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Sample records for remote detection mri

  1. Remote NMR/MRI detection of laser polarized gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Saxena, Sunil; Moule, Adam; Spence, Megan; Seeley, Juliette A.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Han, Song-I; Granwehr, Josef

    2006-06-13

    An apparatus and method for remote NMR/MRI spectroscopy having an encoding coil with a sample chamber, a supply of signal carriers, preferably hyperpolarized xenon and a detector allowing the spatial and temporal separation of signal preparation and signal detection steps. This separation allows the physical conditions and methods of the encoding and detection steps to be optimized independently. The encoding of the carrier molecules may take place in a high or a low magnetic field and conventional NMR pulse sequences can be split between encoding and detection steps. In one embodiment, the detector is a high magnetic field NMR apparatus. In another embodiment, the detector is a superconducting quantum interference device. A further embodiment uses optical detection of Rb--Xe spin exchange. Another embodiment uses an optical magnetometer using non-linear Faraday rotation. Concentration of the signal carriers in the detector can greatly improve the signal to noise ratio.

  2. Sensitivity Quantification of Remote Detection NMR and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granwehr, Josef; Seeley, Juliette A.

    2005-10-25

    A sensitivity analysis of the remote detection NMR techniqueis presented. With remote detection, information about a sample isencoded onto a mobile sensor fluid, which facilitates a spatialseparation of encoding and detection of spin magnetization. This approachcan be interpreted as a two-dimensional NMR experiment, therefore thesame general formalism can be used for a sensitivity analysis. Eventhough remote detection is a point-by-point experiment, the sensitivitydoes not scale unfavorably with the number of detected points compared totransient detection. It is proportional to the relative sensitivitybetween the remote detector and the circuit that is used for encoding.The influence of the different signal decay times is analyzed, and thedistinction between spectroscopy and imaging experiments ismade.

  3. Gradient-free microfluidic flow labeling using thin magnetic films and remotely detected MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern-Manners, Nicholas W.; Kennedy, Daniel J.; Trease, David R.; Teisseyre, Thomas Z.; Malecek, Nicolas S.; Pines, Alexander; Bajaj, Vikram S.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) may be employed as noninvasive measurements yielding detailed information about the chemical and physical parameters that define microscale flows. Despite these advantages, magnetic resonance has been difficult to combine with microfluidics, largely due to its low sensitivity when detecting small sample volumes and the difficulty of efficiently addressing individual flow pathways for parallel measurements without utilizing large electric currents to create pulsed magnetic field gradients. Here, we demonstrate that remotely-detected MRI (RD-MRI) employing static magnetic field gradients produced by thin magnetic films can be used to encode flow and overcome some of these limitations. We show how flow path and history can be selected through the use of these thin film labels and through the application of synchronized, frequency-selective pulses. This obviates the need for large electric currents to produce pulsed magnetic field gradients and may allow for further application of NMR and MRI experiments on microscale devices.

  4. Remote detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A newly designed remote detection system has been developed at Los Alamos that allows the collection of high-resolution gamma-ray spectra and neutron data from a remote location. The system consists of the remote unit and a command unit. The remote unit collects data in a potentially hostile environment while the operator controls the unit by either radio or wire link from a safe position. Both units are battery powered and are housed in metal carrying cases

  5. Functional MRI in Prostate Cancer Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Sankineni; Murat Osman; Choyke, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) has emerged as a promising method for the detection of prostate cancer. The functional MRI components of the MP-MRI consist of the diffusion weighted MRI, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. The purpose of this paper is to review the existing literature about the use of functional MRI in prostate cancer detection.

  6. Remote control catheter navigation: options for guidance under MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller Leah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image-guided endovascular interventions have gained increasing popularity in clinical practice, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is emerging as an attractive alternative to X-ray fluoroscopy for guiding such interventions. Steering catheters by remote control under MRI guidance offers unique challenges and opportunities. Methods In this review, the benefits and limitations of MRI-guided remote control intervention are addressed, and the tools for guiding such interventions in the magnetic environment are summarized. Designs for remote control catheter guidance include a catheter tip electromagnetic microcoil design, a ferromagnetic sphere-tipped catheter design, smart material-actuated catheters, and hydraulically actuated catheters. Remote control catheter guidance systems were compared and contrasted with respect to visualization, safety, and performance. Performance is characterized by bending angles achievable by the catheter, time to achieve bending, degree of rotation achievable, and miniaturization capacity of the design. Necessary improvements for furthering catheter design, especially for use in the MRI environment, are addressed, as are hurdles that must be overcome in order to make MRI guided endovascular procedures more accessible for regular use in clinical practice. Conclusions MR-guided endovascular interventions under remote control steering are in their infancy due to issues regarding safety and reliability. Additional experimental studies are needed prior to their use in humans.

  7. Remote detection of OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdermid, I. Stuart; Laudenslager, James B.

    1986-01-01

    This is a remote measurement technique utilizing a XeCl excimer laser tuned to the Q sub 21 1 rotational transition of the 0-0, A-X band at 307.847 nm. A wavemeter is under development to monitor, on a pulse-to-pulse basis, both the laser lineshape and absolute wavelength. Fluorescence is detected with a multiple Fabry-Perot type filter with a spectral resolution on the order of 0.001 nm. This is tuned to the overlapping Q sub 2 2, Q sub 12 2, Q sub 2 3, and Q sub 12 3 rotational transitions at 308.986 nm. The fringe pattern from this filter is imaged using a discrete, multi-anode detector which has a photon gain of 10 to the 8th power. This permits the simultaneous monitoring of OH fluorescence, N2 and/or O2 rotational Raman scattering and broadband background levels. The use of three etalons in series provides sufficient rejection, approx. greater than 10 to the 10th power, against the laser radiation only 1.2 nm away.

  8. Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) versus axial skeleton MRI (AS-MRI) to detect and measure bone metastases in prostate cancer (PCa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) and axial skeleton MRI (AS-MRI) in detecting and measuring bone metastases in patients with prostate cancer (PCa). WB-MRI and AS-MRI examinations were performed in 60 patients with PCa at high risk of metastases. Two radiologists separately categorised the AS-MRI and WB-MRI as negative or positive for metastases, and measured focal metastases using the ''Response evaluation criteria in solid tumours'' (RECIST) criteria transposed to bone. One radiologist reviewed all examinations 2 months later. Inter- and intraobserver agreements in establishing the presence/absence of metastases were calculated. Bland-Altman plots were used to assess measurement agreement between AS-MRI and WB-MRI. Strong to perfect inter- and intraobserver agreements were found between AS-MRI and WB-MRI in defining the presence/absence of bone metastases. There were no patients with isolated ''peripheral'' metastases at WB-MRI, missed at AS-MRI. There was no difference in lesion count between the two radiologists. AS-MRI and WB-MRI provided statistically equivalent RECIST values for one radiologist and slightly lower values at AS-MRI for the other. In our series of PCa patients, AS-MRI and WB-MRI were equivalent in determining the presence/absence of bone metastases and provided similar evaluation of the metastatic burden. (orig.)

  9. Alzheimer Disease detection on structural MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Ahmed, Olfa; Benois-Pineau, Jenny; Allard, Michèle; Ben Amar, Chokri; Catheline, Gwenaelle

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Structural (MRI) measurements allow detecting and following the evolution of brain atrophy which is a marker of the disease process. Recently, several pattern recognition methods have been proposed to automatically discriminate between patients with and without Alzheimer disease . Support Vector Machines help to identify patterns in data that differentiate between several classes. Hippocampus is the principal region involved in AD. I...

  10. Remote detection device and detection method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a non-destructive detection device for collectively, efficiently and effectively conducting maintenance and detection for confirming the integrity of a nuclear reactor by way of a shielding member for shielding radiation rays generated from an objective portion to be detected. Namely, devices for direct visual detection using an under water TV camera as a sensor, an eddy current detection using a coil as a sensor and each magnetic powder flow detection are integrated and applied collectively. Specifically, the visual detection by using the TV camera and the eddy current flaw detection are adopted together. The flaw detection with magnetic powder is applied as a means for confirming the results of the two kinds of detections by other method. With such procedures, detection techniques using respective specific theories are combined thereby enabling to enhance the accuracy for the evaluation of the detection. (I.S.)

  11. Vehicle Detection from Remote Sensing Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image object detection is an important application of remote sensing technology. Road vehicle detection using very high-resolution remote sensing images has a unique advantage of covering a large area such as Jaddah and Alriad at the same time over all ground-based detectors. But the detection of small vehicle-object in remote sensing imagery is still a challenging task. Several parameters of gray values and sizes are examined to classify the objects in the image. The vehicles and their associated shadows can be discriminated by removing big objects such as roads. Our test shows a promising result of detecting the vehicle. We present an object-based detection approach with Imagine Objective for the detected vehicles in the study area, (Jeddah city, Alriad city ) Imagine Objective employs feature models working on objects produced by image segmentation and various other pixel-based algorithms can be processed by geometric and textural parameters after being vectorized. This process is used and optimised for the extraction of the vehicles from high resolution images. Preliminary object detection tests using a semi automated post-classification approach show reliable results. For this research, the applied methods prove to be useful to detect vehicles on the road of example images even without producing a complete extraction of all vehicles. The approach will be extended to the whole images area

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of living systems by remote detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander; Bouchard, Louis; Xu, Shoujun; Harel, Elad; Budker, Dmitry; Lowery, Thomas; Ledbetter, Micah

    2013-10-29

    A novel approach to magnetic resonance imaging is disclosed. Blood flowing through a living system is prepolarized, and then encoded. The polarization can be achieved using permanent or superconducting magnets. The polarization may be carried out upstream of the region to be encoded or at the place of encoding. In the case of an MRI of a brain, polarization of flowing blood can be effected by placing a magnet over a section of the body such as the heart upstream of the head. Alternatively, polarization and encoding can be effected at the same location. Detection occurs at a remote location, using a separate detection device such as an optical atomic magnetometer, or an inductive Faraday coil. The detector may be placed on the surface of the skin next to a blood vessel such as a jugular vein carrying blood away from the encoded region.

  13. A radiation remote detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation detection device is composed of an optical fiber, a sensing crystal, which, when interacting with a radiation, emits light that propagates through the fiber optic, and an optic sheath surrounding the crystal. The sheath refractive index is inferior to the crystal index, thus ensuring that the light is totally confined. Application to dosimetry and microdosimetry. 3 refs., 2 figs

  14. The remote atmospheric and ionospheric detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) experiment, to fly on a TIROS spacecraft in the late 1980's, consists of a comprehensive set of one limb imaging and seven limb scanning optical sensors. These eight instruments span the spectral range from the extreme ultraviolet to the near infrared, allowing simultaneous observations of the neutral and ion composition on the day and night side as well as in the auroral region. The primary objective of RAIDS is to demonstrate a system for remote sensing of the ionosphere to produce global maps of the electron density, peak altitude and critical frequency

  15. MRI Helps Detect Brain Bleeding Soon After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI Helps Detect Brain Bleeding Soon After Traumatic Brain Injury Military study suggests patients might get better, more ... undergo brain imaging soon after suffering a traumatic brain injury (TBI) may get better treatment more promptly, a ...

  16. MRI detection of single particles for cellular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, Erik M.; Skrtic, Stanko; Sharer, Kathryn; Hill, Jonathan M.; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Koretsky, Alan P

    2004-01-01

    There is rapid growth in the use of MRI for molecular and cellular imaging. Much of this work relies on the high relaxivity of nanometer-sized, ultrasmall dextran-coated iron oxide particles. Typically, millions of dextran-coated ultrasmall iron oxide particles must be loaded into cells for efficient detection. Here we show that single, micrometer-sized iron oxide particles (MPIOs) can be detected by MRI in vitro in agarose samples, in cultured cells, and in mouse embryos. Experiments studyin...

  17. Detectability of MRI Turbulence in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Richard; Semenov, Dmitry; Flock, Mario; Henning, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the nurseries of planet formation. Within them, turbulence acts as a stirring mechanism, combining the large population of small grains successively into pebbles, planetesimals and eventually planetary cores. There are many tuburbulent mechanisms proposed to fulfil this role, however, current observations are not sufficient to distinguish one mechanism from the other.This poster looks at the hallmarks of magneto-rotational instabilities (MRI), which relies on the coupling of the gas to the magnetic fields of the disk. Previous attempts to determine the electron fraction necessary for MRI to be present are hampered by the lack of atomic ions observed in disks and a large uncertainty when scaling abundance molecualr ions which are readily observed.It has been shown with global-MHD models, however, that MRI turbulence can incite distinct azimuthal dependent strucutres in the gas of the disk. We explore the possibility of identifying this non-Keplerian nature of a disk's kinematical structure and discuss whether, through a mode analysis of the kinematic structure, one can isolate MRI tuburlence from other forms with full ALMA capabilities.

  18. Remote detection of explosives with multispectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schau, H. C.

    2009-05-01

    Despite its renewed interest, remote sensing of explosives has proven to be difficult due to the low vapor pressure of the agents. In this paper we discuss a method to detect residue of explosive agents on fabric and clothing using Multi Spectral Imaging. Such a technique will aid in the detection of bomb making activities and individuals. While limited to line of sight only, Multi Spectral Imaging has much to recommend it including inspection of clothing in public places, luggage, and potential locations for bomb manufacture. This paper presents the basic techniques developed for detection of trace TNT and reports the results of several limited field trials. Imaging hardware is discussed and processing methodology is reviewed with some demonstrations of the identification difficulty for explosives and other false targets commonly found. The use of other spectral bands is presented with the goal of eliminating common false targets.

  19. DETECTION OF TUMOR IN MRI USING VECTOR QUANTIZATION SEGMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. H. B. Kekre

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is the state-of-the-art medical imaging technology which allows cross sectional view of the body with unprecedented tissue contrast. MRI plays an important role in assessing pathological conditions of the ankle, foot and brain. It has rapidly evolved into an accepted modality for medical imaging ofdisease processes in the musculoskeletal system, especially the foot and brain due to the use of non-ionizing radiation. MRI provides a digital representation of tissue characteristic that can be obtained in any tissue plane. The images produced by an MRI scanner are best described as slices through the brain. MRI has the added advantage ofbeing able to produce images which slice through the brain in both horizontal and vertical planes. This paper presents a vector quantization segmentation method to detect cancerous mass from MRI images. In order to increase radiologist’s diagnostic performance, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD scheme have been developed to improve the detection of primary signatures of this disease: masses and microcalcifications.

  20. Remote sensing for oil spill detection and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the use of remote sensing for marine oil spill detection and response. The surveillance and monitoring of discharges, and the main elements of effective surveillance are discussed. Tactical emergency response and the requirements for selecting a suitable remote sensing approach, airborne remote sensing systems, and the integration of satellite and airborne imaging are examined. Specifications of satellite surveillance systems potentially usable for oil spill detection, and specifications of airborne remote sensing systems suitable for oil spill detection, monitoring and supplemental actions are tabulated, and a schema of integrated satellite-airborne remote sensing (ISARS) is presented. (UK)

  1. MRI diagnosis of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy from a remote childhood malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by digital clubbing, periosteal proliferation, bone pain, synovitis and arthralgia, all of these being commonly symmetrical. It is occasionally associated with nasopharyngeal lymphoepitheliomas and may develop before or after development of lung metastases in these patients. We report a case of a healthy 22-year-old female who presented to our institution with pain and swelling in the thighs and legs. She had a history of childhood nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma. Radiographs of the knees were negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed features suggestive of bilateral periostitis. Because of the propensity of the rare childhood nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma to present with HOA, this entity was included in the differential diagnosis. A subsequent chest radiograph and CT demonstrated a lung and mediastinal mass that were histologically confirmed to be metastatic. To the best of our knowledge, HOA and metastases from nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma occurring after such a long time interval have not been previously reported. Early demonstration and consideration of HOA on the basis of MRI, lead to expeditious and appropriate subsequent investigation. (orig.)

  2. MRI detection of single particles for cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Erik M.; Skrtic, Stanko; Sharer, Kathryn; Hill, Jonathan M.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2004-01-01

    There is rapid growth in the use of MRI for molecular and cellular imaging. Much of this work relies on the high relaxivity of nanometer-sized, ultrasmall dextran-coated iron oxide particles. Typically, millions of dextran-coated ultrasmall iron oxide particles must be loaded into cells for efficient detection. Here we show that single, micrometer-sized iron oxide particles (MPIOs) can be detected by MRI in vitro in agarose samples, in cultured cells, and in mouse embryos. Experiments studying effects of MRI resolution and particle size from 0.76 to 1.63 ?m indicated that \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{T}}_{2}^{*}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} effects can be readily detected from single MPIOs at 50-?m resolution and significant signal effects could be detected at resolutions as low as 200 ?m. Cultured cells were labeled with fluorescent MPIOs such that single particles were present in individual cells. These single particles in single cells could be detected both by MRI and fluorescence microscopy. Finally, single particles injected into single-cell-stage mouse embryos could be detected at embryonic day 11.5, demonstrating that even after many cell divisions, daughter cells still carry individual particles. These results demonstrate that MRI can detect single particles and indicate that single-particle detection will be useful for cellular imaging. PMID:15256592

  3. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Valls, Laia [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain); Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  4. Detection and size of pulmonary lesions: how accurate is MRI? A prospective comparison of CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Although CT is the modality of choice for morphological lung imaging, an increasing proportion of chest imaging is performed by MRI due to the utilization of whole-body MRI. Therefore, the diagnostic performance of MRI in reliably detecting pulmonary lesions should be established. Purpose. To investigate the detection rate of pulmonary lesions by MRI that can be expected in a clinical setting and to assess the accuracy of lesion measurement by MRI compared to CT. Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients (median age 66 years) with indication for CT imaging due to suspected thoracic malignancy were prospectively included. Chest MRI performed on the same day as CT, comprised unenhanced TrueFisp, ecg-gated T2-weighted HASTE, T1-weighted VIBE, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, fat-saturated VIBE sequences. MR sequences were evaluated for lesion detection by two readers independently and measurement of lesion size was performed. MR findings were correlated with CT. Results. One hundred and eight pulmonary lesions (20 thoracic malignancies, 88 lung nodules) were detected by CT in 26 patients. Lesions were ruled out in two patients. All thoracic malignancies were identified by MRI with strong correlation (r 0.97-0.99; P 1 cm in diameter. If a lung lesion is detected by MRI, it is a reliable finding and its measurement is accurate. CT remains superior in detecting small lung nodules (<6 mm). Detection rate of MRI for small lesions is improved using a multi-sequence protocol including contrast administration

  5. Remote Optical Detection of Alpha Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha emitting radiation sources are typically hard to detect with conventional detectors due to the short range of alpha particles in the air. However, previous studies have shown that remote detection of alpha radiation is possible by measuring the ionization-induced fluorescence of air molecules. The alpha-induced ultraviolet (UV) light is mainly emitted by molecular nitrogen and its fluorescence properties are well known. The benefit of this method is the long range of UV photons in the air. Secondly, the detection is possible also under a strong beta and gamma radiation backgrounds as they do not cause localized molecular excitation. In this work, the optical detection was studied using two different detection schemes; spectral separation of fluorescence from the background lighting and coincidence detection of UV photons originating from a single radiative decay event. Our spectrally integrated measurements have shown that one alpha decay event yields up to 400 fluorescence photons in the air and all these UV photons are induced in a 5 ns time-window. On the other hand, the probability of a background coincidence event in 5 ns scale is very rare compared to the number of background photons. This information can be applied in fluorescence coincidence filtering to discriminate the alpha radiation initiated fluorescence signal from much more intense background lighting. A device called HAUVA (Handheld Alpha UV Application) was built during this work for demonstration purposes. HAUVA utilizes spectral filtering and it is designed to detect alpha emitters from a distance of about 40 cm. Using specially selected room lighting, the device is able to separate 1 kBq alpha emitter from the background lighting with 1 second integration time. (author)

  6. Stress cine MRI for detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress testing is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Stress echocardiography has become a well-established modality for the detection of ischemia-induced wall motion abnormalities. However, display and reliable interpretation of stress echocardiography studies are user-dependent, the test reproducibility is low, and 10 to 15% of patients yield suboptimal or non-diagnostic images. Due to its high spatial and contrast resolution, MRI is known to permit an accurate determination of left ventricular function and wall thickness at rest. Early stress MRI studies provided promising results with respect to the detection of CAD. However, the clinical impact was limited due to long imaging time and problematic patient monitoring in the MRI environment. Recent technical improvements - namely ultrafast MR image acquisition - led to a significant reduction of imaging time and improved patient safety. Stress can be induced by physical exercise or pharmacologically by administration of a beta1-agonist (dobutamine) or vasodilatator (dipyridamole and adenosine). The best developed and most promising stress MRI technique is a high-dose dobutamine/atropine stress protocol (10, 20, 30, 40 ?g/kg/min; optionally 0.25-mg fractions of atropine up to maximal dose 1 mg). Severe complications (myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation and sustained tachycardia, cardiogenic shock) may be expected in 0.25% of patients. Currently, data of three high-dose dobutamine stress MRI studies are available, revealing a good sensitivity (83 - 87%) and specificity (83 - 86%) in the assessment of CAD. The direct comparison between echocardiography and MRI for the detection of stress-induced wall motion abnormalities yielded better results for dobutamine-MRI in terms of sensitivity (86.2% vs. 74.3%; p < 0.05) and specificity (85.7% vs. 69.8% p < 0.05) as compared to dobutamine stress echocardiography. The superior results of MRI can mainly be explained by the better image quality with sharp delineation of the endocardial and epicardial borders. Currently, stress MRI is already a realistic clinical alternative for the non-invasive assessment of CAD in patients with impaired image quality in echocardiography. (orig.)

