychological control for improving prediction of early adolescent mood and emotional resilience beyond parent

Boughton, Kristy L.; Lumley, Margaret N.

2011-01-01

343

Evaluation of Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) in Patients with Mood Disorders: A Multicenter Trial across China  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The aim of this study was to test the ability of the Chinese version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) to identify Bipolar Disorders (BD) in patients diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or Unipolar Disorder (UD) in the clinical setting. Methods 1,487 being treated for MDD or UD at 12 mental health centers across China, completed the MDQ and subsequently examined by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Receiver Operating Characteristic(ROC) curves were used to determine the ability of the MDQ to differentiate between BD (BD, BD-I and BD-II) and MDD or UD and patients with BD-I from patients with BD-II. Results Of the 1,487 patients, 309 (20.8%) satisfied the DSM-IV criteria for BD: 118 (7.9%) for BD-I and 191 (12.8%) for BD-II. When only part one of the MDQ was used, the best cutoff was 7 between BD and UD (sensitivity 0.66, specificity 0.88, positive predictive value 0.59, negative predictive value 0.91), 6 between BD-II and UD, and 10 between BD-I and BD-II. If all three parts of the MDQ were used, the MDQ could not distinguish between BD and UD at a cutoff of 7 (or 6), and the sensitivity was only 0.22 (or 0.24). Conclusion The Chinese version of the MDQ had good psychometric features in screening bipolar disorders from depressive patients with mood disorders when part two and part three of the MDQ were ignored.

Yang, Hai-Chen; Liu, Tie-Bang; Rong, Han; Bi, Jian-Qiang; Ji, Er-Ni; Peng, Hong-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Fang, Yi-Ru; Yuan, Cheng-Mei; Si, Tian-Mei; Lu, Zheng; Hu, Jian; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Yi; Sun, Jing; Li, Hui-Chun; Hu, Chen; Zhang, Jin-Bei; Li, Ling-Jiang

2014-01-01

344

The Mood Disorder Burden Index: A Scale for Assessing the Burden of Caregivers to Adults with Unipolar or Bipolar Disorder  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In this paper we present a brief measure of caregiver burden, the Mood Disorder Burden Index (MDBI), for use with family members and close friends of adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) or bipolar disorder (BD). The MDBI assesses burden in three core domains (patients’ mood symptoms, caregivers’ worry about the future, and caregivers’ interpersonal difficulties with the patient) and includes an optional module that assesses caregiver burden associated with patients’ pharmacoth...

2009-01-01

345

Reciprocal Effects of Antidepressant Treatment on Activity and Connectivity of the Mood Regulating Circuit: An fMRI Study  

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It has been hypothesized that one of the effects of antidepressants is to increase functional connectivity between the cortical mood-regulating and the limbic mood-generating regions. One consequence of this antidepressant effect is thought to be decreased limbic activation in response to negative emotional stimuli. Twelve unmedicated unipolar depressed patients and 11 closely matched healthy comparison subjects completed two magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning sessions at baseline and ...

2007-01-01

346

The UPBEAT Nurse-Delivered Personalized Care Intervention for People with Coronary Heart Disease Who Report Current Chest Pain and Depression: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Depression is common in people with coronary heart disease (CHD) and associated with worse outcome. This study explored the acceptability and feasibility of procedures for a trial and for an intervention, including its potential costs, to inform a definitive randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a nurse-led personalised care intervention for primary care CHD patients with current chest pain and probable depression. Methods Multi-centre, outcome assessor-blinded, randomized parallel group study. CHD patients reporting chest pain and scoring 8 or more on the HADS were randomized to personalized care (PC) or treatment as usual (TAU) for 6 months and followed for 1 year. Primary outcome was acceptability and feasibility of procedures; secondary outcomes included mood, chest pain, functional status, well being and psychological process variables. Result 1001 people from 17 General Practice CHD registers in South London consented to be contacted; out of 126 who were potentially eligible, 81 (35% female, mean age?=?65 SD11 years) were randomized. PC participants (n?=?41) identified wide ranging problems to work on with nurse-case managers. Good acceptability and feasibility was indicated by low attrition (9%), high engagement and minimal nurse time used (mean/SD?=?78/19 mins assessment, 125/91 mins telephone follow up). Both groups improved on all outcomes. The largest between group difference was in the proportion no longer reporting chest pain (PC 37% vs TAU 18%; mixed effects model OR 2.21 95% CI 0.69, 7.03). Some evidence was seen that self efficacy (mean scale increase of 2.5 vs 0.9) and illness perceptions (mean scale increase of 7.8 vs 2.5) had improved in PC vs TAU participants at 1 year. PC appeared to be more cost effective up to a QALY threshold of approximately £3,000. Conclusions Trial and intervention procedures appeared to be feasible and acceptable. PC allowed patients to work on unaddressed problems and appears cheaper than TAU. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN21615909

Barley, Elizabeth A.; Walters, Paul; Haddad, Mark; Phillips, Rachel; Achilla, Evanthia; McCrone, Paul; Van Marwijk, Harm; Mann, Anthony; Tylee, Andre

2014-01-01

347

Inglise mood ja foto Kunstihoones  

Index Scriptorium Estoniae

5. nov.-st Tallinna Kunstihoones näitus "Look at me", Suurbritannia mood ja fotograafia 1960ndatest tänapäevani. Kuraatorid Val Willams, Brett Rogers. Osalejaid. 6. XI samas eesti moekunstnike britiaineline moeshow. Osalevad Anu Lensment, Eve Hanson, Marit Ahven, Jaanus Vahtra, Marju Tammik, Anu Samarüütel

1999-01-01

348

Biological rhythms and mood disorders  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Integration of several approaches concerning time and temporality can enhance the pathophysiological study of major mood disorders of unknown etiology. We propose that these conditions might be interpreted as disturbances of temporal profile of biological rhythms, as well as alterations of time-consciousness. Useful approaches to study time and temporality include philological suggestions, phenomenological and psychopathological conceptualizatíons, clinical descriptions, and research on circ...

