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Sample records for remote detection mri

  1. Remote control catheter navigation: options for guidance under MRI

    Muller Leah; Saeed Maythem; Wilson Mark W; Hetts Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Image-guided endovascular interventions have gained increasing popularity in clinical practice, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as an attractive alternative to X-ray fluoroscopy for guiding such interventions. Steering catheters by remote control under MRI guidance offers unique challenges and opportunities. Methods In this review, the benefits and limitations of MRI-guided remote control intervention are addressed, and the tools for guiding such intervent...

  2. Remote control catheter navigation: options for guidance under MRI

    Muller Leah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image-guided endovascular interventions have gained increasing popularity in clinical practice, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is emerging as an attractive alternative to X-ray fluoroscopy for guiding such interventions. Steering catheters by remote control under MRI guidance offers unique challenges and opportunities. Methods In this review, the benefits and limitations of MRI-guided remote control intervention are addressed, and the tools for guiding such interventions in the magnetic environment are summarized. Designs for remote control catheter guidance include a catheter tip electromagnetic microcoil design, a ferromagnetic sphere-tipped catheter design, smart material-actuated catheters, and hydraulically actuated catheters. Remote control catheter guidance systems were compared and contrasted with respect to visualization, safety, and performance. Performance is characterized by bending angles achievable by the catheter, time to achieve bending, degree of rotation achievable, and miniaturization capacity of the design. Necessary improvements for furthering catheter design, especially for use in the MRI environment, are addressed, as are hurdles that must be overcome in order to make MRI guided endovascular procedures more accessible for regular use in clinical practice. Conclusions MR-guided endovascular interventions under remote control steering are in their infancy due to issues regarding safety and reliability. Additional experimental studies are needed prior to their use in humans.

  3. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author)

  4. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    Nakajima, Yumi; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shinohara, Yukito (Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-03-01

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author).

  5. Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) versus axial skeleton MRI (AS-MRI) to detect and measure bone metastases in prostate cancer (PCa)

    To compare whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) and axial skeleton MRI (AS-MRI) in detecting and measuring bone metastases in patients with prostate cancer (PCa). WB-MRI and AS-MRI examinations were performed in 60 patients with PCa at high risk of metastases. Two radiologists separately categorised the AS-MRI and WB-MRI as negative or positive for metastases, and measured focal metastases using the ''Response evaluation criteria in solid tumours'' (RECIST) criteria transposed to bone. One radiologist reviewed all examinations 2 months later. Inter- and intraobserver agreements in establishing the presence/absence of metastases were calculated. Bland-Altman plots were used to assess measurement agreement between AS-MRI and WB-MRI. Strong to perfect inter- and intraobserver agreements were found between AS-MRI and WB-MRI in defining the presence/absence of bone metastases. There were no patients with isolated ''peripheral'' metastases at WB-MRI, missed at AS-MRI. There was no difference in lesion count between the two radiologists. AS-MRI and WB-MRI provided statistically equivalent RECIST values for one radiologist and slightly lower values at AS-MRI for the other. In our series of PCa patients, AS-MRI and WB-MRI were equivalent in determining the presence/absence of bone metastases and provided similar evaluation of the metastatic burden. (orig.)

  6. Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) versus axial skeleton MRI (AS-MRI) to detect and measure bone metastases in prostate cancer (PCa)

    Lecouvet, F.E.; Simon, M.; Berg, B.C.V.; Simoni, P. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium); Tombal, B. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Department of Urology, Brussels (Belgium); Jamart, J. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Clinique Universitaire de Mont-Godinne, Center of Biostatistics and Medical Documentation, Yvoir (Belgium)

    2010-12-15

    To compare whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) and axial skeleton MRI (AS-MRI) in detecting and measuring bone metastases in patients with prostate cancer (PCa). WB-MRI and AS-MRI examinations were performed in 60 patients with PCa at high risk of metastases. Two radiologists separately categorised the AS-MRI and WB-MRI as negative or positive for metastases, and measured focal metastases using the ''Response evaluation criteria in solid tumours'' (RECIST) criteria transposed to bone. One radiologist reviewed all examinations 2 months later. Inter- and intraobserver agreements in establishing the presence/absence of metastases were calculated. Bland-Altman plots were used to assess measurement agreement between AS-MRI and WB-MRI. Strong to perfect inter- and intraobserver agreements were found between AS-MRI and WB-MRI in defining the presence/absence of bone metastases. There were no patients with isolated ''peripheral'' metastases at WB-MRI, missed at AS-MRI. There was no difference in lesion count between the two radiologists. AS-MRI and WB-MRI provided statistically equivalent RECIST values for one radiologist and slightly lower values at AS-MRI for the other. In our series of PCa patients, AS-MRI and WB-MRI were equivalent in determining the presence/absence of bone metastases and provided similar evaluation of the metastatic burden. (orig.)

  7. Feasibility of Detecting Pulmonary Embolism Using Noncontrast MRI

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of detecting pulmonary emboli utilizing noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging techniques in patients with known pulmonary embolism. Materials and Methods. Eleven patients were enrolled in a study to evaluate right ventricular function by cardiac MRI in patients diagnosed with acute pulmonary embolism on CT pulmonary angiogram. Cardiac MRI was performed as soon as possible following pulmonary embolism detection. Two independent observers reviewed the precontrast portion of each MRI, scoring right, left, and lobar arteries as positive or negative for PE. The CTs were reviewed and interpreted in the same manner. Results. MRI was obtained on average of 40 hours after the CT. Forty-eight vessels were affected by PE on CT, 69% of which were identified on MRI. All eight pulmonary emboli located in the right or left pulmonary arteries were detected on MRI. Of the 15 pulmonary emboli that were not detected on MRI, 7 were subsegmental, 6 were segmental, and 2 were located in a branch not included in the MRI field of view. Conclusions. Most pulmonary emboli detected on CT were identified on noncontrast MRI, even though our MRI protocol was not optimized for pulmonary artery visualization

  8. Remote detection of explosives using trained canines

    Use of dogs is a search method which combines high probability of detection, speed of search, and low cost. It was concluded that the canine could be used for explosive screening of personnel, but that it was imperative that the dog be in a position remote from employees and employee traffic. A study was made of the design of booths and air flow for this purpose. Results of tests and conclusions are given and discussed

  9. MRI diagnosis of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy from a remote childhood malignancy

    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by digital clubbing, periosteal proliferation, bone pain, synovitis and arthralgia, all of these being commonly symmetrical. It is occasionally associated with nasopharyngeal lymphoepitheliomas and may develop before or after development of lung metastases in these patients. We report a case of a healthy 22-year-old female who presented to our institution with pain and swelling in the thighs and legs. She had a history of childhood nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma. Radiographs of the knees were negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed features suggestive of bilateral periostitis. Because of the propensity of the rare childhood nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma to present with HOA, this entity was included in the differential diagnosis. A subsequent chest radiograph and CT demonstrated a lung and mediastinal mass that were histologically confirmed to be metastatic. To the best of our knowledge, HOA and metastases from nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma occurring after such a long time interval have not been previously reported. Early demonstration and consideration of HOA on the basis of MRI, lead to expeditious and appropriate subsequent investigation. (orig.)

  10. MRI diagnosis of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy from a remote childhood malignancy

    Sainani, Nisha I.; Lawande, Malini A.; Pungavkar, Sona A.; Patkar, Deepak P.; Sase, Kirti S. [Dr. Balabhai Nanavati Hospital and Research Centre, Department of MRI, Mammography and BMD, Mumbai (India); Parikh, Vipul P. [Dr. Balabhai Nanavati Hospital and Research Centre, Department of CT and USG, Mumbai (India)

    2007-06-15

    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by digital clubbing, periosteal proliferation, bone pain, synovitis and arthralgia, all of these being commonly symmetrical. It is occasionally associated with nasopharyngeal lymphoepitheliomas and may develop before or after development of lung metastases in these patients. We report a case of a healthy 22-year-old female who presented to our institution with pain and swelling in the thighs and legs. She had a history of childhood nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma. Radiographs of the knees were negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed features suggestive of bilateral periostitis. Because of the propensity of the rare childhood nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma to present with HOA, this entity was included in the differential diagnosis. A subsequent chest radiograph and CT demonstrated a lung and mediastinal mass that were histologically confirmed to be metastatic. To the best of our knowledge, HOA and metastases from nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma occurring after such a long time interval have not been previously reported. Early demonstration and consideration of HOA on the basis of MRI, lead to expeditious and appropriate subsequent investigation. (orig.)

  11. Remote Optical Detection of Alpha Radiation

    Alpha emitting radiation sources are typically hard to detect with conventional detectors due to the short range of alpha particles in the air. However, previous studies have shown that remote detection of alpha radiation is possible by measuring the ionization-induced fluorescence of air molecules. The alpha-induced ultraviolet (UV) light is mainly emitted by molecular nitrogen and its fluorescence properties are well known. The benefit of this method is the long range of UV photons in the air. Secondly, the detection is possible also under a strong beta and gamma radiation backgrounds as they do not cause localized molecular excitation. In this work, the optical detection was studied using two different detection schemes; spectral separation of fluorescence from the background lighting and coincidence detection of UV photons originating from a single radiative decay event. Our spectrally integrated measurements have shown that one alpha decay event yields up to 400 fluorescence photons in the air and all these UV photons are induced in a 5 ns time-window. On the other hand, the probability of a background coincidence event in 5 ns scale is very rare compared to the number of background photons. This information can be applied in fluorescence coincidence filtering to discriminate the alpha radiation initiated fluorescence signal from much more intense background lighting. A device called HAUVA (Handheld Alpha UV Application) was built during this work for demonstration purposes. HAUVA utilizes spectral filtering and it is designed to detect alpha emitters from a distance of about 40 cm. Using specially selected room lighting, the device is able to separate 1 kBq alpha emitter from the background lighting with 1 second integration time. (author)

  12. Activation Detection in fMRI Using Jeffrey Divergence

    Seghouane, Abd-Krim

    2009-12-01

    A statistical test for detecting activated pixels in functional MRI (fMRI) data is proposed. For the derivation of this test, the fMRI time series measured at each voxel is modeled as the sum of a response signal which arises due to the experimentally controlled activation-baseline pattern, a nuisance component representing effects of no interest, and Gaussian white noise. The test is based on comparing the dimension of the voxels fMRI time series fitted data models with and without controlled activation-baseline pattern. The Jeffrey divergence is used for this comparison. The test has the advantage of not requiring a level of significance or a threshold to be provided.

  13. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Valls, Laia [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain); Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  14. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  15. Fast and direct detection of neuronal activation with diffusion MRI

    Over the last 30 years functional neuroimaging has emerged as a revolutionary path to study the brain and the mind. This has been possible because of significant advances mainly in two imaging modalities, namely Positron Emission Tomograph y (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Amazingly, although those two modalities are based on radically different physical approaches (detection of 1 3 radioactivity for the first one and nuclear magnetization for the second), both allo w brain activation images to be obtained through measurements involving water molecules. So far, PET and MRI functional imaging have relied on the same principle that neuronal activation and blood flow are coupled through metabolism: Blood flow increases locally in activated brain regions. In the case of PET one uses H2O radioactive water which is produced by using a cyclotron and injected to the subject vasculature. In activated brain regions the increase in blood flow leads to a local increase in the tissue radioactive water content detected and localized by the PE T camera. With MRI the hydrogen nuclei of brain endogenous water molecules are magnetized by a strong external magnetic field. In activated regions the increase in blood flow results in an increase of blood oxygenation which induces a slight perturbation of the magnetization relaxation properties of the water molecules around blood vessels detected by the MRI scanner (so called 'BOLD' effect). I n both approaches water is, thus, merely an indirect means to look at changes in cerebral blood flow which accompany brain activation, and although PET and BOLD f MRI have been extremely successful for the functional neuroimaging community, present well known limitations. While the coupling between neuronal activation, metabolism and blood flow has been verified in most instances including BOLD f MRI, the degree and the mechanism of coupling remains largely debated (Magistratt, Pellerin, Mangia) and may fail in some pathological

  16. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  17. Novel Miniature Spectrometer For Remote Chemical Detection

    total reflectance (ATR)11 spectroscopy. Many diagnostic problems can be solved by ATR methods that are intractable by ordinary methods, but ATR typically lacks sensitivity for ultra-trace chemical detection. In EWCRDS, the ring-down time of a resonator sensitively responds to chemical species present in the evanescent wave thereby combining the advantages of ATR with the sensitivity of CRDS. Furthermore, EW-CRDS forms the basis for a rugged miniature chemical sensor for which the laser source and photodetector can be located remotely by using optical fiber. Work on EW-CRDS began at NIST with the NRC postdoctoral associateship of the current Principal Investigator during fiscal 1996-1997. Since completion of the NRC associateship, work on EW-CRDS has been majority funded through Project 60231, with some additional funding from the Advanced Technology Program (35K/year in 2000)

  18. Novel Miniature Spectrometer for Remote Chemical Detection

    A entirely new class of chemical sensors is being developed that will enable qualitative and quantitative remote, real-time, optical diagnostics of chemical species in hazardous gas, liquid, and semi-solid phases through a completely novel implementation of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The sensor design uses a tiny, solid block (< 1cm3) of ultra-high purity optical material that is fabricated into a regular, planar polygon with a single convex facet to form a total-internal-reflection (TIR) ring minicavity. The lifetime of a light pulse that is injected into the cavity is extremely sensitive to chemical species in contact with the cavity. By using optical fiber to remotely locate the light source and detector, this new technology will permit high-sensitivity, remote chemical sensing with a rugged, cost-effective device

  19. Can hyperspectral remote sensing detect species specific biochemicals?

    Discrimination of a few plants scattered among many plants is a goal common to detection of agricultural weeds and invasive species. Detection of clandestinely grown Cannabis sativa L. is in many ways a special case of weed detection. Remote sensing technology provides an automated, computer based,...

  20. Research on Remote Network Bidirectional Detect and Control Model

    Hongyao Ju

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Remote network bidirectional detect and control technologies are the key factors to solve local network allopatry expansibility and management. With studying gateway integration technology, bidirectional VPN technology, identity authentication technology and dynamic host management technology can be integrated into gateway. Thus, bidirectional connect and control among allopatry local networks based on Internet can be solved. Whole area expansibility of local network is realized. With experiment, the model is proved to finish remote bidirectional interconnection of local network automatically and to obtain allopatry local users authority. The equipment detecting and controlling in remote local networks are realized.  

  1. Unexpected Coexisting Myocardial Infarction Detected by Delayed Enhancement MRI

    Edouard Gerbaud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an unexpected coexisting anterior myocardial infarction detected by delayed enhancement MRI in a 41-year-old man following a presentation with a first episode of chest pain during inferior acute myocardial infarction. This second necrotic area was not initially suspected because there were no ECG changes in the anterior leads and the left descending coronary artery did not present any significant stenoses on emergency coronary angiography. Unrecognised myocardial infarction may carry important prognostic implications. CMR is currently the best imaging technique to detect unexpected infarcts.

  2. Automated detection of periventricular veins on 7 T brain MRI

    Kuijf, Hugo J.; Bouvy, Willem H.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Viergever, Max A.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Vincken, Koen L.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is common in elderly persons and a leading cause of cognitive decline, dementia, and acute stroke. With the introduction of ultra-high field strength 7.0T MRI, it is possible to visualize small vessels in the brain. In this work, a proof-of-principle study is conducted to assess the feasibility of automatically detecting periventricular veins. Periventricular veins are organized in a fan-pattern and drain venous blood from the brain towards the caudate vein of Schlesinger, which is situated along the lateral ventricles. Just outside this vein, a region-of- interest (ROI) through which all periventricular veins must cross is defined. Within this ROI, a combination of the vesselness filter, tubular tracking, and hysteresis thresholding is applied to locate periventricular veins. All detected locations were evaluated by an expert human observer. The results showed a positive predictive value of 88% and a sensitivity of 95% for detecting periventricular veins. The proposed method shows good results in detecting periventricular veins in the brain on 7.0T MR images. Compared to previous works, that only use a 1D or 2D ROI and limited image processing, our work presents a more comprehensive definition of the ROI, advanced image processing techniques to detect periventricular veins, and a quantitative analysis of the performance. The results of this proof-of-principle study are promising and will be used to assess periventricular veins on 7.0T brain MRI.

  3. Ex vivo MRI evaluation of breast tumors: a novel tool for verifying resection of nonpalpable only MRI detected lesions.

    Agresti, Roberto; Trecate, Giovanna; Ferraris, Cristina; Valeri, Barbara; Maugeri, Ilaria; Pellitteri, Cristina; Martelli, Gabriele; Migliavacca, Silvana; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Bohm, Silvia; Maffioli, Lorenzo; Vergnaghi, Daniele; Panizza, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental question in surgery of only magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected breast lesions is to ensure their removal when they are not palpable by clinical examination and surgical exploration. This is especially relevant in the case of small tumors, carcinoma in situ or lobular carcinoma. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled in the study, 21 patients with breast lesions detected by both conventional imaging and breast MRI (bMRI) and 18 patients with bMRI findings only. Preoperative bMRI allowed staging the disease and localizing the lesion. In the operating theater, contrast medium was injected 1 minute before skin incision. After removal, surgical specimens were submitted to ex vivo MRI, performed using a dedicated surface coil and Spair inversion recovery sequences for suppression of fat signal intensity. All MRI enhancing lesions were completely included within the surgical specimen and visualized by ex vivo MRI. In the first 21 patients, bMRI was able to visualize branching margins or satellite nodules around the core lesion, and allowed for better staging of the surrounding in situ carcinoma; in the last 18 patients, eight of whom were breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA) mutation carriers, bMRI identified 12 malignant tumors, otherwise undetectable, that were all visualized by ex vivo MRI. This is the first description of a procedure that re-enhances breast lesions within a surgical specimen, demonstrating the surgical removal of nonpalpable breast lesions diagnosed only with bMRI. This new strategy reproduces the morphology and the entire extension of the primary lesion on the specimen, with potentially better local surgical control, reducing additional unplanned surgery. PMID:24102850

  4. MRI findings of a remote and isolated vaginal metastasis revealing an adenocarcinoma of the mid-sigmoid colon

    A remote vaginal metastasis from a colo-rectal carcinoma is extremely rare. Only few cases have been described in the literature. The radiological appearances of a vaginal metastasis from colon-rectal cancer have not been extensively investigated. We report the MRI findings with clinical and pathological correlations of a remote and isolated vaginal metastasis revealing a mid-sigmoid adenocarcinoma in a 67 years old woman

  5. Target Detection: Remote Sensing Techniques for Defence Applications

    B. B. Chaudhuri

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous development in remote sensing technology in the recent past has opened up new challenges in defence applications. On important area of such applications is in target detection. This paper describes both classical and newly developed approaches to detect the targets by using remotely-sensed digital images. The classical approach includes statistical classification methods and image processing techniques. The new approach deals with a relatively new sensor technology, namely, synthetic aperture radar (SAR systems and fast developing tools, like neural networks and multisource data integration for analysis and interpretation. With SAR images, it is possible to detect targets or features of a target that is otherwise not possible. Neural networks and multisource data integration tools also have a great potential in analysing and interpreting remote sensing data for target detection.

  6. Protein Remote Homology Detection Based on an Ensemble Learning Approach

    Chen, Junjie; Liu, Bingquan; Huang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Protein remote homology detection is one of the central problems in bioinformatics. Although some computational methods have been proposed, the problem is still far from being solved. In this paper, an ensemble classifier for protein remote homology detection, called SVM-Ensemble, was proposed with a weighted voting strategy. SVM-Ensemble combined three basic classifiers based on different feature spaces, including Kmer, ACC, and SC-PseAAC. These features consider the characteristics of proteins from various perspectives, incorporating both the sequence composition and the sequence-order information along the protein sequences. Experimental results on a widely used benchmark dataset showed that the proposed SVM-Ensemble can obviously improve the predictive performance for the protein remote homology detection. Moreover, it achieved the best performance and outperformed other state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27294123

  7. [A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage].

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Kan, Rui-feng; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Li-ming; Yu, Dian-qiang; Dong, Jin-ting; Han, Xiao-lei; Cui, Yi-ben; Liu, Jian-guo

    2012-02-01

    The detection of natural gas pipeline leak becomes a significant issue for body security, environmental protection and security of state property. However, the leak detection is difficult, because of the pipeline's covering many areas, operating conditions and complicated environment. A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage based on scanning wavelength differential absorption spectroscopy (SWDAS) is introduced. The improved soft threshold wavelet denoising was proposed by analyzing the characteristics of reflection spectrum. And the results showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was increased three times. When light intensity is 530 nA, the minimum remote sensitivity will be 80 ppm x m. A widely used SWDAS can make quantitative remote sensing of natural gas leak and locate the leak source precisely in a faster, safer and more intelligent way. PMID:22512213

  8. Detection and size of pulmonary lesions: how accurate is MRI? A prospective comparison of CT and MRI

    Heye, Tobias; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hosch, Waldemar (Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany)), Email: tobias.heye@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Ley, Sebastian (Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging University Health Network, Mount Sinai Hospital and Women' s College Hospital University of Toronto (Canada)); Heussel, Claus Peter (Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Thoraxklinik, University of Heidelberg (Germany)); Dienemann, Hendrik (Department of Thoracic Surgery, Thoraxklinik, University of Heidelberg (Germany)); Libicher, Martin (Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Diakonie Klinikum, Schwaebisch Hall (Germany))

    2012-03-15

    Background. Although CT is the modality of choice for morphological lung imaging, an increasing proportion of chest imaging is performed by MRI due to the utilization of whole-body MRI. Therefore, the diagnostic performance of MRI in reliably detecting pulmonary lesions should be established. Purpose. To investigate the detection rate of pulmonary lesions by MRI that can be expected in a clinical setting and to assess the accuracy of lesion measurement by MRI compared to CT. Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients (median age 66 years) with indication for CT imaging due to suspected thoracic malignancy were prospectively included. Chest MRI performed on the same day as CT, comprised unenhanced TrueFisp, ecg-gated T2-weighted HASTE, T1-weighted VIBE, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, fat-saturated VIBE sequences. MR sequences were evaluated for lesion detection by two readers independently and measurement of lesion size was performed. MR findings were correlated with CT. Results. One hundred and eight pulmonary lesions (20 thoracic malignancies, 88 lung nodules) were detected by CT in 26 patients. Lesions were ruled out in two patients. All thoracic malignancies were identified by MRI with strong correlation (r 0.97-0.99; P < 0.01) in lesion size measurement compared to CT. Unenhanced, T1-weighted VIBE correctly classified 94% of thoracic malignancies into T-stages. Contrast-enhanced, T1-weighted VIBE performed best in identifying 36% of lung nodules, 40% were detected combining unenhanced and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted VIBE. Detection rate increased to 65% for the combined sequences regarding lesions =5 mm. Lesion size measurement by all MR sequences strongly correlated with CT (r = 0.96-0.97; P = 0.01). Conclusion. MRI is as accurate as CT in detection and size measurement of primary thoracic malignancies >1 cm in diameter. If a lung lesion is detected by MRI, it is a reliable finding and its measurement is accurate. CT remains superior in detecting small

  9. Modelling and interpretation of gas detection using remote laser pointers.

    Hodgkinson, Jane; van Well, Ben; Padgett, Miles; Pride, Russ D.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a quantitative model of the performance of laser pointer style gas leak detectors, which are based on remote detection of backscattered radiation. The model incorporates instrumental noise limits, the reflectivity of the target background surface and a mathematical description of gas leak dispersion in constant wind speed and turbulence conditions. We have investigated optimum instrument performance and limits of detection in simulated leak detection situations. We predict t...

  10. Discovery Radiomics for Multi-Parametric MRI Prostate Cancer Detection

    Chung, Audrey G; Kumar, Devinder; Khalvati, Farzad; Haider, Masoom A; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed form of cancer in Canadian men, and is the third leading cause of cancer death. Despite these statistics, prognosis is relatively good with a sufficiently early diagnosis, making fast and reliable prostate cancer detection crucial. As imaging-based prostate cancer screening, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires an experienced medical professional to extensively review the data and perform a diagnosis, radiomics-driven methods help streamline the process and has the potential to significantly improve diagnostic accuracy and efficiency, and thus improving patient survival rates. These radiomics-driven methods currently rely on hand-crafted sets of quantitative imaging-based features, which are selected manually and can limit their ability to fully characterize unique prostate cancer tumour phenotype. In this study, we propose a novel \\textit{discovery radiomics} framework for generating custom radiomic sequences tailored for prostate cancer detection. Discover...

  11. FDG-PET Lacks Sufficient Sensitivity to Detect Myxoid Liposarcoma Spinal Metastases Detected by MRI

    Schwab, Joseph H.; Healey, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To document a case of myxoid liposarcoma in which PET scan was less sensitive than MRI in detecting spinal metastasis. Materials and Methods. The case of a 65-year-old female with a history of myxoid liposarcoma (MLS) of the thigh resected 5 years previously and now presenting with low back pain is presented. Her medical oncologist ordered an FDG-PET scan to evaluate distant recurrence. Subsequently, an MRI of her spine was obtained by her surgeon. Results. The FDG-PET scan was obta...

  12. INVESTIGATION OF REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR AGRICULTURAL FEEDLOT POLLUTION DETECTION

    This research effort was directed toward the application of remote sensing techniques to the detection and monitoring of pollution from cattle feeding operations. Five livestock feeding operations were selected for the study along the James River from Huron to Redfield, South Dak...

  13. Sensitive change detection for remote sensing monitoring of nuclear treaties

    Canty, Morton J.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Schlittenhardt, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    change is a commonplace application in remote sensing, the detection of anthropogenic changes associated with nuclear activities, whether declared or clandestine, presents a difficult challenge. It is necessary to discriminate subtle, often weak signals of interest on a background of irrelevant or...

  14. SQUID-Detected In Vivo MRI at Microtesla Magnetic Fields

    Moble, Michael; Myers, Whittier R; Lee, SeungKyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2005-06-01

    We use a low transition temperature (T{sub c}) Super-conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to perform in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at magnetic fields around 100 microtesla, corresponding to proton Larmor frequencies of about 5 kHz. In such low fields, broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines due to inhomogeneous magnetic fields and susceptibility variations of the sample are minimized, enabling us to obtain high quality images. To reduce environmental noise the signal is detected by a second-order gradiometer, coupled to the SQUID, and the experiment is surrounded by a 3-mm thick Al shield. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we prepolarize the samples in a field up to 100 mT. Three-dimensional images are acquired in less than 6 minutes with a standard spin-echo phase-encoding sequence. Using encoding gradients of {approx}100 {micro}T/m we obtain three-dimensional images of bell peppers with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 8 mm{sup 3}. Our system is ideally suited to acquiring images of small, peripheral parts of the human body such as hands and arms. In vivo images of an arm, acquired at 132 {micro}T, show 24-mm sections of the forearm with a resolution of 3 x 3 mm{sup 2} and a SNR of 10. We discuss possible applications of MRI at these low magnetic fields.

  15. A Survey on Object Detection in Optical Remote Sensing Images

    Cheng, Gong; Han, Junwei

    2016-01-01

    Object detection in optical remote sensing images, being a fundamental but challenging problem in the field of aerial and satellite image analysis, plays an important role for a wide range of applications and is receiving significant attention in recent years. While enormous methods exist, a deep review of the literature concerning generic object detection is still lacking. This paper aims to provide a review of the recent progress in this field. Different from several previously published su...

  16. Two-Dimensional Change Detection Methods Remote Sensing Applications

    Ilsever, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Change detection using remotely sensed images has many applications, such as urban monitoring, land-cover change analysis, and disaster management. This work investigates two-dimensional change detection methods. The existing methods in the literature are grouped into four categories: pixel-based, transformation-based, texture analysis-based, and structure-based. In addition to testing existing methods, four new change detection methods are introduced: fuzzy logic-based, shadow detection-based, local feature-based, and bipartite graph matching-based. The latter two methods form the basis for a

  17. Simulation Study of the Dendritic Effect on Direct MRI Detection of Neural Electric Event

    Hong-Chuan Xiong; Ying-Ling Huang; Zhao-Tong Hu; De-Zhong Yao

    2009-01-01

    Currently hemodynamic-based functional MRI technique is of limitation in temporal resolution.As neural activities in the brain accompany with current induced neuronal magnetic fields (NMF),it is possible to utilize MRI to detect NMF directly thus to improve the temporal resolution.In this work,the contribution of dendrite branch to NMF is investigated by numeric simulation.The results indicate that the existence of dendrite branch may enhance the detectability of NMF by MRI directly.

  18. Detection of Lesions Underlying Intractable Epilepsy on T1-Weighted MRI as an Outlier Detection Problem.

    El Azami, Meriem; Hammers, Alexander; Jung, Julien; Costes, Nicolas; Bouet, Romain; Lartizien, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition methods, such as computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems, can help clinicians in their diagnosis by marking abnormal regions in an image. We propose a machine learning system based on a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) classifier for the detection of abnormalities in magnetic resonance images (MRI) applied to patients with intractable epilepsy. The system learns the features associated with healthy control subjects, allowing a voxelwise assessment of the deviation of a test subject pattern from the learned patterns. While any number of various features can be chosen and learned, here we focus on two texture parameters capturing image patterns associated with epileptogenic lesions on T1-weighted brain MRI e.g. heterotopia and blurred junction between the grey and white matter. The CAD output consists of patient specific 3D maps locating clusters of suspicious voxels ranked by size and degree of deviation from control patterns. System performance was evaluated using realistic simulations of challenging detection tasks as well as clinical data of 77 healthy control subjects and of eleven patients (13 lesions). It was compared to that of a mass univariate statistical parametric mapping (SPM) single subject analysis based on the same set of features. For all simulations, OC-SVM yielded significantly higher values of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and higher sensitivity at low false positive rate. For the clinical data, both OC-SVM and SPM successfully detected 100% of the lesions in the MRI positive cases (3/13). For the MRI negative cases (10/13), OC-SVM detected 7/10 lesions and SPM analysis detected 5/10 lesions. In all experiments, OC-SVM produced fewer false positive detections than SPM. OC-SVM may be a versatile system for unbiased lesion detection. PMID:27603778

  19. Machine learning for real time remote detection

    Labbé, Benjamin; Fournier, Jérôme; Henaff, Gilles; Bascle, Bénédicte; Canu, Stéphane

    2010-10-01

    Infrared systems are key to providing enhanced capability to military forces such as automatic control of threats and prevention from air, naval and ground attacks. Key requirements for such a system to produce operational benefits are real-time processing as well as high efficiency in terms of detection and false alarm rate. These are serious issues since the system must deal with a large number of objects and categories to be recognized (small vehicles, armored vehicles, planes, buildings, etc.). Statistical learning based algorithms are promising candidates to meet these requirements when using selected discriminant features and real-time implementation. This paper proposes a new decision architecture benefiting from recent advances in machine learning by using an effective method for level set estimation. While building decision function, the proposed approach performs variable selection based on a discriminative criterion. Moreover, the use of level set makes it possible to manage rejection of unknown or ambiguous objects thus preserving the false alarm rate. Experimental evidences reported on real world infrared images demonstrate the validity of our approach.