  7. Fast and direct detection of neuronal activation with diffusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last 30 years functional neuroimaging has emerged as a revolutionary path to study the brain and the mind. This has been possible because of significant advances mainly in two imaging modalities, namely Positron Emission Tomograph y (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Amazingly, although those two modalities are based on radically different physical approaches (detection of 1 3 radioactivity for the first one and nuclear magnetization for the second), both allo w brain activation images to be obtained through measurements involving water molecules. So far, PET and MRI functional imaging have relied on the same principle that neuronal activation and blood flow are coupled through metabolism: Blood flow increases locally in activated brain regions. In the case of PET one uses H2O radioactive water which is produced by using a cyclotron and injected to the subject vasculature. In activated brain regions the increase in blood flow leads to a local increase in the tissue radioactive water content detected and localized by the PE T camera. With MRI the hydrogen nuclei of brain endogenous water molecules are magnetized by a strong external magnetic field. In activated regions the increase in blood flow results in an increase of blood oxygenation which induces a slight perturbation of the magnetization relaxation properties of the water molecules around blood vessels detected by the MRI scanner (so called 'BOLD' effect). I n both approaches water is, thus, merely an indirect means to look at changes in cerebral blood flow which accompany brain activation, and although PET and BOLD f MRI have been extremely successful for the functional neuroimaging community, present well known limitations. While the coupling between neuronal activation, metabolism and blood flow has been verified in most instances including BOLD f MRI, the degree and the mechanism of coupling remains largely debated (Magistratt, Pellerin, Mangia) and may fail in some pathological conditions or in the presence of drugs. Also, it has been pointed out that the spatial functional resolution of vascular based functional neuroimaging might be limited, because vessels responsible for the increase of blood flow and blood volume feed or drain somewhat large territories which include clusters of neurons with potentially different functions. Similarly the physiological delay necessary for the mechanisms triggering the vascular response to work intrinsically limits the temporal resolution of BOLD f MRI. On the other hand, a fundamentally new paradigm is being proposed to look at brain activity through the observation with MRI of the diffusion behavior of the water molecules. It has been shown that the diffusion of water slightly slows down during brain activation. This slowdown, which occurs several seconds before the hemodynamic response detected by BOLD f MRI, has been described in terms of a phase transition of the water molecules in the cells undergoing activation and tentatively attributed to the swelling of those cells. This finding marks a significant departure from the former blood flow based PET and MRI approaches, and potentially offers improved spatial and temporal resolution, because the proposed mechanism appears more intimately linked to neuronal activation. However, the step might even extend further: Contrarily to the former approaches based on changes in artificially induced water physical properties, namely radioactivity and magnetization, required for the external PET or MR I detection, the new, diffusion based approach, merely uses MRI as a means to reveal changes in intrinsic water physical properties. These changes in the diffusion behaviour of water during activation seem to belong to an endogenous part of the activation process, and perhaps even more, could be an active component of this process that evolution has capitalized upon. The aim of this presentation is to review our current knowledge on the water physical properties i n biological tissues, which could be relevant to diffusion f MRI, and to review the biophysical mechanism

  8. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); McDermott, Robert F. (Monona, WI); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  9. Combining diffusion-weighted MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI improves the detection of colorectal liver metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, D-M; Collins, D J; Wallace, T; Chau, I; Riddell, A M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the diagnostic accuracy of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) and a combination of both techniques for the detection of colorectal hepatic metastases. Methods 72 patients with suspected colorectal liver metastases underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI and DW-MRI. Images were retrospectively reviewed with unenhanced T1 and T2 weighted images as Gd-EOB-DTPA image set, DW-MRI image set and combined image set by two independent radiologists. Each lesion detected was scored for size, location and likelihood of metastasis, and compared with surgery and follow-up imaging. Diagnostic accuracy was compared using receiver operating characteristics and interobserver agreement by kappa statistics. Results 417 lesions (310 metastases, 107 benign) were found in 72 patients. For both readers, diagnostic accuracy using the combined image set was higher [area under the curve (Az) = 0.96, 0.97] than Gd-EOB-DTPA image set (Az = 0.86, 0.89) or DW-MRI image set (Az = 0.93, 0.92). Using combined image set improved identification of liver metastases compared with Gd-EOB-DTPA image set (p<0.001) or DW-MRI image set (p<0.001). There was very good interobserver agreement for lesion classification (? = 0.81–0.88). Conclusions Combining DW-MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced T1 weighted MRI significantly improved the detection of colorectal liver metastases. PMID:22167501

  10. White matter injury detection in neonatal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Irene; Hajari, Nasim; Firouzmanesh, Amirhossein; Shen, Rui; Miller, Steven; Poskitt, Ken; Basu, Anup

    2013-02-01

    Early detection of white matter injury in premature newborns can facilitate timely clinical treatments reducing the potential risk of later developmental deficits. It was reported that there were more than 5% premature newborns in British Columbia, Canada, among which 5-10% exhibited major motor deficits and 25-50% exhibited significant developmental and visual deficits. With the advancement of computer assisted detection systems, it is possible to automatically identify white matter injuries, which are found inside the grey matter region of the brain. Atlas registration has been suggested in the literature to distinguish grey matter from the soft tissues inside the skull. However, our subjects are premature newborns delivered at 24 to 32 weeks of gestation. During this period, the grey matter undergoes rapid changes and differs significantly from one to another. Besides, not all detected white spots represent injuries. Additional neighborhood information and expert input are required for verification. In this paper, we propose a white matter feature identification system for premature newborns, which is composed of several steps: (1) Candidate white matter segmentation; (2) Feature extraction from candidates; (3) Validation with data obtained at a later stage on the children; and (4) Feature confirmation for automated detection. The main challenge of this work lies in segmenting white matter injuries from noisy and low resolution data. Our approach integrates image fusion and contrast enhancement together with a fuzzy segmentation technique to achieve promising results. Other applications, such as brain tumor and intra-ventricular haemorrhage detection can also benefit from our approach.

  11. MRI-detected bone marrow edema in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, PC

    2008-01-01

    The availability of therapeutics, such as biologics targeting TNF, has enabled marked inhibition of structural damage previously thought to be unavoidable in many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The importance of physicians being able to reliably identify patients at the greatest risk of disease progression is, therefore, increasing. Many prognostic markers, including MRI-detected pathology at the wrist, have been known for some time to correlate with radiographic RA disease progress...

  12. Diffusion-weighted MRI provides additional value to conventional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandecaveye, Vincent; Keyzer, Frederik de; Op de Beeck, Katya; Roebben, Ilse; Bielen, Didier; Dymarkowski, Steven [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Verslype, Chris; Nevens, Frederik [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Hepatology, Leuven (Belgium); Komuta, Mina; Roskams, Tania [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Topal, Baki [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Abdominal Surgery, Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in differentiating HCC from benign cirrhotic lesions compared with conventional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis underwent conventional and DW-MRI at 1.5 Tesla. Signal intensity ratios (SI{sub ratio}) of solid liver lesions to adjacent hepatic parenchyma were measured for b0, b100, b600 and b1000, and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated. In 27 patients, imaging results were compared to histopathology, and in 28 patients, to imaging follow-up. Based on predetermined thresholds, sensitivity and specificity of DW-MRI and conventional MRI were compared. SI{sub ratio} was significantly different between malignant and benign lesions at all b-values (P<0.0001). No significant difference in ADC was seen (P = 0.47). For detection of malignant lesions, DW-MRI with b600-SI{sub ratio} yielded a sensitivity of 95.2% compared to 80.6% for conventional MRI (P = 0.023) and a specificity of 82.7% compared to 65.4% (P=0.064). The improved accuracy was most beneficial for differentiating malignant lesions smaller than 2 cm. DW-MRI with b600-SI{sub ratio} improved the detection of small HCC and the differentiation of pseudotumoral lesions compared with conventional MRI. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of MRI and endoscope ultrasound detection in preoperative T/N staging of gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Cui; Huang, Liming; WANG, YANLIN; HUANG, YILING; HUANG, YURONG

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a common malignancy and cause of mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) detection in preoperative clinical T/N staging in gastric cancer. Thirty-eight patients diagnosed with gastric cancer by gastroscopy and pathological examination were included in the study. All 38 patients underwent MRI and EUS detection prior to surgery. The accuracy of MRI, EUS and MRI+EUS was evaluated according...

  14. Automated detection of periventricular veins on 7 T brain MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijf, Hugo J.; Bouvy, Willem H.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Viergever, Max A.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Vincken, Koen L.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is common in elderly persons and a leading cause of cognitive decline, dementia, and acute stroke. With the introduction of ultra-high field strength 7.0T MRI, it is possible to visualize small vessels in the brain. In this work, a proof-of-principle study is conducted to assess the feasibility of automatically detecting periventricular veins. Periventricular veins are organized in a fan-pattern and drain venous blood from the brain towards the caudate vein of Schlesinger, which is situated along the lateral ventricles. Just outside this vein, a region-of- interest (ROI) through which all periventricular veins must cross is defined. Within this ROI, a combination of the vesselness filter, tubular tracking, and hysteresis thresholding is applied to locate periventricular veins. All detected locations were evaluated by an expert human observer. The results showed a positive predictive value of 88% and a sensitivity of 95% for detecting periventricular veins. The proposed method shows good results in detecting periventricular veins in the brain on 7.0T MR images. Compared to previous works, that only use a 1D or 2D ROI and limited image processing, our work presents a more comprehensive definition of the ROI, advanced image processing techniques to detect periventricular veins, and a quantitative analysis of the performance. The results of this proof-of-principle study are promising and will be used to assess periventricular veins on 7.0T brain MRI.

  15. FDG-PET Lacks Sufficient Sensitivity to Detect Myxoid Liposarcoma Spinal Metastases Detected by MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. Schwab

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To document a case of myxoid liposarcoma in which PET scan was less sensitive than MRI in detecting spinal metastasis. Materials and Methods. The case of a 65-year-old female with a history of myxoid liposarcoma (MLS of the thigh resected 5 years previously and now presenting with low back pain is presented. Her medical oncologist ordered an FDG-PET scan to evaluate distant recurrence. Subsequently, an MRI of her spine was obtained by her surgeon. Results. The FDG-PET scan was obtained 1 week prior to the MRI, and it did not show increased glucose uptake in the spine. Her MRI did show increased signal intensity in her lumbar spine. CT needle biopsy confirmed the lesion to be metastatic MLS. Conclusion. FDG-PET scans are utilized to detect distant recurrence of cancerous lesions. Myxoid liposarcoma has a unique propensity to metastasize to the spine. Previous reports have documented the unreliability of bone scintigraphy to diagnose these metastases. Our report demonstrates that FDG-PET may also lack the sensitivity needed to detect these lesions. We advocate total spine MRI when screening for metastases in this population when they present with back pain.

  16. Diffusion-weighted MRI provides additional value to conventional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in differentiating HCC from benign cirrhotic lesions compared with conventional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis underwent conventional and DW-MRI at 1.5 Tesla. Signal intensity ratios (SIratio) of solid liver lesions to adjacent hepatic parenchyma were measured for b0, b100, b600 and b1000, and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated. In 27 patients, imaging results were compared to histopathology, and in 28 patients, to imaging follow-up. Based on predetermined thresholds, sensitivity and specificity of DW-MRI and conventional MRI were compared. SIratio was significantly different between malignant and benign lesions at all b-values (Pratio yielded a sensitivity of 95.2% compared to 80.6% for conventional MRI (P = 0.023) and a specificity of 82.7% compared to 65.4% (P=0.064). The improved accuracy was most beneficial for differentiating malignant lesions smaller than 2 cm. DW-MRI with b600-SIratio improved the detection of small HCC and the differentiation of pseudotumoral lesions compared with conventional MRI. (orig.)

  17. Hemorrhage detection in MRI brain images using images features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Stratulat (Visan), Mirela

    2013-11-01

    The abnormalities appear frequently on Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of brain in elderly patients presenting either stroke or cognitive impairment. Detection of brain hemorrhage lesions in MRI is an important but very time-consuming task. This research aims to develop a method to extract brain tissue features from T2-weighted MR images of the brain using a selection of the most valuable texture features in order to discriminate between normal and affected areas of the brain. Due to textural similarity between normal and affected areas in brain MR images these operation are very challenging. A trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection, but they could be detected by using a texture analysis. The proposed analysis is developed in five steps: i) in the pre-processing step: the de-noising operation is performed using the Daubechies wavelets; ii) the original images were transformed in image features using the first order descriptors; iii) the regions of interest (ROIs) were cropped from images feature following up the axial symmetry properties with respect to the mid - sagittal plan; iv) the variation in the measurement of features was quantified using the two descriptors of the co-occurrence matrix, namely energy and homogeneity; v) finally, the meaningful of the image features is analyzed by using the t-test method. P-value has been applied to the pair of features in order to measure they efficacy.

  18. Target Detection: Remote Sensing Techniques for Defence Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Chaudhuri

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous development in remote sensing technology in the recent past has opened up new challenges in defence applications. On important area of such applications is in target detection. This paper describes both classical and newly developed approaches to detect the targets by using remotely-sensed digital images. The classical approach includes statistical classification methods and image processing techniques. The new approach deals with a relatively new sensor technology, namely, synthetic aperture radar (SAR systems and fast developing tools, like neural networks and multisource data integration for analysis and interpretation. With SAR images, it is possible to detect targets or features of a target that is otherwise not possible. Neural networks and multisource data integration tools also have a great potential in analysing and interpreting remote sensing data for target detection.

  19. Discovery Radiomics for Multi-Parametric MRI Prostate Cancer Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Audrey G; Kumar, Devinder; Khalvati, Farzad; Haider, Masoom A; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed form of cancer in Canadian men, and is the third leading cause of cancer death. Despite these statistics, prognosis is relatively good with a sufficiently early diagnosis, making fast and reliable prostate cancer detection crucial. As imaging-based prostate cancer screening, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires an experienced medical professional to extensively review the data and perform a diagnosis, radiomics-driven methods help streamline the process and has the potential to significantly improve diagnostic accuracy and efficiency, and thus improving patient survival rates. These radiomics-driven methods currently rely on hand-crafted sets of quantitative imaging-based features, which are selected manually and can limit their ability to fully characterize unique prostate cancer tumour phenotype. In this study, we propose a novel \\textit{discovery radiomics} framework for generating custom radiomic sequences tailored for prostate cancer detection. Discover...

  20. Detecting link failures in complex network processes using remote monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhal, R.; Abad Torres, J.; Roy, S.

    2015-11-01

    We study whether local structural changes in a complex network can be distinguished from passive remote time-course measurements of the network's dynamics. Specifically the detection of link failures in a network synchronization process from noisy measurements at a single network component is considered. By phrasing the detection task as a Maximum A Posteriori Probability hypothesis testing problem, we are able to obtain conditions under which the detection is (1) improved over the a priori and (2) asymptotically perfect, in terms of the network spectrum and graph. We find that, in the case where the detector has knowledge of the network's state, perfect detection is possible under general connectivity conditions regardless of the measurement location. When the detector does not have state knowledge, a remote signature permits improved but not perfect detection, under the same connectivity conditions. At its essence, detectability is achieved because of the close connection between a network's topology, its eigenvalues and local response characteristics.

  1. SQUID-Detected In Vivo MRI at Microtesla Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moble, Michael; Myers, Whittier R; Lee, SeungKyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2005-06-01

    We use a low transition temperature (T{sub c}) Super-conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to perform in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at magnetic fields around 100 microtesla, corresponding to proton Larmor frequencies of about 5 kHz. In such low fields, broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines due to inhomogeneous magnetic fields and susceptibility variations of the sample are minimized, enabling us to obtain high quality images. To reduce environmental noise the signal is detected by a second-order gradiometer, coupled to the SQUID, and the experiment is surrounded by a 3-mm thick Al shield. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we prepolarize the samples in a field up to 100 mT. Three-dimensional images are acquired in less than 6 minutes with a standard spin-echo phase-encoding sequence. Using encoding gradients of {approx}100 {micro}T/m we obtain three-dimensional images of bell peppers with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 8 mm{sup 3}. Our system is ideally suited to acquiring images of small, peripheral parts of the human body such as hands and arms. In vivo images of an arm, acquired at 132 {micro}T, show 24-mm sections of the forearm with a resolution of 3 x 3 mm{sup 2} and a SNR of 10. We discuss possible applications of MRI at these low magnetic fields.

  2. Diagnostic imaging strategy for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions: use of targeted sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leading-edge technology such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) often reveals mammographically and ultrasonographically occult lesions. MRI is a well-documented, effective tool to evaluate these lesions; however, the detection rate of targeted sonography varies for MRI detected lesions, and its significance is not well established in diagnostic strategy of MRI detected lesions. We assessed the utility of targeted sonography for multidetector-row CT (MDCT)- or MRI-detected lesions in practice. We retrospectively reviewed 695 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who were candidates for breast conserving surgery and underwent MDCT or MRI in our hospital between January 2004 and March 2011. Targeted sonography was performed in all MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions followed by imaging-guided biopsy. Patient background, histopathology features and the sizes of the lesions were compared among benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Of the 695 patients, 61 lesions in 56 patients were detected by MDCT or MRI. The MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography in 58 out of 61 lesions (95.1%). Patients with pathological diagnoses were significantly older and more likely to be postmenopausal than the follow-up patients. Pathological diagnosis proved to be benign in 20 cases and malignant in 25. The remaining 16 lesions have been followed up. Lesion size and shape were not significantly different among the benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Approximately 95% of MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography, and nearly half of these lesions were pathologically proven malignancies in this study. Targeted sonography is a useful modality for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions

  3. Comparison of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced MRI for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.K., E-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.co [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital and Medical School, Keum Am Dong, JeonJu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, C.S.; Han, Y.M.; Park, G.; Hwang, S.B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital and Medical School, Keum Am Dong, JeonJu (Korea, Republic of); Yu, H.C. [Department of General Surgery, Chonbuk National University Hospital and Medical School, Keum Am Dong, JeonJu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: Eighty-nine patients (118 HCCs) who underwent three-dimensional gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and SPIO-enhanced MRI with a mean interval of 4.7 days (range 3-7 days), were included in this study. Two observers reviewed the gadoxetic acid set (unenhanced, early dynamic, 10 and 20 min hepatocyte-phase images) and SPIO set [unenhanced and ferucarbotran-enhanced T1-, T2-turbo spin-echo (TSE), and T2* weighted imaging (WI)] in consensus. Diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity were evaluated using the alternative-free response receiver operator characteristic (ROC) method. Results: The area under ROC curve (Az value) and sensitivity of the gadoxetic acid set (Az 0.964; sensitivity 90.7%) were significantly higher than those of the SPIO set (Az 0.830; sensitivity 84.7%; p < 0.05). There were 14 and seven lesions that were verified only on the gadoxetic acid set and only on the SPIO set, respectively. Four HCCs were clearly revealed as hypointense only on gadoxetic acid-enhanced hepatocyte phase imaging, but were occult on other sequences, including the SPIO set. Conclusion: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI is better than SPIO-enhanced MRI for the detection of HCCs.

  4. Differential Geometric Approach to Change Detection Using Remotely Sensed Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Panigrahi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Change Detection using multi-temporal satellite images of same area is an established as well as actively pursued research problem. Most of the change detection techniques use algebraic or transform methods to do a pixel by pixel comparison of change detection. These techniques heavily depend upon the correct choice of threshold value to segregate the real changed pixels from the apparent changed ones. Also all these techniques can only compute the two dimensional change of the terrain surface from remotely sensed data. In this paper we propose a differential geometry approach to detect changes from remotely sensed images, which can detect the change using the geometric property of the pixels with respect to its surroundings. It can compute and filter the changed pixels having high curvature from that of flat (2D changed pixels.

  5. Remotely detected differential pulse transit time as a stress indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Tarbox, Elizabeth; Cissel, Marty; Moses, Sophia; Luthra, Megha; Vaidya, Misha; Tran, Nhien; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.

    2015-05-01

    The human cardiovascular system, controlled by the autonomic nervous system (ANS), is one of the first sites where one can see the "fight-or-flight" response due to the presence of external stressors. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of detecting mental stress using a novel measure that can be measured in a contactless manner: Pulse transit time (dPTT), which refers to the time that is required for the blood wave (BW) to cover the distance from the heart to a defined remote location in the body. Loosely related to blood pressure, PTT is a measure of blood velocity, and is also implicated in the "fight-or-flight" response. We define the differential PTT (dPTT) as the difference in PTT between two remote areas of the body, such as the forehead and the palm. Expanding our previous work on remote BW detection from visible spectrum videos, we built a system that remotely measures dPTT. Human subject data were collected under an IRB approved protocol from 15 subjects both under normal and stress states and are used to initially establish the potential use of remote dPPT detection as a stress indicator.

  6. Comparison of AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT in the detection of hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT in 12 cases of hepatic lesions. Nine of these were hepatocellular carcinomas. Two cases were metastatic liver tumors (the primary lesion was gastric in one and the other was gallbladder cancer). One case was suspected to be adenomatous hyperplasia. Thirty-two lesions were detected in T2-weighted SE images before AMI-25 administration, while 46 lesions were detected in AMI-25 enhanced MRI images. In particular, AMI-25 enhanced MRI was superior to plain MRI in lesions less than 10 mm in size. A total of 48 lesions were detected in helical dynamic CT. Although AMI-25 enhanced MRI almost equaled helical dynamic CT in the detection of liver tumors, helical dynamic CT was slightly superior to AMI-25 enhanced MRI in the detection of subphrenic lesions. It was possible to know the hemodynamics in each hepatic lesion by helical dynamic CT. AMI-25 enhanced MRI was useful to know the inclusion of reticuloendothelial system, and that yielded different diagnoses in adenomatous hyperplasia and well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Helical dynamic CT was useful for qualitative diagnosis. Both AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT contributed to the detection of liver tumor and qualitative diagnosis. (author)

  7. The method of active remote detection of nuclear ammunition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Method for active nondestructive detection of nuclear ammunition on mobile or remote objects with application of powerful pulse neutron generator of intermediate energy as a mean for control of in international agreements observance relative to nuclear arms reduction is proposed. Numerical modelling of the proposed method is carried out. 10 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  8. Sensitive change detection for remote sensing monitoring of nuclear treaties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, Morton J.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Schlittenhardt, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Triggered in part by the advent of high resolution commercial optical satellites, the analysis of open-source satellite imagery has now established itself as an important tool for monitoring nuclear activities throughout the world (Chitumbo et al 2001). Whereas detection of land cover and land use change is a commonplace application in remote sensing, the detection of anthropogenic changes associated with nuclear activities, whether declared or clandestine, presents a difficult challenge. It is ...