Salvatore, Paola; Indic, Premananda; Murray, Greg; Baldessarini, Ross J.

2012-01-01

349

Shared attention increases mood infusion.  

Science.gov (United States)

The current research explores how awareness of shared attention influences attitude formation. We theorized that sharing the experience of an object with fellow group members would increase elaborative processing, which in turn would intensify the effects of participant mood on attitude formation. Four experiments found that observing the same object as similar others produced more positive ratings among those in a positive mood, but more negative ratings among those in a negative mood. Participant mood had a stronger influence on evaluations when an object had purportedly been viewed by similar others than when (a) that same object was being viewed by dissimilar others, (b) similar others were viewing a different object, (c) different others were viewing a different object, or (d) the object was viewed alone with no others present. Study 4 demonstrated that these effects were driven by heightened cognitive elaboration of the attended object in the shared attention condition. These findings support the theoretical conjecture that an object attended with one's ingroup is subject to broader encoding in relation to existing knowledge structures. PMID:23317087

Shteynberg, Garriy; Hirsh, Jacob B; Galinsky, Adam D; Knight, Andrew P

2014-02-01

350

Involuntary memories after a positive film are dampened by a visuospatial task: unhelpful in depression but helpful in mania?  

Science.gov (United States)

Spontaneous negative mental images have been extensively researched due to the crucial role they play in conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. However, people can also experience spontaneous positive mental images, and these are little understood. Positive images may play a role in promoting healthy positive mood and may be lacking in conditions such as depression. However, they may also occur in problematic states of elevated mood, such as in bipolar disorder. Can we apply an understanding of spontaneous imagery gained by the study of spontaneous negative images to spontaneous positive images? In an analogue of the trauma film studies, 69 volunteers viewed an explicitly positive (rather than traumatic) film. Participants were randomly allocated post-film either to perform a visuospatial task (the computer game 'Tetris') or to a no-task control condition. Viewing the film enhanced positive mood and immediately post-film increased goal setting on a questionnaire measure. The film was successful in generating involuntary memories of specific scenes over the following week. As predicted, compared with the control condition, participants in the visuospatial task condition reported significantly fewer involuntary memories from the film in a diary over the subsequent week. Furthermore, scores on a recognition memory test at 1 week indicated an impairment in voluntary recall of the film in the visuospatial task condition. Clinical implications regarding the modulation of positive imagery after a positive emotional experience are discussed. Generally, boosting positive imagery may be a useful strategy for the recovery of depressed mood. PMID:22570062

Davies, Charlotte; Malik, Aiysha; Pictet, Arnaud; Blackwell, Simon E; Holmes, Emily A

2012-01-01

351

Metabolic disturbances connecting obesity and depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Obesity markedly increases the odds of developing depression. Depressed mood not only impairs motivation, quality of life and overall functioning but also increases the risks of obesity complications. Abdominal obesity is a better predictor of depression and anxiety risk than overall adipose mass. A growing amount of research suggests that metabolic abnormalities stemming from central obesity that lead to metabolic disease may also responsible for the increased incidence of depression in obesity. As reviewed here, a higher mass of dysfunctional adipose tissue is associated with several metabolic disturbances that are either directly or indirectly implicated in the control of emotions and mood. To better comprehend the development of depression in obesity, this review pulls together select findings addressing the link between adiposity, diet and negative emotional states and discusses the evidence that alterations in glucocorticoids, adipose-derived hormones and inflammatory signalling that are characteristic of central obesity may be involved.

StephanieE.Fulton

2013-10-01

352

Cannabis e humor / Cannabis and mood  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: Avaliar as relações entre o uso agudo e crônico de cannabis e alterações do humor. MÉTODO: Os artigos foram selecionados por meio de busca eletrônica no indexador PubMed. Capítulos de livros e as listas de referências dos artigos selecionados também foram revisados. RESULTADOS: Observam-se [...] elevados índices de comorbidade entre abuso/dependência de cannabis e transtornos afetivos em estudos transversais e em amostras clínicas. Estudos longitudinais indicam que, em longo prazo, o uso mais intenso de cannabis está relacionado com um risco maior de desenvolvimento de doença bipolar e, talvez, depressão maior em indivíduos inicialmente sem quadros afetivos; porém, os mesmos não encontraram maior risco de uso de cannabis entre aqueles com mania ou depressão sem esta comorbidade. Outra importante observação é que o uso de substâncias psicoativas em bipolares pode estar associado a uma série de características negativas, como dificuldade na recuperação dos sintomas afetivos, maior número de internações, piora na adesão ao tratamento, risco aumentado de suicídio, agressividade e a uma pobre resposta ao lítio. Tratamentos psicossociais e farmacológicos são indicados para o manejo da comorbidade entre cannabis e transtornos afetivos. CONCLUSÃO: As relações entre o uso de cannabis e alterações do humor são observadas tanto epidemiologicamente quanto nos contextos clínicos. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the relationship between acute and chronic use of cannabis and mood changes. METHOD: Articles were selected by electronic search in PubMed. Chapters in books and reference lists of selected articles were also reviewed. As the research did not involve humans, there was no evaluati [...] on by a Research Ethics Committee. RESULTS: High rates of comorbidity between use/abuse/dependence of cannabis and affective disorders in longitudinal studies and in clinical samples were observed. Longitudinal studies indicate that, in long-term, the higher use of cannabis is associated with an increased risk of developing bipolar disorder, and probably, major depression in subjects initially without affective disorder, but was not found increased risk of cannabis use among those initially only with mania or depression. Another important observation is that substance abuse in bipolar patients may be associated with a number of negative characteristics, such as difficulty in recovering the affective symptoms, more hospitalizations, poor compliance with treatment, increased risk of suicide, aggression and a poor response to lithium. Psychosocial and pharmacological treatments are indicated for the management of comorbidity between cannabis and affective disorders. CONCLUSION: The relationship between cannabis use and mood changes are observed both in the epidemiological research and in the clinical settings.