  20. Comparison of Ultrasound and MRI in Detecting Fetal Anomalies

    R Abdi; Majidi, H.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction & Background: Ultrasound (US) and MRI are considered complementary technologies, and MRI is utilized as an adjunct to US in the evaluation of fetal anomalies. Overall ultrasound remains the prime mo-dality for evaluating disorders of the fetus and pregnancy. Ultrasound continues to have several obvious advan-tages over MRI. It is safe and relatively inexpensive and is widely available It also allows for real-time imaging. However, US does have important limitations. First, it...

  1. The Role of Multiparametric MRI in Detection, Localization and Characterization of Prostate Cancer

    Abd Alazeez, M. A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to detect the performance characteristics of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) in patients with clinical suspicion, or previous diagnosis, of prostate cancer. Mp-MRI (index test) comprised of T2-weighted, diffusion weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging. Radiologists used Likert score 1-5 based on the likelihood of the presence of prostate cancer. Concordance was made between results of mp- MRI and template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy (reference standar...

  2. Multiparametric MRI and targeted prostate biopsy: Improvements in cancer detection, localization, and risk assessment

    Bjurlin, Marc A.; Mendhiratta, Neil; Wysock, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality that increases the accurate localization of prostate cancer at the time of MRI targeted biopsy, thereby enhancing clinical risk assessment, and improving the ability to appropriately counsel patients regarding therapy. Material and methods We used MEDLINE/PubMed to conduct a comprehensive search of the English medical literature. Articles were reviewed, data was extracted, analyzed, and summarized. In this review, we discuss the mp-MRI prostate exam, its role in targeted prostate biopsy, along with clinical applications and outcomes of MRI targeted biopsies. Results Mp-MRI, consisting of T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and possibly MR spectroscopy, has demonstrated improved specificity in prostate cancer detection as compared to conventional T2-weighted images alone. An MRI suspicion score has been developed and is depicted using an institutional Likert or, more recently, a standardized reporting scale (PI-RADS). Techniques of MRI-targeted biopsy include in-gantry MRI guided biopsy, TRUS-guided visual estimation biopsy, and software co-registered MRI-US guided biopsy (MRI-US fusion). Among men with no previous biopsy, MRI-US fusion biopsy demonstrates up to a 20% increase in detection of clinically significant cancers compared to systematic biopsy while avoiding a significant portion of low risk disease. These data suggest a potential role in reducing over-detection and, ultimately, over-treatment. Among men with previous negative biopsy, 72–87% of cancers detected by MRI targeted biopsy are clinically significant. Among men with known low risk cancer, repeat biopsy by MR-targeting improves risk stratification in selecting men appropriate for active surveillance secondarily reducing the need for repetitive biopsy during surveillance. Conclusions Use of mp-MRI for targeting prostate biopsies has the potential to reduce the

  3. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  4. MRI脑测谎实验方法学%Brain-Based MRI lie detection experiment methodology

    李文石; 张好; 胡清泉; 苏香; 郭亮

    2006-01-01

    The brain-based MRI lie detection experiment methodology is reviewed for the first time, including the magnetic resonance imaging paradigm,the double-block deign,the equidistance hit-ball and the test mechanice,This paper illustrates the research results of 3D MRI lie detection and the contrastive experiment of otopoint mapping brain signature lie detection,ingeminates the lie-Truth Law(PT/PL ≤0.618)which we get from the statistic of the world MRI reports. The conclusion points out the essence of this technology,its advantages and disadvantages,and the evolution of this methodology.

  5. Remote measurement of microwave distribution based on optical detection

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Chen, Qun, E-mail: redrocks-chenqun@hotmail.com, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn; Xing, Da, E-mail: redrocks-chenqun@hotmail.com, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2016-01-04

    In this letter, we present the development of a remote microwave measurement system. This method employs an arc discharge lamp that serves as an energy converter from microwave to visible light, which can propagate without transmission medium. Observed with a charge coupled device, quantitative microwave power distribution can be achieved when the operators and electronic instruments are in a distance from the high power region in order to reduce the potential risk. We perform the experiments using pulsed microwaves, and the results show that the system response is dependent on the microwave intensity over a certain range. Most importantly, the microwave distribution can be monitored in real time by optical observation of the response of a one-dimensional lamp array. The characteristics of low cost, a wide detection bandwidth, remote measurement, and room temperature operation make the system a preferred detector for microwave applications.

  6. Remote measurement of microwave distribution based on optical detection

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we present the development of a remote microwave measurement system. This method employs an arc discharge lamp that serves as an energy converter from microwave to visible light, which can propagate without transmission medium. Observed with a charge coupled device, quantitative microwave power distribution can be achieved when the operators and electronic instruments are in a distance from the high power region in order to reduce the potential risk. We perform the experiments using pulsed microwaves, and the results show that the system response is dependent on the microwave intensity over a certain range. Most importantly, the microwave distribution can be monitored in real time by optical observation of the response of a one-dimensional lamp array. The characteristics of low cost, a wide detection bandwidth, remote measurement, and room temperature operation make the system a preferred detector for microwave applications.

  7. Remote measurement of microwave distribution based on optical detection

    In this letter, we present the development of a remote microwave measurement system. This method employs an arc discharge lamp that serves as an energy converter from microwave to visible light, which can propagate without transmission medium. Observed with a charge coupled device, quantitative microwave power distribution can be achieved when the operators and electronic instruments are in a distance from the high power region in order to reduce the potential risk. We perform the experiments using pulsed microwaves, and the results show that the system response is dependent on the microwave intensity over a certain range. Most importantly, the microwave distribution can be monitored in real time by optical observation of the response of a one-dimensional lamp array. The characteristics of low cost, a wide detection bandwidth, remote measurement, and room temperature operation make the system a preferred detector for microwave applications

  8. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  9. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    Ohana, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil - Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie B, Strasbourg (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Neurologie, Garches (France); Marty, Catherine; Lazareth, Jean-Philippe [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Rhumatologie, Garches (France); Maisonobe, Thierry [APH-HP - Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Neuropathologie, Paris (France); Mompoint, Dominique; Carlier, Robert-Yves [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2014-08-15

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of Ultrasound and MRI in Detecting Fetal Anomalies

    R. Abdi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Ultrasound (US and MRI are considered complementary technologies, and MRI is utilized as an adjunct to US in the evaluation of fetal anomalies. Overall ultrasound remains the prime mo-dality for evaluating disorders of the fetus and pregnancy. Ultrasound continues to have several obvious advan-tages over MRI. It is safe and relatively inexpensive and is widely available It also allows for real-time imaging. However, US does have important limitations. First, it is uniquely operator-and interpreter-dependent. In ad-dition, compared to MRI, US provides a smaller field-of-view, and the resolution of US images is restricted by penetration through soft tissues and bone. Thus, the sensitivity of US in evaluating the fetus is reduced in obese patients and in women whose pregnancies are complicated by low amniotic fluid volume. There is a growing body of literature on the use of MRI and has documented its usefulness in confirming or expanding upon US findings. On the contrary, MRI visualization of the fetus is not significantly limited by maternal obe-sity, fetal position, or oligohydramnios, and visualization of the brain is not restricted by the ossified skull. It provides superior soft-tissue contrast resolution and the ability to distinguish individual structures such as lung, liver, kidney, bowel, and gray and white matter. Patients & Methods: In this study, patients in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy were recruited on the basis of abnormal fetal US results within 2 days of MR imaging by another radiologist. Results: In some cases such as anencephaly which is associated with polyhydraminous or in multicystic dys-plastic kidney disease, MRI added no more information to ultrasonography; but in the following cases MRI had more data. In a fetus with bilateral hydronephrosis, MRI could differentiate PUV from UPJ stenosis by visualizing distention of the ureters. MRI allowed better depiction of complex anomalies

  11. fMRI activation detection with EEG priors

    Kalus, Stefanie; Sämann, Philipp; Czisch, Michael; Fahrmeir, Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of brain mapping techniques is to advance the understanding of the relationship between structure and function in the human brain in so-called activation studies. In this work, an advanced statistical model for combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings is developed to fuse complementary information about the location of neuronal activity. More precisely, a new Bayesian method is proposed for enhancing fMRI activation detecti...

  12. Underwater remote detection and monitoring of spilled Orimulsion using sonar

    An accidental spill of Orimulsion on water presents special challenges because the Orimulsion will go into suspension as microscopic surfactant coated bitumen particles in the first 2-3 metres below the water surface. This makes it difficult to detect and monitor the plume. Fleming Co. Environmental examined the potential use of sonar for the underwater remote detection and monitoring of spilled Orimulsion in a small-scale saltwater tank test in Denmark. For the test, a sonar was placed 0.75 m below the water surface at one end of the tank. Acoustic measurements showed that a gradually spreading cloud containing only 5.6 liters of hydrocarbon particles could be detected from 17 meters away in a body of 180,000 liters, even when the sonar was functioning at only 6 per cent of its full power. These positive results may lead to further tank testing or offshore testing in Venezuela. 4 refs., 9 figs

  13. Clever eye algorithm for target detection of remote sensing imagery

    Geng, Xiurui; Ji, Luyan; Sun, Kang

    2016-04-01

    Target detection algorithms for hyperspectral remote sensing imagery, such as the two most commonly used remote sensing detection algorithms, the constrained energy minimization (CEM) and matched filter (MF), can usually be attributed to the inner product between a weight filter (or detector) and a pixel vector. CEM and MF have the same expression except that MF requires data centralization first. However, this difference leads to a difference in the target detection results. That is to say, the selection of the data origin could directly affect the performance of the detector. Therefore, does there exist another data origin other than the zero and mean-vector points for a better target detection performance? This is a very meaningful issue in the field of target detection, but it has not been paid enough attention yet. In this study, we propose a novel objective function by introducing the data origin as another variable, and the solution of the function is corresponding to the data origin with the minimal output energy. The process of finding the optimal solution can be vividly regarded as a clever eye automatically searching the best observing position and direction in the feature space, which corresponds to the largest separation between the target and background. Therefore, this new algorithm is referred to as the clever eye algorithm (CE). Based on the Sherman-Morrison formula and the gradient ascent method, CE could derive the optimal target detection result in terms of energy. Experiments with both synthetic and real hyperspectral data have verified the effectiveness of our method.

  14. A survey on object detection in optical remote sensing images

    Cheng, Gong; Han, Junwei

    2016-07-01

    Object detection in optical remote sensing images, being a fundamental but challenging problem in the field of aerial and satellite image analysis, plays an important role for a wide range of applications and is receiving significant attention in recent years. While enormous methods exist, a deep review of the literature concerning generic object detection is still lacking. This paper aims to provide a review of the recent progress in this field. Different from several previously published surveys that focus on a specific object class such as building and road, we concentrate on more generic object categories including, but are not limited to, road, building, tree, vehicle, ship, airport, urban-area. Covering about 270 publications we survey (1) template matching-based object detection methods, (2) knowledge-based object detection methods, (3) object-based image analysis (OBIA)-based object detection methods, (4) machine learning-based object detection methods, and (5) five publicly available datasets and three standard evaluation metrics. We also discuss the challenges of current studies and propose two promising research directions, namely deep learning-based feature representation and weakly supervised learning-based geospatial object detection. It is our hope that this survey will be beneficial for the researchers to have better understanding of this research field.

  15. Mineralogy and Astrobiology Detection Using Laser Remote Sensing Instrument

    Abedin, M. Nurul; Bradley, Arthur T.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Lucey, Paul G.; Mckay, Chistopher P.; Ismail, Syed; Sandford, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    A multispectral instrument based on Raman, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and a lidar system provides high-fidelity scientific investigations, scientific input, and science operation constraints in the context of planetary field campaigns with the Jupiter Europa Robotic Lander and Mars Sample Return mission opportunities. This instrument conducts scientific investigations analogous to investigations anticipated for missions to Mars and Jupiter's icy moons. This combined multispectral instrument is capable of performing Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy out to a >100 m target distance from the rover system and provides single-wavelength atmospheric profiling over long ranges (>20 km). In this article, we will reveal integrated remote Raman, LIF, and lidar technologies for use in robotic and lander-based planetary remote sensing applications. Discussions are focused on recently developed Raman, LIF, and lidar systems in addition to emphasizing surface water ice, surface and subsurface minerals, organics, biogenic, biomarker identification, atmospheric aerosols and clouds distributions, i.e., near-field atmospheric thin layers detection for next robotic-lander based instruments to measure all the above-mentioned parameters. OCIS codes: (120.0280) Remote sensing and sensors; (130.0250) Optoelectronics; (280.3640) Lidar; (300.2530) Fluorescence, laser-induced; (300.6450) Spectroscopy, Raman; (300.6365) Spectroscopy, laser induced breakdown

  16. Preoperative detection of colorectal liver metastases in fatty liver: MDCT or MRI?

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative detection of colorectal liver metastases in diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver, associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Materials and methods: Twenty preoperative tri-phasic MDCT (4-64-row, Siemens) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (1.5 T or 3.0 T, Siemens) examinations of patients with colorectal cancer and liver metastases in diffuse steatosis were retrospectively evaluated. All patients underwent surgical resection for liver metastases (time interval 1-60 days). The amount of fatty infiltration of the liver was determined histopathologically by semi-quantitative percent-wise estimation and ranged from 25 to 75%. Results: Overall, 51 metastases were found by histopathology of the resected liver segments/lobes. The size of the metastases ranged from 0.4 to 13 cm, with 18 (35%) being up to 1 cm in diameter. In the overall rating, MDCT detected 33/51 lesions (65%), and MRI 45/51 (88%). For lesions up to 1 cm, MDCT detected only 2/18 (11%) and MRI 12/18 (66%). One false positive lesion was detected by MDCT. Statistical analysis showed that MRI is markedly superior to MDCT, with a statistically significant difference (p 1 cm. Conclusion: For the detection of colorectal liver metastases after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and consecutive diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver, MRI is superior to MDCT, especially for the detection of small lesions.

  17. Can breast MRI computer-aided detection (CAD) improve radiologist accuracy for lesions detected at MRI screening and recommended for biopsy in a high-risk population?

    Arazi-Kleinman, T., E-mail: t_arazikleinman@yahoo.co [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Causer, P.A.; Jong, R.A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Hill, K.; Warner, E. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2009-12-15

    Aim: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) computer-aided detection (CAD) for breast MRI screen-detected lesions recommended for biopsy in a high-risk population. Material and methods: Fifty-six consecutive Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 3-5 lesions with histopathological correlation [nine invasive cancers, 13 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 34 benign] were retrospectively evaluated using a breast MRI CAD prototype (CAD-Gaea). CAD evaluation was performed separately and in consensus by two radiologists specializing in breast imaging, blinded to the histopathology. Thresholds of 50, 80, and 100% and delayed enhancement were independently assessed with CAD. Lesions were rated as malignant or benign according to threshold and delayed enhancement only and in combination. Sensitivities, specificities, and negative predictive values (NPV) were determined for CAD assessments versus pathology. Initial MRI BI-RADS interpretation without CAD versus CAD assessments were compared using paired binary diagnostic tests. Results: Threshold levels for lesion enhancement were: 50% to include all malignant (and all benign) lesions; and 100% for all invasive cancer and high-grade DCIS. Combined use of threshold and enhancement patterns for CAD assessment was best (73% sensitivity, 56% specificity and 76% NPV for all cancer). Sensitivities and NPV were better for invasive cancer (100%/100%) than for all malignancies (54%/76%). Radiologists' MRI interpretation was more sensitive than CAD (p = 0.05), but less specific (p = 0.001) for cancer detection. Conclusion: The breast MRI CAD system used could not improve the radiologists' accuracy for distinguishing all malignant from benign lesions, due to the poor sensitivity for DCIS detection.

  18. Detecting neighborhood vacancy level in Detroit city using remote sensing

    Li, X.; Wang, R.; Yang, A.; Vojnovic, I.

    2015-12-01

    With the decline of manufacturing industries, many Rust Belt cities, which enjoyed prosperity in the past, are now suffering from financial stress, population decrease and urban poverty. As a consequence, urban neighborhoods deteriorate. Houses are abandoned and left to decay. Neighborhood vacancy brings on many problems. Governments and agencies try to survey the vacancy level by going through neighborhoods and record the condition of each structure, or by buying information of active mailing addresses to get approximate neighborhood vacancy rate. But these methods are expensive and time consuming. Remote sensing provides a quick and comparatively cost-efficient way to access spatial information on social and demographical attributes of urban area. In our study, we use remote sensing to detect a major aspect of neighborhood deterioration, the vacancy levels of neighborhoods in Detroit city. We compared different neighborhoods using Landsat 8 images in 2013. We calculated NDVI that indicates the greenness of neighborhoods with the image in July 2013. Then we used thermal infrared information from image in February to detect human activities. In winter, abandoned houses will not consume so much energy and therefore neighborhoods with more abandoned houses will have smaller urban heat island effect. Controlling for the differences in terms of the greenness obtained from summer time image, we used thermal infrared from winter image to determine the temperatures of urban surface. We find that hotter areas are better maintained and have lower house vacancy rates. We also compared the changes over time for neighborhoods using Landsat 7 images from 2003 to 2013. The results show that deteriorated neighborhoods have increased NDVI in summer and get colder in winter due to abandonment of houses. Our results show the potential application of remote sensing as an easily accessed and efficient way to obtain data about social conditions in cities. We used the neighborhood

  19. A remote fiber optic dosimeter network for detecting hydrazine vapor

    A fiber optic chemical dosimeter has been developed for use in the remote detection of vapors of toxic amine rocket fuels (hydrazine and its substituted derivatives) that are used as Air Force and civilian launch sites. The dosimeter employs a colorimetric indicating reagent immobilized in a porous sol-gel cladding on multimode fiber. This reagent reacts selectively with the fuel vapor to produce a strongly absorbing cladding that introduces light propagation losses in the fiber; these losses indicate the presence of hydrazine (N2H4) vapor. The absorption occurs over a broad spectral range ideally suited for interrogation by semiconductor diode lasers. The authors have shown that the dosimeter yields an average hydrazine detectivity of 2.3 exposures of the dosimeter to laboratory air have not adversely affected the dosimeter. Additionally, its response to ammonia vapor has been determined to be 9,200 times smaller than its response to hydrazine vapor

  20. An approach to the detection of underwater remote target

    CHEN Xixin; JIANG Guojian; XU Xinsheng; XU Xinsheng

    2004-01-01

    An approach to the detection of underwater remote target by estimating its backscattering coefficient is presented. The key to this approach is that the echo signal is represented in state-variable model and the back-scattering coefficients of target are contained in dynamic noise of this model, thus underwater target can be detected by estimating this dynamic noise,i.e., deconvolving this model. When all noise statistics are a priori known, an optimum deconvolution algorithm based on the optimum state filter is derived, or else, an adaptive deconvolution algorithm based on the adaptive state filter of alternatively estimating the vector state and the noise statistics is developed. In the final simulation test, an echo signal with SNR equal to -6.1 dB is proceeded using the aforementioned two deconvolution algorithms, respectively, and the results demonstrate good performance of the approach.

  1. Pathophysiological changes detected by MRI within 24 hours after head injury

    This report concerns the evaluation of the usefulness of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with head injuries. For this purpose we compared the CT and MRI results obtained on 48 such patients. MRI of all cases was taken within 24 hours after head injury using a 1.5-Tesla unit. The sensitivity of the two modalities in the detection of small traumatic lesions was compared. Traumatic lesions of 23 patients (47.9%) were not detected by CT, but they were demonstrated on MRI. Overall, MRI was significantly more sensitive than CT in detecting early and/or subtle traumatic changes of the brain parenchyma (P1-WI and T2-WI. (B) Corpus callosum lesions with hyperintensity on T2-WI were in fact hemorrhagic contusions by signal changes on sequential MRI. The follow-up of chronological changes of a given corpus callosum lesion was essential for confirmation of its pathology. (C) In one case, scratch-like lesions with strong hypointensity on T1-WI and hyperintensity on T2-WI were clearly demonstrated in the white matter. These observations appeared to indicate axonal damages. (D) Even if initial GCS score is low (2-WI and subsequently disappeared completely. We conclude that performing MRI in the early stage of a head injury is of utility for the understanding of pertinent pathophysiological changes and for predicting outcome. (author)

  2. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using MRI hippocampal texture

    Sørensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; Igel, Christian; Hansen, Naja Liv;

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with reduction in hippocampal volume in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is unknown whether hippocampal texture changes in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) that does not have a change in...... hippocampal volume. We tested the hypothesis that hippocampal texture has association to early cognitive loss beyond that of volumetric changes. The texture marker was trained and evaluated using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, and subsequently...

  3. MRI Detects Myocardial Iron in the Human Heart

    Ghugre, Nilesh R; Enriquez, Cathleen M.; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Nelson, Marvin D.; Coates, Thomas D.; Wood, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Iron-induced cardiac dysfunction is a leading cause of death in transfusion-dependent anemia. MRI relaxation rates R2(1/T2) and R2∗(1∕T2∗) accurately predict liver iron concentration, but their ability to predict cardiac iron has been challenged by some investigators. Studies in animal models support similar R2 and R2∗ behavior with heart and liver iron, but human studies are lacking. To determine the relationship between MRI relaxivities and cardiac iron, regional variations in R2 and R2∗ we...

  4. Clinical MRI for iron detection in Parkinson's disease.

    Rossi, Maija; Ruottinen, Hanna; Soimakallio, Seppo; Elovaara, Irina; Dastidar, Prasun

    2013-01-01

    We studied nonheme iron in Parkinson's disease (PD) using clinically available MRI in 36 patients and 21 healthy volunteers. The subjects underwent thorough clinical investigation, including 3-T MRI. Quantitative R2* was able to reflect symptoms of PD. In addition, the clinically used susceptibility-weighted imaging differentiated between controls and patients, whereas T2-weighted imaging did not. Disease-related changes were present not only in substantia nigra but also in globus pallidus. Such changes are associated with neurodegeneration, reflecting the severity of motor impairment. PMID:23522789

  5. Management of breast lesions detectable only on MRI; Abklaerung ausschliesslich MRT-detektierbarer Mammalaesionen

    Siegmann-Luz, K.C.; Bahrs, S.D.; Preibsch, H.; Hattermann, V.; Claussen, C.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2014-01-15

    Breast MR imaging has become established as the most sensitive imaging method for diagnosing breast cancer. As a result of the increasing examination volume and improved image quality, the number of breast lesions detected only on MRI and requiring further clarification has risen in recent years. According to the S3-guideline 'Diagnosis, Therapy, and Follow-Up of Breast Cancer' as revised in July 2012, institutions performing breast MRI should provide the option of an MRI-guided intervention for clarification. This review describes the indications, methods and results of MRI-guided interventions for the clarification of breast lesions only visible on MRI. Recent guidelines and study results are also addressed and alternative methods and pitfalls are presented. (orig.)

  6. Detection of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by cardiovascular MRI

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in identifying apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods: Sixty-five patients with typical apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (T-AHCM), 51 patients with pre-apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (P-AHCM)and 26 normal controls were confirmed by cMRI. All cases underwent electrocardiogram and echocardiography, of which 16 and 34 cases were studied by radionuclide 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT myocardial scanning and coronary angiography plus left ventriculography, respectively. Results: cMRI confirmed all patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but echocardiography missed 96 cases. Two chamber and four chamber views of cine-cMRI were considered as the best position to show detailed structure of cardiac apex. Forty-seven cases showed spade-like configuration of left ventricular cavity in T-AHCM group, but only 15 patients in P-AHCM group presented the same character. T-AHCM group showed higher apical thickness and ratio of the apical wall thickness to that at basal level than P-AHCM group(18.6±2.7) mm vs (13.6±1.0) mm, 2.2±0.5 vs 1.6±0.3, P<0.05), and the ratios of both T-AHCM group and P-AHCM group were significantly higher than that of control group (9.5±1.7) mm, 1.1±0.1, P<0.05). Hypertrophic wall thickening was lesser in T-AHCM group than in P-AHCM group, while the values of both T-AHCM group and P-AHCM group were significantly lesser than that of control one. Conclusion: MRI is the best diagnostic modality for AHCM, which is highly accurate and better than echocardiography, especially for the diagnosis of mild hypertrophy in the early stage. (authors)

  7. Accuracy of [18F]FDG PET/MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastases.

    Karsten Beiderwellen

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of [18F]FDG-PET/MRI with PET/CT for the detection of liver metastases.32 patients with solid malignancies underwent [18F]FDG-PET/CT and subsequent PET/MRI of the liver. Two readers assessed both datasets regarding lesion characterization (benign, indeterminate, malignant, conspicuity and diagnostic confidence. An imaging follow-up (mean interval: 185±92 days and/-or histopathological specimen served as standards of reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV were calculated for both modalities. Accuracy was determined by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. Values of conspicuity and diagnostic confidence were compared using Wilcoxon-signed-rank test.The standard of reference revealed 113 liver lesions in 26 patients (malignant: n = 45; benign: n = 68. For PET/MRI a higher accuracy (PET/CT: 82.4%; PET/MRI: 96.1%; p<0.001 as well as sensitivity (67.8% vs. 92.2%, p<0.01 and NPV (82.0% vs. 95.1%, p<0.05 were observed. PET/MRI offered higher lesion conspicuity (PET/CT: 2.0±1.1 [median: 2; range 0-3]; PET/MRI: 2.8±0.5 [median: 3; range 0-3]; p<0.001 and diagnostic confidence (PET/CT: 2.0±0.8 [median: 2; range: 1-3]; PET/MRI 2.6±0.6 [median: 3; range: 1-3]; p<0.001. Furthermore, PET/MRI enabled the detection of additional PET-negative metastases (reader 1: 10; reader 2: 12.PET/MRI offers higher diagnostic accuracy compared to PET/CT for the detection of liver metastases.

  8. Satellite Remote Sensing Detection of Wastewater Plumes in Southern California

    Trinh, R. C.; Holt, B.; Pan, B. J.; Rains, C.; Gierach, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Wastewater discharged through ocean outfalls can surface near coastlines and beaches, posing a threat to the marine environment and human health. Coastal waters of the Southern California Bight (SCB) are an ecologically important marine habitat and a valuable resource in terms of commercial fishing and recreation. Two of the largest wastewater treatment plants along the U.S. West Coast discharge into the SCB, including the Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant (HWTP) and the Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD). In 2006, HWTP conducted an internal inspection of its primary 8 km outfall pipe (60 m depth), diverting treated effluent to a shorter 1.2 km pipe (18 m depth) from Nov. 28 to Nov. 30. From Sep. 11 - Oct. 4, 2012, OCSD conducted a similar diversion, diverting effluent from their 7 km outfall pipe to a shallower 2.2 km pipe, both with similar depths to HWTP. Prevailing oceanographic conditions in the SCB, such as temporally reduced stratification and surface circulation patterns, increased the risk of effluent being discharged from these shorter and shallower pipes surfacing and moving onshore. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capabilities of satellite remote sensing data (i.e., sea surface roughness from SAR, sea surface temperature from MODIS-Aqua and ASTER-Terra, chlorophyll-a and water leaving radiance from MODIS-Aqua) in the identification and tracking of wastewater plumes during the 2006 HWTP and 2012 OCSD diversion events. Satellite observations were combined with in situ, wind, and current data taken during the diversion events, to validate remote sensing techniques and gain surface to subsurface context of the nearshore diversion events. Overall, it was found that satellite remote sensing data were able to detect surfaced wastewater plumes along the coast, providing key spatial information that could inform in situ field sampling during future diversion events, such as the planned 2015 HWTP diversion, and thereby constrain costs.

  9. Building multiclass classifiers for remote homology detection and fold recognition

    Karypis George

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein remote homology detection and fold recognition are central problems in computational biology. Supervised learning algorithms based on support vector machines are currently one of the most effective methods for solving these problems. These methods are primarily used to solve binary classification problems and they have not been extensively used to solve the more general multiclass remote homology prediction and fold recognition problems. Results We present a comprehensive evaluation of a number of methods for building SVM-based multiclass classification schemes in the context of the SCOP protein classification. These methods include schemes that directly build an SVM-based multiclass model, schemes that employ a second-level learning approach to combine the predictions generated by a set of binary SVM-based classifiers, and schemes that build and combine binary classifiers for various levels of the SCOP hierarchy beyond those defining the target classes. Conclusion Analyzing the performance achieved by the different approaches on four different datasets we show that most of the proposed multiclass SVM-based classification approaches are quite effective in solving the remote homology prediction and fold recognition problems and that the schemes that use predictions from binary models constructed for ancestral categories within the SCOP hierarchy tend to not only lead to lower error rates but also reduce the number of errors in which a superfamily is assigned to an entirely different fold and a fold is predicted as being from a different SCOP class. Our results also show that the limited size of the training data makes it hard to learn complex second-level models, and that models of moderate complexity lead to consistently better results.

  10. MRI in the evaluation of spina bifida patients in the remote period after meningomyelocele repair

    MRI was performed on 22 patients ranging in age from 3 months to 16 years who had closure of their meningomyelocele shortly after birth. These patients had developed new clinical findings suggestive of spinal cord dysfunction. MRI showed low placement of the spinal cord in all 22. Six patients had lipomas, five had diastematomyelia and six had hydromyelia. Four patients had an obviously dysplastic terminal cord. (orig.)