  9. Automatic brain tumor detection in MRI: methodology and statistical validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Islam, Mohammad A.; Shaik, Jahangheer; Parra, Carlos; Ogg, Robert

    2005-04-01

    Automated brain tumor segmentation and detection are immensely important in medical diagnostics because it provides information associated to anatomical structures as well as potential abnormal tissue necessary to delineate appropriate surgical planning. In this work, we propose a novel automated brain tumor segmentation technique based on multiresolution texture information that combines fractal Brownian motion (fBm) and wavelet multiresolution analysis. Our wavelet-fractal technique combines the excellent multiresolution localization property of wavelets to texture extraction of fractal. We prove the efficacy of our technique by successfully segmenting pediatric brain MR images (MRIs) from St. Jude Children"s Research Hospital. We use self-organizing map (SOM) as our clustering tool wherein we exploit both pixel intensity and multiresolution texture features to obtain segmented tumor. Our test results show that our technique successfully segments abnormal brain tissues in a set of T1 images. In the next step, we design a classifier using Feed-Forward (FF) neural network to statistically validate the presence of tumor in MRI using both the multiresolution texture and the pixel intensity features. We estimate the corresponding receiver operating curve (ROC) based on the findings of true positive fractions and false positive fractions estimated from our classifier at different threshold values. An ROC, which can be considered as a gold standard to prove the competence of a classifier, is obtained to ascertain the sensitivity and specificity of our classifier. We observe that at threshold 0.4 we achieve true positive value of 1.0 (100%) sacrificing only 0.16 (16%) false positive value for the set of 50 T1 MRI analyzed in this experiment.

  10. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Loon, Ton van [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and HTA, Geert Grooteplein Noord 21, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  11. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  12. The Remote Detection of Alpha-Radioactive Nucleus Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkovskiy, Boris; Miroshnichenko, Vladimir; Onishchenko, Evgeny; Simakov, Andrey; Streil, Thomas

    Results of the new device design for the alpha-radiation remote detection are presented. Negative ions from the alpha particle tracks are detected by the discharge wire counter opened to air. Ion clusters being transferred from the particle tracks to the detector volume by an air flux. The detector works in a counting mode that provides sharp selectivity and accuracy of measurements. The basic parameters of the device are: detecting distance -0.5 m; measurement time -30 s; the square sensitivity -0.05 Bq/cm2.

  13. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohana, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil - Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie B, Strasbourg (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Neurologie, Garches (France); Marty, Catherine; Lazareth, Jean-Philippe [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Rhumatologie, Garches (France); Maisonobe, Thierry [APH-HP - Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Neuropathologie, Paris (France); Mompoint, Dominique; Carlier, Robert-Yves [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2014-08-15

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  14. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  15. SQUID-detected NMR and MRI in microtesla magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Robert Francis

    A low transition temperature do Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (low-Tc do SQUID) was used to perform liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments in magnetic fields from microtesla to tens of microtesla, corresponding to proton Larmor frequencies from tens of Hz to kHz. The spins were polarized in a magnetic field of the order of millitesla. Upon turnoff of the polarizing field, precession was induced in the much weaker measurement field. Because the SQUID magnetometer was operated with an untuned, superconducting, input circuit, the integrated intensity of the NMR lines was independent of the strength of the measurement field. On the other hand, the NMR linewidth scaled linearly with the measurement field strength. Narrowing of the NMR signal bandwidth through reduction of the strength of the measurement field led to an enhancement of both spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A novel cryogenic insert was constructed to allow SQUID measurement of NMR signals from room temperature samples with high filling factor. From samples with volume of a few milliliters and thermal polarization of order 10 -8, SNR of a few tens were achieved in a single shot. Heteronuclear scalar couplings were resolved in 1H-31P and 1H-13C systems. Furthermore, the frequency-independent sensitivity of the untuned SQUID magnetometer allowed simultaneous detection of NMR signals from nuclei with different magnetogyric ratios. A system based on a low-Tc SQUID gradiometer was used to acquire MRIs from distilled water and mineral oil phantoms in microtesla fields. The bandwidth-narrowing technique was exploited to enhance spatial resolution for a fixed strength of the encoding gradients. With magnetic field gradients of the order of tens of microtesla per meter, images with spatial resolution of a millimeter were achieved. The techniques described in this thesis could readily be adapted for use with multichannel SQUID systems designed for biomagnetic measurements at low frequency, and represent a first step toward the development of low cost, portable NMR and MRI scanners based on untuned SQUID magnetometers.

  16. Detector for the remote detection of fluorescent substances

    OpenAIRE

    Vassal'lo Sanz, Juan; Vassal'lo Saco, Jara; Gutiérrez Ríos, Julio; Soto Macía, Iván; Gallego García, Elena; Maraver Abad, Patricia; Esteban Orobio, Angel; Madrano Gil, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a system and method for the detection of fluorescent substances, which can be used to locate fluorescent substances situated at an intermediate distance, including at least: laser emitting means emitting in a suitable band in order to produce fluorescences from the family of substances to be located; remote optical receiving means; means for analysing the fluorescence spectral band of the substances to be located; and control means for controlling the laser emitting m...

  17. A novel approach to remote homology detection: jumping alignments

    OpenAIRE

    Spang, Rainer; Rehmsmeier, Marc; Stoye, Jens

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new algorithm for protein classification and the detection of remote homologs. The rationale is to exploit both vertical and horizontal information of a multiple alignment in a well-balanced manner. This is in contrast to established methods such as profiles and profile hidden Markov models which focus on vertical information as they model the columns of the alignment independently and to family pairwise search which focuses on horizontal information as it treats given sequences...

  18. Functional MRI detection of pharmacologically induced memory impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Sperling, Reisa; Greve, Douglas; Dale, Anders; Killiany, Ronald; Holmes, Jennifer; Rosas, H Diana; Cocchiarella, Andrew; Firth, Paul; Rosen, Bruce; Lake, Stephen; Lange, Nicholas; Routledge, Carol; Albert, Marilyn

    2001-01-01

    To examine alterations in brain activation associated with pharmacologically induced memory impairment, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to study the effects of lorazepam and scopolamine on a face–name associative encoding paradigm. Ten healthy young subjects were scanned on four occasions, 2 weeks apart; they were administered i.v. saline during two placebo-scanning sessions and then alternately administered i.v. lorazepam (1 mg) or scopolamine (0.4 mg) in a double-b...

  19. Remote stress detection using a visible spectrum camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Moses, Sophia; Luthra, Megha; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.

    2015-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) can be an important indicator of several conditions that affect the autonomic nervous system, including traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder and peripheral neuropathy. Recent work has shown that some of the HRV features can potentially be used for distinguishing a subject's normal mental state from a stressed one. In all of these past works, HRV analysis is performed on the cardiac activity data acquired by conventional electrocardiography electrodes, which may introduce additional stress and complexity to the acquired data. In this paper we use remotely acquired time-series data extracted from the human facial skin reflectivity signal during rest and mental stress conditions to compute HRV driven features. We further apply a set of classification algorithms to distinguishing between these two states. To determine heart beat signal from the facial skin reflectivity, we apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for denoising and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) for source selection. To determine the signal peaks to extract the RR-interval time-series, we apply a threshold-based detection technique and additional peak conditioning algorithms. To classify RR-intervals, we explored classification algorithms that are commonly used for medical applications such as logistic regression and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Goodness of each classifier is measured in terms of sensitivity/specificity. Results from each classifier are then compared to find the optimal classifier for stress detection. This work, performed under an IRB approved protocol, provides initial proof that remotely-acquired heart rate signal can be used for stress detection. This result shows promise for further development of a remote-sensing stress detection technique both for medical and deception-detection applications.

  20. Can breast MRI computer-aided detection (CAD) improve radiologist accuracy for lesions detected at MRI screening and recommended for biopsy in a high-risk population?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) computer-aided detection (CAD) for breast MRI screen-detected lesions recommended for biopsy in a high-risk population. Material and methods: Fifty-six consecutive Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 3-5 lesions with histopathological correlation [nine invasive cancers, 13 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 34 benign] were retrospectively evaluated using a breast MRI CAD prototype (CAD-Gaea). CAD evaluation was performed separately and in consensus by two radiologists specializing in breast imaging, blinded to the histopathology. Thresholds of 50, 80, and 100% and delayed enhancement were independently assessed with CAD. Lesions were rated as malignant or benign according to threshold and delayed enhancement only and in combination. Sensitivities, specificities, and negative predictive values (NPV) were determined for CAD assessments versus pathology. Initial MRI BI-RADS interpretation without CAD versus CAD assessments were compared using paired binary diagnostic tests. Results: Threshold levels for lesion enhancement were: 50% to include all malignant (and all benign) lesions; and 100% for all invasive cancer and high-grade DCIS. Combined use of threshold and enhancement patterns for CAD assessment was best (73% sensitivity, 56% specificity and 76% NPV for all cancer). Sensitivities and NPV were better for invasive cancer (100%/100%) than for all malignancies (54%/76%). Radiologists' MRI interpretation was more sensitive than CAD (p = 0.05), but less specific (p = 0.001) for cancer detection. Conclusion: The breast MRI CAD system used could not improve the radiologists' accuracy for distinguishing all malignant from benign lesions, due to the poor sensitivity for DCIS detection.

  1. Whole-body MRI using a rolling table platform for the detection of bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Goehde, Susanne C.; Ruehm, Stefan G.; Goyen, Mathias; Bosk, Silke; Debatin, Joerg F.; Barkhausen, Joerg [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Freudenberg, Lutz S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results of whole-body MRI using a recently developed rolling table platform with findings of nuclear scintigraphy in patients with bone metastases. Twenty-six patients with known or suspected bone metastases who had undergone radionuclide scintigraphy were examined by MRI. Patients were placed on a rolling table platform with integrated phased-array surface coils [BodySURF (system for unlimited field of view)] capable of pulling the patient through the isocenter of the magnet. Using a five-station approach three different image sets (T1-weighted gradient recalled echo, half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin echo, and short tau inversion recovery) were collected in the coronal plane. In addition, the spine was imaged in the sagittal plane. The MRI findings were compared with the results obtained by scintigraphy. The whole-body MR examination lasting merely 40 min was feasible in all 26 patients. The MRI revealed excellent correlation with scintigraphy regarding metastatic lesions. A total of 60 regions with metastatic lesions were identified on bone scintigraphy. Fifty-three regions were detected on identical locations by MRI. The regions missed by MRI were located mainly in ribs and skull. The MRI could identify additional bone metastases in spine, pelvis, and femur. The MRI screening for bone metastases correlated well with bone scintigraphy. Use of the rolling table platform permits rapid imaging based on three different contrast mechanisms of the entire skeletal system. (orig.)

  2. Underwater remote detection and monitoring of spilled Orimulsion using sonar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accidental spill of Orimulsion on water presents special challenges because the Orimulsion will go into suspension as microscopic surfactant coated bitumen particles in the first 2-3 metres below the water surface. This makes it difficult to detect and monitor the plume. Fleming Co. Environmental examined the potential use of sonar for the underwater remote detection and monitoring of spilled Orimulsion in a small-scale saltwater tank test in Denmark. For the test, a sonar was placed 0.75 m below the water surface at one end of the tank. Acoustic measurements showed that a gradually spreading cloud containing only 5.6 liters of hydrocarbon particles could be detected from 17 meters away in a body of 180,000 liters, even when the sonar was functioning at only 6 per cent of its full power. These positive results may lead to further tank testing or offshore testing in Venezuela. 4 refs., 9 figs

  3. Comparative study of whole-body MRI and bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess and compare the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scintigraphy in the detection of metastases to bone. Material and methods: Forty randomly selected patients with known malignant tumours were prospectively studied using bone scintigraphy and whole-body MRI. Two patients were excluded. Symptoms of bone metastasis were present in 29 (76%) patients and absent in nine (24%). Findings were classified into four categories according to the probability of bone metastasis: (1) negative, (2) probably negative, (3) probably positive, and (4) positive. Diagnostic accuracy was determined according to the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The definitive diagnosis was reached using other imaging techniques, biopsy, or 12 months clinical follow-up. Results: Metastases were present in 18 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 94, 90, and 92%, respectively, for whole-body MRI and 72, 75, and 74%, respectively, for bone scintigraphy. Diagnostic accuracy measured by the area under the ROC curve was significantly higher for whole-body MRI (96%) than for bone scintigraphy (77%; p<0.05). Interobserver agreement measured by the kappa index was significantly higher for whole-body MRI (0.895) than for bone scintigraphy (0.524; p<0.05). Whole-body MRI detected lesions in tissues other than bone in 17 (45%) patients. Conclusions: Whole-body MRI is more accurate and more objective than bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases. Whole-body MRI can also detect lesions in tissues other than bone.

  4. Detecting Alzheimer’s disease by morphological MRI using hippocampal grading and cortical thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Coupé, Pierrick; Fonov, Vladimir; Collins, D. Louis

    2014-01-01

    Structural MRI is an important imaging biomarker in Alzheimer’s disease as the cerebral atrophy has been shown to closely correlate with cogni-tive symptoms. Recognizing this, numerous methods have been developed for quantifying the disease related atrophy from MRI over the past decades. Special effort has been dedicated to separate AD related modifications from normal ag-ing for the purpose of early detection and prediction. Several groups have re-ported promising results using automatic method...

  5. Comparative study of whole-body MRI and bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balliu, E., E-mail: eballiu@gmail.co [Department of Magnetic Resonance, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Boada, M.; Pelaez, I. [Department of Magnetic Resonance, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, J.C. [Department of Magnetic Resonance, Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta Caterina, Girona (Spain); Barcelo-Vidal, C. [Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, University of Girona (Spain); Rubio, A.; Galofre, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Castro, A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Pedraza, S. [Department of Magnetic Resonance, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    Aim: To assess and compare the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scintigraphy in the detection of metastases to bone. Material and methods: Forty randomly selected patients with known malignant tumours were prospectively studied using bone scintigraphy and whole-body MRI. Two patients were excluded. Symptoms of bone metastasis were present in 29 (76%) patients and absent in nine (24%). Findings were classified into four categories according to the probability of bone metastasis: (1) negative, (2) probably negative, (3) probably positive, and (4) positive. Diagnostic accuracy was determined according to the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The definitive diagnosis was reached using other imaging techniques, biopsy, or 12 months clinical follow-up. Results: Metastases were present in 18 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 94, 90, and 92%, respectively, for whole-body MRI and 72, 75, and 74%, respectively, for bone scintigraphy. Diagnostic accuracy measured by the area under the ROC curve was significantly higher for whole-body MRI (96%) than for bone scintigraphy (77%; p<0.05). Interobserver agreement measured by the kappa index was significantly higher for whole-body MRI (0.895) than for bone scintigraphy (0.524; p<0.05). Whole-body MRI detected lesions in tissues other than bone in 17 (45%) patients. Conclusions: Whole-body MRI is more accurate and more objective than bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases. Whole-body MRI can also detect lesions in tissues other than bone.

  6. A Review on Automated Brain Tumor Detection and Segmentation from MRI of Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Sudipta; Nag, Sanjay; Maitra, Indra Kanta; Samir Kumar BANDYOPADHYAY

    2013-01-01

    Tumor segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is an important but time consuming manual task performed by medical experts. Automating this process is a challenging task because of the high diversity in the appearance of tumor tissues among different patients and in many cases similarity with the normal tissues. MRI is an advanced medical imaging technique providing rich information about the human soft-tissue anatomy. There are different brain tumor detection...

  7. MRI Brain Tumor Segmentation and Necrosis Detection Using Adaptive Sobolev Snakes

    OpenAIRE

    Nakhmani, Arie; Kikinis, Ron; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation in brain MRI volumes is used in neurosurgical planning and illness staging. It is important to explore the tumor shape and necrosis regions at different points of time to evaluate the disease progression. We propose an algorithm for semi-automatic tumor segmentation and necrosis detection. Our algorithm consists of three parts: conversion of MRI volume to a probability space based on the on-line learned model, tumor probability density estimation, and adaptive segment...

  8. Time resolved optical detection for white matter lesion detection: preclinical tests on macaque brains and MRI co-registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planat-Chrétien, A.; Berger, M.; Hervé, L.; Watroba, L.; Demilly, J.; Flament, J.; Stimmer, L.; Aubourg, P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a preclinical assessment on young macaques aimed at detecting white matter lesions. We present the protocol we implemented to achieve the lesions detection using a bedside non-invasive optical-based Time-Resolved instrumentation we have optimized for this purpose. We validated the reconstructed 3D absorption map with co-registration of MRI data.

  9. NMR analysis on microfluidic devices by remote detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonnell, Erin E.; Han, SongI; Hilty, Christian; Pierce,Kimberly; Pines, Alexander

    2005-08-15

    We present a novel approach to perform high-sensitivity NMR imaging and spectroscopic analysis on microfluidic devices. The application of NMR, the most information rich spectroscopic technique, to microfluidic devices remains a challenge because the inherently low sensitivity of NMR is aggravated by small fluid volumes leading to low NMR signal, and geometric constraints resulting in poor efficiency for inductive detection. We address the latter by physically separating signal detection from encoding of information with remote detection. Thereby, we use a commercial imaging probe with sufficiently large diameter to encompass the entire device, enabling encoding of NMR information at any location on the chip. Because large-diameter coils are too insensitive for detection, we store the encoded information as longitudinal magnetization and flow it into the outlet capillary. There, we detect the signal with optimal sensitivity using a solenoidal microcoil, and reconstruct the information encoded in the fluid. We present a generally applicable design for a detection-only microcoil probe that can be inserted into the bore of a commercial imaging probe. Using hyperpolarized 129Xe gas, we show that this probe enables sensitive reconstruction of NMR spectroscopic information encoded by the large imaging probe while keeping the flexibility of a large coil.

  10. Detection of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by cardiovascular MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in identifying apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods: Sixty-five patients with typical apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (T-AHCM), 51 patients with pre-apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (P-AHCM)and 26 normal controls were confirmed by cMRI. All cases underwent electrocardiogram and echocardiography, of which 16 and 34 cases were studied by radionuclide 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT myocardial scanning and coronary angiography plus left ventriculography, respectively. Results: cMRI confirmed all patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but echocardiography missed 96 cases. Two chamber and four chamber views of cine-cMRI were considered as the best position to show detailed structure of cardiac apex. Forty-seven cases showed spade-like configuration of left ventricular cavity in T-AHCM group, but only 15 patients in P-AHCM group presented the same character. T-AHCM group showed higher apical thickness and ratio of the apical wall thickness to that at basal level than P-AHCM group(18.6±2.7) mm vs (13.6±1.0) mm, 2.2±0.5 vs 1.6±0.3, P<0.05), and the ratios of both T-AHCM group and P-AHCM group were significantly higher than that of control group (9.5±1.7) mm, 1.1±0.1, P<0.05). Hypertrophic wall thickening was lesser in T-AHCM group than in P-AHCM group, while the values of both T-AHCM group and P-AHCM group were significantly lesser than that of control one. Conclusion: MRI is the best diagnostic modality for AHCM, which is highly accurate and better than echocardiography, especially for the diagnosis of mild hypertrophy in the early stage. (authors)

  11. Preoperative detection of colorectal liver metastases in fatty liver: MDCT or MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulemann, Vanessa, E-mail: vanessa.kulemann@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Schima, Wolfgang [KH Goettlicher Heiland, Vienna (Austria); Tamandl, Dietmar; Kaczirek, Klaus; Gruenberger, Thomas [Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Wrba, Friedrich [Department of Pathology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative detection of colorectal liver metastases in diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver, associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Materials and methods: Twenty preoperative tri-phasic MDCT (4-64-row, Siemens) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (1.5 T or 3.0 T, Siemens) examinations of patients with colorectal cancer and liver metastases in diffuse steatosis were retrospectively evaluated. All patients underwent surgical resection for liver metastases (time interval 1-60 days). The amount of fatty infiltration of the liver was determined histopathologically by semi-quantitative percent-wise estimation and ranged from 25 to 75%. Results: Overall, 51 metastases were found by histopathology of the resected liver segments/lobes. The size of the metastases ranged from 0.4 to 13 cm, with 18 (35%) being up to 1 cm in diameter. In the overall rating, MDCT detected 33/51 lesions (65%), and MRI 45/51 (88%). For lesions up to 1 cm, MDCT detected only 2/18 (11%) and MRI 12/18 (66%). One false positive lesion was detected by MDCT. Statistical analysis showed that MRI is markedly superior to MDCT, with a statistically significant difference (p < .001), particularly for the detection of small lesions ({<=}1 cm; p < .004). There was no significant difference between the two modalities in the detection of lesions > 1 cm. Conclusion: For the detection of colorectal liver metastases after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and consecutive diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver, MRI is superior to MDCT, especially for the detection of small lesions.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy in detecting tears in the proximal biceps tendon using standard nonenhancing shoulder MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubrow SA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Samuel A Dubrow,1 Jonathan J Streit,2 Yousef Shishani,2 Mark R Robbin,3 Reuben Gobezie21Department of Orthopedics, Alegent Creighton Clinic, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, USA; 2Department of Orthopedics, Cleveland Shoulder Institute, 3Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH, USABackground: There is a paucity of data in the literature evaluating the performance of noncontrast MRI in the diagnosis of partial and complete tears of the proximal portion of the long head of the biceps (LHB tendon. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI compared to arthroscopy for the diagnosis of pathology involving the intra-articular portion of the LHB tendon.Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 66 patients (mean age 57.8 years, range 43–70 years who underwent shoulder arthroscopy and evaluation of the LHB tendon after having had a noncontrast MRI of the shoulder. Biceps pathology was classified by both MRI and direct arthroscopic visualization as either normal, partial tearing, or complete rupture, and arthroscopy was considered to be the gold standard. We then determined the sensitivity, specificity, and positive- and negative-predictive values of MRI for the detection of partial and complete LHB tears.Results: MRI identified 29/66 (43.9% of patients as having a pathologic lesion of the LHB tendon (19 partial and ten complete tears while diagnostic arthroscopy identified tears in 59/66 patients (89.4%; 50 partial and 16 complete. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI for detecting partial tearing of the LHB were 27.7% and 84.2%, respectively (positive predictive value =81.2%, negative predictive value =32.0%. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI for complete tears of the LHB were 56.3% and 98.0%, respectively (positive predictive value =90.0%, negative predictive value =87.5%.Conclusion: Standard noncontrast MRI of the shoulder is limited in detecting partial tears and complete ruptures of the intra-articular LHB tendon. Surgeons may encounter pathologic lesions of the LHB tendon during arthroscopy that are not visualized on preoperative MRI.Keywords: long head biceps tendon, biceps tendon tear, MRI detection, magnetic resonance imaging, case series

  13. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better combination of sensitivity and specificity than did peri-vesical changes

  14. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better combination of sensitivity and specificity than did peri-vesical changes.