Sanches, Rafael Faria; Marques, João Mazzoncini de Azevedo.

353

Cannabis e humor Cannabis and mood  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as relações entre o uso agudo e crônico de cannabis e alterações do humor. MÉTODO: Os artigos foram selecionados por meio de busca eletrônica no indexador PubMed. Capítulos de livros e as listas de referências dos artigos selecionados também foram revisados. RESULTADOS: Observam-se elevados índices de comorbidade entre abuso/dependência de cannabis e transtornos afetivos em estudos transversais e em amostras clínicas. Estudos longitudinais indicam que, em longo prazo, o uso mais intenso de cannabis está relacionado com um risco maior de desenvolvimento de doença bipolar e, talvez, depressão maior em indivíduos inicialmente sem quadros afetivos; porém, os mesmos não encontraram maior risco de uso de cannabis entre aqueles com mania ou depressão sem esta comorbidade. Outra importante observação é que o uso de substâncias psicoativas em bipolares pode estar associado a uma série de características negativas, como dificuldade na recuperação dos sintomas afetivos, maior número de internações, piora na adesão ao tratamento, risco aumentado de suicídio, agressividade e a uma pobre resposta ao lítio. Tratamentos psicossociais e farmacológicos são indicados para o manejo da comorbidade entre cannabis e transtornos afetivos. CONCLUSÃO: As relações entre o uso de cannabis e alterações do humor são observadas tanto epidemiologicamente quanto nos contextos clínicos.OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the relationship between acute and chronic use of cannabis and mood changes. METHOD: Articles were selected by electronic search in PubMed. Chapters in books and reference lists of selected articles were also reviewed. As the research did not involve humans, there was no evaluation by a Research Ethics Committee. RESULTS: High rates of comorbidity between use/abuse/dependence of cannabis and affective disorders in longitudinal studies and in clinical samples were observed. Longitudinal studies indicate that, in long-term, the higher use of cannabis is associated with an increased risk of developing bipolar disorder, and probably, major depression in subjects initially without affective disorder, but was not found increased risk of cannabis use among those initially only with mania or depression. Another important observation is that substance abuse in bipolar patients may be associated with a number of negative characteristics, such as difficulty in recovering the affective symptoms, more hospitalizations, poor compliance with treatment, increased risk of suicide, aggression and a poor response to lithium. Psychosocial and pharmacological treatments are indicated for the management of comorbidity between cannabis and affective disorders. CONCLUSION: The relationship between cannabis use and mood changes are observed both in the epidemiological research and in the clinical settings.

Rafael Faria Sanches

2010-06-01

354

Cox’s Chair Revisited: Can Spinning Alter Mood States?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Although there is clinical and historical evidence for a vivid relation between the vestibular and emotional systems, the neuroscientific underpinnings are poorly understood. The “spin doctors” of the nineteenth century used spinning chairs (e.g. Cox’s chair to treat conditions of mania or elevated arousal. On the basis of a recent study on a hexapod motion simulator, in this prototypic investigation we explore the impact of yaw stimulation on a spinning chair on mood states. Using a controlled experimental stimulation paradigm on a unique 3-D-turntable at the University of Zurich we included 11 healthy subjects and assessed parameters of mood states and autonomic nervous system activity. The Multidimensional Mode State Questionnaire (MDMQ and Visual Analogue Rating Scales (VAS were used to assess changes of mood in response to a 100 sec yaw stimulation. In addition heart rate was continuously monitored during the experiment. Subjects indicated feeling less “good”, “relaxed,” “comfortable,” and “calm” and reported an increased alertness after vestibular stimulation. However, there were no objective adverse effects of the stimulation. Accordingly, heart rate did not significantly differ in response to the stimulation. This is the first study in a highly controlled setting using the historical approach of stimulating the vestibular system to impact mood states. It demonstrates a specific interaction between the vestibular system and mood states and thereby supports recent experimental findings with a different stimulation technique. These results may inspire future research on the clinical potential of this method.

TillmannH.C.Kruger

2013-10-01

355

Effects of theobromine and caffeine on mood and vigilance.  

Science.gov (United States)

Like caffeine, theobromine crosses the blood-brain barrier and binds to adenosine receptors, suggesting it might share caffeine's beneficial effects on mood and vigilance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effect of theobromine doses commonly found in foods on mood and vigilance parameters sensitive to caffeine. Caffeine was tested as a positive control. Twenty-four men (age, 23 [3] years) completed 6 double-blind trials during which they consumed experimental beverages, assessed their mood using standardized self-report questionnaires, and completed a 2-hour visual vigilance task. Three experimental doses (100, 200, and 400 mg theobromine) were delivered in a cocoa-based beverage; 3 matched control treatments (0 mg theobromine, 400 mg theobromine, and 100 mg caffeine) were delivered in a non-cocoa beverage. Mean salivary concentrations of theobromine exhibited significant dose-dependent differences (400 mg trials > 200 mg trial > 100 mg trial > 0 mg trials; P theobromine failed to consistently affect mood state or vigilance (P > 0.05), but 100-mg caffeine significantly decreased lethargy/fatigue and increased vigor (P = 0.006 and 0.011, respectively). These findings indicate theobromine does not influence mood and vigilance when administered in nutritionally relevant doses, despite sharing many of caffeine's structural characteristics. PMID:23764688

Judelson, Daniel A; Preston, Amy G; Miller, Debra L; Muñoz, Colleen X; Kellogg, Mark D; Lieberman, Harris R

2013-08-01

356

The effect of mild depression on time discrimination.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Depressed mood states affect subjective perceptions of time but it is not clear whether this is due to changes in the underlying timing mechanisms, such as the speed of the internal clock. In order to study depression effects on time perception, two experiments using time discrimination methods with short (1000 ms) durations were conducted. Student participants who were categorised as mildly depressed by their scores on the Beck Depression Inventory were less able than c...

