WorldWideScience
 
 
1

Symptoms of depression as reported by Norwegian adolescents on the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study investigated sex-differences in reports of depressive symptoms on a Norwegian translation of the short version of the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ. The sample comprised 9702 Norwegian adolescents (born 1993 to 1995, 54.9\\% girls, mainly attending highschool. A set of statistical analyses were run to investigate the dimensionality of the SMFQ. Girls scored significantly higher than boys on the SMFQ and used the most severe response-category far more frequently. Overall, the statistical analyses supported the essential unidimensionality of SMFQ. However, the items with the highest loadings according to the bifactor analysis, reflecting problems related to tiredness, restlessness and concentration difficulties, indicated that some of the symptoms may both be independent of and part of the symptomatology of depression. Measurement invariance analysis showed that girls scored slightly higher on some items when taking the latent variable into account; girls had a lower threshold for reporting mood problems and problems related to tiredness than boys, who showed a marginally lower threshold for reporting that no-one loved them. However, the effect on the total SMFQ score was marginal, supporting the use of the Norwegian translation of SMFQ as a continuous variable in further studies of adolescents.

AstriJohansenLundervold

2013-09-01

2

State depression: Mood or syndrome?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A State Depression Scale was developed in order to register variations of depressive mood. The Scale has satisfactory reliability, as shown by its internal homogeneity and temporal stability. Concurrent validity of the Scale indicated that the Scale correlates with a POMS-D scale (r = 0.41; p < 0.00, and with the Depressive Personality Scale (r = 0.36; p < 0.00. Divergent validity of the Scale was tested by Scale's correlation with the two measures of state anxiety (STAI-S and POMS-A and was shown to be unsatisfactory since it was as high as the Scale's correlation with scales of depressive affect. Principal Component Analysis extracted four factors: two broader factors, which included depressive-affective contents combined with anxious and depressive-cognitive symptoms, respectively; and another two factors which related to motivational and behavioral characteristics. Sensitivity of the Scale was tested in an experimental setting involving induction of depressive and euphoric mood. The Scale showed high ability to register changes following induction of depressive mood. .

Novovi? Zdenka

2007-01-01

3

Social support and depressed mood in isolated and confined environments  

Science.gov (United States)

The influence of isolation and confinement on social support and depressed mood was examined in a study of 235 men and women who spent a year at McMurdo Station in Antarctica, and a study of 77 men and women who spent a year at the Amundson-Scott South Pole Station. Although availability of support remained unchanged, there was a significant decrease in reported satisfaction with support obtained, as well as a significant increase in depressed mood. Satisfaction with support was inversely associated with depressed mood at the beginning and end of isolation and confinement. At the end of winter, this association varied by source of support. High levels of tension-anxiety, depression and anger preceded an increase in advice seeking, but high levels of advice seeking also preceded an increase in tension-anxiety and depression. Results suggest a significant erosion of social support under conditions of prolonged isolation and confinement, leading to an increase in depressed mood.

Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Johnson, Jeffrey C.; Boster, James S.

2004-05-01

4

Influences of mood variability, negative moods, and depression on adolescent cigarette smoking.  

Science.gov (United States)

Understanding the emotional risk factors for cigarette smoking in adolescence can greatly inform prevention efforts. The current study examined prospective relationships between 3 affective dimensions--negative mood variability, overall negative mood, and depression---affect-related smoking motives, and future smoking patterns among adolescents. The current study expands on prior research by using real-time methods to assess mood and by focusing on a key developmental transition in smoking behavior: the progression from experimentation or low level, infrequent use to higher use. Ninth- and 10th-grade students (N = 461; 55% girls) provided data on cigarette use at a baseline and follow-up 15-month wave, and also provided ecological momentary assessments of negative moods via palmtop computers for 1 week at each wave. Negative mood was examined via the means of negative mood reports at each wave, and mood variability was examined via the intraindividual standard deviations of negative mood reports at each wave. Depressive symptoms and smoking motives were also assessed. Findings supported a complex self-medication model of smoking escalation in adolescence whereby mood-smoking relationships differed by affect dimension and gender. For girls, greater negative mood variability at baseline significantly predicted rapid escalation in smoking over time, whereas depressive symptoms and overall negative mood were unrelated to girls' smoking patterns. In contrast, overall negative mood significantly predicted boys' smoking escalation among those with affect-related motives for smoking. Results thus suggest that inconsistent mood-smoking relations in past work may be driven by the complex interrelationships among affect vulnerabilities, gender, and smoking patterns. PMID:23438244

Weinstein, Sally M; Mermelstein, Robin J

2013-12-01

5

Short Sleep as an Environmental Exposure: A Preliminary Study Associating 5-HTTLPR Genotype to Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Depressed Mood in First-Year University Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives: This study examined whether the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in the SLC6A4 gene is associated with self-reported symptoms of depressed mood in first-year university students with a persistent pattern of short sleep. Design: Students provided DNA samples and completed on-line sleep diaries and a mood scale during the first semester. A priori phenotypes for nocturnal sleep and mood scores were compared for the distribution of genotypes. Setting: Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. Participants: A sample of 135 first-year students, 54 male, 71 Caucasian, mean age 18.1 (± 0.5) yr. Interventions: None. Measurements: Students completed on-line sleep diaries daily across the first term (21-64 days; mean = 51 days ± 11) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) mood scale after 8 wk. DNA was genotyped for the triallelic 5-HTTLPR polymorphism. Low-expressing S and LGpolymorphisms were designated S?, and high-expressing LA was designated L?. Phenotype groups were identified from a combination of CES-D (median split: high > 12; low < 13) and mean nocturnal total sleep time (TST) from diaries: (shorter ? 7 hr; longer ? 7.5 hr). Three genotypes were identified (S?S?, S?L?, L?L?); the S?S? genotype was present in a higher proportion of Asian than non-Asian students. Results: Four phenotype groups were compared: 40 students with shorter TST/high CES-D; 34 with shorter TST/low CES-D; 29 with longer TST/high CES-D; 32 with longer TST/low CES-D. Female:male distribution did not vary across phenotype groups (chi-square = 1.39; df = 3; P = 0.71). S?S? participants (n = 23) were overrepresented in the shorter TST/high CES-D group (chi- square = 15.04; df = 6; P < 0.02). This association was sustained after removing participants with preexisting evidence of depressed mood (chi-square = 12.90; df = 6; P = 0.045). Conclusion: These data indicate that young adults who reported shorter nocturnal sleep and higher depressed mood are more likely than others to carry a variant of the SLC6A4 gene associated with low expression of the serotonin transporter. Citation: Carskadon MA; Sharkey KM; Knopik VS; McGeary JE. Short sleep as an environmental exposure: a preliminary study associating 5-HTTLPR genotype to self-reported sleep duration and depressed mood in first-year university students. SLEEP 2012;35(6):791-796. PMID:22654198

Carskadon, Mary A.; Sharkey, Katherine M.; Knopik, Valerie S.; McGeary, John E.

2012-01-01

6

Smoking Is Associated with, but Does Not Cause, Depressed Mood in Pregnancy - A Mendelian Randomization Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Smokers have a higher prevalence of major depressive episodes and depressive symptoms than the general population, but whether this association is causal, or is due to confounding or reverse causation is uncertain because of the problems inherent in some epidemiological studies. Mendelian randomization, in which a genetic variant is used as a surrogate for measuring exposure, is an approach which may be used to better understand this association. We investigated the rs1051730 single nucleotide polymorphism in the nicotine acetylcholine receptor gene cluster (CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4), associated with smoking phenotypes, to determine whether women who continued to smoke were also more likely to report a low mood during pregnancy. We found among women who smoked pre-pregnancy, those with the 1051730 T allele smoked more and were less likely to quit smoking during pregnancy, but were also less likely to report high levels of depressed mood at 18 weeks of pregnancy (per allele OR?=?0.84, 95%CI 0.72 to 0.99, p?=?0.034). The association between genotype and depressed mood was limited to women who were smokers prior to pregnancy, with weak evidence of an interaction between smoking status and genotype (p?=?0.07). Our results do not support a causal role of smoking on depressed mood, but are consistent with a self-medication hypothesis, whereby smoking is used to alleviate symptoms of depression. A replication study using multiple genetic variants which influence smoking via different pathways is required to confirm these findings and provide evidence that the genetic variant is reflecting the effect of quitting smoking on depressed mood, and is not directly affecting mood. PMID:21818261

Lewis, Sarah J.; Araya, Ricardo; Davey Smith, George; Freathy, Rachel; Gunnell, David; Palmer, Tom; Munafo, Marcus

2011-01-01

7

Cyberbullying Victimisation in Adolescence: Relationships with Loneliness and Depressive Mood  

Science.gov (United States)

Cyberbullying is deliberate, aggressive activity carried out through digital means. Cybervictimisation in adolescence may be related to negative psychosocial variables such as loneliness and depressive mood. The purpose of the present study, the first of its kind in Israel, was to examine the association between adolescent cybervictimisation and…

Olenik-Shemesh, Dorit; Heiman, Tali; Eden, Sigal

2012-01-01

8

Depressed mood in pregnancy: Prevalence and correlates in two Cape Town peri-urban settlements  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The disability associated with depression and its impact on maternal and child health has important implications for public health policy. While the prevalence of postnatal depression is high, there are no prevalence data on antenatal depression in South Africa. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of depressed mood in pregnancy in Cape Town peri-urban settlements. Methods This study reports on baseline data collected from the Philani Mentor Mothers Project (PMMP, a community-based, cluster-randomized controlled trial on the outskirts of Cape Town, South Africa. The PMMP aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based intervention for preventing and managing illnesses related to HIV, TB, alcohol use and malnutrition in pregnant mothers and their infants. Participants were 1062 pregnant women from Khayelitsha and Mfuleni, Cape Town. Measures included the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS, the Derived AUDIT-C, indices for social support with regards to partner and parents, and questions concerning socio-demographics, intimate partner violence, and the current pregnancy. Data were analysed using bivariate analyses followed by logistic regression. Results Depressed mood in pregnancy was reported by 39% of mothers. The strongest predictors of depressed mood were lack of partner support, intimate partner violence, having a household income below R2000 per month, and younger age. Conclusions The high prevalence of depressed mood in pregnancy necessitates early screening and intervention in primary health care and antenatal settings for depression. The effectiveness and scalability of community-based interventions for maternal depression must be developed for pregnant women in peri-urban settlements. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00972699.

le Roux Ingrid

2011-05-01

9

Adolescent Perceptions of Parental Behaviors, Adolescent Self-Esteem, and Adolescent Depressed Mood  

Science.gov (United States)

Using symbolic interaction, we developed a research model that proposed adolescent perceptions of parental support and psychological control would be related to adolescent depressed mood directly and indirectly through self-esteem. We tested the model using self-report questionnaire data from 161 adolescents living with both of their biological…

Plunkett, Scott W.; Henry, Carolyn S.; Robinson, Linda C.; Behnke, Andrew; Falcon, Pedro C., III

2007-01-01

10

Diathesis-Stress and Depressed Mood among Adults with Mental Retardation  

Science.gov (United States)

The impact of diatheses, stress, and their interaction on depressed mood was evaluated to determine the appropriateness of cognitive diathesis-stress models of depression for adults with mental retardation. We also tested hopelessness as a mediator in the prediction of depressed mood to evaluate the hopelessness theory of depression. Seventy-three…

Esbensen, Anna J.; Benson, Betsey A.

2006-01-01

11

Risk Factors Linking Maternal Depressed Mood to Growth in Adolescent Substance Use  

Science.gov (United States)

Maternal depression has been implicated in the development of adolescent substance use. Conceptualizing depression as a continuum, the aims of this study are to (a) understand the relationship between maternal depressed mood and risk factors associated with adolescent substance use; (b) understand the relationship between maternal depressed mood

Cortes, Rebecca C.; Fleming, Charles B.; Mason, W. Alex; Catalano, Richard F.

2009-01-01

12

The pitch of maternal voice : a comparison of mothers suffering from depressed mood and non-depressed mothers reading books to their infants.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: Research suggests that storybook reading promotes language development and that there is a relationship between maternal affective responses in relation to infant affect and language development. The purpose of this study is to relate maternal paralinguistic and verbal behaviour during storybook reading to maternal mood state. Method: Mothers (n=32) reporting depressed mood (as measured by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) were matched on age of baby (mean age = 6 mont...

Reissland, N.; Shepherd, J.; Herrera, E.

2003-01-01

13

The effects of cognitive-behavioural therapy on mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background A mood-related ruminative response style increases the risk of onset and persistence of depression. This preliminary study investigated whether, in depressed adolescents, cognitive-behaviour therapy reduces mood-related ruminative response style. Whether specific factors within the rumination scale were differentially affected by CBT is also reported. Methods 26 depressed adolescents were randomised to receiving serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRI plus psychosocial treatment as usual or SSRI and psychosocial treatment as usual plus CBT. Ruminative response style and depressive symptoms were measured at baseline and after 30 weeks of treatment, with the Responses to Depression Questionnaire and Mood and Feelings Questionnaire. Results There were significantly greater reductions in ruminations in the CBT group compared to the non-CBT group (p = .002. There was no significant difference in the reduction in self-reported depressive symptoms between the groups. Rumination was reduced to levels of never-depressed controls in adolescents who had recovered from depression and received CBT. There were greater falls in the CBT group in the more pathological 'brooding' factor of rumination. Conclusion These findings suggest that adding CBT to SSRI medication in the presence of active clinical care causes a greater reduction in mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents. This may reduce the risk of future relapse. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCNT83809224.

Goodyer Ian M

2008-01-01

14

Adolescents in Primary Care with Sub-Threshold Depressed Mood Screened for Participation in a Depression Prevention Study: Co-Morbidity and Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose Adolescents in primary care with sub-threshold depression symptoms may be candidates for early intervention to prevent onset of full major depressive disorder. Little is known about this population. Method We screened consecutive adolescents (ages 14–21) in 13 primary care sites for presence of depression symptoms for “at least a few days” or “nearly every day” in the last two weeks for possible enrollment in a primary care/Internet-based depression prevention intervention (CATCH-IT). We report illness severity, prevalence of self-harm ideation, prevalence correlates (automatic negative thoughts, generalized self-efficacy, perceived social support from family and friends) and co-occurring symptoms of other mental disorders with depressed mood. Results Twenty-one percent (N=293) of those screened reported a core symptom of depressive disorder of which 83 enrolled in the study and were analyzed. The sample was 40% ethnic minority with a mean zip code household income of $40,249 (SD=$14,500). Reporting at least one symptom of another mental disorder was common for anxiety (48%, N=40), substance abuse (31%, N=15), conduct disorder (71%, N=53), as were self-harm ideation (16%, N=12) and reporting school impairment (100%, N=83). Prevalence correlates for current depressive symptoms included low self-efficacy, automatic negative thoughts, perceived low peer acceptance, and school impairment. Conclusions Adolescents with sub-threshold depressed mood have frequent co-morbid symptoms that may need to be considered in developing prevention interventions. Early intervention targets to reduce depressed mood include pessimistic thinking, low self-efficacy, low peer acceptance, and school impairment. PMID:23795221

Van Voorhees, Benjamin W.; Melkonian, Stephanie; Marko, Monika; Humensky, Jennifer; Fogel, Joshua

2013-01-01

15

The Association of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels with Cognitive Function and Depressed Mood  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective To evaluate the association of thyroid stimulating hormone levels with cognitive function and depressed mood in a community-based sample. Design Cross-sectional study Setting Clinic visit in 1999-2003 Participants Community-dwelling men (N=447) and women (N=663) aged 42-99 years Measurement Cognitive function was assessed with the Buschke-Fuld Selective Reminding Test, the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination, Trails B, and category fluency. Depressed mood was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A fasting blood sample was obtained for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) measurement. Results Mean age was 73.6±10.0 in men and 74.3±10.4 in women. Mean TSH was 1.9 ?IU/ml in both sexes; 9.0% of men and 24% of women reported thyroid medication use. Mean BDI scores were 4.6±4.1 in men and 5.2±4.3 in women; 9% of men and 11% of women used antidepressants. Before and after adjustment for covariates or exclusion of participants taking thyroid hormones, no associations were observed between TSH and cognitive function (ps>0.10). TSH was inversely associated with BDI (p=0.03) in men, but not women. Conclusions Thyroid stimulating hormone level was unrelated to cognitive function in men and women, and was inversely associated with depressed mood in men only, possibly reflecting the greater use of both thyroid medications and antidepressants by women. PMID:19300866

Kritz-Silverstein, Donna; Schultz, Stephen T.; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Wingard, Deborah L.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

2009-01-01

16

Latent Classes of Symptoms related to Clinically Depressed Mood in Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD), according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, is based only on adult symptomatology of depression and not adapted for age and gender. This may contribute to the low diagnostic specificity and validity of adolescent MDD. In this study, we investigated whether latent classes based on symptoms associated with depressed mood could be identified in a sample of adolescents seeking psychiatric care, regardless of traditionally defined diagnostic categories. Methods Self-reports of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Development and Well-Being Assessment were collected consecutively from all new patients between the ages of 13 and 17 years at two psychiatric outpatient clinics in Stockholm, Sweden. Those who reported depressed mood at intake yielded a sample of 21 boys and 156 girls. Latent class analyses were performed for all screening items and for the depression-specific items of the Development and Well-Being Assessment. Results The symptoms that were reported in association with depressed mood differentiated the adolescents into two classes. One class had moderate emotional severity scores on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and mainly symptoms that were congruent with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for MDD. The other class had higher emotional severity scores and similar symptoms to those reported in the first class. However, in addition, this group demonstrated more diverse symptomatology, including vegetative symptoms, suicidal ideation, anxiety, conduct problems, body dysmorphic symptoms, and deliberate vomiting. The classes predicted functional impairment in that the members of the second class showed more functional impairment. Limitations The relatively small sample size limited the generalizability of the results of this study, and the amount of items included in the analysis was restricted by the rules of latent class analysis. No conclusions about gender differences between the classes could be could be drawn as a result of the low number of boys included in the study. Conclusions Two distinct classes were identified among adolescents with depressed mood. The class with highest emotional symptom severity score and the most functional impairment had a more diverse symptomatology that included symptoms that were not congruent with the traditional diagnostic criteria of MDD. However, this additional symptomatology is clinically important to consider. As a result, the clinical usefulness of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders during the diagnostic process of adolescent depression is questioned.

Blom, Eva Henje; Forsman, Mats; Yang, Tony T.; Serlachius, Eva; Larsson, Jan-Olov

2014-01-01

17

Inhibitory Control Mediates the Relationship between Depressed Mood and Overgeneral Memory Recall in Children  

Science.gov (United States)

It has been well established that depressed mood is related to overgeneral memory recall (OGM), which refers to a relative difficulty in retrieving specific information from one's autobiographical memory (AM). The present study examined whether OGM is also related to depressed mood in children and whether lack of inhibitory control mediates this…

Raes, Filip; Verstraeten, Katrien; Bijttebier, Patricia; Vasey, Michael W.; Dalgleish, Tim

2010-01-01

18

Depression Moderates Smoking Behavior in Response to a Sad Mood Induction  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Previous laboratory research suggests that stress and anxiety increase smoking motivation and are attenuated by smoking. There is little experimental data, however, on the relationship between depressed or sad mood and smoking. This study investigated if induced sadness would have a differential effect on smoking behavior compared to a neutral mood state. Baseline depression scores were examined as a potential moderator of this relationship. Mood changes were also tested as a potential mediat...

Fucito, Lisa M.; Juliano, Laura M.

2009-01-01

19

Smoking is associated with, but does not cause, depressed mood in pregnancy--a mendelian randomization study.  

Science.gov (United States)

Smokers have a higher prevalence of major depressive episodes and depressive symptoms than the general population, but whether this association is causal, or is due to confounding or reverse causation is uncertain because of the problems inherent in some epidemiological studies. Mendelian randomization, in which a genetic variant is used as a surrogate for measuring exposure, is an approach which may be used to better understand this association. We investigated the rs1051730 single nucleotide polymorphism in the nicotine acetylcholine receptor gene cluster (CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4), associated with smoking phenotypes, to determine whether women who continued to smoke were also more likely to report a low mood during pregnancy. We found among women who smoked pre-pregnancy, those with the 1051730 T allele smoked more and were less likely to quit smoking during pregnancy, but were also less likely to report high levels of depressed mood at 18 weeks of pregnancy (per allele OR?=?0.84, 95%CI 0.72 to 0.99, p?=?0.034). The association between genotype and depressed mood was limited to women who were smokers prior to pregnancy, with weak evidence of an interaction between smoking status and genotype (p?=?0.07). Our results do not support a causal role of smoking on depressed mood, but are consistent with a self-medication hypothesis, whereby smoking is used to alleviate symptoms of depression. A replication study using multiple genetic variants which influence smoking via different pathways is required to confirm these findings and provide evidence that the genetic variant is reflecting the effect of quitting smoking on depressed mood, and is not directly affecting mood. PMID:21818261

Lewis, Sarah J; Araya, Ricardo; Smith, George Davey; Freathy, Rachel; Gunnell, David; Palmer, Tom; Munafò, Marcus

2011-01-01

20

Clinical Comparison Between Adjustment Disorder with Depressive Mood and Major Depressive Disorder  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare patients with major depressive disorder (MDD following a life event to those suffering from adjustment disorder (AD with depressed mood in terms of clinical features, nature of precipitating stress factors, and functioning. Met­hods: In this study, we included 32 individuals diagnosed as AD with depressed mood, 22 individuals diagnosed as MDD following a life event, and a control group of 30 individuals without any psychological or physical illness. The participants completed the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS, Hamilton Depression Scale (HDS, Rahe-Holmes Social Readjustment Rating Scale, Life Experiences Survey (LES, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF Scale and the Social Functioning Scale (SFS. Both patient groups have been evaluated prospectively for six months. The data were analyzed using Spearman’s rank correlation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance, chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests.Re­sults: The symptom profile of patients diagnosed as having AD with depressed mood was found to be similar to that of subjects with MDD. However, the patients suffering from AD with depressed mood had higher scores on HAS and HDS as compared to the individuals with MDD and, the functioning levels were lower in the MDD group than in the AD group. The severity of life event was related to the severity of psychopathology in the AD group, but this was not the case for the MD group. Conc­lu­si­on: Clinically, AD is quite similar to MDD. AD, a disorder related to life event, is less severe disorder than MDD in terms of symptom profile. At the same time, AD patients demonstrate higher level of functioning than MDD patients. The relationship between MDD and AD should be investigated with larger sample size and long prospective studies. (Arc­hi­ves of Neu­ropsy­chi­atry 2012; 49: 20-8

Gülcan Güleç

2012-03-01

 
 
 
 
21

Impact of Nicotine Replacement Therapy on Post-Cessation Mood Profile by Pre-Cessation Depressive Symptoms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract We evaluated the effects of Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT on the Profile of Mood States (POMS, testing whether pre-cessation depressive symptoms modify NRT's effects on POMS. Out of 608 smokers attempting to quit with NRT, this secondary analysis included 242 participants abstinent for at least two weeks. We measured pre-cessation depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. At 1, 7, and 14 post-cessation days we examined 6 self-reported POMS, i.e. feeling 'anxious', 'sad', 'confused', 'angry', 'energetic' and 'fatigue'. The results of the ANCOVA models suggested no NRT effects on feeling anxious, energetic or fatigue. We found that pre-cessation depression modified NRT effects in some specific mood states, such as depression by NRT- interaction effects on feeling confused and feeling angry. On average, the depressed participants in the placebo groups had the highest symptom scores. However, those depressed in NRT conditions did not have significantly higher symptom scores compared to the non-depressed groups. In treating those negative moods NRT may be particularly important for persons with depressive symptoms before cessation.

Kinnunen Taru H

2006-08-01

22

Cognitive reactivity to sad mood: The importance of the first depressive episode  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Cognitive reactivity to sad mood refers to the degree to which a mild dysphoric state reactivates negative thinking patterns. In this research, the contribution of the history of depression, the length of the current depressive episode and the intensity of the depressive symptoms were assessed in explaining the cognitive reactivity to sad mood measured with the Leiden Index of Depression Sensitivity (LEIDS. The sample consisted of 123 depressed outpatients. The results of principal components analysis suggested a three-factor solution of the LEIDS. The intensity of depressive symptoms, the history of depression and the length of the current depressive episode were all significant in explaining cognitive reactivity to sad mood. We have also found out a significant effect of interaction of the history of depression and the length of the current depressive episode, which demonstrated that a prolonged depression does not induce a stronger cognitive reactivity to sad mood during the relapse of a depressive episode, while during the first depressive episode a longer duration of depression does induce a stronger cognitive reactivity. Such a result demonstrates that the length of the first depressive episode, regardless of its intensity, is crucially important for the formation of cognitive reactivity.

Mari? Zorica

2010-01-01

23

Autobiographical Memory in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The role of Depressed Mood, Rumination, Working Memory and Theory of Mind  

Science.gov (United States)

Autobiographical memory difficulties have been widely reported in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of the current study was to explore the potential correlates of autobiographical memory performance (including depressed mood, rumination, working memory and theory of mind) in adults with ASD, relative to a group of typical adults…

Crane, Laura; Goddard, Lorna; Pring, Linda

2013-01-01

24

Do diabetes and depressed mood affect associations between obesity and quality of life in postmenopause? Results of the KORA-F3 Augsburg population study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess associations of obesity with health-related quality of life (HRQL in postmenopausal women, and whether depressed mood and diabetes moderate these associations. Methods Survey of 983 postmenopausal women aged 35-74, general population, Augsburg region/Germany, 2004/2005. Body weight/height and waist/hip circumference were assessed anthropometrically and classified via BMI ? 30 as obese, and WHR ? 0.85 as abdominally obese (vs. not. Depressed mood was assessed by the Depression and Exhaustion-(DEEX-scale, diabetes and postmenopausal status by self-report/medication, and HRQL by the SF-12. Results General linear models revealed negative associations of obesity and abdominal obesity with physical but not mental HRQL. Both forms of excess weight were associated with diabetes but not depressed mood. Moderation depended on the HRQL-domain in question. In non-diabetic women, depressed mood was found to amplify obesity-associated impairment in physical HRQL (mean "obese"-"non-obese" difference given depressed mood: -6.4, p Conclusions In postmenopausal women, depressed mood may amplify the negative impact of obesity on physical HRQL, while diabetes may be a precondition for some degree of obesity-related impairments in mental HRQL.

Heidelberg Daniela A

2011-11-01

25

Comparing the effectiveness of mood stabilizers and antidepressants for bipolar depression treatment: a retrospective chart review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of antidepressants on recovery in bipolar depression. Method: The most recent depressive episode of patients with DSM-IV Bipolar Disorder, recruited from a specialized mood disorder outpatient unit in Turkey, were evaluated retrospectively. Thirty-four patients, only received mood stabilizer titration or did not change their current treatment regimens and thirty patients, treated with an antidepressant agent were compared on rates of recurrence and time to remission. Results: One third of patients in each group were taking at least one mood stabilizer during their depressive episodes. Mood stabilizer levels were similar in each group and were within therapeutic limits. There were no significant differences between groups on rates of recurrence or time to remission. Conclusions: In this preliminary retrospective study, patients with bipolar depression who were treated with antidepressants did not have a better outcome than patients who received no antidepressants.

Nickholas Craddock

2010-01-01

26

Mood Symptoms, Cognition, and Everyday Functioning: in Major Depression, Bipolar Disorder, and Schizophrenia  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

People with depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia manifest considerable cognitive deficits and impairments in everyday functional outcomes. The severity of current mood symptoms is associated with the severity of cognitive deficits in people with unipolar and bipolar disorder, but impairments are clearly still present in cases with minimal current mood symptoms. In people with schizophrenia, depression is less strongly associated with cognitive deficits on a cross-sectional basis, a...

Harvey, Philip D.

2011-01-01

27

Changes in catastrophizing and depressed mood during and after early cognitive behaviorally oriented interventions for pain.  

Science.gov (United States)

Catastrophizing and depressed mood are risk factors for poor outcome in treatments for pain and appear to act as mediators for favorable outcome. However, little is known about how catastrophizing and depressed mood co-occur within individuals and how these patterns change during treatment, which is the focus of the current study. The study uses data from a randomized controlled trial about early cognitive behaviorally oriented interventions for patients with nonspecific spinal pain (N = 84). Cluster analyses were used to extract subgroups of individuals with similar scoring patterns on catastrophizing and depressed mood at pretreatment, mid-treatment, posttreatment, and at 6 months' follow-up. To track individual progress, the clusters were linked over time. The analyses revealed four clusters: "low depression and catastrophizing", "high depression and catastrophizing", "high depression", and "high catastrophizing". There was little individual transition from one scoring pattern to another across time, not at least for those scoring high on both depressed mood and catastrophizing. Moreover, high stability within this cluster was related to low levels of psychological flexibility at baseline. It is concluded that catastrophizing and depressed mood at the start of treatment were likely to remain high despite a cognitive behavioral intervention and that a lack of psychological flexibility may have a role. PMID:25268910

Flink, Ida K; Boersma, Katja; Linton, Steven J

2014-12-01

28

Mood and the market: can press reports of investors' mood predict stock prices?  

Science.gov (United States)

We examined whether press reports on the collective mood of investors can predict changes in stock prices. We collected data on the use of emotion words in newspaper reports on traders' affect, coded these emotion words according to their location on an affective circumplex in terms of pleasantness and activation level, and created indices of collective mood for each trading day. Then, by using time series analyses, we examined whether these mood indices, depicting investors' emotion on a given trading day, could predict the next day's opening price of the stock market. The strongest findings showed that activated pleasant mood predicted increases in NASDAQ prices, while activated unpleasant mood predicted decreases in NASDAQ prices. We conclude that both valence and activation levels of collective mood are important in predicting trend continuation in stock prices. PMID:24015202

Cohen-Charash, Yochi; Scherbaum, Charles A; Kammeyer-Mueller, John D; Staw, Barry M

2013-01-01

29

Sensorimotor modulation of mood and depression: In search of an optimal mode of stimulation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Depression involves a dysfunction in an affective fronto-limbic circuitry including the prefrontal cortices, several limbic structures including the cingulate cortex, the amygdala and the hippocampus as well as the basal ganglia. A major emphasis of research on the etiology and treatment of mood disorders has been to assess the impact of centrally generated (top-down processes impacting the affective fronto-limbic circuitry. The present review shows that peripheral (bottom-up unipolar stimulation via the visual and the auditory modalities as well as by physical exercise modulates mood and depressive symptoms in humans and animals and activates the same central affective neurocircuitry involved in depression. It is proposed that the amygdala serves as a gateway by articulating the mood regulatory sensorimotor stimulation with the central affective circuitry by emotionally labeling and mediating the storage of such emotional events in long-term memory. Since both amelioration and aggravation of mood is shown to be possible by unipolar stimulation, the review suggests that a psychophysical assessment of mood modulation by multi-modal stimulation may uncover mood ameliorative synergisms and serve as adjunctive treatment for depression. Thus, the integrative review not only emphasizes the relevance of investigating the optimal levels of mood regulatory sensorimotor stimulation, but also provides a conceptual springboard for related future research.

RESITCANBEYLI

2013-07-01

30

Mood Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

... say they're in a bad mood. A mood disorder is different. It affects a person's everyday emotional ... in ten people aged 18 and older have mood disorders. These include depression and bipolar disorder (also called ...

31

Screening for Depressive Disorders Using the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire Anhedonic Depression Scale: A Receiver-Operating Characteristic Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study examined the utility of the anhedonic depression scale from the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ-AD scale) as a way to screen for depressive disorders. Using receiver-operating characteristic analysis, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of the full 22-item MASQ-AD scale, as well as the 8- and 14-item…

Bredemeier, Keith; Spielberg, Jeffery M.; Silton, Rebecca Levin; Berenbaum, Howard; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

2010-01-01

32

The effect of acculturation on depressive moods: immigrant boys and girls during their transition from late adolescence to early adulthood.  

Science.gov (United States)

Using data (N = 773) from a longitudinal study of former Soviet Union immigrants to Israel, this study aimed to identify the psychosocial correlates of depressive mood among immigrant adolescents and differences by age and gender. OLS regression results suggest acculturative and social factors as useful variables in predicting depression. Adolescents with a high probability of assimilating (simultaneous strengthening of Israeli identity and weakening of Russian identity) proved more likely to report low levels of depression. Consistent with the literature, girls were more depressed than boys and age was positively related to depressive moods. As expected, different factors explain the psychological well-being of adolescents of different age groups and sex: in boys, depression was found mainly related to acculturation difficulties; in girls it was related more to their social support. As for age, more independent variables were statistically significant in accounting for depression in the older than in the younger group, which suggests that depression is age-related. The study results should be understood in connection with socialization processes to sex roles and the impact immigration has on this process. PMID:22023498

Turjeman, Hagit; Mesch, Gustavo; Fishman, Gideon

2008-02-01

33

Links between Antisocial Behavior and Depressed Mood: The Role of Life Events and Attributional Style  

Science.gov (United States)

Comorbidity between antisocial behavior and depression in adolescence is widely recognized. This paper examines whether links with depressed mood differ among three subtypes of antisocial behavior: oppositionality, physical aggression and delinquency. In addition we examine two possible contributors to these links: negative life events that are…

Rowe, Richard; Maughan, Barbara; Eley, Thalia C.

2006-01-01

34

About Mood Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

About Mood Disorders Marked by changes in mood, depression and bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression) are both highly ... to take a free & confidential screening for mania. Mood Disorders Are Treatable The majority of people with mood ...

35

The role of dysfunctional attitudes in depressive mood and the mediation effect of "hot" evaluative cognitions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Previous research has found dysfunctional attitudes to be elevated in persons with elevated depressed mood, and a facet of dysfunctional attitudes referred to as Approval by Others has been a significant predictor of severity of depressed mood. The present study evaluated relations between Approval by Others and depression and examined the role of dysfunctional evaluative cognitions over life problems and hassles as a mediator of this relationship among 100 undergraduates. Approval By Others facet was found to be a significant predictor of severity of depressed mood. However, further analysis provided strong evidence that the effect of this dysfunctional attitudes facet is mediated by evaluative cognitions over life problems and hassles. Results are discussed in the context of previous research and cognitive behavioural therapy practice.

Mari? Zorica

2003-01-01

36

Trauma exposure interacts with impulsivity in predicting emotion regulation and depressive mood  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Traumatic exposure may modulate the expression of impulsive behavioral dispositions and change the implementation of emotion regulation strategies associated with depressive mood. Past studies resulted in only limited comprehension of these relationships, especially because they failed to consider impulsivity as a multifactorial construct. Objective Based on Whiteside and Lynam's multidimensional model that identifies four distinct dispositional facets of impulsive-like behaviors, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking (UPPS), the current study used a sample of community volunteers to investigate whether an interaction exists between impulsivity facets and lifetime trauma exposure in predicting cognitive emotion regulation and depressive mood. Methods Ninety-three adults completed questionnaires measuring lifetime trauma exposure, impulsivity, cognitive emotion regulation, and depressive mood. Results Results showed that trauma-exposed participants with a strong disposition toward urgency (predisposition to act rashly in intense emotional contexts) tended to use fewer appropriate cognitive emotion regulation strategies than other individuals. Unexpectedly, participants lacking in perseverance (predisposition to have difficulties concentrating on demanding tasks) used more appropriate emotion regulation strategies if they had experienced traumatic events during their life than if they had not. Emotion regulation mediated the path between these two impulsivity facets and depressive mood. Conclusions Together, these findings suggest that impulsivity has a differential impact on emotion regulation and depressive mood depending on lifetime exposure to environmental factors, especially traumatic events. PMID:25317255

Ceschi, Grazia; Billieux, Joël; Hearn, Melissa; Fürst, Guillaume; Van der Linden, Martial

2014-01-01

37

Trauma exposure interacts with impulsivity in predicting emotion regulation and depressive mood  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Traumatic exposure may modulate the expression of impulsive behavioral dispositions and change the implementation of emotion regulation strategies associated with depressive mood. Past studies resulted in only limited comprehension of these relationships, especially because they failed to consider impulsivity as a multifactorial construct. Objective: Based on Whiteside and Lynam's multidimensional model that identifies four distinct dispositional facets of impulsive-like behaviors, namely urgency, (lack of premeditation, (lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking (UPPS, the current study used a sample of community volunteers to investigate whether an interaction exists between impulsivity facets and lifetime trauma exposure in predicting cognitive emotion regulation and depressive mood. Methods: Ninety-three adults completed questionnaires measuring lifetime trauma exposure, impulsivity, cognitive emotion regulation, and depressive mood. Results: Results showed that trauma-exposed participants with a strong disposition toward urgency (predisposition to act rashly in intense emotional contexts tended to use fewer appropriate cognitive emotion regulation strategies than other individuals. Unexpectedly, participants lacking in perseverance (predisposition to have difficulties concentrating on demanding tasks used more appropriate emotion regulation strategies if they had experienced traumatic events during their life than if they had not. Emotion regulation mediated the path between these two impulsivity facets and depressive mood. Conclusions: Together, these findings suggest that impulsivity has a differential impact on emotion regulation and depressive mood depending on lifetime exposure to environmental factors, especially traumatic events.

Grazia Ceschi

2014-09-01

38

Combining an SSRI with an anticonvulsant in depressed patients with dysphoric mood: an open study  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Several patients with unipolar depression present with prominent dysphoric mood. We aimed at examining the effectiveness of the combination of an SSRI with an anticonvulsant in such patients. Methods Thirty-five newly admitted outpatients with substantial anger, irritability, aggressiveness or hostility who were diagnosed a DSM-IV unipolar depressive disorder were rated on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), the Clinical Global Impro...

Cascavilla Isabella; Morosini Pierluigi; Tarsitani Lorenzo; Orlandi Valerio; Speca Azzurra; Picardi Angelo; Pasquini Massimo; Biondi Massimo

2007-01-01

39

Correlations of depression and total mood disturbance with physical activity and self-concept in preadolescents enrolled in an after-school exercise program.  

Science.gov (United States)

This preliminary investigation estimated relationships of depression and negative mood with physical activity and self-concept in 9- to 12-yr.-old boys and girls (n=49) enrolled in an after-school exercise program for 12 wk. Multiple regression analyses indicated that a significant portion of the variance in scores on the Profile of Mood States subscales, Depression (R2=.55, F=28.00, pSelf-description Questionnaire-I-General Self scores into the equation. A significant reduction on Depression within the treatment group and significantly greater reductions on Depression and Total Mood Disturbance for the treatment group compared to a no-exercise program control (n=41) was also found. Effect sizes (ds=.35 to .53) were somewhat lower than reported for most adult samples. Findings supported social cognitive and self-efficacy theory and an association between physical activity and improved mental health in preadolescents. PMID:16173355

Annesi, James J

2005-06-01

40

Longitudinal characterization of depression and mood states beginning in primary HIV infection.  

Science.gov (United States)

Though depression is known to frequently afflict those with chronic HIV, mood during the early course of HIV is not well characterized. In a prospective study we assessed mood during primary HIV infection [primary HIV infection (PHI), <1 year duration], its association with neuropsychological performance and markers of neurological disease, and its longitudinal course including effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Profile of Mood States (POMS) subscales were longitudinally administered prior to and after ART in PHI subjects. This evaluation of mood was done concurrently with blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuropsychological [total z and global deficit score (GDS)] evaluation at each visit. Analysis employed Spearman's rho, logistic regression, and linear mixed models. 47.7 % of the 65 men recruited at a median 3.5 months HIV duration met BDI criteria for clinical depression at baseline, classified as 'mild' (n = 11), 'moderate' (n = 11), or 'severe' (n = 9). Drug, alcohol, and depression history did not associate with BDI score. Proportional somatic-performance scores were worse than cognitive-affective scores (p = .0045). Vigor subscore of POMS was reduced compared to norms and correlated with total z (r = 0.33, p = 0.013) and GDS (r = -0.32, p = 0.016). BDI and POMS correlated with one another (r = 0.85, p < .0001), but not with CSF or plasma HIV RNA, WBC, albumin ratio or neopterin. Improvement was not observed in BDI and POMS over 330 total follow-up visits, even after initiation of ART. Depression was prevalent during PHI in our subjects, associated with abnormal somatic-performance and vigor scores. Neither neuropsychological performance nor disease biomarkers correlated with depressed mood. Mood indices did not improve over time in the presence of ART. PMID:24385231

Gold, Jessica A; Grill, Marie; Peterson, Julia; Pilcher, Christopher; Lee, Evelyn; Hecht, Frederick M; Fuchs, Dietmar; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Price, Richard W; Robertson, Kevin; Spudich, Serena

2014-06-01

 
 
 
 
41

Trajectories of Depressed Mood from Early Adolescence to Young Adulthood: The Effects of Pubertal Timing and Adolescent Dating  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of pubertal timing and adolescent dating on trajectories of depressed mood from early adolescence to young adulthood were examined among youths who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Results showed that for both boys and girls, the trajectories of depressed mood between the ages of 12 and 23 took an…

Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Biehl, Michael C.; Ge, Xiaojia

2009-01-01

42

The impact of sleep on adolescent depressed mood, alertness and academic performance.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study developed and tested a theoretical model examining the inter-relationships among sleep duration, sleep quality, and circadian chronotype and their effect on alertness, depression, and academic performance. Participants were 385 adolescents aged 13-18 years (M = 15.6, SD = 1.0; 60% male) were recruited from eight socioeconomically diverse high schools in South Australia. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires during class time and recorded their sleep patterns in a sleep diary for 8 days. A good fit was found between the model and the data (?(2)/df = 1.78, CFI = .99, RMSEA = .04). Circadian chronotype showed the largest association with on adolescent functioning, with more evening-typed students reporting worse sleep quality (? = .50, p Sleep quality was significantly associated with poor outcomes: adolescents with poorer sleep quality reported less sleep on school nights (? = -.28, p sleep quality and/or more evening chronotype were also more likely to report worse grades, through the association with depression. Sleep duration showed no direct effect on adolescent functioning. These results identified the importance of two lesser-studied aspects of sleep: circadian chronotype and sleep quality. Easy-to-implement strategies to optimize sleep quality and maintain an adaptive circadian body clock may help to increase daytime alertness, elevate mood, and improve academic performance. PMID:24215949

Short, Michelle A; Gradisar, Michael; Lack, Leon C; Wright, Helen R

2013-12-01

43

Are irrational beliefs and depressive mood more common among problem gamblers than non-gamblers? A survey study of Swedish problem gamblers and controls.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study tests the hypothesis that problem gamblers are more prone to have irrational beliefs and depressed mood than non-gamblers. Irrational beliefs refer to fallacious opinions about probabilities. Gamblers like to believe that chance games (i.e., roulette and lottery) can be controlled and that the outcome of such games is dependent on the patterns of previous outcomes. The empirical material consists of responses to a survey that 302 individuals have answered. Half of the respondents were deemed to be problem gamblers. The results showed that compared to the controls, the problem gamblers were more inclined to show illusion of control due to their skill and reported more depressive mood. The results are discussed in terms of difficulties to know the "hen and the egg" regarding depressive mood, and in terms of intermittent reinforcement to continue gambling. PMID:18543088

Källmén, Håkan; Andersson, Patric; Andren, Anders

2008-12-01

44

Mood Management Intervention for College Smokers with Elevated Depressive Symptoms: A Pilot Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: This pilot study examined smoking reduction and cessation among college smokers with elevated depressive symptomatology participating in a group-based behavioral counseling, mood management, and motivational enhancement combined intervention (CBT). Participants and Methods: Fifty-eight smokers (smoked 6 days in the past 30) were…

Schleicher, Holly E.; Harris, Kari Jo; Campbell, Duncan G.; Harrar, Solomon W.

2012-01-01

45

Increasing Self-Empowerment Related to Depression among Court-Involved Youth: The Moods Matter Project  

Science.gov (United States)

An empirically-guided program designed to empower at-risk youth through increased knowledge of depression and prevention resources was developed and implemented. Ninety-three court-involved adolescents participated in the "Moods Matter" project, a four-part psycho-educational group experience rooted in the principles of Rational Emotive Behavior…

Calley, Nancy G.; Hawley, Lisa D.

2010-01-01

46

Personal Project Content and Stress: Relations to Subjective Health and Depressive Mood  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to examine how personal project stress and stress related to different personal project contents are associated with subjective health and depressive mood among adults. Participants were 343 men and women (20-76 years old), who responded to the questionnaire including the Little's Personal Project Analysis, and health and…

Wallenius, Marjut A.

2007-01-01

47

Lipid peroxidation and depressed mood in community-dwelling older men and women.  