  15. A remote fiber optic dosimeter network for detecting hydrazine vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fiber optic chemical dosimeter has been developed for use in the remote detection of vapors of toxic amine rocket fuels (hydrazine and its substituted derivatives) that are used as Air Force and civilian launch sites. The dosimeter employs a colorimetric indicating reagent immobilized in a porous sol-gel cladding on multimode fiber. This reagent reacts selectively with the fuel vapor to produce a strongly absorbing cladding that introduces light propagation losses in the fiber; these losses indicate the presence of hydrazine (N2H4) vapor. The absorption occurs over a broad spectral range ideally suited for interrogation by semiconductor diode lasers. The authors have shown that the dosimeter yields an average hydrazine detectivity of 2.3 exposures of the dosimeter to laboratory air have not adversely affected the dosimeter. Additionally, its response to ammonia vapor has been determined to be 9,200 times smaller than its response to hydrazine vapor

  16. A remote canister-positioning and glass level detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goles, R.W.; Hof, P.J.; Dierks, R.D.; Holton, L.K. Jr. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-02-01

    This paper presents a remote, contactless microprocessor-based control system has been designed, developed, tested, and used that accurately positions glass-receiving canisters beneath a radioactive liquid-fed ceramic melter and monitors the height and extent of cross-sectional glass fill. Both tasks are accomplished using in-cell gamma-ray sources and out-of-cell detection, analysis and data interpretation equipment. The system aligns the canister axis with the melter overflow section to within {approximately} 3 mm. The canister glass level at 11 fixed elevations is measured to within {+-} 5 mm, while as little as 5 mm of linear cross-sectional voiding (or equivalent glass thickness) can be detected in 30-cm-diam canisters.

  17. Sensitive change detection for remote sensing monitoring of nuclear treaties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, Morton J.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    Triggered in part by the advent of high resolution commercial optical satellites, the analysis of open-source satellite imagery has now established itself as an important tool for monitoring nuclear activities throughout the world (Chitumbo et al 2001). Whereas detection of land cover and land use change is a commonplace application in remote sensing, the detection of anthropogenic changes associated with nuclear activities, whether declared or clandestine, presents a difficult challenge. It is necessary to discriminate subtle, often weak signals of interest on a background of irrelevant or uninteresting changes, see e.g. (Canty and Schlittenhardt 2001). In our contribution we focus attention on the use of conventional multispectral earth observation satellite platforms with moderate ground resolution (Landsat TM, ASTER, SPOT) to detect changes over wide areas which are relevant to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament treaties. The analysis is based upon the multivariate alteration detection (MAD) algorithm proposed by Nielsen et al. 1998 with the inclusion of a recent refinement which puts weight on difficult observations (Nielsen to be published). The multispectral data are pre-processed by orthorectification, illumination angle correction, image registration to sub-pixel accuracy and, where appropriate, wavelet-based panchromatic sharpening. We illustrate the techniques with a number of case studies involving the location of underground nuclear explosions and detection of uranium mining sites. In the former case the change signals are compared with existing seismic data, which include explosion times, locations, yields and depths of burial as well as data about surface collapse (subsidence) phenomena like e.g. crater depth and diameter and test surface-collapse times. The work has been carried out within the framework of the Global Monitoring for Security and Stability Network of Excellence (GMOSS) initiated by the European Commission. Chitumbo, K., Robb, S., Bunney, J. and Lev\\$\\backslash\\$'e, G., IAEA Satellite imagery and the Department of Safeguards, Proceedings of the Symposium on International Safeguards, Vienna 2001 IAEA-SM-367/16/08) on CD-ROM. Canty, M. J., Schlittenhardt, J., Locating the 1998 Indian nuclear tests, Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union 82(3), 2001, pp. 25--29. Nielsen, A. A., Conradsen, K. and Simpson, J. J., Multivariate alteration detection (MAD) and MAF processing in multispectral, bitemporal image data: New approaches to change detection studies, Remote Sens. Environ. 64(1), 1998, pp. 1--19. Nielsen, A. A., Iteratively re-weighted multivariate alteration detection in multi- and hyperspectral data, to be published.

  18. Whole-body MRI for detecting osseous metastases: comparison with bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the reliability of whole-body MRI (WB- MRI) in detecting osseous metastases. Methods: Thirty patients verified with malignant tumor by histology were enrolled. All the patients underwent WB-MRI and bone scintigraphy (BS) with a two week interval. Clinical information, conventional MRI and CT images, and follow-up data were collected as gold standard for the diagnosis of bone metastases. The data of 30 patients and 270 segments as study unit respectively were analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity between WB-MRI and BS were compared with McNemar test. Results: Bone metastases were confirmed in 27 of 30 patients by gold standard. Twenty-five patients with bone metastases were detected by WB-MRI and no false-positive cases. Twenty-seven patients with bone metastases were found by BS but having two false-positive cases. With patients as study unit, the diagnostic sensitivity of WB-MRI and BS were both 92.6% (25/27) and the specificity were 100% (3/3) and 33.3% (1/3), respectively. The area under ROC curve of WB-MRI and BS were 0.9630 and 0.6296, respectively (P>0.05). With segments as study unit, 119 bone metastases segments were confirmed. The diagnostic sensitivity of WB-MRI and BS were 90.8% (108/119) and 70.6% (84/119) (P<0.01). while the specificity were 98.0% (148/151) and 90.7% (137/151), respectively (P<0.01). The area under ROC curve of WB-MRI and BS were 0.9438 and 0.8066. The former was obviously higher than the latter (P< 0.01). Meanwhile, by WB-MRI, 3 cases coexisting with brain metastases, 4 cases with lung metastases, and 4 cases with hepatic metastases were found. Conclusion: WB-MRI was a good tool for screening osseous metastases. (authors)

  19. MRI detected prevalence of abnormalities in patients of knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Mehta

    2015-10-01

    Results: In this present study 72% patients were males and 28% patients females and their ages ranging from (11-80 years. Knee pain was found common in age group 31-40 years. Menisci lesions (44% were more common as compared to ligament lesions (14% in patients of knee pain. Osteoarthritis was found in 40 % of patients of knee pain. Joint effusion and marrow edema was found with incidence of 74% and 62% respectively. 4% patients were suffering from intraarticular tumors. Conclusions: Knee pain can occur at any stage of life due to various causative factors. MRI can demonstrate the exact nature and extent of bony as well as soft tissue abnormality. This has increase the use of MRI in evaluation of patients of knee pain. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(10.000: 2572-2575

  20. Probability distribution function-based classification of structural MRI for the detection of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, I; Demirel, H

    2015-09-01

    High-dimensional classification methods have been a major target of machine learning for the automatic classification of patients who suffer from Alzheimer's disease (AD). One major issue of automatic classification is the feature-selection method from high-dimensional data. In this paper, a novel approach for statistical feature reduction and selection in high-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data based on the probability distribution function (PDF) is introduced. To develop an automatic computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) technique, this research explores the statistical patterns extracted from structural MRI (sMRI) data on four systematic levels. First, global and local differences of gray matter in patients with AD compared to healthy controls (HCs) using the voxel-based morphometric (VBM) technique with 3-Tesla 3D T1-weighted MRI are investigated. Second, feature extraction based on the voxel clusters detected by VBM on sMRI and voxel values as volume of interest (VOI) is used. Third, a novel statistical feature-selection process is employed, utilizing the PDF of the VOI to represent statistical patterns of the respective high-dimensional sMRI sample. Finally, the proposed feature-selection method for early detection of AD with support vector machine (SVM) classifiers compared to other standard feature selection methods, such as partial least squares (PLS) techniques, is assessed. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated using 130 AD and 130 HC MRI data from the ADNI dataset with 10-fold cross validation(1). The results show that the PDF-based feature selection approach is a reliable technique that is highly competitive with respect to the state-of-the-art techniques in classifying AD from high-dimensional sMRI samples. PMID:26226415

  1. A new diagnostic score to detect osteoporosis in patients undergoing lumbar spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signal intensity of lumbar-spine at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates to bone mineral density (BMD). Our aim was to define a quantitative MRI-based score to detect osteoporosis on lumbar-spine MRI. After Ethics Committee approval, we selected female patients who underwent both lumbar-spine MRI and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and a reference group of 131 healthy females (20-29 years) who underwent lumbar-spine MRI. We measured the intra-vertebral signal-to-noise ratio in L1-L4. We introduced an MRI-based score (M-score), on the model of T-score. M-score diagnostic performance in diagnosing osteoporosis was estimated against DXA using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. We included 226 patients (median age 65 years), 70 (31 %) being osteoporotic at DXA. MRI signal-to-noise ratio correlated to BMD (r = -0.677, P < 0.001). M-score negatively correlated to T-score (r = -0.682, P < 0.001). Setting a 90 %-specificity, an M-score threshold of 5.5 was found, distinguishing osteoporosis from non-osteoporosis (sensitivity 54 %; ROC AUC 0.844). Thirty-one (14 %) patients had a fragility fracture, with osteoporosis detected in 15 (48 %) according to M-score and eight (26 %) according to T-score (P = 0.016). M-score obtained on lumbar spine MRI is a quantitative method correlating with osteoporosis. Its diagnostic value remains to be demonstrated on a large prospective cohort of patients. (orig.)

  2. Building multiclass classifiers for remote homology detection and fold recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karypis George

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein remote homology detection and fold recognition are central problems in computational biology. Supervised learning algorithms based on support vector machines are currently one of the most effective methods for solving these problems. These methods are primarily used to solve binary classification problems and they have not been extensively used to solve the more general multiclass remote homology prediction and fold recognition problems. Results We present a comprehensive evaluation of a number of methods for building SVM-based multiclass classification schemes in the context of the SCOP protein classification. These methods include schemes that directly build an SVM-based multiclass model, schemes that employ a second-level learning approach to combine the predictions generated by a set of binary SVM-based classifiers, and schemes that build and combine binary classifiers for various levels of the SCOP hierarchy beyond those defining the target classes. Conclusion Analyzing the performance achieved by the different approaches on four different datasets we show that most of the proposed multiclass SVM-based classification approaches are quite effective in solving the remote homology prediction and fold recognition problems and that the schemes that use predictions from binary models constructed for ancestral categories within the SCOP hierarchy tend to not only lead to lower error rates but also reduce the number of errors in which a superfamily is assigned to an entirely different fold and a fold is predicted as being from a different SCOP class. Our results also show that the limited size of the training data makes it hard to learn complex second-level models, and that models of moderate complexity lead to consistently better results.

  3. Mineralogy and astrobiology detection using laser remote sensing instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, M Nurul; Bradley, Arthur T; Sharma, Shiv K; Misra, Anupam K; Lucey, Paul G; McKay, Christopher P; Ismail, Syed; Sandford, Stephen P

    2015-09-01

    A multispectral instrument based on Raman, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and a lidar system provides high-fidelity scientific investigations, scientific input, and science operation constraints in the context of planetary field campaigns with the Jupiter Europa Robotic Lander and Mars Sample Return mission opportunities. This instrument conducts scientific investigations analogous to investigations anticipated for missions to Mars and Jupiter's icy moons. This combined multispectral instrument is capable of performing Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy out to a >100??m target distance from the rover system and provides single-wavelength atmospheric profiling over long ranges (>20??km). In this article, we will reveal integrated remote Raman, LIF, and lidar technologies for use in robotic and lander-based planetary remote sensing applications. Discussions are focused on recently developed Raman, LIF, and lidar systems in addition to emphasizing surface water ice, surface and subsurface minerals, organics, biogenic, biomarker identification, atmospheric aerosols and clouds distributions, i.e., near-field atmospheric thin layers detection for next robotic-lander based instruments to measure all the above-mentioned parameters. PMID:26368883

  4. Ultra-low-field MRI for the detection of liquid explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, M; Flynn, M; Gomez, J; Hanson, C; Kraus, R; Magnelind, P; Maskaly, K; Matlashov, A; Newman, S; Owens, T; Peters, M; Sandin, H; Savukov, I; Schultz, L; Urbaitis, A; Volegov, P; Zotev, V, E-mail: espy@lanl.go [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Applied Modern Physics Group, MS D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Recently it has become both possible and practical to use magnetic resonance (MR) at magnetic fields in the range from {mu}T to mT, the so-called ultra-low-field (ULF) regime. SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensor technology allows for ultra-sensitive detection while pulsed pre-polarizing fields greatly enhance the signal. The instrumentation allows for unprecedented flexibility in signal acquisition sequences and simplified MRI instrumentation. Here we present results for a new application of ULF MRI and relaxometry for the detection and characterization of liquids. We briefly describe the motivation and advantages of the ULF MR approach, and present recent results from a seven-channel ULF MRI/relaxometer system constructed to non-invasively inspect liquids at a security checkpoint for the presence of hazardous material. The instrument was deployed at the Albuquerque International Airport in December 2008, and results from that endeavor are also presented.

  5. Ultra-low-field MRI for the detection of liquid explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently it has become both possible and practical to use magnetic resonance (MR) at magnetic fields in the range from ?T to mT, the so-called ultra-low-field (ULF) regime. SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensor technology allows for ultra-sensitive detection while pulsed pre-polarizing fields greatly enhance the signal. The instrumentation allows for unprecedented flexibility in signal acquisition sequences and simplified MRI instrumentation. Here we present results for a new application of ULF MRI and relaxometry for the detection and characterization of liquids. We briefly describe the motivation and advantages of the ULF MR approach, and present recent results from a seven-channel ULF MRI/relaxometer system constructed to non-invasively inspect liquids at a security checkpoint for the presence of hazardous material. The instrument was deployed at the Albuquerque International Airport in December 2008, and results from that endeavor are also presented.

  6. Detection and Demarcation of Tumor using Vector Quantization in MRI images

    CERN Document Server

    Kekre, H B; Gharge, Saylee M

    2010-01-01

    Segmenting a MRI images into homogeneous texture regions representing disparate tissue types is often a useful preprocessing step in the computer-assisted detection of breast cancer. That is why we proposed new algorithm to detect cancer in mammogram breast cancer images. In this paper we proposed segmentation using vector quantization technique. Here we used Linde Buzo-Gray algorithm (LBG) for segmentation of MRI images. Initially a codebook of size 128 was generated for MRI images. These code vectors were further clustered in 8 clusters using same LBG algorithm. These 8 images were displayed as a result. This approach does not leads to over segmentation or under segmentation. For the comparison purpose we displayed results of watershed segmentation and Entropy using Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix along with this method.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging goes postmortem: noninvasive detection and assessment of myocardial infarction by postmortem MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the performance of postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (pmMRI) in identification and characterization of lethal myocardial infarction in a non-invasive manner on human corpses. Before forensic autopsy, 20 human forensic corpses were examined on a 1.5-T system for the presence of myocardial infarction. Short axis, transversal and longitudinal long axis images (T1-weighted; T2-weighted; PD-weighted) were acquired in situ. In subsequent autopsy, the section technique was adapted to short axis images. Histological investigations were conducted to confirm autopsy and/or radiological diagnoses. Nineteen myocardial lesions were detected and age staged with pmMRI, of which 13 were histologically confirmed (chronic, subacute and acute). Six lesions interpreted as peracute by pmMRI showed no macroscopic or histological finding. Five of the six peracute lesions correlated well to coronary pathology, and one case displayed a severe hypertrophic alteration. pmMRI reliably demonstrates chronic, subacute and acute myocardial infarction in situ. In peracute cases pmMRI may display ischemic lesions undetectable at autopsy and routine histology. pmMRI has the potential to substantiate autopsy and to counteract the loss of reliable information on causes of death due to the recent disappearance of the clinical autopsy. (orig.)

  8. Ellipsoids for anomaly detection in remote sensing imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosklos, Guenchik; Theiler, James

    2015-05-01

    For many target and anomaly detection algorithms, a key step is the estimation of a centroid (relatively easy) and a covariance matrix (somewhat harder) that characterize the background clutter. For a background that can be modeled as a multivariate Gaussian, the centroid and covariance lead to an explicit probability density function that can be used in likelihood ratio tests for optimal detection statistics. But ellipsoidal contours can characterize a much larger class of multivariate density function, and the ellipsoids that characterize the outer periphery of the distribution are most appropriate for detection in the low false alarm rate regime. Traditionally the sample mean and sample covariance are used to estimate ellipsoid location and shape, but these quantities are confounded both by large lever-arm outliers and non-Gaussian distributions within the ellipsoid of interest. This paper compares a variety of centroid and covariance estimation schemes with the aim of characterizing the periphery of the background distribution. In particular, we will consider a robust variant of the Khachiyan algorithm for minimum-volume enclosing ellipsoid. The performance of these different approaches is evaluated on multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing imagery using coverage plots of ellipsoid volume versus false alarm rate.

  9. Involvement patterns in myotilinopathy and desminopathy detected by a novel neuromuscular whole-body MRI protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) has been successfully applied for oncologic and cardiovascular diagnostics, whereas imaging in myopathies usually employs dedicated protocols restricted to areas of specific interest. In this study, we propose a comprehensive neuromuscular WB-MRI protocol. Eighteen patients with degenerative and inflammatory muscle diseases were included. Whole-body imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MR system using parallel imaging. Examination time was 41:26 min. Coronal and axial T1-weighted and coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences of the whole body were acquired. Images were analysed by two radiologists. With this protocol we could detect characteristic involvement patterns in different myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs): Patients with myotilinopathy showed frequent involvement of the rhomboid muscles (4/5), the erector spinae (5/5), the biceps femoris and the semimembranosus (5/5), while the semitendinosus was relatively spared (2/5). In contrast, in desminopathy patients the ilipsoas (3/4), the sartorius, (3/4), the gracilis (3/4) and the semitendinosus (3/4) were frequently involved, while the semimembranosus was spared (1/4). As shown for MFMs, WB-MRI is an appropriate modality to detect fatty infiltration and oedema in skeletal muscles. WB-MRI could be more useful than dedicated examinations for differential diagnosis, muscle biopsy planning and noninvasive follow-up examinations. (orig.)

  10. MRI for the detection of ureteral opening and ipsilateral kidney in children with single ectopic ureter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the usefulness of MRI in the detection of a single ectopic ureteral opening and the location and dysplastic change of ipsilateral kidney. Nine patients (mean age; 4.8 years, M:F=3:6) in whom a single ectopic ureter was suspected clinically and sonographically underwent conventional radiologic studies (IVP, VCUG, 99mTc-DM-SA scan, as well as US) and MRI. We evaluated images of the point of the ectopic ureteral opening and the location and dysplastic or hydronephrotic change of the ipsilateral kidney, and compared those findings with the endoscopic, surgical, and pathological findings. Eight patients had a unilateral single ectopic ureter and one had bilateral lesions. Seven normally positioned kidneys in six patients showed dysplastic (n=3) or hydronephrotic (n=4) change. In two patients an ectopic dysplastic kidney was located in the pelvis and one had ipsilateral renal agenesis. Conventional radiologic studies failed to reveal two ectopic dysplastic kidneys, one renal agenesis, and eight ectopic ureteral openings. In all patients, MRI clearly demonstrated the location of the kidney and ectopic ureteral opening, and dysplastic or hydronephrotic change of the kidney, and in one patient, uterine duplication. Except in two patients whose ectopic ureteral opening was not found on endoscopy, MRI findings were concordant with endoscopic and surgical findings. MRI was useful for the detection of a single ectopic ureteral opening and for demonstrating the location and dysplastic change of ipsilateral kidney

  11. MRI brain tumor segmentation and necrosis detection using adaptive Sobolev snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhmani, Arie; Kikinis, Ron; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Brain tumor segmentation in brain MRI volumes is used in neurosurgical planning and illness staging. It is important to explore the tumor shape and necrosis regions at di erent points of time to evaluate the disease progression. We propose an algorithm for semi-automatic tumor segmentation and necrosis detection. Our algorithm consists of three parts: conversion of MRI volume to a probability space based on the on-line learned model, tumor probability density estimation, and adaptive segmentation in the probability space. We use manually selected acceptance and rejection classes on a single MRI slice to learn the background and foreground statistical models. Then, we propagate this model to all MRI slices to compute the most probable regions of the tumor. Anisotropic 3D di usion is used to estimate the probability density. Finally, the estimated density is segmented by the Sobolev active contour (snake) algorithm to select smoothed regions of the maximum tumor probability. The segmentation approach is robust to noise and not very sensitive to the manual initialization in the volumes tested. Also, it is appropriate for low contrast imagery. The irregular necrosis regions are detected by using the outliers of the probability distribution inside the segmented region. The necrosis regions of small width are removed due to a high probability of noisy measurements. The MRI volume segmentation results obtained by our algorithm are very similar to expert manual segmentation.