Msetfi, Rachel; Murphy, Robin; Kornbrot, Diana

2012-01-01

357

Treatment of Depression: Newer Pharmacotherapies. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 7.  

Science.gov (United States)

Depressive disorders are persistent, recurring illnesses that impose enormous personal suffering on individuals and their families. Major depression alone is estimated as the fourth most important cause of worldwide loss in disability-adjusted life years ...

C. Aguilar C. D. Mulrow E. Chiquette J. E. Cornell J. W. Williams M. Trivedi

1999-01-01

358

The Effects of Depression, Health Status, and Stressful Life-Events on Self-Reported Memory Problems among Aged Blacks.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examined prevalence and correlates of self-reported memory problems among 1,250 black elders. Over 48.3% of sample reported poor memory/forgetfulness as very or somewhat serious problem. Subjects with hearing impairments, higher number of stressful life events, higher level of depression, and poorer health were more likely to complain of memory…

Bazargan, Mohsen; Barbre, Ann R.

1994-01-01

359

Glycogen synthase kinase-3: a new therapeutic target in mood disorders  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mood disorders, including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder, are common and largely inadequately treated. Additionally, little is known about their etiologies. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 is a serine/threonine protein kinase, interacting with many signaling pathways. In 1996, lithium was found to inhibit GSK-3 and this discovery led us to the possibility that impaired GSK-3 inhibition is related with mood disorders. In time, animal and human studies encouraged this finding. Evidence is reviewed that depression may be associated with impaired inhibitory control of GSK-3, and mania with hyperstimulation of GSK-3. Mood disorders may result in part from impairments in mechanisms controlling the activity of GSK-3 or GSK-3-regulated functions and substantial evidence supports the conclusion that bolstering the modulatory control of GSK-3 is an important component of the therapeutic actions of drugs used to treat mood disorders and that GSK-3 is a valid target for developing new therapeutic interventions. Future research should identify the causes of dysregulation of GSK-3 in mood disorders and the actions of GSK-3 that contribute to these diseases.

feyza aricioglu

2013-01-01

360

The Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Autogenic Relaxation on Young Soccer Players' Mood States  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

Purpose:This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR and autogenic relaxation (AGR on moods of young soccer players.
Methods:Sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ? 1.3 received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States-Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session.
Results:Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores.
Conclusions:These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players' mood states.

Hazwani Hanafi@Ahmad Yusof

2011-11-01

 
 
 
 
361

Thurstone's Scaling Model Applied to the Assessment of Self-Reported Depressive Severity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Thurstone's scaling based on judgments of 527 students and 37 clinical faculty members was applied to the Beck Depression Inventory, the Zung Depression Scale, and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and fitted the observed data well. A psychological continuum was derived for severity of depression. (SLD)

Russo, Joan

1994-01-01

362

Neural network analysis in pharmacogenetics of mood disorders  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background The increasing number of available genotypes for genetic studies in humans requires more advanced techniques of analysis. We previously reported significant univariate associations between gene polymorphisms and antidepressant response in mood disorders. However the combined analysis of multiple gene polymorphisms and clinical variables requires the use of non linear methods. Methods In the present study we tested a neural network strategy fo...

Serretti Alessandro; Smeraldi Enrico

2004-01-01

363

Correlation between mood and heart rate variability indices during daily life  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We investigated the correlation between mood and heart rate variability (HRV indices during daily life. The RR-interval and body acceleration of 40 normal male subjects were recorded using ambulatory device for 48 to 72 hours. Every hour that the subjects were awake they registered their current mood on a Visual Analogue Scale questionnaire. The questionnaire scales eight of the subjects’ current moods. Those are happiness, tension, fatigue, worry, depression, anger, vigor, and confusion. The following four HRV indices were calculated. Those are heart rate, root mean square of successive differences of RR-interval sequence, the normalized high-frequency (0.15 - 0.4 Hz power of RR-in- terval variability, and mean frequency in the high-frequency band of RR-interval variability. The calculated HRV indices data and the mood data were normalized individually, the data with body acceleration exceeding 30 mG were excluded from the analysis to reduce the effect of exercise, and the differences from the first day (?mood and ?HRV-index were taken to reduce the effect of circadian rhythm. The most three highly correlated combinations were ?vigor and ?HFnu (R = –0.24, p < 0.0001, ?vigor and ?RMSSD (R = –0.24, p < 0.0001, and ?vigor and ?HR (R = 0.22, p < 0.001. Vigor exhibited the most significant correlations with HRV indices of eight moods.