Science.gov (United States)

It has been hypothesized that cellular damage caused by oxidative stress is associated with late-life depression but epidemiological evidence is limited. In the present study we evaluated the association between urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2? (8-iso-PGF2?), a biomarker of lipid peroxidation, and depressed mood in a large sample of community-dwelling older adults. Participants were selected from the Health, Aging and Body Composition study, a community-based longitudinal study of older persons (aged 70-79 years). The present analyses was based on a subsample of 1027 men and 948 women free of mobility disability. Urinary concentration of 8-iso-PGF2? was measured by radioimmunoassay methods and adjusted for urinary creatinine. Depressed mood was defined as a score greater than 5 on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale and/or use of antidepressant medications. Depressed mood was present in 3.0% of men and 5.5% of women. Depressed men presented higher urinary concentrations of 8-iso-PGF2? than non-depressed men even after adjustment for multiple sociodemographic, lifestyle and health factors (p?=?0.03, Cohen's d?=?0.30). This association was not present in women (depressed status-by-sex interaction p?=?0.04). Our study showed that oxidative damage may be linked to depression in older men from a large sample of the general population. Further studies are needed to explore whether the modulation of oxidative stress may break down the link between late-life depression and its deleterious health consequences. PMID:23776478

Milaneschi, Yuri; Cesari, Matteo; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Kanaya, Alka M; Yaffe, Kristine; Patrignani, Paola; Metti, Andrea; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Pahor, Marco; Ferrucci, Luigi; Penninx, Brenda W J H

2013-01-01

48

Effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation for improving depressive mood status among nursing home elders in Taiwan: a pilot study.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) to improve depressive mood status among elders in a nursing home in Taiwan. This was an experimental, pre- and posttest study with 2 groups. Nine subjects in the experimental group received TEAS for 15 minutes, 5 times a week for 1 month. Seven subjects in the control group received social visits for 15 minutes, 5 times a week for 1 month. Results indicated that the posttest depression scores significantly differed between the 2 groups. Subjects in the experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in depressive mood status, but changes in the depressive mood status of subjects in the comparison group were not statistically significant. In conclusion, TEAS can be a safe, easy, and noninvasive technique for nursing home staff to improve the depressive mood status of elders. PMID:20933145

Chang, Su-Hsien; Fang, Miao-Chun; Yang, Ya-Shu

2010-01-01

49

Cognitive Variables and Depressed Mood in Adults with Intellectual Disability  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Cognitive theory forms the foundation for cognitive therapy. There has been little research on cognitive theories and cognitive variables associated with depression in individuals with intellectual disability (ID). The current study examined cognitive variables of automatic thoughts, cognitive triad, hopelessness, attributions and…

Esbensen, A. J.; Benson, B. A.

2005-01-01

50

Depressive mood in association with sociodemographic, behavioral, self-perceived health, and coronary artery disease risk factors and sleep complaints.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of the study was to investigate depressive mood in association with sociodemographic, behavioral, self-perceived health, and coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors and sleep complaints among 35-74-year-old citizens of Palanga. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A representative sample of randomly selected 1602 persons, 600 men and 1002 women, was studied. Depressive mood was assessed by the WHO-5 Well-being Index. Sleep complaints, self-perceived health, and behavioral factors were evaluated by the Basic Nordic Sleep Quality questionnaire and questionnaires on self-perceived health and health behavior. Risk factors for CAD were assessed according to WHO recommendations. RESULTS. The highest prevalence of depressive mood (34.7%) was identified in the age group of 45-54 years in the men and in the age group of 55-64 years in the women (30.0%). The highest odds ratios demonstrating a strong association between depressive mood and health behavior were established for the use of antidepressants (OR=26.0) in the men and for the use of sedatives (OR=3.09) in the women. The highest odds ratios demonstrating an association between depressive mood and self-perceived health were established for chronic pyelonephritis (OR=3.13) in the men and diabetic foot pain (OR=4.46) in the women. The highest odds ratios reflecting an association between depressive mood and sleep quality were established for the inability to work due to disturbed sleep (OR=1.93) in the men and self-perceived sleep quality (OR=1.55) in the women. CONCLUSIONS. Depressive mood, which was significantly associated with risky health behavior, poor self-perceived health, and disturbed sleep, was observed more often in the women than the men; however, significant associations between depressive mood and risk factors for CAD were not established. PMID:24509148

Andruškien?, Jurgita; Podlipskyt?, Aurelija; Martink?nas, Arvydas; Varoneckas, Giedrius

2013-01-01

51

Body Dissatisfaction Prospectively Predicts Depressive Mood and Low Self-Esteem in Adolescent Girls and Boys  

Science.gov (United States)

This research examined whether body dissatisfaction prospectively predicted depressive mood and low self-esteem in adolescent girls and boys 5 years later. Participants were early-adolescent girls (n = 440, Time 1 M age = 12.7 years) and boys (n = 366, Time 1 M age = 12.8 years) and midadolescent girls (n = 946, Time 1 M age = 15.8 years) and boys…

Paxton, Susan J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Hannan, Peter J.; Eisenberg, Marla E.

2006-01-01

52

The examination of sport managers and coaches’ stress levels and depressed mood at work in Turkey  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper is an investigation of stress levels and depressed mood at work in sport managers and coaches. Three different questionnaires were applied to professional sport managers (n=60 and coaches (n=52 in Turkey to regard to potential sources of stress before, during and after competitions. This sample represented approximately 21% of the total professional football, basketball and volleyball clubs in Turkey. The questionnaires used are “Perceived Stress Questionnaire”, “Anxiety-Stress Questionnaire” and “Depressed Mood at Work Questionnaire”. Our findings indicated that: The aim of first questionnaire was to assess perceived stressful situations and results show that general stress levels of managers and coaches are under the average. When we examine the second questionnaire consisting of health, physical condition, tension caused by stress; it is seen that negative effects of these factors increase. At last; according to the depressed mood at work questionnaire which evaluates the physiological conditions related to stress; it’s found out that both managers and coaches aren’t satisfied with their working atmosphere and managers’ unhappiness levels are higher than coaches are.

Bilge Donuk

2013-04-01

53

A gender comparison of cognitive vulnerability as a function of moderation and mediation between negative life events and depressive mood  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The primary goal of this study was to examine gender differences in cognitive pathways to depression among a college student population. The moderating and mediating roles of dysfunctional attitudes and negative inferential styles in the relationship between negative life events and depressive mood were tested separately by gender. 306 undergraduate students (171 men and 135 women) who completed the Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II), Inventory to Diagnose Depression, Lifetime...

You, Sungeun

2007-01-01

54

Hostility May Explain the Association between Depressive Mood and Mortality: Evidence from the French GAZEL Cohort Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Depressive mood is associated with mortality. Because personality has been found to be associated with depression and mortality as well, we aimed to test whether depressive mood could predict mortality when adjusting for several measures of personality. Methods 20,625 employees of the French national gas and electricity companies gave consent to enter in the GAZEL cohort in 1989. Questionnaires were mailed in 1993 to assess depressive mood, Type A behaviour pattern, hostility, and the six personality types proposed by Grossarth-Maticek & Eysenck. Vital status and date of death were obtained annually for all participants. The association between psychological variables and mortality was measured by the Relative Index of Inequality (RII) computed through Cox regression. Results 14,356 members of the GAZEL cohort (10,916 men, mean age: 49 years, 3,965 women, mean age: 46 years) completed the depressive mood scale and at least one personality scale. During a mean follow-up of 14.8 years, 687 participants had died. Depressive mood predicted mortality, even after adjustment for age, sex, education level, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and smoking [RII (95% CI) = 1.56 (1.16–2.11)]. However, this association was dramatically reduced (RII reduction: 78.9%) after further adjustment for cognitive hostility (i.e. hostile thoughts) [RII (95% CI) = 1.12 (0.80–1.57)]. Cognitive hostility was the only personality measure remaining associated with mortality after adjustment for depressive mood [RII (95% CI) = 1.97 (1.39–2.77)]. Conclusions Cognitive hostility may either confound or mediate the association between depressive mood and mortality. PMID:20185973

Lemogne, Cedric; Nabi, Hermann; Zins, Marie; Cordier, Sylvaine; Ducimetiere, Pierre; Goldberg, Marcel; Consoli, Silla M.

2010-01-01

55

Influence of depressed mood and psychological stress symptoms on perceived oral contraceptive side effects and discontinuation in young minority women  

Science.gov (United States)

Background We examined the influence of depressed mood and psychological stress on oral contraceptive (OC) side effects and discontinuation. Study Design We administered standard psychological instruments to 354 young women (13–24 years) beginning a six-month OC continuation intervention trial and questions on OC side effects and use at six months. Logisitic regression determined the relationships between psychological conditions, perceived OC side effects and continuation rates. Results Baseline depressed mood (21%) and stress (19%) and six-month mood (25%) and weight changes (57%) were relatively common. Only 38% continued OCs at six months. Depressed mood (OR 2.27, CI 1.25–4.15, p=0.007) and stress (OR 2.07, CI 1.12–3.82, p=0.02) were associated with perceived OC-related moodiness; depressed mood was associated with perceived weight loss (OR 1.89, CI 1.01–3.55, p=0.05). Depressed mood (OR 0.54, CI 0.29–0.99, p=0.04), stress (OR 0.48, CI 0.25–0.91, p=0.03) and perceived weight change (OR 0.60, CI 0.38–0.94, p=0.03) all reduced the likelihood of OC continuation. Conclusion Young women with adverse psychological symptoms are at risk for perceived OC side effects and discontinuation. PMID:22673038

Hall, Kelli Stidham; White, Katharine O'Connell; Rickert, Vaughn I.; Reame, Nancy; Westhoff, Carolyn

2012-01-01

56

The role of Personality, Mood, Subjective Health, and Stress in Depressive Symptoms among High School Students  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Spain | Language: English Abstract in english Background and Objectives: Traditionally, depression among adolescents has been considered uncommon, with around 5% estimated to suffer from depressive disorder. The purpose is to investigate occurrence and psychological correlates for depressive symptoms in male and female high school adolescents i [...] n urban and rural settings. Methods: Participants were 1,069 high school students (response rate 92.0%) with a mean age of 17.6 years. The instruments used were the Zung Depression Self-Rating Scale (SDS), Life Regard Index (LRI), the Neuroticism scale by Eysenck (EPQ-N), the Tension and Effort Stress Inventory (TESI), the Subjective Health Complaints scale (SHC), and the Sense of Humour Questionnaire (SHQ-6). Results: Analyzes of Variance showed sex and urban/rural main effects, and/or interactions (boys and rural students showing highest positive ratings). Stepwise regression analyzes on depression showed all but the TESI variables to significantly explain 41% of the variance in depression. The Sense of Humour and Life Regard Index were strong contributors to depression (55% of variation) when effects of bodily complaints and scores on stressors and efforts were eliminated. Conclusions: The present study showed an unexpectedly high prevalence of severe (12.7%) as well as moderate depressive symptoms (total of 49.2%). Therefore, the results indicate an increase of adolescent depression in recent years. Negative and positive mood, as well as sense of humour, goals in life, and fulfilment of goals seemed to be protecting. Prevalence of depressive symptoms in adolescents was shown to be higher than expected. Positive resource variables appeared to be protecting.

K., Gunnar Götestam; Sven, Svebak; Eva, Naper Jensen.

57

The role of Personality, Mood, Subjective Health, and Stress in Depressive Symptoms among High School Students  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Spain | Language: English Abstract in english Background and Objectives: Traditionally, depression among adolescents has been considered uncommon, with around 5% estimated to suffer from depressive disorder. The purpose is to investigate occurrence and psychological correlates for depressive symptoms in male and female high school adolescents i [...] n urban and rural settings. Methods: Participants were 1,069 high school students (response rate 92.0%) with a mean age of 17.6 years. The instruments used were the Zung Depression Self-Rating Scale (SDS), Life Regard Index (LRI), the Neuroticism scale by Eysenck (EPQ-N), the Tension and Effort Stress Inventory (TESI), the Subjective Health Complaints scale (SHC), and the Sense of Humour Questionnaire (SHQ-6). Results: Analyzes of Variance showed sex and urban/rural main effects, and/or interactions (boys and rural students showing highest positive ratings). Stepwise regression analyzes on depression showed all but the TESI variables to significantly explain 41% of the variance in depression. The Sense of Humour and Life Regard Index were strong contributors to depression (55% of variation) when effects of bodily complaints and scores on stressors and efforts were eliminated. Conclusions: The present study showed an unexpectedly high prevalence of severe (12.7%) as well as moderate depressive symptoms (total of 49.2%). Therefore, the results indicate an increase of adolescent depression in recent years. Negative and positive mood, as well as sense of humour, goals in life, and fulfilment of goals seemed to be protecting. Prevalence of depressive symptoms in adolescents was shown to be higher than expected. Positive resource variables appeared to be protecting.

K., Gunnar Götestam; Sven, Svebak; Eva, Naper Jensen.

2008-09-01

58

Occurrence of symptoms and depressive mood among working-aged coronary heart disease patients  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The typical symptoms of coronary heart disease (CHD, chest pain and breathlessness, are well-known. They are considered quite dramatic, and can thus be fairly reliably mapped by a survey. However, people might have other clearly unpleasant symptoms impairing quality of life. The aim of this study is to evaluate the appearance of these complaints of working-aged people with self-reported CHD. Methods The study consists of a postal questionnaire of randomly selected Finns in age groups 30–34, 40–44 and 50–54, a response rate of 39% (N = 15,477. The subjects were asked whether or not a doctor had told them that they had angina pectoris or had had myocardial infarction. Four randomly selected age and sex matched controls were chosen for every patient. The occurrence of self-reported dyspnoea, chest pain during anger or other kind of emotion, palpitation and perspiration without physical exercise, irregular heartbeats, flushing, trembling of hands and voice, jerking of muscles, depression and day-time sleepiness were examined. Odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI, between occurrence of symptoms and CHD with and without heart infarction, were computed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The sample eventually comprised 319 CHD patients. Dyspnoea, chest pain during anger or other kind of emotion, palpitation, perspiration without physical exercise, irregular heartbeats daily or almost daily, trembling of hands and voice, and jerking of muscles occurred statistically significantly more frequently among CHD patients than among controls. The CHD patients also reported more depressive mood according to Beck's inventory scores and poorer sleep and more frequent day-time sleepiness than controls. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis chest pain during anger or other kind of emotion (ORs 4.12 and 3.61 and dyspnoea (ORs 2.33 and 3.81 were the symptoms most associated with CHD. Conclusions Working-aged people with self-reported coronary heart disease evince a number of symptoms limiting the quality of their every day life. This aspect should be paid attention to when evaluating functional capacity of these patients.

Sillanmäki Lauri H

2004-11-01

59

Memory mood congruency phenomenon in bipolar I disorder and major depression disorder patients  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The objective of the present study was to evaluate memory performance in tasks with and without affective content (to confirm the mood congruency phenomenon) in acutely admitted patients with bipolar I disorder (BD) and major depression disorder (MDD) and in healthy participants. Seventy-eight parti [...] cipants (24 BD, 29 MDD, and 25 healthy controls) were evaluated. Three word lists were used as the memory task with affective content (positive, negative and indifferent). Psychiatric symptoms were also evaluated with rating scales (Young Mania Rating Scale for mania and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale for depression). Patients were selected during the first week of hospitalization. BD patients showed higher scores in the word span with positive tone than MDD patients and healthy controls (P = 0.002). No other difference was observed for tests with affective tone. MDD patients presented significantly lower scores in the Mini-Mental State Exam, logical memory test, visual recognition span, and digit span, while BD patients presented lower scores in the visual recognition test and digit span. Mood congruency effect was found for word span with positive tone among BD patients but no similar effect was observed among MDD patients for negative items. MDD patients presented more memory impairment than BD patients, but BD patients also showed memory impairment

V.B., Delgado; F., Kapczinski; M.L.F., Chaves.

2012-09-01

60

Memory mood congruency phenomenon in bipolar I disorder and major depression disorder patients  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The objective of the present study was to evaluate memory performance in tasks with and without affective content (to confirm the mood congruency phenomenon) in acutely admitted patients with bipolar I disorder (BD) and major depression disorder (MDD) and in healthy participants. Seventy-eight parti [...] cipants (24 BD, 29 MDD, and 25 healthy controls) were evaluated. Three word lists were used as the memory task with affective content (positive, negative and indifferent). Psychiatric symptoms were also evaluated with rating scales (Young Mania Rating Scale for mania and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale for depression). Patients were selected during the first week of hospitalization. BD patients showed higher scores in the word span with positive tone than MDD patients and healthy controls (P = 0.002). No other difference was observed for tests with affective tone. MDD patients presented significantly lower scores in the Mini-Mental State Exam, logical memory test, visual recognition span, and digit span, while BD patients presented lower scores in the visual recognition test and digit span. Mood congruency effect was found for word span with positive tone among BD patients but no similar effect was observed among MDD patients for negative items. MDD patients presented more memory impairment than BD patients, but BD patients also showed memory impairment

V.B., Delgado; F., Kapczinski; M.L.F., Chaves.

 
 
 
 
61

Memory mood congruency phenomenon in bipolar I disorder and major depression disorder patients  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate memory performance in tasks with and without affective content (to confirm the mood congruency phenomenon in acutely admitted patients with bipolar I disorder (BD and major depression disorder (MDD and in healthy participants. Seventy-eight participants (24 BD, 29 MDD, and 25 healthy controls were evaluated. Three word lists were used as the memory task with affective content (positive, negative and indifferent. Psychiatric symptoms were also evaluated with rating scales (Young Mania Rating Scale for mania and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale for depression. Patients were selected during the first week of hospitalization. BD patients showed higher scores in the word span with positive tone than MDD patients and healthy controls (P = 0.002. No other difference was observed for tests with affective tone. MDD patients presented significantly lower scores in the Mini-Mental State Exam, logical memory test, visual recognition span, and digit span, while BD patients presented lower scores in the visual recognition test and digit span. Mood congruency effect was found for word span with positive tone among BD patients but no similar effect was observed among MDD patients for negative items. MDD patients presented more memory impairment than BD patients, but BD patients also showed memory impairment

V.B. Delgado

2012-09-01

62

Mood and Anxiety Symptoms in Psychiatric Inpatients with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent reports suggest that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may experience depression at a high frequency, yet few published studies address this issue, especially among adults. In the current investigation, we reviewed features of depression and comorbid traits among depressed inpatients with intellectual disabilities (ID) as a…

Charlot, Lauren; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Albert, Aranya; Hunt, Anne; Connor, Daniel F.; McIlvane, William J., Jr.

2008-01-01

63

Joint trajectories of smoking and depressive mood: associations with later low perceived self-control and low well-being.  

Science.gov (United States)

This longitudinal study examines comorbid trajectories of cigarette smoking and depressive mood from adolescence to adulthood and its association with low perceived self-control and low well-being in adulthood. Participants (N = 607) were interviewed at 6 time waves. Growth mixture modeling (GMM) determined membership in joint trajectory groups of comorbid smoking and depressive mood ranging from mean age 14 to mean age 32 years. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the associations between earlier trajectory group memberships and low perceived self-control and low well-being in adulthood. Trajectory groups characterized by earlier, comorbid chronic/heavy smoking and chronic/high depressive mood were most at risk for low perceived self-control and low well-being in adulthood. Counseling for adolescents and young adults with low perceived self-control and low well-being should address smoking and depressive mood. Interventions to reduce smoking and depressive mood may result in increased self-control and well-being. PMID:24471577

Brook, David W; Brook, Judith S; Zhang, Chenshu

2014-01-01

64

Comparison of effects of bright light therapy alone or combined with fluoxetine on severity of depression, circadian rhythms, mood disturbance, and sleep quality, in patients with non-seasonal depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mehmet Yücel Agargün,1 Gokben Hizli Sayar,2 Hüseyin Bulut,3 Oguz Tan21Medipol University, Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Uskudar University, Neuropsychiatry Istanbul Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Büyükçekmece Government Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul, TurkeyPurpose: To compare effects of bright light therapy (BLT alone or combined with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI fluoxetine, on severity of depression, circadian rhythms, mood disturbance, and sleep quality, in patients with non-seasonal depression.Patients and methods: Drug-free patients who were administered 10,000 lux of BLT for 30 minutes for 7 days comprised the BLT group (n = 7, while patients who started fluoxetine as an add-on treatment day comprised the SSRI + BLT group (n = 8. The primary outcomes were severity of depression, measured using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; chronotype, measured using the Morningness Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ; mood disturbance, measured using the Profile of Mood States (POMS survey; and sleep quality, measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, before and after treatment in both groups.Results: All patients completed the study, and none reported obvious side effects. The mean onset age of depression was 26.1 years ± 5.3 years in the BLT group and 27 years ± 9.5 years in the SSRI + BLT group (P = 0.425. The number of past depressive episodes was 1.29 ± 0.76 in the BLT group, and 1.5 ± 0.8 in the SSRI + BLT group (P = 0.427. The difference between pre- and posttreatment scores revealed no significant difference between groups for the HAM-D scale, BDI, MEQ, POMS survey, and the PSQI.Conclusion: This study suggests that BLT is effective with respect to the severity of depression, circadian rhythms, mood disturbance, and sleep quality, in non-seasonal depression. However, there was no evidence in favor of adjunctive fluoxetine with BLT in the treatment of non-seasonal depression, for any of the rating scales used in our study.Keywords: bright light therapy, mood states, nonseasonal depression, sleep disorders, sleep quality

A?argün MY

2013-06-01

65

Usefulness of the Spanish version of the mood disorder questionnaire for screening bipolar disorder in routine clinical practice in outpatients with major depression  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background According to some studies, almost 40% of depressive patients – half of them previously undetected – are diagnosed of bipolar II disorder when systematically assessed for hypomania. Thus, instruments for bipolar disorder screening are needed. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) is a self-reported questionnaire validated in Spanish in stable patients with a previously known diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate in the daily clinical pract...

Montes José; García Aurelio; Ezquiaga Elena; de Dios Consuelo; Avedillo Caridad; Soler Begoña

2008-01-01

66

Resting and reactive frontal brain electrical activity (EEG among a non-clinical sample of socially anxious adults: Does concurrent depressive mood matter?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Elliott A Beaton1, Louis A Schmidt2, Andrea R Ashbaugh2,5, Diane L Santesso2, Martin M Antony1,3,4, Randi E McCabe1,31Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 2Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 3Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre, St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 5Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaAbstract: A number of studies have noted that the pattern of resting frontal brain electrical activity (EEG is related to individual differences in affective style in healthy infants, children, and adults and some clinical populations when symptoms are reduced or in remission. We measured self-reported trait shyness and sociability, concurrent depressive mood, and frontal brain electrical activity (EEG at rest and in anticipation of a speech task in a non-clinical sample of healthy young adults selected for high and low social anxiety. Although the patterns of resting and reactive frontal EEG asymmetry did not distinguish among individual differences in social anxiety, the pattern of resting frontal EEG asymmetry was related to trait shyness after controlling for concurrent depressive mood. Individuals who reported a higher degree of shyness were likely to exhibit greater relative right frontal EEG activity at rest. However, trait shyness was not related to frontal EEG asymmetry measured during the speech-preparation task, even after controlling for concurrent depressive mood. These findings replicate and extend prior work on resting frontal EEG asymmetry and individual differences in affective style in adults. Findings also highlight the importance of considering concurrent emotional states of participants when examining psychophysiological correlates of personality.Keywords: social anxiety, shyness, sociability, depression, mood, frontal EEG alpha asymmetry

Elliott A Beaton

2008-03-01

67

Measuring depressive mood in elderly Israeli: reliability and validity of the Depression Adjective Check Lists.  

Science.gov (United States)

To establish the psychometric properties of the state form of the Depression Adjective Check List (DACL) with elderly Israeli, a 1981 Hebrew version of the DACL by Lomranz, Lubin, Eyal, and Medini, along with the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale and Cantril's Self-anchoring Striving Scale, were administered to 86 independently functioning elderly persons (35 men and 51 women) living in a home for the aged. Reliability estimates (alphas and test-retest) were moderate to high; validity estimates (concurrent and construct) were again moderate to high. It was concluded that the state form of the Depression Adjective Check List is suitable for use with elderly Israeli. PMID:1924628

Lomranz, J; Lubin, B; Eyal, N; Joffe, A

1991-06-01

68

Depressive mood, bonding failure, and abusive parenting among mothers with three-month-old babies in a Japanese community  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the relationships between depressive mood, bonding failure, and abusive parenting. Method: We distributed questionnaires to 1198 mothers attending a three-month postnatal health check-up in rural areas in Japan. The questionnaires assessed these three variables along with demographics. We evaluated the causal relationships by comparing different structural equation models to the data. Results: Although all the models fit the data well, the best Akaike Information Criterion was obtained from a model where both depressive mood and bonding failure predict abusive parenting, but depressive mood and bonding failure do not predict each other directly. The determinant coefficient of child abuse in the final model was 0.13. Discussion: We found depressive mood and bonding failure during postpartum period impacted negatively on mother’s parenting behaviour. Because only 13% of the variance of abusive parenting was explainable by this model, further study should be needed to identify other risk factors of child abuse. Similarly, midwives and public health nurse in community should pay attention to not only depression but also bonding failure to prevent child abuse.

Toshinori Kitamura

2013-07-01

69

Abnormal brain glucose metabolism and depressive mood in patients with pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease: SPM analysis of F-18 FDG positron emission tomography  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive mood and pre-dialytic CKD, to localize and quantify depressive mood -related lesions in pre-dialytic CKD patients through statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of brain positron emission tomography (PET), and to examine the usefulness of brain PET for early detection and proper treatment of depressive mood. Twenty one patients with stage 5 CKD and 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed by depressive mood assessment and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of 18F-FDG PET. Depressive mood assessment was done by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The largest clusters were areas including precentral gyrus, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulated cortex of left hemisphere. Other clusters were left transverse temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46, 44), right inferior frontal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left angular gyrus. In addition, correlation was found between hypometabolized areas and HDRS scores of CKD patients in right prefrontal cortex (BA 11) and right anterior cingulated gyrus (BA 24). In conclusion, this study demonstrated specific depressive mood-related abnormal metabolic lesion. Interestingly, in CKD patients with severe depressive mood, cerebral metabolism was similar to that of MDD

70

Optimizing the ingredients for imagery-based interpretation bias modification for depressed mood: is self-generation more effective than imagination alone?  

Science.gov (United States)

Negative interpretation is thought to be crucial in the development and maintenance of depression. Recently developed cognitive bias modification paradigms, intending to change these biases towards a more optimistic interpretation tendency (CBM-I), seem to offer new promising implications for cognitive therapy innovation. This study aimed to increase our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of action of imagery-based CBM-I in the context of depressed mood. We therefore compared the efficacy of CBM-I requiring participants to imagine standardized positive resolutions to a novel, more active training version that required participants to generate the positive interpretations themselves. Fifty-four participants were randomly allocated to (1) standardized CBM-I, (2) self-generation CBM-I or (3) a control group. Outcome measures included self-report mood measures and a depression-related interpretation bias measure. Both positive training variants significantly increased the tendency to interpret fresh ambiguous material in an optimistic manner. However, only the standardized imagery CBM-I paradigm positively influenced mood. PMID:24113076

Rohrbacher, Heike; Blackwell, Simon E; Holmes, Emily A; Reinecke, Andrea

2014-01-01

71

Academic exam stress and depressive mood are associated with reductions in exhaled nitric oxide in healthy individuals.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nitric oxide (NO) has beneficial effects on cardiovascular and immune health. Stress and depression have been linked to a reduction in serum NO. In this study, we examined the effect of academic exam stress on the fraction of NO in exhaled air (FeNO) and spirometric lung function in 41 healthy college students. Participants completed assessments at mid-semester as well as in the early and late phase of an academic exam period. Negative affect, depressive mood, and salivary cortisol were elevated during exams, whereas FeNO and lung function decreased. Higher depressive mood was associated with lower FeNO, whereas higher negative affect was associated higher FeNO across time. These findings provide initial evidence that depression and prolonged stress can alter FeNO and lung function in healthy individuals, which could have adverse consequences for cardiovascular, airway, and immune health. PMID:23410759

Trueba, Ana F; Smith, Noelle B; Auchus, Richard J; Ritz, Thomas

2013-04-01

72

Depression, Schizophrenia, and Social Attraction.  

Science.gov (United States)

Compared the dysphoric mood induction and attraction that subjects reported after a vicarious experience with a depressed patient and a comparable experience with a schizophrenic patient. Results showed similar arousal of dysphoric mood and rejection for both patients. (RC)

Boswell, Philip C.; Murray, Edward J.

1981-01-01

73

Effects of Induced Rumination and Distraction on Mood and Overgeneral Autobiographical Memory in Adolescent Major Depressive Disorder and Controls  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: In adults there is evidence that the affective-cognitive processes of rumination and overgeneral autobiographical memory retrieval may play a part in maintaining depression. This study investigated the effects of induced rumination as compared to distraction on mood and categoric overgeneral memory in adolescents with first episode…

Park, R. J.; Goodyer, I. M.; Teasdale, J. D.

2004-01-01

74

Acceptability of Online Self-Help to People With Depression: Users' Views of MoodGYM Versus Informational Websites  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Little is known about the factors that influence acceptability of and adherence to online psychological interventions. Evidence is needed to guide further development of promising programs. Objective Our goal was to investigate users’ views of two online approaches to self-help for depression: computerized cognitive behavior therapy (cCBT) and informational websites, in a workplace context. Computerized CBT offers an inexpensive and accessible alternative to face-to-face therapy, and employers have an interest in reducing the working time lost to depression or stress. Yet little is known about how employees, who have actual experience of using online approaches, judge the intervention as a process. Methods The qualitative data reported here were collected within an online randomized controlled trial whose participants had diagnosable depression. The experimental intervention was a 5-week cCBT program called MoodGYM, and the control condition was five informational websites about mental health. Data were collected via online questionnaires. There was no evidence of the superiority of either in terms of treatment outcomes. In parallel, using brief rating scales and open-ended questions designed for this purpose, we examined the relative acceptability of each approach over time, including perceptions of cCBT compared to seeing a health care professional. Results At least 60% of participants held online therapy to be at least as acceptable as seeing a professional about mental health issues, and they were more likely to retain this opinion over time if they used the interactive program, MoodGYM, rather than informational websites alone. Barriers to cCBT use fell into four categories: intrinsic, intrapersonal problems; extrinsic technical problems; generic issues mostly pertaining to perceptions of cCBT; and specific issues about the intervention or control condition. These indicate strategies for improving engagement. Conclusions As first-aid for mild to moderate mental health problems, evidence-based computerized approaches have broad acceptability. This could be increased by attending to the barriers noted here and by proactively managing users’ expectations at individual and organizational levels. The findings have implications for occupational health providers and others addressing the needs of working-age adults with depression. They also raise methodological issues for online research. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 24529487; http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN24529487 (Archived by Webcite at http://www.webcitation.org/6O8cCL4mh). PMID:24681717

Sarrami Foroushani, Pooria; Grime, Paul; Thornicroft, Graham

2014-01-01

75

Mood Management Intervention for College Smokers with Elevated Depressive Symptoms: A Pilot Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective This pilot study examined smoking reduction and cessation among college smokers with elevated depressive symptomatology participating in a group-based behavioral counseling, mood management, and motivational enhancement combined intervention (CBT). Participants & Methods Fifty-eight smokers (smoked ? 6 days in the past 30) were randomized to six sessions of CBT (n=29) or a nutrition-focused attention-matched control group (CG, n=29). Results Relative to CG participants, significantly more CBT participants reduced smoking intensity by 50% (?2(1, N=58)=4.86, p=.028) at end of treatment. Although CBT participants maintained smoking reductions at 3- and 6-month follow-up, group differences were no longer significant. No group differences in cessation emerged. Finally, participants in both groups evidenced increased motivation to reduce smoking at end of treatment (F(1, 44)=11.717, p=.001, ?p2=.207). Conclusions Findings demonstrate the utility of this intervention for smoking reduction and maintenance of reductions over time among a population of college students with elevated depressive symptomatology. PMID:22171728

Schleicher, Holly E.; Harris, Kari Jo; Campbell, Duncan G.; Harrar, Solomon W.

2012-01-01

76

Temperament and Character in Euthymic Major Depressive Disorder Patients: The Effect of Previous Suicide Attempts and Psychotic Mood Episodes  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective The purpose of this study was to examine personality traits of patients with major depressive disorder and explore the possible connections between personality and clinical and sociodemographic variables. Methods The sociodemographic and clinical properties of 80 patients with major depression, who were euthymic according to Hamilton Depression Scale scores, were recorded. Their personality was evaluated by using Temperament and Character Inventory and results were compared with 80 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We used general linear model analysis to evaluate the manner in which the variables contributed to TCI scores. Results Remitted depressive patients scored significantly lower on on self-directedness and higher on harm avoidance than HC. Previous suicide attempts had a main effect only on harm avoidance while previous psychotic mood episodes were significantly associated with novelty seeking, self-directedness and cooperativeness. With respect to numeric clinical variables, only duration of illness was significantly and negatively correlated with NS and RD scores. Conclusion Patients with euthymic major depressive disorder may have significantly different personality traits than the normal population, and patients with different clinical and sociodemographic characteristics may show different personality patterns. In addition, assessment of major depressed patients by means of the Temperament and Character Inventory may be helpful to get a deeper insight into those personality traits underlying suicidality and the emergence of psychotic mood episode. PMID:22707961

Albayrak, Yakup; Ekinci, Asl? Erkan

2012-01-01

77

Usefulness of the Spanish version of the mood disorder questionnaire for screening bipolar disorder in routine clinical practice in outpatients with major depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background According to some studies, almost 40% of depressive patients – half of them previously undetected – are diagnosed of bipolar II disorder when systematically assessed for hypomania. Thus, instruments for bipolar disorder screening are needed. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ is a self-reported questionnaire validated in Spanish in stable patients with a previously known diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate in the daily clinical practice the usefulness of the Spanish version of the MDQ in depressive patients. Methods Patients (n = 87 meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for a major depressive episode, not previously known as bipolar were included. The affective module of the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID was used as gold standard. Results MDQ screened 24.1% of depressive patients as bipolar, vs. 12.6% according to SCID. For a cut-off point score of 7 positive answers, sensitivity was 72.7% (95% CI = 63.3 – 82.1 and specificity 82.9% (95% CI = 74.9–90.9. Likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests were 4,252 y 0,329 respectively. Limitations The small sample size reduced the power of the study to 62%. Conclusion Sensitivity and specificity of the MDQ were high for screening bipolar disorder in patients with major depression, and similar to the figures obtained in stable patients. This study confirms that MDQ is a useful instrument in the daily clinical assessment of depressive patients.

Montes José

2008-05-01

78

Criterion validity of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire and one- and two-item depression screens in young adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of short screening questionnaires may be a promising option for identifying children at risk for depression in a community setting. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ and one- and two-item screening instruments for depressive disorders in a school-based sample of young adolescents. Methods Participants were 521 sixth-grade students attending public middle schools. Child and parent versions of the SMFQ were administered to evaluate the child's depressive symptoms. The presence of any depressive disorder during the previous month was assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC as the criterion standard. First, we assessed the diagnostic accuracy of child, parent, and combined scores of the full 13-item SMFQ by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC, sensitivity and specificity. The same approach was then used to evaluate the accuracy of a two-item scale consisting of only depressed mood and anhedonia items, and a single depressed mood item. Results The combined child + parent SMFQ score showed the highest accuracy (AUC = 0.86. Diagnostic accuracy was lower for child (AUC = 0.73 and parent (AUC = 0.74 SMFQ versions. Corresponding versions of one- and two-item screens had lower AUC estimates, but the combined versions of the brief screens each still showed moderate accuracy. Furthermore, child and combined versions of the two-item screen demonstrated higher sensitivity (although lower specificity than either the one-item screen or the full SMFQ. Conclusions Under conditions where parents accompany children to screening settings (e.g. primary care, use of a child + parent version of the SMFQ is recommended. However, when parents are not available, and the cost of a false positive result is minimal, then a one- or two-item screen may be useful for initial identification of at-risk youth.

McCauley Elizabeth

2010-02-01

79

Correlations between regional cerebral blood flow and depression scale in the mood disorder. A study using 123I-IMP SPECT  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was assessed on 26 mood disorder patients using 123I-iodoamphetamine and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and their correlations to depression scores of Hamilton's Rating Scale for Depression were studied. Region of interest (ROI) was established on coronary images and used as an indicator. As a result, left hemisphere was suspected of a primary lesion in mood disorder, however, the relationship between clinical symptoms and various lesion areas were not clarified. Further studies with neuropsychological loading or pharmaceutical loading such as antidepressant are thus expected to clarify the etiology of mood disorders. (S.Y.)

80

Internet-Based Motivation Program for Women With Eating Disorders: Eating Disorder Pathology and Depressive Mood Predict Dropout  

Science.gov (United States)

Background One of the main problems of Internet-delivered interventions for a range of disorders is the high dropout rate, yet little is known about the factors associated with this. We recently developed and tested a Web-based 6-session program to enhance motivation to change for women with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or related subthreshold eating pathology. Objective The aim of the present study was to identify predictors of dropout from this Web program. Methods A total of 179 women took part in the study. We used survival analyses (Cox regression) to investigate the predictive effect of eating disorder pathology (assessed by the Eating Disorders Examination-Questionnaire; EDE-Q), depressive mood (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), motivation to change (University of Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale; URICA), and participants’ age at dropout. To identify predictors, we used the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method. Results The dropout rate was 50.8% (91/179) and was equally distributed across the 6 treatment sessions. The LASSO analysis revealed that higher scores on the Shape Concerns subscale of the EDE-Q, a higher frequency of binge eating episodes and vomiting, as well as higher depression scores significantly increased the probability of dropout. However, we did not find any effect of the URICA or age on dropout. Conclusions Women with more severe eating disorder pathology and depressive mood had a higher likelihood of dropping out from a Web-based motivational enhancement program. Interventions such as ours need to address the specific needs of women with more severe eating disorder pathology and depressive mood and offer them additional support to prevent them from prematurely discontinuing treatment. PMID:24686856

Hirschfeld, Gerrit; Rieger, Elizabeth; Schmidt, Ulrike; Kosfelder, Joachim; Hechler, Tanja; Schulte, Dietmar; Vocks, Silja

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

Depressive symptomatology and pineal epidermoid cyst: a case report.  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction Intracranial epidermoid cysts are congenital cysts. They comprise 0.2-1.8% of primary intracranial tumours and are four to nine times as common as dermoid cysts. Case report We here in present the case of a 32-year-old man who reported sudden onset of symptoms of a depressive symptomatology and particularly severe headache, accompanied by fatigue, depressed mood most of the day, marked diminished interest or pleasure in all or almost all activities, insomnia and diminished ability to think or concentrate. Brain magnetic resolution imaging examination revealed a pineal epidermoid cystic lesion, visualised in the posterior part of the third ventricle, with a maximum diameter of ?2.8 cm and obstructing the aqueduct of Sylvius, causing obstructive hydrocephalus. Discussion Pineal cysts may enlarge over time, because of either increased cyst fluid or intracystic haemorrhage, and become symptomatic. Brain radiological investigations in patients with depressive symptomatology may be substantial. PMID:25287638

Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Economou, Marina; Maltezou, Maria; Kandaraki, Anna; Papadimitriou, George N

2013-08-01

82

Prevalence of mood and anxiety disorder in self reported irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. An epidemiological population based study of women  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is commonly regarded as a functional disorder, and is hypothesized to be associated with anxiety and depression. This evidence mainly rests on population-based studies utilising self-report screening instruments for psychopathology. Other studies applying structured clinical interviews are generally based on small clinical samples, which are vulnerable to biases. The extant evidence base for an association between IBS and psychopathology is hence not conclusive. The aim of this study was therefore to re-examine the hypothesis using population-based data and psychiatric morbidity established with a structured clinical interview. Methods Data were derived from a population-based epidemiological study (n = 1077. Anxiety and mood disorders were established using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR (SCID-I/NP and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12. Current and lifetime IBS was self-reported. Hypertension and diabetes were employed as comparison groups as they are expected to be unrelated to mental health. Results Current IBS (n = 69, 6.4% was associated with an increased likelihood of current mood and/or anxiety disorders (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.49 - 4.60. Half the population reporting a lifetime IBS diagnosis also had a lifetime mood or anxiety disorder. Exploratory analyses demonstrated an increased prevalence of IBS across most common anxiety and mood disorders, the exception being bipolar disorder. The association with IBS and symptoms load (GHQ-12 followed a curved dose response pattern. In contrast, hypertension and diabetes were consistently unrelated to psychiatric morbidity. Conclusions IBS is significantly associated with anxiety and mood disorders. This study provides indicative evidence for IBS as a disorder with a psychosomatic aspect.

Mykletun Arnstein

2010-08-01

83

A new US-UK diagnostic project: mood elevation and depression in first-year undergraduates at Oxford and Stanford universities.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate differences in prevalence of mood elevation, distress and depression among first-year undergraduates at Oxford and Stanford universities. METHOD: An online survey was sent to Oxford and Stanford first-year undergraduate students for two consecutive years in the winter of 2005 and 2006. Students completed a survey that assessed mood symptoms and medication use. RESULTS: Both universities had similar rates of distress by General Health Questionnaire (Oxford - 42.4%; St...

Chandler, Ra; Wang, Pw; Ketter, Ta; Goodwin, Gm

2008-01-01

84

A randomized, controlled trial of meditation for work stress, anxiety and depressed mood in full-time workers.  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective. To assess the effect of meditation on work stress, anxiety and mood in full-time workers. Methods. 178 adult workers participated in an 8-week, 3-arm randomized controlled trial comparing a "mental silence" approach to meditation (n = 59) to a "relaxation" active control (n = 56) and a wait-list control (n = 63). Participants were assessed before and after using Psychological Strain Questionnaire (PSQ), a subscale of the larger Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI), the State component of the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory for Adults (STAI), and the depression-dejection (DD) subscale of the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results. There was a significant improvement for the meditation group compared to both the relaxation control and the wait-list groups the PSQ (P = .026), and DD (P = .019). Conclusions. Mental silence-orientated meditation, in this case Sahaja Yoga meditation, is a safe and effective strategy for dealing with work stress and depressive feelings. The findings suggest that "thought reduction" or "mental silence" may have specific effects relevant to work stress and hence occupational health. PMID:21716708

Manocha, R; Black, D; Sarris, J; Stough, C

2011-01-01

85

The role of Personality, Mood, Subjective Health, and Stress in Depressive Symptoms among High School Students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background and Objectives: Traditionally, depression among adolescents has been considered uncommon, with around 5% estimated to suffer from depressive disorder. The purpose is to investigate occurrence and psychological correlates for depressive symptoms in male and female high school adolescents in urban and rural settings. Methods: Participants were 1,069 high school students (response rate 92.0%) with a mean age of 17.6 years. The instruments used were the Zung Depression Self-Rating Scal...

Gunnar Go?testam, K.; Sven Svebak; Eva Naper Jensen

2008-01-01

86

The influence of positive and negative mood states on risk taking, verbal fluency, and salivary cortisol.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

BACKGROUND: significant frontal cortex dysfunction. It is hypothesised that performance on frontal lobe tasks may be sensitive to induced fluctuations in mood state in non-clinical samples. METHODS: Subjects performed one of two neuropsychological tasks immediately subsequent to a musical mood induction procedure designed to induce either elation or depression. Mood was assessed using self-report measures. Salivary cortisol levels were also measured in an attempt to objectively validate mood ...

Clark, L.; Iversen, Sd; Goodwin, Gm

2001-01-01

87

Locus of Control, Self-Reported Depression, and Perceived Causes of Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines the relation of depression to locus of control and to the perceived causes of depression in a nonpsychiatric population. Findings suggest that adolescent females tend to hold themselves more responsible than males for unsatisfactory personal situations, and this extends to the attribution of causes for unhappy moods. (Author/PC)

Calhoun, Lawrence G.; And Others

1974-01-01

88

Validation of the Chinese version of the "Mood Disorder Questionnaire" for screening bipolar disorder among patients with a current depressive episode  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) is a well-recognized screening tool for bipolar disorder, but its Chinese version needs further validation. This study aims to measure the accuracy of the Chinese version of the MDQ as a screening instrument for bipolar disorder (BPD) in a group of patients with a current major depressive episode. Methods 142 consecutive patients with an initial DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of a major depressive episode were scree...

Gan Zhaoyu; Han Zili; Li Kanglai; Diao Feici; Wu Xiaoli; Guan Nianhong; Zhang Jinbei

2012-01-01

89

Feasibility, Reliability and Validity of the Dutch Translation of the Anxiety, Depression and Mood Scale in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: The informant-based Anxiety, Depression And Mood Scale was translated into Dutch and its feasibility, reliability and validity in older adults (aged greater than or equal to 50 years) with intellectual disabilities (ID) was studied. Method: Test-retest (n = 93) and interrater reliability (n = 83), and convergent (n = 202 and n = 787),…

Hermans, Heidi; Jelluma, Naftha; van der Pas, Femke H.; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

2012-01-01

90

Continuity and Discontinuity of Depressed Mood from Late Adolescence to Young Adulthood: The Mediating and Stabilizing Roles of Young Adults' Socioeconomic Attainment  

Science.gov (United States)

Using prospective, longitudinal data from 467 youth over a 13-year period (late adolescence and young adulthood), the present study investigates three research questions: (1) to what extent do elevations in depressed mood continue (homotypic continuity) from adolescence to young adulthood, (2) to what extent do young adults' socioeconomic…

Wickrama, K. A. S.; Conger, Rand D.; Lorenz, Federick O.; Martin, Monica

2012-01-01

91

Impact of group music therapy on the depression mood of college students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The goal of this study was to examine the effects of group music therapy on depression and mental health among college students. 80 students participated in this study, with 40 assigned to control group and other 40 assigned to experimental group. The results showed that after the group music therapy, for the experimental group, the depression scores have reduced significantly and the mental health scores have improved, while for the control group, no significant difference was obtained on the de-pression and mental health scores. This indicates that group music therapy can effectively reduce depression and improve mental health.