  12. Utility of vaginal and rectal contrast medium in MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassang, M.; Novellas, S.; Bloch-Marcotte, C.; Chevallier, P. [Hopital Archet 2, Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Delotte, J.; Bongain, A. [Hopital Archet 2, Service de Gynecologie-Obstetrique, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Toullalan, O. [Hopital de Cannes, Service de Gynecologie, 15 avenue des Broussailles, B.P. 264, Cannes Cedex (France)

    2010-04-15

    To study the sensitivity of MRI performed utilising vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel in the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis. This was a prospective monocentric study. All patients evaluated by the gynaecologist for pelvic pain, endometriosis or infertility were included. Axial and sagittal T2-weighted images were performed both with and without vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel. Three radiologists, all blinded, interpreted the images with a minimum of 15 days between the two readings. MRI performance with and without vaginal and rectal opacification was evaluated by calculating sensitivity, specificity and both positive and negative predictive values. Seventy-eight patients were included. Among these, 31 patients had deep pelvic endometriosis of which 24 were confirmed by laparoscopy. Seventy-six locations of deep pelvic endometriosis were discovered on MRI. For the three reviewers there was a significant improvement in sensitivity between pre- and post-contrast MRI (p < 0.0002). Opacification of the vagina and rectum significantly improved the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis by expanding the vagina and rectum, thus allowing better delineation of the pelvic organs. This was especially apparent for lesions localised to the vagina and rectovaginal septum. (orig.)

  13. The accuracy of MRI in the detection of Lumbar Disc Containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiner Bradley K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MRI has proven to be an extremely valuable tool in the assessment of normal and pathological spinal anatomy. Accordingly, it is commonly used to assess containment of discal material by the outer fibers of the anulus fibrosus and posterior longitudinal ligaments. Determination of such containment is important to determine candidacy for intradiscal techniques and has prognostic significance. The accuracy of MRI in detecting containment has been insufficiently documented. Methods The MRI's of fifty consecutive patients undergoing open lumbar microdiscectomy were prospectively evaluated for disc containment by a neuroradiologist and senior spinal surgeon using criteria available in the literature and the classification of Macnab/McCulloch. An independent surgeon then performed the surgery and documented the actual containment status using the same methods. Statistical evaluation of accuracy was undertaken. Results MRI was found to be 72% sensitive, 68% specific, and 70% accurate in detecting containment status of lumbar herniated discs. Conclusion MRI may be inaccurate in assessing containment status of lumbar disc herniations in 30% of cases. Given the importance of containment for patient selection for indirect discectomy techniques and intradiscal therapies, coupled with prognostic significance; other methods to assess containment should be employed to assess containment when such alternative interventions are being considered.

  14. Detection of bone metastasis of prostate cancer. Comparison of whole-body MRI and bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: prostate cancer continues to be the third leading cancer-related mortality of western men. Early diagnosis of bone metastasis is important for the therapy regime and for assessing the prognosis. The standard method is bone scintigraphy. Whole-body MRI proved to be more sensitive for early detection of skeletal metastasis. However, studies of homogenous tumor entities are not available. The aim of the study was to compare bone scintigraphy and whole-body MRI regarding the detection of bone metastasis of prostate cancer. Materials and methods: 14 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer and a bone scintigraphy as well as whole-body MRI within one month were included. The mean age was 68 years. Scintigraphy was performed using the planar whole-body technique (ventral and dorsal projections). Suspect areas were enlarged. Whole-body MRI was conducted using native T1w and STIR sequences in the coronary plane of the whole body, sagittal imaging of spine and breath-hold STIR and T1w-Flash-2D sequences of ribs and chest. Bone scintigraphy and whole-body MRI were evaluated retrospectively by experienced radiologists in a consensus reading on a lesion-based level. Results: whole-body MRI detected significantly more bone metastasis (p = 0.024). 96.4% of the demonstrated skeletal metastases in bone scintigraphy were founded in whole-body MRI while only 58.6% of the depicted metastases in MRI were able to be located in scintigraphy. There was no significant difference regarding bone metastasis greater than one centimeter (p = 0.082) in contrast to metastasis less than one centimeter (p = 0.035). Small osteoblastic metastases showed a considerably higher contrast in T1w sequences than in STIR imaging. Further advantages of whole-body MRI were additional information about extra-osseous tumor infiltration and their complications, for example stenosis of spinal canal or vertebral body fractures, found in 42.9% of patients. (orig.)

  15. REMOTE DETECTION OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES USING MILLIMETER WAVE TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnowski, R.; Chien; H.; Gopalsami, N.

    2009-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, a common method for manufacturing weapons-grade special nuclear materials, is accompanied by the release of fi ssion products trapped within the fuel. One of these fi ssion products is a radioactive isotope of Krypton (Kr-85); a pure ?- emitter with a half-life of 10.72 years. Due to its chemical neutrality and relatively long half life, nearly all of the Kr-85 is released into the surrounding air during reprocessing, resulting in a concentration of Kr-85 near the source that is several orders of magnitude higher than the typical background (atmospheric) concentrations. This high concentration of Kr-85 is accompanied by a proportionately high increase in air ionization due to the release of beta radiation from Kr-85 decay. Millimeter wave (MMW) sensing technology can be used to detect the presence of Kr-85 induced plumes since a high concentration of ions in the air increases the radar cross section due to a combination of atmospheric phenomena. Possible applications for this technology include the remote sensing of reprocessing activities across national borders bolstering global anti-proliferation initiatives. The feasibility of using MMW radar technology to uniquely detect the presence of Kr-85 can be tested using commercial ion generators or sealed radioactive sources in the laboratory. In this paper we describe our work to derive an ion dispersion model that will describe the spatial distribution of ions from Kr-85 and other common lab sources. The types and energies of radiation emitted by isotopes Co-60 and Cs-137 were researched, and these parameters were incorporated into these dispersion models. Our results can be compared with the results of MMW detection experiments in order to quantify the relationship between radar cross section and air ionization as well as to further calibrate the MMW detection equipment.

  16. Investigating Machine Learning Techniques for Detection of Depression Using Structural MRI Volumetric Features

    OpenAIRE

    Kuryati Kipli; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Isredza Rahmi A. Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Structural MRI offers anatomical details and high sensitivity to pathological changes. It can demonstrate certain patterns of brain changes present at a structural level. Research to date has shown that volumetric analysis of brain regions has importance in depression detection. However, such analysis has had very minimal use in depression detection studies at individual level. Optimally combining various brain volumetric features/attributes, and summarizing the data into a distinctive set of...

  17. Evaluation of the potential of PET-MRI fusion for detection of liver metastases in patients with neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiter, Nils F.; Steffen, Ingo; Brenner, Winfried; Roettgen, Rainer [Charite, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Nogami, Munenobu [Kochi University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kochi (Japan); Pape, Ulrich-Frank [Charite, Department of Gastroenterology, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd [Charite, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    This study was performed to assess the role of retrospective PET-MRI fusion with Ga-68-DOTA(0)-Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide (Ga-68-DOTATOC) PET and Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI in the detection of hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Twenty-two consecutive patients with suspected liver metastases from histopathologically proven NET were examined with Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI and multiphase contrast-enhanced Ga-68-DOTATOC PET/CT. PET and MRI images were retrospectively fused using commercially available software. Two physicians experienced in nuclear medicine and radiology analysed the images to assess diagnostic confidence and characterise liver lesions. A total of 181 lesions were detected. PET-MRI showed a sensitivity of 91.2% (significantly superior to PET/CT; P < 0.05) and a specificity of 95.6% (significantly superior to MRI; P < 0.05). PET/CT had a sensitivity of 73.5% and a specificity of 88.2%. MRI had a sensitivity of 87.6% and a specificity of 86.8%. The area under the curve was 0.98 for PET-MRI, 0.96 for MRI, and 0.89 for PET/CT (P < 0.05). Retrospectively fused PET-MRI was superior to multiphase contrast-enhanced Ga-68-DOTATOC PET/CT and Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI in the detection of NET liver metastases. It was more sensitive than PET/CT and more specific than MRI. Fused PET-MRI therefore seems well suited for surgical and interventional treatment planning of NET liver metastases. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of the potential of PET-MRI fusion for detection of liver metastases in patients with neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to assess the role of retrospective PET-MRI fusion with Ga-68-DOTA(0)-Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide (Ga-68-DOTATOC) PET and Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI in the detection of hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Twenty-two consecutive patients with suspected liver metastases from histopathologically proven NET were examined with Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI and multiphase contrast-enhanced Ga-68-DOTATOC PET/CT. PET and MRI images were retrospectively fused using commercially available software. Two physicians experienced in nuclear medicine and radiology analysed the images to assess diagnostic confidence and characterise liver lesions. A total of 181 lesions were detected. PET-MRI showed a sensitivity of 91.2% (significantly superior to PET/CT; P < 0.05) and a specificity of 95.6% (significantly superior to MRI; P < 0.05). PET/CT had a sensitivity of 73.5% and a specificity of 88.2%. MRI had a sensitivity of 87.6% and a specificity of 86.8%. The area under the curve was 0.98 for PET-MRI, 0.96 for MRI, and 0.89 for PET/CT (P < 0.05). Retrospectively fused PET-MRI was superior to multiphase contrast-enhanced Ga-68-DOTATOC PET/CT and Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI in the detection of NET liver metastases. It was more sensitive than PET/CT and more specific than MRI. Fused PET-MRI therefore seems well suited for surgical and interventional treatment planning of NET liver metastases. (orig.)

  19. Detection of cranial meningiomas: comparison of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Giesel, Frederik L.; Haberkorn, Uwe; Haufe, Sabine; Kratochwil, Clemens [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Linhart, Heinz G. [DKFZ, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology and Therapy, Heidelberg (Germany); Podlesek, Dino [University Hospital of Dresden, Department of Neurosurgery, Dresden (Germany); Eisenhut, Michael [DKFZ, Department of Radiopharmacy, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    PET imaging with somatostatin receptor ligands, such as {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC, is a well-established method for detection and target volume definition of meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Since DOTATOC PET delivers a higher contrast between meningiomas and surrounding tissues than MRI, we conducted a retrospective analysis to compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with cranial meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Over a period of 6 years, 134 patients (20-82 years of age, 107 women and 27 men) underwent cranial CE-MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. To compare the two methods, the lesions considered typical of meningiomas visually were counted and analysed with respect to their location and SUVmax. In the 134 patients investigated by both modalities, 190 meningiomas were detected by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and 171 by CE-MRI. With knowledge of the PET/CT data, the MRI scans were reinvestigated, which led to the detection of 4 of the 19 incidental meningiomas, resulting in an overall detection rate of 92 % of the meningioma lesions that were found by PET/CT. Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT demonstrated an improved sensitivity in meningioma detection when compared to CE-MRI. Tumours adjacent to the falx cerebri, located at the skull base or obscured by imaging artefacts or calcification are particularly difficult to detect by MRI. Therefore {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT may provide additional information in patients with uncertain or equivocal results on MRI or could help to confirm a diagnosis of meningioma based on MRI or could help to confirm MRI-based diagnosis of meningiomas in cases of biopsy limitations. It is possible that not only radiotherapy and surgical planning, but also follow-up strategies would benefit from this imaging modality. (orig.)

  20. The detection of the dynamic renal function using MRI by gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical study of dynamic renal function and the simulation of renal disorder in rabbit kidney using MRI by Gd-DTPA were performed. T1 of rabbit kidney, which had been operated (complete unilateral ureteral occlusion or incomplete unilateral occlusion of renal artery) was calculated before and after intravenous injection of 0.05 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA, continuously for 90 minutes. All images were obtained by the 0.1 Tesla resistive type MRI. The changes of 1/T1 of cortex and medulla of both kidneys were calculated (MRI renogram). The 4 compartment model of bilateral kidneys was established by 6 normal MRI renogram and renal blood flow-glommelurar function parameter and tubural excration function parameter were calculated by the Runge-Kutta-Gill method and the nonlinear least squares method (Simplex method). The change of renogram pattern was observed by the mathematical change of such parameters and comparative study was performed between such mathematical simulation and practical cases. The actual change of such parameters were calculated by the experimental model of rabbit kidney. It was concluded that the change of MRI renogram pattern was sensitive for unilateral hydronephrosis, renal parenchymal dysfunction by obstructive uropathy and unilateral renal arterial stenosis. Quantitative observation of focal renal parenchymal dysfunction, which was induced by ureteral obstruction, was possible. In the near future it will be also possible to detect acculate ERBF and GFR by the measurement of T1 of human kidney. (author)

  1. MRI detection of unsuspected vertebral injury in acute spinal trauma: incidence and significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. Multilevel spinal injury is well recognised. Previous studies reviewing the radiographs of spinal injury patients have shown an incidence of 15.2% of unsuspected spinal injury. It is recognised that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify injuries that are not demonstrated on radiographs. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and significance of spinal injuries using MRI in comparison with radiographs.Design and patients. The radiographs and MR images of 110 acute spinal injury patients were reviewed independently of each other and the findings were then correlated to determine any unsuspected injury.Results. MRI detected vertebral body bone bruises (microtrabecular bone injury) in 41.8% of spinal injury patients which were not seen on radiographs. These bone bruises were best appreciated on sagittal short tau inversion recovery MR sequences and seen at contiguous and non-contiguous levels in relation to the primary injury.Conclusion. This level of incidence of bone bruises has not previously been appreciated. We recommend that patients undergoing MRI for an injured segment of the spine are better assessed by MRI of the entire spine at the same time to exclude further injury. (orig.)

  2. Early detection of antiangiogenic treatment responses in a mouse xenograft tumor model using quantitative perfusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis plays a major role in tumor growth and metastasis, with tumor perfusion regarded as a marker for angiogenesis. To evaluate antiangiogenic treatment response in vivo, we investigated arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure tumor perfusion quantitatively. Chronic and 24-h acute treatment responses to bevacizumab were assessed by ASL and dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in the A498 xenograft mouse model. After the MRI, tumor vasculature was assessed by CD34 staining. After 39 days of chronic treatment, tumor perfusion decreased to 44.8 ± 16.1 mL/100 g/min (P < 0.05), compared to 92.6 ± 42.9 mL/100 g/min in the control group. In the acute treatment study, tumor perfusion in the treated group decreased from 107.2 ± 32.7 to 73.7 ± 27.8 mL/100 g/min (P < 0.01; two-way analysis of variance), as well as compared with control group post dosing. A significant reduction in vessel density and vessel size was observed after the chronic treatment, while only vessel size was reduced 24 h after acute treatment. The tumor perfusion correlated with vessel size (r = 0.66; P < 0.005) after chronic, but not after acute treatment. The results from DCE-MRI also detected a significant change between treated and control groups in both chronic and acute treatment studies, but not between 0 and 24 h in the acute treatment group. These results indicate that tumor perfusion measured by MRI can detect early vascular responses to antiangiogenic treatment. With its noninvasive and quantitative nature, ASL MRI would be valuable for longitudinal assessment of tumor perfusion and in translation from animal models to human

  3. A boosting approach for prostate cancer detection using multi-parametric MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Massich, Joan; Martí, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi; Vilanova, Joan C.; Walker, Paul M.; Sidibé, Désiré; Mériaudeau, Fabrice

    2015-04-01

    Prostate cancer has been reported as the second most frequently diagnosed men cancers in the world. In the last decades, new imaging techniques based on MRI have been developed in order to improve the diagnosis task of radiologists. In practise, diagnosis can be affected by multiple factors reducing the chance to detect potential lesions. Computer-aided detection and computer-aided diagnosis have been designed to answer to these needs and provide help to radiologists in their daily duties. In this study, we proposed an automatic method to detect prostate cancer from a per voxel manner using 3T multi-parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and a gradient boosting classifier. The best performances are obtained using all multi-parametric information as well as zonal information. The sensitivity and specificity obtained are 94:7% and 93:0%, respectively and an Area Under Curve (AUC) of 0:968.

  4. Development of contaminant detection system based on ultra-low field SQUID-NMR/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an ultra-low field (ULF) NMR/MRI system using an HTS-rf-SQUID and evaluated performance of the system as a contaminant detection system for foods and drinks. In this work, we measured 1D MRIs from water samples with or without various contaminants, such as aluminum and glass balls using the system. In the 1D MRIs, changes of the MRI spectra were detected, corresponding to positions of the contaminants. We measured 2D MRIs from food samples with and without a hole. In the 2D MRIs, the hole position in the sample was well visualized. These results show that the feasibility of the system to detect and localize contaminants in foods and drinks.

  5. Longitudinal change detection in diffusion MRI using multivariate statistical testing on tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigis, Antoine; Noblet, Vincent; Heitz, Fabrice; Blanc, Frédéric; de Sèze, Jérome; Kremer, Stéphane; Rumbach, Lucien; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a longitudinal change detection framework for detecting relevant modifications in diffusion MRI, with application to neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS). The core problem is to identify image regions that are significantly different between two scans. The proposed method is based on multivariate statistical testing which was initially introduced for tensor population comparison. We use this method in the context of longitudinal change detection by considering several strategies to build sets of tensors characterizing the variability of each voxel. These strategies make use of the variability existing in the diffusion weighted images (thanks to a bootstrap procedure), or in the spatial neighborhood of the considered voxel, or a combination of both. Results on synthetic evolutions and on real data are presented. Interestingly, experiments on NMO patients highlight the ability of the proposed approach to detect changes in the normal-appearing white matter (according to conventional MRI) that are related with physical status outcome. Experiments on MS patients highlight the ability of the proposed approach to detect changes in evolving and non-evolving lesions (according to conventional MRI). These findings might open promising prospects for the follow-up of NMO and MS pathologies. PMID:22387171

  6. Can MRI replace DMSA in the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children with urinary tract infections?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal parenchymal defects may be a consequence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in childhood. MRI is a non-radiation imaging modality compared with DMSA scanning. To compare DMSA with MRI for the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children presenting for radiological investigation after a first UTI. Both DMSA and MRI were performed at the same appointment in 37 children (aged 4 months-13 years; mean 4.5 years) with a history of UTI. Both planar and SPECT DMSA were performed. MRI of the kidneys employed axial and coronal T1-, T2- and fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences. Some children had imaging after IV contrast medium. The coronal fat-saturated T1-W sequence was the best sequence and it detected all the findings on MRI. MRI had a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 87% for the detection of a scarred kidney using DMSA as the gold standard. MRI diagnosed pyelonephritis in two children that had been interpreted as scarring on DMSA. Renal MRI using a single, coronal, fat-saturated T1-W sequence is a rapid, accurate and minimally invasive technique for the detection of renal scarring that does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  7. Can MRI replace DMSA in the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children with urinary tract infections?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavanagh, Eoin C.; Ryan, Stephanie; McCourbrey, Siobhan; O' Connor, Rachel; Donoghue, Veronica [Children' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Awan, Atif [Children' s University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Dublin (Ireland)

    2005-03-01

    Renal parenchymal defects may be a consequence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in childhood. MRI is a non-radiation imaging modality compared with DMSA scanning. To compare DMSA with MRI for the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children presenting for radiological investigation after a first UTI. Both DMSA and MRI were performed at the same appointment in 37 children (aged 4 months-13 years; mean 4.5 years) with a history of UTI. Both planar and SPECT DMSA were performed. MRI of the kidneys employed axial and coronal T1-, T2- and fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences. Some children had imaging after IV contrast medium. The coronal fat-saturated T1-W sequence was the best sequence and it detected all the findings on MRI. MRI had a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 87% for the detection of a scarred kidney using DMSA as the gold standard. MRI diagnosed pyelonephritis in two children that had been interpreted as scarring on DMSA. Renal MRI using a single, coronal, fat-saturated T1-W sequence is a rapid, accurate and minimally invasive technique for the detection of renal scarring that does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  8. Detection of Septic System Performance via Remote Sensing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, A. H.; Kuszmaul, J. S.; Harvey, C.

    2005-05-01

    Failing and improperly managed septic systems can affect water quality in their environs and cause health problems for individuals or community residents. When unchecked, failing systems can allow disease-causing pathogens to enter groundwater aquifers and pollute surface waters, contaminating drinking water, recreational waterways, and fishing grounds. Early detection of septic system leakage and failure can limit the extent of these problems. External symptoms which occur over an improperly functioning septic system can include lush or greener growth of vegetation, distress of vegetation, excessive soil moisture levels, or pooling of surface effluent. The use of remote sensing technologies coupled with attainable permit records to successfully identify these features could enable the appropriate agencies to target problem areas without extensive field inspection. High-resolution, airborne imagery was identified as having the potential to detect relative changes in soil moisture, to delineate individual leach fields, and to locate effluent discharges into water bodies. In addition, vegetation patterns responding to nutrient-rich effluent and increased soil moisture could be examined using a vegetation index. Both thermal- and color-infrared imagery were acquired for a study area in Jackson County, Mississippi, adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico. Within this coastal neighborhood known to have significant septic system failures, over 50 volunteer residents supplied information regarding the function of their systems and access to their property. Following data collection, regression methods were used to nominate the major indicators of malfunctioning systems. A ranking system for the "level of function" was derived from these analyses. A model was created which inputs data from attainable records and imagery analysis and outputs a predicted level of septic system function. The end product of this research will permit evaluation of septic system performance to be estimated using only easily obtainable data, allowing for minimal effort in the prioritization of problem areas by regulatory agencies.