Kohzoh Yoshino

2011-09-01

364

Prevalence, Comorbidity and Correlates of DSM-5 Proposed Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective There are no published empirical studies on the DSM-5 proposed Disruptive Mood Dysregulation disorder. This study will estimate prevalence, comorbidity, and correlates of this proposed disorder in the community. Methods Prevalence rates were estimated using data from three community studies involving 7,881 observations of 3,258 participants covering ages 2 to 17. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder was diagnosed using items from structured psychiatric interviews. Results Three-month prevalence rates for meeting disruptive mood dysregulation disorder criteria ranged from 0.8% to 3.3% with the highest rate in preschoolers. These rates dropped slightly with strict application of the exclusion criterion, but were largely unaffected by application of the onset and duration criteria. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder co-occurred with all common psychiatric disorders. The highest levels of co-occurrence were with depressive disorders (odds ratios between 9.9 and 23.5) and oppositional defiant disorder (odds ratios between 52.9 and 103.0). Sixty-two to 92% of the time disruptive mood dysregulation disorder occurred with another disorder and 32 to 68% of the time it occurred with both an emotional and a behavioral disorder. Affected children displayed elevated rates of social impairments, school suspension, service use, and poverty. Conclusions Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder is relatively uncommon after early childhood, frequently co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders, and meets common standards for psychiatric “caseness.” This disorder identifies children with severe levels of both emotional and behavioral dysregulation.

Copeland, William E.; Angold, Adrian; Costello, E. Jane; Egger, Helen

2013-01-01

365

Mood and metabolic consequences of sleep deprivation as a potential endophenotype' in bipolar disorder.  

Science.gov (United States)

It has been commonly recognized that circadian rhythm and sleep/wake cycle are causally involved in bipolar disorder. There has been a paucity of systematic research considering the relations between sleep and mood states in bipolar disorder. The current study examines the possible influences of sleep deprivation on mood states and endocrine functions among first-degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls. Blood samples were taken at two time points in the consecutive mornings at predeprivation and postdeprivation periods. Participants simultaneously completed the Profiles of Mood States at two time points after giving blood samples. Plasma T3 and TSH levels increased after total sleep deprivation in both groups. Sleep deprivation induced TSH levels were reversely associated with depression-dejection among healthy controls. A paradoxical effect was detected for only the first-degree relatives of the patients that changes in plasma cortisol levels negatively linked to depression-dejection and anger-hostility scores after total sleep deprivation. Plasma DHEA levels became correlated with vigor-activity scores after sleep deprivation among first-degree relatives of bipolar patients. On the contrary, significant associations of depression-dejection, anger-hostility, and confusion-bewilderment with the baseline plasma DHEA levels became statistically trivial in the postdeprivation period. Findings suggested that first-degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder had completely distinct characteristics with respect to sleep deprivation induced responses in terms of associations between endocrine functions and mood states as compared to individuals whose relatives had no psychiatric problems. Considering the relationships between endocrine functions and mood states among relatives of the patients, it appears like sleep deprivation changes the receptor sensitivity which probably plays a pivotal role on mood outcomes among the first-degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder. PMID:23664567

Aydin, Adem; Selvi, Yavuz; Besiroglu, Lutfullah; Boysan, Murat; Atli, Abdullah; Ozdemir, Osman; Kilic, Sultan; Balaharoglu, Rag?p

2013-09-01

366

Mood scores in relation to hormone replacement therapies during menopause: a prospective randomized trial.  

Science.gov (United States)

There is lack of studies in literature about the long-term effects of hormone replacement therapies and cholesterol levels on mood scores in menopause. In the present study we have investigated whether serum lipid levels affect mood scores in menopause and evaluated the long-term effects of the combined hormone replacement regimens (HRT) on depressive symptoms in postmenopausal women. In this prospective-randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, 286 women in menopause were divided into four groups according to therapeutic regimens they received; 1) Conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) of 0.625 mg plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) of 2.5 mg (n = 79), 2) CEE (0.625 mg) plus MPA of 5 mg (n = 77), 3) tibolone of 2.5 mg (a selective tissue estrogenic activity regulator) (n = 76), and 4) Calcium (Ca) of 1,000 mg (n = 54). Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and serum levels of lipoprotein lipids were assessed before and after 12-months of treatment with oral continuous HRT and Ca supplementation. BDI scores in the study groups were not correlated with lipid profiles. We compared two subgroups of patients with initial BDI scores 0-14 (normal mood scores) in order to asses for the possible relation between the lipid profile and mood. Following treatment, first subgroup had increased scores to 15-30 (mildly depressed women, n = 27) and the second subgroup preserved BDI scores of 0-14 (normal mood scores, n = 23). Serum levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein and body mass index were found to be similar between these two groups. BDI scores decreased significantly in all HRT groups after 12 months of treatment, compared to Ca group (p tibolone, have superior long-term effects on mood scores in menopause and should be considered during the decision process for use of HRT due to menopausal symptoms. PMID:16210834

Onalan, Gogsen; Onalan, Reside; Selam, Belgin; Akar, Munire; Gunenc, Ziya; Topcuoglu, Ata