Haizhen Wang

2011-03-01

92

Chronobiology and Mood Disorders  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Living organizms show cyclic rhythmicity in a variety of physiological, hormonal, behavioral, and psychological processes. Sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, hormone levels, mood and cognition display a circadian rhythm in humans. Delays, advances or desynchronizations of circadian rhythm are known to be strongly associated with mental illness especially mood disorders such as bipolar disorder, major depression and seasonal affective disorder. Furthermore, some of the mood stabilizers, sleep deprivation and light treatment are employed to treat mood disorders by shifting circadian rhythm. This paper reviews the relationship between mood disorders and circadian rhythm, and describes treatment options by altering circadian rhythm.

Yavuz Selvi

2011-09-01

93

Statistical parametric mapping analysis of the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and symptom clusters of the depressive mood in patients with pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and symptom clusters of depressive mood in pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease (CKD). Twenty-seven patients with stage 4-5 CKD were subjected to statistical parametric mapping analysis of brain single-photon emission computed tomography. Correlation analyses between separate symptom clusters of depressive mood and rCBF were done. The first factor (depressive mood) was negatively correlated with rCBF in the right insula, posterior cingulate gyrus, and left superior temporal gyrus, and positively correlated with rCBF in the left fusiform gyrus. The second factor (insomnia) was negatively correlated with rCBF in the right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral cingulate gyri, right insula, right putamen, and right inferior parietal lobule, and positively correlated with rCBF in left fusiform gyrus and bilateral cerebellar tonsils. The third factor (anxiety and psychomotor aspects) was negatively correlated with rCBF in the left inferior frontal gyms, right superior frontal gyms, right middle temporal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, and left superior frontal gyrus, and positively correlated with rCBF in the right ligual gyrus and right parahippocampal gyrus. In this study, the separate symptom clusters were correlated with specific rCBF patterns similar to those in major depressive disorder patients without CKD. However, some areas with discordant rCBF patterns were also noted when compared with major depressive disorder patients. Further larger scale investigations are needed. (author)

94

Validation of a composite of suicide items from the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) in offspring of recurrently depressed parents.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) is widely used for the assessment of depression in adolescents. The main aim of this study was to examine the concurrent and predictive validity of a composite of four MFQ items related to suicidal ideation using an interview measure of suicidal ideation. A prospective 3-wave high-risk study of offspring of parents with recurrent depression was used including 294 families where children were initially aged 9-17 years. Measures included four parent and child rated MFQ items assessing suicide-related ideation (referred to here as the "MFQ-SI") and a clinically-defined interview measure of suicidal ideation. A parent-child combined MFQ-SI subscale performed well as a screening tool against the interview measure of suicidal ideation (baseline area under the curve (AUC) (95% CI):0.92 (0.85-1.00)). Longitudinally, this measure showed reasonable predictive validity against future suicidal ideation (AUC (95% CI):0.73 (0.58-0.88)). Lastly, there was evidence that a child-rated MFQ-SI scale performed better than a parent-rated one in detecting concurrent suicidal ideation. Longitudinally, both parent and child scales showed reasonable predictive validity against future suicidal ideation. In summary, a brief screen using four MFQ items related to suicidal ideation performs well in identifying concurrent and future suicidal ideation in high-risk adolescents. PMID:24534124

Hammerton, Gemma; Zammit, Stanley; Potter, Robert; Thapar, Anita; Collishaw, Stephan

2014-04-30

95

The Effect of Eight Weeks of Aerobic Training on Reducing Mood Disorders, Depression And Mania in High School Students High School Boys  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study was to consider the effect of eight weeks of aerobic training on the reduction of mood disorders, depression and mania in boys' high school in Ilam-Iran. This was a quasi-experimental and field research taking the experimental and control groups into consideration. In this study, 60 students were randomly selected as the sample. In order to measure students' Depression and mania, multifaceted Minnesota questionnaire (MMPI-2 and depression and mania sub-scales were used. We applied both descriptive and inferential statistics using SPSS software for statistical analysis of data. The results showed that eight weeks of aerobic exercise had a significant effect on students` depressive disorders and mania. Eight weeks of aerobic exercise reduced depression and mania in experimental group of students.

Mohsen Piri

2012-01-01

96

Erythropoietin : a candidate treatment for mood symptoms and memory dysfunction in depression  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Current pharmacological treatments for depression have a significant treatment-onset-response delay, an insufficient efficacy for many patients and fail to reverse cognitive dysfunction. Erythropoietin (EPO) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions and improves cognitive function in animal models of acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions and in patients with cognitive decline.

Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Vinberg, Maj

2012-01-01

97

Effect of Induced Mood States on Activity and Self Reported Affect.  

Science.gov (United States)

Eighty-eight males and females participated in one of three affect inducing conditions which involved reading neutral, depression, or elation statements. Subjects in the depression condition, in contrast to the elation group, reported themselves to be more depressed, anxious, and hostile, were less expansive in graphic expression and less likely…

Strickland, Bonnie R.; Hale, W. Daniel

98

Erythropoietin: a candidate treatment for mood symptoms and memory dysfunction in depression.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

OBJECTIVE: Current pharmacological treatments for depression have a significant treatment-onset-response delay, an insufficient efficacy for many patients and fail to reverse cognitive dysfunction. Erythropoietin (EPO) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions and improves cognitive function in animal models of acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions and in patients with cognitive decline. METHODS: We systematically reviewed the published findings from animal and human studies explo...

Miskowiak, Kw; Vinberg, M.; Harmer, Cj; Ehrenreich, H.; Kessing, Lv

2012-01-01

99

Ovariectomy results in variable changes in nociception, mood and depression in adult female rats.  

Science.gov (United States)

Decline in the ovarian hormones with menopause may influence somatosensory, cognitive, and affective processing. The present study investigated whether hormonal depletion alters the nociceptive, depressive-like and learning behaviors in experimental rats after ovariectomy (OVX), a common method to deplete animals of their gonadal hormones. OVX rats developed thermal hyperalgesia in proximal and distal tail that was established 2 weeks after OVX and lasted the 7 weeks of the experiment. A robust mechanical allodynia was also occurred at 5 weeks after OVX. In the 5th week after OVX, dilute formalin (5%)-induced nociceptive responses (such as elevating and licking or biting) during the second phase were significantly increased as compared to intact and sham-OVX females. However, chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve-induced mechanical allodynia did not differ as hormonal status (e.g. OVX and ovarian intact). Using formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA), which is believed to reflect the pain-related negative emotion, we further found that OVX significantly attenuated F-CPA scores but did not alter electric foot-shock-induced CPA (S-CPA). In the open field and forced swimming test, there was an increase in depressive-like behaviors in OVX rats. There was no detectable impairment of spatial performance by Morris water maze task in OVX rats up to 5 weeks after surgery. Estrogen replacement retrieved OVX-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity and depressive-like behaviors. This is the first study to investigate the impacts of ovarian removal on nociceptive perception, negative emotion, depressive-like behaviors and spatial learning in adult female rats in a uniform and standard way. PMID:24710472

Li, Li-Hong; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

2014-01-01

100

Condições ambientais associadas ao humor depressivo na adolescência / Environmental conditions associated with depressed mood in adolescence  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Portugal | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese O presente trabalho analisa a associação entre ambiente físico e social e a psicopatologia, nomeadamente depressão, numa amostra de 254 adolescentes, 82 do sexo masculino e 172 do sexo feminino, todos estudantes do ensino secundário de três escolas de uma zona perto de Lisboa, com uma média de idade [...] de 16,9 (DP = 1,48). A recolha de dados foi efetuada com recurso a um Questionário Demográfico, ao Inventário de Depressão Infantil - CDI (Kovacs, 1981) e ao Inventário de Sintomas Breve - BSI (Derogatis, 1982). Os resultados confirmaram a hipótese de uma associação entre sexo, grau de escolaridade, a ESE parental e as condições ambientais da habitação e do bairro. As implicações dos resultados são discutidas sobre os esforços para aumentar a prevenção de bem-estar e saúde mental durante a adolescência. Abstract in english The present work analyse the association of the social and physical environment and the psychopathology, namely depression, in a sample of 254 teenagers, 82 males and 172 females, all them high school students from three schools nearby area of Lisbon, with a average age of 16.9 (SD = 1.48). The data [...] collection included a Demographic Questionnaire, the Children´s Depression Inventory - CDI (Kovacs, 1981) and the Brief Symptom Inventory - BSI (Derogatis, 1982). Results confirmed the hypothesis of an association among gender, school grade, parental SES and the environmental conditions of the housing and neighbourhood. Implications of the results are discussed namely concerning preventing efforts to increase wellbeing and mental health during adolescence.

Anabela, Rosando; Margarida Gaspar de, Matos.

 
 
 
 
101

Condições ambientais associadas ao humor depressivo na adolescência / Environmental conditions associated with depressed mood in adolescence  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Portugal | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese O presente trabalho analisa a associação entre ambiente físico e social e a psicopatologia, nomeadamente depressão, numa amostra de 254 adolescentes, 82 do sexo masculino e 172 do sexo feminino, todos estudantes do ensino secundário de três escolas de uma zona perto de Lisboa, com uma média de idade [...] de 16,9 (DP = 1,48). A recolha de dados foi efetuada com recurso a um Questionário Demográfico, ao Inventário de Depressão Infantil - CDI (Kovacs, 1981) e ao Inventário de Sintomas Breve - BSI (Derogatis, 1982). Os resultados confirmaram a hipótese de uma associação entre sexo, grau de escolaridade, a ESE parental e as condições ambientais da habitação e do bairro. As implicações dos resultados são discutidas sobre os esforços para aumentar a prevenção de bem-estar e saúde mental durante a adolescência. Abstract in english The present work analyse the association of the social and physical environment and the psychopathology, namely depression, in a sample of 254 teenagers, 82 males and 172 females, all them high school students from three schools nearby area of Lisbon, with a average age of 16.9 (SD = 1.48). The data [...] collection included a Demographic Questionnaire, the Children´s Depression Inventory - CDI (Kovacs, 1981) and the Brief Symptom Inventory - BSI (Derogatis, 1982). Results confirmed the hypothesis of an association among gender, school grade, parental SES and the environmental conditions of the housing and neighbourhood. Implications of the results are discussed namely concerning preventing efforts to increase wellbeing and mental health during adolescence.

Anabela, Rosando; Margarida Gaspar de, Matos.

2013-03-01

102

Protocol for a randomised controlled trial investigating self-help email messages for sub-threshold depression: the Mood Memos study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-threshold depression is common, impairs functioning, and increases the risk of developing major depression. Although psychological treatments have been investigated for sub-threshold depression, they are costly. A less costly alternative could be an educational health promotion campaign about effective self-help for depression symptoms. The aim of the study is to test the efficacy of a low-cost email-based mental health promotion campaign in changing self-help behaviour and preventing more severe depression in adults with sub-threshold depression. Methods/Design The project is a randomised controlled trial of an automated preventive email-intervention aimed at people with sub-threshold depression. Adults aged 18+ with sub-threshold depression (as measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, who are not already receiving professional treatment for depression, are eligible for admission to the study. Internet users will sign up via the study website http://www.moodmemos.com and be randomly allocated to receive emails twice weekly for six weeks containing either self-help coping advice or general information about depression as a control. Outcomes will be assessed at the start, midpoint, and end of the intervention, as well as six months later. Outcomes assessed include symptoms, incidence of major depression, psychological distress, social and occupational functioning, coping strategies, and coping self-efficacy. The primary hypothesis is that the Mood Memo emails containing coping strategies will reduce depression symptoms and be better at preventing major depression than the control emails that contain general information about depression. Discussion Promotion of actions an individual can take to prevent physical disease is a technique often used in public health. This study applies this approach to mental health, and explores whether a low-cost, easily disseminated email-based campaign can improve self-help coping behaviour and prevent depression in adults with sub-threshold depression. Trial Registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12609000925246

Mackinnon Andrew J

2011-01-01

103

Feasibility of an interval, inspiration-triggered nocturnal odorant application by a novel device: a patient-blinded, randomised crossover, pilot trial on mood and sleep quality of depressed female inpatients.  

Science.gov (United States)

It has been suggested that certain odorants positively affect mood, but this has not yet been scientifically tested in humans. The aim of the current study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new odorant applicator and to assess the effects of nocturnal intermittent rose odorant application on mood, and quality of sleep and dreams in depressed female inpatients. We hypothesised that mood as primary outcome will improve. Twenty-seven normosmic, 18- to 49-year-old female, depressed inpatients were investigated in a randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Exclusion criteria were rhinitis, hyp- or anosmia. During sleep, an interval-controlled, inspiration-triggered applicator added rose concentrate to the inspirated air. There were three consecutive nights of each odorant and placebo application and a wash-out phase. Patients completed standardised questionnaires on mood, dreams, and sleep quality. Four patients dropped out (n = 1: non-compliance in filling in the questionnaires, n = 3: intolerance of nasal tube). Otherwise, this novel odorant applicator was well tolerated. Application of the odorant showed no significant mood differences between rose and placebo, however, some subdomains of sleep quality and mood showed a positive trend towards improvement by rose application. The feasibility of this new device and of nasal tubes could be shown. Odorant application is well tolerated. It may have a positive influence on quality of mood and sleep in depressed patients. A longer application phase is planned to obtain convincing evidence for our hypothesis. PMID:24390040

Vitinius, Frank; Hellmich, Martin; Matthies, Annalena; Bornkessel, Fabian; Burghart, Heiner; Albus, Christian; Huettenbrink, Karl-Bernd; Vent, Julia

2014-09-01

104

Efecto de diversas actividades físicas en el estado anímico depresivo en estudiantes universitarios costarricenses / Effect of physical activities on depressive mood in Costa Rican university students  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Costa Rica | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Objetivo: Determinar el efecto de actividades físicas en el estado anímico depresivo de estudiantes universitarios costarricenses. Método: Participaron 522 estudiantes (259 mujeres y 263 hombres) matriculados en la Universidad de Costa Rica. Se construyeron dos categorías según la finalidad del curs [...] o matriculado: a) acondicionamiento físico (n = 208) y b) actividad deportiva (n = 314). Los instrumentos: Perfil de Estados Anímicos (POMS) y el Inventario de Depresión de Beck (BDI-II), se aplicaron al inicio, a la segunda semana y al final del curso. El programa fue de 12 semanas. Resultados: el 16.25% del estudiantado presentó síntomas depresivos entre leve y severo. Se encontró una correlación significativa entre el Índice de masa Corporal y los síntomas de depresión para quienes obtuvieron puntajes de depresión entre leve, moderada y severa (r = 0.224; p = 0.041). Se encontraron porcentajes de cambio diferentes para el constructo depresión cuando los participantes realizaron actividades deportivas o de acondicionamiento físico; sin embargo, éstos variaron según el instrumento utilizado. Con el BDI-II ambos grupos experimentaron reducción significativa en depresión (p Abstract in english Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of physical activities on the depressive mood of Costa Rican university students. Methods: Participants were 522 students (259 females and 263 males) attending the University of Costa Rica. Two categories were constructed based on the r [...] egistered course goal: a) fitness class (n = 208) and b) sports class (n= 314). The data collection instruments Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Beck’s Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) were filled out at the beginning of the semester, two-weeks after, and at the end of the course. The course duration was 12 weeks long. Results: 16.25% of the students showed light and severe depressive symptoms. A significant correlation between body mass index and depression symptoms was found among participants scoring light, moderate and severe depression mood (r =0.224; p = 0.041). Percentage change scores were found for the depression construct when participants performed sports or fitness activities; however, scores varied according to the measurement instrument used. When the BDI-II scale was used both groups showed a significant reduction in depression (p

Cinthya, Campos Salazar; José, Moncada Jiménez.

2012-06-01

105

Epilepsy and Mood Disorders  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mood disorders are the most common psychiatric comorbid disorder that affects quality of life and prognosis in epilepsy. The relation between depression and epilepsy is bidirectional. Not only the risk of having a depression among epilepsy cases is more than the healthy control cases, but also the risk of having epilepsy among depressive cases is more than the healthy control cases. People diagnosed with epilepsy are five times more likely than their peers to commit suicide. Moreover it seems that some epilepsy types like temporal lobe epilepsy have a much higher risk (25 times for suicide. Risk of suicide in epilepsy, which is independent from depression, increases more with the presence of depression. The common pathway between epilepsy, depression and suicide is hypofrontality and irregularity of serotonin metabolism. Contrary to depression, data on relationship between bipolar disorder and epilepsy is limited. However, mood disorder, mixed episodes with irritable character and mania are more frequent than assumed. As a matter of fact, both disorders share some common features. Both are episodic and can become chronic. Kindling phenomenon, irregularities in neurotransmitters, irregularities in voltage gate ion channels and irregularities in secondary messenger systems are variables that are presented in the etiologies of both disorders. Anticonvulsant drugs with mood regulatory effects are the common points of treatment. Understanding their mechanisms of action will clarify the pathophysiological processes. In this article, the relationhip between epilepsy and mood disorders, comorbidity, secondary states and treatment options in both cases have been discussed.

Sermin Kesebir

2012-03-01

106

A randomised, feasibility trial of a tele-health intervention for Acute Coronary Syndrome patients with depression ('MoodCare': Study protocol  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary heart disease (CHD and depression are leading causes of disease burden globally and the two often co-exist. Depression is common after Myocardial Infarction (MI and it has been estimated that 15-35% of patients experience depressive symptoms. Co-morbid depression can impair health related quality of life (HRQOL, decrease medication adherence and appropriate utilisation of health services, lead to increased morbidity and suicide risk, and is associated with poorer CHD risk factor profiles and reduced survival. We aim to determine the feasibility of conducting a randomised, multi-centre trial designed to compare a tele-health program (MoodCare for depression and CHD secondary prevention, with Usual Care (UC. Methods Over 1600 patients admitted after index admission for Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS are being screened for depression at six metropolitan hospitals in the Australian states of Victoria and Queensland. Consenting participants are then contacted at two weeks post-discharge for baseline assessment. One hundred eligible participants are to be randomised to an intervention or a usual medical care control group (50 per group. The intervention consists of up to 10 × 30-40 minute structured telephone sessions, delivered by registered psychologists, commencing within two weeks of baseline screening. The intervention focuses on depression management, lifestyle factors (physical activity, healthy eating, smoking cessation, alcohol intake, medication adherence and managing co-morbidities. Data collection occurs at baseline (Time 1, 6 months (post-intervention (Time 2, 12 months (Time 3 and 24 months follow-up for longer term effects (Time 4. We are comparing depression (Cardiac Depression Scale [CDS] and HRQOL (Short Form-12 [SF-12] scores between treatment and UC groups, assessing the feasibility of the program through patient acceptability and exploring long term maintenance effects. A cost-effectiveness analysis of the costs and outcomes for patients in the intervention and control groups is being conducted from the perspective of health care costs to the government. Discussion This manuscript presents the protocol for a randomised, multi-centre trial to evaluate the feasibility of a tele-based depression management and CHD secondary prevention program for ACS patients. The results of this trial will provide valuable new information about potential psychological and wellbeing benefits, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of an innovative tele-based depression management and secondary prevention program for CHD patients experiencing depression. Trial Registration Number Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12609000386235

Hare David L

2011-02-01

107

Preventing mood and anxiety disorders in youth: a multi-centre RCT in the high risk offspring of depressed and anxious patients  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Anxiety and mood disorders are highly prevalent and pose a huge burden on patients. Their offspring is at increased risk of developing these disorders as well, indicating a clear need for prevention of psychopathology in this group. Given high comorbidity and non-specificity of intergenerational transmission of disorders, prevention programs should target both anxiety and depression. Further, while the indication for preventive interventions is often elevated symptoms, offspring with other high risk profiles may also benefit from resilience-based prevention programs. Method/design The current STERK-study (Screening and Training: Enhancing Resilience in Kids is a randomized controlled clinical trial combining selected and indicated prevention: it is targeted at both high risk individuals without symptoms and at those with subsyndromal symptoms. Individuals without symptoms meet two of three criteria of the High Risk Index (HRI; female gender, both parents affected, history of a parental suicide (attempt. This index was developed in an earlier study and corresponds with elevated risk in offspring of depressed patients. Children aged 8–17 years (n?=?204 with subthreshold symptoms or meeting the criteria on the HRI are randomised to one of two treatment conditions, namely (a 10 weekly individual child CBT sessions and 2 parent sessions or (b minimal information. Assessments are held at pre-test, post-test and at 12 and 24 months follow-up. Primary outcome is the time to onset of a mood or anxiety disorder in the offspring. Secondary outcome measures include number of days with depression or anxiety, child and parent symptom levels, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness. Based on models of aetiology of mood and anxiety disorders as well as mechanisms of change during interventions, we selected potential mediators and moderators of treatment outcome, namely coping, parent–child interaction, self-associations, optimism/pessimism, temperament, and emotion processing. Discussion The current intervention trial aims to significantly reduce the risk of intergenerational transmission of mood and anxiety disorders with a short and well targeted intervention that is directed at strengthening the resilience in potentially vulnerable children. We plan to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of such an intervention and to identify mechanisms of change. Trial registration NTR2888

Nauta Maaike H

2012-04-01

108

Agreement between children and parents when reporting anxiety and depressive symptoms in pediatric epilepsy.  

Science.gov (United States)

The levels of agreement between self- and parent/proxy-reports of anxiety and depressive symptoms in pediatric epilepsy were evaluated. Data were drawn from 56 pairs of children with epilepsy and at least one parent. Anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), while depressive symptoms were assessed using the Mood and Feeling Questionnaire (MFQ). Moderate to substantial levels of agreement between raters when reporting various anxiety symptoms, such as panic/somatic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, and school phobia symptoms, were observed. Levels of agreement between raters were substantial when reporting depressive symptoms. However, levels of agreement differed if raw or criterion-referenced questionnaires' scores were used. In case of using raw questionnaire scores, substantial agreements appeared when reporting overall anxiety and depressive symptoms. On the other hand, moderate agreements appeared when reporting particular anxiety symptoms with raw questionnaire scores or when using criterion-referenced scores that indicate the presence of certain symptoms in a clinical range. Therefore, it is advisable to include both raters when assessing anxiety and depressive symptoms in pediatric epilepsy. PMID:23032119

Stevanovic, Dejan; Jancic, Jasna; Topalovic, Mirko; Tadic, Ivana

2012-10-01

109

Learning about depression  

Science.gov (United States)

... once in a while. Clinical depression is a mood disorder. It occurs when feelings of sadness, loss, anger, ... Fava M, Cassano P. Mood disorders: Major depressive disorder and ... JF, Fava M, Biederman J, Rauch SL, eds. Massachusetts General ...

110

A Test of the Effects of Acute Sleep Deprivation on General and Specific Self-Reported Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms: An Experimental Extension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Evidence indicates acute sleep deprivation affects negative mood states. The present study experimentally tested the effects of acute sleep deprivation on self-reported symptoms of state anxiety and depression as well as general distress among 88 physically and psychologically healthy adults. As hypothesized, the effects of acute sleep deprivation increased state anxiety and depression, as well as general distress, relative to a normal night of sleep control condition. Based on the tripartite...

Babson, Kimberly A.; Trainor, Casey D.; Feldner, Matthew T.; Blumenthal, Heidemarie

2010-01-01

111

Anomalous Functional Brain Activation Following Negative Mood Induction in Children with Pre-School Onset Major Depression  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

While major depressive disorder has been shown to be a significant mental health issue for school-age children, recent research indicates that depression can be observed in children as early as the preschool period. Yet, little work has been done to explore the neurobiological factors associated with this early form of depression. Given research suggesting a relation between adult depression and anomalies in emotion-related neural circuitry, the goal of the current study was to elucidate chan...

Pagliaccio, David; Luby, Joan; Gaffrey, Mike; Belden, Andrew; Botteron, Kelly; Gotlib, Ian H.; Barch, Deanna M.

2012-01-01

112

Mood disorder as a manifestation of primary hypoparathyroidism: a case report  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction Primary hypoparathyroidism is a rare condition caused by parathyroid hormone deficiency and characterized by hypocalcemia. The clinical manifestations of primary hypoparathyroidism include tetany, seizures, paresthesias, dementia, and parkinsonism. Psychiatric manifestations such as mood disorders are unusual and may constitute a major diagnostic challenge, especially if the typical manifestations caused by hypocalcemia are absent. Case presentation The patient was a 22-year-old Caucasian man with a history of chronic omeprazole use and periodic seizures, who presented to the emergency department of a secondary hospital in Southern Brazil with symptoms of major depression (sadness, anhedonia, loss of appetite, insomnia, and fatigue) associated with paresthesias affecting his toes. The initial electrocardiogram revealed a prolonged QTc interval. A computed tomography scan of his brain revealed bilateral, nonenhancing hyperdense calcifications involving the putamen and caudate nucleus. An electroencephalogram showed generalized bursts of slow spikes. Blood laboratory study results indicated serum hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, and hyperphosphatemia associated with a low parathyroid hormone level. His serum levels of albumin, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, thyroid-stimulating hormone, T3 and T4 thyroid hormones, as well as the results of kidney function tests, were normal. The definitive diagnosis was primary hypoparathyroidism with psychiatric manifestations due to chronic hypomagnesemia induced by proton pump inhibitor use. Conclusions In some cases, to differentiate between a primary psychiatric disorder and primary hypoparathyroidism with neuropsychiatric symptoms may represent a challenge given that the classical manifestations of hypocalcemia, especially tetany, may be absent in the setting of chronic hypoparathyroidism. Clinicians and psychiatrists should consider primary hypoparathyroidism part of the differential diagnosis during the evaluation of patients with mood symptoms, especially in the context of atypical presentations associated with hypocalcemia. PMID:25280468

2014-01-01

113

MOOD CHANGES FOLLOWING GOLF AMONG SENIOR RECREATIONAL PLAYERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Golf has been recommended as a relatively risk-free form of exercise for an ageing population. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of playing a round of golf on mood states in recreational players. Ageing male golfers (N = 34; Age: M = 68.7, SD = 5.4 years completed a mood measure immediately before and after an 18-hole round of golf. Distance walked per game was measured using a pedometer. Results indicate reported scores on Anger, Depression, and Fatigue increased and Vigor reduced following the game. However, it should be noted that although there was an increase in unpleasant mood states, this should be seen in the context of the overall mood profile, which was positive. Pedometer results indicated golfers walked a mean distance of 10.21 km (± 1.11. Results show participants of this age-group engaged in a meaningful exercise session and that mood scores deteriorated following play. Findings from the present study show that elderly golfers experienced mood profiles following golf similar to younger athletes following competition. For golf to be recommended as an activity for promoting physical activity among an aging population, the player's ability to regulate unpleasant mood states should be considered. Future research should investigate the effects of experiencing negative mood states following golf on motivation to participate.

Haydn Jarrett

2005-03-01

114

Pessimistic Mood in Decompensated Narcissistic Patient.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We report the negative emotional state as pessimistic mood of a case with narcissisticpersonality disorder during the period of narcissistic decompensation. In addition, we identifiedthe clinical differences between pessimistic mood and depressive disorder. An 28-yearoldunmarried woman experienced herself; her life and the external object as futile and disappointingafter repeated failure to satisfy her grandiose fantasies about the search for ideallove. The patient then gave up her formerly gratifying activities, and fell into a prolongedstate of negative emotions and passivity dominated by pessimistic mood characterized by anoverwhelming sense of futility. The patient did not respond to medical treatment with antidepressantsfirstly. However after a 2-year course of intensive psychotherapy , the patientwas able to restore her zest to find a new boyfriend with a more rational and realistic attitude.Clinically, decompensated narcissistic patients do not exhibit the typical attitude ofworthlessness or guilty feelings, and are devoid of certain specific depressive emotions(e.g.,sadness, sorrow, etc.. In contrast, decompenssted narcissistic patients with pessimistic moodexhibit a dominant sense of futility and other negative emotions presented as outrage anddisappointment. The purpose of this case report was to emphasize the importance to recognizeclinical features of pessimistic mood for the differential diagnosis and management ofthe decompensated narcissistic patient.

Ping-Suen Yang

2004-04-01

115

Mood congruence effect in autobiographical recall: Is mood a mediator?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the present study we test the hypothesis that the effect of mood congruence in autobiographical recall is underlain by mood. Thirty-eight female participants were subjected to positive, negative and neutral mood inductions, and then asked to recall three personal memories. Participants’ mood was assessed using self-report questionnaires and by electromyograph (EMG measurements of corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major muscle activity. We replicated the congruence effect between the mood inductions and the valence of the participants’ recalled memories. Furthermore, this effect was mediated by mood, as measured by EMG and self-report questionnaires. The results suggest that mood influences the mood congruence effect in a way that cannot be explained by semantic priming alone.

Dra?e Saša

2013-01-01

116

Depression - elderly  

Science.gov (United States)

Depression in the elderly ... Cassano P, Fava M. Mood disorders: major depressive disorder and dysthymic disorder. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum JF, Fava M, Biederman J, Rauch SL, eds. Massachusetts General ...

117

What Makes Argentinian Girls Unhappy? A Cross-Cultural Contribution to Understanding Gender Differences in Depressed Mood during Adolescence.  

Science.gov (United States)

Aims to provide a cross-cultural contribution to the study of gender differences in adolescent mood by providing results of a survey of Argentinian boys and girls at the age of 13-14, 15-16, and 17-18. The gender difference, larger than that of many first-world samples, is significant at 15-16 and the gap increases at 17-18. (Author)

Facio, Alicia; Batistuta, Mercedes

2001-01-01

118

Regional cerebral blood flow in mood disorders. I. Comparison of major depressives and normal controls at rest  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We measured regional cerebral blood flow with the xenon 133 inhalation technique in 41 patients with major depressive disorder and 40 matched, normal controls during an eyes-closed, resting condition. The depressed group had a marked reduction in global cortical blood flow. To examine topographic abnormalities, traditional multivariate analyses were applied, as well as a new scaled subprofile model developed to identify abnormal functional neural networks in clinical samples. Both approaches indicated that the depressed sample had an abnormality in topographic distribution of blood flow, in addition to the global deficit. The scaled subprofile model identified the topographic abnormality as being due to flow reduction in the depressed patients in selective frontal, central, superior temporal, and anterior parietal regions. This pattern may reflect dysfunction in the parallel distributed cortical network involving frontal and temporoparietal polymodal association areas. The extent of this topographic abnormality, as revealed by the scaled subprofile model, was associated with both patient age and severity of depressive symptoms

119

Manipulating serotonin function in depression  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In Chapter 2, results of a study are reported in which remitted depressed patients are compared to healthy controls to investigate possible residual cognitive impairments that persist into the euthymic phase. Chapter 3 will describe the effects of an alpha-lactalbumin enriched diet on cognitive performance in unmedicated recovered depressed patients and healthy controls. In Chapter 4 the effects of alpha-lactalbumin on mood and stress-induced cortisol response in unmedicated recovered depress...

Merens, Wendelien

2007-01-01

120

Major Depression in a Brazilian Amazon Woman with Down Syndrome: A Case Report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We report on a 28 years-old woman with Down syndrome and moderate intellectual disability that was referred to us with a 1-month history of progressive change from being cheerful and cooperative to becoming socially withdrawn, tearful, apathetic and disinterested in activities. She had also shown behavioral deterioration with loss of adaptive skills. Her appetite decreased, leading to a 10 kg weight loss, and she developed initial insomnia. The patient was treated with fluoxetine at 20 mg each day. She made a complete recovery over one month, and 15 months after the beginning of pharmacologic therapy, continued to be free of depressive symptoms. Although major depression is not commonly associated with Down’s syndrome, the diagnosis of this mood disorder must be considered when alterations of vegetative functions and activity are observed.

Dárcio Marcel Castelo de Souza

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
121

Reproductive hormonal treatments for mood disorders in women.  

Science.gov (United States)

There has been a century-long view in medicine that reproductive function in both men and women is intimately involved with mood regulation. The 19th century witnessed a proliferation of medical reports documenting beneficial effects on mood and behavior after medical or surgical manipulations of women's reproductive functíon. More recently, the results of several studies suggest that gonadal steroids do regulate mood in some women. Thus, there is considerable interest in the potential role of reproductive therapies in the management of depressive illness, including both classical and reproductive endocrine-related mood disorders. Future studies need to determine the predictors of response to hormonal therapies compared with traditional antidepressant agents, and to characterize the long-term safety and benefits of these therapies. PMID:22033644

Schmidt, Peter J; Rubinow, David R

2002-06-01

122

Perinatal episodes across the mood disorder spectrum.  

Science.gov (United States)

CONTEXT Affective disorders are common in women, with many episodes having an onset in pregnancy or during the postpartum period. OBJECTIVE To investigate the occurrence and timing of perinatal mood episodes in women with bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and recurrent major depression (RMD). SETTING AND PATIENTS Women were recruited in our ongoing research on the genetic and nongenetic determinants of major affective disorders. Participants were interviewed and case notes were reviewed. Best-estimate diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV criteria. The 1785 parous women identified included 1212 women with bipolar disorder (980 with type I and 232 with type II) and 573 with RMD. Data were available on 3017 live births. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES We report the lifetime occurrence of perinatal mood episodes, the rates of perinatal episodes per pregnancy/postpartum period, and the timing of the onset of episodes in relation to delivery. RESULTS More than two-thirds of all diagnostic groups reported at least 1 lifetime episode of illness during pregnancy or the postpartum period. Women with bipolar I disorder reported an approximately 50% risk of a perinatal major affective episode per pregnancy/postpartum period. Risks were lower in women with RMD or bipolar II disorder, at approximately 40% per pregnancy/postpartum period. Mood episodes were significantly more common in the postpartum period in bipolar I disorder and RMD. Most perinatal episodes occurred within the first postpartum month, with mania or psychosis having an earlier onset than depression. CONCLUSIONS Although episodes of postpartum mood disorder are more common in bipolar I disorder and manic and psychotic presentations occur earlier in the postpartum period, perinatal episodes are highly prevalent across the mood disorder spectrum. PMID:23247604

Di Florio, Arianna; Forty, Liz; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Heron, Jess; Jones, Lisa; Craddock, Nicholas; Jones, Ian

2013-02-01

123

A proof of principle for using adaptive testing in routine Outcome Monitoring: the efficiency of the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire -Anhedonic Depression CAT  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background In Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM there is a high demand for short assessments. Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT is a promising method for efficient assessment. In this article, the efficiency of a CAT version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire, - Anhedonic Depression scale (MASQ-AD for use in ROM was scrutinized in a simulation study. Methods The responses of a large sample of patients (N = 3,597 obtained through ROM were used. The psychometric evaluation showed that the items met the requirements for CAT. In the simulations, CATs with several measurement precision requirements were run on the item responses as if they had been collected adaptively. Results CATs employing only a small number of items gave results which, both in terms of depression measurement and criterion validity, were only marginally different from the results of a full MASQ-AD assessment. Conclusions It was concluded that CAT improved the efficiency of the MASQ-AD questionnaire very much. The strengths and limitations of the application of CAT in ROM are discussed.

Smits Niels

2012-01-01

124

A pilot, 8-week, placebo lead-in trial of quetiapine extended release for depression in midlife women: impact on mood and menopause-related symptoms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Perimenopausal and early postmenopausal women have shown an increased risk for developing depression (new onset or recurrent); concomitant vasomotor and other menopause-related complaints significantly affect quality of life and overall functioning. This study examined the effects of quetiapine extended release (XR) in midlife women with major depressive disorder who also reported significant menopause-related symptoms. Forty eligible women with major depressive disorder entered a 2-week, placebo lead-in phase, followed by an 8-week open trial with quetiapine XR, flexible dose, 150-300 mg/d. The primary outcome measure (depressive symptoms) was assessed using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores. Other measures included menopause symptoms (Greene Climacteric Scale total scores and subscores) and the impact of hot flashes on functioning (Hot Flash-Related Daily Interference Scale). Weight, cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose levels were monitored. Data from 24 subjects (modified intent-to-treat, last observation carried forward; quetiapine XR mean dose, 191 [SD, 55] mg/d) showed improvement in depressive and menopause-related symptoms, that is, reduction in MADRS, GCS, and Hot Flash-Related Daily Interference Scale scores (P 50% reduction in MADRS scores); 15 achieved remission (MADRSquetiapine XR should be further examined in larger, controlled trials for the management of depressed, symptomatic midlife women. PMID:20814317

Soares, Claudio N; Frey, Benicio N; Haber, Erika; Steiner, Meir

2010-10-01

125

Temper outbursts in paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder and their association with depressed mood and treatment outcome.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Temper outbursts in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are a common source of concern, but remain poorly understood. This study examined a set of hypotheses related to: (a) the prevalence of temper outbursts in paediatric OCD, (b) the associations of temper outbursts with OCD severity and depressive symptoms; and (c) the influence of temper outbursts on treatment response.

Krebs, G.; Bolhuis, K.; Heyman, I.; Mataix-cols, D.; Turner, C.; Stringaris, A

2013-01-01

126

Temper Outbursts in Paediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Their Association with Depressed Mood and Treatment Outcome  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Temper outbursts in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are a common source of concern, but remain poorly understood. This study examined a set of hypotheses related to: (a) the prevalence of temper outbursts in paediatric OCD, (b) the associations of temper outbursts with OCD severity and depressive symptoms; and (c) the…

Krebs, Georgina; Bolhuis, Koen; Heyman, Isobel; Mataix-Cols, David; Turner, Cynthia; Stringaris, Argyris

2013-01-01

127

Stress and Depressed Mood in Medical Students, Law Students, and Graduate Students at McGill University.  

Science.gov (United States)

Administration of the Derogatis Stress Profile to 509 medical students, 380 law students, and 215 graduate students at McGill University (Ontario) revealed that medical students are not greatly stressed relative to other groups, so other explanations must be sought for elevated levels of depression in some. One clear stressor found is the…

Helmers, Karin F.; Danoff, Deborah; Steinert, Yvonne; Young, Simon N.; Leyton, Marco

1997-01-01

128

Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

... disorder," or "clinical depression." Click for more information Depression in Older Adults Important life changes that happen as we get ... subsyndromal depression, psychotic depression. and bipolar depression. ... is common among older adults. It includes less severe but clear symptoms of ...

129

Validation of the Chinese version of the "Mood Disorder Questionnaire" for screening bipolar disorder among patients with a current depressive episode  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ is a well-recognized screening tool for bipolar disorder, but its Chinese version needs further validation. This study aims to measure the accuracy of the Chinese version of the MDQ as a screening instrument for bipolar disorder (BPD in a group of patients with a current major depressive episode. Methods 142 consecutive patients with an initial DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of a major depressive episode were screened for BPD using the Chinese translation of the MDQ and followed up for one year. The final diagnosis, determined by a special committee consisting of three trained senior psychiatrists, was used as a 'gold standard' and ROC was plotted to evaluate the performance of the MDQ. The optimal cut-off was chosen by maximizing the Younden's index. Results Of the 142 patients, 122 (85.9% finished the one year follow-up. On the basis of a semi-structured clinical interview 48.4% (59/122 received a diagnosis of unipolar depression (UPD, 36.9% (45/122 BPDII and 14.8% (18/122 BPDI. At the end of the one year follow-up,9 moved from UPD to BPD, 2 from BPDII to UPD, 1 from BPDII to BPDI, the overall rate of initial misdiagnosis was 16.4%. MDQ showed a good accuracy for BPD: the optimal cut-off was 4, with a sensitivity of 0.72 and a specificity of 0.73. When BPDII and BPDI were calculated independently, the optimal cut-off for BPDII was 4, with a sensitivity of 0.70 and a specificity of 0.73; while the optimal cut-off for BPDI was 5, with a sensitivity of 0.67 and a specificity of 0.86. Conclusions Our results show that the Chinese version of MDQ is a valid tool for screening BPD in a group of patients with current depressive episode on the Chinese mainland.

Gan Zhaoyu

2012-01-01

130

Screening for Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

... domain and may be used without permission. Education Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring ... to improve the lives of people who have mood disorders. The Power of Peers DBSA envisions wellness for ...

131

Diabetes and ischemic heart disease: double jeopardy with regard to depressive mood and reduced quality of life.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two chronic diseases results in an elevation in specific elements of the chronic stress concept. A total of 361 participants with IHD were included, of whom 47 suffered from concomitant diabetes. Stress was measured by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and by the following questionnaires: the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the SF-36 Quality of Life questionnaire (SF-36 QOL), the WHO-5 Well-being Index, and the clinical stress signs (CSSs) scale. Participants with diabetes and IHD had a higher MDI score, a lower SF-36 physical component summary score, and a lower score of several sub-measurements of the SF-36 mental component score when compared with patients with IHD without diabetes. No significant differences were observed regarding stress measured by the PPS measure, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, or the number of CSSs. In conclusion, the combination of diabetes and IHD seems to be associated with increased depressive symptoms, lower overall physical QOL, and reduced mental QOL on several sub-elements of the questionnaire. This should be recognized in the management of patients with double diagnoses. PMID:25139960

Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille; Bech, Per; Hjalmarson, Ake; Gyntelberg, Finn; Faber, Jens

2014-12-01

132

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... millions of people every year. Depression has an impact on most aspects of everyday ... psychological, and environmental factors can cause depression. Major depression is often ...

133

Relationship between maternal depression as a risk factor for childhood trauma and mood disorders in young adults / Relação entre depressão materna como fator de risco para trauma na infância e transtornos de humor em jovens  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Contexto Depressão materna pode ser um fator de risco para trauma na infância (TI), com consequente desenvolvimento de transtornos de humor (TH) em seus filhos na vida adulta. Objetivo Verificar a relação entre depressão materna (como fator de risco para TI) e TH em jovens. Métodos A amostra [...] foi composta de 164 jovens adultos e suas mães. A depressão materna foi identificada por meio do Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.). Transtornos de humor nos jovens foram confirmados pela entrevista estruturada para o DSM-IV (SCID), enquanto o TI foi avaliado pelo Questionário de Trauma na Infância (CTQ). Resultados No grupo de jovens com TH, indivíduos que tiveram mães deprimidas apresentaram escores médios de TI mais altos em comparação aos que não tinham mães com depressão (p Abstract in english Background Maternal depression may be a risk factor for childhood trauma (CT), with resultant offspring development of mood disorders (MD) in adult life. Objective To verify the relationship between maternal depression (as a risk factor for childhood trauma) and mood disorders in young adults. [...] Methods The sample was composed of 164 young adults and their mothers. Maternal depression was identified through the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.). Mood Disorders in the young adults were confirmed with the Structured Interview for the DSM-IV (SCID), whereas the CT was evaluated using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Results In the group of young adults with MD, individuals who had depressed mothers presented higher mean scores of CT in comparison to the ones who did not have mothers with Depression (p

Luana Porto, Barbosa; Luciana, Quevedo; Giovanna Del Grande Da, Silva; Karen, Jansen; Pedro, Magalhães; Ricardo Tavares, Pinheiro; Ricardo Azevedo da, Silva.

2014-07-01

134

Social Anxiety Disorder and Mood Disorders Comorbidity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Social Anxiety Disorder is a common disorder leading functional impairment. The comorbidity between mood disorders with social anxiety disorder is relatively common. This comorbidity impacts the clinical severity, resistance and functionality of patients. The systematic evaluation of the comorbidity in both patient groups should not be ignored and be carefully conducted. In general, social anxiety disorder starts at an earlier age than mood disorders and is reported to be predictor for subsequent major depression. The absence of comorbidity in patients with social anxiety disorder is a predictor of good response to treatment. In bipolar disorder patients with comorbid social anxiety disorder, there is an increased level of general psychopathology. Besides, they have poor outcome and increased risk of suicide. In this article, comorbidity between these two disorders has been evaluated in detail.

Zerrin Binbay

2012-03-01

135

Job strain and the risk of depression: is reporting biased?  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

It is unknown whether the relation between job strain and depression reflects causal characteristics of the working environment or reporting bias. The authors investigated reporting bias by analyzing individual versus work-unit measures of job strain and the risk of depressive symptoms (n = 287) and a diagnosis of depression (n = 97) among 4,291 employees within 378 work units in Aarhus, Denmark, 2007. All participants reported psychological demands and decision latitude, and the authors estimated mean values for each work unit. The odds ratios predicting depressive symptoms or a diagnosis of depression for the highest versus the lowest levels of individual, self-reported high psychological demands and low decision latitude were significantly increased above 2.5. When participants were classified by the work-unit mean levels, these associations were substantially smaller. For depressive symptoms, the odds ratios were 1.49 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88, 2.53) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.84, 1.39), respectively, for psychological demands and decision latitude. For a diagnosis of depression, the odds ratios were 1.33 (95% CI: 0.57, 3.09) and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.68, 1.56), respectively, for psychological demands and decision latitude. These findings indicate that reporting bias inflates associations between job strain and the occurrence of depression, if studies rely on individual self-reports.