  11. MRI in the evaluation of spina bifida patients in the remote period after meningomyelocele repair

    Williamson, M.R.; Glasier, C.M.; Chadduck, W.M.; Angtuaco, E.J.C.; Binet, E.F.

    1989-07-01

    MRI was performed on 22 patients ranging in age from 3 months to 16 years who had closure of their meningomyelocele shortly after birth. These patients had developed new clinical findings suggestive of spinal cord dysfunction. MRI showed low placement of the spinal cord in all 22. Six patients had lipomas, five had diastematomyelia and six had hydromyelia. Four patients had an obviously dysplastic terminal cord. (orig.).

  12. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by two different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    Duer-Jensen, A.; Vestergaard, A.; Dohn, U.M.;

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the ability of two different dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) units and conventional radiography (CR) for identifying bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints. Methods: CR and two MRI examinations (using 0.2 T Esaote Artoscan and 0...... 15.8% of large erosions in wrists. Conclusions: Both E-MRI units detected more erosions than CR, in particular due to a higher sensitivity in metacarpal heads and carpal bones. The MagneVu unit detected fewer erosions than the Artoscan unit due to a lower average image quality and a smaller.......2 T portable MagneVu MV1000 units) of 418 bones in the dominant wrist and second to fifth MCP joints of 15 patients with RA and 4 healthy controls were performed and evaluated blindly for bones being visible and for erosions. Results: In MCP joints, MagneVu visualised 18.5% of bones entirely and 71...

  13. First results of ground-based LWIR hyperspectral imaging remote gas detection

    Zheng, Wei-jian; Lei, Zheng-gang; Yu, Chun-chao; Wang, Hai-yang; Fu, Yan-peng; Liao, Ning-fang; Su, Jun-hong

    2014-11-01

    The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented. The LWIR hyperspectral imaging by using the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy, and the results of outdoor ether gas detection, verify the features of LWIR hyperspectral imaging remote sensing and technical approach. It provides a new technical means for ground-based gas remote sensing.

  14. Second-look ultrasonography for MRI-detected suspicious breast lesions in patients with breast cancer

    Min Ji Hong; Joo Hee Cha; Hak Hee Kim; Hee Jung Shin; Eun Young Chae; Ji Eun Shin; Woo Jung Choi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of second-look ultrasonography (US) for investigating additional suspicious lesions detected on preoperative staging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for breast cancer. Methods: Between September 2008 and August 2010, 1,970 breast MRIs were performed at our medical institution for the evaluation of breast cancer before surgery. Second-look US was recommended for 135 patients with 149 suspicious lesions, following the MRI interpretation...

  15. The accuracy of MRI in the detection of Lumbar Disc Containment

    Weiner Bradley K; Patel Rikin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background MRI has proven to be an extremely valuable tool in the assessment of normal and pathological spinal anatomy. Accordingly, it is commonly used to assess containment of discal material by the outer fibers of the anulus fibrosus and posterior longitudinal ligaments. Determination of such containment is important to determine candidacy for intradiscal techniques and has prognostic significance. The accuracy of MRI in detecting containment has been insufficiently documented. Me...

  16. Time resolved optical detection for white matter lesion detection: preclinical tests on macaque brains and MRI co-registration

    Planat-Chrétien, A.; Berger, M.; Hervé, L.; Watroba, L.; Demilly, J.; Flament, J.; Stimmer, L.; Aubourg, P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a preclinical assessment on young macaques aimed at detecting white matter lesions. We present the protocol we implemented to achieve the lesions detection using a bedside non-invasive optical-based Time-Resolved instrumentation we have optimized for this purpose. We validated the reconstructed 3D absorption map with co-registration of MRI data.

  17. MRI detected prevalence of abnormalities in patients of knee pain

    Ritu Mehta

    2015-10-01

    Results: In this present study 72% patients were males and 28% patients females and their ages ranging from (11-80 years. Knee pain was found common in age group 31-40 years. Menisci lesions (44% were more common as compared to ligament lesions (14% in patients of knee pain. Osteoarthritis was found in 40 % of patients of knee pain. Joint effusion and marrow edema was found with incidence of 74% and 62% respectively. 4% patients were suffering from intraarticular tumors. Conclusions: Knee pain can occur at any stage of life due to various causative factors. MRI can demonstrate the exact nature and extent of bony as well as soft tissue abnormality. This has increase the use of MRI in evaluation of patients of knee pain. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(10.000: 2572-2575

  18. Remote Detection of Iodine By using Differential Absorption Lidar

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is frequently used for atmospheric gas monitoring to detect impurities such as nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, iodine, and ozone. In this paper, DIAL technique of using remote sensing experiment is performed in the previous step. Radioactive iodine emitted by nuclear plants, however, is not frequently measured using DIAL because of the difficulty in preparing samples and its dangerous characteristics. In this paper, we configurated the DIAL system in our laboratory. A head detect the iodine gas of air and detect the iodine gas of cell in the distance of 90m. To lock the frequency of Nd:YAG laser, the iodine cell was used for discriminator. We acquired the signals from iodine cell by various frequency locking ratio that were from 0.1 to 0.9 by steps of 0.1. In the paper, we confirmed that the signals from the iodine target cell was proportional to the frequency locking ratio of the laser. For the iodine measurement, the transmission ratio using the injection-seeded laser is locked to 0.9 (off line) and 0.1 (on line) on the edges of the iodine absorption line to stabilize the frequency. The DIAL measurements were performed using a target iodine cell in the laboratory. We confirmed that the on- to off-line ratio decreased after the laser passed through the iodine cell

  19. Preoperative detection of colorectal liver metastases in fatty liver: MDCT or MRI?

    Kulemann, Vanessa, E-mail: vanessa.kulemann@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Schima, Wolfgang [KH Goettlicher Heiland, Vienna (Austria); Tamandl, Dietmar; Kaczirek, Klaus; Gruenberger, Thomas [Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Wrba, Friedrich [Department of Pathology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative detection of colorectal liver metastases in diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver, associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Materials and methods: Twenty preoperative tri-phasic MDCT (4-64-row, Siemens) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (1.5 T or 3.0 T, Siemens) examinations of patients with colorectal cancer and liver metastases in diffuse steatosis were retrospectively evaluated. All patients underwent surgical resection for liver metastases (time interval 1-60 days). The amount of fatty infiltration of the liver was determined histopathologically by semi-quantitative percent-wise estimation and ranged from 25 to 75%. Results: Overall, 51 metastases were found by histopathology of the resected liver segments/lobes. The size of the metastases ranged from 0.4 to 13 cm, with 18 (35%) being up to 1 cm in diameter. In the overall rating, MDCT detected 33/51 lesions (65%), and MRI 45/51 (88%). For lesions up to 1 cm, MDCT detected only 2/18 (11%) and MRI 12/18 (66%). One false positive lesion was detected by MDCT. Statistical analysis showed that MRI is markedly superior to MDCT, with a statistically significant difference (p < .001), particularly for the detection of small lesions ({<=}1 cm; p < .004). There was no significant difference between the two modalities in the detection of lesions > 1 cm. Conclusion: For the detection of colorectal liver metastases after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and consecutive diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver, MRI is superior to MDCT, especially for the detection of small lesions.

  20. Visual Detection and Identification Are Not the Same: Evidence from Psychophysics and fMRI

    Straube, Sirko; Fahle, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    Sometimes object detection as opposed to identification is sufficient to initiate the appropriate action. To explore the neural origin of behavioural differences between the two tasks, we combine psychophysical measurements and fMRI, specifically contrasting shape detection versus identification of a figure. This figure consisted of Gabor elements…

  1. A comprehensive system for evaluation of remote sequence similarity detection

    Kim Bong-Hyun

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate and sensitive performance evaluation is crucial for both effective development of better structure prediction methods based on sequence similarity, and for the comparative analysis of existing methods. Up to date, there has been no satisfactory comprehensive evaluation method that (i is based on a large and statistically unbiased set of proteins with clearly defined relationships; and (ii covers all performance aspects of sequence-based structure predictors, such as sensitivity and specificity, alignment accuracy and coverage, and structure template quality. Results With the aim of designing such a method, we (i select a statistically balanced set of divergent protein domains from SCOP, and define similarity relationships for the majority of these domains by complementing the best of information available in SCOP with a rigorous SVM-based algorithm; and (ii develop protocols for the assessment of similarity detection and alignment quality from several complementary perspectives. The evaluation of similarity detection is based on ROC-like curves and includes several complementary approaches to the definition of true/false positives. Reference-dependent approaches use the 'gold standard' of pre-defined domain relationships and structure-based alignments. Reference-independent approaches assess the quality of structural match predicted by the sequence alignment, with respect to the whole domain length (global mode or to the aligned region only (local mode. Similarly, the evaluation of alignment quality includes several reference-dependent and -independent measures, in global and local modes. As an illustration, we use our benchmark to compare the performance of several methods for the detection of remote sequence similarities, and show that different aspects of evaluation reveal different properties of the evaluated methods, highlighting their advantages, weaknesses, and potential for further development. Conclusion The

  2. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  3. REMOTE DETECTION OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES USING MILLIMETER WAVE TECHNOLOGY

    Barnowski, R.; Chien; H.; Gopalsami, N.

    2009-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, a common method for manufacturing weapons-grade special nuclear materials, is accompanied by the release of fi ssion products trapped within the fuel. One of these fi ssion products is a radioactive isotope of Krypton (Kr-85); a pure β- emitter with a half-life of 10.72 years. Due to its chemical neutrality and relatively long half life, nearly all of the Kr-85 is released into the surrounding air during reprocessing, resulting in a concentration of Kr-85 near the source that is several orders of magnitude higher than the typical background (atmospheric) concentrations. This high concentration of Kr-85 is accompanied by a proportionately high increase in air ionization due to the release of beta radiation from Kr-85 decay. Millimeter wave (MMW) sensing technology can be used to detect the presence of Kr-85 induced plumes since a high concentration of ions in the air increases the radar cross section due to a combination of atmospheric phenomena. Possible applications for this technology include the remote sensing of reprocessing activities across national borders bolstering global anti-proliferation initiatives. The feasibility of using MMW radar technology to uniquely detect the presence of Kr-85 can be tested using commercial ion generators or sealed radioactive sources in the laboratory. In this paper we describe our work to derive an ion dispersion model that will describe the spatial distribution of ions from Kr-85 and other common lab sources. The types and energies of radiation emitted by isotopes Co-60 and Cs-137 were researched, and these parameters were incorporated into these dispersion models. Our results can be compared with the results of MMW detection experiments in order to quantify the relationship between radar cross section and air ionization as well as to further calibrate the MMW detection equipment.

  4. Computer-aided Detection of Prostate Cancer with MRI: Technology and Applications.

    Liu, Lizhi; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Fei, Baowei

    2016-08-01

    One in six men will develop prostate cancer in his lifetime. Early detection and accurate diagnosis of the disease can improve cancer survival and reduce treatment costs. Recently, imaging of prostate cancer has greatly advanced since the introduction of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). Mp-MRI consists of T2-weighted sequences combined with functional sequences including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging. Because of the big data and variations in imaging sequences, detection can be affected by multiple factors such as observer variability and visibility and complexity of the lesions. To improve quantitative assessment of the disease, various computer-aided detection systems have been designed to help radiologists in their clinical practice. This review paper presents an overview of literatures on computer-aided detection of prostate cancer with mp-MRI, which include the technology and its applications. The aim of the survey is threefold: an introduction for those new to the field, an overview for those working in the field, and a reference for those searching for literature on a specific application. PMID:27133005

  5. Assessing the sensitivity of diffusion MRI to detect neuronal activity directly.

    Bai, Ruiliang; Stewart, Craig V; Plenz, Dietmar; Basser, Peter J

    2016-03-22

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is widely used to study brain function in the neurosciences. Unfortunately, conventional fMRI only indirectly assesses neuronal activity via hemodynamic coupling. Diffusion fMRI was proposed as a more direct and accurate fMRI method to detect neuronal activity, yet confirmative findings have proven difficult to obtain. Given that the underlying relation between tissue water diffusion changes and neuronal activity remains unclear, the rationale for using diffusion MRI to monitor neuronal activity has yet to be clearly established. Here, we studied the correlation between water diffusion and neuronal activity in vitro by simultaneous calcium fluorescence imaging and diffusion MR acquisition. We used organotypic cortical cultures from rat brains as a biological model system, in which spontaneous neuronal activity robustly emerges free of hemodynamic and other artifacts. Simultaneous fluorescent calcium images of neuronal activity are then directly correlated with diffusion MR signals now free of confounds typically encountered in vivo. Although a simultaneous increase of diffusion-weighted MR signals was observed together with the prolonged depolarization of neurons induced by pharmacological manipulations (in which cell swelling was demonstrated to play an important role), no evidence was found that diffusion MR signals directly correlate with normal spontaneous neuronal activity. These results suggest that, whereas current diffusion MR methods could monitor pathological conditions such as hyperexcitability, e.g., those seen in epilepsy, they do not appear to be sensitive or specific enough to detect or follow normal neuronal activity. PMID:26941239

  6. Operational multi-angle hyperspectral remote sensing for feature detection

    Bostater, Charles R.; Brooks, Donald K.

    2013-10-01

    Remote sensing results of land and water surfaces from airborne and satellite platforms are dependent upon the illumination geometry and the sensor viewing geometry. Correction of pushbroom hyperspectral imagery can be achieved using bidirectional reflectance factors (BRF's) image features based upon their multi-angle hyperspectral signatures. Ground validation of features and targets utilize non-imaging sensors such as hemispherical goniometers. In this paper, a new linear translation based hyperspectral imaging goniometer system is described. Imagery and hyperspectral signatures obtained from a rotation stage platform and the new linear non-hemispherical goniometer system shows applications and a multi-angle correction approach for multi-angle hyperspectral pushbroom imagery corrections. Results are presented in a manner in order to describe how ground, vessel and airborne based multi-angle hyperspectral signatures can be applied to operational hyperspectral image acquisition by the calculation of hyperspectral anisotropic signature imagery. The results demonstrate the analysis framework from the systems to water and coastal vegetation for exploitation of surface and subsurface feature or target detection based using the multi-angle radiative transfer based BRF's. The hyperspectral pushbroom multi-angle analysis methodology forms a basis for future multi-sensor based multi-angle change detection algorithms.

  7. Microfluidic gas flow profiling using remote detection NMR

    Hilty, Christian; McDonnell, Erin; Granwehr, Josef; Pierce,Kimberly; Han, Song-I Han; Pines, Alexander

    2005-05-06

    Miniaturized fluid handling devices have recently attracted considerable interest in many areas of science1. Such microfluidic chips perform a variety of functions, ranging from analysis of biological macromolecules2,3 to catalysis of reactions and sensing in the gas phase4,5. To enable precise fluid handling, accurate knowledge of the flow properties within these devices is important. Due to low Reynolds numbers, laminar flow is usually assumed. However, either by design or unintentionally, the flow characteristic in small channels is often altered, for example by surface interactions, viscous and diffusional effects, or electrical potentials. Therefore, its prediction is not always straight-forward6-8. Currently, most microfluidic flow measurements rely on optical detection of markers9,10, requiring the injection of tracers and transparent devices. Here, we show profiles of microfluidic gas flow in capillaries and chip devices obtained by NMR in the remote detection modality11,12. Through the transient measurement of dispersion13, NMR is well adaptable for non-invasive, yet sensitive determination of the flow field and provides a novel and potentially more powerful tool to profile flow in capillaries and miniaturized flow devices.

  8. Tree-mycorrhizal associations detected remotely from canopy spectral properties.

    Fisher, Joshua B; Sweeney, Sean; Brzostek, Edward R; Evans, Tom P; Johnson, Daniel J; Myers, Jonathan A; Bourg, Norman A; Wolf, Amy T; Howe, Robert W; Phillips, Richard P

    2016-07-01

    A central challenge in global ecology is the identification of key functional processes in ecosystems that scale, but do not require, data for individual species across landscapes. Given that nearly all tree species form symbiotic relationships with one of two types of mycorrhizal fungi - arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi - and that AM- and ECM-dominated forests often have distinct nutrient economies, the detection and mapping of mycorrhizae over large areas could provide valuable insights about fundamental ecosystem processes such as nutrient cycling, species interactions, and overall forest productivity. We explored remotely sensed tree canopy spectral properties to detect underlying mycorrhizal association across a gradient of AM- and ECM-dominated forest plots. Statistical mining of reflectance and reflectance derivatives across moderate/high-resolution Landsat data revealed distinctly unique phenological signals that differentiated AM and ECM associations. This approach was trained and validated against measurements of tree species and mycorrhizal association across ~130 000 trees throughout the temperate United States. We were able to predict 77% of the variation in mycorrhizal association distribution within the forest plots (P < 0.001). The implications for this work move us toward mapping mycorrhizal association globally and advancing our understanding of biogeochemical cycling and other ecosystem processes. PMID:27282323

  9. A new diagnostic score to detect osteoporosis in patients undergoing lumbar spine MRI

    Signal intensity of lumbar-spine at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates to bone mineral density (BMD). Our aim was to define a quantitative MRI-based score to detect osteoporosis on lumbar-spine MRI. After Ethics Committee approval, we selected female patients who underwent both lumbar-spine MRI and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and a reference group of 131 healthy females (20-29 years) who underwent lumbar-spine MRI. We measured the intra-vertebral signal-to-noise ratio in L1-L4. We introduced an MRI-based score (M-score), on the model of T-score. M-score diagnostic performance in diagnosing osteoporosis was estimated against DXA using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. We included 226 patients (median age 65 years), 70 (31 %) being osteoporotic at DXA. MRI signal-to-noise ratio correlated to BMD (r = -0.677, P < 0.001). M-score negatively correlated to T-score (r = -0.682, P < 0.001). Setting a 90 %-specificity, an M-score threshold of 5.5 was found, distinguishing osteoporosis from non-osteoporosis (sensitivity 54 %; ROC AUC 0.844). Thirty-one (14 %) patients had a fragility fracture, with osteoporosis detected in 15 (48 %) according to M-score and eight (26 %) according to T-score (P = 0.016). M-score obtained on lumbar spine MRI is a quantitative method correlating with osteoporosis. Its diagnostic value remains to be demonstrated on a large prospective cohort of patients. (orig.)

  10. A new diagnostic score to detect osteoporosis in patients undergoing lumbar spine MRI

    Bandirali, Michele; Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Di Leo, Giovanni; Papini, Giacomo Davide Edoardo [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo [IRCCS Fondazione Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mineralometria Ossea Computerizzata e Ambulatorio Malattie Metabolismo Minerale e Osseo, Servizio di Medicina Nucleare, Milano (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Signal intensity of lumbar-spine at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates to bone mineral density (BMD). Our aim was to define a quantitative MRI-based score to detect osteoporosis on lumbar-spine MRI. After Ethics Committee approval, we selected female patients who underwent both lumbar-spine MRI and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and a reference group of 131 healthy females (20-29 years) who underwent lumbar-spine MRI. We measured the intra-vertebral signal-to-noise ratio in L1-L4. We introduced an MRI-based score (M-score), on the model of T-score. M-score diagnostic performance in diagnosing osteoporosis was estimated against DXA using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. We included 226 patients (median age 65 years), 70 (31 %) being osteoporotic at DXA. MRI signal-to-noise ratio correlated to BMD (r = -0.677, P < 0.001). M-score negatively correlated to T-score (r = -0.682, P < 0.001). Setting a 90 %-specificity, an M-score threshold of 5.5 was found, distinguishing osteoporosis from non-osteoporosis (sensitivity 54 %; ROC AUC 0.844). Thirty-one (14 %) patients had a fragility fracture, with osteoporosis detected in 15 (48 %) according to M-score and eight (26 %) according to T-score (P = 0.016). M-score obtained on lumbar spine MRI is a quantitative method correlating with osteoporosis. Its diagnostic value remains to be demonstrated on a large prospective cohort of patients. (orig.)

  11. Probability distribution function-based classification of structural MRI for the detection of Alzheimer's disease.

    Beheshti, I; Demirel, H

    2015-09-01

    High-dimensional classification methods have been a major target of machine learning for the automatic classification of patients who suffer from Alzheimer's disease (AD). One major issue of automatic classification is the feature-selection method from high-dimensional data. In this paper, a novel approach for statistical feature reduction and selection in high-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data based on the probability distribution function (PDF) is introduced. To develop an automatic computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) technique, this research explores the statistical patterns extracted from structural MRI (sMRI) data on four systematic levels. First, global and local differences of gray matter in patients with AD compared to healthy controls (HCs) using the voxel-based morphometric (VBM) technique with 3-Tesla 3D T1-weighted MRI are investigated. Second, feature extraction based on the voxel clusters detected by VBM on sMRI and voxel values as volume of interest (VOI) is used. Third, a novel statistical feature-selection process is employed, utilizing the PDF of the VOI to represent statistical patterns of the respective high-dimensional sMRI sample. Finally, the proposed feature-selection method for early detection of AD with support vector machine (SVM) classifiers compared to other standard feature selection methods, such as partial least squares (PLS) techniques, is assessed. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated using 130 AD and 130 HC MRI data from the ADNI dataset with 10-fold cross validation(1). The results show that the PDF-based feature selection approach is a reliable technique that is highly competitive with respect to the state-of-the-art techniques in classifying AD from high-dimensional sMRI samples. PMID:26226415

  12. Cardiovascular MRI in Detection and Measurement of Aortic Atheroma in Stroke/TIA patients

    Faber, Theodore; Rippy, Ashley; Hyslop, W Brian; Hinderliter, Alan; Sen, Souvik

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic Atheroma (AoA) is an independent risk factor for new and recurrent stroke. AoA ulceration and mobility are associated with an increased risk for brain embolism. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for detection and measurement of AoA in stroke/TIA patients. Cardiovascular MRI (cMRI) could be an alternative, non-invasive imaging modality for stroke/TIA patients. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and correlation of AoA detected and ...

  13. Small colorectal liver metastases: Detection with SPIO-enhanced MRI in comparison with gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI and CT imaging

    Hekimoglu, Koray, E-mail: korayhekim@yahoo.com.tr [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Ustundag, Yucel [Department of Internal Medicine, Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Dusak, Abdurrahim; Kalaycioglu, Bora; Besir, Halit [Department of Radiology, Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Engin, Huseyin [Department of Internal Medicine, Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Erdem, Oktay [Department of Radiology, Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2011-03-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the diagnostic role of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus gadobenate dimeglumine (GbD)-enhanced MRI and computed tomography (CT) investigations for detection of small (less than 1 cm) colorectal liver metastases (LMs) of colorectal cancer. Seventy-eight LMs in 16 patients were evaluated with dynamic CT imaging, GbD-enhanced dynamic MR imaging and SPIO-enhanced MR imaging. Two radiologists were reviewed the LMs seperately. Agreement between the readers and three algorithms was analyzed. Differences between the lesion detection ratios of the methods were analyzed by two proportion z test. Sensitivity values of each modality were also calculated. Interobserver agreement values with kappa analysis were found to be the best for three modalities and kappa values were 0.866, 0.843, and 1.0 respectively. For all 78 LMs, SPIO-enhanced MRI detected all lesions (100% sensitivity). This sensitivity value was higher than GbD-enhanced MRI, and there was a significant difference (p < 0.05). GbD-enhanced MRI depicted 71 lesions and this modality could not detected 7 lesions (91% sensitivity). This modality had moderate sensitivity, and this value is greater than CT imaging, so there was a significant difference also (p < 0.05). Dynamic triphasic CT imaging detected 64 (R1) and 65 (R2) LMs. This modality had the lowest sensitivity (R1: 0.82, R2: 0.83 respectively). Only SPIO-enhanced MRI was able to detect all LMs less than 1 cm. LMs were the best detected with SPIO-enhanced MRI. We recommend SPIO-enhanced MRI to be the primary alternative modality especially for diagnosis of small colorectal LMs.

  14. SQUID-Detected Microtesla MRI in the presence of Metal

    Moessle, Michael; Han, Song-I.; Myers, Whittier; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2006-09-06

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed at fields of 1 T and above, the presence of a metal insert can distort the image because of susceptibility differences within the sample and modification of the radiofrequency fields by screening currents. Furthermore, it is not feasible to perform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or acquire a magnetic resonance image if the sample is enclosed in a metal container. Both problems can be overcome by substantially lowering the NMR frequency. Using a microtesla imaging system operating at 2.8 kHz, with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as the signal detector, we have obtained distortion-free images of a phantom containing a titanium bar and three-dimensional images of an object enclosed in an aluminum can; in both cases high-field images are inaccessible.

  15. Detection and Demarcation of Tumor using Vector Quantization in MRI images

    Kekre, H B; Gharge, Saylee M

    2010-01-01

    Segmenting a MRI images into homogeneous texture regions representing disparate tissue types is often a useful preprocessing step in the computer-assisted detection of breast cancer. That is why we proposed new algorithm to detect cancer in mammogram breast cancer images. In this paper we proposed segmentation using vector quantization technique. Here we used Linde Buzo-Gray algorithm (LBG) for segmentation of MRI images. Initially a codebook of size 128 was generated for MRI images. These code vectors were further clustered in 8 clusters using same LBG algorithm. These 8 images were displayed as a result. This approach does not leads to over segmentation or under segmentation. For the comparison purpose we displayed results of watershed segmentation and Entropy using Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix along with this method.

  16. The usefulness of MRI for detection of the thymus gland in myasthenia gravis

    Hokezu, Youichi; Kaseda, Syun; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Osame, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Kuniaki (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Ohkubo, Koichi; Hagiwara, Hiroshi

    1989-08-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were examined to find thymus or thymoma employing chest radiographs, computed tomography (CT), pneumomediastinography (PMG), computed tomography after pneumomediastinography (PMG-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray CT examination could reveal thymus only in half out of 6 cases scanned. On the other hand, MRI confirmed thymus or thymoma in 6 out of 7 patients. PMG and PMG-CT confirmed thymus or thymoma clearly in all of the 4 cases studied. PMG and PMG-CT examinations revealed thymus or thymoma more clearly than MRI. MRI is, however, an examination causing no pain to the patients and also more superior to X-ray CT in distinguishing between a thymus and mediastinal fat or vascular structure. In addition, MRI could reveal even capsules in thymoma which were never revealed by X-ray CT. We concluded that MRI could be an alternative method to CT and PMG in detection of thymus or thymoma in MG. (author).

  17. The usefulness of MRI for detection of the thymus gland in myasthenia gravis

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were examined to find thymus or thymoma employing chest radiographs, computed tomography (CT), pneumomediastinography (PMG), computed tomography after pneumomediastinography (PMG-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray CT examination could reveal thymus only in half out of 6 cases scanned. On the other hand, MRI confirmed thymus or thymoma in 6 out of 7 patients. PMG and PMG-CT confirmed thymus or thymoma clearly in all of the 4 cases studied. PMG and PMG-CT examinations revealed thymus or thymoma more clearly than MRI. MRI is, however, an examination causing no pain to the patients and also more superior to X-ray CT in distinguishing between a thymus and mediastinal fat or vascular structure. In addition, MRI could reveal even capsules in thymoma which were never revealed by X-ray CT. We concluded that MRI could be an alternative method to CT and PMG in detection of thymus or thymoma in MG. (author)

  18. SISCOM technique with a variable Z score improves detectability of focal cortical dysplasia. A comparative study with MRI

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of the causes of epilepsy, but its diagnosis by MRI remains difficult. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of subtraction ictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) and MRI to detect the epileptogenic focus in patients with FCD. MRI and SISCOM findings of 20 patients with pathologically proven FCD were retrospectively reviewed. MRI was visually assessed for detecting FCD. SISCOM was evaluated by a new method selecting a higher standard deviation (Z score) area as the epileptogenic focus. We scored the detectability in both SISCOM and MRI while referring to the pathology. Sixteen patients agreed with pathology on SISCOM and 14 patients on MRI. Although MRI could not point out foci in two cases of FCD type I, SISCOM could do so in both of them. A combined diagnosis of SISCOM and MRI agreed with the pathology in 18 patients. Narrowing the target by elevating the Z score on SISCOM seems to be an appropriate method to detect the foci without the need for expertise of radiologists. We recommend this combined method of SISCOM and MRI for presurgical evaluation in patients with FCD. (author)

  19. Second-look ultrasonography for MRI-detected suspicious breast lesions in patients with breast cancer

    Min Ji Hong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of second-look ultrasonography (US for investigating additional suspicious lesions detected on preoperative staging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for breast cancer. Methods: Between September 2008 and August 2010, 1,970 breast MRIs were performed at our medical institution for the evaluation of breast cancer before surgery. Second-look US was recommended for 135 patients with 149 suspicious lesions, following the MRI interpretation, and 108 patients with 121 lesions were included in this study. The detection rate on second-look US, according to the lesion type, diameter, and histopathological outcome, was analyzed. Results: Of the 121 lesions considered in this study, 97 (80.2% were diagnosed on MRI as masses and 24 (19.8% as non-mass-like lesions; 105 lesions (86.8% were correlated and 16 (13.2% were not correlated with the findings of second-look US. Of the 105 correlated lesions, 29 (27.6% were proven to be malignant and 76 (72.4% were benign. Although a greater number of large malignant lesions were correlated on second-look US than small benign lesions, there was no statistically significant difference according to lesion diameter or type, as seen on MRI or pathology. Conclusion: We have concluded that second-look US is a useful diagnostic tool for lesions incidentally detected on breast MRI, as in this study, it could identify 86.8% of the MRI-detected breast lesions.

  20. Utility of vaginal and rectal contrast medium in MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis

    To study the sensitivity of MRI performed utilising vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel in the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis. This was a prospective monocentric study. All patients evaluated by the gynaecologist for pelvic pain, endometriosis or infertility were included. Axial and sagittal T2-weighted images were performed both with and without vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel. Three radiologists, all blinded, interpreted the images with a minimum of 15 days between the two readings. MRI performance with and without vaginal and rectal opacification was evaluated by calculating sensitivity, specificity and both positive and negative predictive values. Seventy-eight patients were included. Among these, 31 patients had deep pelvic endometriosis of which 24 were confirmed by laparoscopy. Seventy-six locations of deep pelvic endometriosis were discovered on MRI. For the three reviewers there was a significant improvement in sensitivity between pre- and post-contrast MRI (p < 0.0002). Opacification of the vagina and rectum significantly improved the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis by expanding the vagina and rectum, thus allowing better delineation of the pelvic organs. This was especially apparent for lesions localised to the vagina and rectovaginal septum. (orig.)