2005-11-01

367

The relationship between mood and sleep in different female reproductive states  

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Background Sleep is disrupted in depressed subjects, but it also deteriorates with age and possibly with the transition to menopause. The nature of interaction between mood, sleep, age and reproductive state is not well-defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between mood and sleep among healthy women in different reproductive states. Methods We analyzed data from 11 younger (20–26 years), 21 perimenopausal (43–51 years) and 29 postmenopausal (58–71 years) healthy women who participated in a study on menopause, sleep and cognition. The 21-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered to assess mood. Subjective sleep quality was assessed with the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire (BNSQ). Objective sleep was measured with all-night polysomnography (PSG) recordings. Perimenopausal and younger women were examined during the first days of their menstrual cycle at the follicular phase. Results Among younger women, less arousals associated with higher BDI total scores (p?=?0.026), and higher SWS percentages with more dissatisfaction (p?=?0.001) and depressive-somatic symptoms (p?=?0.025), but with less depressive-emotional symptoms (p?=?0.001). In specific, less awakenings either from REM sleep or SWS, respectively, associated with more punishment (p?=?0.005; p?=?0.036), more dissatisfaction (p?depressive-somatic symptoms (p?=?0.001; p?=?0.009), but with less depressive-emotional symptoms (p?=?0.002; p?=?0.003). In perimenopausal women, higher BNSQ insomnia scores (p?=?0.005), lower sleep efficiencies (p?=?0.022) and shorter total sleep times (p?=?0.024) associated with higher BDI scores, longer sleep latencies with more depressive-somatic symptoms (p?=?0.032) and longer REM latencies with more dissatisfaction (p?=?0.017). In postmenopausal women, higher REM percentages associated with higher BDI total scores (p?=?0.019) and more depressive-somatic symptoms (p?=?0.005), and longer SWS latencies with more depressive-somatic symptoms (p?=?0.030). Conclusions Depressive symptoms measured with the total BDI scores associated with sleep impairment in both perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. In younger women, specific BDI factors revealed minor associations, suggesting that the type of sleep impairment can vary in relation to different depressive features. Our data indicate that associations between sleep and depressed mood may change in conjunction with hormonal milestones.

2014-01-01

368

Differences in depressive symptoms between Korean and American outpatients with major depressive disorder.  

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Previous epidemiologic studies have revealed that East-Asian populations experience fewer depressive symptoms than American populations do. However, it is unclear whether this difference applies to clinical patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This present study included 1592 Korean and 3744 American outpatients who were 18 years of age or older and met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. criteria for single or recurrent episodes of nonpsychotic MDD, and evaluated their symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form. Korean patients scored significantly lower for guilt and depressed mood items, and higher for hypochondriasis and suicidality items than American patients did, after adjusting for total Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores. Conversely, no significant differences were found in quality and function of daily life between groups. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that Korean patients experienced less frequent depressed mood and guilt, including verbal and nonverbal expression of depressed mood [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.23] and feelings of punishment (AOR = 0.036, 95% CI 0.025-0.054) when compared with Americans after adjusting for age and sex. Conversely, Korean patients experienced more frequent suicidality and hypochondriasis, including suicidal ideas or gestures (AOR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.60-2.76) and self-absorption of hypochondriasis (AOR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.70-2.20). In conclusion, decreased expression of depressed mood and guilt may cause underdiagnosis of MDD in Korean patients. Early diagnosis of and intervention for depression and suicide may be delayed because of this specific cross-cultural difference in depression symptoms. PMID:24323201

Jeon, Hong Jin; Walker, Rosemary S; Inamori, Aya; Hong, Jin Pyo; Cho, Maeng Je; Baer, Lee; Clain, Alisabet; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

2014-05-01

369

Restructuring mood in cyclothymia using cognitive behavior therapy: an intensive time-sampling study.  

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Hypotheses predicting how cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) would change the daily pattern of mood and sleep in a patient with cyclothymia were formulated based on circadian processes. Using a prospective single-case experimental design, the patient provided mood ratings every 4 hours and sleep reports daily for 49 weeks, including a 4-week baseline, a 20-session CBT intervention, and a follow-up period. Improvements in mood during and after therapy were accounted for by reduced daily mood variability and extended sleep. The patient's energy at different times of day was explained by adjusting the endogenous rhythm in a mathematical circadian model. Treatment of cyclothymia and related bipolar disorders may be enhanced by integrating understanding of circadian mood regulation into CBT treatment. PMID:18324665

Totterdell, Peter; Kellett, Stephen

2008-04-01

370

Brooding and Pondering: Isolating the Active Ingredients of Depressive Rumination with Exploratory Factor Analysis and Structural Equation Modeling  

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Depressive rumination, as assessed by Nolen-Hoeksema's Response Styles Questionnaire (RSQ), predicts the onset, chronicity, and duration of depressed mood. However, some RSQ items contain depressive content and result in a heterogeneous factor structure. After the a priori elimination of items potentially confounded with depressed item content,…

Armey, Michael F.; Fresco, David M.; Moore, Michael T.; Mennin, Douglas S.; Turk, Cynthia L.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Kecmanovic, Jelena; Alloy, Lauren B.

2009-01-01

371

Comparison of children's self-reports of depressive symptoms among different family interaction types in northern Taiwan  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has shown that family interactions are associated with depressive symptoms in children. However, detailed classifications of family interaction types have not been studied thoroughly. This study aims to understand the types of family interactions children experience and to identify the specific types of family interactions that are associated with a higher risk of depressive symptoms in children. Methods Data used in the study was collected as part of the Child and Adolescent Behavior in Long term Evolution (CABLE project in 2003. CABLE is a longitudinal cohort study that commenced in 2001 and collects data annually from children in Taipei city and Hsinchu county in northern Taiwan. The data analyzed in this study was that obtained from the sixth graders (aged 11 to 12 years old in 2003. Of the 2,449 sixth graders, 51.2% were boys and 48.8% were girls. Factor analysis and cluster analysis were used to investigate the types of family interactions. One way ANOVA was used to establish the relationship between family interaction types and children's self-reports of depressive symptoms. Results Based on the results of factor analysis, the latent factors for family interactions included supporting activities, psychological control, parental discipline, behavioral supervision, and family conflict. After conducting cluster analysis using factor scores, four types of family interactions were revealed: supervised (29.66%, disciplined (13.56%, nurtured (40.96% and conflict (15.82%. Children from the disciplined or conflict families were more likely to report depressive symptoms. Children from the nurtured families were least likely to report depressive symptoms. Conclusion Family interactions can be classified into four different types, which are related to children's self-reports of depressive symptoms. The creation of a family interaction environment that is beneficial for children's mental health is an important issue for health education and health promotion professionals.