Kolstad, Henrik; Hansen, Åse Marie

2011-01-01

136

Benefits from aerobic exercise in patients with major depression: a pilot study  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background—Several reports indicate that physical activity can reduce the severity of symptoms in depressed patients. Some data suggest that even a single exercise bout may result in a substantial mood improvement.

Dimeo, F.; Bauer, M.; Varahram, I.; Proest, G.; Halter, U.

2001-01-01

137

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... life. In addition, depression affects the people who love and care about the person who is depressed. ... guide you toward helping yourself or someone you love who may be suffering from depression. Depression Feeling ...

138

Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

... a person has several episodes. Dysthymic disorder, or dysthymia —depressive symptoms that last a long time (2 years or ... depression. Minor depression —similar to major depression and dysthymia, but symptoms are less severe and may not last as ...

139

Adolescent Depression.  

Science.gov (United States)

Affective disorder is characterized by maladaptive changes in mood, attitudes, energy level, and physical status. These changes constitute the basic dimensions of depression. Depression results from a combination of genetic and experiential factors. There are sex differences and age differences with regard to depression, and there is a high…

Evans, Dina M.

140

In the winning mood  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present research aimed to test the role of mood in the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT; Bechara et al., 1994. In the IGT, participants can win or lose money by picking cards from four different decks. They have to learn by experience that two decks are overall advantageous and two decks are overall disadvantageous. Previous studies have shown that at an early stage in this card-game, players begin to display a tendency towards the advantageous decks. Subsequent research suggested that at this stage, people base their decisions on conscious gut feelings (Wagar and Dixon, 2006. Based on empirical evidence for the relation between mood and cognitive processing-styles, we expected and consistently found that, compared to a negative mood state, reported and induced positive mood states increased this early tendency towards advantageous decks. Our results provide support for the idea that a positive mood causes stronger reliance on affective signals in decision-making than a negative mood.

Marieke de Vries

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Why do bad things happen to me? Attributional style, depressed mood, and persecutory delusions in patients with schizophrenia.  

Science.gov (United States)

Theoretical models postulate an important role of attributional style (AS) in the formation and maintenance of persecutory delusions and other positive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, current research has gathered conflicting findings. In a cross-sectional design, patients with persistent positive symptoms of schizophrenia (n = 258) and healthy controls (n = 51) completed a revised version of the Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire (IPSAQ-R) and assessments of psychopathology. In comparison to controls, neither patients with schizophrenia in general nor patients with persecutory delusions (n = 142) in particular presented an externalizing and personalizing AS. Rather, both groups showed a "self-blaming" AS and attributed negative events more toward themselves. Persecutory delusions were independently predicted by a personalizing bias for negative events (beta = 0.197, P = .001) and by depression (beta = 0.152, P = .013), but only 5% of the variance in persecutory delusions could be explained. Cluster analysis of IPSAQ-R scores identified a "personalizing" (n = 70) and a "self-blaming" subgroup (n = 188), with the former showing slightly more pronounced persecutory delusions (P = .021). Results indicate that patients with schizophrenia and patients with persecutory delusions both mostly blamed themselves for negative events. Nevertheless, still a subgroup of patients could be identified who presented a more pronounced personalizing bias and more severe persecutory delusions. Thus, AS in patients with schizophrenia might be less stable but more determined by individual and situational characteristics that need further elucidation. PMID:24743864

Mehl, Stephanie; Landsberg, Martin W; Schmidt, Anna-Christine; Cabanis, Maurice; Bechdolf, Andreas; Herrlich, Jutta; Loos-Jankowiak, Stephanie; Kircher, Tilo; Kiszkenow, Stephanie; Klingberg, Stefan; Kommescher, Mareike; Moritz, Steffen; Müller, Bernhard W; Sartory, Gudrun; Wiedemann, Georg; Wittorf, Andreas; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Wagner, Michael

2014-11-01

142

Temporal Relations in Daily-Reported Maternal Mood and Disruptive Child Behavior  

Science.gov (United States)

Examined temporal relations between maternal mood and disruptive child behaviour using daily assessments of 30 mother-child dyads carried out over 8 consecutive weeks (623 pooled observations). Pooled time-series analyses showed synchronous fluctuation in child behaviour and maternal distress. Time-lagged models showed temporal relations between…

Elgar, Frank J.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; McGrath, Patrick J.; Stewart, Sherry H.; Curtis, Lori J.

2004-01-01

143

Restriction of meat, fish, and poultry in omnivores improves mood: A pilot randomized controlled trial  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Omnivorous diets are high in arachidonic acid (AA compared to vegetarian diets. Research shows that high intakes of AA promote changes in brain that can disturb mood. Omnivores who eat fish regularly increase their intakes of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, fats that oppose the negative effects of AA in vivo. In a recent cross-sectional study, omnivores reported significantly worse mood than vegetarians despite higher intakes of EPA and DHA. This study investigated the impact of restricting meat, fish, and poultry on mood. Findings Thirty-nine omnivores were randomly assigned to a control group consuming meat, fish, and poultry daily (OMN; a group consuming fish 3-4 times weekly but avoiding meat and poultry (FISH, or a vegetarian group avoiding meat, fish, and poultry (VEG. At baseline and after two weeks, participants completed a food frequency questionnaire, the Profile of Mood States questionnaire and the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales. After the diet intervention, VEG participants reduced their EPA, DHA, and AA intakes, while FISH participants increased their EPA and DHA intakes. Mood scores were unchanged for OMN or FISH participants, but several mood scores for VEG participants improved significantly after two weeks. Conclusions Restricting meat, fish, and poultry improved some domains of short-term mood state in modern omnivores. To our knowledge, this is the first trial to examine the impact of restricting meat, fish, and poultry on mood state in omnivores.

Beezhold Bonnie L

2012-02-01

144

Trastorno del estado de ánimo mixto con síntomas psicóticos asociado a Sibutramina Case Report: Mixed Mood Disorder with Psychotic Symptoms Associated to Sibutramine  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objetivos: describir un caso de una persona que en relación con el uso de Sibutramina presenta trastorno del estado de ánimo. Métodos: reporte de caso. Resultados: paciente de 28 años, quien presenta primer episodio maniaco con síntomas psicóticos y posterior asociación de sintomatología depresiva inducida probablemente por el uso de Sibutramina. Conclusiones: la Sibutramina puede estar relacionada con la presentación de cuadros afectivos y psicóticos en personas vulnerables, por lo que se recomienda la evaluación del estado mental y los antecedentes de la persona a quien se va a prescribir.Objectives: Describe a case of Mood Disorder in relation to the use of Sibutramine. Methods: Case Report. Results: A 28 year-old patient who shows the first episode of mania with psychotic features, with later association of depressive symptoms possibly induced by the administration of Sibutramine. Conclusions: Sibutramine can be related with the development of affective and psychotic symptoms in a vulnerable patient. The evaluation of the mental state and history is recommended before its prescription.

Juan Carlos Alba

2006-03-01

145

Negative moods correlate with craving in female methamphetamine users enrolled in compulsory detoxification  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (METH use, especially in females, has become a growing public health concern in China. In this study, we aimed to characterize the factors that contributed to drug craving in female METH users under isolated compulsory detoxification. We characterized factors contributing to craving such as duration of detoxification, history of drug use and self-reported mood state. Methods Subjects (N=113 undergoing a 1- to 3-year METH detoxification program were recruited from the Zhejiang Compulsory Detoxification Center for Women. The Questionnaire of METH-use Urge (QMU was used to evaluate the level of craving for METH. The Abbreviate Profile of Mood States (A-POMS was applied as an assessment for the negative mood disturbances. Results The participants were at a mean age of 25.2, primarily lowly educated and unemployed, and single. Smoking was the only route of METH administration at an average dose of 0.5 g/day, and 4 times/week. The reported craving level was positively correlated with the negative mood disturbances and the weekly dose of METH, but independent of the duration of detoxification. Furthermore, all five aspects of negative mood disturbances, including fatigue, bewilderment, anxiety, depression and hostility, were shown to positively correlate to the self-reported craving level after controlling for weekly dose of METH. Conclusions The data demonstrate a robust correlation between mood distress and craving for METH. Our results call for close evaluation of mood distress in treatment of METH users in China.

Shen Wenwen

2012-10-01

146

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... a baby. Depression can also affect children. Family members may think that by ignoring depression, it will ... go away. However, since depression clouds judgment, family members or friends usually need to make the first ...

147

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... com mh010106 Last reviewed: 07/28/2013 2 Causes of Depression Combination of genetic, psychological, and environmental factors can cause depression. Major depression is often associated with changes ...

148

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Causes of Depression Combination of genetic, psychological, and environmental factors can cause depression. Major depression is often ... says to do so. Antidepressants can produce side effects that may include: • Dry mouth • Feeling sleepy • Difficulty ...

149

Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

... the patient is under anesthesia. Healthy Minds TV - Depression Suicide Prevention Lifeline Depression education campaign from the Partnership ... from The Joint Commission: Let's Talk Facts Brochures: Depression Teen Suicide ECT

150

Reproductive Hormones and Mood Disorders  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available During the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and breast-feeding periods, as well as in menopausal and post-menopausal periods, the physiological and psychological processes that change according to the hormonal fluctuations influence every women similarly and each one differently. These physiological processes are controlled by neuroendocrine sequences, of which the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis are the most important ones. The hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis affects mood, anxiety, cognition and pain. The interaction of these hormones with mood and behavior is bidirectional. The differences in phenomenology and epidemiology of mood disorders with regards to gender can be explained with the effects of hormones. All of the periods mentioned above are related with mood disorders at terms of risk factors, disease symptoms, progress of disease and response to treatment. Epidemiologic data supports the relationship between the mood disorders and reproductive processes. The prevalence of major depression increases in women with the menarche and ceases in post- menopausal period. Similarly, the initial symptoms of bipolar disorder begins around the menarche period in 50% of the cases. Despite proper treatment, some female patients with major depression experience recurrence during the premenstrual period of their menstrual cycles. The conformity and change in a woman’s brain during pregnancy is controlled dominantly by the neuroendocrine systems, while it is controlled by the external stimuli actively related to the baby during nursing period. The changes that occur are closely related to postpartum mood disorders. Again, all the changes and suspension of medication during this procedure are risk factors for early depressive and dysphoric situations. Variables of a wide range, from follicle stimulating hormone, melatonin, and sleep to body mass index interact with mood disorders in menopausal and post-menopausal periods. Interest on the effects of gonadal steroids on the central nervous system has grown parallel with our increasing knowledge. In the last decade, the place of hormonal treatments in the treatment of mood disorders have been discussed continously. During this period, along with the anti-depressant efficacy of estrogen, anti-manic efficacy of tamoxifen was also demonstrated in several studies. In this paper, the complex relationship between the physiological changes and the mood disorders during a menstrual cycle, pregnancy, nursing, menopausal and post-menopausal periods are briefly reviewed and discussed over the reproductive hormones in the context of etiology, phenomenology and treatment.

Sermin Kesebir

2010-12-01

151

Stepped care for depression and anxiety: a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a stepped care program among primary care patients with mood or anxiety disorders  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mood and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and have a large impact on the lives of the affected individuals. Therefore, optimal treatment of these disorders is highly important. In this study we will examine the effectiveness of a stepped care program for primary care patients with mood and anxiety disorders. A stepped care program is characterized by different treatment steps that are arranged in order of increasing intensity. METHODS: This study is a randomised co...

Seekles, W. M.; Straten, A.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Marwijk, H. W. J.; Cuijpers, P.

2009-01-01

152

Major depression with psychotic features  

Science.gov (United States)

Psychotic depression; Delusional depression ... Fava M, Cassano P. Mood disorders: Major depressive disorder and dysthymic disorder. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum JF, Fava M, Biederman J, Rauch SL, eds. Massachusetts General ...

153

Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Distinction between true negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia is difficult. In the present study we seek to establish the psychological profile of depression-prone schizophrenic patients. We addressed the issue by comparing the expression of psychological indices, such as the feelings of being in control of events, anxiety, mood, and the style of coping with stress in depressive and non-depressive schizophrenics. We also analyzed the strength of the association of these indices with the presence of depressive symptoms. A total of 49 patients (18 women and 31 men, aged 23-59 were enrolled into the study, consisting of a self-reported psychometric survey. We found that the prevalence of clinically significant depression in schizophrenic patients was 61%. The factors which contributed to the intensification of depressive symptoms were the external locus of control, anxiety, gloomy mood, and the emotion-oriented coping with stress. We conclude that psychological testing may discern those schizophrenic patients who would be at risk of depression development and may help separate the blurred boundaries between depressive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

Gozdzik-Zelazny A

2011-12-01

154

How Does Depression Develop?  

Science.gov (United States)

... these things alone may not be enough to cause depression, but several of them acting together can trigger ... is no single gene that controls mood or causes depression. However, your genetic makeup is important, because genes ...

155

Depression history, depression vulnerability and the experience of everyday negative events.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined whether deficits in dealing with daily problems emerge before a depressive episode (i.e., pre-existing vulnerability) or after a depressive episode (i.e., psychosocial scar). Participants completed a 30-day daily diary in which they reported their most negative event of the day, their appraisals of that event, and their mood. Three years later, they completed a structured depression interview. The sample consisted of 350 college students, 24 of whom had a past history of depression and 54 of whom experienced a depressive episode subsequent to dairy completion. Multilevel modeling revealed that students with past depression blamed others more than the never-depressed and those with subsequent depression, which supported the scar hypothesis. In support of the vulnerability hypothesis, as compared to the never-depressed group, participants with past depression demonstrated steeper declines in positive mood on more stressful days but did not significantly differ from the subsequent depression group. Overall, our findings do not provide clear support for either hypothesis; however, this study is the first to use a daily diary design to directly compare individuals with past depression to individuals who would subsequently experience depression. PMID:21170154

O'Grady, Megan A; Tennen, Howard; Armeli, Stephen

2010-11-01

156

Self-Referential Thinking, Suicide, and Function of the Cortical Midline Structures and Striatum in Mood Disorders: Possible Implications for Treatment Studies of Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Bipolar Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

Bipolar depression is often refractory to treatment and is frequently associated with anxiety symptoms and elevated suicide risk. There is a great need for adjunctive psychotherapeutic interventions. Treatments with effectiveness for depressive and anxiety symptoms as well as suicide-related thoughts and behaviors would be particularly beneficial. Mindfulness-based interventions hold promise, and studies of these approaches for bipolar disorder are warranted. The aim of this paper is to provide a conceptual background for such studies by reviewing key findings from diverse lines of investigation. Results of that review indicate that cortical midline structures (CMS) appear to link abnormal self-referential thinking to emotional dysregulation in mood disorders. Furthermore, CMS and striatal dysfunction may play a role in the neuropathology underlying suicide-related thoughts and behaviors. Thus, combining studies of mindfulness interventions targeting abnormal self-referential thinking with functional imaging of CMS and striatal function may help delineate the neurobiological mechanisms of action of these treatments. PMID:21961061

Marchand, William R.

2012-01-01

157

Stepped care for depression and anxiety: from primary care to specialized mental health care: a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a stepped care program among primary care patients with mood or anxiety disorders  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Mood and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and have a large impact on the lives of the affected individuals. Therefore, optimal treatment of these disorders is highly important. In this study we will examine the effectiveness of a stepped care program for primary care patients with mood and anxiety disorders. A stepped care program is characterized by different treatment steps that are arranged in order of increasing intensity. Methods This study is a randomised controlled trial with two conditions: stepped care and care as usual, whereby the latter forms the control group. The stepped care program consists of four evidence based interventions: (1 Watchful waiting, (2 Guided self-help, (3 Problem Solving Treatment and (4 Medication and/or specialized mental health care. The study population consists of primary care attendees aged 18–65 years. Screeners are sent to all patients of the participating general practitioners. Individuals with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental disorders (DSM diagnosis of major depression, dysthymia, panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, or social phobia are included as well as individuals with minor depression and anxiety disorders. Primary focus is the reduction of depressive and anxiety symptoms. Both conditions are monitored at 8, 16 and 24 weeks. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a stepped care program for patients with depressive and anxiety disorder. If effective, a stepped care program can form a worthwhile alternative for care as usual. Strengths and limitations of this study are discussed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trails: ISRCTN17831610.

Seekles Wike

2009-06-01

158

Method of treating depression  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

Henn, Fritz

2013-04-09

159

Method of treating depression  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

Henn, Fritz (East Patchogue, NY)

2012-01-24

160

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... millions of people every year. Depression has an impact on most aspects of everyday life. It affects ... that could have symptoms similar to depression. Blood tests and possible brain images may be done to ...

 
 
 
 
161

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... 28/2013 2 Causes of Depression Combination of genetic, psychological, and environmental factors can cause depression. Major ... says to do so. Antidepressants can produce side effects that may include: • Dry mouth • Feeling sleepy • Difficulty ...

162

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... who may be suffering from depression. Depression Feeling blue or sad is a normal reaction to stressful ... situations that may lead to sadness or feeling blue include: • Losing someone you love • Becoming sick • Losing ...

163

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... 28/2013 2 Causes of Depression Combination of genetic, psychological, and environmental factors can cause depression. Major ... The diagnosis includes a physical examination, a complete history of symptoms, and a mental status examination. Diagnosis ...

164

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... chest and abdomen. Stimulating this nerve with a low current may help some severe cases of depression. ... relationships are all very helpful in keeping stress low and reducing the chances of feeling depressed again. ...

165

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... some people become depressed with no known triggering event. Depression tends to run in families. It is ... stress and maintain a more balanced outlook on life. Regular exercise, healthy diet, and stable relationships are ...

166

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... cause depression. Major depression is often associated with changes in the brain. The brain controls all of our activities. It controls how we move our body, speak, and understand. It also controls our emotions ...

167

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... be depressed. This is especially true after the birth of a baby. Depression can also affect children. ... associated with changes in the brain. The brain controls all of our activities. It controls how we ...

168

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... as neurons, communicate with each other using special chemical compounds called “neurotransmitters.” Depressed people have imbalanced neurotransmitters. Since the brain controls the whole body, people with depression may also ...

169

Clinical, physical and lifestyle indicators and relationship with cognition and mood in aging: a cross-sectional analysis of distinct educational groups  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It is relevant to unravel the factors that may mediate the cognitive decline observed during aging. Previous reports indicate that education has a positive influence on cognitive performance, while age, female gender and, especially, depressed mood were associated with poorer performances across multiple cognitive dimensions (memory and general executive function. Herein, the present study aimed to characterize the cognitive performance of community-dwelling individuals within distinct educational groups categorized by the number of completed formal school years: “less than 4”, “4, completed primary education”, and “more than 4”. Participants (n = 1051 were randomly selected from local health registries and representative of the Portuguese population for age and gender. Neurocognitive and clinical assessments were conducted in local health care centers. Structural equation modeling was used to derive a cognitive score, and hierarchical linear regressions were conducted for each educational group. Education, age and depressed mood were significant variables in directly explaining the obtained cognitive score, while gender was found to be an indirect variable. In all educational groups, mood was the most significant factor with effect on cognitive performance. Specifically, a depressed mood led to lower cognitive performance. The clinical disease indices cardiac and stroke associated with a more negative mood, while moderate increases in BMI, alcohol consumption and physical activity associated positively with improved mood and thus benefitted cognitive performance. Results warrant further research on the cause-effect (longitudinal relationship between clinical indices of disease and risk factors and mood and cognition throughout aging.

Nadine Correia Santos

2014-02-01

170

Clinical, physical and lifestyle variables and relationship with cognition and mood in aging: a cross-sectional analysis of distinct educational groups  

Science.gov (United States)

It is relevant to unravel the factors that may mediate the cognitive decline observed during aging. Previous reports indicate that education has a positive influence on cognitive performance, while age, female gender and, especially, depressed mood were associated with poorer performances across multiple cognitive dimensions (memory and general executive function). Herein, the present study aimed to characterize the cognitive performance of community-dwelling individuals within distinct educational groups categorized by the number of completed formal school years: “less than 4,” “4, completed primary education,” and “more than 4.” Participants (n = 1051) were randomly selected from local health registries and representative of the Portuguese population for age and gender. Neurocognitive and clinical assessments were conducted in local health care centers. Structural equation modeling was used to derive a cognitive score, and hierarchical linear regressions were conducted for each educational group. Education, age and depressed mood were significant variables in directly explaining the obtained cognitive score, while gender was found to be an indirect variable. In all educational groups, mood was the most significant factor with effect on cognitive performance. Specifically, a depressed mood led to lower cognitive performance. The clinical disease indices cardiac and stroke associated with a more negative mood, while moderate increases in BMI, alcohol consumption and physical activity associated positively with improved mood and thus benefitted cognitive performance. Results warrant further research on the cause-effect (longitudinal) relationship between clinical indices of disease and risk factors and mood and cognition throughout aging. PMID:24605100

Santos, Nadine C.; Costa, Patricio S.; Cunha, Pedro; Portugal-Nunes, Carlos; Amorim, Liliana; Cotter, Jorge; Cerqueira, Joao J.; Palha, Joana A.; Sousa, Nuno

2013-01-01

171

Music Shifts Frontal EEG in Depressed Adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Fourteen chronically depressed female adolescents listened to rock music for a 23-minute session. EEG was recorded and saliva samples were collected to determine the effects of the music on stress hormone cortisol levels. No differences were reported for mood state; however, cortisol levels decreased and relative right-frontal activation was…

Field, Tiffany; Martinez, Alex; Nawrocki, Thomas; Pickens, Jeffrey; Fox, Nathan A.; Schanberg, Saul

1998-01-01

172

Epidemiology and treatment of mood disorders in a day hospital setting from 1996 to 2007: an Italian study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Maria Luca,1 Giuseppa Prossimo,1 Vincenzo Messina,1 Antonina Luca,2 Salvatore Romeo,1 Carmela Calandra11Department of Medical and Surgery Specialties, Psychiatry Unit, 2Department of Neuroscience, University Hospital Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, Catania, Sicily, ItalyBackground: The present study aimed: to assess prescribing patterns in the treatment of major depression, bipolar disorder type I, cyclothymia, and dysthymia from 1996 to 2007 in a day hospital setting; to evaluate the prevalence of the above-mentioned mood disorders and gender distribution; and to relate familiality, comorbidity, and marital status to each diagnosis.Methods: Medical records for 777 day hospital patients with a diagnosis of major depression, bipolar disorder type I, cyclothymia, or dysthymia were grouped into two 6-year periods so as to compare the prescribing patterns of tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, first-generation antipsychotics, second-generation antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers. Gender, prevalence, familiality, comorbidity, and marital status were related to each diagnosis.Results: The most common mood disorder, with a female preponderance, was major depression, regardless of marital status. High percentages of familiality and comorbidity were found for major depression, while a reduction was found in the utilization of tricyclic antidepressants. There was no statistically significant difference in rates of prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, but some irregularities were found upon evaluating each diagnosis (eg, increased utilization of these agents in dysthymia and major depression, respectively. There was an increase in prescriptions for serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, but no marked differences in utilization of noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, which remained basically low. There was no significant difference in prescribing of first-generation antipsychotic agents, although a reduction was found. There was a significant increase in utilization of second-generation antipsychotics and mood stabilizers.Conclusion: Our epidemiological findings are consistent with data reported in the literature regarding the high prevalence of major depression among the mood disorders, as well as the impact of familiality and comorbidity. Analysis of prescribing patterns for antidepressants, antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers in the treatment of mood disorders shows a shift from older to newer drugs, and wider use of mood stabilizers.Keywords: antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, prescribing patterns, mood disorders, treatment

Luca M

2013-02-01

173

Mood disorder with mixed, psychotic features due to vitamin b12 deficiency in an adolescent: case report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Reports of psychiatric disorders due to its deficiency mostly focus on middle aged and elderly patients. Here we report a case of vitamin B 12 deficiency in a 16-year old, male adolescent who presented with mixed mood disorder symptoms with psychotic features. Chief complaints were “irritability, regressive behavior, apathy, crying and truancy” which lasted for a year. Premorbid personality was unremarkable with no substance use/exposure or infections. No stressors were present. The patient was not vegetarian. Past medical history and family history was normal. Neurological examination revealed glossitis, ataxia, rigidity in both shoulders, cog-wheel rigidity in the left elbow, bilateral problems of coordination in cerebellar examination, reduced swinging of the arms and masked face. Romberg’s sign was present. Laboratory evaluations were normal. Endoscopy and biopsy revealed atrophy of the gastric mucosa with Helicobacter Pylori colonization. Schilling test was suggestive of malabsorbtion. He was diagnosed with Mood disorder with Mixed, Psychotic Features due to Vitamin B12 Deficiency and risperidone 0.5?mg/day and intramuscular vitamin B12 500 mcg/day were started along with referral for treatment of Helicobacter pylori. A visit on the second week revealed no psychotic features. Romberg’s sign was negative and cerebellar tests were normal. Extrapyramidal symptoms were reduced while Vitamin B12 levels were elevated. Risperidone was stopped and parenteral Vitamin B12 treatment was continued with monthly injections for 3?months. Follow-up endoscopy and biopsy at the first month demonstrated eradication of H. pylori. He was followed monthly for another 6?months and psychiatric symptoms did not recur at the time of last evaluation. Despite limitations, this case may underline the observation that mood disorders with psychotic features especially with accompanying extrapyramidal symptoms lacking a clear etiology may be rare manifestation of vitamin B12 and/or folate deficiency in children and adolescents and be potentially amenable to treatment.

Tufan Ali

2012-06-01

174

Short-term duloxetine administration affects neural correlates of mood-congruent memory  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

It is unknown how antidepressants reverse mood-congruent memory bias, a cognitive core factor causing and maintaining depression. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design, we investigated the effect of a short-term treatment (14 days) with the dual reuptake inhibitor duloxetine on neural correlates of mood-congruent and mood-incongruent memory formation and retrieval in healthy volunteers who underwent a sad mood induction procedure. Duloxetine did not affect acute mood sta...

2011-01-01

175

Transtornos do humor em enfermaria de clínica médica e validação de escala de medida (HAD de ansiedade e depressão Mood disorders among medical in-patients: a validation study of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Para estimar a prevalência de transtornos do humor, foram utilizadas a entrevista estruturada, "Clinical Interview Schedule" (CIS-R, e a escala "Hospital Anxiety and Depression" (HAD em 78 pacientes internados em uma enfermaria geral de adultos (43 homens e 35 mulheres, média de idade = 43,2 anos. Foi encontrada prevalência instantânea de 39% de transtornos do humor. Dezesseis (20,5% pacientes preencheram critérios para ansiedade, a maioria dos casos sendo de gravidade leve. Vinte e seis (33% casos de depressão foram detectados, 7 dos quais de gravidade moderada. Observou-se uma combinação de sintomas de preocupação, depressão, ansiedade e insônia. A HAD mostrou-se de fácil compreensão pelos pacientes. As subescalas de ansiedade e de depressão tiveram consistência interna de 0,68 e 0,77, respectivamente. A correlação dos itens com as respectivas subescalas sugere que essas possuem validades convergentes, não discriminantes. Com ponto de corte 8/9, a sensibilidade e a especificidade foram 93,7% e 72,6%, para ansiedade, e 84,6% e 90,3%, para depressão. Na prática clínica, a utilização da HAD poderia auxiliar na detecção de casos de transtornos do humor que necessitam de tratamento.The revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD Scale were used to estimate the prevalence of mood disorders among 78 consecutive admissions to a general medical ward in a university general hospital in Brazil (43 males and 35 females; mean age = 43.2yr. Interviewers also completed a 5-point symptom severity scales for anxiety and depression. The definition of cases of anxiety [and depression] was based on two criteria: a. score > 2 on the CIS-R section of anxiety [> 4 on the CIS-R sections of depression and depressive ideas]; and b. score > 2 on the clinical severity scale for anxiety [score > 2 on the clinical severity scale for depression]. A 39% prevalence rate of affective disorders was found. Sixteen (20.5% patients met criteria for anxiety, most of the disorders being of mild severity. Twenty-sic patients (33% were depressed, 7 of them in a moderate degree. The HAD was easily understood by the patients. Anxiety and depression subscales had internal consistency of 0.68 and 0.77, respectively. At a cut-off point of 8/9 sensibility and specificity were 93.7% and 72.6% for anxiety, and 84.6% and 90.3% for depression. HAD items correlated positively with the respective subscales. To a lesser degree, they also correlated with the alternative subscale. Our findings confirm the high prevalence of mood disorders among medical in-patients. In clinical practice, the HAD may have a useful role in detecting those patients requiring further psychological care.

Neury J. Botega

1995-10-01

176

Transtornos do humor em enfermaria de clínica médica e validação de escala de medida (HAD) de ansiedade e depressão / Mood disorders among medical in-patients: a validation study of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD)  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Public Health | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Para estimar a prevalência de transtornos do humor, foram utilizadas a entrevista estruturada, "Clinical Interview Schedule" (CIS-R), e a escala "Hospital Anxiety and Depression" (HAD) em 78 pacientes internados em uma enfermaria geral de adultos (43 homens e 35 mulheres, média de idade = 43,2 anos) [...] . Foi encontrada prevalência instantânea de 39% de transtornos do humor. Dezesseis (20,5%) pacientes preencheram critérios para ansiedade, a maioria dos casos sendo de gravidade leve. Vinte e seis (33%) casos de depressão foram detectados, 7 dos quais de gravidade moderada. Observou-se uma combinação de sintomas de preocupação, depressão, ansiedade e insônia. A HAD mostrou-se de fácil compreensão pelos pacientes. As subescalas de ansiedade e de depressão tiveram consistência interna de 0,68 e 0,77, respectivamente. A correlação dos itens com as respectivas subescalas sugere que essas possuem validades convergentes, não discriminantes. Com ponto de corte 8/9, a sensibilidade e a especificidade foram 93,7% e 72,6%, para ansiedade, e 84,6% e 90,3%, para depressão. Na prática clínica, a utilização da HAD poderia auxiliar na detecção de casos de transtornos do humor que necessitam de tratamento. Abstract in english The revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale were used to estimate the prevalence of mood disorders among 78 consecutive admissions to a general medical ward in a university general hospital in Brazil (43 males and 35 females; mean age = 43.2yr) [...] . Interviewers also completed a 5-point symptom severity scales for anxiety and depression. The definition of cases of anxiety [and depression] was based on two criteria: a. score > 2 on the CIS-R section of anxiety [> 4 on the CIS-R sections of depression and depressive ideas]; and b. score > 2 on the clinical severity scale for anxiety [score > 2 on the clinical severity scale for depression]. A 39% prevalence rate of affective disorders was found. Sixteen (20.5%) patients met criteria for anxiety, most of the disorders being of mild severity. Twenty-sic patients (33%) were depressed, 7 of them in a moderate degree. The HAD was easily understood by the patients. Anxiety and depression subscales had internal consistency of 0.68 and 0.77, respectively. At a cut-off point of 8/9 sensibility and specificity were 93.7% and 72.6% for anxiety, and 84.6% and 90.3% for depression. HAD items correlated positively with the respective subscales. To a lesser degree, they also correlated with the alternative subscale. Our findings confirm the high prevalence of mood disorders among medical in-patients. In clinical practice, the HAD may have a useful role in detecting those patients requiring further psychological care.

Neury J., Botega; Márcia R., Bio; Maria Adriana, Zomignani; Celso, Garcia Jr; Walter A. B., Pereira.

177

Transtornos do humor em enfermaria de clínica médica e validação de escala de medida (HAD) de ansiedade e depressão / Mood disorders among medical in-patients: a validation study of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD)  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Para estimar a prevalência de transtornos do humor, foram utilizadas a entrevista estruturada, "Clinical Interview Schedule" (CIS-R), e a escala "Hospital Anxiety and Depression" (HAD) em 78 pacientes internados em uma enfermaria geral de adultos (43 homens e 35 mulheres, média de idade = 43,2 anos) [...] . Foi encontrada prevalência instantânea de 39% de transtornos do humor. Dezesseis (20,5%) pacientes preencheram critérios para ansiedade, a maioria dos casos sendo de gravidade leve. Vinte e seis (33%) casos de depressão foram detectados, 7 dos quais de gravidade moderada. Observou-se uma combinação de sintomas de preocupação, depressão, ansiedade e insônia. A HAD mostrou-se de fácil compreensão pelos pacientes. As subescalas de ansiedade e de depressão tiveram consistência interna de 0,68 e 0,77, respectivamente. A correlação dos itens com as respectivas subescalas sugere que essas possuem validades convergentes, não discriminantes. Com ponto de corte 8/9, a sensibilidade e a especificidade foram 93,7% e 72,6%, para ansiedade, e 84,6% e 90,3%, para depressão. Na prática clínica, a utilização da HAD poderia auxiliar na detecção de casos de transtornos do humor que necessitam de tratamento. Abstract in english The revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale were used to estimate the prevalence of mood disorders among 78 consecutive admissions to a general medical ward in a university general hospital in Brazil (43 males and 35 females; mean age = 43.2yr) [...] . Interviewers also completed a 5-point symptom severity scales for anxiety and depression. The definition of cases of anxiety [and depression] was based on two criteria: a. score > 2 on the CIS-R section of anxiety [> 4 on the CIS-R sections of depression and depressive ideas]; and b. score > 2 on the clinical severity scale for anxiety [score > 2 on the clinical severity scale for depression]. A 39% prevalence rate of affective disorders was found. Sixteen (20.5%) patients met criteria for anxiety, most of the disorders being of mild severity. Twenty-sic patients (33%) were depressed, 7 of them in a moderate degree. The HAD was easily understood by the patients. Anxiety and depression subscales had internal consistency of 0.68 and 0.77, respectively. At a cut-off point of 8/9 sensibility and specificity were 93.7% and 72.6% for anxiety, and 84.6% and 90.3% for depression. HAD items correlated positively with the respective subscales. To a lesser degree, they also correlated with the alternative subscale. Our findings confirm the high prevalence of mood disorders among medical in-patients. In clinical practice, the HAD may have a useful role in detecting those patients requiring further psychological care.

Neury J., Botega; Márcia R., Bio; Maria Adriana, Zomignani; Celso, Garcia Jr; Walter A. B., Pereira.

178

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... However, since depression clouds judgment, family members or friends usually need to ... outlook on life. Regular exercise, healthy diet, and stable relationships are all very ...

179

Screening for depressed mood in an adolescent psychiatric context by brief self-assessment scales -- testing psychometric validity of WHO-5 and BDI-6 indices by latent trait analyses  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder is prevalent in the adolescent psychiatric clinical setting and often comorbid with other primary psychiatric diagnoses such as ADHD or social anxiety disorder. Systematic manual-based diagnostic procedures are recommended to identify such comorbidity but they are time-consuming and often not fully implemented in clinical practice. Screening for depressive symptoms in the child psychiatric context using brief, user-friendly and easily managed self-assessment scales may be of clinical value and utility. The aim of the study is to test the psychometric validity of two such scales, which may be used in a two-step screening procedure, the WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5) and the six-item version of Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-6). METHOD: 66 adolescent psychiatric patients with a clinical diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD), 60 girls and 6 boys, aged 14--18 years, mean age 16.8 years, completed the WHO-5 scale as well as the BDI-6. Statistical validitywas tested by Mokken and Rasch analyses. RESULTS: The correlation between WHO-5 and BDI-6 was -0.49 (p=0.0001). Mokken analyses showed a coefficient of homogeneity for the WHO-5 of 0.52 and for the BDI-6 of 0.46. Rasch analysis also accepted unidimensionality when testing males versus females (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The WHO-5 is psychometrically valid in an adolescent psychiatric context including both genders to assess the wellness dimension and applicable as a first step in screening for MDD. The BDI-6 may be recommended as a second step in the screening procedure, since it is statistically valid and has the ability to unidimensionally capture the severity of depressed mood.

Blom, Eva Henje; Bech, Per

2012-01-01

180

Mood Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

... ADHD or becoming depressed in response to parental divorce or any other stressful situation. (In fact, research has shown that the intactness of a child’s family and its socioeconomic status have little or no effect on whether a child develops MDD.) While children ...

 
 
 
 
181

The Association of Paternal Mood and Infant Temperament: A Pilot Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Maternal depression is associated with adverse child development, but little is known about the effects of paternal depression. This pilot study estimated the prevalence of paternal depression and mood state, and assessed the relationship between paternal mood and infant temperament. The participants in the study were 98 fathers of newborn babies.…

Dave, Shreya; Nazareth, Irwin; Sherr, Lorraine; Senior, Rob

2005-01-01

182

Attentionally modulated effects of cortisol and mood on memory for emotional faces in healthy young males.  

Science.gov (United States)

Heightened cortisol levels due to stress or acute administration seem to enhance memory for emotional material, independently of emotional valence. An arousal-driven neurobiological mechanism involving the amygdala has been proposed. The relation between pre-task salivary measures of cortisol (by convention named 'basal levels') and emotionally modulated memory has not been investigated yet. Given the association between higher basal levels of cortisol and indices of low mood, valence-specific effects on emotionally modulated memory could be expected (e.g. mood-congruent or stimulus-specific forms of processing). This study was designed to investigate the relationship between basal levels of salivary cortisol, self-reported mood and spatial memory for neutral, happy and angry facial expressions in healthy young volunteers (N=31). Memory performance was indexed using a modified version of a computerized object-relocation task, using emotional facial expressions as stimuli. Results showed a significant relation between cortisol and depressive mood. More importantly, both the levels of cortisol and depressive mood were inversely related to the memory performance for the happy facial expressions, while a similar relationship between cortisol and memory performance on angry faces neared significance. An explanation in terms of the down-regulation of social behavior by elevated basal cortisol levels is postulated. PMID:12892660

Van Honk, J; Kessels, R P C; Putman, P; Jager, G; Koppeschaar, H P F; Postma, A

2003-10-01

183

Evaluation of the mood repair hypothesis of compulsive buying  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Compulsive buying (CB is a proposed disorder of dysregulated buying behaviour that is associated with high rates of Axis I comorbidity, particularly depression and anxiety. It has been proposed that purchasing behaviours may serve as a maladaptive means of alleviating negative affect in vulnerable individuals. The aim of the current study was to experimentally manipulate affect to test this mood repair hypothesis. Compulsive buyers (n = 26 and pathological gamblers (n = 23 diagnosed using structured clinical interviews (SCID and healthy controls (n = 24 were randomly assigned to either a negative or positive mood-induction procedure (MIP and participated in an experimental buying task. Results revealed that, irrespective of mood induction condition, compulsive buyers reported a greater urge to acquire items, purchased more items, and spent a greater total amount of money during the buying task when compared to the healthy control group. Compulsive buyers were also faster than pathological gamblers in making decisions to purchase, even after controlling for motor impulsivity (BIS. There was, however, no main effect of mood-induction condition or group by condition interaction. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

Alishia D. Williams

2012-04-01

184

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... X-Plain.com mh010106 Last reviewed: 07/28/2013 1 Depression is a disease. Doctors can distinguish ... X-Plain.com mh010106 Last reviewed: 07/28/2013 2 Causes of Depression Combination of genetic, psychological, ...

185

Depression Subtypes in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective The association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and depression provides a unique opportunity to understand the relation between systemic inflammation and depressive symptom profiles. Methods Youth (n = 226) ages 9 to 17 years with comorbid IBD and depression underwent psychiatric assessment and evaluation of IBD activity. Latent profile analysis (LPA) identified depressive subgroups based on similar responses to the Children’s Depression Rating Scale-Revised. Demographic factors, depression severity, anxiety, IBD activity, inflammatory markers, IBD-related medications, and illness perception were evaluated as predictors of profile membership. Results Mean age was 14.3 years; 75% had Crohn disease; 31% were taking systemic corticosteroids. Mean depressive severity was moderate, whereas IBD activity, which reflects inflammation, was mild. LPA identified 3 subgroups: Profile-1 (mild, 75%) had diverse low-grade depressive symptoms and highest quality of life; Profile-2 (somatic, 19%) had severe fatigue, appetite change, anhedonia, decreased motor activity, and depressed mood with concurrent high-dose steroid therapy and the highest IBD activity; and Profile-3 (cognitive, 6%) had the highest rates of self-reported depressive symptoms, ostomy placements, and anxiety with IBD symptoms in the relative absence of inflammation. Conclusions Evidence was found for 3 depression profiles in youth with IBD and depression. Our analyses determined that patients with predominantly somatic or cognitive symptoms of depression comprised 25% of our cohort. These findings may be used to design subgroup-specific interventions for depression in adolescents with IBD and other physical illnesses associated with systemic inflammation. PMID:24345836

Szigethy, Eva M.; Youk, Ada O.; Benhayon, David; Fairclough, Diane L.; Newara, Melissa C.; Kirshner, Margaret A.; Bujoreanu, Simona I.; Mrakotsky, Christine; Bousvaros, Athos; Srinath, Arvind I.; Keljo, David J.; Kupfer, David J.; DeMaso, David R.

2014-01-01

186

Depressed mood and poor quality of life in male patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis / Comportamento depressivo e má qualidade de vida em homens com insuficiência renal crônica submetidos à hemodiálise  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: Avaliar o estado de humor e a qualidade de vida de homens em tratamento hemodialítico, correlacionar as alterações observadas no humor com os diferentes domínios do questionário de qualidade de vida. MÉTODO: Foram incluídos 47 homens em tratamento hemodialítico estável há mais de seis mese [...] s. Foram aplicadas a Escala de Hamilton de depressão e o Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, questionário de qualidade de vida relacionado à saúde, em sua forma traduzida e adaptada para a língua portuguesa. RESULTADOS: A média da idade dos pacientes era 39,4 ± 8,9 anos. Na avaliação pela Escala de Hamilton, observou-se em 32 (68,1%) pacientes a presença de depressão. Encontramos correlação negativa significativa entre os resultados obtidos na escala de Hamilton e os seguintes parâmetros das dimensões específicas do Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire: lista de sintomas e problemas (rs = -0,399; p = 0,005), qualidade da interação social (rs = -0,433; p = 0,002) e sono (rs = -0,585; p Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To assess mood and quality of life in male hemodialysis patients, and to correlate mood swings with the different domains of the quality of life questionnaire. METHOD: Forty-seven male patients undergoing regular hemodialysis for more than six months were included in the study. The Hamilt [...] on Rating Scale for Depression and the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, in a version translated into and adapted to Portuguese, were used. RESULTS: The patients' age was 39.4 ± 8.9 years (median ± SD). Depression was observed in 32 (68.1%) patients according to the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. A significant negative correlation was found between the results from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the following parameters of the specific dimensions of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire: list of symptoms and problems (rs = -0.399; p = 0.005), quality of social interaction (rs = -0.433; p = 0.002), and quality of sleep (rs = -0.585; p

Thales Weber, Garcia; Joel Paulo Russomano, Veiga; Lucilia Domingues Casulari da, Motta; Flávio José Dutra de, Moura; Luiz Augusto, Casulari.

2010-12-01

187

Depressed mood and poor quality of life in male patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis / Comportamento depressivo e má qualidade de vida em homens com insuficiência renal crônica submetidos à hemodiálise  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: Avaliar o estado de humor e a qualidade de vida de homens em tratamento hemodialítico, correlacionar as alterações observadas no humor com os diferentes domínios do questionário de qualidade de vida. MÉTODO: Foram incluídos 47 homens em tratamento hemodialítico estável há mais de seis mese [...] s. Foram aplicadas a Escala de Hamilton de depressão e o Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, questionário de qualidade de vida relacionado à saúde, em sua forma traduzida e adaptada para a língua portuguesa. RESULTADOS: A média da idade dos pacientes era 39,4 ± 8,9 anos. Na avaliação pela Escala de Hamilton, observou-se em 32 (68,1%) pacientes a presença de depressão. Encontramos correlação negativa significativa entre os resultados obtidos na escala de Hamilton e os seguintes parâmetros das dimensões específicas do Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire: lista de sintomas e problemas (rs = -0,399; p = 0,005), qualidade da interação social (rs = -0,433; p = 0,002) e sono (rs = -0,585; p Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To assess mood and quality of life in male hemodialysis patients, and to correlate mood swings with the different domains of the quality of life questionnaire. METHOD: Forty-seven male patients undergoing regular hemodialysis for more than six months were included in the study. The Hamilt [...] on Rating Scale for Depression and the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, in a version translated into and adapted to Portuguese, were used. RESULTS: The patients' age was 39.4 ± 8.9 years (median ± SD). Depression was observed in 32 (68.1%) patients according to the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. A significant negative correlation was found between the results from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the following parameters of the specific dimensions of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire: list of symptoms and problems (rs = -0.399; p = 0.005), quality of social interaction (rs = -0.433; p = 0.002), and quality of sleep (rs = -0.585; p

Thales Weber, Garcia; Joel Paulo Russomano, Veiga; Lucilia Domingues Casulari da, Motta; Flávio José Dutra de, Moura; Luiz Augusto, Casulari.