  1. The accuracy of MRI in the detection of Lumbar Disc Containment

    Weiner Bradley K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MRI has proven to be an extremely valuable tool in the assessment of normal and pathological spinal anatomy. Accordingly, it is commonly used to assess containment of discal material by the outer fibers of the anulus fibrosus and posterior longitudinal ligaments. Determination of such containment is important to determine candidacy for intradiscal techniques and has prognostic significance. The accuracy of MRI in detecting containment has been insufficiently documented. Methods The MRI's of fifty consecutive patients undergoing open lumbar microdiscectomy were prospectively evaluated for disc containment by a neuroradiologist and senior spinal surgeon using criteria available in the literature and the classification of Macnab/McCulloch. An independent surgeon then performed the surgery and documented the actual containment status using the same methods. Statistical evaluation of accuracy was undertaken. Results MRI was found to be 72% sensitive, 68% specific, and 70% accurate in detecting containment status of lumbar herniated discs. Conclusion MRI may be inaccurate in assessing containment status of lumbar disc herniations in 30% of cases. Given the importance of containment for patient selection for indirect discectomy techniques and intradiscal therapies, coupled with prognostic significance; other methods to assess containment should be employed to assess containment when such alternative interventions are being considered.

  2. Utility of vaginal and rectal contrast medium in MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis

    Chassang, M.; Novellas, S.; Bloch-Marcotte, C.; Chevallier, P. [Hopital Archet 2, Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Delotte, J.; Bongain, A. [Hopital Archet 2, Service de Gynecologie-Obstetrique, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Toullalan, O. [Hopital de Cannes, Service de Gynecologie, 15 avenue des Broussailles, B.P. 264, Cannes Cedex (France)

    2010-04-15

    To study the sensitivity of MRI performed utilising vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel in the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis. This was a prospective monocentric study. All patients evaluated by the gynaecologist for pelvic pain, endometriosis or infertility were included. Axial and sagittal T2-weighted images were performed both with and without vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel. Three radiologists, all blinded, interpreted the images with a minimum of 15 days between the two readings. MRI performance with and without vaginal and rectal opacification was evaluated by calculating sensitivity, specificity and both positive and negative predictive values. Seventy-eight patients were included. Among these, 31 patients had deep pelvic endometriosis of which 24 were confirmed by laparoscopy. Seventy-six locations of deep pelvic endometriosis were discovered on MRI. For the three reviewers there was a significant improvement in sensitivity between pre- and post-contrast MRI (p < 0.0002). Opacification of the vagina and rectum significantly improved the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis by expanding the vagina and rectum, thus allowing better delineation of the pelvic organs. This was especially apparent for lesions localised to the vagina and rectovaginal septum. (orig.)

  3. Detection of epileptic activity in fMRI without recording the EEG

    Lopes, R.; Lina, J. M.; Fahoum, F.; Gotman, J.

    2012-01-01

    EEG–fMRI localizes epileptic foci by detecting cerebral hemodynamic changes that are correlated to epileptic events visible in EEG. However, scalp EEG is insensitive to activity restricted to deep structures and recording the EEG in the scanner is complex and results in major artifacts that are difficult to remove.

  4. Meta-analysis of CSF and MRI biomarkers for detecting preclinical Alzheimer's disease

    B. Schmand; H.M. Huizenga; W.A. van Gool

    2010-01-01

    Background Abnormal levels of biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and atrophy of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are being used increasingly to diagnose early Alzheimer's disease (AD). We evaluated the claim that these biomarkers can detect preclinical A

  5. Serial cranial ultrasonography or early MRI for detecting preterm brain injury?

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Raets, Marlou M A; Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Govaert, Paul; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Reiss, Irwin K M; Smit, Liesbeth S; Lequin, Maarten H; Dudink, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate detection ability and feasibility of serial cranial ultrasonography (CUS) and early MRI in preterm brain injury. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Level III neonatal intensive care unit. PATIENTS: 307 infants, born below 29 weeks of gestation. METHODS: Serial CUS a

  6. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques for early detection of plant diseases

    Krezhova, Dora; Maneva, Svetla; Zdravev, Tomas

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is an emerging, multidisciplinary field with diverse applications in Earth observation. Nowadays spectral remote sensing techniques allow presymptomatic monitoring of changes in the physiological state of plants with high spectral resolution. Hyperspectral leaf reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence proved to be highly suitable for identification of growth anomalies of cultural plants that result from the environmental changes and different stress factors. Hyperspectral technologies can find place in many scientific areas, as well as for monitoring of plants status and functioning to help in making timely management decisions. This research aimed to detect a presence of viral infection in young pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) caused by Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) by using hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence data and to assess the effect of some growth regulators on the development of the disease. In Bulgaria CMV is one of the widest spread pathogens, causing the biggest economical losses in crop vegetable production. Leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence data were collected by a portable fibre-optics spectrometer in the spectral ranges 450÷850 nm and 600-900 nm. Greenhouse experiment with pepper plants of two cultivars, Sivria (sensitive to CMV) and Ostrion (resistant to CMV) were used. The plants were divided into six groups. The first group consisted of healthy (control) plants. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, the second group was inoculated with CMV. The other four groups were treated with growth regulators: Spermine, MEIA (beta-monomethyl ester of itaconic acid), ВТН (benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid-S-methyl ester) and Phytoxin. On the next day, the pepper plants of these four groups were inoculated with CMV. The viral concentrations in the plants were determined by the serological method DAS-ELISA. Statistical, first derivative and cluster analysis were applied and several vegetation indices were

  7. Detection and localization of deep endometriosis by means of MRI and correlation with the ENZIAN score

    Di Paola, V., E-mail: dipaola.valerio@libero.it; Manfredi, R.; Castelli, F.; Negrelli, R.; Mehrabi, S.; Pozzi Mucelli, R.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The accuracy of MRI for deep endometriosis was 95%. •The agreement between histopathological and MRI ENZIAN score was excellent (k = 0.824). •The highest agreement was for adenomyosis (1.000) and lesions of utero-sacral ligaments (0.890). •MRI ENZIAN score allows to obtain a correct preoperative staging of deep endometriosis. -- Abstract: Purpose: To determine the accuracy of ENZIAN score, as detected on MR imaging, compared to surgical-pathologic findings. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the investigational review board and the requirement for informed patient consent was waived. 115 patients were included according to following criteria: tubo-ovarian and/or deep endometriosis suspected at physical examination and transvaginal ultrasound; availability of MR examination; histopathological results from laparoscopic or surgical treatment. Exclusion criteria: lack of available MR examination, and/or (b) lack of a definitive histopathological results. Histopathological findings from bioptic specimens obtained during laparoscopic or laparotomic treatment were considered as reference standard. For all detected lesions a score according to ENZIAN score (revised 2010) was assigned both for MRI and histopathological findings. By comparing MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score the overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values in relation to presence/absence of deep endometriosis in each patient were calculated. k-Cohen to evaluate the degree of concordance between MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score was also measured. Moreover the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for each specific localization provided by ENZIAN score were also calculated. Results: At histopathology, the diagnosis of deep endometriosis was confirmed in 82/115 (71.3%) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of MRI were 94%, 97

  8. Detection and localization of deep endometriosis by means of MRI and correlation with the ENZIAN score

    Highlights: •The accuracy of MRI for deep endometriosis was 95%. •The agreement between histopathological and MRI ENZIAN score was excellent (k = 0.824). •The highest agreement was for adenomyosis (1.000) and lesions of utero-sacral ligaments (0.890). •MRI ENZIAN score allows to obtain a correct preoperative staging of deep endometriosis. -- Abstract: Purpose: To determine the accuracy of ENZIAN score, as detected on MR imaging, compared to surgical-pathologic findings. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the investigational review board and the requirement for informed patient consent was waived. 115 patients were included according to following criteria: tubo-ovarian and/or deep endometriosis suspected at physical examination and transvaginal ultrasound; availability of MR examination; histopathological results from laparoscopic or surgical treatment. Exclusion criteria: lack of available MR examination, and/or (b) lack of a definitive histopathological results. Histopathological findings from bioptic specimens obtained during laparoscopic or laparotomic treatment were considered as reference standard. For all detected lesions a score according to ENZIAN score (revised 2010) was assigned both for MRI and histopathological findings. By comparing MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score the overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values in relation to presence/absence of deep endometriosis in each patient were calculated. k-Cohen to evaluate the degree of concordance between MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score was also measured. Moreover the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for each specific localization provided by ENZIAN score were also calculated. Results: At histopathology, the diagnosis of deep endometriosis was confirmed in 82/115 (71.3%) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of MRI were 94%, 97

  9. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P < 0.001). The positive and negative predictive values for elastography in the determination of active myositis were 75% and 31

  10. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    Berko, Netanel S.; Levin, Terry L. [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Hay, Arielle [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Miami, FL (United States); Sterba, Yonit; Wahezi, Dawn [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P < 0.001). The positive and negative predictive values for elastography in the determination of active myositis were 75% and 31

  11. Imatimid-induced bone marrow necrosis detected on MRI examination and mimicking bone metastases

    Vanel, D.; Bonvalot, S.; Pechoux, C. le; Cioffi, A.; Domont, J.; Cesne, A. le [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2007-09-15

    Imatinib has revolutionized the treatment and prognosis of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). In contrast to liver and/or abdominal involvement, bone metastases are an uncommon event in GIST. We report here two patients with metastatic GIST who developed pelvic bone marrow focal lesions visible on MRI examinations, while Imatinib dramatically improved other tumor sites. A biopsy in one patient diagnosed bone marrow necrosis. The other patient had a favorable follow-up over several years, without bone metastases. Focal bone marrow abnormalities, detected on MRI examinations and mimicking bone metastases in patients who were otherwise responding, should be considered as probable bone marrow necrosis. (orig.)

  12. Natural gas leaks detection by spatial-resolvable-CW-laser-based remote monitoring

    Agishev, R.R.; Bajazitov, R.A.; Galeyev, M.M.; Ismagilow, Z.B. [Kazan State Technical Univ., Tatarstan (Russian Federation). Dept. of Radioelectronic and Quantum Systems

    1996-12-31

    The opportunities of spatial-resolvable atmosphere monitoring and atmospheric pollutions remote chemical analysis based on the CW-laser radiants are investigated. A frequency-responsive processing peculiarities of atmosphere remote sensing signals are described. Application of the mentioned approach for the limited hydrocarbons remote detection and sensing is discussed. The requirements to the CW-LIDAR receiving and radiating systems parameters are formulated. The evaluations of the system sensitivity limit, measurement accuracy and accuracy increase ways are presented.

  13. Detection of Sulfatase Enzyme Activity with a CatalyCEST MRI Contrast Agent.

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Fernández-Cuervo, Gabriela; Acfalle, Jasmine P; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI contrast agent has been developed that detects sulfatase enzyme activity. The agent produces a CEST signal at δ=5.0 ppm before enzyme activity, and a second CEST signal appears at δ=9.0 ppm after the enzyme cleaves a sulfate group from the agent. The comparison of the two signals improved detection of sulfatase activity. PMID:26956002

  14. 19F MRI Detection of Acute Allograft Rejection with In Vivo Perfluorocarbon Labeling of Immune Cells

    Hitchens, T. Kevin; Ye, Qing; Eytan, Danielle F.; Janjic, Jelena M.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Ho, Chien

    2011-01-01

    Current diagnosis of organ rejection following transplantation relies on tissue biopsy, which is not ideal due to sampling limitations and risks associated with the invasive procedure. We have previously shown that cellular MRI of iron-oxide labeled immune-cell infiltration can provide a non-invasive measure of rejection status by detecting areas of hypointensity on T2*-weighted images. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of using a fluorine-based cellular tracer agent to detect m...

  15. Development of Remote Control Laboratory for Radiation Detection via Internet

    The role of experiments in science education is essential for understanding the natural phenomena and principle related to a subject. Therefore, the remote control experiment via Internet is one of key solution for distance learners in science education. The remote experiments are also necessary for the time-consuming experiment which takes several days, collaborative experiment between distance learners, expensive laboratory equipment which is not usually available to students, experimental procedure which is dangerous, etc. In this study, we have developed a general method for a remote control laboratory system using internet and interface techniques. It is possible for students to learn the nuclear physics to control the real instruments and conduct physics experimentation with internet techniques. We proposed the remote control radiation measurement system as a sample application. This system could be useful for the monitoring near a nuclear power plants in order to improve the environment data credibility to the public

  16. Further studies on the remote detection of submerged Orimulsion with a range-gated laser fluorosensor

    A study was conducted to evaluate the capabilities of range-gated laser fluorosensors for the remote, subsurface detection of heavy oils and other products such as Orimulsion. The series of studies initiated by Environment Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard are continuing. They were designed to develop technologies capable of real-time remote detection of neutrally buoyant and/or submerged fuels in the marine environment. In this paper, the authors presented the results of the second phase of the study into the remote detection of submerged Orimulsion with a range-gated fluorosensor. 13 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  17. Automated Detection of Lupus White Matter Lesions in MRI.

    Roura, Eloy; Sarbu, Nicolae; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; González-Villà, Sandra; Cervera, Ricard; Bargalló, Núria; Lladó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML). In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative, and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection [True Positive Rate (62%) and Positive Prediction Value (80%), respectively] as well as segmentation accuracy [Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%)]. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration. PMID:27570507

  18. Automated Detection of Lupus White Matter Lesions in MRI

    Roura, Eloy; Sarbu, Nicolae; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; González-Villà, Sandra; Cervera, Ricard; Bargalló, Núria; Lladó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML). In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative, and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection [True Positive Rate (62%) and Positive Prediction Value (80%), respectively] as well as segmentation accuracy [Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%)]. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration.

  19. Detection of electroporation-induced membrane permeabilization states in the brain using diffusion-weighted MRI

    Mahmood, Faisal; Hansen, Rasmus H; Agerholm-Larsen, Birgit;

    2015-01-01

    (DW-MRI) as a quantitative method for detecting EP-induced membrane permeabilization of brain tissue using a rat brain model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-four anesthetized Sprague-Dawley male rats were electroporated in the right hemisphere, using different voltage levels to induce no permeabilization...... (NP), transient membrane permeabilization (TMP), and permanent membrane permeabilization (PMP), respectively. DW-MRI was acquired 5 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours after EP. Histology was performed for validation of the permeabilization states. Tissue content of water, Na+, K+, Ca2+, and...... extracellular volume were determined. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the DW-MRI parameters, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and kurtosis, at different voltage levels. The two-sample Mann- Whitney test with Holm's Bonferroni correction was used to identify pairs of significantly different...

  20. Rectal cancer: Possibilities of MRI in detection of local recurrence

    Miučin-Vukadinović Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Treatment of rectal cancer, which includes periodic evaluations, may lead to earlier identification of recurrent local infiltration. Differentiation between local recurrence and other post radiation changes is frequently rather difficult. Pelvic MR examination was performed in 30 patients (20 men, 10 women at the Institute of oncology, Sremska Kamenica. All patients underwent surgical resection of rectal cancer at the same institution. Preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy was administrated in 29 patients (93%. Criteria for detection of local recurrent tumors were based on morphologic changes, such as the presence of tumor infiltration, size increase of the mass and the change of the mass shape. Recurrent tumor infiltration was detected in 50% patents. Tumors of low differentiation histological type was predominantly found within 10 months after surgery, while moderately differentiated and high differentiated types were detected within 20 months and after 20 months after resection, respectively. Pelvic MR examination represents important diagnostic modality for recurrent rectal cancer identification.

  1. Abbreviated protocol for breast MRI: Are multiple sequences needed for cancer detection?

    Highlights: • Abbreviated breast MR demonstrates high sensitivity for breast carcinoma detection. • Time to perform/interpret the abbreviated exam is shorter than a standard MRI exam. • An abbreviated breast MRI could reduce costs and make MRI screening more available. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the ability of an abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, consisting of a precontrast T1 weighted (T1W) image and single early post-contrast T1W image, to detect breast carcinoma. Materials and methods: A HIPAA compliant Institutional Review Board approved review of 100 consecutive breast MRI examinations in patients with biopsy proven unicentric breast carcinoma. 79% were invasive carcinomas and 21% were ductal carcinoma in situ. Four experienced breast radiologists, blinded to carcinoma location, history and prior examinations, assessed the abbreviated protocol evaluating only the first post-contrast T1W image, post-processed subtracted first post-contrast and subtraction maximum intensity projection images. Detection and localization of tumor were compared to the standard full diagnostic examination consisting of 13 pre-contrast, post-contrast and post-processed sequences. Results: All 100 cancers were visualized on initial reading of the abbreviated protocol by at least one reader. The mean sensitivity for each sequence was 96% for the first post-contrast sequence, 96% for the first post-contrast subtraction sequence and 93% for the subtraction MIP sequence. Within each sequence, there was no significant difference between the sensitivities among the 4 readers (p = 0.471, p = 0.656, p = 0.139). Mean interpretation time was 44 s (range 11–167 s). The abbreviated imaging protocol could be performed in approximately 10–15 min, compared to 30–40 min for the standard protocol. Conclusion: An abbreviated breast MRI protocol allows detection of breast carcinoma. One pre and post-contrast T1W sequence may be adequate for detecting

  2. Abbreviated protocol for breast MRI: Are multiple sequences needed for cancer detection?

    Mango, Victoria L., E-mail: vlm2125@columbia.edu [Columbia University Medical Center, Herbert Irving Pavilion, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Morris, Elizabeth A., E-mail: morrise@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); David Dershaw, D., E-mail: dershawd@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Abramson, Andrea, E-mail: abramsoa@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Fry, Charles, E-mail: charles_fry@nymc.edu [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); New York Medical College, 40 Sunshine Cottage Rd, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States); Moskowitz, Chaya S. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Hughes, Mary, E-mail: hughesm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Kaplan, Jennifer, E-mail: kaplanj@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Jochelson, Maxine S., E-mail: jochelsm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Abbreviated breast MR demonstrates high sensitivity for breast carcinoma detection. • Time to perform/interpret the abbreviated exam is shorter than a standard MRI exam. • An abbreviated breast MRI could reduce costs and make MRI screening more available. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the ability of an abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, consisting of a precontrast T1 weighted (T1W) image and single early post-contrast T1W image, to detect breast carcinoma. Materials and methods: A HIPAA compliant Institutional Review Board approved review of 100 consecutive breast MRI examinations in patients with biopsy proven unicentric breast carcinoma. 79% were invasive carcinomas and 21% were ductal carcinoma in situ. Four experienced breast radiologists, blinded to carcinoma location, history and prior examinations, assessed the abbreviated protocol evaluating only the first post-contrast T1W image, post-processed subtracted first post-contrast and subtraction maximum intensity projection images. Detection and localization of tumor were compared to the standard full diagnostic examination consisting of 13 pre-contrast, post-contrast and post-processed sequences. Results: All 100 cancers were visualized on initial reading of the abbreviated protocol by at least one reader. The mean sensitivity for each sequence was 96% for the first post-contrast sequence, 96% for the first post-contrast subtraction sequence and 93% for the subtraction MIP sequence. Within each sequence, there was no significant difference between the sensitivities among the 4 readers (p = 0.471, p = 0.656, p = 0.139). Mean interpretation time was 44 s (range 11–167 s). The abbreviated imaging protocol could be performed in approximately 10–15 min, compared to 30–40 min for the standard protocol. Conclusion: An abbreviated breast MRI protocol allows detection of breast carcinoma. One pre and post-contrast T1W sequence may be adequate for detecting

  3. Implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system in a clinical MRI setting

    Purpose: To evaluate the implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system (FMDS) into a clinical MRI setting. Materials and methods: One thousand patients were considered for MRI safety screening using an FMDS. Equipment used was a Ferroguard® Screener (Metrasens Ltd, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK). Fully gowned patients rotated 360° in front of the FMDS in a standardized manner following traditional MRI screening methods (the use of a written questionnaire (Fig. B.1) and verbal interview. Results: Final results included 1032 individual screening events performed in 977 patients. There were 922 (94%) initial passes using the FMDS; 34 (4%) failed initial screens but passed a subsequent screen; 21 (2%) failed the initial and subsequent screens. Thus, including all screening events (n = 1032), there were 956 (93%) true negatives (TN); 21 (2%) false positives (FP) and 55 (5%) true positives (TP). No false negatives (FN) were recorded. Therefore, sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 98%. Conclusion: Implementation and correct usage of an FMDS proved to increase safety within a clinical MRI environment by alerting staff to ferromagnetic items or implants not identified using traditional MRI screening methods. An FMDS should be used as an adjunct to these methods. The information in this study pertains to the specific equipment used in this investigation. - Highlights: • Ferromagnetic detection system sensitivity in this study was 100%. • Ferromagnetic detection system specificity in this study was 98%. • The additional screening procedure had little impact on throughput ie additional time taken was minimal. • Staff training, technique and compliance is important in implementing the screening procedures. • The ferromagnetic detection system identified objects that may have demonstrated projectile, heating or artefact effects

  4. Detection of the dynamic renal function using MRI by gadolinium-DTPA

    Torii, Shinichiro; Machida, Toyohei; Ohoishi, Yukihiko; Tateno, Yukio; Fukuda, Nobuo.

    1988-06-01

    The mathematical study of dynamic renal function and the simulation of renal disorder in rabbit kidney using MRI by Gd-DTPA were performed. T1 of rabbit kidney, which had been operated (complete unilateral ureteral occlusion or incomplete unilateral occlusion of renal artery) was calculated before and after intravenous injection of 0.05 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA, continuously for 90 minutes. All images were obtained by the 0.1 Tesla resistive type MRI. The changes of 1/T1 of cortex and medulla of both kidneys were calculated (MRI renogram). The 4 compartment model of bilateral kidneys was established by 6 normal MRI renogram and renal blood flow-glommelurar function parameter and tubural excration function parameter were calculated by the Runge-Kutta-Gill method and the nonlinear least squares method (Simplex method). The change of renogram pattern was observed by the mathematical change of such parameters and comparative study was performed between such mathematical simulation and practical cases. The actual change of such parameters were calculated by the experimental model of rabbit kidney. It was concluded that the change of MRI renogram pattern was sensitive for unilateral hydronephrosis, renal parenchymal dysfunction by obstructive uropathy and unilateral renal arterial stenosis. Quantitative observation of focal renal parenchymal dysfunction, which was induced by ureteral obstruction, was possible. In the near future it will be also possible to detect acculate ERBF and GFR by the measurement of T1 of human kidney.

  5. The detection of the dynamic renal function using MRI by gadolinium-DTPA

    The mathematical study of dynamic renal function and the simulation of renal disorder in rabbit kidney using MRI by Gd-DTPA were performed. T1 of rabbit kidney, which had been operated (complete unilateral ureteral occlusion or incomplete unilateral occlusion of renal artery) was calculated before and after intravenous injection of 0.05 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA, continuously for 90 minutes. All images were obtained by the 0.1 Tesla resistive type MRI. The changes of 1/T1 of cortex and medulla of both kidneys were calculated (MRI renogram). The 4 compartment model of bilateral kidneys was established by 6 normal MRI renogram and renal blood flow-glommelurar function parameter and tubural excration function parameter were calculated by the Runge-Kutta-Gill method and the nonlinear least squares method (Simplex method). The change of renogram pattern was observed by the mathematical change of such parameters and comparative study was performed between such mathematical simulation and practical cases. The actual change of such parameters were calculated by the experimental model of rabbit kidney. It was concluded that the change of MRI renogram pattern was sensitive for unilateral hydronephrosis, renal parenchymal dysfunction by obstructive uropathy and unilateral renal arterial stenosis. Quantitative observation of focal renal parenchymal dysfunction, which was induced by ureteral obstruction, was possible. In the near future it will be also possible to detect acculate ERBF and GFR by the measurement of T1 of human kidney. (author)

  6. MRI detection of unsuspected vertebral injury in acute spinal trauma: incidence and significance

    Objective. Multilevel spinal injury is well recognised. Previous studies reviewing the radiographs of spinal injury patients have shown an incidence of 15.2% of unsuspected spinal injury. It is recognised that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify injuries that are not demonstrated on radiographs. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and significance of spinal injuries using MRI in comparison with radiographs.Design and patients. The radiographs and MR images of 110 acute spinal injury patients were reviewed independently of each other and the findings were then correlated to determine any unsuspected injury.Results. MRI detected vertebral body bone bruises (microtrabecular bone injury) in 41.8% of spinal injury patients which were not seen on radiographs. These bone bruises were best appreciated on sagittal short tau inversion recovery MR sequences and seen at contiguous and non-contiguous levels in relation to the primary injury.Conclusion. This level of incidence of bone bruises has not previously been appreciated. We recommend that patients undergoing MRI for an injured segment of the spine are better assessed by MRI of the entire spine at the same time to exclude further injury. (orig.)

  7. Early detection of antiangiogenic treatment responses in a mouse xenograft tumor model using quantitative perfusion MRI

    Angiogenesis plays a major role in tumor growth and metastasis, with tumor perfusion regarded as a marker for angiogenesis. To evaluate antiangiogenic treatment response in vivo, we investigated arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure tumor perfusion quantitatively. Chronic and 24-h acute treatment responses to bevacizumab were assessed by ASL and dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in the A498 xenograft mouse model. After the MRI, tumor vasculature was assessed by CD34 staining. After 39 days of chronic treatment, tumor perfusion decreased to 44.8 ± 16.1 mL/100 g/min (P < 0.05), compared to 92.6 ± 42.9 mL/100 g/min in the control group. In the acute treatment study, tumor perfusion in the treated group decreased from 107.2 ± 32.7 to 73.7 ± 27.8 mL/100 g/min (P < 0.01; two-way analysis of variance), as well as compared with control group post dosing. A significant reduction in vessel density and vessel size was observed after the chronic treatment, while only vessel size was reduced 24 h after acute treatment. The tumor perfusion correlated with vessel size (r = 0.66; P < 0.005) after chronic, but not after acute treatment. The results from DCE-MRI also detected a significant change between treated and control groups in both chronic and acute treatment studies, but not between 0 and 24 h in the acute treatment group. These results indicate that tumor perfusion measured by MRI can detect early vascular responses to antiangiogenic treatment. With its noninvasive and quantitative nature, ASL MRI would be valuable for longitudinal assessment of tumor perfusion and in translation from animal models to human

  8. Detection of cranial meningiomas: comparison of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and contrast-enhanced MRI

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Giesel, Frederik L.; Haberkorn, Uwe; Haufe, Sabine; Kratochwil, Clemens [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Linhart, Heinz G. [DKFZ, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology and Therapy, Heidelberg (Germany); Podlesek, Dino [University Hospital of Dresden, Department of Neurosurgery, Dresden (Germany); Eisenhut, Michael [DKFZ, Department of Radiopharmacy, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    PET imaging with somatostatin receptor ligands, such as {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC, is a well-established method for detection and target volume definition of meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Since DOTATOC PET delivers a higher contrast between meningiomas and surrounding tissues than MRI, we conducted a retrospective analysis to compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with cranial meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Over a period of 6 years, 134 patients (20-82 years of age, 107 women and 27 men) underwent cranial CE-MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. To compare the two methods, the lesions considered typical of meningiomas visually were counted and analysed with respect to their location and SUVmax. In the 134 patients investigated by both modalities, 190 meningiomas were detected by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and 171 by CE-MRI. With knowledge of the PET/CT data, the MRI scans were reinvestigated, which led to the detection of 4 of the 19 incidental meningiomas, resulting in an overall detection rate of 92 % of the meningioma lesions that were found by PET/CT. Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT demonstrated an improved sensitivity in meningioma detection when compared to CE-MRI. Tumours adjacent to the falx cerebri, located at the skull base or obscured by imaging artefacts or calcification are particularly difficult to detect by MRI. Therefore {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT may provide additional information in patients with uncertain or equivocal results on MRI or could help to confirm a diagnosis of meningioma based on MRI or could help to confirm MRI-based diagnosis of meningiomas in cases of biopsy limitations. It is possible that not only radiotherapy and surgical planning, but also follow-up strategies would benefit from this imaging modality. (orig.)

  9. Longitudinal change detection in diffusion MRI using multivariate statistical testing on tensors.

    Grigis, Antoine; Noblet, Vincent; Heitz, Fabrice; Blanc, Frédéric; de Sèze, Jérome; Kremer, Stéphane; Rumbach, Lucien; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a longitudinal change detection framework for detecting relevant modifications in diffusion MRI, with application to neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS). The core problem is to identify image regions that are significantly different between two scans. The proposed method is based on multivariate statistical testing which was initially introduced for tensor population comparison. We use this method in the context of longitudinal change detection by considering several strategies to build sets of tensors characterizing the variability of each voxel. These strategies make use of the variability existing in the diffusion weighted images (thanks to a bootstrap procedure), or in the spatial neighborhood of the considered voxel, or a combination of both. Results on synthetic evolutions and on real data are presented. Interestingly, experiments on NMO patients highlight the ability of the proposed approach to detect changes in the normal-appearing white matter (according to conventional MRI) that are related with physical status outcome. Experiments on MS patients highlight the ability of the proposed approach to detect changes in evolving and non-evolving lesions (according to conventional MRI). These findings might open promising prospects for the follow-up of NMO and MS pathologies. PMID:22387171

  10. Diffusion-weighted MRI for uveal melanoma liver metastasis detection

    Wagner, Mathilde; Petras, Slavomir; Servois, Vincent [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Mariani, Pascale; Cassoux, Nathalie [Institut Curie, Department of Surgery, Paris (France); Bidard, Francois Clement; Rodrigues, Manuel Jorge; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie [Institut Curie, Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Farkhondeh, Fereshteh [Institut Curie, Department of Pathology, Paris (France)

    2015-08-15

    We aimed to assess the sensitivity of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the detection of pathologically confirmed uveal melanoma liver metastases (UMLM). Twenty patients who underwent complete surgical resection of their UMLM (N = 83) were included. Pre-surgery liver MR imaging included T2-weighted, T1-weighted, DW and dynamic-gadolinium-enhanced MR sequences. Two radiologists independently reviewed three sets of images (DW / morphologic-dynamic / combined) for each patient using intraoperative and pathological findings as a standard of reference. The sensitivities of the morphologic-dynamic and DW images for UMLM detection were 63 % and 59 %, respectively, for reader 1 (R1) and 64 % and 53 %, for reader 2 (R2). Sensitivity of the combined set was higher than sensitivity in the two other sets (R1:69 %, R2:67 %), but was only significantly different than the sensitivity of the DW images (McNemar test). For the three sets and the two readers, the sensitivity for UMLM smaller than 5 mm (37-46 %) was significantly lower than that for UMLM larger than 5 mm (67-90 %). The sensitivity for UMLM located in the subcapsular area (41-54 %) was significantly lower than that for intraparenchymal UMLM (68-86 %) (Chi-square test). Our study shows that the addition of DW imaging to morphologic-dynamic images does not significantly increase MR sensitivities for UMLM detection. (orig.)