Yen Lee-Lan

2007-06-01

372

Comparison of racemic ketamine and S-ketamine in treatment-resistant major depression: report of two cases.  

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Recent studies with intravenous infusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine showed robust and rapid antidepressant effects within hours after treatment. Ketamine is a racemic mixture consisting of two enantiomers, R- and S-ketamine. In contrast to ketamine, S-ketamine is reported to be less prone to psychomimetic side effects, such as derealisation and hallucinations. In this report we describe the effect of ketamine and S-ketamine infusion therapy, respectively, in two patients with treatment-resistant major depression. Severity of depression was rated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). While one patient did not respond to either treatment, in the other patient intravenous administration of ketamine as well as S-ketamine showed an antidepressant effect as assessed by a decrease in HAMD-21 and BDI at days 1 and 3 after infusion which faded until day 6. Both patients experienced psychomimetic side effects during ketamine infusion which were absent during treatment with S-ketamine. We conclude that S-ketamine might exert similar antidepressant effects as ketamine in drug-resistant depression but may be better tolerated by the patients. PMID:19224412

Paul, Robert; Schaaff, Nadine; Padberg, Frank; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Frodl, Thomas

2009-01-01

373

Validity of a self-reported diagnosis of depression among participants in a cohort study using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression assessment in population studies is usually based on depressive symptoms scales. However, the use of scales could lead to the choice of an arbitrary cut-off point depending on the sample characteristics and on the patient diagnosis. Thus, the use of a medical diagnosis of depression could be a more appropriate approach. Objective To validate a self-reported physician diagnosis of depression using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I as Gold Standard and to assess the factors associated to a valid self-reported diagnosis. Methods The SUN Project is a cohort study based on university graduates followed-up through postal questionnaires. The response to the question included in the questionnaire: Have you ever been diagnosed of depression by a physician? was compared to that obtained through the SCID-I applied by a psychiatrist or a clinical psychologist. The percentages of confirmed depression and non-depression were assessed for the overall sample and according to several characteristics. Logistic regression models were fitted to ascertain the association between different factors and a correct classification regarding depression status. Results The percentage of confirmed depression was 74.2%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI = 63.3–85.1. Out of 42 participants who did not report a depression diagnosis in the questionnaire, 34 were free of the disease (%confirmed non-depression = 81.1%; 95% CI = 69.1–92.9. The probability of being a true positive was higher among ex-smokers and non-smokers and among those overweight or obese but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The validity of a self-reported diagnosis of depression in the SUN cohort is adequate. Thus, this question about depression diagnosis could be used in further investigations regarding this disease in this graduate cohort study.

Pla Jorge

2008-06-01

374

The Clinical Correlates of Reported Childhood Sexual Abuse: An Association between Age at Trauma Onset and Severity of Depression and PTSD in Adults  

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This study investigated the relationship between the age of self-reported sexual abuse occurrence and the development of post-traumatic stress disorder and/or depressive symptoms in adulthood. Subjects were evaluated for the presence of post-traumatic stress disorder and/or depressive symptoms as well as for a self-reported history of sexual abuse…

Schoedl, Aline Ferri; Costa, Mariana Cadrobbi Pupo; Mari, Jair J.; Mello, Marcelo Feijo; Tyrka, Audrey R.; Carpenter, Linda L.; Price, Lawrence H.

2010-01-01

375

Catching Leaders’ Mood: Contagion Effects in Teams  

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Full Text Available Much of the behavior at work takes place within teams. Leaders of teams experience different feelings that, in turn, can have an impact on how team members feel and perform. This study examined the effects of leaders’ mood on individual team members’ mood, group affective tone, and team outcomes (actual team performance, potency, and goal commitment in a laboratory study, with a sample of 63 students working in three-person teams. Furthermore, the study investigated the mediating role of group affective tone in the leaders’ mood–team outcomes relationship. Results demonstrated that leaders influence team members’ individual mood, group affective tone, actual team performance, and potency. Moreover, group affective tone mediated the relationship between team leaders’ mood and potency. Taken together, the findings suggest that in order to enhance subordinates’ work experience and to attain desired outcomes, leaders should be aware of their mood and its potential effects.

Judith Volmer

2012-08-01

376

Hypertension and depression Hipertensão arterial sistêmica e depressão  

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Despite the high prevalence of depression and hypertension, the relationship between the two diseases has received little attention. This paper reviews the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and prognostic aspects of this association, as well as its implications for treatment. A Medline search was conducted using the following key words: depression, blood pressure, blood pressure variability, physical morbidity, hypertension, mood, stress, hypertension, antidepressive agents, and genetics, ...

Andréia Zavaloni Scalco; Mônica Zavaloni Scalco; João Batista Serro Azul; Francisco Lotufo Neto

2005-01-01

377

If I Had - A Family Member with Psychotic Depression  

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Full Text Available ... focusses on the psychotic forms of depression and bipolar disorder, and the hypothesis that genes predisposing to these ... in genetic or clinical studies on depression or bipolar disorder, please contact 1-877-MOODS-JH Dr. Potash: ...

378

Higher Reported Levels of Depression, Stress, and Anxiety Are Associated with Increased Endorsement of ADHD Symptoms by Postsecondary Students  

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This study examined the extent to which postsecondary students endorse symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and whether experienced level of stress, depression, or anxiety are associated with higher reporting of ADHD symptoms. Students attending a combined health and counseling service completed the Conners Adult ADHD Rating…

Harrison, Allyson G.; Alexander, Sandra J.; Armstrong, Irene T.