188

Medically unexplained pain complaints are associated with underlying unrecognized mood disorders in primary care  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with chronic pain frequently display comorbid depression, but the impact of this concurrence is often underestimated and mistreated. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of unrecognized major depression and other mood disorders and comorbid unexplained chronic pain in primary care settings and to explore the associated factors. Also, to compare the use of health services by patients with unexplained chronic pain, both with and without mood disorder comorbidity. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of primary care centers. 3189 patients consulting for "unexplained chronic pain" were assessed by the Visual Analogue Scales (VAS and the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD questionnaire. Results We report: a a high prevalence of unrecognized mood disorders in patients suffering from unexplained chronic pain complaints (80.4%: CI 95%: 79.0%; 81.8%; b a greater susceptibility of women to mood disorders (OR adjusted = 1.48; CI 95%:1.22; 1.81; c a direct relationship between the prevalence of mood disorders and the duration of pain (OR adjusted = 1.01; CI 95%: 1.01; 1.02 d a higher comorbidity with depression if the pain etiology was unknown (OR adjusted = 1.74; CI 95%: 1.45; 2.10 and, e an increased use of health care services in patients with such a comorbidity (p Conclusions The prevalence of undiagnosed mood disorders in patients with unexplained chronic pain in primary care is very high, leading to dissatisfaction with treatment processes and poorer outcomes. Consequently, it seems necessary to explore this condition more regularly in general practice in order to reach accurate diagnoses and to select the appropriate treatment.

Díaz-Fernández Paula

2010-03-01

189

Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormones and cortisol in both menstrual phases of women with chronic fatigue syndrome and effect of depressive mood on these hormones  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a disease which defined as medically unexplained, disabling fatigue of 6 months or more duration and often accompanied by several of a long list of physical complaints. We aimed to investigate abnormalities of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis hormones and cortisol concentrations in premenopausal women with CFS and find out effects of depression rate on these hormones. Methods We examined follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, estradiol, progesterone and cortisol concentrations in 43 premenopausal women (mean age: 32.86 ± 7.11 with CFS and compared matched 35 healthy controls (mean age: 31.14 ± 6.19. Patients were divided according to menstrual cycle phases (follicular and luteal and compared with matched phase controls. Depression rate was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and patients with high BDI scores were compared to patients with low BDI scores. Results There were no significant differences in FSH, LH, estradiol and progesterone levels in both of menstrual phases of patients versus controls. Cortisol levels were significantly lower in patients compared to controls. There were no significant differences in all hormone levels in patients with high depression scores versus patients with low depression scores. Conclusion In spite of high depression rate, low cortisol concentration and normal HPG axis hormones of both menstrual phases are detected in premenopausal women with CFS. There is no differentiation between patients with high and low depression rate in all hormone levels. Depression condition of CFS may be different from classical depression and evaluation of HPG and HPA axis should be performed for understanding of pathophysiology of CFS and planning of treatment.

Nas Kemal

2004-12-01

190

Influence of postpartum onset on the course of mood disorders  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background To ascertain the impact of postpartum onset (PPO on the subsequent time course of mood disorders. Methods This retrospective study compared per year rates of excited (manic or mixed and depressive episodes between fifty-five women with bipolar (N = 22 or major depressive (N = 33 disorders with first episode occurring postpartum (within four weeks after childbirth according to DSM-IV definition and 218 non-postpartum onset (NPPO controls. Such patients had a traceable illness course consisting of one or more episodes alternating with complete symptom remission and no additional diagnoses of axis I disorders, mental retardation or brain organic diseases. A number of variables reported to influence the course of mood disorders were controlled for as possible confounding factors Results Bipolar women with postpartum onset disorder had fewer excited episodes (p = 0.005 and fewer episodes of both polarities (p = 0.005 compared to non-postpartum onset subjects. No differences emerged in the rates of depressive episodes. All patients who met criteria for rapid cycling bipolar disorder (7 out of 123 were in the NPPO group. Among major depressives, PPO patients experienced fewer episodes (p = 0.016. With respect to clinical and treatment features, PPO-MDD subjects had less personality disorder comorbidity (p = 0.023 and were less likely to be on maintenance treatment compared to NPPO comparison subjects (p = 0.002 Conclusion Such preliminary findings suggest that PPO mood disorders may be characterized by a less recurrent time course. Future research in this field should elucidate the role of comorbid personality disorders and treatment. Moreover it should clarify whether PPO disorders are also associated with a more positive outcome in terms of social functioning and quality of life.

Olgiati Paolo

2006-01-01

191

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... mh010106 Last reviewed: 07/28/2013 4 More advanced cases with ideas of suicide may necessitate admission ... depression. They are often also necessary in more advanced cases along with any prescribed medications. It may ...

192

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... of depression may not necessitate any medications, only psychotherapy. This document is for informational purposes and is ... a hospital and treatment with medications. Counseling and psychotherapy can be very helpful in treating mild cases ...

193

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... of not getting help can be troubling. This reference summary will help you to understand depression and ... ever feels like ending their life, they should call a doctor immediately. If you realize that a ...

194

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Last reviewed: 07/28/2013 3 A thorough social and medical history is essential. This is followed ... medications. It may take weeks before depression medications work. Therefore, it is important to keep taking them ...

195

Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

... t have the right balance of chemicals. Hormonal factors – Menstrual cycle changes, pregnancy, miscarriage, postpartum period, perimenopause, and menopause may all cause a woman to develop depression. Stress – Stressful life events such as trauma, loss ...

196

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... sleeping. • Little or no interest in companionship or sex. • Feeling worthless or hopeless and taking personal blame for everything. • Shy away from friends and family, feeling ashamed of being depressed. • Poor personal hygiene, ...

197

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... history of symptoms, and a mental status examination. Diagnosis This document is for informational purposes and is ... successfully. The choice of treatment depends on the diagnosis. Mild forms of depression may not necessitate any ...

198

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... in life. Some examples of situations that may lead to sadness or feeling blue include: • Losing someone ... also. Drinking alcohol and using illicit drugs can lead to depression, since drugs and alcohol affect the ...

199

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... in the upper chest area. Electroconvulsive therapy or ECT is useful in patients with severe depression and who are slow to respond to medications. ECT helps restore the balance of neurotransmitters by causing ...

200

Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

... help people build the confidence to deal with life's struggles. Treatment for depression might include talk therapy, medication, or a combination of both. Sometimes, therapists might recommend daily exercise, exposure to daylight, or better ways of eating. ...

 
 
 
 
201

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... depression is often associated with changes in the brain. The brain controls all of our activities. It controls how ... our emotions and feelings. The cells of the brain, known as neurons, communicate with each other using ...

202

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... family, feeling ashamed of being depressed. • Poor personal hygiene, not bathing or dressing nicely. Sometimes the feelings ... can produce side effects that may include: • Dry mouth • Feeling sleepy • Difficulty starting the urinary stream • Sexual ...

203

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Depression Feeling blue or sad is a normal reaction to stressful or sad situations in life. Some ... material, it may become out of date over time. It is important that you rely on the ...

204

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... or sex. • Feeling worthless or hopeless and taking personal blame for everything. • Shy away from friends and family, feeling ashamed of being depressed. • Poor personal hygiene, not bathing or dressing nicely. Sometimes the ...

205

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... able to make healthy changes that can reduce stress and maintain a more balanced outlook on life. ... stable relationships are all very helpful in keeping stress low and reducing the chances of feeling depressed ...

206

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... has an impact on most aspects of everyday life. It affects eating and sleeping routines, self-esteem, and perspective on life. In addition, depression affects the people who love ...

207

Independent Dimensions of Depression: A Factor Analysis of Three Self-Report Depression Measures  

Science.gov (United States)

An examination of the specific areas of agreement and disagreement among the Beck Depression Inventory (DI), the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), and the Lubin Depression Adjective Check Lists (DACL) was made to see if all three measured the same aspects of depressive behavior and how they could be used together to optimize assessment of…

Giambra, Leonard M.

1977-01-01

208

Mood after stroke: a case control study of biochemical, neuro-imaging and socio-economic risk factors for major depression in stroke survivors  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Though vascular factors may be important in the aetiology of late-life depression, it is not clear whether they have a major effect on the risk of depression after a stroke. We investigated the relationship between physiological, biochemical, neuro-imaging and socio-economic factors and late-phase post-stroke depression in a cross-sectional case-control study. Methods People living at home at least 9 months after a stroke were interviewed using a structured proforma. Depression was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, together with a Montgomery Asberg (MADRS score >17. Stroke survivors of similar age and functional status but without symptoms of, or recent treatment for, depression and with MADRS score Results Stroke survivors with depression were more likely than controls to have been smokers, to have had hypertension or peripheral arterial disease, and to have had more than one stroke or multiple discrete brainscan lesions. In univariate analysis they had significantly higher blood pressure, lower Mini-Mental State (MMSE scores, higher serum homocysteine and lower folate levels, as well as more extensive white matter and basal ganglia changes on brainscan. In logistic regression, previous hypertension (OR 3.4, peripheral vascular disease (OR 4.7, number of strokes (OR 2, MMSE score (OR 0.76 and basal ganglia changes (OR 2.2, were independently associated with depression. Conclusion These results suggest that patients with hypertension, hyperhomocysteinaemia and other factors associated with cerebral small vessel disease, may be more susceptible to post-stroke depression. Future intervention trials should focus on such high risk groups.

Fall Susan

2010-12-01

209

Reproductive depression.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reproductive depression is the depression in women that is related to the hormonal changes of the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and the menopause and is manifested clinically as premenstrual depression, postnatal depression and climacteric depression. These three components occur in the same vulnerable women in that a woman with depression in the menopausal transition will usually have a history of premenstrual syndrome (PMS; premenstrual dysphoric disorder [PMDD]), would have been in a good mood during pregnancy and then develop postnatal depression. When the periods return the depression becomes cyclical as PMS. These three conditions are effectively treated with transdermal estrogens which should be the first-choice therapy rather than antidepressants. Estrogens can be used together with antidepressants. The critical time to prevent long-term mood problems is the correct treatment of postnatal depression. In women with low energy and libido, often a side effect of antidepressants, the addition of transdermal testosterone is useful. These women with reproductive depression are often progesterone/progestogen intolerant and a smaller dose or duration of progestogen is a necessary compromise. Alternatively a Mirena IUS or rarely a hysterectomy is required. PMID:22394303

Studd, John; Nappi, Rossella E

2012-03-01

210

The increasing burden of depression.  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent epidemiological surveys conducted in general populations have found that the lifetime prevalence of depression is in the range of 10% to 15%. Mood disorders, as defined by the World Mental Health and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, have a 12-month prevalence which varies from 3% in Japan to over 9% in the US. A recent American survey found the prevalence of current depression to be 9% and the rate of current major depression to be 3.4%. All studies of depressive disorders have stressed the importance of the mortality and morbidity associated with depression. The mortality risk for suicide in depressed patients is more than 20-fold greater than in the general population. Recent studies have also shown the importance of depression as a risk factor for cardiovascular death. The risk of cardiac mortality after an initial myocardial infarction is greater in patients with depression and related to the severity of the depressive episode. Greater severity of depressive symptoms has been found to be associated with significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality including cardiovascular death and stroke. In addition to mortality, functional impairment and disability associated with depression have been consistently reported. Depression increases the risk of decreased workplace productivity and absenteeism resulting in lowered income or unemployment. Absenteeism and presenteeism (being physically present at work but functioning suboptimally) have been estimated to result in a loss of $36.6 billion per year in the US. Worldwide projections by the World Health Organization for the year 2030 identify unipolar major depression as the leading cause of disease burden. This article is a brief overview of how depression affects the quality of life of the subject and is also a huge burden for both the family of the depressed patient and for society at large. PMID:21750622

Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Briley, Mike

2011-01-01

211

Pubertal Timing, Sexual Behaviour and Self-Reported Depression in Middle Adolescence.  

Science.gov (United States)

Study analyzed associations between pubertal timing, sexual activity, and self-reported depression in sample of girls and boys aged 14-16. Among girls, self-reported depression was associated with early puberty and intimate sexual relationship. Among boys, depression was associated with every early and late puberty and experience of intercourse.…

Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Kosunen, Elisa; Rimpela, Matti

2003-01-01

212

Treatment of self-reported depression among Hispanics and African Americans.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study applied the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations framework to examine the correlates of depression and the receipt of medical treatment among low-income Hispanics and African Americans residing in public housing. We compared three groups: those who reported (1) self-diagnosed but without physician-diagnosed depression, (2) depression diagnosed by a physician but who did not receive pharmaceutical treatment, and (3) depression diagnosed by a physician and antidepressant pharmacotherapy consumed by patient. Random samples of 287 adults from three public housing communities were surveyed. Over 48% of this sample reported that they were suffering from depression. One out of three people who reported being depressed also said that a physician had never diagnosed his or her condition. Only 40% of those who said that a physician had diagnosed depression also reported taking antidepressant medication. Untreated depression among underserved racial and ethnic minorities is alarming and points to an urgent need for intervention. PMID:15937396

Bazargan, Mohsen; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Baker, Richard S

2005-05-01

213

Acute Psychosis and Depression Associated with Hypercalcemia: A Case Report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Psychosis and depression are mental disorders that can exist secondary to some medical disorders and may be associated with the use of drugs. The most frequent causes of these disorders are substance abuse, infections (especially central nervous system infections, hormone or collagen tissue disorders, cancer, and side effect of drugs used to treat diseases. Hypercalcemia is referred as high level of calcium in the blood - higher than 10,2 mg/dl - and is often seen with parathyroid adenoma. Hypercalcemia may cause several symptoms. In this case report, we represent the case of a patient who presented with delusion of persecution and depressive symptoms probably secondary to hypercalcemia. (Arc­hi­ves of Neu­ropsy­chi­atry 2013;50: 75-77

Halil ÖZCAN

2013-03-01

214

Lower Serum Albumin Levels in Patients with Mood Disorders  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Some physicians have reported lower serum albumin levels in patients withmajor depression in Western countries. In this study, the relationshipbetween serum albumin levels and mood disorders (including mania andmajor depression was investigated during the acute phases in Taiwanesepsychiatric inpatients.Methods: A review of medical charts during a 1-year period was carried out in a populationof 213 Taiwanese psychiatric inpatients that included 61 patients withmood disorders (with or without suicide attempts. The collected dataincluded age, body weight, height, serum albumin levels, and routine bloodbiochemistry examination results. These data were compared with data froma healthy control group (N=32 drawn from the staff of the psychiatric ward.Statistical analysis was done using covariance after age adjustment.Results: The mean serum albumin levels were 40.2¡ 4.0 g/L in patients with mania(N=25, 39.8¡ 2.8 g/L in patients with major depression (N=36, and 45.8¡ 2.0 g/L in the control group. Patients with mania (F=64.6, p = 0.000 andmajor depression (F=68.9, p = 0.000, respectively, had significantly loweralbumin levels than the control group after age adjustment. However, for thepatients with major depression, no significant difference in serum albuminlevels were found between patients who had attempted suicide and thosewho had not.Conclusion: Lower serum albumin levels were noted during the acute phases of maniaand major depression in Taiwanese psychiatric inpatients.

Tiao-Lai Huang

2002-08-01

215

Sensitivity and specificity of the Major Depression Inventory in outpatients  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is a new, brief, self-report measure for depression based on the DSM-system, which allows clinicians to assess the presence of a depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV, but also to assess the severity of the depressive symptoms. Methods We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and psychometric qualities of the MDI in a consecutive sample of 258 psychiatric outpatients. Of these patients, 120 had a mood disorder (70 major depression, 49 dysthymia. A total of 139 subjects had a comorbid axis-I diagnosis, and 91 subjects had a comorbid personality disorder. Results Crohnbach's alpha of the MDI was a satisfactory 0.89, and the correlation between the MDI and the depression subscale of the SCL-90 was 0.79 (p Conclusion The MDI is an attractive, brief depression inventory, which seems to be a reliable tool for assessing depression in psychiatric outpatients.

Noteboom Annemieke

2007-08-01

216

Electrophysiological evidence of the time course of attentional bias in nonpatients reporting symptoms of depression with and without co-occurring anxiety  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Anxiety is characterized by attentional biases to threat, but findings are inconsistent for depression. To address this inconsistency, the present study systematically assessed the role of co-occurring anxiety in attentional bias in depression. In addition, the role of emotional valence, arousal, and gender was explored. Ninety-two nonpatients completed the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ; Meyer et al., 1990; Molina & Borkovec, 1994 and portions of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ; Watson, Clark, et al., 1995; Watson, Weber, et al., 1995. Individuals reporting high levels of depression and low levels of anxiety (depression only, high levels of depression and anxiety (combined, or low levels of both (control completed an emotion-word Stroop task during event-related brain potential (ERP recording. Pleasant and unpleasant words were matched on emotional arousal level. An attentional bias was not evident in the depression-only group. Women in the combined group had larger N200 amplitude for pleasant than unpleasant stimuli, and the combined group as a whole had larger right-lateralized P300 amplitude for pleasant than unpleasant stimuli, consistent with an early and later attentional bias that is specific to unpleasant valence in the combined group. Men in the control group had larger N200 amplitude for pleasant than unpleasant stimuli, consistent with an early attentional bias that is specific to pleasant valence. The present study indicates that the nature and time course of attention prompted by emotional valence and not arousal differentiates depression with and without anxiety, with some evidence of gender moderating early effects. Overall, results suggest that co-occurring anxiety is more important than previously acknowledged in demonstrating evidence of attentional biases in depression.

SarahM.Sass

2014-04-01

217

Regular group exercise is associated with improved mood but not quality of life following stroke  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Purpose. People with stroke living in the community have an increased prevalence of depression and lower quality of life than healthy older adults. This cross-sectional observational study investigated whether participation in regular exercise was associated with improved mood and quality of life. Methods. We recruited three groups of community dwelling participants: 13 healthy older adults, 17 adults post-stroke who regularly participated in group exercise at a community fitness facility and 10 adults post-stroke who did not regularly exercise. We measured mood using the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS and quality of life using the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL scale. Results. Levels of stress and depression were significantly greater in the people with stroke who did not undertake regular exercise (p = 0.004 and p = 0.004 respectively, although this group had more recent strokes (p < 0.001. Both stroke groups had lower quality of life scores (p = 0.04 than the healthy adults. Conclusions. This small, community-based study confirms that people following stroke report poorer quality of life than stroke-free individuals. However, those who exercise regularly have significantly lower stress and depression compared to stroke survivors who do not. Future research should focus on the precise type and amount of exercise capable of improving mood following stroke.

Michelle N. McDonnell

2014-03-01

218

Plain Talk about Depression. Plain Talk Series.  

Science.gov (United States)

Depression is defined as a "whole-body" illness, involving the body, mood, and thoughts. Three of the most prevalent types of depressive disorders are described: major depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disorders (formerly called manic-depressive illness). Eleven symptoms of depression and 10 symptoms of mania are listed. Causes of depression are…

Sargent, Marilyn

219

Depression  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... have them also. Drinking alcohol and using illicit drugs can lead to depression, since drugs and alcohol affect the chemicals in the brain. ... the patient to stop using alcohol or illicit drugs. Some medications, especially blood pressure medications, can lead ...

220

[Burning mouth syndrome and depression: a case report].  

Science.gov (United States)

We present a 63-year-old male patient with major depression, characterised by prominent somatic symptoms localised especially around the mouth, whose complaints started just after a prostate operation. The symptoms consisting of burning in the mouth, pain, dry mouth (xerostomia), an unpleasant and strange feeling of taste and itching, are all consistent with burning mouth syndrome. Burning mouth syndrome is a common disorder, usually affecting elderly females, characterised by intractable pain and burning in the oral cavity, evident especially in the tongue, together with a normal mouth mucosa. In the scientific literature a variety of terms are used to describe similar symptoms, such as glossodynia, glossopyrosis, stomatodynia and oral dysestesia. Most patients suffer from the syndrome for a long time, ranging from months up to years. The onset was reported to be gradual for most of the subjects, although many patients relate the onset of symptoms to previous dental procedures or to a previous medical illness. Burning mouth syndrome has a multifactorial etiology. Anxiety disorder, hypochondriasis, conversion disorder and especially depression may be considered amongst the psychological factors responsible for this situation. The psychological findings in burning mouth syndrome patients may be either the consequence of the chronic pain condition or its cause. It is well known that those patients had a relatively high percentage of psychiatric or psychological treatment in the past and/or present. After excluding organic factors, depression should be considered in old patients with predominant mouth complaints. PMID:12794658

Ku?u, Nesim; Akyüz, Gamze; Do?an, Orhan

2002-01-01

 
 
 
 
221

Seasonal mood variation: an epidemiological study in northern Norway.  

Science.gov (United States)

In an epidemiological study carried out in the town of Tromsö in northern Norway an extensive questionnaire was sent twice, in summer and winter, to 1000 subjects to investigate the degree of symptoms of mood variation (depression or hypomania) during the polar winter night and midnight sun seasons. The results suggest that the general population north of the Arctic Circle shows a major seasonal mood variation. It is suggested that seasonal mood variation is a chronobiological mood disturbance related to and probably precipitated by extreme variations in light. The therapeutic implications and preventive measures are discussed. PMID:2327276

Haggag, A; Eklund, B; Linaker, O; Götestam, K G

1990-02-01

222

Estimated 1 in 10 U.S. Adults Report Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

... the below text, map, and attached PDF. Current Depression in U.S. Adults Current depression 1 was defined as meeting criteria ... down, depressed, or hopeless." Data Source: CDC. Current Depression Among Adults --- United States, 2006 and 2008. MMWR 2010;59( ...

223

Influence of social desirability on age differences in self-reports of mood and personality  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Increased age has been found to be associated with differences in affect and personality which have been interpreted in terms of better emotional regulation and increased maturity. However, these findings have largely been based on self-report data, and the primary goal of the current research was to investigate the hypothesis that age-related differences in affect and in certain desirable personality traits might, at least partially, reflect age differences in social desirability. As expecte...

Soubelet, Andrea; Salthouse, Timothy A.

2011-01-01

224

Emotional recognition in depressed epilepsy patients.  

Science.gov (United States)

The current study examined the relationship between emotional recognition and depression using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Second Edition (MMPI-2), in a population with epilepsy. Participants were a mixture of surgical candidates in addition to those receiving neuropsychological testing as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Results suggested that patients with epilepsy reporting increased levels of depression (Scale D) performed better than those patients reporting low levels of depression on an index of simple facial recognition, and depression was associated with poor prosody discrimination. Further, it is notable that more than half of the present sample had significantly elevated Scale D scores. The potential effects of a mood-congruent bias and implications for social functioning in depressed patients with epilepsy are discussed. PMID:19393764

Brand, Jesse G; Burton, Leslie A; Schaffer, Sarah G; Alper, Kenneth R; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William B

2009-07-01

225

Sleep difficulty mediates effects of vasomotor symptoms on mood in younger breast cancer survivors.  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract Objective Treatment-induced early menopause occurs in > 80% of premenopausal women diagnosed with breast cancer. This study explored the relationship between vasomotor symptoms (VMS), sleep and mood in women aged 40-51 years with non-metastatic breast cancer. Methods Cross-sectional study using validated questionnaires (Greene Climacteric scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). Women (n = 114) were recruited from the community and hospital outpatient clinics. Frequency determination and structural equation modeling (SEMod) were used to examine the relationship between the latent variables: VMS, anxiety, and depression, and the indicator variable: difficulty sleeping. Results Participants' mean age was 47 years and 94% became menopausal after breast cancer diagnosis. Difficulty sleeping was reported by 82% of women with 46% reporting (Likert scale) 'quite a bit/extremely'. Most women reported night sweats (77% of women: 47% reporting 'quite a bit/extremely') and hot flushes (84% of women: 50% reporting 'quite a bit/extremely'). HADS scores indicated clinically relevant depression and anxiety in 98% and 99% of women, respectively. SEMod revealed that VMS contributed to difficulty sleeping (standardized coefficient = 0.54; p depression (standardized coefficient = -0.03; p = 0.8), although anxiety was a strong predictor of depression (standardized coefficient = 0.83; p = 0.015). Conclusions VMS, sleep and mood disturbance are commonly experienced by younger women with breast cancer. Using SEMod, we demonstrate for the first time that VMS may directly influence sleep in these women. VMS may have an indirect effect on mood, partly mediated by sleep difficulty. PMID:24673553

Vincent, A J; Ranasinha, S; Sayakhot, P; Mansfield, D; Teede, H J

2014-10-01

226

Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 in the Etiology and Treatment of Mood Disorders  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The mood disorders major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder are prevalent, are inadequately treated, and little is known about their etiologies. A better understanding of the causes of mood disorders would benefit from improved animal models of mood disorders, which now rely on behavioral measurements. This review considers the limitations in relating measures of rodent behaviors to mood disorders, and the evidence from behavioral assessments indicating that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (...

Jope, Richard Scott

2011-01-01

227

Stigma moderates the associations of insight with depressed mood, low self-esteem, and low quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

.001). Conclusions Our results suggest that the associations of insight with depression, low quality of life, and negative self-esteem are moderated by stigma. Patients with good insight who do not perceive much stigmatization seem to be best off across various outcome parameters. Those with poor insight have problems with service engagement and medication compliance. Patients with good insight accompanied by stigmatizing beliefs have the highest risk of experiencing low quality of life, nega...

Staring, A. B. P.; Gaag, M.; Berge, M. Den; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Mulder, C. L.

2009-01-01

228

The effect of prenatal Hatha yoga on affect, cortisol and depressive symptoms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Perinatal depression impacts maternal and child health, and little is known about effective interventions. The effects of prenatal Hatha yoga on cortisol, affect and depressive symptoms were investigated in 51 women. Twice during pregnancy, yoga group participants reported on affect and provided a saliva sample before and after a 90-min prenatal Hatha yoga session. Corresponding measures were obtained from yoga and control group participants on days of usual activity. Depressive symptoms were assessed in pregnancy and post partum. Cortisol was lower (p antepartum depressive symptoms than control group participants. Findings indicate that prenatal Hatha yoga may improve current mood and may be effective in reducing postpartum depressive symptoms. PMID:24767955

Bershadsky, Svetlana; Trumpfheller, Linda; Kimble, Holly Beck; Pipaloff, Diana; Yim, Ilona S

2014-05-01

229

Depressed mood and poor quality of life in male patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis Comportamento depressivo e má qualidade de vida em homens com insuficiência renal crônica submetidos à hemodiálise  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess mood and quality of life in male hemodialysis patients, and to correlate mood swings with the different domains of the quality of life questionnaire. METHOD: Forty-seven male patients undergoing regular hemodialysis for more than six months were included in the study. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, in a version translated into and adapted to Portuguese, were used. RESULTS: The patients' age was 39.4 ± 8.9 years (median ± SD. Depression was observed in 32 (68.1% patients according to the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. A significant negative correlation was found between the results from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the following parameters of the specific dimensions of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire: list of symptoms and problems (rs = -0.399; p = 0.005, quality of social interaction (rs = -0.433; p = 0.002, and quality of sleep (rs = -0.585; p OBJETIVO: Avaliar o estado de humor e a qualidade de vida de homens em tratamento hemodialítico, correlacionar as alterações observadas no humor com os diferentes domínios do questionário de qualidade de vida. MÉTODO: Foram incluídos 47 homens em tratamento hemodialítico estável há mais de seis meses. Foram aplicadas a Escala de Hamilton de depressão e o Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, questionário de qualidade de vida relacionado à saúde, em sua forma traduzida e adaptada para a língua portuguesa. RESULTADOS: A média da idade dos pacientes era 39,4 ± 8,9 anos. Na avaliação pela Escala de Hamilton, observou-se em 32 (68,1% pacientes a presença de depressão. Encontramos correlação negativa significativa entre os resultados obtidos na escala de Hamilton e os seguintes parâmetros das dimensões específicas do Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire: lista de sintomas e problemas (rs = -0,399; p = 0,005, qualidade da interação social (rs = -0,433; p = 0,002 e sono (rs = -0,585; p < 0,001. Entre os domínios genéricos, o estado de humor apresenta correlação negativa significativa com a saúde geral (rs = -0,475; p < 0,001, o bem-estar emocional (rs = -0,354; p = 0,015, a função social e a energia/fadiga (rs = -0,518; p < 0,001. Para os demais parâmetros do Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire não foram observadas relações significativas com a escala de Hamilton. CONCLUSÃO: O estado de humor apresentou correlação negativa com diversos escores de qualidade de vida avaliados pelo Kidney Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, sugerindo possível influência do estado de humor na qualidade de vida dos pacientes renais em hemodiálise.

Thales Weber Garcia

2010-12-01

230

Sleep and Mood During A Winter in Antarctica  

Science.gov (United States)

Seasonal variations in sleep characteristics and their association with changes in mood were examined in 91 American men and women also who spent the 1991 austral winter at three different research stations in Antarctica. Measures of total hours of sleep over a 24-hr period, duration of longest (i.e.,"nighttime") sleep event, number of sleep events, time of sleep onset, and quality of sleep remained unchanged over the course of the austral winter (March through October). However, exposure to total darkness based on station latitude was significantly associated with total hours of sleep, duration of are longest sleep event, time of sleep onset, and quality of sleep. Reported vigor the previous month was a significant independent predictor of changes in all five sleep measures; previous month's measures of all six POMS subscales were significant independent predictors of sleep quality. Sleep characteristics were significant independent predictors of vigor and confusion the following month; total sleep, longest sleep event, sleep onset and sleep quality were significant independent predictors of tension-anxiety and depression. Changes in mood during the austral winter are preceded by changes in sleep characteristics, but prolonged exposure to the photoperiodicity characteristic of the high latitudes appears to be associated with improved sleep. In turn, mood changes appear to affect certain sleep characteristics, especially sleep quality.

Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Houseal, Matt; Miller, Christopher

2000-01-01

231

Local cerebral glucose metabolism (LCMRGlc) in mood disorders  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

PET studies (LCMRGlc units of ? moles/min/100g and errors in std. dev.) were performed in patients with unipolar depression (n=11), bipolar depression (n=8), hypomania (n=8) and bipolar mixed states (n=3) in drug free states as well as during spontaneous or drug induced changes in mood, and age/sex matched normals (n=9). The major findings were: bipolar depressed patients had lower (P<0.001) supratentorial CMRGlc (16.7 +- 3.7) than normals (23.6 +- 1.9), hypomanic bipolars (24.7 + 44.6) or unipolars (24.5 +- 3.0). Bipolar mixed (16.4 +- 4.8) were not different from bipolar depressed but were different from all other states (P<0.02). Bipolar depressed and mixed showed increased (30%) supratentorial CMRGlc (P<0.05) with elevated mood (euthymic or hypomanic). Three rapid cycling bipolar patients (2 studies depressed and 1 hypomanic) also showed consistent increases (35%) in supratentorial CMRGlc from depressed to elevated mood state. Unipolar depressed patients had a low LCMRGlc ratio of caudate to hemispheric (c/Hem) (1.18 +- 0.09) compared to bipolar depression (1.30 +- 0.13) or normals (1.32 +- 0.07). Four unipolar patients studied after drug induced recovery showed corresponding return of Cd/Hem ratio to normal. Results of these studies show; delineation of bipolar depressed from unpolar depressed and normals. Separation of mixed biopolar from unipolar and correspondence of the former with bipolar rather than unipolar depression (controversial characterization by other diagnostic criteria), separation of unipolar from normal and bipolar by reduced LCMRGlc of caudate, and direct correspondence of changes in mood state with changes in LCMRGlc independent of whether changes in mood were drug induced or spontaneous

232

'You're depressed'; 'no I'm not': GPs' and patients' different models of depression. UMDS MSc in General Practice Teaching Group.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Questionnaires concerning models of depression were completed by 90 general practitioners (GPs) and 681 patients. GPs and patients held similar beliefs about the role of mood-related symptoms, psychological causes, and non-medical treatments. However, the GPs reported greater support for somatic symptoms, medical causes, and medical treatments. Therefore, GPs and patients report different models of depression, with GPs favouring a more medical perspective. In addition, the results illustrated...

1999-01-01

233

Coping with the Stress of Parental Depression II: Adolescent and Parent Reports of Coping and Adjustment  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined associations between adolescents' self-reports and parents' reports of adolescents' exposure to family stress, coping, and symptoms of anxiety/depression and aggression in a sample of 78 adolescent offspring of depressed parents. Significant cross-informant correlations were found between adolescents' reports of family stress,…

Jaser, Sarah S.; Langrock, Adela M.; Keller, Gary; Merchant, Mary Jane; Benson, Molly A.; Reeslund, Kristen; Champion, Jennifer E.; Compas, Bruce E.

2005-01-01

234

Optimal management of perimenopausal depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Barbara L ParryDepartment of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, USAAbstract: Only recently has the perimenopause become recognized as a time when women are at risk for new onset and recurrence of major depression. Untreated depression at this time not only exacerbates the course of a depressive illness, but also puts women at increased risk for sleep disorders, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Although antidepressant medication is the mainstay of treatment, adjunctive therapy, especially with estrogen replacement, may be indicated in refractory cases, and may speed the onset of antidepressant action. Many, but not all, studies, report that progesterone antagonizes the beneficial effects of estrogen. Although some antidepressants improve vasomotor symptoms, in general they are not as effective as estrogen alone for relieving these symptoms. Estrogen alone, however, does not generally result in remission of major depression in most (but not all studies, but may provide benefit to some women with less severe symptoms if administered in therapeutic ranges. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in addition to estrogen are usually more beneficial in improving mood than SSRIs or estrogen treatment alone for major depression, whereas the selective norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors do not require the addition of estrogen to exert their antidepressant effects in menopausal depression. In addition to attention to general health, hormonal status, and antidepressant treatment, the optimal management of perimenopausal depression also requires attention to the individual woman’s psychosocial and spiritual well being.Keywords: menopause, depression, management

Barbara L Parry

2010-06-01

235

PSYCHOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV, postpartum depression may include any nonpsychotic depressive disorder during the first four weeks of postpartum, according to research criteria during the first year after birth. The exact cause of postpartum depression is not yet known, and most researchers believe that postpartum depression is a bio-psycho-social problem. So far, the biological aspect of the disease is explained by changing the levels of estrogen and progesterone during pregnancy, and by decrease of hormone levels after birth. Psychological correlates are often associated with low selfesteem, pessimism as a personality trait, bad strategies of coping with stress, mood swings and emotional reactions. The social aspect of the disease is associated with the existential conditions of pregnant woman, support of partners and education level. This paper will include issues like hereditary causes and possible psychological factors of postpartum depression prevention. Nowadays, it is estimated that on average 15% of women, regardless of the pregnancy outcome, are suffering from postpartum depression. However, this information includes only those women who were diagnosed with postpartum depression and who themselves reported about it. Almost every woman receives basic care during pregnancy to prevent complications in the physiological level. This paper has shown possible psychological factors of postpartum depression prevention, the impact of optimism, self-esteem and coping skills.

Anida Fazlagi?

2011-12-01

236

Quality improvement in depression care in the Netherlands: the Depression Breakthrough Collaborative. A quality improvement report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Improving the healthcare for patients with depression is a priority health policy across the world. Roughly, two major problems can be identified in daily practice: (1 the content of care is often not completely consistent with recommendations in guidelines and (2 the organization of care is not always integrated and delivered by multidisciplinary teams. Aim: To describe the content and preliminary results of a quality improvement project in primary care, aiming at improving the uptake of clinical depression guidelines in daily practice as well as the collaboration between different mental health professionals. Method: A Depression Breakthrough Collaborative was initiated from December 2006 until March 2008. The activities included the development and implementation of a stepped care depression model, a care pathway with two levels of treatment intensity: a first step treatment level for patients with non-severe depression (brief or mild depressive symptoms and a second step level for patients with severe depression. Twelve months data were measured by the teams in terms of one outcome and several process indicators. Qualitative data were gathered by the national project team with a semi-structured questionnaire amongst the local team coordinators. Results: Thirteen multidisciplinary teams participated in the project. In total 101 health professionals were involved, and 536 patients were diagnosed. Overall 356 patients (66% were considered non-severely depressed and 180 (34% patients showed severe symptoms. The mean percentage of non-severe patients treated according to the stepped care model was 78%, and 57% for the severely depressed patient group. The proportion of non-severely depressed patients receiving a first step treatment according to the stepped care model, improved during the project, this was not the case for the severely depressed patients. The teams were able to monitor depression symptoms to a reasonable extent during a period of 6 months. Within 3 months, 28% of monitored patients had recovered, meaning a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score of 10 and lower, and another 27% recovered between 3 and 6 months. Conclusions and discussion: A stepped care approach seems acceptable and feasible in primary care, introducing different levels of care for different patient groups. Future implementation projects should pay special attention to the quality of care for severely depressed patients. Although the Depression Breakthrough Collaborative introduced new treatment concepts in primary and specialty care, the change capacity of the method remains unclear. Thorough data gathering is needed to judge the real value of these intensive improvement projects.

Gerdien Franx

2009-06-01

237

Adult separation anxiety in patients with complicated grief versus healthy control subjects: relationships with lifetime depressive and hypomanic symptoms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Around 9% to 20% of bereaved individuals experience symptoms of complicated grief (CG that are associated with significant distress and impairment. A major issue is whether CG represents a distinctive nosographic entity, independent from other mental disorders, particularly major depression (MD, and the role of symptoms of adult separation anxiety. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical features of patients with CG versus a sample of healthy control subjects, with particular focus on adult separation anxiety and lifetime mood spectrum symptoms. Methods A total of 53 patients with CG and 50 healthy control subjects were consecutively recruited and assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I disorders (SCID-I/P, Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG, Adult Separation Anxiety Questionnaire (ASA-27, Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS and Mood Spectrum-Self Report (MOODS-SR lifetime version. Results Patients with CG reported significantly higher scores on the MOODS-SR, ASA-27, and WSAS with respect to healthy control subjects. The scores on the ASA-27 were significantly associated with the MOODS-SR depressive and manic components amongst both patients and healthy control subjects, with a stronger association in the latter. Conclusions A major limitation of the present study is the small sample size that may reduce the generalizability of the results. Moreover, lifetime MOODS-SR does not provide information about the temporal sequence of the manic or depressive symptoms and the loss. The frequent comorbidity with MD and the association with both depressive and manic lifetime symptoms do not support the independence of CG from mood disorders. In our patients, CG is associated with high levels of separation anxiety in adulthood. However, the presence of lifetime mood instability, as measured by the frequent presence of depressive and hypomanic lifetime symptoms, suggests that cyclothymia might represent the common underlying feature characterizing the vulnerability to both adult separation anxiety and CG.

Dell'Osso Liliana

2011-10-01

238

Screening for depression and suicide: self-report instruments that work.  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-report instruments for depression and suicide risk can help busy clinicians identify adult clients who may be at risk for depressive disorders. These instruments provide a baseline measure of clients' behavioral status, reflect response to treatment, and improve clinical decision making. Such scales can also detect symptoms of depression regardless of whether they are reported or observed. Clinicians' recognition of depression is improved when self-report screening tools are used. When it is not feasible to conduct a thorough psychiatric evaluation, screening instruments can identify at-risk clients who need further evaluation. PMID:16350912

Valente, Sharon M; Saunders, Judith

2005-11-01

239

Mood disorders in Asians.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mood disorders are disorders that have a disturbance in mood as the predominant feature. They are common psychiatric disorders and are associated with significant distress and functional impairment. As the theory of mood disorders is based on the philosophy of mind/body dichotomy in the West, it contradicts the holistic tradition of medicine in the East. This may partially explain why many Asians with mood disorders emphasize their physical symptoms in discussions with their treatment providers. In the development of the DSM and ICD diagnostic systems, it is presumed that the diagnostic categories are applicable to all races and ethnicities. Similarly, many consider pharmacological and psychological treatment approaches to mood disorders universally applicable. To effectively treat Asians with mood disorders, clinicians need to customize biological and psychosocial interventions in consideration of patients' potential genetic and cultural differences. PMID:24524714

Yeung, Albert; Chang, Doris

2014-02-01

240

Prediction of symptoms of emotional distress by mood regulation expectancies and affective traits.  

Science.gov (United States)

Three studies examined negative mood regulation expectancies (NMRE) and affective traits as independent predictors of self-reported symptoms of emotional distress. NMRE represent individuals' beliefs that they can alleviate unpleasant emotional states. Stronger NMRE are associated with more adaptive coping, more positive cognition during negative moods, more effective responses under stress and less emotional distress. Affective traits represent long-term tendencies toward particular affective experiences; they confer risk for specific symptoms of emotional distress. In Study 1, NMRE, trait negative affect (TNA) and trait positive affect (TPA) were all independently associated with depression among students and staff of a German university. In Study 2, in prospective analyses among U.S. college students traits exhibited hypothesised relationships with anxiety and depressive symptoms, and NMRE uniquely predicted anhedonic depression. Study 3 revealed independent prediction of change in symptoms over time by NMRE among U.S. college students, whereas traits were not associated with change in distress, anxiety and depression symptoms. Results suggest independent roles for NMRE and traits in the development of depression and anxiety symptoms and highlight the importance of NMRE as a potential target of therapeutic intervention in the process of symptom change. PMID:25355670

Catanzaro, Salvatore J; Backenstrass, Matthias; Miller, Steven A; Mearns, Jack; Pfeiffer, Nils; Brendalen, Sherry

2014-12-01

 
 
 
 
241

Dysfunctional hippocampal activity affects emotion and cognition in mood disorders.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mood disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder and generalized anxiety disorder usually comprise mood related as well as cognitive symptoms and the interaction between these symptoms is still not clear. Most antidepressant drugs have a positive effect on mood but do not treat the cognitive dysfunctions or even aggravate the symptoms. In this review we will evaluate the association between mood and cognition in the context of mood disorders. In the first section we will summarize the brain circuits at the intersection between cognition and emotion, highlighting the role of the hippocampus. In the second section, we will survey the contribution of the glutamate and GABA systems in the pathophysiology of mood disorders, making an effort to understand the link between emotions and cognition and how novel therapeutic approaches deal with them. In the third section we will explore the monoamine involvement in the emotion/cognition duality in the context of mood disorders. Finally we will underline the role of synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis in depression. We consider that a broader knowledge about the integrative mechanisms involved in specific aspects of mood disorders is crucial in the development of more powerful and effective antidepressant drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Brain Integration. PMID:22541166

Femenía, Teresa; Gómez-Galán, Marta; Lindskog, Maria; Magara, Salvatore

2012-10-01

242

Vegetarian diets are associated with healthy mood states: a cross-sectional study in Seventh Day Adventist adults  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The physical health status of vegetarians has been extensively reported, but there is limited research regarding the mental health status of vegetarians, particularly with regard to mood. Vegetarian diets exclude fish, the major dietary source of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, critical regulators of brain cell structure and function. Omnivorous diets low in EPA and DHA are linked to impaired mood states in observational and experimental studies. Methods We examined associations between mood state and polyunsaturated fatty acid intake as a result of adherence to a vegetarian or omnivorous diet in a cross-sectional study of 138 healthy Seventh Day Adventist men and women residing in the Southwest. Participants completed a quantitative food frequency questionnaire, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS, and Profile of Mood States (POMS questionnaires. Results Vegetarians (VEG:n = 60 reported significantly less negative emotion than omnivores (OMN:n = 78 as measured by both mean total DASS and POMS scores (8.32 ± 0.88 vs 17.51 ± 1.88, p = .000 and 0.10 ± 1.99 vs 15.33 ± 3.10, p = .007, respectively. VEG reported significantly lower mean intakes of EPA (p p p p p p p p p p Conclusions The vegetarian diet profile does not appear to adversely affect mood despite low intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids.

Johnston Carol S

2010-06-01

243

Attitudes and beliefs among patients treated with mood stabilizers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that attitudes and beliefs are important in predicting adherence in depressive and bipolar disorders. However, such attitudes and beliefs on mood stabilizers have not been analysed by socio-demographic and clinical variables. Methods The Mood Stabilizer Compliance Questionnaire (MSQC was mailed to a large population of patients with depressive or bipolar disorder representative of patients treated at their first contacts to hospital settings in Denmark. Results Of the 1005 recipients, 49.9 % responded to the letter and among these 256 indicated that they previously had been or currently were in treatment with a mood stabilizer. A large proportion of the patients (40 to 80 % had non-correct views on the effect of mood stabilizers. Older patients consistently had a more negative view on the doctor-patient relationship, more non-correct views on the effect of mood stabilizers and a more negative view on mood stabilizers. There was no difference in the attitudes and beliefs according to the type of disorder (depressive or bipolar, the number of psychiatric hospitalisations or according to the type of the current doctor (general practitioner, private psychiatrist, community psychiatry doctor, hospital doctor, other doctor. Conclusion There is a need of improving knowledge and attitudes toward diagnosis and treatment especially among elder patients as this may add to improve the prognosis of depressive and bipolar disorders.

Hansen Hanne

2006-05-01

244

Self-Report Screening Measures for Depression in Chronic Pain Patients.  

Science.gov (United States)

Investigated the relationship of several self-report depression scales to clinician Diagnostic Statistical Manual-III diagnoses of major depressive disorders in chronic pain patients (N=40). Results indicated a high degree of agreement between the self-report data and the results of diagnostic interviews that use standardized criteria. (LLL)

Turner, Judith A.; Romano, Joan M.

1984-01-01

245

Winter Depression: Integrating mood, circadian rhythms, and the sleep/wake and light/dark cycles into a bio-psycho-social-environmental model.  