  11. Detection of Spontaneous Schwannomas by MRI in a Transgenic Murine Model of Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    S.M. Messerli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous schwannomas were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in a transgenic murine model of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 expressing a dominant mutant form of merlin under the Schwann cell-specific PO promoter. Approximately 85% of the investigated mice showed putative tumors by 24 months of age. Specifically, 21% of the mice showed tumors in the intercostal muscles, 14% in the limb muscles, 7% in the spinal cord and spinal ganglia, 7% in the external ear, 14% in the muscle of the abdominal region, and 7% in the intestine; 66% of the female mice had uterine tumors. Multiple tumors were detected by MRI in 21% of mice. The tumors were isointense with muscle by T1-weighted MRI, showed strong enhancement following administration of gadolinium-DTPA, and were markedly hyperintense by T2-weighted MRI, all hallmarks of the clinical manifestation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumors consisted of schwannomas and Schwann cell hyperplasias. The lesions stained positively for S-100 protein and a marker antigen for the mutated transgenic NF2 protein, confirming that the imaged tumors and areas of hyperplasia were of Schwann cell origin and expressed the mutated NF2 protein. Tumors were highly infectable with a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 vector, hrR3, which contains the reporter gene, lacZ. The ability to develop schwannoma growth with a noninvasive imaging technique will allow assessment of therapeutic interventions.

  12. Mapping litter decomposition by remote-detected indicators

    L. Rossi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf litter decomposition is a key process for the functioning of natural ecosystems. An important limiting factor for this process is detritus availability, which we have estimated by remote sensed indices of canopy green biomass (NDVI. Here, we describe the use of multivariate geostatistical analysis to couple in situ measures with hyper-spectral and multi-spectral remote-sensed data for producing maps of litter decomposition. A direct relationship between the decomposition rates in four different CORINE habitats and NDVI, calculated at different scales from Landsat ETM+ multi-spectral data and MIVIS hyper-spectral data was found. Variogram analysis was used to evaluate the spatial properties of each single variable and their common interaction. Co-variogram and co-kriging analysis of the two variables turned out to be an effective approach for decomposition mapping from remote-sensed spatial explicit data.

  13. Robust Remote Homology Detection by Feature Based Profile Hidden Markov Models

    Plötz Thomas; Fink Gernot A.

    2005-01-01

    The detection of remote homologies is of major importance for molecular biology applications like drug discovery. The problem is still very challenging even for state-of-the-art probabilistic models of protein families, namely Profile HMMs. In order to improve remote homology detection we propose feature based semi-continuous Profile HMMs. Based on a richer sequence representation consisting of features which capture the biochemical properties of residues in their local context, family specif...

  14. Robust detection of multiple sclerosis lesions from intensity-normalized multi-channel MRI

    Karpate, Yogesh; Commowick, Olivier; Barillot, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease with heterogeneous evolution among the patients. Quantitative analysis of longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) provides a spatial analysis of the brain tissues which may lead to the discovery of biomarkers of disease evolution. Better understanding of the disease will lead to a better discovery of pathogenic mechanisms, allowing for patient-adapted therapeutic strategies. To characterize MS lesions, we propose a novel paradigm to detect white matter lesions based on a statistical framework. It aims at studying the benefits of using multi-channel MRI to detect statistically significant differences between each individual MS patient and a database of control subjects. This framework consists in two components. First, intensity standardization is conducted to minimize the inter-subject intensity difference arising from variability of the acquisition process and different scanners. The intensity normalization maps parameters obtained using a robust Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) estimation not affected by the presence of MS lesions. The second part studies the comparison of multi-channel MRI of MS patients with respect to an atlas built from the control subjects, thereby allowing us to look for differences in normal appearing white matter, in and around the lesions of each patient. Experimental results demonstrate that our technique accurately detects significant differences in lesions consequently improving the results of MS lesion detection.

  15. Can MRI replace DMSA in the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children with urinary tract infections?

    Renal parenchymal defects may be a consequence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in childhood. MRI is a non-radiation imaging modality compared with DMSA scanning. To compare DMSA with MRI for the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children presenting for radiological investigation after a first UTI. Both DMSA and MRI were performed at the same appointment in 37 children (aged 4 months-13 years; mean 4.5 years) with a history of UTI. Both planar and SPECT DMSA were performed. MRI of the kidneys employed axial and coronal T1-, T2- and fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences. Some children had imaging after IV contrast medium. The coronal fat-saturated T1-W sequence was the best sequence and it detected all the findings on MRI. MRI had a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 87% for the detection of a scarred kidney using DMSA as the gold standard. MRI diagnosed pyelonephritis in two children that had been interpreted as scarring on DMSA. Renal MRI using a single, coronal, fat-saturated T1-W sequence is a rapid, accurate and minimally invasive technique for the detection of renal scarring that does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of Methods for Robust, Automatic Detection of Net Tear with Remotely Operated Vehicle and Remote Sensing

    Haugene, Tormod

    2014-01-01

    Accompanying the continuous growth of the aquaculture fish farming industry in the recent years, the usage of Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) for regular inspections of net integrity has become increasingly common. For a human ROV operator, routine inspections can be repetitious and time consuming, and improving the regularity and efficiency of these operations are of interest. The aim of this study was therefore be to develop a robust technique for automatic detection of net damage with an ...

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves accuracy for detecting focal splenic involvement in children and adolescents with Hodgkin disease

    Punwani, Shonit; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Cheung, King Kenneth; Skipper, Nicholas [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Bell, Nichola; Humphries, Paul D. [University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Bainbridge, Alan [University College London, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Groves, Ashley M.; Hain, Sharon F.; Ben-Haim, Simona [University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Shankar, Ananth; Daw, Stephen [University College London Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Accurate assessment of splenic disease is important for staging Hodgkin lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to assess T2-weighted imaging with and without dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for evaluation of splenic Hodgkin disease. Thirty-one children with Hodgkin lymphoma underwent whole-body T2-weighted MRI with supplementary DCE splenic imaging, and whole-body PET-CT before and following chemotherapy. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians derived a PET-CT reference standard for splenic disease, augmented by follow-up imaging. Unaware of the PET-CT, two experienced radiologists independently evaluated MRI exercising a locked sequential read paradigm (T2-weighted then DCE review) and recorded the presence/absence of splenic disease at each stage. Performance of each radiologist was determined prior to and following review of DCE-MRI. Incorrect MRI findings were ascribed to reader (lesion present on MRI but missed by reader) or technical (lesion not present on MRI) error. Seven children had splenic disease. Sensitivity/specificity of both radiologists for the detection of splenic involvement using T2-weighted images alone was 57%/100% and increased to 100%/100% with DCE-MRI. There were three instances of technical error on T2-weighted imaging; all lesions were visible on DCE-MRI. T2-weighted imaging when complemented by DCE-MRI imaging may improve evaluation of Hodgkin disease splenic involvement. (orig.)

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves accuracy for detecting focal splenic involvement in children and adolescents with Hodgkin disease

    Accurate assessment of splenic disease is important for staging Hodgkin lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to assess T2-weighted imaging with and without dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for evaluation of splenic Hodgkin disease. Thirty-one children with Hodgkin lymphoma underwent whole-body T2-weighted MRI with supplementary DCE splenic imaging, and whole-body PET-CT before and following chemotherapy. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians derived a PET-CT reference standard for splenic disease, augmented by follow-up imaging. Unaware of the PET-CT, two experienced radiologists independently evaluated MRI exercising a locked sequential read paradigm (T2-weighted then DCE review) and recorded the presence/absence of splenic disease at each stage. Performance of each radiologist was determined prior to and following review of DCE-MRI. Incorrect MRI findings were ascribed to reader (lesion present on MRI but missed by reader) or technical (lesion not present on MRI) error. Seven children had splenic disease. Sensitivity/specificity of both radiologists for the detection of splenic involvement using T2-weighted images alone was 57%/100% and increased to 100%/100% with DCE-MRI. There were three instances of technical error on T2-weighted imaging; all lesions were visible on DCE-MRI. T2-weighted imaging when complemented by DCE-MRI imaging may improve evaluation of Hodgkin disease splenic involvement. (orig.)

  19. Symmetry-based detection and diagnosis of DCIS in breast MRI

    Srikantha, Abhilash; Harz, Markus T.; Newstead, Gillian; Wang, Lei; Platel, Bram; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Mann, Ritse M.; Hahn, Horst K.; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2013-02-01

    The delineation and diagnosis of non-mass-like lesions, most notably DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ), is among the most challenging tasks in breast MRI reading. Even for human observers, DCIS is not always easy to diferentiate from patterns of active parenchymal enhancement or from benign alterations of breast tissue. In this light, it is no surprise that CADe/CADx approaches often completely fail to classify DCIS. Of the several approaches that have tried to devise such computer aid, none achieve performances similar to mass detection and classification in terms of sensitivity and specificity. In our contribution, we show a novel approach to combine a newly proposed metric of anatomical breast symmetry calculated on subtraction images of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast MRI, descriptive kinetic parameters, and lesion candidate morphology to achieve performances comparable to computer-aided methods used for masses. We have based the development of the method on DCE MRI data of 18 DCIS cases with hand-annotated lesions, complemented by DCE-MRI data of nine normal cases. We propose a novel metric to quantify the symmetry of contralateral breasts and derive a strong indicator for potentially malignant changes from this metric. Also, we propose a novel metric for the orientation of a finding towards a fix point (the nipple). Our combined scheme then achieves a sensitivity of 89% with a specificity of 78%, matching CAD results for breast MRI on masses. The processing pipeline is intended to run on a CAD server, hence we designed all processing to be automated and free of per-case parameters. We expect that the detection results of our proposed non-mass aimed algorithm will complement other CAD algorithms, or ideally be joined with them in a voting scheme.

  20. MRI does not detect acetabular osteolysis around metal-on-metal Birmingham THA

    Waldstein, Wenzel; Schmidt-Braekling, Tom; Boettner, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective Osteolysis has not been recognized as a common failure mode of the Birmingham modular metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA). The clinical value of metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the periprosthetic soft tissue is well documented; however, the appropriate image modalities to detect periacetabular osteolysis remain unclear. Case summary Eleven patients with periacetabular osteolysis within 3–6 years after uncemented Birmi...

  1. INFARCT DETECTION IN BRAIN MRI USING IMPROVED SEGMENTATION ALGORITHM AND VOLUME VISUALIZATION

    Praveen Kumar E; Sumithra M G; Sunil Kumar P

    2013-01-01

    In the present days, for the human body anatomical study and for the treatment planning medicalscience very much depend on the medical imaging technology and medical images. Specifically for thehuman brain, MRI widely prefers and using for the imaging. But by nature medical images are complex andnoisy.This leads to the necessity of processes that reduces difficulties in analysis and improves quality ofoutput.This paper discuss about an improved segmentation algorithm for infarct detection in ...

  2. Computer-aided detection in breast MRI: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Dorrius, Monique D.; der Weide, Marijke C. Jansen-van; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the additional value of computer-aided detection (CAD) in breast MRI by assessing radiologists’ accuracy in discriminating benign from malignant breast lesions. Methods A literature search was performed with inclusion of relevant studies using a commercially available CAD system with automatic colour mapping. Two independent researchers assessed the quality of the studies. The accuracy of the radiologists’ performance with and without CAD was presented as pooled sensiti...

  3. Intra-articular membranous interposition detected by MRI in developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Watanabe, W.; Itoi, Eiji; Sato, Kozo [Akita Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    2000-12-01

    Intra-articular membranous interposition was detected by MRI in the hip joint with residual subluxation of a girl aged 5 years 10 months. This structure, which had low signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images, separated the femoral head from the acetabulum. Histological examination revealed chondrometaplasia, which suggested that this interposition might be transformed to a surface cartilaginous tissue of the secondary acetabulum often observed in residual subluxation of the hip. (orig.)

  4. MRI detection of breast cancer micrometastases with a fibronectin-targeting contrast agent

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Qutaish, Mohammed; Han, Zheng; Schur, Rebecca M.; Liu, Yiqiao; Wilson, David L.; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in breast cancer patients. Early detection of high-risk breast cancer, including micrometastasis, is critical in tailoring appropriate and effective interventional therapies. Increased fibronectin expression, a hallmark of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, is associated with high-risk breast cancer and metastasis. We have previously developed a penta-peptide CREKA (Cys-Arg-Glu-Lys-Ala)-targeted gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cont...

  5. Flight Tests of the DELICAT Airborne LIDAR System for Remote Clear Air Turbulence Detection

    Vrancken, Patrick; Wirth, Martin; Ehret, Gerhard; Witschas, Benjamin; Veerman, Henk; Tump, Robert; Barny, Hervé; Rondeau, Philippe; Dolfi-Bouteyre, Agnès; Lombard, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    An important aeronautics application of lidar is the airborne remote detection of Clear Air Turbulence which cannot be performed with onboard radar. We report on a DLR-developed lidar system for the remote detection of such turbulent areas in the flight path of an aircraft. The lidar, consisting of a high-power UV laser transmitter and a direct detection system, was installed on a Dutch research aircraft. Flight tests executed in 2013 demonstrated the performance of the lidar system to detect local subtle variations in the molecular backscatter coefficient indicating the turbulence some 10 to 15 km ahead.

  6. MRI of the Breast for the Detection and Assessment of the Size of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    The aim of the study was to compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and mammography for the detection and assessment of the size of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The preoperative contrast-enhanced MRI and mammography were analyzed in respect of the detection and assessment of the size of DCIS in 72 patients (age range: 30 67 years, mean age: 47 years). The MRI and mammographic measurements were compared with the histopathologic size with using the Pearson's correlation coefficients and the Mann-Whitney u test. We evaluated whether the breast density, the tumor nuclear grade, the presence of comedo necrosis and microinvasion influenced the MRI and mammographic size estimates by using the chi-square test. Of the 72 DCIS lesions, 68 (94%) were detected by MRI and 62 (86%) were detected by mammography. Overall, the Pearson's correlation of the size between MRI and histopathology was 0.786 versus 0.633 between mammography and histopathology (p < 0.001). MRI underestimated the size by more than 1 cm (including false negative examination) in 12 patients (17%), was accurate in 52 patients (72%) and overestimated the size by more than 1 cm in eight patients (11%) whereas mammography underestimated the size in 25 patients (35%), was accurate in 31 patients (43%) and overestimated the size in 16 patients (22%). The MRI, but not the mammography, showed significant correlation for the assessment of the size of tumor in noncomedo DCIS (p < 0.001 vs p = 0.060). The assessment of tumor size by MRI was affected by the nuclear grade (p = 0.008) and the presence of comedo necrosis (p = 0.029), but not by the breast density (p 0.747) or microinvasion (p = 0.093). MRI was more accurate for the detection and assessment of the size of DCIS than mammography

  7. Clinical evaluation of asymptomatic sinus disease detected by MRI

    Iwabuchi, Yasuo; Hanamure, Yutaka; Hirota, Johji; Ohyama, Masaru [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1994-12-01

    The detection of lesions of the paranasal sinuses as incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of patients suspected of intracranial disease who have no nasal symptoms has been far more common than we expected. The present study was performed on 325 patients with a mean age of 60.7 years. Medical histories were taken whether they had any nasal symptoms or not. Asymptomatic sinus disease was present in 41.6% of the 257 patients who had no nasal symptoms, and 9.7% of the patients had either marked mucosal thickening, excessive fluid or polyps in the maxillary sinuses. Although the mean age of these patients was comparatively high, we can infer that 1 in 10 have relatively severe sinus lesions. Mucociliary transport time was measured using the saccharin method in 15 patients who had sinus disease but no nasal symptoms. The mean transport time was 15.6 minutes and within normal limits. Routine ENT examination revealed no lesions in the nasal cavity of any of the subjects. We classified the patients with asymptomatic sinus disease into two groups -- group A: patients with sinus disease associated with some nasal manifestations but who did not complain about them, and group B: patients who had sinus disease but did not have any nasal problems. Group B represents genuine asymptomatic sinus disease in the narrow sense. Most asymptomatic patients in this study appeared to belong to group B. They had some sinus disease, but because their mucociliary function in their nasal cavity was normal, they did not have any nasal symptoms. When we find patients with asymptomatic sinus disease, we have to determine which group they belong to by examining their nasal cavity and measuring their saccharin time. Patients in group A should be medically treated, but those in group B should be followed without medical treatment. (author).

  8. Clinical evaluation of asymptomatic sinus disease detected by MRI

    The detection of lesions of the paranasal sinuses as incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of patients suspected of intracranial disease who have no nasal symptoms has been far more common than we expected. The present study was performed on 325 patients with a mean age of 60.7 years. Medical histories were taken whether they had any nasal symptoms or not. Asymptomatic sinus disease was present in 41.6% of the 257 patients who had no nasal symptoms, and 9.7% of the patients had either marked mucosal thickening, excessive fluid or polyps in the maxillary sinuses. Although the mean age of these patients was comparatively high, we can infer that 1 in 10 have relatively severe sinus lesions. Mucociliary transport time was measured using the saccharin method in 15 patients who had sinus disease but no nasal symptoms. The mean transport time was 15.6 minutes and within normal limits. Routine ENT examination revealed no lesions in the nasal cavity of any of the subjects. We classified the patients with asymptomatic sinus disease into two groups -- group A: patients with sinus disease associated with some nasal manifestations but who did not complain about them, and group B: patients who had sinus disease but did not have any nasal problems. Group B represents genuine asymptomatic sinus disease in the narrow sense. Most asymptomatic patients in this study appeared to belong to group B. They had some sinus disease, but because their mucociliary function in their nasal cavity was normal, they did not have any nasal symptoms. When we find patients with asymptomatic sinus disease, we have to determine which group they belong to by examining their nasal cavity and measuring their saccharin time. Patients in group A should be medically treated, but those in group B should be followed without medical treatment. (author)

  9. Computer assisted early detection of liver metastases from fMRI maps

    We present a new method for computer-aided early detection of liver metastases tumors. The method characterized colorectal hepatic metastases and follows their early hemodynamical changes using an fMRI-based statistical model. The changes in hepatic hemodynamics are evaluated from T2W fMRI images acquired during breathing of air, air-CO2, and carbogen. A classification model is build to help radiologists differentiate tumor from healthy tissue. The model is built from 132 well-validated fMRI samples of tumors and healthy tissue. For each sample, a histogram-based features-vector is constructed. The model is then generated from the data with an SVM classifier. To test the model, 32 non-validated fMRI samples were used. A total of 22 samples proved to be healthy tissue and 11 samples proved to be tumors. Nine samples were judged as tumors by the naked eye, but proved to be healthy tissue later. Our classification model yields accuracy of 78.12% with 66.67% precision on the test set. (orig.)

  10. Interactive Change Detection Using High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on Active Learning with Gaussian Processes

    Ru, Hui; Yu, Huai; Huang, Pingping; Yang, Wen

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  11. Crop stress detection and classification using hyperspectral remote sensing

    Irby, Jon Trenton

    Agricultural production has observed many changes in technology over the last 20 years. Producers are able to utilize technologies such as site-specific applicators and remotely sensed data to assist with decision making for best management practices which can improve crop production and provide protection to the environment. It is known that plant stress can interfere with photosynthetic reactions within the plant and/or the physical structure of the plant. Common types of stress associated with agricultural crops include herbicide induced stress, nutrient stress, and drought stress from lack of water. Herbicide induced crop stress is not a new problem. However, with increased acreage being planting in varieties/hybrids that contain herbicide resistant traits, herbicide injury to non-target crops will continue to be problematic for producers. With rapid adoption of herbicide-tolerant cropping systems, it is likely that herbicide induced stress will continue to be a major concern. To date, commercially available herbicide-tolerant varieties/hybrids contain traits which allow herbicides like glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium to be applied as a broadcast application during the growing season. Both glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium are broad spectrum herbicides which have activity on a large number of plant species, including major crops like non-transgenic soybean, corn, and cotton. Therefore, it is possible for crop stress from herbicide applications to occur in neighboring fields that contain susceptible crop varieties/hybrids. Nutrient and moisture stress as well as stress caused by herbicide applications can interact to influence yields in agricultural fields. If remotely sensed data can be used to accurately identify specific levels of crop stress, it is possible that producers can use this information to better assist them in crop management to maximize yields and protect their investments. This research was conducted to evaluate classification of specific

  12. Incidental memory encoding assessed with signal detection theory and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI

    Benjamin eClemens

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies that apply a ‘subsequent memory’ approach, successful encoding is indicated by increased fMRI activity during the encoding phase for hits versus misses, in areas underlying memory encoding such as the hippocampal formation. Signal-detection theory (SDT can be used to analyze memory-related fMRI activity as a function of the participant’s memory trace strength (d’. The goal of the present study was to use SDT to examine the relationship between fMRI activity during incidental encoding and participants’ recognition performance. To implement a new approach, post-experimental group assignment into High- or Low Performers (HP or LP was based on 29 healthy participants' recognition performance, assessed with SDT. The analyses focused on the interaction between the factors group (HP vs. LP and recognition performance (hits vs. misses. A whole-brain analysis revealed increased activation for HP versus LP during incidental encoding for remembered versus forgotten items (hits > misses in the insula / temporo-parietal junction (TPJ and the FFG. Parameter estimates in these regions exhibited a significant positive correlation with (d’. As these brain regions are highly relevant for salience detection (insula, stimulus-driven attention (TPJ, and content-specific processing of mnemonic stimuli (FFG, we suggest that HPs’ elevated memory performance was associated with enhanced attentional and content-specific sensory processing during the encoding phase. We provide first correlative evidence that encoding-related activity in content-specific sensory areas and content-independent attention and salience detection areas influences memory performance in a task with incidental encoding of facial stimuli. Based on our findings, we discuss whether the aforementioned group differences in brain activity during incidental encoding might constitute the basis of general differences in memory performance

  13. The Value of Prostate MRI with Endorectal Coil in Detecting Seminal Vesicle Involvement in Patients with Prostate Cancer

    Ghafoori, Mahyar; Alavi, Manijeh; Shakiba, Madjid; Hoseini, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background: In prostate cancer, detection of seminal vesicle involvement is important because it influences the treatment planning and prognosis of the patients. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the value of prostate MRI with endorectal coil in the detection of seminal vesicle involvement in patients with prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total number of 238 biopsy-proven prostate cancer patients were examined by 1.5 Tesla MRI with a combination of pelvic and en...

  14. Limited role of gadolinium to detect active sacroiliitis on MRI in juvenile spondyloarthritis

    Herregods, N.; Leus, A.; Verstraete, K.; Jans, L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent (Belgium); Jaremko, J.L. [University of Alberta Hospital, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Baraliakos, X. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne (Germany); Dehoorne, J. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to routine non contrast-enhanced MRI to detect active sacroiliitis in clinically juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). A total of 80 children clinically suspected for sacroiliitis prospectively underwent MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Axial and coronal T1-weighted (T1), Short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-DTPA (Gd) contrast-enhanced (T1/Gd) sequences were obtained. The presence of bone marrow edema (BME), capsulitis, enthesitis, high intra-articular STIR signal, synovial enhancement and a global diagnostic impression of the MRI for diagnosis of sacroiliitis was recorded. STIR and T1/Gd sequences had 100 % agreement for depiction of BME, capsulitis and enthesitis. High intra-articular STIR signal was seen in 18/80 (22.5 %) patients, 15 (83 %) of whom also showed synovial enhancement in the T1/Gd sequence. Sensitivity (SN) and specificity (SP) for a clinical diagnosis of JSpA were similar for high STIR signal (SN = 33 %, SP = 85 %) and T1/Gd synovial enhancement (SN = 36 %, SP = 92 %). Positive likelihood ratio (LR+) for JSpA was twice as high for synovial enhancement than high STIR signal (4.5 compared to 2.2). Global diagnostic impression was similar (STIR: SN = 55 %, SP = 87 %, LR + =4.2; T1/Gd: SN = 55 %, SP = 92 %, LR + = 6.9). MRI without contrast administration is sufficient to identify bone marrow edema, capsulitis and retroarticular enthesitis as features of active sacroiliitis in juvenile spondyloarthritis. In selected cases when high STIR signal in the joint is the only finding, gadolinium-enhanced images may help to confirm the presence of synovitis. (orig.)

  15. Limited role of gadolinium to detect active sacroiliitis on MRI in juvenile spondyloarthritis

    The aim of this study is to determine the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to routine non contrast-enhanced MRI to detect active sacroiliitis in clinically juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). A total of 80 children clinically suspected for sacroiliitis prospectively underwent MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Axial and coronal T1-weighted (T1), Short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-DTPA (Gd) contrast-enhanced (T1/Gd) sequences were obtained. The presence of bone marrow edema (BME), capsulitis, enthesitis, high intra-articular STIR signal, synovial enhancement and a global diagnostic impression of the MRI for diagnosis of sacroiliitis was recorded. STIR and T1/Gd sequences had 100 % agreement for depiction of BME, capsulitis and enthesitis. High intra-articular STIR signal was seen in 18/80 (22.5 %) patients, 15 (83 %) of whom also showed synovial enhancement in the T1/Gd sequence. Sensitivity (SN) and specificity (SP) for a clinical diagnosis of JSpA were similar for high STIR signal (SN = 33 %, SP = 85 %) and T1/Gd synovial enhancement (SN = 36 %, SP = 92 %). Positive likelihood ratio (LR+) for JSpA was twice as high for synovial enhancement than high STIR signal (4.5 compared to 2.2). Global diagnostic impression was similar (STIR: SN = 55 %, SP = 87 %, LR + =4.2; T1/Gd: SN = 55 %, SP = 92 %, LR + = 6.9). MRI without contrast administration is sufficient to identify bone marrow edema, capsulitis and retroarticular enthesitis as features of active sacroiliitis in juvenile spondyloarthritis. In selected cases when high STIR signal in the joint is the only finding, gadolinium-enhanced images may help to confirm the presence of synovitis. (orig.)

  16. A Novel Datamining Based Approach for Remote Intrusion Detection

    Renu Deepti.S, Loshma.G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, as information systems are more open to the Internet,attacks and intrusions are also increasing rapidly so the importance of secure networks is also vital. New intelligent Intrusion Detection Systems which are based on sophisticated algorithms are in demand.Intrusion Detection System (IDS is an important detection used as a countermeasure to preserve data integrity and system availability from attacks. It is a combination of software and hardware that attempts to perform intrusion detection.In data mining based intrusion detection system, we should make use of particular domain knowledge in relation to intrusion detection in order to efficiently extract relative rules from large amounts of records.This paper proposes boosting method for intrusion detection and it is possible to detect the intrusions in all the Systems, without installing the Software in client System (like client-server via Web service (Apache tomcat by using the ip address of the client system.

  17. Progress on detection of liquid explosives using ultra-low field MRI

    Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schuttz, Larry M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baguisa, Shermiyah [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dunkerley, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magnelind, Per [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Owens, Tuba [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandin, Henrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. Over the past several years there has been increasing interest in performing NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime, with measurement field strengths of 10-100 microTesla and pre-polarization fields of 30-50 mTesla. The real-time signal-to-noise ratio for such measurements is about 100. Our group at LANL has built and demonstrated the performance of SQUID-based ULF NMR/MRI instrumentation for classification of materials and detection of liquid explosives via their relaxation properties measured at ULF, using T{sub 1}, and T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1} frequency dispersion. We are also beginning to investigate the performance of induction coils as sensors. Here we present recent progress on the applications of ULF MR to the detection of liquid explosives, in imaging and relaxometry.

  18. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by 2 different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    Duer, Anne; Vestergaard, Aage; Døhn, Uffe Møller;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the ability of 2 different dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) units and conventional radiography (CR) for identifying bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints. METHODS: CR and 2 MRI-examinations (on 0.2T Esaote...... carpal bones. MagneVu and CR detected 100% and 89%, respectively, of large erosions (OMERACT-RAMRIS-score > 1 on Artoscan) in MCP-joints, and 69% and 15.8% of large erosions in wrists. CONCLUSIONS: Both E-MRI units detected more erosions than CR, particularly due to a higher sensitivity in metacarpal...... Artoscan and 0.2T portable MagneVu MV1000 units) of 418 bones in the dominant wrist and 2.-5. MCP-joints of 15 RA patients and 4 healthy controls were performed and blindedly evaluated for bones being visible and for erosions. RESULTS: In MCP-joints, MagneVu visualized 18.5% of bones entirely and 71...

  19. Incremental Activation Detection for Real-Time fMRI Series Using Robust Kalman Filter

    Liang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI is a technique that enables us to observe human brain activations in real time. However, some unexpected noises that emerged in fMRI data collecting, such as acute swallowing, head moving and human manipulations, will cause much confusion and unrobustness for the activation analysis. In this paper, a new activation detection method for rt-fMRI data is proposed based on robust Kalman filter. The idea is to add a variation to the extended kalman filter to handle the additional sparse measurement noise and a sparse noise term to the measurement update step. Hence, the robust Kalman filter is designed to improve the robustness for the outliers and can be computed separately for each voxel. The algorithm can compute activation maps on each scan within a repetition time, which meets the requirement for real-time analysis. Experimental results show that this new algorithm can bring out high performance in robustness and in real-time activation detection.