2013-01-01

379

The Effect of Meditation on Self-Reported Measures of Stress, Anxiety, Depression, and Perfectionism in a College Population  

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The effects of meditation, specifically Transcendental Meditation (TM), on college students' experience of stress, anxiety, depression, and perfectionistic thoughts was investigated using 43 undergraduate students. Self-report measures of the variables were completed prior to the start of the study. Student groups were trained in TM and practiced…

Burns, Jaimie L.; Lee, Randolph M.; Brown, Lauren J.

2011-01-01

380

Do moods affect programmers’ debug performance?:  

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There is much research that shows people’s mood can affect their activities. This paper argues that this also applies to programmers, especially their debugging. Literature-based framework is presented linking programming with various cognitive activities as well as linking cognitive activities with moods. Further, the effect of mood on debugging was tested in two experiments. In the first experiment, programmers (n = 72) saw short movie clips selected for their ability to provoke specific ...

Khan, I. A.; Brinkman, W. P.; Hierons, R. M.

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

More creative through positive mood? Not everyone!  

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It is commonly assumed that positive mood improves human creativity and that the neurotransmitter dopamine might mediate this association. However, given the non-linear relation between dopamine and flexibility in divergent thinking (Akbari Chermahini and Hommel, 2010), the impact of mood on divergent kinds of creativity might depend on a given individual's tonic dopamine level. We tested this possibility in adults by assessing mood, performance in a divergent thinking task [the Alternate Use...

Akbari Chermahini, S.; Hommel, Bernhard

2012-01-01

382

Mood and the evaluation of leaders.  

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Research on the evaluation of leaders has shown that evaluation ratings are prone to several biases. The present study deals with one possible bias, namely, the relationship between mood and the perception or evaluation of a leader. The affect-as-information framework, which indicates that mood influences the response to certain kinds of questions, constitutes the theoretical background of the study. In the study, we ask students to indicate their mood, then to read a description of a leader ...

2003-01-01

383

URINARY MELATONIN IN DEPRESSION  

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This report is based on a study of 12 cases of depression (8 endogenous, 4 neurotic) with a view to explore the possible association between urinary melatonin and the illness prior to and following treatment. While cases of endogenous depression had low 24 hour as well as nocturnal urinary melatonin levels, the neurotic depressives showed higher than normal levels. A rise in the 24 hour melatonin levels occurred in all cases of endogenous depression though this did not apply, to the nocturnal...

Rao, A. Venkoba; Devi, S. Parvathi; Srinivasan, V.

1983-01-01

384

Emotional eating, depressive symptoms and self-reported food consumption. A population-based study.  

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We examined the associations of emotional eating and depressive symptoms with the consumption of sweet and non-sweet energy-dense foods and vegetables/fruit, also focusing on the possible interplay between emotional eating and depressive symptoms. The participants were 25-64-year-old Finnish men (n=1679) and women (n=2035) from the FINRISK 2007 Study (DILGOM substudy). The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R18, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and a 132-item Food Frequency Questionnaire were used. Emotional eating and depressive symptoms correlated positively (r=0.31 among men and women), and both were related to a higher body mass. Emotional eating was related to a higher consumption of sweet foods in both genders and non-sweet foods in men independently of depressive symptoms and restrained eating. The positive associations of depressive symptoms with sweet foods became non-significant after adjustment for emotional eating, but this was not the case for non-sweet foods. Depressive symptoms, but not emotional eating, were related to a lower consumption of vegetables/fruit. These findings suggest that emotional eating and depressive symptoms both affect unhealthy food choices. Emotional eating could be one factor explaining the association between depressive symptoms and consumption of sweet foods, while other factors may be more important with respect to non-sweet foods and vegetables/fruit. PMID:20138944

Konttinen, Hanna; Männistö, Satu; Sarlio-Lähteenkorva, Sirpa; Silventoinen, Karri; Haukkala, Ari

2010-06-01

385

More creative through positive mood? Not everyone!  

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It is commonly assumed that positive mood improves human creativity and that the neurotransmitter dopamine might mediate this association. However, given the non-linear relation between dopamine and flexibility in divergent thinking (Akbari Chermahini and Hommel, 2010), the impact of mood on divergent kinds of creativity might depend on a given individual's tonic dopamine level. We tested this possibility in adults by assessing mood, performance in a divergent thinking task [the Alternate Uses Task (AUT)], and eye blink rates (EBRs), a well-established clinical marker of the individual dopamine level, before and after positive mood or negative mood induction. As expected, the association between flexibility in divergent thinking performance and EBR followed an inverted U-shape function (with best performance for medium levels), positive mood induction raised EBRs and only individuals with below-median EBRs, but not those with above-median EBRs, benefited from positive mood. These observations provide support for dopamine-based approaches to the impact of mood on creativity and challenge the generality of the widely held view that positive mood facilitates creativity. PMID:23189050

Akbari Chermahini, S; Hommel, Bernhard

2012-01-01

386

More creative through positive mood? Not everyone!  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It is commonly assumed that positive mood improves human creativity and that the neurotransmitter dopamine might mediate this association. However, given the non-linear relation between dopamine and flexibility in divergent thinking (Akbari Chermahini & Hommel, 2010, the impact of mood on divergent kinds of creativity might depend on a given individual’s tonic dopamine level. We tested this possibility in adults by assessing mood, performance in a divergent-thinking task (the Alternate Uses Task, and eye-blink rates (EBRs, a well-established clinical marker of the individual dopamine level, before and after positive-mood or negative-mood induction. As expected, the association between flexibility in divergent-thinking performance and EBR followed an inverted U-shape function (with best performance for medium levels, positive mood induction raised EBRs and only individuals with below-median EBRs, but