Science.gov (United States)

The phase shift hypothesis (PSH) states that most patients with SAD become depressed in the winter because of a delay in circadian rhythms with respect to the sleep/wake cycle: According to the PSH, these patients should preferentially respond to the antidepressant effects of bright light exposure when it is scheduled in the morning so as to provide a corrective phase advance and restore optimum alignment between the circadian rhythms tightly coupled to the endogenous circadian pacemaker and those rhythms that are related to the sleep/wake cycle. Recent support for the PSH has come from studies in which symptom severity was shown to correlate with the degree of circadian misalignment: it appears that a subgroup of patients are phase advanced, not phase delayed; however, the phase-delayed type is predominant in SAD and perhaps in other disorders as well, such as non-seasonal unipolar depression. It is expected that during the next few years the PSH will be tested in these and other conditions, particularly since healthy subjects appear to have more severe symptoms of sub-clinical dysphoria correlating with phase-delayed circadian misalignment; critically important will be the undertaking of treatment trials to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of morning bright light or afternoon/evening low-dose melatonin in these disorders in which symptoms are more severe as the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) is delayed with respect to the sleep/wake cycle (non-restorative sleep should also be evaluated, as well as bipolar disorder). The possibility that some individuals (and disorders) will be of the phase-advanced type should be considered, taking into account that the correct timing of phase-resetting agents for them will be bright light scheduled in the evening and/or low-dose melatonin taken in the morning. While sleep researchers and clinicians are accustomed to phase-typing patients with circadian-rhythm sleep disorders according to the timing of sleep, phase typing based on the DLMO with respect to the sleep/wake cycle may lead to quite different recommendations for the optimal scheduling of phase-resetting agents, particularly for the above disorders and conditions. PMID:20160896

Lewy, Alfred J; Emens, Jonathan S; Songer, Jeannie B; Sims, Neelam; Laurie, Amber L; Fiala, Steven C; Buti, Allie L

2009-06-01

246

Anxiety, depressed mood, self-esteem, and traumatic stress symptoms among distant witnesses of the 9/11 terrorist attacks: transitory responses and psychological resilience.  

Science.gov (United States)

Posttraumatic stress related to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and general psychological distress were examined in six cohorts of college students (N=5412) enrolled at an American public university between Spring 2000 and Fall 2002 some 2,500 miles from New York. Consistent with data from Schuster et al.'s (2001) national survey, which used a very low threshold criterion, our findings revealed that 44% of women and 32% of men experienced at least one symptom of posttraumatic stress 6-17 days after the attacks. In contrast to these results, depression levels showed only small differences, and self-esteem and trait anxiety showed no changes. Findings indicate that 9/11-related stress responses among distant witnesses were very mild, transitory and focused in scope, suggesting resilience with respect to broader psychological and psychopathological reactions. Findings are discussed with respect to the role of physical and psychological proximity on the reactions to traumatic events in the general population. PMID:18988435

Matt, Georg E; Vázquez, Carmelo

2008-11-01

247

The role of the self-concept in the relationship of menstrual symptom attitudes and negative mood  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: A relationship between symptom attitudes and negative affect has consistently been found in a range of different symptom domains. Little is known, however, about the role of different aspects of the self in this rela-tionship. We explored the mediating role of in-terferences of symptom with the self-concept in the association of menstrual symptom attitudes and depressive mood. Methods: Eighty-one women completed an online survey on men-strual symptom attitudes, perceived interfer-ences of symptoms with various self-aspects and negative mood states. We tested our hy-pothesis in a mediation analysis. Results: We found a complete mediation of the relationship of symptom attitudes and depressive mood by interferences of symptoms with self-aspects. However, interferences with self-aspects did not play a role in the association of anxious mood and symptom report. Conclusion: The self- concept should receive greater attention in re-search on symptom attitudes and psychological well-being. This would be particularly important in research on medically unexplained symptom report.

Tilman Eckloff

2011-06-01

248

Development of a Patient-Report Measure of Psychotherapy for Depression  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Despite clear indications of need to improve depression treatment, practical tools that efficiently measure psychotherapy are not available. We developed a patient-report measure of psychotherapy for depression that assesses Cognitive Behavioral (CBT), Interpersonal (IPT), and Psychodynamic therapies. 420 patients with depression from a large managed behavioral health care organization completed the measure. The three subscales measuring CBT, IPT, and Psychodynamic Therapy showed good interna...

Miranda, Jeanne; Hepner, Kimberly A.; Azocar, Francisca; Greenwood, Greg; Ngo, Victoria; Burnam, M. Audrey

2010-01-01

249

Improvement of Depression after Treatment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: A Case Report and a Review  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Patients with dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) in the transverse-sigmoid sinus suffer from several symptoms: bruit, headache, visual impairment, and so on. But depression is rare in patients with DAVF. The authors reported a rare case presenting the improvement of depression after the treatment of a dural arteriovenous fistula in the left transverse-sigmoid sinus. A 46-year-old male had suffered from depression and was treated with antidepressants at a local hospital for four years. Th...

Minoru Nakagawa; Kenji Sugiu; Kenjiro Fujiwara

2012-01-01

250

How Is Depression Diagnosed?  

Science.gov (United States)

... health-care providers must sort out the different types of mood disorders to make a useful and relevant diagnosis. Dysthymia (a moderate and persistent form of minor depression) is treated differently from bipolar disorder (an illness with periods of depression and ...

251

Adult mood disorders and childhood psychological trauma  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between adult mood disorders and childhood psychological trauma in a developing country. METHOD: Adults with and without mood disorders were assessed in a case-control study using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Assessment of childhood trauma included physical and sexual abuse, frequent exposure to violence, and parental loss. RESULTS: In two independent multivariate analyses, after adjusting for potential confounding factors, we found a higher odds ratio for frequent exposure to violence in the community (p = .037 and for physical abuse by parents or caregivers during childhood/adolescence (p = .012 in the group with mood disorders than in the control group. In secondary analyses splitting the mood disorder group in two subgroups (manic episode, and major depressive episodes/ dysthymia, only manic patients showed significantly higher rates of frequent exposure to violence in the community (p = 0.01 and physical abuse during childhood (p = 0.02 than did patients in the control group. In addition, maniac patients had significantly higher rates of sexual abuse than did controls (p = .03. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings document an association between violence during childhood and adult mood disorders, especially for manic patients, in a developing country.

Zavaschi Maria Lucrécia Scherer

2006-01-01

252

DEP: A Depression Emulation Program*  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Cognitive deficits can be studied by “lesioning” computer simulations of normal cognitive processes. DEP (Depression Emulation Program) implements key aspects of a computational theory of “normal” adaptive reactive depression. A theory of “normal” depression is a step toward a theory of “pathological” depression. Transient depressed mood caused by an environmental event may be an example of fallure-triggered reprogramming of the self-schema. We normally generate responses to o...

Webster, Charles; Glass, Richard M.; Banks, Gordon

1988-01-01

253

Social disability of Brazilian mood disorder patients  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Mood disorders cause many social problems, often involving family relationships. Few studies are available in the literature comparing patients with bipolar, unipolar, dysthymic, and double depressive disorders concerning these aspects. In the present study, demographic and disease data were collected using a specifically prepared questionnaire. Social adjustment was assessed using the Disability Adjustment Scale and family relationships were evaluated using the Global Assessment of Relationa...

Tucci, A. M.; Kerr-corre?a, F.; Dias, R. S.

2004-01-01

254

Depressive disorders and suicide: Epidemiology, risk factors, and burden.  

Science.gov (United States)

The social and economic impact of mood disorders and suicide is extremely high and may be even higher in coming years, and yet, research in mental health is largely underfunded. This report summarizes the most recent data concerning the epidemiology and burden of depression and suicide, and underlines the most recent initiatives to identify the barriers to effective treatment and prevention of mood disorders. Global cooperation and networks of research networks are proposed. Progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology and subtypes of depression, technological advances, emphasis on early prediction of response and prevention, and a paradigm shift in drug development are crucial to overcome the current challenges posed by increasing rates of depression and suicide. PMID:23313644

Miret, Marta; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis; Sanchez-Moreno, Jose; Vieta, Eduard

2013-12-01

255

Quetiapine monotherapy for bipolar depression  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Bipolar depression is more common, disabling, and difficult-to-treat than the manic and hypomanic phases that define bipolar disorder. Unlike the treatment of so-called “unipolar” depressions, antidepressants generally are not indicated as monotherapies for bipolar depressions and recent studies suggest that -even when used in combination with traditional mood stabilizers –...

Thase, Michael E.

2008-01-01

256

The depression report: a new deal for depression and anxiety disorders  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Crippling depression and chronic anxiety are the biggest causes of misery in Britain today. They are the great submerged problem, which shame keeps out of sight. But if you mention them, you soon discover how many families are affected. According to the respected Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, one in six of us would be diagnosed as having depression or chronic anxiety disorder, which means that one family in three is affected. That is the bad news. The good news is that we now have evidence-ba...

2006-01-01

257

Gender differences in mental health service utilization among respondents reporting depression in a national health survey  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study examined whether people who self-reported depression sought mental health treatment in the year after being interviewed, and how gender affected utilization. Depression data were obtained from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2000-01, and linked to medical records in Ontario (n = 24,677. Overall, women had higher rates of mental health service utilization, but there were no gender differences in rates of specialist care. The gender difference in mental health contact was greater for those without depression, as opposed to those with depression. Among those without depression, women were significantly more likely than men to use mental health services; however, rates were similar for women and men with depression. This finding suggests that men may be more likely than women to delay seeing a doctor for minor mental health concerns, but will seek help once a problem reaches a threshold.

Katherine L. W. Smith

2013-09-01

258

Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms in Lesbian Birth Mothers and Comothers  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite the frequency of postpartum depression, little is known about the experiences of lesbian birth mothers and their female partners, or comothers. In this modest yet important exploratory investigation, 20 lesbian mothers completed a survey of self-reported postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS) and related risk factors. Results indicate that…

Maccio, Elaine M.; Pangburn, Jaimee A.

2012-01-01

259

Brief Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Anxiety and Depression: Piloting an Integrated Treatment Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

Mood and anxiety disorders in youth are disabling, distressing, and prevalent. Furthermore, depression and anxiety frequently co-exist, may share several etiological factors, and respond to similar interventions. In this paper, we report preliminary results from a treatment adaptation project designed to condense existing cognitive behavioral…

Weersing, V. Robin; Gonzalez, Araceli; Campo, John V.; Lucas, Amanda N.

2008-01-01

260

Uncontrolled Self-Medication with Venlafaxine in a Patient with Major Depressive Disorder  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Antidepressants are known to have no significant ability to cause addiction. However, a recent study showed many individuals with mood disorders self-medicated with antidepressants to relieve symptoms. We report here a male physician, diagnosed five years ago with major depressive disorder, with insomnia, anxiousness, and chest heaviness. He began self-medicating with 150 mg of venlafaxine daily, without any monitoring. During his most recent severe depressive episode, he was taking up to 1,5...

Song, Ji-hye; Yu, Bum-hee; Lee, Dongsoo; Yoon, Se Chang; Jeon, Hong Jin

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

The increasing burden of depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Jean-Pierre Lépine1, Mike Briley21Hôpital Lariboisière Fernand Widal, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris Unité INSERM 705 CNRS UMR 8206, Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France; 2NeuroBiz Consulting and Communication, Castres, FranceAbstract: Recent epidemiological surveys conducted in general populations have found that the lifetime prevalence of depression is in the range of 10% to 15%. Mood disorders, as defined by the World Mental Health and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, have a 12-month prevalence which varies from 3% in Japan to over 9% in the US. A recent American survey found the prevalence of current depression to be 9% and the rate of current major depression to be 3.4%. All studies of depressive disorders have stressed the importance of the mortality and morbidity associated with depression. The mortality risk for suicide in depressed patients is more than 20-fold greater than in the general population. Recent studies have also shown the importance of depression as a risk factor for cardiovascular death. The risk of cardiac mortality after an initial myocardial infarction is greater in patients with depression and related to the severity of the depressive episode. Greater severity of depressive symptoms has been found to be associated with significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality including cardiovascular death and stroke. In addition to mortality, functional impairment and disability associated with depression have been consistently reported. Depression increases the risk of decreased workplace productivity and absenteeism resulting in lowered income or unemployment. Absenteeism and presenteeism (being physically present at work but functioning suboptimally have been estimated to result in a loss of $36.6 billion per year in the US. Worldwide projections by the World Health Organization for the year 2030 identify unipolar major depression as the leading cause of disease burden. This article is a brief overview of how depression affects the quality of life of the subject and is also a huge burden for both the family of the depressed patient and for society at large.Keywords: epidemiology, DALY, mortality risk, economic burden, family burden, depression

Lépine J-P

2011-05-01

262

Depression as the cause and consequence of cerebrovascular diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Inbtroduction: Recent epidemiological, clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological studies have reported substantial evidence on the complex interactive relationships between depression and cerebrovascular diseases, especially in older populations, and plausible explanations of the etiopathogenetic mechanisms in both directions have been proposed. Poststroke depression Although there is no general consensus regarding its prevalence, it is widely accepted that major depression after stroke is common and that it should be recognized as a key factor in rehabilitation and outcome following stroke. Vascular depression The "vascular depression" hypothesis presupposes that late-onset depression may often result from vascular damage to frontal-subcortical circuits implicated in mood regulation. This concept has stimulated many researches and the obtained results support the proposed hypothesis. Depression as a stroke risk factor Recent large studies have emphasized the role of depression per se in the development of subsequent stroke. Mechanisms proposed to explain the increased risk of cerebrovascular diseases in depressed patients There are a number of plausible mechanisms that could explain why depression may increase the risk of subsequent cerebrovascular disease, the most important being sympathoadrenal hyperactivity, platelet activation, an increase in inflammatory cytokines and an increased risk of arrhythmias. Conclusion: Thorough clinical examinations determining the conventional stroke risk factors in the population with depression, as well as management of depression as part of the overall measures for the reduction of cerebrovascular risk factors are of utmost importance.

Rabi-Žiki? Tamara

2007-01-01

263

Parenting with bipolar disorder: coping with risk of mood disorders to children.  

Science.gov (United States)

Children of individuals with bipolar disorder (BPD) have increased risk for mood disorders and other adverse psychosocial outcomes due to genetic and environmental risk. Though parents with BPD are aware of increased risk to children, little is known about efforts undertaken in response or their perceived utility. Among parents who self-report with BPD, this study identifies key variables associated with parental coping with children's risk of mood disorders; and explores the relationship between monitoring children's moods and perceived coping efficacy. In this U.S. study, active parental coping with, and cognitive distancing from, child's risk were measured using novel scales. Parents (n = 266) who self-identified as having BPD completed a web-based survey. They had at least one unaffected child. Most participants endorsed monitoring their children's moods. Monitoring was associated with increased perceived control over the child's well-being (p parental coping with risk to children was positively associated with active coping with own illness (? = 0.25, p = 0.001), family history (? = 0.24, p = 0.001), and self-report of current depression (? = 0.16, p = 0.037), explaining 13.8% of the variance (F = 8.81, p child's risk was positively associated with confidence in diagnosis (? = 0.25, p = 0.001), and negatively associated with self-report of current mania (? = -0.19, p = 0.007), perceiving BPD as genetic (? = -0.26, p Parents' adaptation to their own BPD was modestly correlated with active coping with child's risk (r = 0.15, p parents with BPD. Further research is necessary to elucidate the psychological benefits of active coping versus cognitive distancing from child's risk, and explore additional variables that predict parental coping with children's risk of mood disorders. PMID:24581078

Peay, Holly Landrum; Rosenstein, Donald L; Biesecker, Barbara Bowles

2014-03-01

264

Music feels like moods feel.  

Science.gov (United States)

While it is widely accepted that music evokes moods, there is disagreement over whether music-induced moods are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music as such. The arguments against the aesthetic relevance of music-induced moods are: (1) moods cannot be intentionally directed at the music and (2) music-induced moods are highly subjective experiences and are therefore a kind of mind-wandering. This paper presents a novel account of musical moods that avoids these objections. It is correct to say that a listener's entire mood is not relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. However, the experience of mood consists of having different feelings. Music induces feelings that are intentionally directed at the music and clusters of these feelings can be recognized as typical of a specific mood. Therefore, mood-feelings are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. PMID:24795677

Goffin, Kris

2014-01-01

265

Music feels like moods feel  

Science.gov (United States)

While it is widely accepted that music evokes moods, there is disagreement over whether music-induced moods are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music as such. The arguments against the aesthetic relevance of music-induced moods are: (1) moods cannot be intentionally directed at the music and (2) music-induced moods are highly subjective experiences and are therefore a kind of mind-wandering. This paper presents a novel account of musical moods that avoids these objections. It is correct to say that a listener’s entire mood is not relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. However, the experience of mood consists of having different feelings. Music induces feelings that are intentionally directed at the music and clusters of these feelings can be recognized as typical of a specific mood. Therefore, mood-feelings are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. PMID:24795677

Goffin, Kris

2014-01-01

266

Music feels like moods feel  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available While it is widely accepted that music evokes moods, there is disagreement over whether music-induced moods are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music as such. The arguments against the aesthetic relevance of music-induced moods are: (1 moods cannot be intentionally directed at the music and (2 music-induced moods are highly subjective experiences and are therefore a kind of mind-wandering. This paper presents a novel account of musical moods that avoids these objections. It is correct to say that a listener's entire mood is not relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. However, the experience of mood consists of having different feelings. Music induces feelings that are intentionally directed at the music and clusters of these feelings can be recognized as typical of a specific mood. Therefore, mood-feelings are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music.

KrisGoffin

2014-04-01

267

Coping with the stress of parental depression: parents' reports of children's coping, emotional, and behavioral problems.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examined children's coping and involuntary responses to the stress of living with a depressed parent in relation to their symptoms of anxiety/depression and aggression. Sixty-six clinically depressed adults rated their children's (ages 7 to 17 years old; N = 101) coping and involuntary responses to parental stressors and anxiety/depressive and aggressive behavior symptoms. Based on parent report, children of depressed parents had high rates of symptoms of anxiety/depression and aggression, were exposed to moderate levels of parental stressors (parental intrusiveness, parental withdrawal), and responded to the stress of living with a depressed parent in ways that were associated with symptoms of psychopathology. Children's use of secondary control coping (e.g., positive thinking, acceptance, distraction) was associated with fewer anxiety/depression and aggression symptoms. In contrast, involuntary engagement responses (e.g., rumination, intrusive thoughts) were associated with more anxiety/depression and aggression symptoms. Path analyses revealed that a model in which secondary control coping and involuntary engagement stress responses mediated the relation between family stressors and child symptoms provided the best fit with the data. Implications of these findings for developing interventions for children to reduce the risk of psychopathology are discussed. PMID:12149969

Langrock, Adela M; Compas, Bruce E; Keller, Gary; Merchant, Mary Jane; Copeland, Mary Ellen

2002-09-01

268

Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium / Cleptomanía, distúrbio do humor e lítio  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Os autores descrevem e comentam o caso de uma paciente com Distúrbio de Humor Bipolar e Cleptomanía (DSM-III-R) que apresentou remissão de seu quadro compulsivo após instituição de litioterapia. Discutem a possibilidade de tratamento medicamentoso para este distúrbio e apontam para a necessidade de [...] estudos que estabeleçam a eventual relação entre cleptomania, distúrbios do humor e litioterapia. Abstract in english Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the [...] possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.

Fábio Lopes, Rocha; Maria Elizabete Guimarães, Rocha.

1992-12-01

269

Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium / Cleptomanía, distúrbio do humor e lítio  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Os autores descrevem e comentam o caso de uma paciente com Distúrbio de Humor Bipolar e Cleptomanía (DSM-III-R) que apresentou remissão de seu quadro compulsivo após instituição de litioterapia. Discutem a possibilidade de tratamento medicamentoso para este distúrbio e apontam para a necessidade de [...] estudos que estabeleçam a eventual relação entre cleptomania, distúrbios do humor e litioterapia. Abstract in english Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the [...] possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.

Fábio Lopes, Rocha; Maria Elizabete Guimarães, Rocha.

270

Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium Cleptomanía, distúrbio do humor e lítio  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.Os autores descrevem e comentam o caso de uma paciente com Distúrbio de Humor Bipolar e Cleptomanía (DSM-III-R que apresentou remissão de seu quadro compulsivo após instituição de litioterapia. Discutem a possibilidade de tratamento medicamentoso para este distúrbio e apontam para a necessidade de estudos que estabeleçam a eventual relação entre cleptomania, distúrbios do humor e litioterapia.

Fábio Lopes Rocha

1992-12-01

271

Mood and audience effects on video lottery terminal gambling.  

Science.gov (United States)

Little is known about the situational factors associated with gambling behavior. We induced 180 male participants (mean age: 21.6) into a positive, negative, or neutral mood prior to gambling on a video lottery terminal (VLT). While gambling, participants were observed by either a male peer, female peer, or no one. Induced mood had no effect on gambling behavior. Participants induced into a negative mood prior to gambling, however, reported more positive moods after gambling, whereas those with positive and neutral moods reported more negative moods after gambling. Participants observed by either a male or female peer spent less time gambling on the VLT compared to those not observed. Participants observed by a female peer lost less money relative to the other observer conditions. Degree of problem gambling in the last year had little influence on these effects. Some practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19921408

Mishra, Sandeep; Morgan, Michael; Lalumière, Martin L; Williams, Robert J

2010-09-01

272

Sleep deprivation in depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Ten patients diagnosed as suffering from depressive illness were treated with 2 consecutive nights of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was effective in both types of depression viz. endoge-nous and reactive. The improvement was greater and seemed to last longer in endogenous depression as compared to reactive depression at the time of evaluation, 7 days after completion of sleep deprivation. Depressed mood, suicidal tendencies and retard-ation seemed to show the greatest improvement while insight and gastro-intestinal and somatic symptoms, improved the least.

Doongaji D

1979-01-01

273

Depressive symptoms in epilepsy: prevalence, impact, aetiology, biological correlates and effect of treatment with antiepileptic drugs.  

Science.gov (United States)

Occurring in up to 80% of patients with epilepsy, depression in epilepsy may manifest as (i) major depressive disorder, meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th edition (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria; (ii) atypical depression or dysthymia; or (iii) a dysthymic-like disorder with intermittent symptoms that can be milder than those of major depression. Depressive symptoms impair patients' health-related quality of life and may affect the clinical course of epilepsy. Depressive symptoms in epilepsy have been attributed to several causes, including endocrine and/or metabolic effects of seizures; the psychological response to epilepsy and its associated mental, physical and social challenges; common pathogenic mechanisms between depression and epilepsy; and the adverse effects of certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), particularly GABAergic agents, such as vigabatrin, tiagabine, topiramate and phenobarbital. Whereas some AEDs impair mood, others appear to improve aspects of mood or are mood neutral. Demonstrable antidepressant efficacy of AEDs used to manage seizures could have a significant impact on the care of patients with epilepsy. The AED lamotrigine has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of depressive symptoms in patients with epilepsy. In randomized, double-blind, clinical trials in patients with epilepsy, depressive symptoms improved more with lamotrigine monotherapy than valproate monotherapy and more with lamotrigine adjunctive therapy than placebo. Results of open-label studies of lamotrigine monotherapy and adjunctive therapy are consistent with the results of double-blind clinical trials. Lamotrigine-associated improvement in depressive symptoms is independent of its anticonvulsant efficacy. In prospective assessments, gabapentin, levetiracetam and oxcarbazepine each exhibited potentially beneficial effects on depressive symptoms in patients with epilepsy. However, evidence for the efficacy of gabapentin, levetiracetam and oxcarbazepine in the treatment of depressive symptoms in epilepsy is inconclusive at present because the effects of each agent have only been reported in single studies of an open-label design and with small sample sizes. PMID:18627207

Miller, J Mitchell; Kustra, Robert P; Vuong, Alain; Hammer, Anne E; Messenheimer, John A

2008-01-01

274

Distinct profiles of behavioral inhibition and activation system sensitivity in unipolar vs. bipolar mood disorders.  

Science.gov (United States)

Psychiatric outpatients with mood disorders (n=275) and community controls (n=733) completed a measure of Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) and Behavioral Activation System (BAS) sensitivity; psychiatric outpatients also completed measures of mood symptom severity. All patients scored higher on BIS compared to controls; patients with bipolar disorders scored higher on BAS scales compared to patients with depressive disorders. BIS and BAS demonstrated unique patterns of association with mood symptoms. Results support the clinical utility of the BIS/BAS. PMID:24857564

Quilty, Lena C; Mackew, Laura; Bagby, R Michael

2014-09-30

275

Convexity meningioma associated with depression: A case report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction. Meningiomas are slow growing, extra-axial lesions, and can be neurologically silent for a long time and present only with depression. Case Outline. A 65-year-old woman developed major depression and was treated with antidepressants for two years. Depression failed to respond to drug treatment and there was no improvement. Two months before admission to hospital, due to the onset of epilepsy attack the patient underwent reinvestigation, and a large temporal convexity meningioma, which corresponded in position to the original electroencephalography focus, was diagnosed using the computer topography of the brain. The patient underwent osteoplastic craniotomy, and a left fronto-temporal convexity meningioma of 5 cm in diameter was completely removed with its attachment to the dura. Histological examination confirmed a fibroblastic meningioma. Conclusion. Total resection of convexity meningioma and decompression of the brain tissue in the region of limbic pathways that are involved, may contribute to a complete remission of depression symptoms. This case also illustrates the need for a prompt neuroimaging of the brain when patients present any atypical psychiatric symptoms, with late onset (>50 years old of the first depressive episode or fast changes of the mental state.

Živkovi? Nenad

2014-01-01

276

Self-reported depressive symptom measures: sensitivity to detecting change in a randomized, controlled trial of chronically depressed, nonpsychotic outpatients.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study evaluated and compared the performance of three self-report measures: (1) 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (IDS-SR30); (2) 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (QIDS-SR16); and (3) Patient Global Impression-Improvement (PGI-I) in assessing clinical outcomes in depressed patients during a 12-week, acute phase, randomized, controlled trial comparing nefazodone, cognitive-behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (CBASP), and the combination in the treatment of chronic depression. The IDS-SR30, QIDS-SR16, PGI-I, and the 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS24) ratings were collected at baseline and at weeks 1-4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. Response was defined a priori as a > or =50% reduction in baseline total score for the IDS-SR30 or for the QIDS-SR16 or as a PGI-I score of 1 or 2 at exit. Overall response rates (LOCF) to nefazodone were 41% (IDS-SR30), 45% (QIDS-SR16), 53% (PCI-I), and 47% (HDRS17). For CBASP, response rates were 41% (IDS-SR30), 45% (QIDS-SR16), 48% (PGI-I), and 46% (HDRS17). For the combination, response rates were 68% (IDS-SR30 and QIDS-SR16), 73% (PGI-I), and 76% (HDRS17). Similarly, remission rates were comparable for nefazodone (IDS-SR30=32%, QIDS-SR16=28%, PGI-I=22%, HDRS17=30%), for CBASP (IDS-SR30=32%, QIDS-SR16=30%, PGI-I=21%, HDRS17=32%), and for the combination (IDS-SR30=52%, QIDS-SR16=50%, PGI-I=25%, HDRS17=49%). Both the IDS-SR30 and QIDS-SR16 closely mirrored and confirmed findings based on the HDRS24. These findings raise the possibility that these two self-reports could provide cost- and time-efficient substitutes for clinician ratings in treatment trials of outpatients with nonpsychotic MDD without cognitive impairment. Global patient ratings such as the PGI-I, as opposed to specific item-based ratings, provide less valid findings. PMID:15578008

Rush, A John; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Carmody, Thomas J; Ibrahim, Hisham M; Markowitz, John C; Keitner, Gabor I; Kornstein, Susan G; Arnow, Bruce; Klein, Daniel N; Manber, Rachel; Dunner, David L; Gelenberg, Alan J; Kocsis, James H; Nemeroff, Charles B; Fawcett, Jan; Thase, Michael E; Russell, James M; Jody, Darlene N; Borian, Frances E; Keller, Martin B

2005-02-01

277

Mood disorders and complementary and alternative medicine: a literature review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Naseem Akhtar Qureshi,1 Abdullah Mohammed Al-Bedah21General Administration for Research and Studies, Sulaimania Medical Complex, 2National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Mood disorders are a major public health problem and are associated with considerable burden of disease, suicides, physical comorbidities, high economic costs, and poor quality of life. Approximately 30%–40% of patients with major depression have only a partial response to available pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has been used either alone or in combination with conventional therapies in patients with mood disorders. This review of the literature examines evidence-based data on the use of CAM in mood disorders. A search of the PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Quertile databases using keywords was conducted, and relevant articles published in the English language in the peer-reviewed journals over the past two decades were retrieved. Evidence-based data suggest that light therapy, St John's wort, Rhodiola rosea, omega-3 fatty acids, yoga, acupuncture, mindfulness therapies, exercise, sleep deprivation, and S-adenosylmethionine are effective in the treatment of mood disorders. Clinical trials of vitamin B complex, vitamin D, and methylfolate found that, while these were useful in physical illness, results were equivocal in patients with mood disorders. Studies support the adjunctive role of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid in unipolar and bipolar depression, although manic symptoms are not affected and higher doses are required in patients with resistant bipolar depression and rapid cycling. Omega-3 fatty acids are useful in pregnant women with major depression, and have no adverse effects on the fetus. Choline, inositol, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, and N-acetylcysteine are effective adjuncts in bipolar patients. Dehydroepiandrosterone is effective both in bipolar depression and depression in the setting of comorbid physical disease, although doses should be titrated to avoid adverse effects. Ayurvedic and homeopathic therapies have the potential to improve symptoms of depression, although larger controlled trials are needed. Mind-body-spirit and integrative medicine approaches can be used effectively in mild to moderate depression and in treatment-resistant depression. Currently, although CAM therapies are not the primary treatment of mood disorders, level 1 evidence could emerge in the future showing that such treatments are effective.Keywords: complementary and alternative medicine, mood disorders, Ayurveda, homeopathy, integrative medicine

Qureshi NA

2013-05-01

278

Cyclic mood disorder heralding adult-onset autosomal dominant leucodystrophy: a clinical masquerader.  

Science.gov (United States)

Leucodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of progressive white matter diseases which may be inherited in dominant, recessive or X-linked fashion depending on the type. Adrenoleucodystrophy (ALD) and metachromatic leucodystrophy (MLD) are rather commoner forms of leucodystrophies whereas krabbes disease, alexander disease, cannavans disease etc. are of less common type. Adult-onset autosomal dominant leucodystrophy (ADLD) is a lately described rarer form of leucodystrophy with perhaps no case report from India. Various leucodystrophies may have different clinical presentations, ranging from subtle cognitive and psychiatric manifestations to gross motor disabilities, visual impairment and seizure. Psychiatric manifestations in the form of psychoses and frank schizophrenia are commonly described in MLD. Depression though uncommonly reported in MLD, cyclic mood disorders have been rarely described in any form of leucodystrophies. We are reporting an eye opener, a case of ADLD which masqueraded as a rapid cyclic mood disorder for initial four years, later to be followed by progressive neurological signs and symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is perhaps the first case report of ADLD presenting as rapid cyclic mood disorder in the world literature. PMID:24813031

Jain, Rajendra S; Prakash, Swayam; Raghavendra, B S; Nagpal, Kadam; Handa, Rahul

2014-06-01

279

Finasteride induced depression: a prospective study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Finasteride is a competitive inhibitor of 5 alpha-reductase enzyme, and is used for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and androgenetic alopecia. Animal studies have shown that finasteride might induce behavioral changes. Additionally, some cases of finasteride-induced depression have been reported in humans. The purpose of this study was to examine whether depressive symptoms or anxiety might be induced by finasteride administration. Methods One hundred and twenty eight men with androgenetic alopecia, who were prescribed finasteride (1 mg/day were enrolled in this study. Information on depressed mood and anxiety was obtained by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Participants completed BDI and HADS questionnaires before beginning the treatment and also two months after it. Results Mean age of the subjects was 25.8(± 4.4 years. At baseline, mean BDI and HADS depression scores were 12.11(± 7.50 and 4.04(± 2.51, respectively. Finasteride treatment increased both BDI (p Conclusion This preliminary study suggests that finasteride might induce depressive symptoms; therefore this medication should be prescribed cautiously for patients with high risk of depression. It seems that further studies would be necessary to determine behavioral effects of this medication in higher doses and in more susceptible patients.

Habibollahi Peiman

2006-10-01

280

Scoring rules and rating formats of Self-report Depression Questionnaires: a comparison of approaches.  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-report measures of depression differ in their construction and scoring rules. In the present study from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project we tested the hypothesis that the loss of information due to scoring rules or rating formats reduces the validity of depression severity assessment. One hundred fifty-three outpatients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) who presented for treatment or who were in ongoing treatment and had their medication changed due to lack of efficacy completed the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) and Remission from Depression Questionnaire (RDQ) at the initiation of treatment and 4 month follow-up. The patients were evaluated with the 17-item Hamilton Depression scale (HAMD). The CUDOS and RDQ were equally highly correlated with the HAMD at baseline and follow-up. There was no significant difference in the correlations between the modified and original scoring algorithms of the QIDS with the HAMD at baseline and the follow-up. On each scale, the patients showed significant levels of improvement from baseline to 4 months, and the effect sizes were similar. These findings suggest that the loss of information due to the scoring rules of the QIDS or the rating format of the RDQ did not reduce the validity of depression severity assessment. PMID:24745466

Zimmerman, Mark; D'Avanzato, Catherine; Attiullah, Naureen; Friedman, Michael; Toba, Cristina; Boerescu, Daniela A

2014-08-15

 
 
 
 
281

Development and natural history of mood disorders.  

Science.gov (United States)

To expand and accelerate research on mood disorders, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) developed a project to formulate a strategic research plan for mood disorder research. One of the areas selected for review concerns the development and natural history of these disorders. The NIMH convened a multidisciplinary Workgroup of scientists to review the field and the NIMH portfolio and to generate specific recommendations. To encourage a balanced and creative set of proposals, experts were included within and outside this area of research, as well as public stakeholders. The Workgroup identified the need for expanded knowledge of mood disorders in children and adolescents, noting important gaps in understanding the onset, course, and recurrence of early-onset unipolar and bipolar disorder. Recommendations included the need for a multidisciplinary research initiative on the pathogenesis of unipolar depression encompassing genetic and environmental risk and protective factors. Specifically, we encourage the NIMH to convene a panel of experts and advocates to review the findings concerning children at high risk for unipolar depression. Joint analyses of existing data sets should examine specific risk factors to refine models of pathogenesis in preparation for the next era of multidisciplinary research. Other priority areas include the need to assess the long-term impact of successful treatment of juvenile depression and known precursors of depression, in particular, childhood anxiety disorders. Expanded knowledge of pediatric-onset bipolar disorder was identified as a particularly pressing issue because of the severity of the disorder, the controversies surrounding its diagnosis and treatment, and the possibility that widespread use of psychotropic medications in vulnerable children may precipitate the condition. The Workgroup recommends that the NIMH establish a collaborative multisite multidisciplinary Network of Research Programs on Pediatric-Onset Bipolar Disorder to achieve a better understanding of its causes, course, treatment, and prevention. The NIMH should develop a capacity-building plan to ensure the availability of trained investigators in the child and adolescent field. Mood disorders are among the most prevalent, recurrent, and disabling of all illnesses. They are often disorders of early onset. Although the NIMH has made important strides in mood disorders research, more data, beginning with at-risk infants, children, and adolescents, are needed concerning the etiology and developmental course of these disorders. A diverse program of multidisciplinary research is recommended to reduce the burden on children and families affected with these conditions. PMID:12361667

Costello, E Jane; Pine, Daniel S; Hammen, Constance; March, John S; Plotsky, Paul M; Weissman, Myrna M; Biederman, Joseph; Goldsmith, H Hill; Kaufman, Joan; Lewinsohn, Peter M; Hellander, Martha; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Koretz, Doreen S; Nelson, Charles A; Leckman, James F

2002-09-15

282

[Parental care and post partum depression: a case report].  

Science.gov (United States)

The post partum depression (PPD) is a severe risk factor for the emotional and cognitive development of offspring. The Authors describe the relationship between mother with PPD and her two-year old child. The mother repeats patterns of parental care experienced during her own childhood. PMID:22825437

Aceti, Franca; Carluccio, Giuseppe Mattia; Meuti, Valentina; Piperno, Francesca; Sogos, Carla; Straniero Sergio, Bianca; Nicolis, Sara

2012-01-01

283

Changes in mood status and neurotic levels during a 20-day bed rest  

Science.gov (United States)

This study evaluated changes of mood status and depressive and neurotic levels in nine young male subjects during a 20-day 6° head-down tilting bed rest and examined whether exercise training modified these changes. Participants were asked to complete psychometrical inventories on before, during, and after the bed rest experiment. Depressive and neurotic levels were enhanced during bed rest period according to the Japanese version of Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale and the Japanese version of the General Health Questionnaire. Mood state "vigor" was impaired and "confusion" was increased during bed rest and recumbent control periods compared to pre-bed rest and ambulatory control periods according to the Japanese version of Profiles of Mood State, whereas the mood "tension-anxiety", "depression-dejection", "anger-hostility" and "fatigue" were relatively stable during experiment. Isometric exercise training did not modify these results. Microgravity, along with confinement to bed and isolation from familiar environments, induced impairment of mental status.

Ishizaki, Yuko; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Kim, Chang-Sun; Fujita, Masayo; Maegawa, Yuko; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Katsura, Taisaku; Suzuki, Yoji; Gunji, Atsuaki

2002-04-01

284

Role of suggestion in odor-induced mood change.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of ambient odor (lavender, neroli or placebo) and suggestions related to the effects of an odor (relaxing, stimulating or none) on mood were explored. Mood of 90 undergraduate women was assessed using physiological measures (heart rate and skin conductance) and the self-report Profile of Mood States questionnaire. Analysis indicated that physiological measures were influenced by suggestion in predictable directions. Relaxing odors yielded decreases in heart rate and skin conductance, with stimulating odors yielding the reverse effects under equivalent conditions. These data further support the notion that expectations play a significant role in mediating odor-evoked mood changes. PMID:15362382

Campenni, C Estelle; Crawley, Edward J; Meier, Michael E

2004-06-01

285

Magnetic seizure therapy in an adolescent with refractory bipolar depression: a case report  

Science.gov (United States)

Magnetic seizure therapy (MST) has shown efficacy in adult patients with treatment-resistant depression with limited impairment in memory. To date, the use of MST in adolescent depression has not been reported. Here we describe the first successful use of MST in the treatment of an adolescent patient with refractory bipolar depression. This patient received MST in an ongoing open-label study for treatment-resistant major depression. Treatments employed a twin-coil MST apparatus, with the center of each coil placed over the frontal cortex (ie, each coil centered over F3 and F4). MST was applied at 100 Hz and 100% machine output at progressively increasing train durations. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and cognitive function was assessed with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. This adolescent patient achieved full remission of clinical symptoms after an acute course of 18 MST treatments and had no apparent cognitive decline, other than some autobiographical memory impairment that may or may not be related to the MST treatment. This case report suggests that MST may be a safe and well tolerated intervention for adolescents with treatment-resistant bipolar depression. Pilot studies to further evaluate the effectiveness and safety of MST in adolescents warrant consideration.

Noda, Yoshihiro; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Downar, Jonathan; Croarkin, Paul E; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Blumberger, Daniel M

2014-01-01

286

Prevalence and Characteristics of Probable Major Depression and Bipolar Disorder within UK Biobank: Cross-Sectional Study of 172,751 Participants  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives UK Biobank is a landmark cohort of over 500,000 participants which will be used to investigate genetic and non-genetic risk factors for a wide range of adverse health outcomes. This is the first study to systematically assess the prevalence and validity of proposed criteria for probable mood disorders within the cohort (major depression and bipolar disorder). Methods This was a descriptive epidemiological study of 172,751 individuals assessed for a lifetime history of mood disorder in relation to a range of demographic, social, lifestyle, personality and health-related factors. The main outcomes were prevalence of a probable lifetime (single) episode of major depression, probable recurrent major depressive disorder (moderate), probable recurrent major depressive disorder (severe), probable bipolar disorder and no history of mood disorder (comparison group). Outcomes were compared on age, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, educational attainment, functioning, self-reported health status, current depressive symptoms, neuroticism score, smoking status and alcohol use. Results Prevalence rates for probable single lifetime episode of major depression (6.4%), probable recurrent major depression (moderate) (12.2%), probable recurrent major depression (severe) (7.2%) and probable bipolar disorder (1.3%) were comparable to those found in other population studies. The proposed diagnostic criteria have promising validity, with a gradient in evidence from no mood disorder through major depression and probable bipolar disorder in terms of gender distribution, socioeconomic status, self-reported health rating, current depressive symptoms and smoking. Significance The validity of our proposed criteria for probable major depression and probable bipolar disorder within this cohort are supported by these cross-sectional analyses. Our findings are likely to prove useful as a framework for a wide range of future genetic and non-genetic studies. PMID:24282498

Smith, Daniel J.; Nicholl, Barbara I.; Cullen, Breda; Martin, Daniel; Ul-Haq, Zia; Evans, Jonathan; Gill, Jason M. R.; Roberts, Beverly; Gallacher, John; Mackay, Daniel; Hotopf, Matthew; Deary, Ian; Craddock, Nick; Pell, Jill P.

2013-01-01

287

Resilience and Unemployment: Exploring Risk and Protective Influences for the Outcome Variables of Depression and Assertive Job Searching  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined adult resilience in the context of the adversity of unemployment. Seventy-seven unemployed job seekers completed a self-report survey containing the Resilience Scale (G. M. Wagnild & H. M. Young, 1993), Centre for Epidemiologic Studies-Depressed Mood Scale (L. S. Radloff, 1977), and the Assertive Job Hunting Survey (H. A.…

Moorhouse, Anne; Caltabiano, Marie L.

2007-01-01

288

Explicit and implicit information needs of people with depression: a qualitative investigation of problems reported on an online depression support forum  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Health management is impeded when consumers do not possess adequate knowledge about their illness. At a public health level, consumer knowledge about depression is particularly important because depression is highly prevalent and causes substantial disability and burden. However, currently little is known about the information needs of people with depression. This study aimed to investigate the explicit and implicit information needs of users of an online depression support forum. Methods A sample of 2680 posts was systematically selected from three discussion forums on an online depression bulletin board (blueboard.anu.edu.au. Data were examined for evidence of requests for information (reflecting explicit needs and reports of past or current problems (implicit needs. Thematic analysis was conducted using a data-driven inductive approach with the assistance of NVivo 7, and instances of questions and people reporting particular types of problems were recorded. Results A total of 134 participants with personal experience of depression contributed to the data analysed. Six broad themes represented participant queries and reported problems: Understanding depression; disclosure and stigma; medication; treatment and services; coping with depression; and comorbid health problems. A variety of specific needs were evident within these broad thematic areas. Some people (n = 46 expressed their information needs by asking direct questions (47 queries but the majority of needs were expressed implicitly (351 problems by the 134 participants. The most evident need for information related to coping with depression and its consequences, followed by topics associated with medication, treatment and services. Conclusions People with depression have substantial unmet information needs and require strategies to deal with the difficulties they face. They require access to high quality and relevant online resources and professionals; thus, there is a need to rectify current gaps in the provision of information and limitations of dissemination. Greater knowledge about depression and its treatment is also needed at the general community level.

Banfield Michelle A

2011-05-01

289

Three types of self-efficacy associated with medication adherence in patients with co-occurring HIV and substance use disorders, but only when mood disorders are present  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Susan Reif,1 Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell,1,2 Jia Yao,1 Sara LeGrand,1,2 Anna Uehara,2 Edgar Asiimwe,2 Evelyn Byrd Quinlivan31Duke Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, 2Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, 3Center for Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Adherence with medication regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a life-saving behavior for people with HIV infection, yet adherence is challenging for many individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. Medication-taking self-efficacy, which is the confidence that one can take one's medication as prescribed, is associated with better adherence with HIV medication. However, little is known about the influence that other kinds of self-efficacy have on adherence with HIV medication, especially among HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. We sought to examine the relationship between adherence with HIV medication among substance users and three specific kinds of self-efficacy, ie, one's confidence that one can communicate with medical providers, get support, and manage one's mood. We further sought to examine whether symptoms of depression and anxiety moderate these relationships.Methods: Patients were recruited from three HIV clinics in the southeastern United States as part of an integrated study of treatment for HIV and substance use.Results: We interviewed 154 patients with HIV and substance use who reported taking HIV medications. Based on symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, 63% had probable depression and/or anxiety. Higher levels of self-efficacy in provider communication (? = 3.86, P < 0.01, getting needed support (? = 2.82, P < 0.01, and mood management (? = 2.29, P < 0.05 were related to better self-reported adherence with HIV medication among study participants with probable depression and/or anxiety. The three kinds of self-efficacy were not associated with medication adherence among participants with HIV and substance use only.Conclusion: In the search for mutable factors to improve medication adherence among individuals triply diagnosed with HIV, substance use, and mood disorders, these findings support previous research indicating the benefit of enhancing self-efficacy, and further point to three specific kinds of self-efficacy that may benefit medication adherence, ie, provider communication, getting support, and mood management.Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus, self-efficacy, substance use, depression, anxiety, interventions

Reif S

2013-06-01

290

Polygenic risk and white matter integrity in individuals at high risk of mood disorder  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are highly heritable and genetically overlapping conditions characterised by episodic elevation and/or depression of mood. Both demonstrate abnormalities in white matter integrity, measured using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that are also heritable. However it is unclear how these abnormalities relate to the underlying genetic architecture of each disorder. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have demonstrated a significant polygenic contribution to BD and MDD, where risk is attributed to the summation of many alleles of small effect. Determining the effects of an overall polygenic risk profile score on neuroimaging abnormalities may help to identify proxy measures of genetic susceptibility and thereby inform models of risk prediction. Methods In the current study we determined the extent to which common genetic variation underlying risk to mood disorders (BD and MDD) was related to fractional anisotropy, an index of white matter integrity. This was conducted in unaffected individuals at familial risk of mood disorder (n=70) and comparison subjects (n=62). Polygenic risk scores were calculated separately for BD and MDD based on GWAS data from the Psychiatric Genome Consortia. Results We report that a higher polygenic risk allele load for MDD was significantly associated with decreased white matter integrity across both groups in a large cluster with a peak in the right-sided superior longitudinal fasciculus. Conclusions These findings suggest that the polygenic approach to examining brain imaging data may be a useful means of identifying traits linked to the genetic risk of mood disorders. PMID:23453289

Whalley, Heather C; Sprooten, Emma; Hackett, Suzanna; Hall, Lynsey; Blackwood, Douglas H; Glahn, David C; Bastin, Mark; Hall, Jeremy; Lawrie, Stephen M; Sussmann, Jessika E; McIntosh, Andrew M

2014-01-01

291

Mindfulness-based stress reduction for comorbid anxiety and depression: case report and clinical considerations.  