  20. CEST-MRI detects metabolite levels altered by breast cancer cell aggressiveness and chemotherapy response.

    Chan, Kannie W Y; Jiang, Lu; Cheng, Menglin; Wijnen, Jannie P; Liu, Guanshu; Huang, Peng; van Zijl, Peter C M; McMahon, Michael T; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-06-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an MRI contrast mechanism that detects the exchange of protons from distinct hydroxyl, amine, and amide groups to tissue water through the transfer of signal loss, with repeated exchange enhancing their effective signal. We applied CEST to detect systematically 15 common cellular metabolites in a panel of differentially aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. The highest CEST contrast was generated by creatine, myo-inositol, glutamate, and glycerophosphocholine, whose cellular concentrations decreased with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness. These decreased metabolite concentrations resulted in turn in a decreased CEST profile with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. Treatment of both breast cancer cell lines with the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin resulted in increased metabolic CEST profiles, which correlated with significant increases in creatine, phosphocreatine, and glycerophosphocholine. CEST can detect breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. The presented results help shed light on possible contributions from CEST-active metabolites to the CEST contrast produced by breast cancers. The metabolic CEST profile may improve detection sensitivity over conventional MRS, and may have the potential to assess breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy non-invasively using MRI if specialized metabolic CEST profile detection can be realized in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27100284

  1. Haemorrhage in intracerebral arteriovenous malformations: detection with MRI and comparison with clinical history

    Fifty-one patients with 59 angiographically proven cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were examined by high-field MRI to detect blood breakdown products. Results were correlated with the history of intracranial bleeding. Evidence of previous episodes of haemorrhage was seen in 10 of 12 patients (83.3%) with verified bleeding, 4 of 9 patients (44.4%) with symptoms which could suggest bleeding and in 6 of 30 patients (20%) with negative histories. Because of the known rebleeding rate and the increased risk of associated complications, identification of the subgroup who had had haemorrhage and should therefore be considered for surgery may be beneficial. MRI can make a contribution to management by demonstrating prior haemorrhage in patients with an inadequate clinical history. (orig.)

  2. Aircraft target onboard detecting technology via Circular Information Matching method for remote sensing satellite

    Xiao, Huachao; Zhou, Quan; Li, Li

    2015-10-01

    Image information onboard processing is one o f important technology to rapidly achieve intelligence for remote sensing satellites. As a typical target, aircraft onboard detection has been getting more attention. In this paper, we propose an efficient method of aircraft detection for remote sensing satellite onboard processing. According to the feature of aircraft performance in remote sensing image, the detection algorithm consists of two steps: First Salient Object Detection (SOD) is employed to reduce the amount of calculation on large remote sensing image. SOD uses Gabor filtering and a simple binary test between pixels in a filtered image. White points are connected as regions. Plane candidate regions are screened from white regions by area, length and width of connected region. Next a new algorithm, called Circumferential Information Matching method, is used to detect aircraft on candidate regions. The results of tests show circumference curve around the plane center is stable shape, so the candidate region can be accurately detecting with this feature. In order to rotation invariant, we use circle matched filter to detect target. And discrete fast Fourier transform (DFFT) is used to accelerate and reduce calculation. Experiments show the detection accuracy rate of proposed algorithm is 90% with less than 0.5s processing time. In addition, the calculation of the proposed method through quantitative anglicized is very small. Experimental results and theoretical analysis show that the proposed method is reasonable and highly-efficient.

  3. Remote control and position detection by micro whistles

    Ibargüen Albentosa, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Micro whistles are devices inspired by flue-type instruments, and consist basically of a tube with an inlet and outlet hole. When air is blown through the inlet hole, the micro whistle emits a tone with an approximately defined frequency. This frequency is a function of the air pressure supplied, and its nominal value is determined by the geometry of the whistle. Micro whistles can be used as remote controls, if two or more of them with different nominal frequencies are actuated simultaneousl...

  4. A practical MRI technique for detecting Abdominal Aorta Aneurism and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Aykut Aktas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Peripheral Arterial Disease(PAD and abdominal aorta aneurysm(AAA are frequent problems in geriatric population. In DSA, CTA or MRA techniques contrast agents has to be used for diagnosis that can be nephrotoxic for elderly patients. Magnetic resonans imaging (MRI is the most powerful, non-ionising radiological diagnostic tool that has the highest soft tissue contrast resolution. The aim of our study was to investigate the effectivity of MRI by the means of detecting the AAA and PAD in comparison with DSA. Material and Method: After getting ethical commitee approvel and informed consent, we have performed Balanced turbo field echo(B-TFE MRI technique without contrast agent in 1.5 Tesla MRI device before DSA examination. The luminal diameters of renal arteries, infrarenal abdominal aorta, iliac and femoral arteries was measured by using Philips DICOM Viewer R2.2 application. The intraclass corelation coefficient and reliability used to check if the techniques could be used for each other and the t-test was used to measure the differences between them. Results: There has been a high relationship between B-TFE and DSA in detecting the pathologies of larger arteries like aorta. In the case of small arterial pathologies, there is relatively lower relationship between BTFE and DSA. Discussion: For the diagnosis of AAA and PAD, DSA is the gold standart technique but it is invasive and patients have radiation exposure. In the follow up of geriatric patients with larger arterial pathologies B-TFE can be used instead of contrast enhanced MRA and invasive DSA.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of portal-phase CT and MRI with mangafodipir trisodium in detecting liver metastases from colorectal carcinoma

    Regge, D. [Radiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy)]. E-mail: daniele.regge@ircc.it; Campanella, D. [Radiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Anselmetti, G.C. [Radiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Cirillo, S. [Radiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Gallo, T.M. [Radiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Muratore, A. [Oncological Surgery Unit, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Capussotti, L. [Oncological Surgery Unit, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Galatola, G. [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Strada Provinciale, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Floriani, I. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan (Italy); Aglietta, M. [Medical Oncology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Strada Provinciale, Candiolo, Turin (Italy)

    2006-04-15

    AIM: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of single section spiral computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with tissue-specific contrast agent mangafodipir trisodium (MnDPDP) in the detection of colorectal liver metastases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty-five consecutive patients undergoing surgery for primary and/or metastatic disease were evaluated using CT (5 mm collimation and reconstruction interval, pitch 2), two-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo (2D FSPGR) T1 and single shot fast-spin echo (SSFSE) T2 weighted breath-hold MRI sequences, performed before and after intravenous administration of MnDPDP. The reference standards were intraoperative ultrasound and histology. RESULTS: The per-patient accuracy of CT was 72.8 versus 78.4% for unenhanced MRI (p=0.071) and 82.4% for MnDPDP-enhanced MRI (p=0.005). MnDPDP-enhanced MRI appeared to be more accurate than unenhanced MRI but this was not significant (p=0.059). The sensitivity of CT was 48.4% versus 58.1% for unenhanced MRI (p=0.083) and 66.1% for MnDPDP-enhanced MRI (p=0.004). The difference in specificity between procedures was not significant. The per-lesion sensitivity was 71.7, 74.9 and 82.7% for CT, unenhanced MRI, and MnDPDP-enhanced MRI, respectively; the positive predictive value of the procedures was respectively 84.0, 96.0 and 95.8%. MnDPDP-enhanced MRI provided a high level diagnostic confidence in 92.5% of the cases versus 82.5% for both unenhanced MRI and CT. The kappa value for inter-observer variability was >0.75 for all procedures. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of MnDPDP-enhanced MRI is significantly higher than single section spiral CT in the detection of colorectal cancer liver metastases; no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was observed between unenhanced MRI and MnDPDP-enhanced MRI.

  6. Agricultural practices in grasslands detected by spatial remote sensing.

    Dusseux, Pauline; Vertès, Françoise; Corpetti, Thomas; Corgne, Samuel; Hubert-Moy, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    The major decrease in grassland surfaces associated with changes in their management that has been observed in many regions of the earth during the last half century has major impacts on environmental and socio-economic systems. This study focuses on the identification of grassland management practices in an intensive agricultural watershed located in Brittany, France, by analyzing the intra-annual dynamics of the surface condition of vegetation using remotely sensed and field data. We studied the relationship between one vegetation index (NDVI) and two biophysical variables (LAI and fCOVER) derived from a series of three SPOT images on one hand and measurements collected during field campaigns achieved on 120 grasslands on the other. The results show that the LAI appears as the best predictor for monitoring grassland mowing and grazing. Indeed, because of its ability to characterize vegetation status, LAI estimated from remote sensing data is a relevant variable to identify these practices. LAI values derived from the SPOT images were then classified based on the K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) supervised algorithm. The results points out that the distribution of grassland management practices such as grazing and mowing can be mapped very accurately (Kappa index = 0.82) at a field scale over large agricultural areas using a series of satellite images. PMID:25182683

  7. Application of MultiScale Hidden Markov Modeling Wavelet Coefficients to fMRI Activation Detection

    Fangyuan Nan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: The problem of detection of functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs, that is, to decide active and nonactive regions of human brain from fMRIs is studied in this paper. fMRI research is finding and will find more and more applications in diagnosing and treating brain diseases like depression and schizophrenia. At its initial stage fMRI detection are pixel-wise methods, which do not take advantage of mutual information among neighboring pixels. Ignoring such spatial information can reduce detection accuracy. During past decade, many efforts have been focusing on taking advantage of spatial correlation inherent in fMRI data. Most well known is smoothing using a fixed Gaussian filter and the compensation for multiple testing using Gaussian random field theory as used by Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM. Other methods including wavelets had also been proposed by the community. Approach: In this study a novel two-step approach was put forward that incorporates spatial correlation information and is amenable to analysis and optimization. First, a new multi scale image segmentation algorithm was proposed to decompose the correlation image into several different regions, each of which is of homogeneous statistical behavior. Second, each region will be classified independently as active or inactive using existing pixel-wise test methods. The image segmentation consists of two procedures: Edge detection followed by label estimation. To deduce the presence or absence of an edge from continuous data, two fundamental assumption of our algorithm are 1 each wavelet coefficient was described by a 2-state Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM; 2 across scale, each state is caused by its parent state, hence the Multiscale Hidden Markov Model (MHMM. The states of Markov chain are unknown ("hidden" and represent the presence (state 1 or absence (state 0 of edges. Using this interpretation, the edge detection problem boils down to the posterior state

  8. A pooled analysis of MRI in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in patients with malignant lymphoma

    Aim: To explore the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting bone marrow infiltration of malignant lymphoma through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Materials and methods: Studies that evaluated the diagnostic performance of MRI in detecting bone marrow infiltration of malignant lymphoma were acquired from the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cancerlit, and Cochrane Library database, from February 1987 to May 2012. Pooled estimation and subgroup analysis data were obtained by statistical analysis. Results: A total of 13 studies involving 634 patients who fulfilled all of the inclusion criteria were considered for the analysis. No publication bias was found (p = 0.70). The pooled sensitivity of MRI was 0.82 [95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.70–0.90] and the pooled specificity was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.72–0.84). Overall, positive likelihood ratios (LR+) was 3.9 (95% CI: 2.8–5.4) and negative likelihood ratios (LR−) was 0.23 (95% CI: 0.13–0.41). In patients with high pre-test probabilities, MRI enabled confirmation of bone marrow involvement; in patients with low pre-test probabilities, MRI enabled exclusion of bone marrow involvement. Worst-case-scenario (pre-test probability, 50%) post-test probabilities were 80% and 18% for positive and negative MRI results, respectively. In subgroup analysis, MRI performed with 1.5 T devices had higher pooled specificity (0.80, 95% CI: 0.71–0.88) than the MRI with ≤1 T (0.78, 95% CI: 0.71–0.85; p < 0.05). The pooled sensitivity of MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.39–0.92) and the pooled specificity was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.69–0.97). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI without DWI was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.76–0.94) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.72–0.85), respectively. Conclusion: A limited number of small studies indicate that MRI can serve as a valuable tool for detecting bone marrow infiltration of malignant lymphoma. Results were most promising when performing MRI using high field strength devices

  9. Detection of traffic congestion in optical remote sensing imagery

    Palubinskas, Gintautas; Kurz, Franz; Reinartz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A new approach for the traffic congestion detection in time series of optical digital camera images is proposed. It is well suited to derive various traffic parameters such as vehicle density, average vehicle velocity, beginning and end of congestion, length of congestion or for other traffic monitoring applications. The method is based on the vehicle detection on the road segment by change detection between two images with a short time lag, the usage of a priori information such as road data...

  10. Model based traffic congestion detection in optical remote sensing imagery

    Palubinskas, Gintautas; Kurz, Franz; Reinartz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A new model based approach for the traffic congestion detection in time series of airborne optical digital camera images is proposed. Methods It is based on the estimation of the average vehicle speed on road segments. The method puts various techniques together: the vehicle detection on road segments by change detection between two images with a short time lag, the usage of a priori information such as road data base, vehicle sizes and road parameters and a si...

  11. Pulse artifact detection in simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording based on EEG map topography.

    Iannotti, Giannina R; Pittau, Francesca; Michel, Christoph M; Vulliemoz, Serge; Grouiller, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    One of the major artifact corrupting electroencephalogram (EEG) acquired during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the pulse artifact (PA). It is mainly due to the motion of the head and attached electrodes and wires in the magnetic field occurring after each heartbeat. In this study we propose a novel method to improve PA detection by considering the strong gradient and inversed polarity between left and right EEG electrodes. We acquired high-density EEG-fMRI (256 electrodes) with simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) at 3 T. PA was estimated as the voltage difference between right and left signals from the electrodes showing the strongest artifact (facial and temporal). Peaks were detected on this estimated signal and compared to the peaks in the ECG recording. We analyzed data from eleven healthy subjects, two epileptic patients and four healthy subjects with an insulating layer between electrodes and scalp. The accuracy of the two methods was assessed with three criteria: (i) standard deviation, (ii) kurtosis and (iii) confinement into the physiological range of the inter-peak intervals. We also checked whether the new method has an influence on the identification of epileptic spikes. Results show that estimated PA improved artifact detection in 15/17 cases, when compared to the ECG method. Moreover, epileptic spike identification was not altered by the correction. The proposed method improves the detection of pulse-related artifacts, particularly crucial when the ECG is of poor quality or cannot be recorded. It will contribute to enhance the quality of the EEG increasing the reliability of EEG-informed fMRI analysis. PMID:25307731

  12. Detection of emission sources using passive-remote Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    The detection and identification of toxic chemicals released in the environment is important for public safety. Passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers can be used to detect these releases. Their primary advantages are their small size and ease of setup and use. Open-path FTIR spectrometers are used to detect concentrations of pollutants from a fixed frame of reference. These instruments detect plumes, but they are too large and difficult to aim to be used to track a plume to its source. Passive remote FTIR spectrometers contain an interferometer, optics, and a detector. They can be used on tripods and in some cases can be hand-held. A telescope can be added to most units. We will discuss the capability of passive-remote FTIR spectrometers to detect the origin of plumes. Low concentration plumes were released using a custom-constructed vaporizer. These plumes were detected with different spectrometers from different distances. Passive-remote spectrometers were able to detect small 10 cm on a side chemical releases at concentration-pathlengths at the low parts per million-meter (ppm-m) level

  13. Regularisation in multi- and hyperspectral remote sensing change detection

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    Change detection methods for multi- and hypervariate data look for differences in data acquired over the same area at different points in time. These differences may be due to noise or differences in (atmospheric etc.) conditions at the two acquisition time points. To prevent a change detection...... method from detecting uninteresting change due to noise or arbitrary spurious differences the application of regularisation also known as penalisation is considered to be important. Two types of regularisation in change detected by the multivariate alteration detection (MAD) transformation are considered......: 1) ridge regression type and smoothing operators applied to the estimated weights in the MAD transform; and 2) pre-processing (before applying the MAD transformation) by noise reducing orthogonal transformations where the number of retained transformed variables can be considered a regularisation...

  14. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI

    Jie Wen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gray matter (GM damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS. The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2* in 10 each relapsing–remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2* values from healthy controls (HCs of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ΔR2* values – age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ΔR2* values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ΔR2* values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM regions in MS compared with HC. ΔR2* values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05 correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests showed no correlation with cortical GM ΔR2* values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2

  15. Multi-kernel graph embedding for detection, Gleason grading of prostate cancer via MRI/MRS.

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Kurhanewicz, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-02-01

    voxel based classification of CaP presence. The CaP region of interest identified in Step 1 is then subsequently classified as either high or low Gleason grade CaP in Step 2. Comparing SeSMiK-GE with unimodal T2w MRI, MRS classifiers and a commonly used feature concatenation (COD) strategy, yielded areas (AUC) under the receiver operative curve (ROC) of (a) 0.89±0.09 (SeSMiK), 0.54±0.18 (T2w MRI), 0.61±0.20 (MRS), and 0.64±0.23 (COD) for distinguishing benign from CaP regions, and (b) 0.84±0.07 (SeSMiK),0.54±0.13 (MRI), 0.59±0.19 (MRS), and 0.62±0.18 (COD) for distinguishing high and low grade CaP using a leave one out cross-validation strategy, all evaluations being performed on a per voxel basis. Our results suggest that following further rigorous validation, SeSMiK-GE could be developed into a powerful diagnostic and prognostic tool for detection and grading of CaP in vivo and in helping to determine the appropriate treatment option. Identifying low grade disease in vivo might allow CaP patients to opt for active surveillance rather than immediately opt for aggressive therapy such as radical prostatectomy. PMID:23294985

  16. Activation detection in functional MRI using subspace modeling and maximum likelihood estimation.

    Ardekani, B A; Kershaw, J; Kashikura, K; Kanno, I

    1999-02-01

    A statistical method for detecting activated pixels in functional MRI (fMIRI) data is presented. In this method, the fMRI time series measured at each pixel is modeled as the sum of a response signal which arises due to the experimentally controlled activation-baseline pattern, a nuisance component representing effects of no interest, and Gaussian white noise. For periodic activation-baseline patterns, the response signal is modeled by a truncated Fourier series with a known fundamental frequency but unknown Fourier coefficients. The nuisance subspace is assumed to be unknown. A maximum likelihood estimate is derived for the component of the nuisance subspace which is orthogonal to the response signal subspace. An estimate for the order of the nuisance subspace is obtained from an information theoretic criterion. A statistical test is derived and shown to be the uniformly most powerful (UMP) test invariant to a group of transformations which are natural to the hypothesis testing problem. The maximal invariant statistic used in this test has an F distribution. The theoretical F distribution under the null hypothesis strongly concurred with the experimental frequency distribution obtained by performing null experiments in which the subjects did not perform any activation task. Application of the theory to motor activation and visual stimulation fMRI studies is presented. PMID:10232667

  17. Nanoparticle Enhanced MRI Scanning to Detect Cellular Inflammation in Experimental Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection

    S. R. Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We investigated whether ultrasmall paramagnetic particles of iron oxide- (USPIO- enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can detect experimental chronic allograft damage in a murine renal allograft model. Materials and Methods. Two cohorts of mice underwent renal transplantation with either a syngeneic isograft or allograft kidney. MRI scanning was performed prior to and 48 hours after USPIO infusion using T2∗-weighted protocols. R2∗ values were calculated to indicate the degree of USPIO uptake. Native kidneys and skeletal muscle were imaged as reference tissues and renal explants analysed by histology and electron microscopy. Results. R2∗ values in the allograft group were higher compared to the isograft group when indexed to native kidney (median 1.24 (interquartile range: 1.12 to 1.36 versus 0.96 (0.92 to 1.04, P<0.01. R2∗ values were also higher in the allograft transplant when indexed to skeletal muscle (6.24 (5.63 to 13.51 compared to native kidney (2.91 (1.11 to 6.46 P<0.05. Increased R2∗ signal in kidney allograft was associated with macrophage and iron staining on histology. USPIO were identified within tissue resident macrophages on electron microscopy. Conclusion. USPIO-enhanced MRI identifies macrophage.

  18. Remote Detection of Xenon-based Molecular Sensors and the Development of Novel Paramagnetic Agents

    Smith, Monica A.

    2012-01-01

    Applications of laser-polarized xenon nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging have grown in number due to the exceptional sensitivity of xenon to its local environment. When paired with microfluidic technology, xenon-based molecular sensors (XBMS) have the potential to be used in a broad range of applications from medical devices to geochemistry. Detection of XBMS on a microfluidic chip requires remote detection NMR methodology, where the encoding and detection of aqueous...

  19. Remote laser detection of natural gas leakages from pipelines

    A differential absorption lidar based on a tunable TEA CO2 laser emitting at 42 lines of the 'hot' 0111 - 1110 band in the range from 10.9 to 11.4 μm is developed for detecting natural gas leakages from oil pipelines by measuring the ethane content in the atmosphere. The ethane detection sensitivity is 0.9 ppm km. The presence of methane does not distort the measurement results. The developed lidar can detect the natural gas leakage from kilometre heights at the flying velocities up to 200 km h-1 and a probe pulse repetition rate of 5 Hz. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. A novel Hessian based algorithm for rat kidney glomerulus detection in 3D MRI

    Zhang, Min; Wu, Teresa; Bennett, Kevin M.

    2015-03-01

    The glomeruli of the kidney perform the key role of blood filtration and the number of glomeruli in a kidney is correlated with susceptibility to chronic kidney disease and chronic cardiovascular disease. This motivates the development of new technology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the number of glomeruli and nephrons in vivo. However, there is currently a lack of computationally efficient techniques to perform fast, reliable and accurate counts of glomeruli in MR images due to the issues inherent in MRI, such as acquisition noise, partial volume effects (the mixture of several tissue signals in a voxel) and bias field (spatial intensity inhomogeneity). Such challenges are particularly severe because the glomeruli are very small, (in our case, a MRI image is ~16 million voxels, each glomerulus is in the size of 8~20 voxels), and the number of glomeruli is very large. To address this, we have developed an efficient Hessian based Difference of Gaussians (HDoG) detector to identify the glomeruli on 3D rat MR images. The image is first smoothed via DoG followed by the Hessian process to pre-segment and delineate the boundary of the glomerulus candidates. This then provides a basis to extract regional features used in an unsupervised clustering algorithm, completing segmentation by removing the false identifications occurred in the pre-segmentation. The experimental results show that Hessian based DoG has the potential to automatically detect glomeruli,from MRI in 3D, enabling new measurements of renal microstructure and pathology in preclinical and clinical studies.

  1. Mobile Passive Optical Imager for Remote Gas Detection Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tunable filters based on electro-optic effect have shown great potential in detecting gas concentration through obtaining its absorption spectrum. In filter-based...

  2. Columbia - Invasive Species Detection from Remote and Groundbased Mapping

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Columbia NWR has a number of invasive plants that have gone untreated due to lack of staff for detection and mapping. Volunteers can be used to map some areas where...

  3. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Renz, D.M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Dromain, C. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif cedex (France); Diekmann, F. [St. Joseph-Stift Bremen, Department of Medical Imaging, Bremen (Germany); Engelken, F.; Krohn, M.; Singh, J.M.; Bick, U. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ingold-Heppner, B. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Pathology, Berlin (Germany); Winzer, K.J. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Breast Center, Department of Gynecology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  4. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  5. Remote sensing techniques for the detection of soil erosion and the identification of soil conservation practices

    Pelletier, R. E.; Griffin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The following paper is a summary of a number of techniques initiated under the AgRISTARS (Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys Through Aerospace Remote Sensing) project for the detection of soil degradation caused by water erosion and the identification of soil conservation practices for resource inventories. Discussed are methods to utilize a geographic information system to determine potential soil erosion through a USLE (Universal Soil Loss Equation) model; application of the Kauth-Thomas Transform to detect present erosional status; and the identification of conservation practices through visual interpretation and a variety of enhancement procedures applied to digital remotely sensed data.

  6. MRI-based methods to detect placental and fetal brain abnormalities in utero.

    Girardi, Guillermina

    2016-04-01

    There are very few methods for screening women for pregnancy complications. Identification of pregnancies at risk would be of enormous clinical significance as would influence decisions made about pregnancy management and delivery. Adverse pregnancy outcomes such as obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and preterm birth (PTB), characterized by placental insufficiency and abnormal fetal brain development, in mice and humans have been associated with activation of inflammatory pathways, in particular the complement cascade. Recently, antibodies against C3 activation products conjugated with contrast agent ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles were used to detect non-invasively sites of inflammation within the placenta and the fetal brain in mouse models of APS and PTB. In utero, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based detection of C3 deposition in the placenta in the APS model was associated with signs of placental insufficiency and intrauterine growth restriction. In both models, fetal brain C3 deposition was associated with cortical axonal cytoarchitecture disruption and increased neurodegeneration. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS), another non invasive method, is used to identify metabolic abnormalities to predict fetal brain abnormalities. This review describes the recent development of preclinical MRI-based methods for the detection of inflammatory markers of placental insufficiency and abnormal fetal brain development and metabolism to predict pregnancy outcomes. PMID:26187242

  7. Gadolinium(III) texaphyrin: a tumor selective radiation sensitizer that is detectable by MRI.

    Young, S W; Qing, F; Harriman, A; Sessler, J.L.; Dow, W C; Mody, T D; Hemmi, G W; Hao, Y.; Miller, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Gadolinium(III) texaphyrin (Gd-tex2+) is representative of a new class of radiation sensitizers detectable by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This porphyrin-like complex has a high electron affinity [E1/2 (red.) approximately = -0.08 V versus normal hydrogen electrode] and forms a long-lived pi-radical cation upon exposure to hydrated electrons, reducing ketyl radicals, or superoxide ions. Consistent with these chemical findings, Gd-tex2+ was found to be an efficient radiation sensitizer in...

  8. Toward early cancer detection using superparamagnetic relaxometry in a SQUID-based ULF-MRI system

    Magnelind, P. E.; Kim, Y. J.; Matlashov, A. N.; Newman, S. G.; Volegov, P. L.; Espy, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    To detect cancer at a very early state it is essential to detect a very small quantity of cancerous cells. One very sensitive method relies on targeting the cancer cells using antibody labeled single-core magnetic nanoparticles and detecting the relaxation of the magnetization using instruments based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). However, the localization suffers from inverse-problem issues similar to those found in magnetoencephalography. On the other hand, the same magnetic nanoparticles can also work as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Through the combination of superparamagnetic relaxometry and ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI), in one and the same instrument, the accuracy of the magnetic moment localization can be enhanced and anatomical information can also be obtained. Results on superparamagnetic relaxometry and the dipole localization accuracy in our seven-channel low-Tc SQUID-gradiometer array are reported.

  9. Toward early cancer detection using superparamagnetic relaxometry in a SQUID-based ULF-MRI system

    To detect cancer at a very early state it is essential to detect a very small quantity of cancerous cells. One very sensitive method relies on targeting the cancer cells using antibody labeled single-core magnetic nanoparticles and detecting the relaxation of the magnetization using instruments based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). However, the localization suffers from inverse-problem issues similar to those found in magnetoencephalography. On the other hand, the same magnetic nanoparticles can also work as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Through the combination of superparamagnetic relaxometry and ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI), in one and the same instrument, the accuracy of the magnetic moment localization can be enhanced and anatomical information can also be obtained. Results on superparamagnetic relaxometry and the dipole localization accuracy in our seven-channel low-Tc SQUID-gradiometer array are reported. (paper)

  10. Coral Pigments: Quantification Using HPLC and Detection by Remote Sensing

    Cottone, Mary C.

    1995-01-01

    contribute to the limited database of pigment concentrations in healthy corals, from which quantitative definitions of 'healthy' vs. 'bleached' coral may emerge. They also serve as ground-truth, corresponding to fluorescence data collected from the reef at Puako using airborne remote sensing of laser induced fluorescence. Fluorescence spectra from several overflights using the NASA AOL (airborne oceanographic lidar) system show consistent chlorphyll fluorescence peaks around 685 nm, as well as consistence peaks in the 400-600 nm range which may emanate from granules in the coral tissue. These data, along with results from previous studies of coral fluorescence, suggest that remote sensing of laser-induced fluorescence may become a rapid and efficient means of monitoring coral pigmentation and coral reef bleaching.

  11. A Novel GBM Saliency Detection Model Using Multi-Channel MRI.

    Subhashis Banerjee

    Full Text Available The automatic computerized detection of regions of interest (ROI is an important step in the process of medical image processing and analysis. The reasons are many, and include an increasing amount of available medical imaging data, existence of inter-observer and inter-scanner variability, and to improve the accuracy in automatic detection in order to assist doctors in diagnosing faster and on time. A novel algorithm, based on visual saliency, is developed here for the identification of tumor regions from MR images of the brain. The GBM saliency detection model is designed by taking cue from the concept of visual saliency in natural scenes. A visually salient region is typically rare in an image, and contains highly discriminating information, with attention getting immediately focused upon it. Although color is typically considered as the most important feature in a bottom-up saliency detection model, we circumvent this issue in the inherently gray scale MR framework. We develop a novel pseudo-coloring scheme, based on the three MRI sequences, viz. FLAIR, T2 and T1C (contrast enhanced with Gadolinium. A bottom-up strategy, based on a new pseudo-color distance and spatial distance between image patches, is defined for highlighting the salient regions in the image. This multi-channel representation of the image and saliency detection model help in automatically and quickly isolating the tumor region, for subsequent delineation, as is necessary in medical diagnosis. The effectiveness of the proposed model is evaluated on MRI of 80 subjects from the BRATS database in terms of the saliency map values. Using ground truth of the tumor regions for both high- and low- grade gliomas, the results are compared with four highly referred saliency detection models from literature. In all cases the AUC scores from the ROC analysis are found to be more than 0.999 ± 0.001 over different tumor grades, sizes and positions.

  12. Jellyfish Patch Detecting Using Low Latitude Remote Sensing System

    Lee, J. S.; Jo, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    Jellyfish can be asexual and sexual reproduction depending on the environment, and it has excellent environmental adaptability and reproduction than other sea creatures. If the marine environment become worse, jellyfish can take advantage in the competition for survival. Marine environmental changes caused by rapid climate change, dyke construction and land reclamation will increase the amount of jellyfish and as a result can lead to a various social and economic problems. In this study, jellyfish were observed in coastal area using a low-altitude Helikite remote sensing system for the first time. Helikite is a type of helium balloon plus a kite that can get the data with optical sensors for the desired spatial resolutions by adjusting the altitudes. In addition, it has an advantage that can monitor any objects for a long time at one place as long as the electric power and helium last. In this study, we observed the jellyfish patches using a digital camera in the Chesapeake Bay and estimate populations and size of jellyfish patches through image processing. Research results suggests that we can have long-term real-time observations for not only jellyfish, but also other harmful marine creatures.