  9. Rectal cancer: Possibilities of MRI in detection of local recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miu?in-Vukadinovi? Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Treatment of rectal cancer, which includes periodic evaluations, may lead to earlier identification of recurrent local infiltration. Differentiation between local recurrence and other post radiation changes is frequently rather difficult. Pelvic MR examination was performed in 30 patients (20 men, 10 women at the Institute of oncology, Sremska Kamenica. All patients underwent surgical resection of rectal cancer at the same institution. Preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy was administrated in 29 patients (93%. Criteria for detection of local recurrent tumors were based on morphologic changes, such as the presence of tumor infiltration, size increase of the mass and the change of the mass shape. Recurrent tumor infiltration was detected in 50% patents. Tumors of low differentiation histological type was predominantly found within 10 months after surgery, while moderately differentiated and high differentiated types were detected within 20 months and after 20 months after resection, respectively. Pelvic MR examination represents important diagnostic modality for recurrent rectal cancer identification.

  10. Armor-piercing bullet: 3-T MRI findings and identification by a ferromagnetic detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacozoff, Alexandra M; Pekmezci, Murat; Shellock, Frank G

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues at 3 T for an armor-piercing bullet and to determine if this item could be identified using a ferromagnetic detection system. An armor-piercing bullet (.30 caliber, 7.62 × 39, copper-jacketed round, steel core; Norinco) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions, heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. Heating was assessed with the bullet in a gelled-saline-filled phantom with MRI performed using a transmit/receive radio frequency body coil at a whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate of 2.9 W/kg for 15 minutes. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences. In addition, a special ferromagnetic detection system (Ferroguard Screener; Metrasens, Lisle, Illinois) was used in an attempt to identify this armor-piercing bullet. The findings indicated that the armor-piercing bullet showed substantial magnetic field interactions. Heating was not excessive. Artifacts were large and may create diagnostic problems if the area of interest is close to this bullet. The ferromagnetic detection system yielded a positive result. We concluded that this armor-piercing bullet is MR unsafe. Importantly, this ballistic item was identified using the particular ferromagnetic detection system utilized in this investigation, which has important implications for MRI screening and patient safety. PMID:23707130

  11. Robust detection of multiple sclerosis lesions from intensity-normalized multi-channel MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpate, Yogesh; Commowick, Olivier; Barillot, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease with heterogeneous evolution among the patients. Quantitative analysis of longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) provides a spatial analysis of the brain tissues which may lead to the discovery of biomarkers of disease evolution. Better understanding of the disease will lead to a better discovery of pathogenic mechanisms, allowing for patient-adapted therapeutic strategies. To characterize MS lesions, we propose a novel paradigm to detect white matter lesions based on a statistical framework. It aims at studying the benefits of using multi-channel MRI to detect statistically significant differences between each individual MS patient and a database of control subjects. This framework consists in two components. First, intensity standardization is conducted to minimize the inter-subject intensity difference arising from variability of the acquisition process and different scanners. The intensity normalization maps parameters obtained using a robust Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) estimation not affected by the presence of MS lesions. The second part studies the comparison of multi-channel MRI of MS patients with respect to an atlas built from the control subjects, thereby allowing us to look for differences in normal appearing white matter, in and around the lesions of each patient. Experimental results demonstrate that our technique accurately detects significant differences in lesions consequently improving the results of MS lesion detection.

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves accuracy for detecting focal splenic involvement in children and adolescents with Hodgkin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate assessment of splenic disease is important for staging Hodgkin lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to assess T2-weighted imaging with and without dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for evaluation of splenic Hodgkin disease. Thirty-one children with Hodgkin lymphoma underwent whole-body T2-weighted MRI with supplementary DCE splenic imaging, and whole-body PET-CT before and following chemotherapy. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians derived a PET-CT reference standard for splenic disease, augmented by follow-up imaging. Unaware of the PET-CT, two experienced radiologists independently evaluated MRI exercising a locked sequential read paradigm (T2-weighted then DCE review) and recorded the presence/absence of splenic disease at each stage. Performance of each radiologist was determined prior to and following review of DCE-MRI. Incorrect MRI findings were ascribed to reader (lesion present on MRI but missed by reader) or technical (lesion not present on MRI) error. Seven children had splenic disease. Sensitivity/specificity of both radiologists for the detection of splenic involvement using T2-weighted images alone was 57%/100% and increased to 100%/100% with DCE-MRI. There were three instances of technical error on T2-weighted imaging; all lesions were visible on DCE-MRI. T2-weighted imaging when complemented by DCE-MRI imaging may improve evaluation of Hodgkin disease splenic involvement. (orig.)

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves accuracy for detecting focal splenic involvement in children and adolescents with Hodgkin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punwani, Shonit; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Cheung, King Kenneth; Skipper, Nicholas [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Bell, Nichola; Humphries, Paul D. [University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Bainbridge, Alan [University College London, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Groves, Ashley M.; Hain, Sharon F.; Ben-Haim, Simona [University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Shankar, Ananth; Daw, Stephen [University College London Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Accurate assessment of splenic disease is important for staging Hodgkin lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to assess T2-weighted imaging with and without dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for evaluation of splenic Hodgkin disease. Thirty-one children with Hodgkin lymphoma underwent whole-body T2-weighted MRI with supplementary DCE splenic imaging, and whole-body PET-CT before and following chemotherapy. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians derived a PET-CT reference standard for splenic disease, augmented by follow-up imaging. Unaware of the PET-CT, two experienced radiologists independently evaluated MRI exercising a locked sequential read paradigm (T2-weighted then DCE review) and recorded the presence/absence of splenic disease at each stage. Performance of each radiologist was determined prior to and following review of DCE-MRI. Incorrect MRI findings were ascribed to reader (lesion present on MRI but missed by reader) or technical (lesion not present on MRI) error. Seven children had splenic disease. Sensitivity/specificity of both radiologists for the detection of splenic involvement using T2-weighted images alone was 57%/100% and increased to 100%/100% with DCE-MRI. There were three instances of technical error on T2-weighted imaging; all lesions were visible on DCE-MRI. T2-weighted imaging when complemented by DCE-MRI imaging may improve evaluation of Hodgkin disease splenic involvement. (orig.)

  14. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques for early detection of plant diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, Dora; Maneva, Svetla; Zdravev, Tomas

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is an emerging, multidisciplinary field with diverse applications in Earth observation. Nowadays spectral remote sensing techniques allow presymptomatic monitoring of changes in the physiological state of plants with high spectral resolution. Hyperspectral leaf reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence proved to be highly suitable for identification of growth anomalies of cultural plants that result from the environmental changes and different stress factors. Hyperspectral technologies can find place in many scientific areas, as well as for monitoring of plants status and functioning to help in making timely management decisions. This research aimed to detect a presence of viral infection in young pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) caused by Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) by using hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence data and to assess the effect of some growth regulators on the development of the disease. In Bulgaria CMV is one of the widest spread pathogens, causing the biggest economical losses in crop vegetable production. Leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence data were collected by a portable fibre-optics spectrometer in the spectral ranges 450÷850 nm and 600-900 nm. Greenhouse experiment with pepper plants of two cultivars, Sivria (sensitive to CMV) and Ostrion (resistant to CMV) were used. The plants were divided into six groups. The first group consisted of healthy (control) plants. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, the second group was inoculated with CMV. The other four groups were treated with growth regulators: Spermine, MEIA (beta-monomethyl ester of itaconic acid), ??? (benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid-S-methyl ester) and Phytoxin. On the next day, the pepper plants of these four groups were inoculated with CMV. The viral concentrations in the plants were determined by the serological method DAS-ELISA. Statistical, first derivative and cluster analysis were applied and several vegetation indices were calculated for assessment the differences between the spectral data of healthy and injured (stressed) plants of two cultivars. The averaged reflectance spectra for all groups were analyzed in the most informative for green plants spectral ranges: green, red, red edge, and near infrared. Fluorescence spectra were analyzed at five characteristic wavelengths located at the maximums of the emitted radiation and at the forefronts and rear slopes. On the 7th day no visual changes in the leaves occurred but a decrease of spectral reflectance was established in the green and red ranges for all cases of two cultivars. On the 14th day an increase of the number of statistically significant differences between spectral reflectance of healthy and treated plants was observed. A shift of the red edge position to the blue region was observed for the case of treatment only with CMV. The growth regulator MEIA is with the best preventing action on the leaves. The correlation of the results from spectral analyses and the DAS-ELISA findings for presence of CMV demonstrates the efficiency and sensitivity of these remote sensing techniques for reliable diagnosis of viral infection and injuries of the plants.

  15. Detection of abnormalities in MRI images of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is currently one of the leading causes of death. This paper presents an approach for not only the detection but also early stage of tumours can be detectable. Medical imaging technique is most commonly used to visualize the internal structure and function of the body. Magnetic Resonance Imaging provides much greater contrast between the different soft tissues of the body than computed tomography (CT) does, making it especially useful in neurological (brain), musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and oncological (cancer) imaging. In recent years the image processing mechanisms are used widely in several medical areas for improving earlier detection and treatment stages, in which the time factor is very important to discover the disease in the patient as possible as fast, especially in various cancer tumours such as the brain cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer. We passed the available brain cancer images and its database in basic three stages to achieve more quality and accuracy in our experimental results: firstly image enhancement stage which we used low pre-processing image techniques: Gabor filter using a Gaussian rule in which produced the best resultant enhanced images. In the image segmentation stage we used thresholding segmentation mechanism by Otsu thresholding algorithm. Finally we relied on general features which help us to make a comparison between normal and abnormal images. (author)

  16. Diffusion-weighted MRI for uveal melanoma liver metastasis detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Mathilde; Petras, Slavomir; Servois, Vincent [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Mariani, Pascale; Cassoux, Nathalie [Institut Curie, Department of Surgery, Paris (France); Bidard, Francois Clement; Rodrigues, Manuel Jorge; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie [Institut Curie, Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Farkhondeh, Fereshteh [Institut Curie, Department of Pathology, Paris (France)

    2015-08-15

    We aimed to assess the sensitivity of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the detection of pathologically confirmed uveal melanoma liver metastases (UMLM). Twenty patients who underwent complete surgical resection of their UMLM (N = 83) were included. Pre-surgery liver MR imaging included T2-weighted, T1-weighted, DW and dynamic-gadolinium-enhanced MR sequences. Two radiologists independently reviewed three sets of images (DW / morphologic-dynamic / combined) for each patient using intraoperative and pathological findings as a standard of reference. The sensitivities of the morphologic-dynamic and DW images for UMLM detection were 63 % and 59 %, respectively, for reader 1 (R1) and 64 % and 53 %, for reader 2 (R2). Sensitivity of the combined set was higher than sensitivity in the two other sets (R1:69 %, R2:67 %), but was only significantly different than the sensitivity of the DW images (McNemar test). For the three sets and the two readers, the sensitivity for UMLM smaller than 5 mm (37-46 %) was significantly lower than that for UMLM larger than 5 mm (67-90 %). The sensitivity for UMLM located in the subcapsular area (41-54 %) was significantly lower than that for intraparenchymal UMLM (68-86 %) (Chi-square test). Our study shows that the addition of DW imaging to morphologic-dynamic images does not significantly increase MR sensitivities for UMLM detection. (orig.)

  17. The detection of the dynamic renal function using MRI by gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the dynamic renal function in rabbits using MRI by Gd-DTPA was performed. T1 of rabbit kidney, which had been operated (complete unilateral ureteral occlusion or incomplete unilateral occulusion of the renal artery) was calculated before and after intravenous injection of 0.05 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA, continuously for 90 minutes. All images were obtained by the 0.1 Tesla resistive type MRI. The changes of 1/T1 of cortex and medulla of both kidneys were plotted (MRI renography). T1 of renal cortex was shorter than that of renal medulla in normal kidney by plain T1 image, and T1 of both parts of the kidney was elongated day after day in unilateral hydronephrosis without contrast media. The peak was marked 2 minutes after injection of Gd-DTPA and the half-life of the excretory phase was 30 minute in the cortex and 40 minute in the medulla in normal MRI renography. The operated site was higher than the opposite-site in the change of 1/T1 (the peak value-the value before administration) immediately after operation, but after 24 hours the operated site was lower, in hydronephrotic rabbits. The renal parenchymal damage due to ureteral obstruction was accurately and sensitively detected. In renal arterial stenosis, the change of 1/T1 was minimal in the operated-site because of the reduction of excretion of contrast media due to decrease of GFR. It was concluded that MRI renography was able to detect regional dynamic renal function and it was expected that calculation of ERBF, GFR and tubular excretory function was quantitively examined by mathematical analysis. (author)

  18. Detection of electroporation-induced membrane permeabilization states in the brain using diffusion-weighted MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Hansen, Rasmus H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tissue permeabilization by electroporation (EP) is a promising technique to treat certain cancers. Non-invasive methods for verification of induced permeabilization are important, especially in deep-seated cancers. In this study we evaluated diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) as a quantitative method for detecting EP-induced membrane permeabilization of brain tissue using a rat brain model. Material and methods. Fifty-four anesthetized Sprague-Dawley male rats were electroporated in the right hemisphere, using different voltage levels to induce no permeabilization (NP), transient membrane permeabilization (TMP), and permanent membrane permeabilization (PMP), respectively. DW-MRI was acquired 5 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours after EP. Histology was performed for validation of the permeabilization states. Tissue content of water, Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and extracellular volume were determined. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the DW-MRI parameters, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and kurtosis, at different voltage levels. The two-sample Mann- Whitney test with Holm's Bonferroni correction was used to identify pairs of significantly different groups. The study was approved by the Danish Animal Experiments Inspectorate. Results and conclusion. Results showed significant difference in the ADC between TMP and PMP at 2 hours (p < 0.001) and 24 hours (p < 0.05) after EP. Kurtosis was significantly increased both at TMP (p < 0.05) and PMP (p < 0.001) 5 minutes after EP, compared to NP. Kurtosis was also significantly higher at 24 hours (p < 0.05) and 48 hours (p < 0.05) at PMP compared to NP. Physiological parameters indicated correlation with the permeabilization states, supporting the DW-MRI findings. We conclude that DW-MRI is capable of detecting EP-induced permeabilization of brain tissue and to some extent of differentiating NP, TMP and PMP using appropriate scan timing.

  19. Symmetry-based detection and diagnosis of DCIS in breast MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikantha, Abhilash; Harz, Markus T.; Newstead, Gillian; Wang, Lei; Platel, Bram; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Mann, Ritse M.; Hahn, Horst K.; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2013-02-01

    The delineation and diagnosis of non-mass-like lesions, most notably DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ), is among the most challenging tasks in breast MRI reading. Even for human observers, DCIS is not always easy to diferentiate from patterns of active parenchymal enhancement or from benign alterations of breast tissue. In this light, it is no surprise that CADe/CADx approaches often completely fail to classify DCIS. Of the several approaches that have tried to devise such computer aid, none achieve performances similar to mass detection and classification in terms of sensitivity and specificity. In our contribution, we show a novel approach to combine a newly proposed metric of anatomical breast symmetry calculated on subtraction images of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast MRI, descriptive kinetic parameters, and lesion candidate morphology to achieve performances comparable to computer-aided methods used for masses. We have based the development of the method on DCE MRI data of 18 DCIS cases with hand-annotated lesions, complemented by DCE-MRI data of nine normal cases. We propose a novel metric to quantify the symmetry of contralateral breasts and derive a strong indicator for potentially malignant changes from this metric. Also, we propose a novel metric for the orientation of a finding towards a fix point (the nipple). Our combined scheme then achieves a sensitivity of 89% with a specificity of 78%, matching CAD results for breast MRI on masses. The processing pipeline is intended to run on a CAD server, hence we designed all processing to be automated and free of per-case parameters. We expect that the detection results of our proposed non-mass aimed algorithm will complement other CAD algorithms, or ideally be joined with them in a voting scheme.

  20. Whole-body MRI for detecting metastatic bone tumor. Diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assessed the diagnostic value of whole body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (WB-MRI) using diffusion-weighted images (DWI) for detecting bone metastasis and compared it with that of skeletal scintigraphy (SS). Thirty patients with malignancies (breast cancer, 17 patients; prostate cancer, 9; and one patient each, thyroid cancer, liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, and extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma) underwent both WB-MRI and SS to detect bone metastasis. All patients were followed more than 6 months by MR imaging, SS, or computed tomographic (CT) examination. For WB-MRI, patients were placed in feet-first supine position with table-top extender and quadrature body coil. We acquired DWI (axial plane from lower neck to proximal femur) (single shot short TI inversion-recovery [STIR]: repetition time [TR] 6243/echo time [TE] 59/inversion time [TI] 180 ms; b value: 600 s/mm2; 5-mm slice thickness; 112 x 112 matrix), T1-weighted fast spin echo (T1WI), and STIR (sagittal plane of total spine images and coronal plane of whole body images) images. Four blinded readers independently and separately interpreted images of combined MR sequences of T1WI+STIR (session 1) and T1WI+STIR+DWI (session 2). In 10 of 30 patients, we detected a total of 52 metastatic bone lesions; in the other 20, follow-up examinations confirmed no metastatic bone lesions. For these 52 lesions, for session 2, the mean sensitivity was 96% and the positive predictive value (PPV) was 98%. Those values were superior to those of session 1 (sensitivity: 88%; PPV: 95%) and those of SS (sensitivity: 96%; PPV: 94%). WB-MRI that included DWI was useful for detecting bone metastasis. (author)

  1. MRI detection of early bone metastases in B16 mouse melanoma models

    OpenAIRE

    Gauvain, Karen M.; Garbow, Joel R; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Hirbe, Angela C.; Weilbaecher, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Bone metastasis causes significant morbidity in cancer patients, including bone pain, pathologic fractures, nerve compression syndrome, and hypercalcemia. Animal models are utilized to study the pathogenesis of skeletal metastases and to evaluate potential therapeutic agents. Previously published methods for imaging bone metastasis in rodent models have focused on identifying advanced stage metastasis using simple X-rays. Here we report MRI as a method for detecting early bone metastases in m...

  2. Detecting functional connectivity change points for single-subject fMRI data

    OpenAIRE

    IvorCribben; TorWager; MartinLindquist

    2013-01-01

    Recently in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies there has been an increased interest in understanding the dynamic manner in which brain regions communicate with one another, as subjects perform a set of experimental tasks or as their psychological state changes. Dynamic Connectivity Regression (DCR) is a data-driven technique used for detecting temporal change points in functional connectivity between brain regions where the number and location of the change points are unkno...

  3. Detecting functional connectivity change points for single-subject fMRI data

    OpenAIRE

    Cribben, Ivor; Wager, Tor D.; Lindquist, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies there has been an increased interest in understanding the dynamic manner in which brain regions communicate with one another, as subjects perform a set of experimental tasks or as their psychological state changes. Dynamic Connectivity Regression (DCR) is a data-driven technique used for detecting temporal change points in functional connectivity between brain regions where the number and location of the change points are unknow...

  4. Intra-articular membranous interposition detected by MRI in developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, W.; Itoi, Eiji; Sato, Kozo [Akita Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    2000-12-01

    Intra-articular membranous interposition was detected by MRI in the hip joint with residual subluxation of a girl aged 5 years 10 months. This structure, which had low signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images, separated the femoral head from the acetabulum. Histological examination revealed chondrometaplasia, which suggested that this interposition might be transformed to a surface cartilaginous tissue of the secondary acetabulum often observed in residual subluxation of the hip. (orig.)

  5. Non destructive assessment of watercore in apples using MRI. Disorder detection with HR-MAS

    OpenAIRE

    Melado Herreros, Angela; Barreiro Elorza, Pilar; Val, Jesús; Blanco, Alvaro; Ruiz Cabello Osuna, Jesus Maria; Rodriguez, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    This work was carried out in the frame of the European project InsideFood (Integrated sensing and imaging devices for designing, monitoring and controlling microstructure of foods). The aim of this project is to provide technological solutions for exploring the microstructure of foods, by the development, combination and application of different non destructive techniques: X-ray CT, OCT, MRI, NMR, TRS and SRS. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used in order to detect waterco...

  6. Detecting Alzheimer’s disease by morphological MRI using hippocampal grading and cortical thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Coupé, Pierrick

    2014-01-01

    Structural MRI is an important imaging biomarker in Alzheimer’s disease as the cerebral atrophy has been shown to closely correlate with cogni-tive symptoms. Recognizing this, numerous methods have been developed for quantifying the disease related atrophy from MRI over the past decades. Special effort has been dedicated to separate AD related modifications from normal ag-ing for the purpose of early detection and prediction. Several groups have re-ported promising results using automatic methods; however, it is very difficult to compare these methods due to varying cohorts and different validation frameworks. To address this issue, the public challenge on Computer-Aided Di-agnosis of Dementia based on structural MRI data (CADDementia) was pro-posed. The challenge calls for accurate classification of 354 MRI scans collect-ed among AD patients, subjects with mild cognitive impairment and cognitively normal control. The true diagnosis is hidden from the participating groups, thus making the validation truly objective. This paper describes our proposed meth-od to automatically classify the challenge data along with a validation on 30 scans with known diagnosis also provided for the challenge.

  7. Development of Remote Control Laboratory for Radiation Detection via Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of experiments in science education is essential for understanding the natural phenomena and principle related to a subject. Therefore, the remote control experiment via Internet is one of key solution for distance learners in science education. The remote experiments are also necessary for the time-consuming experiment which takes several days, collaborative experiment between distance learners, expensive laboratory equipment which is not usually available to students, experimental procedure which is dangerous, etc. In this study, we have developed a general method for a remote control laboratory system using internet and interface techniques. It is possible for students to learn the nuclear physics to control the real instruments and conduct physics experimentation with internet techniques. We proposed the remote control radiation measurement system as a sample application. This system could be useful for the monitoring near a nuclear power plants in order to improve the environment data credibility to the public

  8. Mapping litter decomposition by remote-detected indicators

    OpenAIRE

    ROSSI, L; Zurlini, G.; Salvatori, R; Costantini, M.L.; Mandrone, S.; Mancinelli, G.; N. Zaccarelli; Sabetta, L

    2006-01-01

    Leaf litter decomposition is a key process for the functioning of natural ecosystems. An important limiting factor for this process is detritus availability, which we have estimated by remote sensed indices of canopy green biomass (NDVI). Here, we describe the use of multivariate geostatistical analysis to couple in situ measures with hyper-spectral and multi-spectral remote-sensed data for producing maps of litter decomposition. A direct relationship between the decomposition rates in four d...