Science.gov (United States)

Growing research literature has documented the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for anxiety and depressive disorders. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) teaches a series of mindfulness meditation and yoga practices, delivered in a group format during eight weekly sessions plus one full-day session. This case report demonstrates how MBSR was associated with dramatic clinical improvement of an individual with symptoms of panic, generalized anxiety, and depression. Scores on clinical assessment measures suggested clinically severe levels of anxious arousal, generalized anxiety, worry, fear of negative evaluation, and depression at the beginning of the intervention. The scores on all these measures fell well within normal limits 7 weeks later at the end of the intervention, and no remaining symptoms were reported afterward. Increased life satisfaction and quality of life were documented as well. This case illustrates the potential benefit of MBSR as an alternative or adjunctive treatment for comorbid anxiety and depressive disorder symptoms. PMID:23124187

Hazlett-Stevens, Holly

2012-11-01

292

Ruminative Responses to Negative and Positive Affect Among Students Diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Rumination in response to negative affect has been found to predict the onset, severity, and duration of depressive symptoms. Few researchers, however, have considered rumination within bipolar disorder, nor have studies considered parallel responses that might intensify positive affect. The current study examined self-reported rumination in response to both negative and positive affect among people diagnosed via the SCID with BPD (n = 28), major depressive disorder (MDD; n = 35), or no mood ...

Johnson, Sheri L.; Mckenzie, Gavin; Mcmurrich, Stephanie

2008-01-01

293

Seasonality and Sleep: A Clinical Study on Euthymic Mood Disorder Patients  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background. Research on mood disorders has progressively focused on the study of seasons and on the mood in association with them during depressive or manic episodes yet few studies have focused on the seasonal fluctuation that characterizes the patient's clinical course both during an illness episode and during euthymic periods. Methods. 113 euthymic outpatients 46 affected by major recurrent depression and 67 affected by bipolar disorder were recruited. We evaluated the impact of clinical ?...

Barbara Barbini; Mara Cigala Fulgosi; Dario Delmonte; Chiara Gavinelli; Chiara Brambilla; Enrico Smeraldi

2012-01-01

294

Gender differences in mental health service utilization among respondents reporting depression in a national health survey  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study examined whether people who self-reported depression sought mental health treatment in the year after being interviewed, and how gender affected utilization. Depression data were obtained from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2000-01), and linked to medical records in Ontario (n = 24,677). Overall, women had higher rates of mental health service utilization, but there were no gender differences in rates of specialist ca...

Smith, Katherine L. W.; Matheson, Flora I.; Rahim Moineddin; Dunn, James R.; Hong Lu; John Cairney; Glazier, Richard H.

2013-01-01

295

Mood disorders in childhood and adolescence  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The identification and treatment of mood disorders in children and adolescents has grown over the last decades. Major depression is one of the most common and debilitating disorders worldwide, imposing a massive burden to the youth population. Bipolar disorder is being increasingly recognized as hav [...] ing its roots early in life, and its presentation during childhood and adolescence has been submitted to extensive research. This review aims to highlight clinical aspects of the current knowledge on mood disorders in the pediatric population, presenting updated information on epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and management strategies. Limitations of available evidence and future directions of research in the field are also discussed.

Thiago Botter Maio, Rocha; Cristian Patrick, Zeni; Sheila Cavalcante, Caetano; Christian, Kieling.

296

Magnetic seizure therapy in an adolescent with refractory bipolar depression: a case report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Yoshihiro Noda,1,2 Zafiris J Daskalakis,1–3 Jonathan Downar,4 Paul E Croarkin,5 Paul B Fitzgerald,6 Daniel M Blumberger1–3 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 2Temerty Centre for Therapeutic Brain Intervention, 3Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 4MRI-Guided rTMS Clinic, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 6Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University Central Clinical School, Melbourne, Australia Abstract: Magnetic seizure therapy (MST has shown efficacy in adult patients with treatment-resistant depression with limited impairment in memory. To date, the use of MST in adolescent depression has not been reported. Here we describe the first successful use of MST in the treatment of an adolescent patient with refractory bipolar depression. This patient received MST in an ongoing open-label study for treatment-resistant major depression. Treatments employed a twin-coil MST apparatus, with the center of each coil placed over the frontal cortex (ie, each coil centered over F3 and F4. MST was applied at 100 Hz and 100% machine output at progressively increasing train durations. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and cognitive function was assessed with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. This adolescent patient achieved full remission of clinical symptoms after an acute course of 18 MST treatments and had no apparent cognitive decline, other than some autobiographical memory impairment that may or may not be related to the MST treatment. This case report suggests that MST may be a safe and well tolerated intervention for adolescents with treatment-resistant bipolar depression. Pilot studies to further evaluate the effectiveness and safety of MST in adolescents warrant consideration. Keywords: brain stimulation, treatment-resistant depression, adolescent depression, cognitive effects

Noda Y

2014-10-01

297

Adolescents with depressive symptoms and their challenges with learning in school.  

Science.gov (United States)

We examine school performance among 83 adolescents at risk for major depression. Negative mood interfered with subjective measures of school performance, including ability to do well in school, homework completion, concentrate in class, interact with peers, and going to class. No significant relationships were found for mood and objective measures of school performance (school attendance, English, and Math grades). Students with a college-educated parent had stronger performance in objective measures (school attendance and Math grades), whereas males had lower English grades. In qualitative interviews, adolescents reported that negative thinking led to procrastination, which led to poor school performance, which led to more negative thinking. Adolescents with depressive symptoms that do not meet the threshold for referral report struggles in school. Understanding the specific challenges faced by adolescents with even low levels of depressive symptoms can help school nurses, teachers, and parents identify appropriate interventions to help adolescents succeed in school. PMID:20606058

Humensky, Jennifer; Kuwabara, Sachiko A; Fogel, Joshua; Wells, Corrie; Goodwin, Brady; Van Voorhees, Benjamin W

2010-10-01

298

Subcortical biophysical abnormalities in patients with mood disorders.  

Science.gov (United States)

Cortical-subcortical circuits have been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Structural and biochemical abnormalities have been identified in patients diagnosed with mood disorders using magnetic resonance imaging-related approaches. In this study, we used magnetization transfer (MT), an innovative magnetic resonance approach, to study biophysical changes in both gray and white matter regions in cortical-subcortical circuits implicated in emotional regulation and behavior. Our study samples comprised 28 patients clinically diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 31 non-depressed subjects of comparable age and gender. MT ratio (MTR), representing the biophysical integrity of macromolecular proteins within key components of cortical-subcortical circuits-the caudate, thalamic, striatal, orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate and dorsolateral regions-was the primary outcome measure. In our study, the MTR in the head of the right caudate nucleus was significantly lower in the MDD group when compared with the comparison group. MTR values showed an inverse relationship with age in both groups, with more widespread relationships observed in the MDD group. These data indicate that focal biophysical abnormalities in the caudate nucleus may be central to the pathophysiology of depression and critical to the cortical-subcortical abnormalities that underlie mood disorders. Depression may also accentuate age-related changes in the biophysical properties of cortical and subcortical regions. These observations have broad implications for the neuronal circuitry underlying mood disorders across the lifespan. PMID:23877833

Kumar, A; Yang, S; Ajilore, O; Wu, M; Charlton, R; Lamar, M

2014-06-01

299

Maternal Recurrent Mood Disorders and High-Functioning Autism  

Science.gov (United States)

A quantitative examination was made of the association of parental mood and anxiety disorders with severity of disability within a large sample of young children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD). Maternal recurrent mood disorders were associated with elevated cognitive and adaptive functioning in their affected children, parent reports

Cohen, Ira L.; Tsiouris, John A.

2006-01-01

300

More Evidence That Exercise May Help Fight Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

... JavaScript. More Evidence That Exercise May Help Fight Depression But low mood can be a barrier to ... 2015) Thursday, October 16, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Depression Exercise and Physical Fitness THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 ( ...

 
 
 
 
301

The influence of emerging low mood symptoms on sleep in children: a pilot study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Deirdre A Conroy, Anameti Usoro, Robert F Hoffmann, Kirk J Brower, Roseanne ArmitageUniversity of Michigan, Department of Psychiatry, Ann Arbor, MI, USAPurpose: Sleep disturbances can lead to the onset and relapse of psychiatric disorders. However, the age at which this relationship begins and the role of sleep disturbances in the trajectory to the onset of a psychiatric disorder are still not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to explore, based on self- and parental-reports of mood symptoms, subjective and objective sleep in young children who are at risk of developing a psychiatric disorder but who have not yet met diagnostic criteria.Patients and methods: Twenty-one children (eleven girls between the ages of 8 and 11 (mean age = 9.7 years, standard deviation = 1.1 years were dichotomized into low mood (LM and not low mood (NLM groups based on scoring below or above the median threshold score on at least two of the following questionnaires: the Child Depressive Rating Scale (CDRS, Weinberg Screening Affective Scale (WSAS, and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS. The children completed sleep diaries and underwent two nights (for adaptation and baseline of polysomnography. Sleep stages and sleep microarchitecture (alpha, sigma, beta, and delta in the first half of the night, were analyzed.Results: Self-reported sleep disturbance accounted for 72% of the variance (F[3, 20] = 15, P < 0.005 of the Weinberg Screening Affective Scale in LM children. LM children had fewer arousals at night, but awakened earlier than NLM children. Regardless of mood, girls had more sleep disturbance, as well as lower alpha, beta, and delta power in the first half of the night, compared to boys. Girls with LM had shorter sleep times and a lower percentage of rapid eye movement sleep.Conclusions: Girls with and without LM, and without a clinical diagnosis of depression, showed more sleep disturbances than boys of the same age. Sleep disturbances evident early in life and in LM girls may reflect greater risk for future sleep or psychiatric disorders.Keywords: depression, insomnia, EEG, pediatrics

Conroy DA

2012-10-01

302

Building a new Rasch-based self-report inventory of depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Michela Balsamo,1 Giuseppe Giampaglia,2 Aristide Saggino11DiSPUTer, Department of Psychological Sciences, Humanities and Territory, “G d'Annunzio” University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy; 2Department of Economics and Statistics, “Federico-II” University, Naples, ItalyAbstract: This paper illustrates a sequential item development process to create a new self-report instrument of depression refined with Rasch analysis from a larger pool of potential diagnostic items elicited through a consensus approach by clinical experts according to the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for major depression. A 51-item pool was administered to a sample of 529 subjects (300 healthy community-dwelling adults and 229 psychiatric outpatients. Item selection resulted in a 21-item set, named the Teate Depression Inventory, with an excellent Person Separation Index and no evidence of bias due to an item–trait interaction (?2=147.71; df =168; P=0.48. Additional support for the unidimensionality, local independence, appropriateness of the response format, and discrimination ability between clinical and nonclinical subjects was provided. No substantial differential item functioning by sex was observed. The Teate Depression Inventory shows considerable promise as a unidimensional tool for the screening of depression. Finally, advantages and disadvantages of this methodology will be discussed in terms of subsequent possible mathematical analyses, statistical tests, and implications for clinical investigations.Keywords: depression, scale development, self-report scales, Rasch analysis

Balsamo M

2014-01-01

303

Mood, food, and obesity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Food is a potent natural reward and food intake is a complex process. Reward and gratification associated with food consumption leads to dopamine (DA production, which in turn activates reward and pleasure centers in the brain. An individual will repeatedly eat a particular food to experience this positive feeling of gratification. This type of repetitive behavior of food intake leads to the activation of brain reward pathways that eventually overrides other signals of satiety and hunger. Thus, a gratification habit through a favorable food leads to overeating and morbid obesity. Overeating and obesity stems from many biological factors engaging both central and peripheral systems in a bi-directional manner involving mood and emotions. Emotional eating and altered mood can also lead to altered food choice and intake leading to overeating and obesity. Research findings from human and animal studies support a two-way link between three concepts, mood, food, and obesity. The focus of this article is to provide an overview of complex nature of food intake where various biological factors link mood, food intake, and brain signaling that engages both peripheral and central nervous system signaling pathways in a bi-directional manner in obesity.

MinatiSingh

2014-09-01

304

Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

2007-01-01

305

Are higher rates of depression in women accounted for by differential symptom reporting?  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The gender difference in prevalence and incidence rates of depression is one of the most consistent findings in psychiatric epidemiology. We sought to examine whether any gender differences in symptom profile might account for this difference in rates. Method This study was a population-based 13-year follow-up survey of community-dwelling adults living in East Baltimore in 1981. Subjects were the continuing participants of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Program. Participants interviewed between 1993 and 1996 with complete data on depressive symptoms and covariates were included (n = 1,727). We applied structural equations with a measurement model for dichotomous data (the MIMIC – multiple indicators, multiple causes – model) to compare symptoms between women and men, in relation to the nine symptom groups comprising the diagnostic criteria for major depression, adjusting for several potentially influential characteristics (namely, age, self-reported ethnicity, educational attainment, marital status, and employment). Results There were no significant gender differences in the self-report of depression symptoms even taking into account the higher level of depressive symptoms of women and the influence of other covariates. For example, women were no more likely to endorse sadness than were men, as evidenced by a direct effect coefficient that was not significantly different from the null [adjusted estimated direct effect of gender on report of sadness = 0.105, 95% confidence interval (?0.113, 0.323)]. Conclusions Men and women in this community sample reported similar patterns of depressive symptoms. No evidence that the presentation of depressive symptoms differs by gender was found. PMID:15052394

Gallo, Joseph J.

2010-01-01

306

Depression during the Menopausal Transition  

Science.gov (United States)

The perception that menopause leads to mood disturbances such as depression has a long history. How did these beliefs come about, and are they supported by the scientific literature? This article reviews the theories of menopause and depression, the scientific literature, and the implications of these findings for prevention and treatment.…

Avis, Nancy E.

2003-01-01

307

Inflammation Causes Mood Changes Through Alterations in Subgenual Cingulate Activity and Mesolimbic Connectivity  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: Inflammatory cytokines are implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. In rodents, systemically administered inflammatory cytokines induce depression-like behavior. Similarly in humans, therapeutic interferon-a induces clinical depression in a third of patients. Conversely, patients with depression also show elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines.Objectives: To determine the neural mechanisms underlying inflammation-associated mood change and modulatory effects on circuits invol...

2009-01-01

308

The way early-onset chronically depressed patients are treated today makes me sad  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The author has treated almost 400 chronically depressed outpatients during his career. He has also participated as a Field Trial Coordinator in the Unipolar Field Trials of DSM-IV and consulted with the DSM-V Mood Disorders Workgroup concerning his research for the new diagnostic nomenclature for the chronic depressions, Chronic Depression Disorder. In addition, he has served as Principal Investigator in several large clinical trials involving 2200 chronically depressed outpatients. The current paper is a Brief Report describing his negative reactions to the way 40 of his chronically depressed patients have been treated today by both Psychologists and Psychiatrists. All the patients are his patients and have been seen by him in psychotherapy over the past decade. Several reasons are proposed for the inadequate treatment and specific proposals are made for the improvement of treatment for the early-onset chronically depressed patient.

James P. McCullough

2012-01-01

309

Major depressive disorder  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This treatment guideline draws on several international guidelines: (i) Practice Guidelines of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) for the Treatment of Patients with Major Depressive Disorder, Second Edition; (ii) Clinical Guidelines for the Treatment of Depressive Disorders by the Canadian Psychiatric Association and the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT); (iii) National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines; (iv) Royal Australian and New Zealand C...

Grobler, G.

2013-01-01

310

Glycogen synthase kinase-3 in the etiology and treatment of mood disorders  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The mood disorders major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder are prevalent, are inadequately treated, and little is known about their etiologies. A better understanding of the causes of mood disorders would benefit from improved animal models of mood disorders, which now rely on behavioral measurements. This review considers the limitations in relating measures of rodent behaviors to mood disorders, and the evidence from behavioral assessments indicating that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3 dysregulation promotes mood disorders and is a potential target for treating mood disorders. The classical mood stabilizer lithium was identified by studying animal behaviors and later was discovered to be an inhibitor of GSK3. Several mood-relevant behavioral effects of lithium in rodents have been identified, and most have now been shown to be due to its inhibition of GSK3. An extensive variety of pharmacological and molecular approaches for manipulating GSK3 are discussed, the results of which strongly support the proposal that inhibition of GSK3 reduces both depression-like and manic-like behaviors. Studies in human postmortem brain and peripheral cells also have identified correlations between alterations in GSK3 and mood disorders. Evidence is reviewed that depression may be associated with impaired inhibitory control of GSK3, and mania by hyper-stimulation of GSK3. Taken together, these studies provide substantial support for the hypothesis that inhibition of GSK3 activity is therapeutic for mood disorders. Future research should identify the causes of dysregulated GSK3 in mood disorders and the actions of GSK3 that contribute to these diseases.

RichardScottJope

2011-08-01

311

Glial abnormalities in mood disorders.  

Science.gov (United States)

Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glial cells may be important in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and may be possible targets for the development of new treatments. In this article we review the evidence for glial abnormalities in mood disorders, and we discuss glial cell biology and evidence from postmortem studies of mood disorders. The goal is not to carry out a comprehensive review but to selectively discuss existing evidence in support of an argument for the role of glial cells in mood disorders. PMID:25377605

Ongür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J; Carlezon, William A; Cohen, Bruce M

2014-01-01

312

The self-reported Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale is a useful evaluative tool in major depressive disorder  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of Patient-reported Outcomes (PROs as secondary endpoints in the development of new antidepressants has grown in recent years. The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the 9-item, patient-administered version of the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S. Methods Data from a multicentre, double-blind, 8-week, randomised controlled trial of 278 outpatients diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder were used to evaluate the validity, reliability and sensitivity to change of the MADRS-S using psychometric methods. A Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve was plotted to identify the most appropriate threshold to define perceived remission. Results No missing values were found at the item level, indicating good acceptability of the scale. The construct validity was satisfactory: all items contributed to a common underlying concept, as expected. The correlation between MADRS-S and physicians' MADRS was moderate (r = 0.54, p Conclusion Taking account of patient's perceptions of the severity of their own symptoms along with the psychometric properties of the MADRS-S enable its use for evaluative purposes in the development of new antidepressant drugs.

Fantino Bruno

2009-05-01

313

Congenital depressed skull fracture in the absence of trauma: case report and literature review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Zulma S Tovar-Spinoza, Peter D KimDepartment of Neurosurgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse NYAbstract: There are limited reports of neonatal depressed skull fractures in the absence of any known trauma or obvious risk factors. Here we describe a male neonate with a significant frontal nontraumatic depressed fracture, his course of treatment, and a literature review. A male neonate was attended for a significant congenital depressed skull fracture in the left frontal bone. He was born full term after an uncomplicated delivery to a multiparous mother who was a human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV-positive immigrant from sub-Saharan Africa. The pregnancy was otherwise uncomplicated. There was no history of trauma to the mother during the pregnancy or delivery. Ultrasonography had been unremarkable. No other abnormalities were noted. The patient was brought to the operating room at the age of 13 days for elevation of his fracture due to its nonreducible nature. A small linear incision was made just posterior to the coronal suture. The dura mater was stripped and a combination of Penfield and periostial elevators was used to elevate the depressed fracture. Nontraumatic depressed skull fractures are uncommon in neonates. The cause of this entity has not been identified, and many theories about its origin have been proposed. Treatment can be either surgical or conservative.Keywords: neonatal, congenital, depressed fracture, spontaneous, nontraumatic

Tovar-Spinoza ZS

2012-02-01

314

Selegiline remarkably improved stage 5 treatment-resistant major depressive disorder: a case report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Yuji Kitaichi,1 Takeshi Inoue,1 Nobuyuki Mitsui,1 Shin Nakagawa,1 Rie Kameyama,1 Yoshiyuki Hayashishita,1 Tohru Shiga,2 Ichiro Kusumi,1 Tsukasa Koyama1 1Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan; 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan Abstract: We report a case in which selegiline, an irreversible monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B inhibitor, greatly improved depressive symptoms in an adult with stage 5 treatment-resistant major depressive disorder. Four antidepressants and four augmentation therapies had previously been ineffective or intolerable, and electroconvulsive therapy had only a temporary effect. After 20 weeks of treatment with selegiline (10 mg/day, the patient's score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS had decreased from 19 to 4 points. [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET showed increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral basal ganglia after initiating selegiline treatment; blood dopamine levels were also increased after selegiline treatment. These results raise the possibility that selegiline enhances dopaminergic neural transmission in treatment-resistant depression, thus leading to an improvement in depressive symptoms. Keywords: treatment-resistant depression, FDG-PET, glucose metabolism, basal ganglia

Kitaichi Y

2013-10-01

315

Expectations, mood, and eating behavior in binge eating disorder. Beware of the bright side.  

Science.gov (United States)

Sad people may indulge in fattening snacks because they believe that eating will repair their mood. To test whether (1) changes in expectations and mood had an effect on caloric intake and (2) depressive symptoms moderated caloric intake, 73 women with binge eating disorder were randomly assigned to a condition in which expectations about food and emotion were either confirmed or disconfirmed. Subsequently they were shown either an upsetting or an amusing movie clip followed by a taste task. Contrary to our expectations, there were no differences in the four conditions: participants in all four conditions ate comparable amounts of calories. Manipulation of expectations or mood had no effect on caloric intake. However, higher baseline expectations that food is pleasurable and useful as a reward resulted in a higher caloric intake after positive mood induction. Non-depressed individuals ate less after a negative mood induction than did depressed individuals. Interestingly, they also ate less than the group of individuals, depressed and not, whose mood was positively induced. Non-depressed individuals seem to use healthier coping strategies: negative affect signals that the environment poses a problem. Positive affect on the other hand signals that the environment is benign, and thus makes people less vigilant about food intake. PMID:19520125

Dingemans, Alexandra E; Martijn, Carolien; van Furth, Eric F; Jansen, Anita T M

2009-10-01

316

Depression in Adolescence: Current Knowledge, Research Directions, and Implications for Programs and Policy.  

Science.gov (United States)

This document focuses on adolescent depression, described as a major, pervasive, and perhaps increasing problem. A brief introduction to depression in adolescence, with case examples, is followed by a discussion of what constitutes adolescent depression. Depressed mood, depressive syndromes, and clinical depression are three approaches taken in…

Petersen, Anne C.; And Others

317

Novel glutamatergic drugs for the treatment of mood disorders  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Kyle AB Lapidus, Laili Soleimani, James W MurroughMood and Anxiety Disorders Program, Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Mood disorders are common and debilitating, resulting in a significant public health burden. Current treatments are only partly effective and patients who have failed to respond to trials of existing antidepressant agents (eg, those who suffer from treatment-resistant depression [TRD] require innovative therapeutics with novel mechanisms of action. Although neuroscience research has elucidated important aspects of the basic mechanisms of antidepressant action, most antidepressant drugs target monoaminergic mechanisms identified decades ago. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and glutamatergic dysfunction has been implicated in mood disorders. These data provide a rationale for the pursuit of glutamatergic agents as novel therapeutic agents. Here, we review preclinical and clinical investigations of glutamatergic agents in mood disorders with a focus on depression. We begin with discussion of evidence for the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine, followed by studies of the antidepressant efficacy of the currently marketed drugs riluzole and lamotrigine. Promising novel agents currently in development, including N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor modulators, 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl propanoic acid (AMPA receptor modulators, and drugs with activity at the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu receptors are then reviewed. Taken together, both preclinical and clinical evidence exists to support the pursuit of small molecule modulators of the glutamate system as novel therapeutic agents in mood disorders. It is hoped that by targeting neural systems outside of the monoamine system, more effective and perhaps faster acting therapeutics can be developed for patients suffering from these disabling disorders.Keywords: glutamate, mood disorders, major depressive disorder, ketamine, NMDA, AMPA

Murrough JW

2013-08-01

318

Mood alterations in mindful versus aerobic exercise modes.  

Science.gov (United States)

The results of most recent studies have generally indicated an improvement in mood after participation in aerobic exercise. However, only a few researchers have compared mindful modes of exercise with aerobic exercise to examine the effect of 1 single session of exercise on mood. In the present study, the authors assessed state anxiety, depressive mood, and subjective well-being prior to and following 1 class of 1 of 4 exercise modes: yoga, Feldenkrais (awareness through movement), aerobic dance, and swimming; a computer class served as a control. Participants were 147 female general curriculum and physical education teachers (mean age = 40.15, SD = 0.2) voluntarily enrolled in a 1-year enrichment program at a physical education college. Analyses of variance for repeated measures revealed mood improvement following Feldenkrais, swimming, and yoga but not following aerobic dance and computer lessons. Mindful low-exertion activities as well as aerobic activities enhanced mood in 1 single session of exercise. The authors suggest that more studies assessing the mood-enhancing benefits of mindful activities such as Feldenkrais and yoga are needed. PMID:14629072

Netz, Yael; Lidor, Ronnie

2003-09-01

319

The relationship between self-report of depression and media usage.  

Science.gov (United States)

Depression is a debilitating condition that adversely affects many aspects of a person's life and general health. Earlier work has supported the idea that there may be a relationship between the use of certain media and depression. In this study, we tested if self-report of depression (SRD), which is not a clinically based diagnosis, was associated with increased internet, television, and social media usage by using data collected in the Media Behavior and Influence Study (MBIS) database (N = 19,776 subjects). We further assessed the relationship of demographic variables to this association. These analyses found that SRD rates were in the range of published rates of clinically diagnosed major depression. It found that those who tended to use more media also tended to be more depressed, and that segmentation of SRD subjects was weighted toward internet and television usage, which was not the case with non-SRD subjects, who were segmented along social media use. This study found that those who have suffered either economic or physical life setbacks are orders of magnitude more likely to be depressed, even without disproportionately high levels of media use. However, among those that have suffered major life setbacks, high media users-particularly television watchers-were even more likely to report experiencing depression, which suggests that these effects were not just due to individuals having more time for media consumption. These findings provide an example of how Big Data can be used for medical and mental health research, helping to elucidate issues not traditionally tested in the fields of psychiatry or experimental psychology. PMID:25309388

Block, Martin; Stern, Daniel B; Raman, Kalyan; Lee, Sang; Carey, Jim; Humphreys, Ashlee A; Mulhern, Frank; Calder, Bobby; Schultz, Don; Rudick, Charles N; Blood, Anne J; Breiter, Hans C

2014-01-01

320

The relationship between self-report of depression and media usage  

Science.gov (United States)

Depression is a debilitating condition that adversely affects many aspects of a person's life and general health. Earlier work has supported the idea that there may be a relationship between the use of certain media and depression. In this study, we tested if self-report of depression (SRD), which is not a clinically based diagnosis, was associated with increased internet, television, and social media usage by using data collected in the Media Behavior and Influence Study (MBIS) database (N = 19,776 subjects). We further assessed the relationship of demographic variables to this association. These analyses found that SRD rates were in the range of published rates of clinically diagnosed major depression. It found that those who tended to use more media also tended to be more depressed, and that segmentation of SRD subjects was weighted toward internet and television usage, which was not the case with non-SRD subjects, who were segmented along social media use. This study found that those who have suffered either economic or physical life setbacks are orders of magnitude more likely to be depressed, even without disproportionately high levels of media use. However, among those that have suffered major life setbacks, high media users—particularly television watchers—were even more likely to report experiencing depression, which suggests that these effects were not just due to individuals having more time for media consumption. These findings provide an example of how Big Data can be used for medical and mental health research, helping to elucidate issues not traditionally tested in the fields of psychiatry or experimental psychology. PMID:25309388

Block, Martin; Stern, Daniel B.; Raman, Kalyan; Lee, Sang; Carey, Jim; Humphreys, Ashlee A.; Mulhern, Frank; Calder, Bobby; Schultz, Don; Rudick, Charles N.; Blood, Anne J.; Breiter, Hans C.

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

The relationship between self-report of depression and media usage  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Depression is a debilitating condition that adversely affects many aspects of a person's life and general health. Earlier work has supported the idea that there may be a relationship between the use of certain media and depression. In this study, we tested if self-report of depression (SRD, which is not a clinically based diagnosis, was associated with increased internet, television, and social media usage by using data collected in the Media Behavior and Influence Study (MBIS database (N=19,776 subjects. We further assessed the relationship of demographic variables to this association. These analyses found that SRD rates were in the range of published rates of clinically diagnosed major depression. It found that those who tended to use more media also tended to be more depressed, and that segmentation of SRD subjects was weighted toward internet and television usage, which was not the case with non-SRD subjects, who were segmented along social media use. This study found that those who have suffered either economic or physical life setbacks are orders of magnitude more likely to be depressed, even without disproportionately high levels of media use. However, among those that have suffered major life setbacks, high media users – particularly television watchers – were even more likely to report experiencing depression, which suggests that these effects were not just due to individuals having more time for media consumption. These findings provide an example of how Big Data can be used for medical and mental health research, helping to elucidate issues not traditionally tested in the fields of psychiatry or experimental psychology.

Martin Block

2014-09-01

322

Children and Adolescents Coping With Cancer: Self- and Parent Reports of Coping and Anxiety/Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective The diagnosis and treatment of cancer present children and adolescents with significant stress. However, research on the ways that children and adolescents cope with cancer-related stress has not yielded clear findings on the efficacy of different coping strategies, and has been limited by reliance primarily on self-reports of both coping and distress. To address this gap, the current study used a control-based model of coping to examine self- and parent reports of child/adolescent coping and symptoms of anxiety and depression in a sample of children with cancer. Method Children and adolescents (5 to 17 years old) and their parents were recruited near the time of a child’s diagnosis or relapse of cancer (M = 1.30 months postdiagnosis). Child self-reports (n = 153), mother reports (n = 297), and father reports (n = 161) of children’s coping and symptoms of anxiety/depression were obtained. Results Bivariate correlations revealed significant associations for secondary control coping (efforts to adapt to source of stress; e.g., acceptance, cognitive reappraisal) and disengagement coping (e.g., avoidance, denial) with anxiety/depression within and across informants. Linear multiple regression analyses indicated that secondary control coping accounted for unique variance in symptoms of anxiety/ depression both within and across informants. Conclusions Secondary control coping appears important for children and adolescents during early phases of treatment for cancer, and it may serve as an important target for future interventions to enhance adjustment in these children. PMID:25068455

Compas, Bruce E.; Desjardins, Leandra; Vannatta, Kathryn; Young-Saleme, Tammi; Rodriguez, Erin M.; Dunn, Madeleine; Bemis, Heather; Snyder, Sarah; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

2014-01-01

323

[Postpartum depression].  

Science.gov (United States)

A retrospective study was carried out in Beijing, China, in 1992. Edinburgh postnatal depression scale was used to inquire the mothers at 6-12 month after delivery. A total of 550 women were investigated by mailing. 425 women replied. The positive rate of PPD in our study was 17.9%. Women who had had a history of mood disorder before pregnancy had a higher risk of PPD. Social and psychological factors such as lacking support from the women's relatives, the poor marital relationship and the bad living condition shown to be significantly associated with postnatal depression. PPD can seriously affected the physical and mental health and well-being of women, her child's early education causing delayed development and her family causing a great deal of suffering, personal distress and marital troubles even causing divorce and suicide. Thus it is important to identify the high risk women and give treatment as early as possible. PMID:8313745

Guo, S F

1993-09-01

324

Psychometric properties of the Brunel Mood Scale in Chinese adolescents and adults.  

Science.gov (United States)

Building on the work of Terry and colleagues (Terry, P. C., Lane, A. M., Lane, H. J., & Keohane, L. (1999). Development and validation of a mood measure for adolescents. Journal of Sports Sciences, 17, 861-872; Terry, P. C., Lane, A. M., & Fogarty, G. J. (2003). Construct validity of the Profile of Mood States-Adolescents for use with adults. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 4, 125-139.), the present study examined the validity and internal consistency reliability of the Chinese version of the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS-C) among 2,548 participants, comprising adolescent athletes (n = 520), adult athletes (n = 434), adolescent students (n = 673), and adult students (n = 921). Both adolescent and adult athletes completed the BRUMS-C before, during, or after regular training and both adolescent and adult students completed the BRUMS-C in a classroom setting. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) provided support for the factorial validity of a 23-item six-factor model, with one item removed from the hypothesised measurement model. Internal consistency reliabilities were satisfactory for all subscales across each of the four samples. Criterion validity was supported with strong relationships between the BRUMS-C, abbreviated POMS, and Chinese Affect Scale consistent with theoretical predictions. Multi-sample CFAs showed the BRUMS-C to be invariant at the configural, metric, strong, and structural levels for all samples. Furthermore, latent mean difference analyses showed that athletes reported significantly higher levels of fatigue than students while maintaining almost the same levels of vigour, and adolescent students reported significantly higher levels of depressed mood than the other three samples. PMID:24702192

Zhang, Chun-Qing; Si, Gangyan; Chung, Pak-Kwong; Du, Mengmeng; Terry, Peter C

2014-01-01

325

The significance of mixed states in depression and mania.  

Science.gov (United States)

The DSM-5 definition of mixed features "specifier" of manic, hypomanic and major depressive episodes captures sub-syndromal non-overlapping symptoms of the opposite pole, experienced in bipolar (I, II, and not otherwise specified) and major depressive disorders. This combinatory model seems to be more appropriate for less severe forms of mixed state, in which mood symptoms are prominent and clearly identifiable. Sub-syndromal depressive symptoms have been frequently reported to co-occur during mania. Similarly, manic or hypomanic symptoms during depression resulted common, dimensionally distributed, and recurrent. The presence of mixed features has been associated with a worse clinical course and high rates of comorbidities including anxiety, personality, alcohol and substance use disorders and head trauma or other neurological problems. Finally, mixed states represent a major therapeutic challenge, especially when you consider that these forms tend to have a less favorable response to drug treatments and require a more complex approach than non-mixed forms. PMID:25135783

Perugi, Giulio; Quaranta, Giuseppe; Dell'Osso, Liliana

2014-10-01

326

Associations between Peer Victimization, Self-Reported Depression and Social Phobia among Adolescents: The Role of Comorbidity  

Science.gov (United States)

Associations of peer victimization with adolescent depression and social phobia (SP), while controlling for comorbidity between them, have not been sufficiently explored in earlier research. A total of 3156 Finnish adolescents aged 15-16 years participated in a survey study. Self-reported peer victimization, as well as self-reported depression

Ranta, Klaus; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Marttunen, Mauri

2009-01-01

327

Does follow-up in a specialized center influence symptom profile and severity of bipolar depression?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Despite bipolar patients spend up to one third of their lives in depression, the treatment of bipolar depression remains as an understudied area. Although more atypical depressive symptoms are expected to be seen in bipolar depression, ethnocultural differences and regular follow-ups can change the onset and expression of clinical symptoms. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to evaluate the symptoms of depressive bipolar patients who are followed up in a specialized mood disorder unit. Methods: The most severe depressive symptoms of 144 bipolar patients were followed up using standardized forms in a specialized mood disorder outpatient unit. Obtained data analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: It was determined that less than 10% of depressive symptoms were severe. Feelings of guilt and low self-esteem were not detected in nearly half of the patients (45,8%; active (3,5% or passive (15,3% suicidal ideation was seen approximately in one-fifth of the patients. The rate of psychotic symptoms was considerably low (4,2%. Beside this, vegetative symptoms other than loss of energy and lack of concentration were not seen in more than half of the patients. Adding a mood stabilizer or titrating the levels and psychotherapeutic interventions were adequate for remission in one-third of the patients. Discussion: Although previously it was reported bipolar depressive symptoms were severe with higher suicide rates, in less than 10% of patients, depressive symptoms were severe and the rate of active suicidal ideation was 3,5% in our study. Moreover, the rate of psychotic symptoms was found 4,2%. Although occurrence of milder symptoms contradicts with the literature, this can be explained by the follow-up of the patients in a specialized unit and early intervention before symptoms get more severe. Decreased need for pharmacological intervention can also be explained by the same reason.

E. Timuçin Oral

2010-01-01

328

Epigenetic mechanisms in mood disorders: targeting neuroplasticity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Developing novel therapeutics and diagnostic tools based upon an understanding of neuroplasticity is critical in order to improve the treatment and ultimately the prevention of a broad range of nervous system disorders. In the case of mood disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD), where diagnoses are based solely on nosology rather than pathophysiology, there exists a clear unmet medical need to advance our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms and to develop fundamentally new mechanism experimental medicines with improved efficacy. In this context, recent preclinical molecular, cellular, and behavioral findings have begun to reveal the importance of epigenetic mechanisms that alter chromatin structure and dynamically regulate patterns of gene expression that may play a critical role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Here, we will review recent advances involving the use of animal models in combination with genetic and pharmacological probes to dissect the underlying molecular mechanisms and neurobiological consequence of targeting this chromatin-mediated neuroplasticity. We discuss evidence for the direct and indirect effects of mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and antipsychotics, among their many other effects, on chromatin-modifying enzymes and on the epigenetic state of defined genomic loci, in defined cell types and in specific regions of the brain. These data, as well as findings from patient-derived tissue, have also begun to reveal alterations of epigenetic mechanisms in the pathophysiology and treatment of mood disorders. We summarize growing evidence supporting the notion that selectively targeting chromatin-modifying complexes, including those containing histone deacetylases (HDACs), provides a means to reversibly alter the acetylation state of neuronal chromatin and beneficially impact neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription and mood-related behaviors. Looking beyond current knowledge, we discuss how high-resolution, whole-genome methodologies, such as RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) for transcriptome analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) for analyzing genome-wide occupancy of chromatin-associated factors, are beginning to provide an unprecedented view of both specific genomic loci as well as global properties of chromatin in the nervous system. These methodologies when applied to the characterization of model systems, including those of patient-derived induced pluripotent cell (iPSC) and induced neurons (iNs), will greatly shape our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms and the impact of genetic variation on the regulatory regions of the human genome that can affect neuroplasticity. Finally, we point out critical unanswered questions and areas where additional data are needed in order to better understand the potential to target mechanisms of chromatin-mediated neuroplasticity for novel treatments of mood and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:23376737

Fass, D M; Schroeder, F A; Perlis, R H; Haggarty, S J

2014-04-01

329

The gastrointestinal tract microbiome, probiotics, and mood.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mental health is closely linked to physical health. Depression (e.g., major depression) is highly prevalent worldwide and a major cause of disability. In a subgroup with treatment-resistant depression, standard pharmacotherapy interventions provide small if any incremental improvement in patient outcomes and may also require the application of an alternate approach. Therefore, in addition to the standard pharmacotherapies prescribed, patients will also be advised on the benefits of psychological counseling, electroconvulsive therapy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation or increasing physical activity and reducing harmful substance consumption. Numerous nutraceuticals have a beneficial role in treatment-resistant depression and include, herbal medicines of which Hypericum perforatum is the best studied, omega-3 fatty acid preparations, S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAMe), various mineral formulations (e.g., magnesium) and folate (singly or in combination with B group vitamins) are prescribed to a lesser extent. Furthermore, a largely neglected area of research activity has been the role of live probiotic cultures that contribute to repairing dysbiosis (a leaky gut barrier abnormality) in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). In this commentary, we build a hypothesis that in addition suggests that GIT metabolites that are elaborated by the microbiome cohort may provide novel and significant avenues for efficacious therapeutic interventions for mood disorders. We posit that the microbiome in the gastrointestinal tract is implicit as an important participant for the amelioration of adverse mood conditions via the diverse metabolic activities provided by live beneficial bacteria (probiotics) as an active adjuvant treatment. This activity is in part triggered by a controlled release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hence further questions the antioxidant/oxidative stress postulate. PMID:25266952

Vitetta, Luis; Bambling, Matthew; Alford, Hollie

2014-12-01

330

Mood disorders in individuals with distal 18q deletions.  

Science.gov (United States)

We examined 36 participants at least 4 years old with hemizygous distal deletions of the long arm of Chromosome 18 (18q-) for histories of mood disorders and to characterize these disorders clinically. Since each participant had a different region of 18q hemizygosity, our goal was also to identify their common region of hemizygosity associated with mood disorders; thereby identifying candidate causal genes in that region. Lifetime mood and other psychiatric disorders were determined by semi-structured interviews of patients and parents, supplemented by reviews of medical and psychiatric records, and norm-referenced psychological assessment instruments, for psychiatric symptoms, cognitive problems, and adaptive functioning. Sixteen participants were identified with lifetime mood disorders (ages 12-42 years, 71% female, 14 having had unipolar depression and 2 with bipolar disorders). From the group of 20 who did not meet criteria for a mood disorder; a comparison group of 6 participants were identified who were matched for age range and deletion size. Mood-disordered patients had high rates of anxiety (75%) and externalizing behavior disorders (44%), and significant mean differences from comparison patients (P?mood-disordered group that included a hypothetical gene, C18orf62, and two known genes, ZADH2 and TSHZ1. We conclude that patients having terminal deletions of this critical region of the long arm of Chromosome 18 are highly likely to have mood disorders, which are often comorbid with anxiety and to a lesser extent with externalizing disorders. PMID:24006251

Daviss, William B; O'Donnell, Louise; Soileau, Bridgette T; Heard, Patricia; Carter, Erika; Pliszka, Steven R; Gelfond, Jonathan A L; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

2013-12-01

331

TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (TDCRP)  

Science.gov (United States)

The NIMH Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program (TDCRP) was a collaborative agreement between NIMH (Mood, Anxiety and Personality Disorder Research Branch) and three research sites, George Washington University, University of Oklahoma and the University of Pittsbu...

332

Epilepsy and Mood  

Science.gov (United States)

... used to treat different medical condi- tions, including depression, bipolar disorder, chronic pain, and epilepsy. It has long been shown that ... bipolar disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, or ... veterans who had depression or bipolar disorder were much more likely to ...

333

Family Report of ASD Concomitant with Depression or Anxiety among US Children  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective is to estimate prevalence of parent-reported depression or anxiety among children with ASD, and describe parental concerns for their children. The design is Analysis of National Survey of Children's Health, 2003-2004. The participants are a national sample of 102,353 parents. 311,870 (544/100,000) parents of children ages 4-17 in the…

McPheeters, Melissa L.; Davis, Alaina; Navarre, J. Richard; Scott, Theresa A.

2011-01-01

334

Perfectionism and ethnicity: implications for depressive symptoms and self-reported academic achievement.  

Science.gov (United States)

Ethnic differences in perfectionism were examined among Asian American, African American, and Caucasian American college students. Analyses revealed that Asian American students scored significantly higher than the other groups on 3 of 6 perfectionism subscales. Minority students reported significantly higher parental expectations than Caucasian students. Significant correlations emerged for all 3 groups between depressive symptoms and concerns about making mistakes, perceived criticism from parents, and self-doubt. In regression analyses, perfectionism explained significant variance in depressive symptoms for Asian Americans and Caucasians and explained significant variance in cumulative grade point average for Asian Americans and African Americans. Self-doubt emerged as a robust individual predictor in these analyses. PMID:12647326

Castro, Jennifer R; Rice, Kenneth G

2003-02-01

335

Social disability of Brazilian mood disorder patients  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mood disorders cause many social problems, often involving family relationships. Few studies are available in the literature comparing patients with bipolar, unipolar, dysthymic, and double depressive disorders concerning these aspects. In the present study, demographic and disease data were collected using a specifically prepared questionnaire. Social adjustment was assessed using the Disability Adjustment Scale and family relationships were evaluated using the Global Assessment of Relational Functioning Scale. One hundred patients under treatment for at least 6 months were evaluated at the Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic of the Botucatu School of Medicine, UNESP. Most patients were women (82% more than 50 (49% years old with at least two years of follow-up, with little schooling (62% had less than 4 years, and of low socioeconomic level. Logistic regression analysis showed that a diagnosis of unipolar disorder (P = 0.003, OR = 0.075, CI = 0.014-0.403 and dysthymia (P = 0.001, OR = 0.040, CI = 0.006-0.275 as well as family relationships (P = 0.002, OR = 0.953, CI = 0914-0.992 played a significant role in social adjustment. Unipolar and dysthymic patients presented better social adjustment than bipolar and double depressive patients (P < 0.001, results that were not due to social class. These patients, treated at a teaching hospital, may represent the severest mood disorder cases. Evaluations were made knowing the diagnosis of the patients, which might also have influenced some of the results. Social disabilities among mood disorder patients are very frequent and intensive.