  13. Diffusion-weighted and conventional MRI in detection of Multiple Sclerosis lesions in brain: a comparative study

    "Z. Miabi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic disease that begins most commonly in young adults and is characterized pathologically by multiple areas of central nervous system (CNS white matter inflammation, demyelination, and glial scarring. The most valuable aid for diagnosis is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. New type of MRI has been developed on the basis of molecular diffusion which capable of detecting acute and active lesions. Early diagnosis and treatment is possible to stop or slow down progression of disease. The aim of this study is to compare the findings of conventional and diffusion- weighted (DW MRI in detection cerebral lesions of MS. Methods: Thirty patients with clinically definite MS and 30 healthy volunteers were studied in a descriptive-prospective survey over a twelve-month period of time. Conventional and DW MRI were used in both groups. Total number, morphology, location and the mean size of the intra-cerebral plaques of MS were compared between group. The sensitivity and the specificity of both imaging methods in detecting these plaques were determined. Results: Thirty patients with MS with the mean age of 32.76±8.79 years and 30 healthy individuals with the mean age of 32.75± 9.23 years were enrolled. Plaque within the brain was significantly higher by the conventional method (P< 0.05. Ovoid lesions were greater in number in the conventional method group. More lesions were detected by the conventional method in the areas of periventricle, centrum semiovale and corpus callosum. Regarding the size of plaque, the minimum measurement was significantly lower in the conventional method group. The sensitivity of both methods was 100%. The specificity of conventional and DW MRI was 86.6% and 96.6%, respectively. Conclusion: In our study the sensitivity of both methods was the same but the specificity of DW MRI was higher. DW MRI may detect lesions which are not detectable by the routine methods.

  14. MRI-detected extramural vascular invasion is an independent prognostic factor for synchronous metastasis in patients with rectal cancer

    Sohn, Beomseok; Lim, Joon-seok; Kim, Honsoul; Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Myoung, Sungmin [Jungwon University, Department of Medical Information, Goesan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Junjeong [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyu [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) could predict synchronous distant metastases in rectal cancer. Patients who underwent rectal MRI between July 2011 and December 2012 were screened. This study included 447 patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma who had undergone MRI without previous treatment. Distant metastases were recorded at the initial work-up and over a 6-month follow-up. Univariate/multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the risk of metastasis. The diagnostic performance was calculated using pathologic lymphovascular invasion (LVI) as a gold standard. Among 447 patients, 79 patients (17.7 %) were confirmed to have distant metastases. Three MRI features are significantly associated with a high risk of distant metastasis: positive EMVI (odds ratio 3.02), high T stage (odds ratio 2.10) and positive regional lymph node metastasis (odds ratio 6.01). EMVI in a large vessel (≥3 mm) had a higher risk for metastasis than EMVI in a small vessel (<3 mm). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI-detected EMVI were 28.2 %, 94.0 % and 80.3 %, respectively. MRI-detected EMVI is an independent risk factor for synchronous metastasis in rectal cancer. EMVI in large vessels is a stronger risk factor for distant metastasis than EMVI in small vessels. (orig.)

  15. Improved detection of localized prostate cancer using co-registered MRI and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT

    Jambor, Ivan, E-mail: ivjamb@utu.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); 2nd Department of Radiology, Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Bratislava (Slovakia); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Borra, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.borra@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Kemppainen, Jukka, E-mail: Jukka.Kemppainen@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lepomaeki, Virva, E-mail: Virva.Lepomaki@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta, E-mail: Riitta.Parkkola@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Dean, Kirsti, E-mail: Kirsti.Dean@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Alanen, Kalle, E-mail: Kalle.Alanen@tyks.fi [Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Arponen, Eveliina, E-mail: Eveliina.Arponen@utu.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Nurmi, Martti, E-mail: Martti.Nurmi@tyks.fi [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J., E-mail: Hannu.Aronen@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We aimed to study the ability of contrast enhanced MRI at 1.5 T and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT, both individually and using fused data, to detect localized prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six men with untreated prostate cancer and negative for metastatic disease on pelvic CT and bone scan were prospectively enrolled. A pelvic {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT scan was performed in all patients, and a contrast enhanced MRI scan in 33 patients (6 examinations using both endorectal coil and surface coils, and 27 examinations using surface coils only). After the imaging studies 10 patients underwent prostatectomy and 26 were treated by image guided external beam radiation treatment. Image fusion of co-registered PET and MRI data was performed based on anatomical landmarks visible on CT and MRI using an advanced in-house developed software package. PET/CT, MRI and fused PET/MRI data were evaluated visually and compared with biopsy findings on a lobar level, while a sextant approach was used for patients undergoing prostatectomy. Results: When using biopsy samples as method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for visual detection of prostate cancer on a lobar level by contrast enhanced MRI was 85%, 37%, 73% and that of {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT 88%, 41%, 74%, respectively. Fusion of PET with MRI data increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to 90%, 72% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Fusion of sequentially obtained PET/CT and MRI data for the localization of prostate cancer is feasible and superior to the performance of each individual modality alone.

  16. MRI detects brain reorganization after human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC treatment of stroke in rat.

    Quan Jiang

    Full Text Available Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC represent an attractive cell source and a potential technology for neurorestoration and improvement of functional outcomes following stroke. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo and were intravenously administered hUTC (N = 11 or vehicle (N = 10 48 hrs after stroke. White matter and vascular reorganization was monitored over a 12-week period using MRI and histopathology. MRI results were correlated with neurological functional and histology outcomes to demonstrate that MRI can be a useful tool to measure structural recovery after stroke. MRI revealed a significant reduction in the ventricular volume expansion and improvement in cerebral blood flow (CBF in the hUTC treated group compared to vehicle treated group. Treatment with hUTC resulted in histological and functional improvements as evidenced by enhanced expression of vWF and synaptophysin, and improved outcomes on behavioral tests. Significant correlations were detected between MRI ventricular volumes and histological lesion volume as well as number of apoptotic cells. A positive correlation was also observed between MRI CBF or cerebral blood volume (CBV and histological synaptic density. Neurological functional tests were also significantly correlated with MRI ventricular volume and CBV. Our data demonstrated that MRI measurements can detect the effect of hUTC therapy on the brain reorganization and exhibited positive correlation with histological measurements of brain structural changes and functional behavioral tests after stroke. MRI ventricular volumes provided the most sensitive index in monitoring brain remodeling and treatment effects and highly correlated with histological and functional measurements.

  17. MRI detects brain reorganization after human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) treatment of stroke in rat.

    Jiang, Quan; Thiffault, Christine; Kramer, Brian C; Ding, Guang Liang; Zhang, Li; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P; Li, Lian; Arbab, Ali S; Lu, Mei; Navia, Brad; Victor, Stephen J; Hong, Klaudyne; Li, Qing Jiang; Wang, Shi Yang; Li, Yi; Chopp, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) represent an attractive cell source and a potential technology for neurorestoration and improvement of functional outcomes following stroke. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo) and were intravenously administered hUTC (N = 11) or vehicle (N = 10) 48 hrs after stroke. White matter and vascular reorganization was monitored over a 12-week period using MRI and histopathology. MRI results were correlated with neurological functional and histology outcomes to demonstrate that MRI can be a useful tool to measure structural recovery after stroke. MRI revealed a significant reduction in the ventricular volume expansion and improvement in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the hUTC treated group compared to vehicle treated group. Treatment with hUTC resulted in histological and functional improvements as evidenced by enhanced expression of vWF and synaptophysin, and improved outcomes on behavioral tests. Significant correlations were detected between MRI ventricular volumes and histological lesion volume as well as number of apoptotic cells. A positive correlation was also observed between MRI CBF or cerebral blood volume (CBV) and histological synaptic density. Neurological functional tests were also significantly correlated with MRI ventricular volume and CBV. Our data demonstrated that MRI measurements can detect the effect of hUTC therapy on the brain reorganization and exhibited positive correlation with histological measurements of brain structural changes and functional behavioral tests after stroke. MRI ventricular volumes provided the most sensitive index in monitoring brain remodeling and treatment effects and highly correlated with histological and functional measurements. PMID:22900057

  18. T1ρ MRI detects cartilage damage in asymptomatic individuals with a cam deformity.

    Anwander, Helen; Melkus, Gerd; Rakhra, Kawan S; Beaulé, Paul E

    2016-06-01

    Hips with a cam deformity are at risk for early cartilage degeneration, mainly in the anterolateral region of the joint. T1ρ MRI is a described technique for assessment of proteoglycan content in hyaline cartilage and subsequently early cartilage damage. In this study, 1.5 Tesla T1ρ MRI was performed on 20 asymptomatic hips with a cam deformity and compared to 16 healthy control hips. Cam deformity was defined as an alpha angle at 1:30 o'clock position over 60° and/or at 3:00 o'clock position over 50.5°. Hip cartilage was segmented and divided into four regions of interest (ROIs): anterolateral, anteromedial, posterolateral, and posteromedial quadrants. Mean T1ρ value of the entire weight bearing cartilage in hips with a cam deformity (34.0 ± 4.6 ms) was significantly higher compared to control hips (31.3 ± 3.2 ms, p = 0.050). This difference reached significance in the anterolateral (p = 0.042) and posteromedial quadrants (p = 0.041). No significant correlation between the alpha angle and T1ρ values was detected. The results indicate cartilage damage occurs in hips with a cam deformity before symptoms occur. A significant difference in T1ρ values was found in the anterolateral quadrant, the area of direct engagement of the deformity, and in the posteromedial quadrant. To conclude, T1ρ MRI can detect early chondral damage in asymptomatic hips with a cam deformity. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1004-1009, 2016. PMID:26573964

  19. Remotely-Sensed Detection of Foreclosure Effects on Residential Landscapes

    Cutts, B.; Minn, M.; Pavlovic, N. R.; Greenberg, J. A.; Fraterrigo, J.; Turner, V. K.

    2014-12-01

    This project aims to understand whether the foreclosure crisis of 2007-2010 led to change in yard management with consequences for property and neighborhood land cover. By triangulating across analyses that vary in spatial and temporal resolution, this study examines whether foreclosure has resulted in changes in household and neighborhood vegetation structure. One common hypothesis is that the of financial distress is a reduction in lawn management (mowing, irrigating, and fertilizing ) due to economic constraint, vacancy or abandonment. However, changes in these practices differ across space as they are mediated by individual idiosyncrasies as well as complex social norms encoded in formal and informal institutions. The aim of our broader research project is to gain understanding of how foreclosure changes yard management within the context of these institutions. This poster presents preliminary results of analyses that aim to understand the relationship between foreclosure and land cover change in Maricopa County (Phoenix), Arizona. We synthesize foreclosure data with other social data sources focused on demographics, property characteristics, and vacancy to quantify both general and spatially dependent signatures of foreclosure in remotely-sensed NDVI data from MODIS and LANDSAT. Through results from multiple sources of data, we aim to isolate and describe signals that can be correlated with housing distress and foreclosure-induced vacancy. Arizona is analytically advantageous as area with an arid climate where the vegetation changes resulting from cessation of lawn maintenance are often dramatic and clearly observable. Our preliminary analysis indicates that there are specific NDVI signatures reflecting differing landscape-maintenance responses to foreclosure, supporting our central thesis that foreclosure influences land cover. These results provide a foundation upon which we will engage in both detailed investigation of the environmental effects of this

  20. Remote Mine Detection Technologies for Land and Water Environments

    Hoover, Eddie R.

    1999-05-11

    The detection of mines, both during and after hostilities, is a growing international problem. It limits military operations during wartime and unrecovered mines create tragic consequences for civilians. From a purely humanitarian standpoint an estimated 100 million or more unrecovered mines are located in over 60 countries worldwide. This paper presents an overview of some of the technologies currently being investigated by Sandia National Laboratories for the detection and monitoring of minefields in land and water environments. The three technical areas described in this paper are: 1) the development of new mathematical techniques for combining or fusing the data from multiple sources for enhanced decision-making; 2) an environmental fate and transport (EF&T) analysis approach that is central to improving trace chemical sensing technique; and 3) the investigation of an underwater range imaging device to aid in locating and characterizing mines and other obstacles in coastal waters.

  1. Geospatial Image Stream Processing: Models, techniques, and applications in remote sensing change detection

    Rueda-Velasquez, Carlos Alberto

    Detection of changes in environmental phenomena using remotely sensed data is a major requirement in the Earth sciences, especially in natural disaster related scenarios where real-time detection plays a crucial role in the saving of human lives and the preservation of natural resources. Although various approaches formulated to model multidimensional data can in principle be applied to the inherent complexity of remotely sensed geospatial data, there are still challenging peculiarities that demand a precise characterization in the context of change detection, particularly in scenarios of fast changes. In the same vein, geospatial image streams do not fit appropriately in the standard Data Stream Management System (DSMS) approach because these systems mainly deal with tuple-based streams. Recognizing the necessity for a systematic effort to address the above issues, the work presented in this thesis is a concrete step toward the foundation and construction of an integrated Geospatial Image Stream Processing framework, GISP. First, we present a data and metadata model for remotely sensed image streams. We introduce a precise characterization of images and image streams in the context of remotely sensed geospatial data. On this foundation, we define spatially-aware temporal operators with a consistent semantics for change analysis tasks. We address the change detection problem in settings where multiple image stream sources are available, and thus we introduce an architectural design for the processing of geospatial image streams from multiple sources. With the aim of targeting collaborative scientific environments, we construct a realization of our architecture based on Kepler, a robust and widely used scientific workflow management system, as the underlying computational support; and open data and Web interface standards, as a means to facilitate the interoperability of GISP instances with other processing infrastructures and client applications. We demonstrate our

  2. Temporal Forest Change Detection and Forest Health Assessment using Remote Sensing

    This paper presents the detection of Angsi and Berembun Reserve Forest change for years 1996 and 2013. Forest is an important part of our ecosystem. The main function is to absorb carbon oxide and produce oxygen in their cycle of photosynthesis to maintain a balance and healthy atmosphere. However, forest changes as time changes. Some changes are necessary as to give way for economic growth. Nevertheless, it is important to monitor forest change so that deforestation and development can be planned and the balance of ecosystem is still preserved. It is important because there are number of unfavorable effects of deforestation that include environmental and economic such as erosion of soil, loss of biodiversity and climate change. The forest change detection can be studied with reference of several satellite images using remote sensing application. Forest change detection is best done with remote sensing due to large and remote study area. The objective of this project is to detect forest change over time and to compare forest health indicated by Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) using remote sensing and image processing. The forest under study shows depletion of forest area by 12% and 100% increment of deforestation activities. The NDVI value which is associated with the forest health also shows 13% of reduction

  3. Detection of suspected placental invasion by MRI: Do the results depend on observer’ experience?

    Alamo, Leonor, E-mail: leonor.alamo@chuv.ch [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Anaye, Anass; Rey, Jannick; Denys, Alban [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bongartz, Georg [Universitätsspital Basel (Switzerland); Terraz, Sylvain [Hôpitaux Universitaires Genève (Switzerland); Artemisia, Simona; Meuli, Reto; Schmidt, Sabine [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of previously described MR features used for detecting suspected placental invasion according to observers’ experience. Materials and methods: Our population included 25 pregnant women (mean age 35.16) investigated by prenatal MRI (1.5 T, T1- and T2-weighted MR-sequences without i.v. contrast), among them 12 with histopathologically proven placental invasion and 13 women (52%) without placental invasion used as control group. Two senior and two junior radiologists blindly and independently reviewed MR-examinations in view of 6 previously defined MR-features indicating presence and degree of placental invasion (placenta increta, accreta or percreta). For each reader the sensibility, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) were calculated. Interobserver agreements between senior and junior readers were determined. Stepwise logistic regression was performed including the 6 MR-features predictive of placental invasion. Results: Demographics between both groups were statistically equivalent. Overall sensitivity and specificity for placental invasion was 90.9% and 75.0% for seniors and 81.8% and 61.8% for juniors, respectively. The best single MR-feature indicating placental invasion was T2-hypointense placental bands (r{sup 2} = 0.28), followed by focally interrupted myometrial border, infiltration of pelvic organs and tenting of the bladder (r{sup 2} = 0.36). Interobserver agreement for detecting placental invasion was 0.64 for seniors and 0.41 for juniors, thus substantial and moderate, respectively. Seniors detected placental invasion and depth of infiltration with significantly higher diagnostic certitude than juniors (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0282, respectively). Conclusion: MRI can be a reliable and reproducible tool for the detection of suspected placental invasion, but the diagnostic value significantly depends on observers’ experience.

  4. Land use change detection using remote sensing and artificial neural network: Application to Birjand, Iran

    Saeed Ahmadizadeh; Maryam Yousefi; Mehdi Saghafi

    2014-01-01

    Land is becoming a scarce natural resource due to the burgeoning population growth and urbanization. Essentially, detecting changes in land surface is significant for understanding and assessing human impacts on the environment. Nowadays, land use change detection using remote sensing data provides quantitative and timely information for management and evaluation of natural resources. This study investigates the land use changes in Birjand of Iran using Landsat TM5 images between 1986 and 201...

  5. Detection of Harbours from High Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery via Saliency Analysis and Feature Learning

    Wang, Yetianjian; Pan, Li; Wang, Dagang; Kang, Yifei

    2016-06-01

    Harbours are very important objects in civil and military fields. To detect them from high resolution remote sensing imagery is important in various fields and also a challenging task. Traditional methods of detecting harbours mainly focus on the segmentation of water and land and the manual selection of knowledge. They do not make enough use of other features of remote sensing imagery and often fail to describe the harbours completely. In order to improve the detection, a new method is proposed. First, the image is transformed to Hue, Saturation, Value (HSV) colour space and saliency analysis is processed via the generation and enhancement of the co-occurrence histogram to help detect and locate the regions of interest (ROIs) that is salient and may be parts of the harbour. Next, SIFT features are extracted and feature learning is processed to help represent the ROIs. Then, by using classified feature of the harbour, a classifier is trained and used to check the ROIs to find whether they belong to the harbour. Finally, if the ROIs belong to the harbour, a minimum bounding rectangle is formed to include all the harbour ROIs and detect and locate the harbour. The experiment on high resolution remote sensing imagery shows that the proposed method performs better than other methods in precision of classifying ROIs and accuracy of completely detecting and locating harbours.

  6. Non-contact biopotential sensor for remote human detection

    This paper describes a new low-cost, low-noise displacement current sensor developed for non-contact measurements of human biopotentials and well suited for detection of human presence applications. The sensor employs a simple, improvised transimpedance amplifier that eliminates the need for ultra high values resistors normally needed in current amplifiers required for this type of measurements. The sensor provides an operational bandwidth of 0.5 - 250 Hz, and a noise level of 7.8μV√Hz at 1 Hz down to 30nV/√Hz at 1 kHz. Reported experimental results demonstrate the sensor's capability in measuring heart related biopotentials within 0.5m off-body distance, and muscle related biopotentials within 10m no obstacles off-body distance, and 5m off-body distance with a concrete wall in between.

  7. Remote calorimetric detection of urea via flow injection analysis.

    Gaddes, David E; Demirel, Melik C; Reeves, W Brian; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2015-12-01

    The design and development of a calorimetric biosensing system enabling relatively high throughput sample analysis are reported. The calorimetric biosensor system consists of a thin (∼20 μm) micromachined Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) as a temperature sensor placed in close proximity to a fluidic chamber packed with an immobilized enzyme. Layer by layer enzyme immobilization of urease is demonstrated and its activity as a function of the number of layers, pH, and time has been evaluated. This configuration enables a sensing system where a transducer element is physically separated from the analyte solution of interest and is thereby free from fouling effects typically associated with biochemical reactions occuring on the sensor surface. The performance of this biosensing system is demonstrated by detection of 1-200 mM urea in phosphate buffer via a flow injection analysis (FIA) technique. Miniaturized fluidic systems were used to provide continuous flow through a reaction column. Under this configuration the biosensor has an ultimate resolution of less than 1 mM urea and showed a linear response between 0-50 mM. This work demonstrates a sensing modality in which the sensor itself is not fouled or contaminated by the solution of interest and the enzyme immobilized Kapton® fluidic reaction column can be used as a disposable cartridge. Such a system enables reuse and reliability for long term sampling measurements. Based on this concept a biosensing system is envisioned which can perform rapid measurements to detect biomarkers such as glucose, creatinine, cholesterol, urea and lactate in urine and blood continuously over extended periods of time. PMID:26479269

  8. Image analysis, classification, and change detection in remote sensing with algorithms for ENVI/IDL

    Canty, Morton J

    2011-01-01

    Demonstrating the breadth and depth of growth in the field since the publication of the popular first edition, Image Analysis, Classification and Change Detection in Remote Sensing, with Algorithms for ENVI/IDL, Second Edition has been updated and expanded to keep pace with the latest versions of the ENVI software environment. Effectively interweaving theory, algorithms, and computer codes, the text supplies an accessible introduction to the techniques used in the processing of remotely sensed imagery. This significantly expanded edition presents numerous image analysis examples and algorithms

  9. A new method of inshore ship detection in high-resolution optical remote sensing images

    Hu, Qifeng; Du, Yaling; Jiang, Yunqiu; Ming, Delie

    2015-10-01

    Ship as an important military target and water transportation, of which the detection has great significance. In the military field, the automatic detection of ships can be used to monitor ship dynamic in the harbor and maritime of enemy, and then analyze the enemy naval power. In civilian field, the automatic detection of ships can be used in monitoring transportation of harbor and illegal behaviors such as illegal fishing, smuggling and pirates, etc. In recent years, research of ship detection is mainly concentrated in three categories: forward-looking infrared images, downward-looking SAR image, and optical remote sensing images with sea background. Little research has been done into ship detection of optical remote sensing images with harbor background, as the gray-scale and texture features of ships are similar to the coast in high-resolution optical remote sensing images. In this paper, we put forward an effective harbor ship target detection method. First of all, in order to overcome the shortage of the traditional difference method in obtaining histogram valley as the segmentation threshold, we propose an iterative histogram valley segmentation method which separates the harbor and ships from the water quite well. Secondly, as landing ships in optical remote sensing images usually lead to discontinuous harbor edges, we use Hough Transform method to extract harbor edges. First, lines are detected by Hough Transform. Then, lines that have similar slope are connected into a new line, thus we access continuous harbor edges. Secondary segmentation on the result of the land-and-sea separation, we eventually get the ships. At last, we calculate the aspect ratio of the ROIs, thereby remove those targets which are not ship. The experiment results show that our method has good robustness and can tolerate a certain degree of noise and occlusion.

  10. Incident and Traffic-Bottleneck Detection Algorithm in High-Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    S.M.M. Kahaki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important methods to solve traffic congestion is to detect the incident state of a roadway. This paper describes the development of a method for road traffic monitoring aimed at the acquisition and analysis of remote sensing imagery. We propose a strategy for road extraction, vehicle detection and incident detection from remote sensing imagery using techniques based on neural networks, Radon transform for angle detection and traffic-flow measurements. Traffic-bottleneck detection is another method that is proposed for recognizing incidents in both offline and real-time mode. Traffic flows and incidents are extracted from aerial images of bottleneck zones. The results show that the proposed approach has a reasonable detection performance compared to other methods. The best performance of the learning system was a detection rate of 87% and a false alarm rate of less than 18% on 45 aerial images of roadways. The performance of the traffic-bottleneck detection method had a detection rate of 87.5%.

  11. Brain Tumor Detection and Classification Using Deep Learning Classifier on MRI Images

    V.P. Gladis Pushpa Rathi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has become an effective tool for clinical research in recent years and has found itself in applications such as brain tumour detection. In this study, tumor classification using multiple kernel-based probabilistic clustering and deep learning classifier is proposed. The proposed technique consists of three modules, namely segmentation module, feature extraction module and classification module. Initially, the MRI image is pre-processed to make it fit for segmentation and de-noising process is carried out using median filter. Then, pre-processed image is segmented using Multiple Kernel based Probabilistic Clustering (MKPC. Subsequently, features are extracted for every segment based on the shape, texture and intensity. After features extraction, important features will be selected using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA for classification purpose. Finally, deep learning classifier is employed for classification into tumor or non-tumor. The proposed technique is evaluated using sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. The proposed technique results are also compared with existing technique which uses Feed-Forward Back Propagation Network (FFBN. The proposed technique achieved an average sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.88, 0.80 and 0.83, respectively with the highest values as about 1, 0.85 and 0.94. Improved results show the efficiency of the proposed technique.

  12. RoboHound:developing sample collection and preconcentration hardware for a remote trace explosives detection system.

    Peterson, David J. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Denning, David J.; Hobart, Clinton G.; Lenz, Michael C.; Anderson, Robert J.; Carlson, Dennis L.; Hunter, John Anthony; Gladwell, T. Scott; Mitchell, Mary-Anne; Hannum, David W.; Baumann, Mark J.

    2005-09-01

    The RoboHound{trademark} Project was a three-year, multiphase project at Sandia National Laboratories to build and refine a working prototype trace explosive detection system as a tool for a commercial robot. The RoboHound system was envisioned to be a tool for emergency responders to test suspicious items (i.e., packages or vehicles) for explosives while maintaining a safe distance. The project investigated combining Sandia's expertise in trace explosives detection with a wheeled robotic platform that could be programmed to interrogate suspicious items remotely for the presence of explosives. All of the RoboHound field tests were successful, especially with regards to the ability to collect and detect trace samples of RDX. The project has gone from remote sampling with human intervention to a fully automatic system that requires no human intervention until the robot returns from a sortie. A proposal is being made for additional work leading towards commercialization.

  13. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  14. Study on Method of Geohazard Change Detection Based on Integrating Remote Sensing and GIS

    Following a comprehensive literature review, this paper looks at analysis of geohazard using remote sensing information. This paper compares the basic types and methods of change detection, explores the basic principle of common methods and makes an respective analysis of the characteristics and shortcomings of the commonly used methods in the application of geohazard. Using the earthquake in JieGu as a case study, this paper proposes a geohazard change detection method integrating RS and GIS. When detecting the pre-earthquake and post-earthquake remote sensing images at different phases, it is crucial to set an appropriate threshold. The method adopts a self-adapting determination algorithm for threshold. We select a training region which is obtained after pixel information comparison and set a threshold value. The threshold value separates the changed pixel maximum. Then we apply the threshold value to the entire image, which could also make change detection accuracy maximum. Finally, we output the result to the GIS system to make change analysis. The experimental results show that this method of geohazard change detection based on integrating remote sensing and GIS information has higher accuracy with obvious advantages compared with the traditional methods

  15. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    D. R. Thompson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of the NASA/ESA CO2 and Methane Experiment (COMEX campaign in California during June and August/September 2014. COMEX was a multi-platform campaign to measure CH4 plumes released from anthropogenic sources including oil and gas infrastructure. We discuss principles for real-time spectral signature detection and measurement, and report performance on the NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG. AVIRIS-NG successfully detected CH4 plumes in real-time at Gb s−1 data rates, characterizing fugitive releases in concert with other in situ and remote instruments. The teams used these real-time CH4 detections to coordinate measurements across multiple platforms, including airborne in situ, airborne non-imaging remote sensing, and ground-based in situ instruments. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of real-time trace gas signature detection in an airborne science campaign, and presages many future applications.

  16. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    Dragana Roganovic

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities.  We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. The difference in performance between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography was significant (p < 0.001, while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p = 0.20. 

  17. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: Comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    Dragana Roganovic; Dragana Djilas; Sasa Vujnovic; Dag Pavic; Dragan Stojanov

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities.  We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by ...

  18. Fast joint detection-estimation of evoked brain activity in event-related fMRI using a variational approach

    Chaari, Lotfi; Vincent, Thomas; Forbes, Florence; Dojat, Michel; Ciuciu, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    International audience In standard within-subject analyses of event-related fMRI data, two steps are usually performed separately: detection of brain activity and estimation of the hemodynamic response. Because these two steps are inherently linked, we adopt the socalled region-based Joint Detection-Estimation (JDE) framework that addresses this joint issue using a multivariate inference for detection and estimation. JDE is built by making use of a regional bilinear generative model of the...

  19. Detection of Coastline Deformation Using Remote Sensing and Geodetic Surveys

    Sabuncu, A.; Dogru, A.; Ozener, H.; Turgut, B.

    2016-06-01

    The coastal areas are being destroyed due to the usage that effect the natural balance. Unconsciously sand mining from the sea for nearshore nourishment and construction uses are the main ones. Physical interferences for mining of sand cause an ecologic threat to the coastal environment. However, use of marine sand is inevitable because of economic reasons or unobtainable land-based sand resources. The most convenient solution in such a protection-usage dilemma is to reduce negative impacts of sand production from marine. This depends on the accurate determination of criteriaon production place, style, and amount of sand. With this motivation, nearshore geodedic surveying studies performed on Kilyos Campus of Bogazici University located on the Black Sea coast, north of Istanbul, Turkey between 2001-2002. The study area extends 1 km in the longshore. Geodetic survey was carried out in the summer of 2001 to detect the initial condition for the shoreline. Long-term seasonal changes in shoreline positions were determined biannually. The coast was measured with post-processed kinematic GPS. Besides, shoreline change has studied using Landsat imagery between the years 1986-2015. The data set of Landsat 5 imageries were dated 05.08.1986 and 31.08.2007 and Landsat 7 imageries were dated 21.07.2001 and 28.07.2015. Landcover types in the study area were analyzed on the basis of pixel based classification method. Firstly, unsupervised classification based on ISODATA (Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis Technique) has been applied and spectral clusters have been determined that gives prior knowledge about the study area. In the second step, supervised classification was carried out by using the three different approaches which are minimum-distance, parallelepiped and maximum-likelihood. All pixel based classification processes were performed with ENVI 4.8 image processing software. Results of geodetic studies and classification outputs will be presented in this paper.

  20. Review of methods for functional brain connectivity detection using fMRI

    Li, Kaiming; Guo, Lei; Nie, Jingxin; Li, Gang; Liu, Tianming

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid of 1990s, functional connectivity study using fMRI (fcMRI) has drawn increasing attention of neuroscientists and computer scientists, since it opens a new window to explore functional network of human brain with relatively high resolution. A variety of methods for fcMRI study have been proposed. This paper intends to provide a technical review on computational methodologies developed for fcMRI analysis. From our perspective, these computational methods are classified into two ge...