  9. Detection of Rib Metastases in Patients with Lung Cancer: A Comparative Study of MRI, CT and Bone Scintigraphy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yan-Qing; Yang, Yang; Xing, Yan-Fen; Jiang, Sen; Sun, Xi-Wen

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the imaging findings of bone scintigraphy, chest CT and chest MRI in 55 cases of lung cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the detection of rib metastases were compared between imaging modalities on both a per-lesion and a per-patient basis. On a per-lesion basis, MRI sensitivity and accuracy were significantly higher than that of bone scintigraphy and CT (P0.05). MRI appears to be superior for the detection of ribs metastases in lung cancer.

  10. Automatic Cloud Detection and Removal Algorithm for MODIS Remote Sensing Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Lingjia Gu; Ruizhi Ren; Shuang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Cloud is one of the most common interferers in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrum-radiometer (MODIS) remote sensing imagery. Because of cloud interference, much important and useful information covered by cloud cannot be recovered well. How to detect and remove cloud from MODIS imagery is an important issue for wide application of remote sensing data. In general, cloud can be roughly divided into two types, namely, thin cloud and thick cloud. In order to effectively detect and eliminate clo...

  11. A Method of Target Detection in Remote Sensing Image Captured based for Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Jin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A refined energy constrained minimization method is developed for target detection in hyperspectral remote sensing images captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs during their surveillance missions, which has been tested in the experiment under this paper. The experiment result proves, in the detection process, this method can effectively restrain noises so far as the spectral characteristics of any potential target are known, and find sub-pixel targets out effectively from the hyperspectral remote sensing image in unknown background spectrum

  12. Comparison of delayed enhanced cine MRI, single photon emission computed tomography and echocardiography for the detection of viable myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of delayed enhanced cardiac MRI(DE-MRI), nitrate stress 99Tcm-MIBI imaging (N-SPECT) and low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography (LDDSE) for the detection of viable myocardium. Methods: Cardiac rest cine MRI(cine-MRI), DE-URI, N-SPECT and LDDSE were performed in 32 patients within one week after onset of acute myocardial infarction and undertaking percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) thereafter. Second cine-MRI was performed 6- 11 months after PCI. A 16-segment model was adopted for the image analysis. Wall motion improvement after PCI was considered as a myocardial viability. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of three methods for the detection of viable segments were compared dy t and ?2 test. Results: The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of DE-MRI were 76.7% (79/103), 83.8% (88/105)and 80.3% (167/208), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of N-SPECT were 75.9% (82/108), 65.2% (60/92) and 71.0% (142/200), respectively. The specificity and accuracy of N-SPECT were significantly lower than that of DE- MRI(P<0.01). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of LDDSE were 70.1% (47/67), 70.4% (50/71) and 70. 3% (97/138), respectively. The sensitivity of LDDSE was comparable to that of DE-MRI and the specificity and accuracy of LDDSE were significantly lower than that of DE-MRI (P<0.05). Conclusion: DE-MRI with high specificity and accuracy, potentially, is a valuable imaging method for the detection of viable myocardium. (authors)

  13. Clinical evaluation of asymptomatic sinus disease detected by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of lesions of the paranasal sinuses as incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of patients suspected of intracranial disease who have no nasal symptoms has been far more common than we expected. The present study was performed on 325 patients with a mean age of 60.7 years. Medical histories were taken whether they had any nasal symptoms or not. Asymptomatic sinus disease was present in 41.6% of the 257 patients who had no nasal symptoms, and 9.7% of the patients had either marked mucosal thickening, excessive fluid or polyps in the maxillary sinuses. Although the mean age of these patients was comparatively high, we can infer that 1 in 10 have relatively severe sinus lesions. Mucociliary transport time was measured using the saccharin method in 15 patients who had sinus disease but no nasal symptoms. The mean transport time was 15.6 minutes and within normal limits. Routine ENT examination revealed no lesions in the nasal cavity of any of the subjects. We classified the patients with asymptomatic sinus disease into two groups -- group A: patients with sinus disease associated with some nasal manifestations but who did not complain about them, and group B: patients who had sinus disease but did not have any nasal problems. Group B represents genuine asymptomatic sinus disease in the narrow sense. Most asymptomatic patients in this study appeared to belong to group B. They had some sinus disease, but because their mucociliary function in their nasal cavity was normal, they did not have any nasal symptoms. When we find patients with asymptomatic sinus disease, we have to determine which group they belong to by examining their nasal cavity and measuring their saccharin time. Patients in group A should be medically treated, but those in group B should be followed without medical treatment. (author)

  14. Clinical evaluation of asymptomatic sinus disease detected by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwabuchi, Yasuo; Hanamure, Yutaka; Hirota, Johji; Ohyama, Masaru [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1994-12-01

    The detection of lesions of the paranasal sinuses as incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of patients suspected of intracranial disease who have no nasal symptoms has been far more common than we expected. The present study was performed on 325 patients with a mean age of 60.7 years. Medical histories were taken whether they had any nasal symptoms or not. Asymptomatic sinus disease was present in 41.6% of the 257 patients who had no nasal symptoms, and 9.7% of the patients had either marked mucosal thickening, excessive fluid or polyps in the maxillary sinuses. Although the mean age of these patients was comparatively high, we can infer that 1 in 10 have relatively severe sinus lesions. Mucociliary transport time was measured using the saccharin method in 15 patients who had sinus disease but no nasal symptoms. The mean transport time was 15.6 minutes and within normal limits. Routine ENT examination revealed no lesions in the nasal cavity of any of the subjects. We classified the patients with asymptomatic sinus disease into two groups -- group A: patients with sinus disease associated with some nasal manifestations but who did not complain about them, and group B: patients who had sinus disease but did not have any nasal problems. Group B represents genuine asymptomatic sinus disease in the narrow sense. Most asymptomatic patients in this study appeared to belong to group B. They had some sinus disease, but because their mucociliary function in their nasal cavity was normal, they did not have any nasal symptoms. When we find patients with asymptomatic sinus disease, we have to determine which group they belong to by examining their nasal cavity and measuring their saccharin time. Patients in group A should be medically treated, but those in group B should be followed without medical treatment. (author).

  15. Progress on detection of liquid explosives using ultra-low field MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schuttz, Larry M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baguisa, Shermiyah [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dunkerley, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magnelind, Per [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Owens, Tuba [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandin, Henrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. Over the past several years there has been increasing interest in performing NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime, with measurement field strengths of 10-100 microTesla and pre-polarization fields of 30-50 mTesla. The real-time signal-to-noise ratio for such measurements is about 100. Our group at LANL has built and demonstrated the performance of SQUID-based ULF NMR/MRI instrumentation for classification of materials and detection of liquid explosives via their relaxation properties measured at ULF, using T{sub 1}, and T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1} frequency dispersion. We are also beginning to investigate the performance of induction coils as sensors. Here we present recent progress on the applications of ULF MR to the detection of liquid explosives, in imaging and relaxometry.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of portal-phase CT and MRI with mangafodipir trisodium in detecting liver metastases from colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of single section spiral computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with tissue-specific contrast agent mangafodipir trisodium (MnDPDP) in the detection of colorectal liver metastases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty-five consecutive patients undergoing surgery for primary and/or metastatic disease were evaluated using CT (5 mm collimation and reconstruction interval, pitch 2), two-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo (2D FSPGR) T1 and single shot fast-spin echo (SSFSE) T2 weighted breath-hold MRI sequences, performed before and after intravenous administration of MnDPDP. The reference standards were intraoperative ultrasound and histology. RESULTS: The per-patient accuracy of CT was 72.8 versus 78.4% for unenhanced MRI (p=0.071) and 82.4% for MnDPDP-enhanced MRI (p=0.005). MnDPDP-enhanced MRI appeared to be more accurate than unenhanced MRI but this was not significant (p=0.059). The sensitivity of CT was 48.4% versus 58.1% for unenhanced MRI (p=0.083) and 66.1% for MnDPDP-enhanced MRI (p=0.004). The difference in specificity between procedures was not significant. The per-lesion sensitivity was 71.7, 74.9 and 82.7% for CT, unenhanced MRI, and MnDPDP-enhanced MRI, respectively; the positive predictive value of the procedures was respectively 84.0, 96.0 and 95.8%. MnDPDP-enhanced MRI provided a high level diagnostic confidence in 92.5% of the cases versus 82.5% for both unenhanced MRI and CT. The kappa value for inter-observer variability was >0.75 for all procedures. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of MnDPDP-enhanced MRI is significantly higher than single section spiral CT in the detection of colorectal cancer liver metastases; no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was observed between unenhanced MRI and MnDPDP-enhanced MRI

  17. A pooled analysis of MRI in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in patients with malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To explore the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting bone marrow infiltration of malignant lymphoma through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Materials and methods: Studies that evaluated the diagnostic performance of MRI in detecting bone marrow infiltration of malignant lymphoma were acquired from the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cancerlit, and Cochrane Library database, from February 1987 to May 2012. Pooled estimation and subgroup analysis data were obtained by statistical analysis. Results: A total of 13 studies involving 634 patients who fulfilled all of the inclusion criteria were considered for the analysis. No publication bias was found (p = 0.70). The pooled sensitivity of MRI was 0.82 [95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.70–0.90] and the pooled specificity was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.72–0.84). Overall, positive likelihood ratios (LR+) was 3.9 (95% CI: 2.8–5.4) and negative likelihood ratios (LR?) was 0.23 (95% CI: 0.13–0.41). In patients with high pre-test probabilities, MRI enabled confirmation of bone marrow involvement; in patients with low pre-test probabilities, MRI enabled exclusion of bone marrow involvement. Worst-case-scenario (pre-test probability, 50%) post-test probabilities were 80% and 18% for positive and negative MRI results, respectively. In subgroup analysis, MRI performed with 1.5 T devices had higher pooled specificity (0.80, 95% CI: 0.71–0.88) than the MRI with ?1 T (0.78, 95% CI: 0.71–0.85; p < 0.05). The pooled sensitivity of MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.39–0.92) and the pooled specificity was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.69–0.97). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI without DWI was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.76–0.94) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.72–0.85), respectively. Conclusion: A limited number of small studies indicate that MRI can serve as a valuable tool for detecting bone marrow infiltration of malignant lymphoma. Results were most promising when performing MRI using high field strength devices. MRI with DWI is shown to be more specific than conventional MRI techniques. This deserves further investigation in future studies

  18. MRI for the detection of anorectal fistulas; MRT in der Diagnostik anorektaler Fisteln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Langer, M. [Abt. Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    MRI is accepted as one of the major diagnostic tools for the detection of anorectal fistulas and abscesses. Noninvasiveness and high accuracy are advantageous hallmarks of this technique. In general, the purpose of imaging anal fistulas is to reduce the risk of recurrence, incontinence and non-healing. To achieve these goals, the applied method must provide the proctologist with detailed information. In this context, MRI acts as a guide for surgeons to accurately plan fistula operations. Another aspect is the follow-up of conservatively treated patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease. In 2000, subtraction MR fistulography was introduced as new imaging technique. This review provides an overview of the entire spectrum of diagnostic modalities for anorectal fistulas with emphasis on subtraction MR fistulography. (orig.)

  19. Activatable 19F MRI nanoparticle probes for the detection of reducing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Matsushita, Hisashi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2015-01-12

    (19)F?magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes that can detect biological phenomena such as cell dynamics, ion concentrations, and enzymatic activity have attracted significant attention. Although perfluorocarbon (PFC) encapsulated nanoparticles are of interest in molecular imaging owing to their high sensitivity, activatable PFC nanoparticles have not been developed. In this study, we showed for the first time that the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effect can efficiently decrease the (19)F?NMR/MRI signals of PFCs in silica nanoparticles. On the basis of the PRE effect, we developed a reduction-responsive PFC-encapsulated nanoparticle probe, FLAME-SS-Gd(3+) (FSG). This is the first example of an activatable PFC-encapsulated nanoparticle that can be used for in?vivo imaging. Calculations revealed that the ratio of fluorine atoms to Gd(3+) complexes per nanoparticle was more than approximately 5.0×10(2), resulting in the high signal augmentation. PMID:25413833

  20. Thermal Hyperspectral Remote Sensing for Plant Species and Stress Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlerf, M.; Rock, G.; Ullah, S.; Gerhards, M.; Udelhoven, T.; Skidmore, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy offers a novel opportunity for measuring emissivity spectra of natural surfaces. Emissivity spectra are not directly measured, they first have to be retrieved from the raw measurements. Once retrieved, the spectra can be used, for example, to discriminate plant species or to detect plant stress. Knowledge of plant species distribution is essential for the sustainable management of ecosystems. Remote sensing of plant species has so far mostly been limited to data in the visible and near-infrared where, however, different species often reveal similar reflectance curves. Da Luz and Crowley showed in a recent paper that in the TIR plants indeed have distinct spectral features. Also with a certain species, subtle changes of emissivity in certain wavebands may occur, when biochemical compounds change due to osmotic adjustment induced by water stress. Here we show, that i) emissive imaging spectroscopy allows for reliable and accurate retrieval of plant emissivity spectra, ii) emissivity spectra are well suited to discriminate plant species, iii) a reduction in stomatal conductance (caused by stress) changes the thermal infrared signal. For 13 plant species in the laboratory and for 8 plant species in a field setup emissivity spectra were retrieved. A comparison shows, that for most species the shapes of the emissivity curves agree quite well, but that clear offsets between the two types of spectra exist. Discrimination analysis revealed that based on the lab spectra, 13 species could be distinguished with an average overall classification accuracy of 92% using the 6 best spectral bands. For the field spectra (8 species), a similar high OAA of 89% was achieved. Species discrimination is likely to be possible due to variations in the composition of the superficial epidermal layer of plant leaves and in internal chemical concentrations producing unique emissivity features. However, to date, which spectral feature is responsible for which chemical compound remains unclear. This new technique of TIR spectroscopy bears great potential for floristic mapping and vegetation stress monitoring, besides other applications. Future airborne and spaceborne studies, however, will have to overcome a number of challenges, for instance the cavity effect, atmospheric influences, and signal-to-noise.

  1. Mapping litter decomposition by remote-detected indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rossi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf litter decomposition is a key process for the functioning of natural ecosystems. An important limiting factor for this process is detritus availability, which we have estimated by remote sensed indices of canopy green biomass (NDVI. Here, we describe the use of multivariate geostatistical analysis to couple in situ measures with hyper-spectral and multi-spectral remote-sensed data for producing maps of litter decomposition. A direct relationship between the decomposition rates in four different CORINE habitats and NDVI, calculated at different scales from Landsat ETM+ multi-spectral data and MIVIS hyper-spectral data was found. Variogram analysis was used to evaluate the spatial properties of each single variable and their common interaction. Co-variogram and co-kriging analysis of the two variables turned out to be an effective approach for decomposition mapping from remote-sensed spatial explicit data.

  2. Substitute or complement? Defining the relative place of EEG and fMRI in the detection of voluntary brain reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, D; Henriques, J; Comte, A; Grigoryeva, L; Ortega, J-P; Cretin, E; Brunotte, G; Haffen, E; Moulin, T; Aubry, R; Pazart, L

    2015-04-01

    To improve the assessment of awareness in patients with disorders of consciousness, recent protocols using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) have been developed, and led some specialized coma centers to use this method on a routine basis. Recently, promising results have also been observed with electroencephalography (EEG), a less expensive and widely available technique. However, since the spatiotemporal nature of the recorded signal differs between both EEG and fMRI, the question of whether one method could substitute or should complement the other method is a matter of debate. In this study, we compared the neural processes of two well-known EEG and fMRI mental imagery protocols to define the relative place of each method in the assessment of awareness. A group of 20 healthy volunteers performed both EEG and fMRI command-following and communication tasks. Distinct command following was found with both EEG and fMRI for five subjects, only with fMRI for 12 subjects, and only with EEG for one subject. In the communication task, neither EEG nor fMRI alone gave satisfactory results and no reliable communication could be established in approximately 1/3rd of the participants. If fMRI showed the best performance to detect volitional reactions in mental imagery tasks, our results provide evidence that the use of EEG must not be underestimated since a better detection was found with this method for at least one subject. More than being used as a substitute, EEG should complement fMRI to improve the detection of sign of awareness, and to reduce the risks of misjudgments. PMID:25644421

  3. Airport detection in remote sensing images: a method based on saliency map

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Lv, Qi; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Liming(Physics Department, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244-1130, USA)

    2012-01-01

    The detection of airport attracts lots of attention and becomes a hot topic recently because of its applications and importance in military and civil aviation fields. However, the complicated background around airports brings much difficulty into the detection. This paper presents a new method for airport detection in remote sensing images. Distinct from other methods which analyze images pixel by pixel, we introduce visual attention mechanism into detection of airport and improve the efficie...

  4. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Renz, D.M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Dromain, C. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif cedex (France); Diekmann, F. [St. Joseph-Stift Bremen, Department of Medical Imaging, Bremen (Germany); Engelken, F.; Krohn, M.; Singh, J.M.; Bick, U. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ingold-Heppner, B. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Pathology, Berlin (Germany); Winzer, K.J. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Breast Center, Department of Gynecology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  5. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gray matter (GM damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS. The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2* in 10 each relapsing–remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2* values from healthy controls (HCs of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ?R2* values – age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ?R2* values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ?R2* values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM regions in MS compared with HC. ?R2* values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05 correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests showed no correlation with cortical GM ?R2* values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2* values can serve as biomarkers of tissue injury due to MS in the brain, including the cerebral cortex, an area that has been difficult to evaluate using standard MRI.

  6. Remote Gas Detection Using Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy for Counter Bio-Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlazak, Matthew; Yam, Seng Yiep; Majstorovic, Dejan; Hansen, Hedley J.; Abbott, Derek

    2002-11-01

    The mm-wave (10-110 GHz) frequency band contains the fundamental rotational resonance frequencies of many molecular gases composed of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. The high specificity of the rotational spectra to organic molecules affords mm-wave spectroscopy having potential use in remotely sensing atmospheric pollutants and the detection of airborne chemicals is gaining importance for arms control treaty verification, intelligence collection and environmental monitoring. This paper considers RF receiver systems for remote chemical detection measurements based on mm-wave spectral line emissions. It discusses the design, performance and operation of specific receiving systems for detecting the presence of ammonia in laboratory based transmit-and-receive experiments.

  7. Modeling Chemical Detection Sensitivities of Active and Passive Remote Sensing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharlemann, E T

    2003-07-28

    During nearly a decade of remote sensing programs under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL has developed a set of performance modeling codes--called APRS--for both Active and Passive Remote Sensing systems. These codes emphasize chemical detection sensitivity in the form of minimum detectable quantities with and without background spectral clutter and in the possible presence of other interfering chemicals. The codes have been benchmarked against data acquired in both active and passive remote sensing programs at LLNL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The codes include, as an integral part of the performance modeling, many of the data analysis techniques developed in the DOE's active and passive remote sensing programs (e.g., ''band normalization'' for an active system, principal component analysis for a passive system).

  8. Aircraft target onboard detecting technology via Circular Information Matching method for remote sensing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Huachao; Zhou, Quan; Li, Li

    2015-10-01

    Image information onboard processing is one o f important technology to rapidly achieve intelligence for remote sensing satellites. As a typical target, aircraft onboard detection has been getting more attention. In this paper, we propose an efficient method of aircraft detection for remote sensing satellite onboard processing. According to the feature of aircraft performance in remote sensing image, the detection algorithm consists of two steps: First Salient Object Detection (SOD) is employed to reduce the amount of calculation on large remote sensing image. SOD uses Gabor filtering and a simple binary test between pixels in a filtered image. White points are connected as regions. Plane candidate regions are screened from white regions by area, length and width of connected region. Next a new algorithm, called Circumferential Information Matching method, is used to detect aircraft on candidate regions. The results of tests show circumference curve around the plane center is stable shape, so the candidate region can be accurately detecting with this feature. In order to rotation invariant, we use circle matched filter to detect target. And discrete fast Fourier transform (DFFT) is used to accelerate and reduce calculation. Experiments show the detection accuracy rate of proposed algorithm is 90% with less than 0.5s processing time. In addition, the calculation of the proposed method through quantitative anglicized is very small. Experimental results and theoretical analysis show that the proposed method is reasonable and highly-efficient.

  9. Is MRI better than CT for detecting a vascular component to dementia? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Beynon Rebecca; Sterne Jonathan A C; Wilcock Gordon; Likeman Marcus; Harbord Roger M; Astin Margaret; Burke Margaret; Bessell Alysson; Ben-Shlomo Yoav; Hawkins James; Hollingworth William; Whiting Penny

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Identification of causes of dementia soon after symptom onset is important, because appropriate treatment of some causes of dementia can slow or halt its progression or enable symptomatic treatment where appropriate. The accuracy of MRI and CT, and whether MRI is superior to CT, in detecting a vascular component to dementia in autopsy confirmed and clinical cohorts of patients with VaD, combined AD and VaD (“mixed dementia”), and AD remain unclear. We conducted a systemati...