A.M. Tucci

2004-11-01

336

Mood-Dependent Cognitive Change in a Man with Bipolar Disorder Who Cycles Every 24 Hours  

Science.gov (United States)

A case study of a bipolar patient whose mood changes every 24 hours is described to illustrate the changes in cognitive processing and content during different phases of bipolar disorder. The participant completed a battery of questionnaires and tasks on 4 separate occasions: twice when depressed and twice when manic. Depression tended to be…

Lam, Dominic; Mansell, Warren

2008-01-01

337

T3111C clock single nucleotide polymorphism and mood disorders: a meta-analysis.  

Science.gov (United States)

It has been hypothesized that abnormalities in the molecular clock underlie the development of mood disorders, in the direction of higher prevalence in individuals with a reduced flexibility to adapt to important regulations of mood in response to changes in seasons, stress levels, sleep schedules, and time zones. In particular, a T/C change (rs1801260) at the 3111 position of the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) gene has been explored in psychiatry disorders. This meta-analysis has been undertaken to investigate the association between rs1801260 and both mood disorders and depression severity, shedding light on previous controversial results and providing better power to detect smaller effect sizes. PubMed and ISI databases were searched for studies focused on the association between rs1801260 and mood disorders spectrum. Quality of studies was assessed. We found no association between CLOCK genotypes and mood disorders, even when we separately investigated ethnical homogeneous or unipolar disorder studies. No association was found regarding severity of depression either. The methodological quality of the studies has been found to be medium-high. Our meta-analysis shows no association between rs1801260 and mood disorders (as a complete phenotype) or depression severity and points out the necessity of further research in order to better understand the underlying biological machinery of circadian dysfunction in subjects affected by mood disorders. PMID:20560707

Calati, Raffaella; Gaspar-Barba, Enrique; Yukler, Adina; Serretti, Alessandro

2010-06-01

338

Maintaining remission of depression with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation during pregnancy: a case report.  

Science.gov (United States)

It is important to explore potential safe treatment options for the ongoing treatment of women's depression during pregnancy. One promising treatment is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We report on the case of a woman who became pregnant while receiving regular maintenance rTMS combined with pharmacotherapy treatment for major depressive episode. The patient achieved remission following two acute courses of rTMS and continued with maintenance rTMS treatment over the course of 4 years, during which she became pregnant and gave birth to a healthy infant. Her remission was maintained over this time including during and after her pregnancy. There were no adverse effects to the patient or her infant during the pregnancy or in the post-natal period. Maintenance rTMS may be an effective and feasible treatment option for depression during pregnancy. PMID:24638141

Burton, Cassandra; Gill, Shane; Clarke, Patrick; Galletly, Cherrie

2014-06-01

339

Treatment of Bipolar Depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Depressive episodes are significant in bipolar illness since patients can spend up to one-third of their lives in depression. Although the treatment of bipolar depression remains an understudied area, new data from randomized, controlled trials and naturalistic studies expanded the range of treatments avaliable. The main aim in the treatment of bipolar depression is the prevention of the patient switching to mania and cycle acceleration, and antidepressant therapy may be contraindicated because of the risk for switching. Guidelines for the acute treatment of the bipolar depression emphasize treatment with a mood stabilizer, of which lithium has been the most thoroughly studied in randomized, controlled trials in acute bipolar depression. Lamotrigine had found significant ellicacy in recent studies as well and got FDA approval for its effect on preventing new episodes.

Kür?at Alt?nta?

2005-01-01

340

The relationship between anxiety, depression and illness perception in tberculosis patients in Pakistan  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Objective As the rates of TB world over have increased during the past 10 years, there has been a growing awareness of depression and its role in the outcome of chronic disorders. Though depression is common in patients with TB no study as yet has examined the prevalence of depression in this group in Pakistan. We aimed to determine the presence of depression, anxiety and illness perceptions in patients suffering from Tuberculosis (TB in Pakistan. Methods 108 consecutive outpatients with tuberculosis completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS and the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ. Results Out of 108 patients, 50 (46.3% were depressed and 51 (47.2% had anxiety. Raised depression and anxiety scores were associated with an increase in the number of symptoms reported (HADS Depression: r = 0.346, p = Conclusion We found that about a half of patients in our sample met the criteria for probable depression and anxiety based on HADS score. Negative illness perceptions were clearly related to reports of mood symptoms. As depression and lack of perceived control over illness in those suffering from tuberculosis are reported to be independent predictors of poor adherence further studies to investigate their relationship with medication adherence are required.

Chaudhry Imran B

2008-02-01

 
 
 
 
341

Assessing the Applicability of E-Therapies for Depression, Anxiety, and Other Mood Disorders Among Lesbians and Gay Men: Analysis of 24 Web- and Mobile Phone-Based Self-Help Interventions  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Lesbians and gay men have disproportionately high rates of depression and anxiety, and report lower satisfaction with treatments. In part, this may be because many health care options marginalize them by assuming heterosexuality, or misunderstand and fail to respond to the challenges specifically faced by these groups. E-therapies have particular potential to respond to the mental health needs of lesbians and gay men, but there is little research to determine whether they do so, or how they might be improved. Objective We sought to examine the applicability of existing mental health e-therapies for lesbians and gay men. Methods We reviewed 24 Web- and mobile phone-based e-therapies and assessed their performance in eight key areas, including the use of inclusive language and content and whether they addressed mental health stressors for lesbians and gay men, such as experiences of stigma related to their sexual orientation, coming out, and relationship issues that are specific to lesbians and gay men. Results We found that e-therapies seldom addressed these stressors. Furthermore, 58% (14/24) of therapies contained instances that assumed or suggested the user was heterosexual, with instances especially prevalent among better-evidenced programs. Conclusions Our findings, and a detailed review protocol presented in this article, may be used as guides for the future development of mental health e-therapies to better accommodate the needs of lesbians and gay men. PMID:24996000

Lyons, Anthony; Pitts, Marian; Mitchell, Anne; Christensen, Helen

2014-01-01

342

Recurrence of major depressive disorder following a switch from escitalopram to St. John’s Wort: a case report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Hypericum perforatum extracts, popularly known as St. John’s wort (known as “sar? kantaron” in Turkish are widely used for the treatment of major depression, especially in German speaking countries. Data on the effectiveness of such extracts for the maintenance treatment of major depression is limited. In this case report, a female patient who was euthymic under escitalopram treatment and experienced a recurrence of depression following a switch to St. John’s wort will be described.

erhan ertekin

2014-01-01

343

Play Practices and Play Moods  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The aim of this article is to develop a view of play as a relation between play practices and play moods based on an empirical study of children's everyday life and by using Bateson's term of ‘framing’ [(1955/2001). In Steps to an ecology of mind (pp. 75–80). Chicago: University of Chicago Press], Schmidt's notion of ‘commonness’ [(2005). Om respekten. København: Danmarks Pædagogiske Universitets Forlag; (2011). On respect. Copenhagen: Danish School of Education University Press] and Heidegger's term ‘mood’ [(1938/1996). Time and being. Cornwall: Wiley-Blackwell.]. Play mood is a state of being in which we are open and ready, both to others and their production of meaning and to new opportunities for producing meaning. This play mood is created when we engage with the world during play practices. The article points out four types of play moods – devotion, intensity, tension and euphorica – which show an affiliation with four types of play practices such as sliding, shifting, displaying and exceeding. Though play practices and play moods become possible, this conceptual framework makes it possible to highlight three features of play – first, moods are essential to play; second, moods are always in plural and finally, different moods describe different ways of being in play which means different ways of engaging with the world and the people around us.

Karoff, Helle Skovbjerg

2013-01-01

344

PERSONALITY DOES NOT INFLUENCE EXERCISE-INDUCED MOOD ENHANCEMENT AMONG FEMALE EXERCISERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study investigated the influence of personality on exercise-induced mood changes. It was hypothesised that (a exercise would be associated with significant mood enhancement across all personality types, (b extroversion would be associated with positive mood and neuroticism with negative mood both pre- and post-exercise, and (c personality measures would interact with exercise-induced mood changes. Participants were 90 female exercisers (M = 25.8 yr, SD = 9.0 yr who completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI once and the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS before and after a 60-minute exercise session. Median splits were used to group participants into four personality types: stable introverts (n = 25, stable extroverts (n = 20, neurotic introverts (n = 26, and neurotic extroverts (n = 19. Repeated measures MANOVA showed significant mood enhancement following exercise across all personality types. Neuroticism was associated with negative mood scores pre- and post-exercise but the effect of extroversion on reported mood was relatively weak. There was no significant interaction effect between exercise-induced mood enhancement and personality. In conclusion, findings lend support to the notion that exercise is associated with improved mood. However, findings show that personality did not influence this effect, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood

Andrew M. Lane

2005-09-01

345

High familial risk for mood disorder is associated with low dorsolateral prefrontal cortex serotonin transporter binding  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Mood disorders are elicited through a combination of genetic and environmental stress factors, and treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors ameliorates depressive symptoms. Changes in the serotonin transporter (SERT) binding may therefore occur in depressive patients and in subjects at risk for developing depression. The aim of this study was to explore whether abnormalities in SERT might be present in healthy individuals with familial predisposition to mood disorder. Nine individuals at high familial risk (mean age 32.2+/-4.2 years) and 11 individuals at low risk (mean age 32.4+/-5.0 years) for developing mood disorder were included. The subjects were healthy twins with or without a co-twin history of mood disorder identified by linking information from the Danish Twin Register and the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. Regional in vivo brain serotonin transporter binding was measured with [(11)C]DASB PET. The volumes of interest included the orbitofrontal cortex, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, caudate, putamen, thalamus, and midbrain. We found that individuals at high familial risk for mood disorders had a 35% reduction in SERT binding in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (p=0.014, Bonferroni corrected) and on a trend basis a 15% reduction in anterior cingulate (p=0.018, un-corrected). The depression and symptom scores of the high and the low risk individuals were not significantly different. In conclusion, our data suggest that a low SERT binding in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex represents a trait marker for mood disorders.

Frokjaer, Vibe G; Vinberg, Maj

2009-01-01

346

Self-compassion as an emotion regulation strategy in major depressive disorder.  

Science.gov (United States)

Cognitive reappraisal and acceptance are two presumably adaptive emotion regulation strategies in depression. More recently, self-compassion has been discussed as another potentially effective strategy for coping with depression. In the present study, we compared the effectiveness of self-compassion with a waiting condition, reappraisal, and acceptance in a clinically depressed sample, and tested the hypothesis that the intensity of depressed mood would moderate the differential efficacy of these strategies. In an experimental design, we induced depressed mood at four points in time in 48 participants meeting criteria for major depressive disorder. After each mood induction, participants were instructed to wait, reappraise the situation, accept their negative emotions, or employ self-compassion to regulate their depressed mood. Self-ratings of depressed mood were assessed before and after each mood induction and regulation phase. Results showed that the reduction of depressed mood was significantly greater in the self-compassion condition than in the waiting condition. No significant differences were observed between the self-compassion and the reappraisal condition, and between the self-compassion and the acceptance condition in patients' mood ratings. However, the intensity of self-rated depressed mood at baseline was found to moderate the comparative effectiveness of self-compassion and reappraisal with a trend of self-compassion being more effective than reappraisal in high depressed mood at baseline. These findings support the use of self-compassion as another adaptive emotion regulation strategy for patients with major depressive disorder, especially for those suffering from high levels of depressed mood. PMID:24929927

Diedrich, Alice; Grant, Michaela; Hofmann, Stefan G; Hiller, Wolfgang; Berking, Matthias

2014-07-01

347

Reproducibility of negative mood induction: a self-referent plus musical mood induction procedure and a controllable/uncontrollable stress paradigm.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mood induction procedures (MIPs) have been used extensively as a means of inducing a variety of mood states in laboratory settings. Recently, MIPs have been employed in a repeated measures design in combination with such techniques as functional imaging and psychopharmacological investigations. This study attempted to assess the repeatability of two paradigms designed to induce a depressed/negative affect, a self-referent plus musical MIP and a controllable/uncontrollable stress paradigm, to assess the viability of using such procedures in a repeated design. Healthy volunteers were enrolled in to one of two studies. Study 1 administered a self-referent plus musical MIP on three separate occasions: neutral and depressive mood induction (MI) in a balanced order, followed by a further depressive MI. In study 2, volunteers were subjected to sessions of controllable and uncontrollable noise stress in a balanced order on two different occasions. Subjective ratings of mood were obtained prior to and following the interventions. Depressive MI successfully increased ratings of negative affect, although this effect tended to be greater on the first occasion than on the second. Correlation between mood change on the first and second occasions were low, both for the MIP and stress paradigm. As such, caution should be exercised in using these procedures in a repeated measures design. However, the results may vary depending on the type of MIP employed. PMID:15107191

Richell, R A; Anderson, M

2004-03-01

348

Biases in affective forecasting and recall in individuals with depression and anxiety symptoms.  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors used experience sampling to investigate biases in affective forecasting and recall in individuals with varying levels of depression and anxiety symptoms. Participants who were higher in depression symptoms demonstrated stronger (more pessimistic) negative mood prediction biases, marginally stronger negative mood recall biases, and weaker (less optimistic) positive mood prediction and recall biases. Participants who were higher in anxiety symptoms demonstrated stronger negative mood prediction biases, but positive mood prediction biases that were on par with those who were lower in anxiety. Anxiety symptoms were not associated with mood recall biases. Neither depression symptoms nor anxiety symptoms were associated with bias in event prediction. Their findings fit well with the tripartite model of depression and anxiety. Results are also consistent with the conceptualization of anxiety as a "forward-looking" disorder, and with theories that emphasize the importance of pessimism and general negative information processing in depressive functioning. PMID:22649114

Wenze, Susan J; Gunthert, Kathleen C; German, Ramaris E

2012-07-01

349

A longitudinal study of the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette use among African American adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

The relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette use was examined in a sample of 623 African Americans during adolescence and transition to adulthood by using hierarchical linear modeling. Participants in the study were interviewed across 6 occasions over 8 years. Results indicate that depressive symptoms tend to decrease over time, whereas cigarette use tends to increase for both female and male adolescents. The results also suggest that depressive symptoms predict later cigarette use. Male adolescents who reported more depressive symptoms were more likely than female adolescents to use cigarettes as a way to cope with their mood. These results suggest that depressive symptoms may be important to consider when developing smoking cessation interventions for African American youth. PMID:15755235

Repetto, Paula B; Caldwell, Cleopatra H; Zimmerman, Marc A

2005-03-01

350

Multivitamin and Protein Supplement Use Is Associated With Positive Mood States and Health Behaviors in US Military and Coast Guard Personnel.  

Science.gov (United States)

Approximately 60% of Armed Forces personnel regularly consume dietary supplements (DSs). We investigated the association of mood and health behaviors with multiple classes of DSs in military and Coast Guard personnel (N = 5536). Participants completed a survey of DS use and the Quick Mood Scale to assess mood domains of wakeful-drowsiness, relaxed-anxious, cheerful-depressed, friendly-aggression, clearheaded-confused, and well coordinated-clumsy. Supplements were categorized as multivitamin/minerals (MVM), individual vitamin/minerals, protein/amino acid supplements (PS), combination products (C), herbals (H), purported steroid analogs, (S) and other (O). One-way analyses of covariance assessed associations of DSs and perceived health behavior with mood controlling for age. Logistic regression determined associations between DS use and health behavior. Users of MVM and PS reported feeling significantly (P Users of MVM and PS were more likely to report their general health, eating habits, and fitness level as excellent/good (P users versus nonusers of DSs could be a confounding factor in studies of DSs. PMID:25122181

Austin, Krista G; McGraw, Susan M; Lieberman, Harris R

2014-10-01

351

Biological basis for the co-morbidity between smoking and mood disorders  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Nicotine dependence is still the major preventable cause of death in the developed world, and has strong comorbity with mood disorders including major depression. Depressed patients are more likely to smoke cigarettes, and quitting can precipitate an episode of depression in some subjects. Interestingly, antidepressants, particularly the atypical antidepressant buproprion, are therapeutics that can help smokers quit. Despite these observations, the underlying biological factors of the relatio...

Mineur, Yann S.; Picciotto, Marina R.

2009-01-01

352

Smoking in Response to Negative Mood in Men Versus Women as a Function of Distress Tolerance  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction: Negative mood situations often increase smoking behavior and reward, effects that may be greater among women and smokers low in tolerance for distress. Methods: Adult dependent smokers (N = 164; 86 men, 78 women) first completed measures of distress tolerance via self-report and by mirror-tracing and breath-holding tasks. They then participated in 2 virtually identical laboratory sessions, involving induction of negative versus neutral mood (control) via pictorial slides and music. They rated negative affect (NA) before and during mood induction and smoked their preferred brand ad libitum during the last 14 min of mood induction. Our aim was to examine mood effects on NA, smoking reward (“liking”), and smoking intake (puff volume and number) as a function of sex and distress tolerance. Results: Negative mood induction increased NA, as planned, and smoking reward and intake compared with neutral mood. Increases in NA and puff volume due to negative mood were greater in women compared with men, as hypothesized, but no main effects of the self-report or behavioral distress tolerance measures were seen in responses to mood induction. However, unexpectedly, lower self-reported distress tolerance was associated with greater smoking intake due to negative (but not neutral) mood in men and generally due to neutral (but not negative) mood in women. Conclusions: Negative mood may increase smoking intake more in women compared with men. Yet, low distress tolerance may enhance smoking intake due to negative versus neutral mood differentially between women and men, suggesting that sex and distress tolerance may interact to influence smoking responses to negative mood. PMID:22416115

Giedgowd, Grace E.; Karelitz, Joshua L.; Conklin, Cynthia A.; Lerman, Caryn

2012-01-01

353

Parent and adolescent reports of parenting when a parent has a history of depression: associations with observations of parenting.  

Science.gov (United States)

The current study examined the congruence of parent and adolescent reports of positive and negative parenting with observations of parent-adolescent interactions as the criterion measure. The role of parent and adolescent depressive symptoms in moderating the associations between adolescent or parent report and observations of parenting also was examined. Participants were 180 parents (88.9 % female) with a history of clinical depression and one of their 9-to-15 year old children (49.4 % female). Parents and adolescents reported on parenting skills and depressive symptoms, and parenting was independently observed subsequently in the same session. Findings indicated adolescent report of positive, but not negative, parenting was more congruent with observations than parent report. For negative parenting, depressive symptoms qualified the relation between the parent or adolescent report and independent observations. For parents, higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with more congruence with observed parenting (supporting a depressive realism hypothesis) whereas an opposite trend emerged for adolescents (providing some supporting evidence for a depression-distortion hypothesis). PMID:23851629

Parent, Justin; Forehand, Rex; Dunbar, Jennifer P; Watson, Kelly H; Reising, Michelle M; Seehuus, Martin; Compas, Bruce E

2014-02-01

354

The relationship between attachment style and postpartum depression.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although an increasing number of studies show an association between adult attachment style and mood disorders, the relationship between adult attachment style and depression associated with childbirth is largely unknown. This study investigated the association between women's attachment style, postpartum depression (PPD), and other risk factors. During the 32nd week of pregnancy, 84 women were interviewed using the Attachment Style Interview. Participants also completed self-report questionnaires about reaction to pregnancy, family relationships, current life stresses, and symptoms of depression and anxiety. At one-month postpartum, they were evaluated for postpartum depressive symptoms using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Eighty-two women completed the second self-report questionnaires and were evaluated for PPD. The data of 76 women were eligible for analysis. PPD was present in 21%. An insecure attachment style was significantly related to depression. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed significant effects for insecure attachment, social economic status, and antenatal depression on PPD. Adding the insecure attachment style factor to the logistic model that predicted PPD increased the area under the curve to 0.87 (95% CI .77-.98; p depressive disorders could improve screening and the design of interventions. PMID:25098625

Ikeda, Mari; Hayashi, Momoko; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

2014-12-01

355

Measuring consistency of autobiographical memory recall in depression.  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

Autobiographical amnesia assessments in depression need to account for normal changes in consistency over time, contribution of mood and type of memories measured. We report herein validation studies of the Columbia Autobiographical Memory Interview - Short Form (CAMI-SF), exclusively used in depressed patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) but without previous published report of normative data. The CAMI-SF was administered twice with a 6-month interval to 44 healthy volunteers to obtain normative data for retrieval consistency of its Semantic, Episodic-Extended and Episodic-Specific components and assess their reliability and validity. Healthy volunteers showed significant large decreases in retrieval consistency on all components. The Semantic and Episodic-Specific components demonstrated substantial construct validity. We then assessed CAMI-SF retrieval consistencies over a 2-month interval in 30 severely depressed patients never treated with ECT compared with healthy controls (n=19). On initial assessment, depressed patients produced less episodic-specific memories than controls. Both groups showed equivalent amounts of consistency loss over a 2-month interval on all components. At reassessment, only patients with persisting depressive symptoms were distinguishable from controls on episodic-specific memories retrieved. Research quantifying retrograde amnesia following ECT for depression needs to control for normal loss in consistency over time and contribution of persisting depressive symptoms.

Semkovska, Maria

2012-05-15

356

Pharmacogenomics of Mood Stabilizers in the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is a chronic and often severe psychiatric illness characterized by manic and depressive episodes. Among the most effective treatments, mood stabilizers represent the keystone in acute mania, depression, and maintenance treatment of BD. However, treatment response is a highly heterogeneous trait, thus emphasizing the need for a structured informational framework of phenotypic and genetic predictors. In this paper, we present the current state of pharmacogenomic research on long-term treatment in BD, specifically focusing on mood stabilizers. While the results provided so far support the key role of genetic factors in modulating the response phenotype, strong evidence for genetic predictors is still lacking. In order to facilitate implementation of pharmacogenomics into clinical settings (i.e., the creation of personalized therapy, further research efforts are needed.

Alessio Squassina

2010-01-01

357

Sex Differences on Depression Self-Rating Scale in Two Populations: Research Report  

Science.gov (United States)

The self-report of depressive symptoms of high school adolescents from two populations were compared. The study aims to find out whether or not; 1) there are significant sex differences between two communities and 2) with regard to the same-sex, there are significant differences between two communities. Nine hundred and twenty eight adolescents from London and 2012 adolescents from six cities from Iran were requested to fill in the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS). The results showed that significant differences between two sexes in each population. All girls had higher mean scores on all items on DSRS than boys. With regard to the same-sex, significant differences were found between either female or male populations in two communities. The research showed that female adolescents from Iran were significantly experienced more depressive symptoms than the Londoners. Similar results were repeated for the male groups. In conclusion, female adolescents are vulnerable to life stressors and tend to experience more negative feedback and interpretations than boys. Moreover, social roles and limitations, particularly for Iranian adolescents, may influence female adolescents to demonstrate depression symptoms.

Seyed-Hossein, Salimi; Mohamad-Reza, Tagavi; Parviz, Azad-Fallah; Reza, Karaminia; Tayebi, A.

358

Patients' views of physical activity as treatment for depression: a qualitative study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Clinical guidance recommends physical activity to manage patients with persistent subthreshold depressive symptoms or mild-to-moderate depression. However, little is known regarding the acceptability of physical activity as a treatment for depression from patients' perspective. Aim To explore patients' views of physical activity for the treatment of depression in the context of primary care. Design of study In-depth interviews were held with 33 participants taking part in a randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of physical activity for the management of depression. Setting Primary care. Results Most participants perceived physical activity to be an acceptable treatment for depression. The mechanisms by which physical activity could enhance mood were attributed to a number of subjective benefits including biochemical pathways, providing a source of distraction from negative thoughts, and a sense of purpose. Participants who expressed a belief that their depression was caused by biochemical mechanisms reported activity that ‘raised the heartbeat’ as most beneficial, while those who believed depression was situational in origin tended to state the benefits of less-aerobic activities, such as walking. Many participants reported low motivation and a lack of confidence as barriers to undertaking physical activity. These patients suggested that medication could be helpful for initiating and maintaining activity. Conclusion Patients view physical activity as an effective treatment for depression. However, they vary in their views about how physical activity might impact on depression, what intensity and form of activity is necessary to enhance mood, and the barriers to undertaking activity. This variation suggests the need for GPs to elicit patients' views on physical activity as a treatment, and offer interventions that are tailored to the needs and expectations of individual patients. PMID:21439172

Searle, Aidan; Calnan, Michael; Lewis, Glyn; Campbell, John; Taylor, Adrian; Turner, Katrina

2011-01-01

359

fMRI activation in amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex in unmedicated subjects with major depressive disorder  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Although amygdala and frontal lobe functional abnormalities have been reported in patients with mood disorders, the literature regarding Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is inconsistent. Likely confounds include heterogeneity of patient samples, medication status, and analytic approach. This study evaluated amygdala and frontal lobe activation in unmedicated MDD patients. Fifteen MDD patients and 15 matched healthy controls were scanned using fMRI during the performance of an emotional faces t...

Townsend, Jennifer D.; Eberhart, Nicole K.; Bookheimer, Susan Y.; Eisenberger, Naomi I.; Foland-ross, Lara C.; Cook, Ian A.; Sugar, Catherine A.; Altshuler, Lori L.

2010-01-01

360

Relationship between cognitive appraisals of symptoms and negative mood for subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The onset and course of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS are strongly influenced by psychological factors, and treatment often includes cognitive-behavioral therapy. We conducted a study of the relationships between cognitive appraisal of IBS symptoms and negative mood for the subtypes of IBS. Method The participants were 1087 college students who completed a set of questionnaires that included the Rome II Modular Questionnaire, Self-reported IBS Questionnaire, Cognitive Appraisal Rating Scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results The participants included 206 individuals with IBS; 61 had diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBSD and 45 had constipation-predominant IBS (IBSC. The overall IBS group scored higher on anxiety and depression than the control group. The IBSD and IBSC groups each had significantly higher scores for anxiety but did not significantly differ from the control group in scores for depression. There were no significant differences between the IBSD and IBSC groups in their cognitive appraisal of IBS symptoms. For the IBSD group, anxiety was significantly, positively correlated with commitment, effect, and threat, and depression was significantly, negatively correlated with controllability. In contrast, there were no significant correlations between mood and cognitive appraisal for the IBSC group. Multiple regression analyses with abdominal symptoms as dependent variables and cognitive appraisals as independent variables showed that for the IBSD group, abdominal pain was significantly, positively correlated with commitment, and abdominal discomfort was significantly, positively correlated with appraisal of effect and threat. For the IBSC group, abdominal pain and hard stool were significantly, positively correlated with commitment, and abdominal discomfort was significantly, positively correlated with appraisal of effect and threat. Conclusion IBS patients as a general group report high levels of anxiety and depression. However, IBSD and IBSC were both associated only with high anxiety, but not depression, when compared to the non-IBS control group. For the IBSD group, anxiety was associated with cognitive appraisals, but this association was not found for the IBSC group. These groups did not differ in their associated cognitive appraisals, and are similar in terms of the positive relationship between abdominal pain and discomfort and the cognitive appraisals of coping.

Nomura Shinobu

2008-04-01

 
 
 
 
361

Can incidence of depression in women be linked to estrogen dependent secretion of various hormone binding proteins?  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper describes a possible framework of hormones and their binding proteins (BPs) that might be responsible for the increased incidence of depression in women, including postnatal depression. It is based on three reported facts: Increased cortisol exposure reduces growth hormone (GH) secretion. Cortisol and GH show opposite effects on mood. Liver secretion of various hormone binding proteins is increased under estrogen exposure. If we accept that pure cortisol exposure leads to depressive mood, while simultaneous brain exposure to cortisol and an anabolic (growth hormone or somatomammotropin) is less mood affecting, the occurrence of depression an be more likely in persons: with altered sleep patterns and thus reduced GH secretion, in individuals with increased chronic cortisol exposure (any individual under repeated or sustained stress, older individuals with stressful memories, etc.). The proposed mechanism can be enhanced in women of reproductive age through increased transcortin and GH BP pools due to estrogen action on liver. A particularly vulnerable phase seems to be the early postnatal period, when sudden discontinuation of somatomammotropin anabolic actions might lead to postnatal depression that takes weeks or months to resolve, until the GH/cortisol circadian rhythm normalization. PMID:18996648

Dodig-Curkovic, Katarina; Kurbel, Sven; Matic, Vesna Cacinovic

2009-02-01

362

Evaluation of the mood repair hypothesis of compulsive buying  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Compulsive buying (CB) is a proposed disorder of dysregulated buying behaviour that is associated with high rates of Axis I comorbidity, particularly depression and anxiety. It has been proposed that purchasing behaviours may serve as a maladaptive means of alleviating negative affect in vulnerable individuals. The aim of the current study was to experimentally manipulate affect to test this mood repair hypothesis. Compulsive buyers (n = 26) and pathological gamblers (

Williams, Alishia D.

2012-01-01

363

Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for anxiety and depression in adults with mild intellectual disabilities (ID): a pilot randomised controlled trial  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: Several studies have showed that people with intellectual disabilities (ID) have suitable skills to undergo cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Case studies have reported successful use of cognitive behavioural therapy techniques (with adaptations) in people with ID. Modified cognitive behavioural therapy may be a feasible and effective approach for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders in ID. To date, two studies have reported group-based manaulised cogn...

2011-01-01

364

Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for anxiety and depression in adults with mild intellectual disabilities (ID): a pilot randomised controlled trial  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Several studies have showed that people with intellectual disabilities (ID) have suitable skills to undergo cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Case studies have reported successful use of cognitive behavioural therapy techniques (with adaptations) in people with ID. Modified cognitive behavioural therapy may be a feasible and effective approach for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders in ID. To date, two studies have reported gr...

Blizard Robert; Parkes Charles; Martin Sue; Strydom Andre; Azam Kiran; Serfaty Marc; Hassiotis Angela; King Michael

2011-01-01

365

Mood Dependent Music Generator  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Music is one of the most expressive media to show and manipulate emotions, but there have been few studies on how to generate music connected to emotions. Such studies have always been shunned upon by musicians affirming that a machine cannot create expressive music, as it's the composer's and player's experiences and emotions that get poured into the piece. At the same time another problem is that music is highly complicated (and subjective) and finding out which elements transmit certain emotions is not an easy task. This demo wants to show how the manipulation of a set of features can actually change the mood the music transmits, hopefully awakening an interest in this area of research.

Scirea, Marco

2013-01-01

366

The Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Autogenic Relaxation on Young Soccer Players' Mood States  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Purpose: This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR and autogenic relaxation (AGR on moods of young soccer players. Methods: Sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3 received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States-Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Results: Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. Conclusions: These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players' mood states.

Hazwani Hanafi@Ahmad Yusof

2011-06-01

367

Moderate Exercise Plus Sleep Education Improves Self-Reported Sleep Quality, Daytime Mood, and Vitality in Adults with Chronic Sleep Complaints: A Waiting List-Controlled Trial  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Research indicates that physical exercise can contribute to better sleep quality. This study investigates the six-week influence of a combined intervention on self-rated sleep quality, daytime mood, and quality of life. A nonclinical sample of 114 adults with chronic initiating and the maintaining of sleep complaints participated in the study. The intervention group of 70 adults underwent moderate physical exercise, conducted weekly, plus sleep education sessions. Improvements among participa...

Michael Schredl; Daniel Erlacher; Carmen Gebhart

2011-01-01

368

Exposure to bright light is associated with positive social interaction and good mood over short time periods: A naturalistic study in mildly seasonal people.  

Science.gov (United States)

Bright light is used to treat winter depression and might also have positive effects on mood in some healthy individuals. We examined possible links between bright light exposure and social interaction using naturalistic data. For 20 days in winter and/or summer, 48 mildly seasonal healthy individuals wore a light meter at the wrist and recorded in real-time their behaviours, mood, and perceptions of others during social interactions. Possible short-term effects of bright light were examined using the number of minutes, within any given morning, afternoon or evening, that people were exposed to light exceeding 1000 lux (average: 19.6min). Social interactions were labelled as having occurred under conditions of no, low or high bright light exposure. Independent of season, day, time, and location, participants reported less quarrelsome behaviours, more agreeable behaviours and better mood when exposed to high but not low levels of bright light. Given that the effects were seen only when exposure levels were above average, a minimum level of bright light may be necessary for its positive effects to occur. Daily exposure levels were generally low in both winter and summer. Spending more time outdoors and improving indoor lighting may help optimize everyday social behaviour and mood across seasons in people with mild seasonality. PMID:17275841

aan het Rot, M; Moskowitz, D S; Young, S N

2008-03-01

369

Factors associated with antenatal depression in pregnant Korean females: the effect of bipolarity on depressive symptoms  

Science.gov (United States)

Background This cross-sectional study sought to identify factors associated with antenatal depression in pregnant Korean females, including sociodemographic parameters, social support, social conflict, and bipolarity. Methods Eighty-four pregnant women were recruited to complete questionnaires on sociodemographic factors, obstetric history, depressive symptoms, and bipolarity. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Korean version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Bipolarity was assessed using the Korean version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire. Results Nineteen participants (22.6%) had positive Mood Disorder Questionnaire scores, suggesting the presence of bipolarity, and were significantly more likely to score high on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Antenatal depression was associated with bad marital communication and marital dissatisfaction. Conclusion These results suggest that spousal interactions play a significant role in antenatal depression, and pregnant women with bipolarity may be more depressed than those without bipolarity. PMID:24966674

Park, Chul Min; Seo, Hye-Jin; Jung, Young-Eun; Kim, Moon-Doo; Hong, Seong-Chul; Bahk, Won-Myong; Yoon, Bo-Hyun; Hur, Min Hee; Song, Jae Min

2014-01-01

370

Effects of frontal transcranial direct current stimulation on emotional processing and mood in healthy humans  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The prefrontal cortex is involved in mood and emotional processing. In patients suffering from depression, the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is hypoactive, while activity of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is enhanced. Counterbalancing these pathological excitability alterations by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS improves mood in these patients. In healthy subjects, however, rTMS of the same areas has no major effect, and the effects of tDCS are mixed. We aimed to evaluate the effects of prefrontal tDCS on mood and mood-related cognitive processing in healthy humans. In a first study, we administered excitability-enhancing anodal, excitability-diminishing cathodal and placebo tDCS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, combined with antagonistic stimulation of the right frontopolar cortex, and tested acute mood changes by an adjective checklist. Subjective mood was not influenced by tDCS. Emotional face identification, however, which was explored in a second experiment, was subtly improved by a tDCS-driven excitability modulation of the prefrontal cortex, markedly by anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for positive emotional content. We conclude that tDCS of the prefrontal cortex improves mood processing in healthy subjects, but does not influence subjective mood state.

MichaelA.Nitsche

2012-06-01

371

Depressive Disorders: Treatments Bring New Hope.  

Science.gov (United States)

This booklet describes the symptoms, forms, causes, and treatment of depression, with particular focus on depression in children, adolescents, and older adults. Symptoms include: persistent sad or "empty" mood; feelings of hopelessness, guilt, or helplessness; loss of interest in ordinary activities; sleep disturbances; eating disturbances;…

Sargent, Marilyn

372

Long-term MRA follow-up after coiling of intracranial aneurysms: impact on mood and anxiety  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) screening for recurrence of a coiled intracranial aneurysm and formation of new aneurysms long-term after coiling may induce anxiety and depression. In coiled patients, we evaluated effects on mood and level of anxiety from long-term follow-up MRA in comparison to general population norms. Of 162 patients participating in a long-term (>4.5 years) MRA follow-up after coiling, 120 completed the EQ-5D questionnaire, a visual analog health scale and a self-developed screening related questionnaire at the time of MRA. Three months later, the same questionnaires were completed by 100 of these 120 patients. Results were compared to general population norms adjusted for gender and age. Any problem with anxiety or depression was reported in 56 of 120 patients (47%; 95%CI3856%) at baseline and 42 of 100 patients (42%; 95%CI3252%) at 3 months, equally for screen-positives and -negatives. Compared to the reference population, participants scored 38% (95%CI967%) and 27% (95%CI450%) more often any problem with anxiety or depression. Three months after screening, 21% (20 of 92) of screen-negatives and 13% (one of eight) of screen-positives reported to be less afraid of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) compared to before screening. One of eight screen-positives reported increased fear of SAH. Patients with coiled intracranial aneurysms participating in long-term MRA screening reported significantly more often to be anxious or depressed thy more often to be anxious or depressed than a reference group. Screening did not significantly increase anxiety or depression temporarily. However, subjectively, patients did report an increase in anxiety caused by screening, which decreased after 3 months. (orig.)

373

Predicting relapse in major depressive disorder using patient-reported outcomes of depressive symptom severity, functioning, and quality of life in the individual burden of illness index for depression (IBI-D)  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) often experience unexpected relapses, despite achieving remission. This study examines the utility of a single multidimensional measure that captures variance in patient-reported Depressive Symptom Severity, Functioning, and Quality of Life (QOL), in predicting MDD relapse. Methods Complete data from remitted patients at the completion of 12 weeks of citalopram in the STAR*D study were used to calculate the Individual Burden of Illness index for Depression (IBI-D), and predict subsequent relapse at six (n = 956), nine (n = 778), and twelve months (n = 479) using generalized linear models. Results Depressive Symptom Severity, Functioning, and QOL were all predictors of subsequent relapse. Using Akaike information criteria (AIC), the IBI-D provided a good model for relapse even when Depressive Symptom Severity, Functioning, and QOL were combined in a single model. Specifically, an increase of one in the IBI-D increased the odds ratio of relapse by 2.5 at 6 months (? = 0.921 ± 0.194, z = 4.76, p < 2 × 10?6), by 2.84 at 9 months (? = 1.045 ± 0.22, z = 4.74, p < 2.2 × 10?6), and by 4.1 at 12 months (? = 1.41 ± 0.29, z = 4.79, p < 1.7 × 10?6). Limitations Self-report poses a risk to measurement precision. Using highly valid and reliable measures could mitigate this risk. The IBI-D requires time and effort for filling out the scales and index calculation. Technological solutions could help ease these burdens. The sample suffered from attrition. Separate analysis of dropouts would be helpful. Conclusions Incorporating patient-reported outcomes of Functioning and QOL in addition to Depressive Symptom Severity in the IBI-D is useful in assessing the full burden of illness and in adequately predicting relapse, in MDD. PMID:23790554

IsHak, Waguih William; Greenberg, Jared M.; Cohen, Robert M.

2014-01-01

374

The effect of music video clips on adolescent boys' body image, mood, and schema activation.  

Science.gov (United States)

There is limited research that has examined experimentally the effects of muscular images on adolescent boys' body image, with no research specifically examining the effects of music television. The aim of the current study was to examine the effects of viewing muscular and attractive singers in music video clips on early, mid, and late adolescent boys' body image, mood, and schema activation. Participants were 180 boys in grade 7 (mean age = 12.73 years), grade 9 (mean age = 14.40 years) or grade 11 (mean age = 16.15 years) who completed pre- and post-test measures of mood and body satisfaction after viewing music videos containing male singers of muscular or average appearance. They also completed measures of schema activation and social comparison after viewing the clips. The results showed that the boys who viewed the muscular clips reported poorer upper body satisfaction, lower appearance satisfaction, lower happiness, and more depressive feelings compared to boys who viewed the clips depicting singers of average appearance. There was no evidence of increased appearance schema activation but the boys who viewed the muscular clips did report higher levels of social comparison to the singers. The results suggest that music video clips are a powerful form of media in conveying information about the male ideal body shape and that negative effects are found in boys as young as 12 years. PMID:23443315

Mulgrew, Kate E; Volcevski-Kostas, Diana; Rendell, Peter G

2014-01-01

375

Herbal remedies, mood, and cognition.  

Science.gov (United States)

Herbal medicines were the "sole" source of medicine for thousands of years, in every culture since the advent of human civilization. Today, patients are increasing the use of these botanicals for numerous conditions, such as mood and cognition. This article will explore commonly used herbal remedies for mood and cognition functioning. It is imperative that nurses and nurse practitioners obtain expertise with these botanicals with regard to efficacy, adverse effects and contraindications, possible drug interactions, and safety considerations. PMID:22157508

Acee, Anna M; Sharoff, Leighsa

2012-01-01

376

Prevalence of mood disorders and utility of the PRIME-MD in patients undergoing radiation therapy  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Purpose: To validate a short, structured interview procedure that allows practicing oncologists to quickly and reliably identify mood disorders in their patients, and to estimate the prevalence and types of mood disorders in a radiation therapy patient setting, noting relationships between mood disorders and patient characteristics. Methods: Consecutive, eligible adult patients from the practices of two radiation oncologists were administered the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) by the treating physician. A subset of these patients was also evaluated with the SCID, administered by trained mental health care personnel. Agreement between the two instruments was examined using the kappa statistic. Prevalence of mood disorders was determined from the PRIME-MD. The significance of relationships between patient characteristics and mood disorders was examined by chi-square and ANOVA analysis, and subsequently by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: One hundred twenty-two patients were studied. Fifty-three of these were administered the SCID. Agreement between the two instruments was very good (kappa = 0.70). A diagnosis of a depressive or anxiety disorder by the PRIME-MD was made in 59 of the 122 patients (48%, 95% confidence interval = 39%, 58%). Multivariate analysis showed that a diagnosis of a depressive mood disorder was significantly related to pain intensity and prior history of depression. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the validity and feasibility of the PRIME-MD administered by oncologists in making diagnoses of mood disorders. The prevalence of mood disorders in our set of patients undergoing a course of RT was nearly 50%. Future studies should describe the natural history of these disorders, and determine optimal intervention strategies

377

Somatic symptoms in depression  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Both painful and nonpainful somatic symptoms essentially characterize clinical states of depressive mood. So far, this well-established psychopathological knowledge has been appreciated only insufficiently by the official diagnostic sys-terms of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text Revision (DSM-IVTR) and the ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders. Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines (ICD-10). From a perspective of primary ...

Kapfhammer, Hans-peter

2006-01-01

378

Depression research: where are we now?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Extensive studies have led to a variety of hypotheses for the molecular basis of depression and related mood disorders, but a definite pathogenic mechanism has yet to be defined. The monoamine hypothesis, in conjunction with the efficacy of antidepressants targeting monoamine systems, has long been the central topic of depression research. While it is widely embraced that the initiation of antidepressant efficacy may involve acute changes in monoamine systems, apparently, the focus of current research is moving toward molecular mechanisms that underlie long-lasting downstream changes in the brain after chronic antidepressant treatment, thereby reaching for a detailed view of the pathophysiology of depression and related mood disorders. In this minireview, we briefly summarize major themes in current approaches to understanding mood disorders focusing on molecular views of depression and antidepressant action.

Lee Saebom

2010-03-01

379

Persistent akathisia masquerading as agitated depression after use of ziprasidone in the treatment of bipolar depression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Thomas M Penders,1 Salina Agarwal,2 Rachel Rohaidy11Department of Psychiatric Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA; 2Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: There has been increasing recognition that the second-generation antipsychotic drugs can produce extrapyramidal side effects. This case reports the development of severe akathisia in a patient being treated with ziprasidone for bipolar depression. The case illustrates that this symptom can be easily mistaken for worsening agitated depression. Akathisia may produce considerable distress and elevate suicide risk. Such symptoms may persist for weeks and be refractory to discontinuation of the offending agent or to pharmacological interventions commonly used to mitigate this reaction.Keywords: extrapyramidal, second-generation, affective, antipsychotic, suicide, mood disorder

Penders TM

2013-04-01

380

Chronic inhalant dependence with early onset cognitive impairment, depression and psychotic disorders: a case report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Inhalant substance dependence is generally seen at 14-15 years of age and its prevalence decreases in adulthood. Inhalant use is common among disadvantaged groups, street children, people with history of crime, depression, suicide, antisocial attitudes, history of abuse, violence and any other drug dependence. Psychosocial factors are important in the beginning of inhalant dependence. Medical and neurological problems are frequently seen in chronic inhalant users. The duration of inhalant use is positively correlated with morbidity and mortality. In this report, medical and neuropsychiatric results of chronic inhalant dependence will be discussed. In our patient, chronic inhalant use caused central and peripheral neuropathy, cognitive impairment, depression, psychotic disorder, upper motor neuron type destruction in muscles and mild anemia. Neuropsychiatric destructive effects are prominent in chronic abuse. Mirtazapine and olanzapine treatment decreased depressive and psychotic symptoms, but cognitive impairment, neuropathy, upper motor neuron type destruction didn?t recover completely. Given serious and sometimes irreversible consequences of chronic inhalant dependence, early medical and psychosocial interventions seem very important.

Safiye Gürel

2011-01-01