  1. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 tesla MRI : Clinical and radiological correlates

    Van Dalen, Jan Willem; Scuric, Eva E M; Van Veluw, Susanne J.; Caan, Matthan W A; Nederveen, Aart J.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Van Gool, Willem A.; Richard, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. Methods-We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a populati

  2. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 Tesla MRI: clinical and radiological correlates

    Dalen, J.W. van; Scuric, E.E.; Veluw, S.J. van; Caan, M.W.; Nederveen, A.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Gool, W.A. van; Richard, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. METHODS: We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a popula

  3. Comparison of laser methods for the remote detection of atmospheric pollutants.

    Kildal, H.; Byer, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Three methods of remote air pollution detection - Raman backscattering, resonance backscattering, and resonance absorption - are discussed and compared. Theoretical expressions are derived for the minimum detectable pollutant concentration, and in each case the depth resolution and the problems of interference, pump depletion, and background noise are discussed. A brief discussion of possible laser sources is included, numerical examples of the detectabilities based on present technology are given. The atmospheric transparency limits the useful range to a few kilometers for the Raman and resonance backscattering schemes. F or the resonance absorption technique the useful range can be as great as 50 kilometers.

  4. Detection and surveillance of rejection reactions after heart transplant by means of a sequence of MRI of 'black blood' type

    A echocardiography and a MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) investigation were achieved at 3 months to 7 years after heart transplant in 61 patients among whose 35 were suspected of rejection and 32 have had a myocardial biopsy. The myocardial (T2) transversal relaxation time was determined by using an inversion-recovery/spin-echo upon a magnet of 0.5 T. The rejection diagnosis criteria by echography was compared with that of a anomalistic high value of T2: 1. the MRI was positive but the echography not in 5 cases, all having positive biopsies; 2. the echography was positive but the MRI was not in 10 cases among which all the biopsies were negative; 3. the MRI and the echography gave concordant results in 46 cases (7 positives and 39 negatives) among which an agreement with the biopsy results was observed in 91% (20/22) of cases. The 12 patients having a positive MRI have had a new examination at 2 to 15 days after the anti-rejection treatment; the T2 values got normalized. In conclusion, the determination of the myocardial T2 by means of a 'black blood' MRI sequence appears to be superior to an echocardiography in detecting the rejections after heart transplant and could be utilised to evaluate the efficiency of anti-rejection treatment

  5. Is MRI better than CT for detecting a vascular component to dementia? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Beynon Rebecca

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of causes of dementia soon after symptom onset is important, because appropriate treatment of some causes of dementia can slow or halt its progression or enable symptomatic treatment where appropriate. The accuracy of MRI and CT, and whether MRI is superior to CT, in detecting a vascular component to dementia in autopsy confirmed and clinical cohorts of patients with VaD, combined AD and VaD (“mixed dementia”, and AD remain unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate this question. Methods We searched eight databases and screened reference lists to identify studies addressing the review question. We assessed study quality using QUADAS. We estimated summary diagnostic accuracy according to imaging finding, and ratios of diagnostic odds ratios (RDORs for MRI versus CT and high versus low risk of bias. Results We included 7 autopsy and 31 non-autopsy studies. There was little evidence that selective patient enrolment and risk of incorporation bias impacted on diagnostic accuracy (p = 0.12 to 0.95. The most widely reported imaging finding was white matter hyperintensities. For CT (11 studies summary sensitivity and specificity were 71% (95% CI 53%-85% and 55% (44%-66%. Corresponding figures for MRI (6 studies were 95% (87%-98% and 26% (12%-50%. General infarcts was the most specific imaging finding on MRI (96%; 95% CI 94%-97% and CT (96%; 93%-98%. However, sensitivity was low for both MRI (53%; 36%-70% and CT (52%; 22% to 80%. No imaging finding had consistently high sensitivity. Based on non-autopsy studies, MRI was more accurate than CT for six of seven imaging findings, but confidence intervals were wide. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence to suggest that MRI is superior to CT with respect to identifying cerebrovascular changes in autopsy-confirmed and clinical cohorts of VaD, AD, and ‘mixed dementia’.

  6. A remote islanding detection and control strategy for photovoltaic-based distributed generation systems

    Highlights: • This study presents a new remote islanding detection method for PV based DG systems. • An uncomplicated VLSI based structure for voltage drifting detection is proposed with FPGA. • The proposed method was verified by the developed PV testbed constituted in the laboratory. • The islanding detection time is 1.65 ms even in a resonant condition. • The proposed method is independent from inverter & load so it can be easily implemented. - Abstract: This study presents a new remote islanding detection method and control system for photovoltaic (PV) based Distributed Generation (DG) systems. The proposed method monitors and controls the grid, local load and the output of the PV inverter in real time with the communication of circuit breakers. The proposed remote control system detects the changes in the currents of the circuit breakers, frequency, and the voltages by checking the defined threshold values at all electrical branches of the PV system. The proposed islanding detection algorithm was implemented by a low-cost FPGA board. The control system was also designed by considering a Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) structure. The proposed method was verified by a developed prototype PV system constituted in the laboratory. The proposed control system was checked in a resonance condition with an active power match, and the verified results indicated that the developed system was also independent of the load and the inverter. Islanding detection time is approximately 1.65 ms even in a worst-case operational scenario, and this is a significantly shorter response time according to the existing standards. The proposed method presents a realistic solution to islanding, is easy to implement, and is suitable for real system applications. The method also provides a reliable islanding detection and presents a low-cost solution to the subject

  7. Continuously moving table MRI with sliding multislice for rectal cancer staging: Image quality and lesion detection

    Baumann, Tobias [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 49, 79095 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: tobias.baumann@uniklinik-freiburg.de; Ludwig, Ute [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Physics, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 49, 79095 Freiburg (Germany); Pache, Gregor [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 49, 79095 Freiburg (Germany); Fautz, Hans-Peter [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Physics, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 49, 79095 Freiburg (Germany); Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Schaefer, Oliver [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 49, 79095 Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine image quality and lesion detection of sliding multislice (SMS), a recently developed moving table MRI technique, in patients with rectal cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven paired SMS (Avanto, Siemens Medical Solutions) and MDCT (Sensation 64, Siemens Medical Solutions) examinations of abdomen and pelvis were performed in patients with rectal cancer and compared for detection of liver, lymph node and bone metastases by two independent observers. A contrast-enhanced, fat saturated 2D gradient echo sequence (TE, 2.0 ms; TR, 102 ms; slice, 5 mm) was acquired with SMS and a standard contrast-enhanced protocol (100 ml 2.5 ml/s; slice, 5 mm) was used for abdominal MDCT. Standard of reference consisted of a consensus evaluation of SMS, MDCT, and all available follow-up examinations after a period of 6 months. Artifact burden and image quality of SMS was assessed in comparison to stationary gradient echo sequences obtained in an age-matched group of 27 patients. Results: Whereas SMS achieved a mean quality score of 3.65 (scale, 0-4) for the liver, representing very good diagnostic properties, strong breathing artifacts in the intestinal region were observed in 19 cases by both observers. The retroperitoneum still achieved a mean quality score of 3.52, although breathing artifacts were noted in 12 and 15 cases (observers 1 and 2, respectively). The sensitivities of SMS to detect hepatic metastases were 91.2% and 94.1% for both observers, respectively, compared to 98.5%/98.5% for MDCT. The sensitivities for lymph node metastases were 87.5%/81.3% for SMS compared to 78.1%/81.3% for MDCT. The sensitivities for bone metastases were 91.7%/100% for SMS compared to 8.3%/16.7% for MDCT. Conclusion: With slightly reduced image quality in the intestinal region, SMS exhibits equal detection of lymph node and liver metastases compared to MDCT. SMS MRI proved to be superior to MDCT in detection of bone metastases.

  8. Continuously moving table MRI with sliding multislice for rectal cancer staging: Image quality and lesion detection

    Purpose: To determine image quality and lesion detection of sliding multislice (SMS), a recently developed moving table MRI technique, in patients with rectal cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven paired SMS (Avanto, Siemens Medical Solutions) and MDCT (Sensation 64, Siemens Medical Solutions) examinations of abdomen and pelvis were performed in patients with rectal cancer and compared for detection of liver, lymph node and bone metastases by two independent observers. A contrast-enhanced, fat saturated 2D gradient echo sequence (TE, 2.0 ms; TR, 102 ms; slice, 5 mm) was acquired with SMS and a standard contrast-enhanced protocol (100 ml 2.5 ml/s; slice, 5 mm) was used for abdominal MDCT. Standard of reference consisted of a consensus evaluation of SMS, MDCT, and all available follow-up examinations after a period of 6 months. Artifact burden and image quality of SMS was assessed in comparison to stationary gradient echo sequences obtained in an age-matched group of 27 patients. Results: Whereas SMS achieved a mean quality score of 3.65 (scale, 0-4) for the liver, representing very good diagnostic properties, strong breathing artifacts in the intestinal region were observed in 19 cases by both observers. The retroperitoneum still achieved a mean quality score of 3.52, although breathing artifacts were noted in 12 and 15 cases (observers 1 and 2, respectively). The sensitivities of SMS to detect hepatic metastases were 91.2% and 94.1% for both observers, respectively, compared to 98.5%/98.5% for MDCT. The sensitivities for lymph node metastases were 87.5%/81.3% for SMS compared to 78.1%/81.3% for MDCT. The sensitivities for bone metastases were 91.7%/100% for SMS compared to 8.3%/16.7% for MDCT. Conclusion: With slightly reduced image quality in the intestinal region, SMS exhibits equal detection of lymph node and liver metastases compared to MDCT. SMS MRI proved to be superior to MDCT in detection of bone metastases.

  9. An Optimized Clustering Approach for Automated Detection of White Matter Lesions in MRI Brain Images

    M. Anitha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Settings White Matter lesions (WMLs are small areas of dead cells found in parts of the brain. In general, it is difficult for medical experts to accurately quantify the WMLs due to decreased contrast between White Matter (WM and Grey Matter (GM. The aim of this paper is to
    automatically detect the White Matter Lesions which is present in the brains of elderly people. WML detection process includes the following stages: 1. Image preprocessing, 2. Clustering (Fuzzy c-means clustering, Geostatistical Possibilistic clustering and Geostatistical Fuzzy clustering and 3.Optimization using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The proposed system is tested on a database of 208 MRI images. GFCM yields high sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 94% and overall accuracy of 93% over FCM and GPC. The clustered brain images are then subjected to Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The optimized result obtained from GFCM-PSO provides sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 94% and accuracy of 95%. The detection results reveals that GFCM and GFCMPSO better localizes the large regions of lesions and gives less false positive rate when compared to GPC and GPC-PSO which captures the largest loads of WMLs only in the upper ventral horns of the brain.

  10. Using High Spatial Resolution to Improve BOLD fMRI Detection at 3T.

    Juliana Iranpour

    Full Text Available For different functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD contrast, the acquisition of T2*-weighted scans at a high spatial resolution may be advantageous in terms of time-course signal-to-noise ratio and of BOLD sensitivity when the regions are prone to susceptibility artifacts. In this study, we explore this solution by examining how spatial resolution influences activations elicited when appetizing food pictures are viewed. Twenty subjects were imaged at 3 T with two different voxel volumes, 3.4 μl and 27 μl. Despite the diminution of brain coverage, we found that high-resolution acquisition led to a better detection of activations. Though known to suffer to different degrees from susceptibility artifacts, the activations detected by high spatial resolution were notably consistent with those reported in published activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses, corresponding to taste-responsive regions. Furthermore, these regions were found activated bilaterally, in contrast with previous findings. Both the reduction of partial volume effect, which improves BOLD contrast, and the mitigation of susceptibility artifact, which boosts the signal to noise ratio in certain regions, explained the better detection noted with high resolution. The present study provides further evidences that high spatial resolution is a valuable solution for human BOLD fMRI, especially for studying food-related stimuli.

  11. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    Thompson, D. R.; I. Leifer; Bovensmann, H.; Eastwood, M; M. Fladeland; C. Frankenberg; K. Gerilowski; Green, R. O.; S. Kratwurst; Krings, T; B. Luna; A. K. Thorpe

    2015-01-01

    Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of th...

  12. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    Thompson, D. R.; I. Leifer; Bovensmann, H.; Eastwood, M; M. Fladeland; C. Frankenberg; K. Gerilowski; Green, R. O.; S. Kratwurst; Krings, T; B. Luna; A. K. Thorpe

    2015-01-01

    Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform miss...

  13. IQPC 2015 TRACK: WATER DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION ON MULTISOURCE REMOTE SENSING AND TERRAIN DATA

    Olasz, A.; D. Kristóf; Belényesi, M.; Bakos, K.; Kovács, Z.; Balázs, B.; Szabó, Sz.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2013, the EU FP7 research project “IQmulus” encourages the participation of the whole scientific community as well as specific user groups in the IQmulus Processing Contest (IQPC). This year, IQPC 2015 consists of three processing tasks (tracks), from which “Water detection and classification on multi-source remote sensing and terrain data” is introduced in the present paper. This processing track addresses a particular problem in the field of big data processing and management...

  14. A Dual-Mode UWB Wireless Platform with Random Pulse Length Detection for Remote Patient Monitoring

    Reyes, Carlos; Bisbe, Sergi; Shen, Ming; Jiang, Hao; Mikkelsen, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a dual-mode ultra-wideband platform for wireless Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM). Existing RPM solutions are typically based on two different hardware platforms; one responsible for medical-data monitoring and one to handle data transmission. The proposed RPM topology is based on a single hardware platform, but it is capable of both monitoring and data transmission. This is achieved by employing a new random pulse length detection method that allows data transmission by us...

  15. Initial studies on the remote detection of submerged Orimulsion with a range-gated laser fluorosensor

    Tests are being conducted to determine the capabilities of active sensors such as the laser fluorosensor used to detect heavy oils under the water surface. Submerged and neutrally buoyant oils and other petroleum products such as Orimulsion are very difficult to detect using conventional sensors. Environment Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard have initiated a series of studies to develop technologies capable of real-time remote detection of submerged spills in the marine environment. This paper presented the preliminary results of remote detection testing of submerged Orimulsion with laser-induced fluorescence. Laser fluorosensors are airborne sensors used to detect, classify and map oils and other petroleum products in both marine and terrestrial environments. Modern laser fluorosensors have range-gated detection systems which turn on the detector at the exact moment when a fluorescence spectral return is expected. The detector can be range-gated to look into the water column to observe fluorescence emitted from a submerged target. The clarity of the water and the emission of the wavelength from the laser determine the depth to which the technique can be used. Overlying water changes the fluorescence signature of the submerged target due to wavelength-dependent absorption. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  16. Experience acquired by the Mobile Remote-Control Operation and Detection Group of the CEA

    In recent years the Mobile Remote-Control Operation and Detection Group of the CEA have intervened on various occasions as follows: to replace personnel required to spend time in working areas in which dose rates were permanently high or very high; to support personnel required to work near high-activity sources producing or likely to produce mobile or short-lived beams of ionizing radiation; and to support personnel required to perform tedious and/or repetitive operations in working areas in which only a limited amount of time may be spent. Among the interventions performed, mention is made of the recovery of radioactive sources which have been placed in abnormal positions as a result of incorrect handling or incidents involving machinery; the transfer of radioactive sources during the loading or unloading of irradiation devices; the inspection by television camera, modification, dismantling or reassembly of protective devices in the neighbourhood of high- or very high-activity sources; and the cleaning of installations polluted by radioactive contaminants which present a high risk of external irradiation of the personnel required to work there. After obtaining a hermetically sealed version of the ''Mobile Remote-Control Intervention Operator'' (TOMI) and an ''Intervention Dose and Dose-Rate Measurement Unit'' (EDDI) in 1979, the Mobile Remote-Control Operation and Detection Group has very recently put into operation a remote-controlled intervention module which takes up very little space and can carry over 100 kg of different types of equipment. The authors summarize development work on the MERITE module and on master-slave remote handling devices with servo control and feedback of the MA-23 type, the flexibility of which has yet again been verified very recently during an intervention at a nuclear installation. (author)

  17. Quaternion-Based Improved Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for Color Remote Sensing Image Edge Detection

    Dujin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the color remote sensing image has the most notable features such as huge amount of data, rich image details, and the containing of too much noise, the edge detection becomes a grave challenge in processing of remote sensing image data. To explore a possible solution to the urgent problem, in this paper, we first introduced the quaternion into the representation of color image. In this way, a color can be represented and analyzed as a single entity. Then a novel artificial bee colony method named improved artificial bee colony which can improve the performance of conventional artificial bee colony was proposed. In this method, in order to balance the exploration and the exploitation, two new search equations were presented to generate candidate solutions in the employed bee phase and the onlookers phase, respectively. Additionally, some more reasonable artificial bee colony parameters were proposed to improve the performance of the artificial bee colony. Then we applied the proposed method to the quaternion vectors to perform the edge detection of color remote sensing image. Experimental results show that our method can get a better edge detection effect than other methods.

  18. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiemann, Dora K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Choi, Junoh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  19. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    Thompson, D. R.; Leifer, I.; Bovensmann, H.; Eastwood, M.; Fladeland, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Gerilowski, K.; Green, R. O.; Kratwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Luna, B.; Thorpe, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of the NASA/ESA CO2 and MEthane eXperiment (COMEX) campaign in California during June and August/September 2014. COMEX was a multi-platform campaign to measure CH4 plumes released from anthropogenic sources including oil and gas infrastructure. We discuss principles for real-time spectral signature detection and measurement, and report performance on the NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG). AVIRIS-NG successfully detected CH4 plumes in real-time at Gb s-1 data rates, characterizing fugitive releases in concert with other in situ and remote instruments. The teams used these real-time CH4 detections to coordinate measurements across multiple platforms, including airborne in situ, airborne non-imaging remote sensing, and ground-based in situ instruments. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of real-time trace-gas signature detection in an airborne science campaign, and presages many future applications. Post-analysis demonstrates matched filter methods providing noise-equivalent (1σ) detection sensitivity for 1.0 % CH4 column enhancements equal to 141 ppm m.

  20. Introducing a new definition towards clinical detection of Microvascular changes using diffusion and perfusion MRI

    Based on MRI diffusion's and perfusion, a new criterion for detection and the healing progress of damaged tissue is suggested. The study is based on the ratio of capillary radii in symmetrical damaged and normal tissue neighboring spaces. The apparent diffusion coefficient and cerebral blood flow were measured in the brain tissues of six male wistar rats utilizing suggested MRI measurement techniques. The apparent diffusion coefficient values of damaged and normal regions were (392±34.1) x10-6 mm2s-1 and (659±40.7)x10-6 mm2s-1, respectively. The cerebral blood flow values of damaged and normal regions were 14.5±10.13 mi/min/100 g and 125±41.03 mi/min/100 g, respectively. The geometrical parameters of the capillary for damaged and normal regions midle root/√ Λ, where midle root is the mean radius and Λ is the mean capillary segment length , were calculated to be 5.45±2.01mm0.5g-0.5 (mean±Sd) and 12.8±2.04 mm0.5g-0.5, respectively. Furthermore, based on constant Λ, the damaged, versus normal region, mean radius, was shown to follow the criterionmidle root Damaged≅0.13xmidle root Normal. A further analysis was conducted through suitable theoretical modeling and assumptions for the above-mentioned criterion. The analysis showed a distinct difference between normal and damaged tissues in various healing progress conditions. Moreover, a new image, namely, Diffusion/Flow map (DF map), which is a mere division of the ADC map to the cerebral blood flow map, was introduced and utilized to contrast between normal and damaged tissue

  1. Detecting a fluid-filled borehole using elastic waves from a remote borehole.

    Tang, Xiaoming; Cao, Jingji; Li, Zhen; Su, Yuanda

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of a fluid-filled borehole with incident elastic waves is an important topic for downhole acoustic measurements. By analyzing the wave phenomena of this problem, one can simulate the detection of a borehole target using a source-receiver system in a remote borehole. The analysis result shows that the wave signals from the target borehole are of sufficient amplitude even though the borehole size is small compared to wavelength. Consequently, the target borehole can be detected when the two boreholes are far away from each other. The result can be utilized to provide a method for testing downhole acoustic imaging tools. PMID:27586782

  2. Prostate cancer transrectal HIFU ablation: detection of local recurrences using T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    The objective was to evaluate T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in detecting local cancer recurrences after prostate high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Fifty-nine patients with biochemical recurrence after prostate HIFU ablation underwent T2-weighted and DCE MRI before transrectal biopsy. For each patient, biopsies were performed by two operators: operator 1 (blinded to MR results) performed random and colour Doppler-guided biopsies (''routine biopsies''); operator 2 obtained up to three cores per suspicious lesion on MRI (''targeted biopsies''). Seventy-seven suspicious lesions were detected on DCE images (n=52), T2w images (n=2) or both (n=23). Forty patients and 41 MR lesions were positive at biopsy. Of the 36 remaining MR lesions, 20 contained viable benign glands. Targeted biopsy detected more cancers than routine biopsy (36 versus 27 patients, p=0.0523). The mean percentages of positive cores per patient and of tumour invasion of the cores were significantly higher for targeted biopsies (p<0.0001). The odds ratios of the probability of finding viable cancer and viable prostate tissue (benign or malignant) at targeted versus routine biopsy were respectively 3.35 (95% CI 3.05-3.64) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.13-1.63). MRI combining T2-weighted and DCE images is a promising method for guiding post-HIFU biopsy towards areas containing recurrent cancer and viable prostate tissue. (orig.)

  3. Optimization of Visual Tasks for Detecting Visual Cortex Activity in fMRI Studies

    "A. Mirzajani

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: functional magnetic resonance imaging is a useful non-invasive technique for the evaluation and mapping of human brain, especially the visual cortex. One of the most important subjects in this background is optimizing visual stimuli in various forms of visual tasks for acquiring significant and ro-bust signals. Materials and methods: The effects of physical pa-rameters of visual stimuli on 14 healthy volunteers for detecting visual cortical activity were evaluated by functional magnetic resonance imaging. These pa-rameters were temporal frequency (TF, different pat-terns of activation including, square wave and sine wave grating, and two different states of rest includ-ing black and white screens. Results: The results showed that BOLD signal will be maximally in the TF of 8 Hz, and use the black screen in the rest state. However there was not significant difference between square-¬wave and sine-wave grat-ings in producing visual activation in the cortex. Conclusion: Physical parameters of visual tasks are effective in detecting visual cortical activity, and it is necessary to pay attention to them in order to get sig-nificant and robust signal. Visual tasks with TF of 8 Hz and one pattern of square-wave or sine-wave in activation state, and black screen in rest state are op-timally suitable for fMRI studies.

  4. EDGE DETECTION METHOD OF REMOTE SENSING IMAGES BASED ON MATHEMATICAL MORPHOLOGY OF MULTI-STRUCTURE ELEMENTS

    LIN Hui; DU Pei-jun; ZHAO Chang-sheng; SHU Ning

    2004-01-01

    This paper puts forward an effective,specific algorithm for edge detection.Based on multi-structure elements of gray mathematics morphology,in the light of difference between noise and edge shape of RS images,the paper establishes multi-structure elements to detect edge by utilizing the grey form transformation principle.Compared with some classical edge detection operators,such as Sobel Edge Detection Operator,LOG Edge Detection Operator,and Canny Edge Detection Operator,the experiment indicates that this new algorithm possesses very good edge detection ability,which can detect edges more effectively,but its noise-resisting ability is relatively low.Because of the bigger noise of remote sensing image,the authors probe into putting forward other edge detection method based on combination of wavelet directivity checkout technology and small-scale Mathematical Morphology finally.So,position at the edge can be accurately located,the noise can be inhibited to a certain extent and the effect of edge detection is obvious.

  5. Detection of ancient Egyptian archaeological sites using satellite remote sensing and digital image processing

    Corrie, Robert K.

    2011-11-01

    Satellite remote sensing is playing an increasingly important role in the detection and documentation of archaeological sites. Surveying an area from the ground using traditional methods often presents challenges due to the time and costs involved. In contrast, the multispectral synoptic approach afforded by the satellite sensor makes it possible to cover much larger areas in greater spectral detail and more cost effectively. This is especially the case for larger scale regional surveys, which are helping to contribute to a better understanding of ancient Egyptian settlement patterns. This study presents an overview of satellite remote sensing data products, methodologies, and image processing techniques for detecting lost or undiscovered archaeological sites with reference to Egypt and the Near East. Key regions of the electromagnetic spectrum useful for site detection are discussed, including the visible near-infrared (VNIR), shortwave infrared (SWIR), thermal infrared (TIR), and microwave (radar). The potential of using Google Earth as both a data provider and a visualization tool is also examined. Finally, a case study is presented for detecting tell sites in Egypt using Landsat ETM+, ASTER, and Google Earth imagery. The results indicated that principal components analysis (PCA) was successfully able to detect and differentiate tell sites from modern settlements in Egypt's northwestern Nile Delta region.

  6. 'One-stop-shop' staging: Should we prefer FDG-PET/CT or MRI for the detection of bone metastases?

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of fully diagnostic, contrast-enhanced whole-body FDG-PET/CT and whole-body MRI for detection of bone metastases in patients suffering from newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer and malignant melanoma. Material and Methods: 109 consecutive non-small cell lung cancer (n = 54) and malignant melanoma (n = 55) patients underwent whole-body FDG-PET/CT and whole-body MRI for initial tumor staging. All images were evaluated by four experienced physicians (three radiologists, one nuclear medicine physician). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for detection of bone metastases were determined for both modalities. Statistically significant differences between FDG-PET/CT and MRI were calculated with Fisher's Exact test (p < 0.05). Clinical and imaging follow-up data with a mean follow-up time of 434 days served as the reference standard. Results: According to the reference standard 11 patients (10%) suffered from bone metastases. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for the detection of osseous metastases was 45%, 99%, 83%, 94%, and 94% with whole-body FDG-PET/CT and 64%, 94%, 54%, 96%, and 91% with whole-body MRI. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.6147). Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT and MRI seem to be equally suitable for the detection of skeletal metastases in patients suffering from newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer and malignant melanoma. Both modalities go along with a substantial rate of false-negative findings requiring a close follow-up of patients who are staged free of bone metastases at initial staging.

  7. Edge Detection from High Resolution Remote Sensing Images using Two-Dimensional log Gabor Filter in Frequency Domain

    Edges are vital features to describe the structural information of images, especially high spatial resolution remote sensing images. Edge features can be used to define the boundaries between different ground objects in high spatial resolution remote sensing images. Thus edge detection is important in the remote sensing image processing. Even though many different edge detection algorithms have been proposed, it is difficult to extract the edge features from high spatial resolution remote sensing image including complex ground objects. This paper introduces a novel method to detect edges from the high spatial resolution remote sensing image based on frequency domain. Firstly, the high spatial resolution remote sensing images are Fourier transformed to obtain the magnitude spectrum image (frequency image) by FFT. Then, the frequency spectrum is analyzed by using the radius and angle sampling. Finally, two-dimensional log Gabor filter with optimal parameters is designed according to the result of spectrum analysis. Finally, dot product between the result of Fourier transform and the log Gabor filter is inverse Fourier transformed to obtain the detections. The experimental result shows that the proposed algorithm can detect edge features from the high resolution remote sensing image commendably

  8. AN APPLIED RESEARCH ON APPROACH OF DYADIC WAVELET TRANSFORM FOR REMOTE SENSING IMAGE EDGE DETECTION

    Fu Wei; Xing Guangzhong; Hou Lantian; Qin Qiming; Wang Wenjun

    2006-01-01

    In the edge detection of Remote Sensing (RS) image, the useful detail losing and the spurious edge often appear. To solve the problem, the authors uses the dyadic wavelet to detect the edge of surface features by combining the edge detecting with the multi-resolution analyzing of the wavelet transform. Via the dyadic wavelet decomposing, the RS image of a certain appropriate scale is obtained, and the edge data of the plane and the upright directions are respectively figured out, then the gradient vector module of the surface features is worked out. By tracing them, the authors get the edge data of the object, therefore build the RS image which obtains the checked edge. This method can depress the effect of noise and examine exactly the edge data of the object by rule and line. With an experiment of an RS image which obtains an airport, the authors certificate the feasibility of the application of dyadic wavelet in the object edge detection.

  9. A robust anomaly based change detection method for time-series remote sensing images

    Time-series remote sensing images record changes happening on the earth surface, which include not only abnormal changes like human activities and emergencies (e.g. fire, drought, insect pest etc.), but also changes caused by vegetation phenology and climate changes. Yet, challenges occur in analyzing global environment changes and even the internal forces. This paper proposes a robust Anomaly Based Change Detection method (ABCD) for time-series images analysis by detecting abnormal points in data sets, which do not need to follow a normal distribution. With ABCD we can detect when and where changes occur, which is the prerequisite condition of global change studies. ABCD was tested initially with 10-day SPOT VGT NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) times series tracking land cover type changes, seasonality and noise, then validated to real data in a large area in Jiangxi, south of China. Initial results show that ABCD can precisely detect spatial and temporal changes from long time series images rapidly

  10. An initial experimental study-the value of gadolinium-enhanced MRI and delay enhanced MRI in detecting articular cartilage degeneration of the rabbit knee

    Objective: To explore the appearance and value of early and delaye Gadolinium- enhanced MRI in detecting aricular cartilage generation of rabbit knee. Methods: Twenty adult New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups (A, B, C, D, E). Intra-articular injection of Papain was performed to establish animal models of different stages of cartilage degeneration in the right knees of A, B, C, D groups, and MR scan was conducted 24 hours,one week one month and three months after the last Papain injection. The knees were scanned bilaterally with T1WI and 3D-FS-SPGR in sagittal plane. The signal intensity ratio between articular cartilage and surrounding soft tissue was measured at plain scan and 0, 2, 4 hours after intravenous injection of gadolinium (Gd-DTPA). The articular cartilage was pathologically examined (HE and alcican blue stain). Results: In 3D-FS-SPGR sequence, it showed significant difference in the SIR between processing side of four groups (F=7.961, P1WI sequence in detecting the change of cartilage signal intensity. (2)SIR on early and delayed Gadolinium-enhanced MRI has the ability in evaluating the early stage change of cartilage degeneration. (authors)