  10. Hepatic MRI with SPIO: detection and characterization of focal liver lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of parenterally administered iron oxides have been developed for contrast-enhanced MRI of the liver. Two different classes of iron oxides are currently clinically approved or in phase 3 trials: superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIO) with a high R2/R1 relaxivity ratio and short blood half-life (AMI-25 and SH U 555 A), and ultrasmall paramagnetic iron oxides (USPIO) with a lower R2/R1 relaxivity ratio and longer blood half-life (AMI-227). All iron oxides significantly increase tumor-to-liver contrast and allow detection of more lesions than unenhanced MRI on T2-weighted images at a field strength of 0.2-1.5 T. Malignant lesions without phagocytic cells exhibit constant signal on T2-weighted accumulation phase images with all three iron oxides. All iron oxides cause a signal decrease of benign lesions with either phagocytic cells or a significant blood pool on T2-weighted accumulation phase images. The signal decrease of benign lesions is proportional to the Kupffer cell activity or tumor vascularity and is useful for lesion characterization. Another enhancement feature for the differentiation of benign from malignant lesions is ring enhancement of malignant lesions (metastases) on T1-weighted enhanced images either during the perfusion phase with SH U 555 A or during the accumulation phase with AMI-227, which is attributed to the blood pool effects of the compounds. Differentiation of lesions and vessels is easier on enhanced images with angiographic effects than on unenhanced images. Iron oxides improve the quality of two-dimensional MR angiography techniques of the portal venous system by decreasing background signal (liver tissue with all iron oxides) and increasing intravascular signal (AMI-227). The use of iron oxides for hepatic MRI provides an alternative to the existing multistep diagnosis with CT, CT portography, MRI and biopsy. (orig.)

  11. A novel Hessian based algorithm for rat kidney glomerulus detection in 3D MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Wu, Teresa; Bennett, Kevin M.

    2015-03-01

    The glomeruli of the kidney perform the key role of blood filtration and the number of glomeruli in a kidney is correlated with susceptibility to chronic kidney disease and chronic cardiovascular disease. This motivates the development of new technology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the number of glomeruli and nephrons in vivo. However, there is currently a lack of computationally efficient techniques to perform fast, reliable and accurate counts of glomeruli in MR images due to the issues inherent in MRI, such as acquisition noise, partial volume effects (the mixture of several tissue signals in a voxel) and bias field (spatial intensity inhomogeneity). Such challenges are particularly severe because the glomeruli are very small, (in our case, a MRI image is ~16 million voxels, each glomerulus is in the size of 8~20 voxels), and the number of glomeruli is very large. To address this, we have developed an efficient Hessian based Difference of Gaussians (HDoG) detector to identify the glomeruli on 3D rat MR images. The image is first smoothed via DoG followed by the Hessian process to pre-segment and delineate the boundary of the glomerulus candidates. This then provides a basis to extract regional features used in an unsupervised clustering algorithm, completing segmentation by removing the false identifications occurred in the pre-segmentation. The experimental results show that Hessian based DoG has the potential to automatically detect glomeruli,from MRI in 3D, enabling new measurements of renal microstructure and pathology in preclinical and clinical studies.

  12. Novel membrane-permeable contrast agent for brain tumor detection by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohanraja; Medarova, Zdravka; Pantazopoulos, Pamela; Dai, Guangping; Moore, Anna

    2010-03-01

    One of the key challenges hindering the clinical intervention against brain cancer is defined by the inability to detect brain tumors at an early enough stage to permit effective therapy. Furthermore, the rapid growth and severe lethality of this form of cancer predicate the vital importance of monitoring the development of the pathology and its outcome after therapeutic intervention. With this in mind, we designed a novel membrane-permeant contrast agent, MN-MPAP-Cy5.5, which consists of a superparamagnetic iron oxide core, for MRI conjugated to myristoylated polyarginine peptides, as a membrane translocation module and labeled with the near-infrared dye Cy5.5 for correlative microscopy. This probe showed a remarkable uptake by U-87 human glioma cells in vitro and localized and delineated stereotactically injected tumor in vivo by MRI. Our findings suggest that the agent mediates its effects by translocation of the magnetic nanoparticles label across the leaky tumor vasculature, followed by enhanced accumulation in tumor cells. The noninvasive detection of brain tumors when they are still small represents a formidable challenge from an imaging standpoint. Our study describes an improved strategy to detect brain lesions by utilizing a contrast agent with membrane translocation properties. PMID:20146231

  13. Dynamic connectivity detection: an algorithm for determining functional connectivity change points in fMRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuting; Lindquist, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in using fMRI data to study the dynamic nature of brain connectivity. In this setting, the activity in a set of regions of interest (ROIs) is often modeled using a multivariate Gaussian distribution, with a mean vector and covariance matrix that are allowed to vary as the experiment progresses, representing changing brain states. In this work, we introduce the Dynamic Connectivity Detection (DCD) algorithm, which is a data-driven technique to detect temporal change points in functional connectivity, and estimate a graph between ROIs for data within each segment defined by the change points. DCD builds upon the framework of the recently developed Dynamic Connectivity Regression (DCR) algorithm, which has proven efficient at detecting changes in connectivity for problems consisting of a small to medium (100). The newly proposed DCD method is faster, requires less user input, and is better able to handle high-dimensional data. It overcomes the shortcomings of DCR by adopting a simplified sparse matrix estimation approach and a different hypothesis testing procedure to determine change points. The application of DCD to simulated data, as well as fMRI data, illustrates the efficacy of the proposed method. PMID:26388711

  14. Crop stress detection and classification using hyperspectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Jon Trenton

    Agricultural production has observed many changes in technology over the last 20 years. Producers are able to utilize technologies such as site-specific applicators and remotely sensed data to assist with decision making for best management practices which can improve crop production and provide protection to the environment. It is known that plant stress can interfere with photosynthetic reactions within the plant and/or the physical structure of the plant. Common types of stress associated with agricultural crops include herbicide induced stress, nutrient stress, and drought stress from lack of water. Herbicide induced crop stress is not a new problem. However, with increased acreage being planting in varieties/hybrids that contain herbicide resistant traits, herbicide injury to non-target crops will continue to be problematic for producers. With rapid adoption of herbicide-tolerant cropping systems, it is likely that herbicide induced stress will continue to be a major concern. To date, commercially available herbicide-tolerant varieties/hybrids contain traits which allow herbicides like glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium to be applied as a broadcast application during the growing season. Both glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium are broad spectrum herbicides which have activity on a large number of plant species, including major crops like non-transgenic soybean, corn, and cotton. Therefore, it is possible for crop stress from herbicide applications to occur in neighboring fields that contain susceptible crop varieties/hybrids. Nutrient and moisture stress as well as stress caused by herbicide applications can interact to influence yields in agricultural fields. If remotely sensed data can be used to accurately identify specific levels of crop stress, it is possible that producers can use this information to better assist them in crop management to maximize yields and protect their investments. This research was conducted to evaluate classification of specific crop stresses utilizing hyperspectral remote sensing. Key words: crop stress, herbicide drift, remote sensing

  15. MRI-detected extramural vascular invasion is an independent prognostic factor for synchronous metastasis in patients with rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Lim, Joon-seok; Kim, Honsoul; Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Myoung, Sungmin [Jungwon University, Department of Medical Information, Goesan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Junjeong [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyu [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) could predict synchronous distant metastases in rectal cancer. Patients who underwent rectal MRI between July 2011 and December 2012 were screened. This study included 447 patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma who had undergone MRI without previous treatment. Distant metastases were recorded at the initial work-up and over a 6-month follow-up. Univariate/multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the risk of metastasis. The diagnostic performance was calculated using pathologic lymphovascular invasion (LVI) as a gold standard. Among 447 patients, 79 patients (17.7 %) were confirmed to have distant metastases. Three MRI features are significantly associated with a high risk of distant metastasis: positive EMVI (odds ratio 3.02), high T stage (odds ratio 2.10) and positive regional lymph node metastasis (odds ratio 6.01). EMVI in a large vessel (?3 mm) had a higher risk for metastasis than EMVI in a small vessel (<3 mm). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI-detected EMVI were 28.2 %, 94.0 % and 80.3 %, respectively. MRI-detected EMVI is an independent risk factor for synchronous metastasis in rectal cancer. EMVI in large vessels is a stronger risk factor for distant metastasis than EMVI in small vessels. (orig.)

  16. MRI-detected extramural vascular invasion is an independent prognostic factor for synchronous metastasis in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) could predict synchronous distant metastases in rectal cancer. Patients who underwent rectal MRI between July 2011 and December 2012 were screened. This study included 447 patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma who had undergone MRI without previous treatment. Distant metastases were recorded at the initial work-up and over a 6-month follow-up. Univariate/multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the risk of metastasis. The diagnostic performance was calculated using pathologic lymphovascular invasion (LVI) as a gold standard. Among 447 patients, 79 patients (17.7 %) were confirmed to have distant metastases. Three MRI features are significantly associated with a high risk of distant metastasis: positive EMVI (odds ratio 3.02), high T stage (odds ratio 2.10) and positive regional lymph node metastasis (odds ratio 6.01). EMVI in a large vessel (?3 mm) had a higher risk for metastasis than EMVI in a small vessel (<3 mm). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI-detected EMVI were 28.2 %, 94.0 % and 80.3 %, respectively. MRI-detected EMVI is an independent risk factor for synchronous metastasis in rectal cancer. EMVI in large vessels is a stronger risk factor for distant metastasis than EMVI in small vessels. (orig.)

  17. Improved detection of localized prostate cancer using co-registered MRI and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambor, Ivan, E-mail: ivjamb@utu.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); 2nd Department of Radiology, Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Bratislava (Slovakia); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Borra, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.borra@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Kemppainen, Jukka, E-mail: Jukka.Kemppainen@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lepomaeki, Virva, E-mail: Virva.Lepomaki@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta, E-mail: Riitta.Parkkola@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Dean, Kirsti, E-mail: Kirsti.Dean@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Alanen, Kalle, E-mail: Kalle.Alanen@tyks.fi [Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Arponen, Eveliina, E-mail: Eveliina.Arponen@utu.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Nurmi, Martti, E-mail: Martti.Nurmi@tyks.fi [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J., E-mail: Hannu.Aronen@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We aimed to study the ability of contrast enhanced MRI at 1.5 T and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT, both individually and using fused data, to detect localized prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six men with untreated prostate cancer and negative for metastatic disease on pelvic CT and bone scan were prospectively enrolled. A pelvic {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT scan was performed in all patients, and a contrast enhanced MRI scan in 33 patients (6 examinations using both endorectal coil and surface coils, and 27 examinations using surface coils only). After the imaging studies 10 patients underwent prostatectomy and 26 were treated by image guided external beam radiation treatment. Image fusion of co-registered PET and MRI data was performed based on anatomical landmarks visible on CT and MRI using an advanced in-house developed software package. PET/CT, MRI and fused PET/MRI data were evaluated visually and compared with biopsy findings on a lobar level, while a sextant approach was used for patients undergoing prostatectomy. Results: When using biopsy samples as method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for visual detection of prostate cancer on a lobar level by contrast enhanced MRI was 85%, 37%, 73% and that of {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT 88%, 41%, 74%, respectively. Fusion of PET with MRI data increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to 90%, 72% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Fusion of sequentially obtained PET/CT and MRI data for the localization of prostate cancer is feasible and superior to the performance of each individual modality alone.

  18. Improved detection of localized prostate cancer using co-registered MRI and 11C-acetate PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: We aimed to study the ability of contrast enhanced MRI at 1.5 T and 11C-acetate PET/CT, both individually and using fused data, to detect localized prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six men with untreated prostate cancer and negative for metastatic disease on pelvic CT and bone scan were prospectively enrolled. A pelvic 11C-acetate PET/CT scan was performed in all patients, and a contrast enhanced MRI scan in 33 patients (6 examinations using both endorectal coil and surface coils, and 27 examinations using surface coils only). After the imaging studies 10 patients underwent prostatectomy and 26 were treated by image guided external beam radiation treatment. Image fusion of co-registered PET and MRI data was performed based on anatomical landmarks visible on CT and MRI using an advanced in-house developed software package. PET/CT, MRI and fused PET/MRI data were evaluated visually and compared with biopsy findings on a lobar level, while a sextant approach was used for patients undergoing prostatectomy. Results: When using biopsy samples as method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for visual detection of prostate cancer on a lobar level by contrast enhanced MRI was 85%, 37%, 73% and that of 11C-acetate PET/CT 88%, 41%, 74%, respectively. Fusion of PET with MRI data increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to 90%, 72% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Fusion of sequentially obtained PET/CT and MRI data for the localization of prostate cancer is feasible and superior to the performance of each individual modality alone.

  19. Detection of emission sources using passive-remote Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection and identification of toxic chemicals released in the environment is important for public safety. Passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers can be used to detect these releases. Their primary advantages are their small size and ease of setup and use. Open-path FTIR spectrometers are used to detect concentrations of pollutants from a fixed frame of reference. These instruments detect plumes, but they are too large and difficult to aim to be used to track a plume to its source. Passive remote FTIR spectrometers contain an interferometer, optics, and a detector. They can be used on tripods and in some cases can be hand-held. A telescope can be added to most units. We will discuss the capability of passive-remote FTIR spectrometers to detect the origin of plumes. Low concentration plumes were released using a custom-constructed vaporizer. These plumes were detected with different spectrometers from different distances. Passive-remote spectrometers were able to detect small 10 cm on a side chemical releases at concentration-pathlengths at the low parts per million-meter (ppm-m) level

  20. Integrated data processing of remotely sensed and vector data for building change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofina, N.; Ehlers, M.; Michel, U.

    2012-10-01

    In recent years natural disasters have had an increasing impact leading to tremendous economic and human losses. Remote sensing technologies are being used more often for rapid detection and visualization of changes in the affected areas, providing essential information for damage assessment, planning and coordination of recovery activities. This study presents a GIS-based approach for the detection of damaged buildings. The methodology is based on the integrated analysis of vector data containing information about the original urban layout and remotely sensed images obtained after a catastrophic event. For the classification of building integrity a new `Detected Part of Contour' (DPC) feature was developed. The DPC feature defines a part of the building contour that can be detected in the related remotely sensed image. It reaches maximum value (100%) if the investigated building contour is intact. Next, several features based on the analysis of textural information of the remotely sensed image are considered. Finally, a binary classification of building conditions concludes the change detection analysis. The proposed method was applied to the 2010 earthquake in Qinghai (China). The results indicate that a GIS-based analysis can markedly improve the accuracy of change detection analysis. The proposed methodology has been developed solely within the Open Source Software environment (GRASS GIS, Python, Orange). The employment of Open Source Software provides the way for an innovative, flexible and costeffective implementation of change detection operations.

  1. Intraoperative detection of glioma invasion beyond MRI enhancement with Raman spectroscopy in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermyn, Michael; Mok, Kelvin; Mercier, Jeanne; Desroches, Joannie; Pichette, Julien; Saint-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    Cancer tissue is frequently impossible to distinguish from normal brain during surgery. Gliomas are a class of brain cancer which invade into the normal brain. If left unresected, these invasive cancer cells are the source of glioma recurrence. Moreover, these invasion areas do not show up on standard-of-care pre-operative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This inability to fully visualize invasive brain cancers results in subtotal surgical resections, negatively impacting patient survival. To address this issue, we have demonstrated the efficacy of single-point in vivo Raman spectroscopy using a contact hand-held fiber optic probe for rapid detection of cancer invasion in 8 patients with low and high grade gliomas. Using a supervised machine learning algorithm to analyze the Raman spectra obtained in vivo, we were able to distinguish normal brain from the presence of cancer cells with sensitivity and specificity greater than 90%. Moreover, by correlating these results with pre-operative MRI we demonstrate the ability to detect low density cancer invasion up to 1.5cm beyond the cancer extent visible using MRI. This represents the potential for significant improvements in progression-free and overall patient survival, by identifying previously undetectable residual cancer cell populations and preventing the resection of normal brain tissue. While the importance of maximizing the volume of tumor resection is important for all grades of gliomas, the impact for low grade gliomas can be dramatic because surgery can even be curative. This convenient technology can rapidly classify cancer invasion in real-time, making it ideal for intraoperative use in brain tumor resection.

  2. Remote detection of single emitters via optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Then, Patrick; Razinskas, Gary; Feichtner, Thorsten; Haas, Philippe; Wild, Andreas; Bellini, Nicola; Osellame, Roberto; Cerullo, Giulio; Hecht, Bert

    2014-05-01

    The integration of lab-on-a-chip technologies with single-molecule detection techniques may enable new applications in analytical chemistry, biotechnology, and medicine. We describe a method based on the reciprocity theorem of electromagnetic theory to determine and optimize the detection efficiency of photons emitted by single quantum emitters through truncated dielectric waveguides of arbitrary shape positioned in their proximity. We demonstrate experimentally that detection of single quantum emitters via such waveguides is possible, confirming the predicted behavior of the detection efficiency. Our findings blaze the trail towards efficient lensless single-emitter detection compatible with large-scale optofluidic integration.

  3. Colorimetric detection of hazardous gases using a remotely operated capturing and processing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Robles, Roberto; Moragues, María Esperanza; Vivancos, José-Luis; Ibáñez, Javier; Fraile, Rubén; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; García-Breijo, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an electronic system for the automatic detection of hazardous gases. The proposed system implements colorimetric sensing algorithms, thus providing a low-cost solution to the problem of gas sensing. It is remotely operated and it performs the tasks of image capturing and processing, hence obtaining colour measurements in RGB (Red-Green-Blue) space that are subsequently sent to a remote operator via the internet. A prototype of the system has been built to test its performance. Specifically, experiments have been carried out aimed at the detection of CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2 and formaldehyde at diverse concentrations by using a chromogenic array composed by 13 active and 2 inert compounds. Statistical analyses of the results reveal a good performance of the electronic system and the feasibility of remote hazardous gas detection using colorimetric sensor arrays. PMID:26434416

  4. Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy Modeling for Remote Chemical Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.

    2000-09-30

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy techniques show promise for active infrared remote chemical sensing. FM spectroscopy techniques have reduced sensitivity to optical and electronic noise, and are relatively immune to the effects of various electronic and mechanical drifts. FM systems are responsive to sharp spectral features and can therefore reduce the effects of spectral clutter due to interfering chemicals in the plume or in the atmosphere. The relatively high modulation frequencies used for FM also reduces the effects of albedo (reflectance) and plume variations. Conventional differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are performance limited by the noise induced by speckle. Analysis presented in this report shows that FM based sensors may reduce the effects of speckle by one to two orders of magnitude. This can result in reduced dwell times and faster area searches, as well as reducing various forms of spatial clutter. FM systems will require a laser system that is continuously tunable at relatively high frequencies (0.1 to 20 MHz). One promising candidate is the quantum-cascade (QC) laser [1, 2]. The QC laser is potentially capable of power levels on the order of 1 Watt and frequency tuning on the order of 3 - 6 GHz, which is the performance level required for FM spectroscopy based remote sensing. In this report we describe a high-level numerical model for an FM spectroscopy based remote sensing system, and application to two unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) scenarios. A Predator scenario operating at a slant range of 6.5 km with a 10 cm diameter telescope, and a Global Hawk scenario operating at a range of 30 km with a 20 cm diameter telescope, has been assumed to allow estimation of the performance of potential FM systems.

  5. Value of FDG-PET vs MRI/CT in detection and staging of early uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective study was performed to define the efficiency of FDG-PET in detecting primaries and in preoperatively assessing lymph node metastases of cervical cancer. Forty one patients with cervical cancer were investigated with PET (370 MBq F-18-FDG, Siemens ECAT EXACT HR+, visual evaluation) and MRI prior radical hysterectomy with pelvic, and additionally 12 cases paraortal, lymphadenectomies. Histopathological evaluation verified in all cases the evidence of cervical cancer except in one case, where the tumor was completely removed by conisation procedure. Sensitivity of PET and MRI were 95% and 85%, respectively. In 16/82 pelvic lymph node sites metastases were histologically detected (7 x micrometastases). Sensitivity, specificity, positive positive and negative predictive value were 50%, 85%, 44% and 88% for PET and 31%, 90%, 40% and 86% for MRI. Out of the 12 cases with dissection of paraortal lymph nodes, metastases were found histologically in 3 cases. PET detected 2/3 truly with no false positive result while CT detected 0/3 cases with no false positive findings. It is concluded that PET can detect cervical cancer with high accuracy. The accuracy of PET and MRI was similar for detection of pelvic metastases. Both methods have limited sensitivity due to the high incidence of micrometastases. PET was more accurate than CT in detection of paraortal metastases

  6. Brain MRI Tumor Detection using Active Contour Model and Local Image Fitting Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabizadeh, Nooshin; John, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an important issue in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here an automatic brain tumor detection method is introduced that uses T1-weighted images and K. Zhang et. al.'s active contour model driven by local image fitting (LIF) energy. Local image fitting energy obtains the local image information, which enables the algorithm to segment images with intensity inhomogeneities. Advantage of this method is that the LIF energy functional has less computational complexity than the local binary fitting (LBF) energy functional; moreover, it maintains the sub-pixel accuracy and boundary regularization properties. In Zhang's algorithm, a new level set method based on Gaussian filtering is used to implement the variational formulation, which is not only vigorous to prevent the energy functional from being trapped into local minimum, but also effective in keeping the level set function regular. Experiments show that the proposed method achieves high accuracy brain tumor segmentation results.

  7. Underwater oil detection experiment by laser fluorescence remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jubai; Yang, Rongrong; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2010-10-01

    Spilled oil is one of the most serious marine environment disasters, which damaged ecological environment seriously with long-term and large-scale impact. Based on the experiment and research in the Canadian Centre of Environmental Technology, an experiment is taken to detect the underwater suspended oil-spills by Laser-induced fluorescence. It quantizes the conditions that Laser-induced fluorescence can be used to detect underwater oil, and makes a solid theory foundation for the system design of underwater oil detection by Laser-induced fluorescence. This environmental solves a key problem for underwater oil detection by Laser-induced fluorescence.

  8. Detection of suspected placental invasion by MRI: Do the results depend on observer’ experience?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of previously described MR features used for detecting suspected placental invasion according to observers’ experience. Materials and methods: Our population included 25 pregnant women (mean age 35.16) investigated by prenatal MRI (1.5 T, T1- and T2-weighted MR-sequences without i.v. contrast), among them 12 with histopathologically proven placental invasion and 13 women (52%) without placental invasion used as control group. Two senior and two junior radiologists blindly and independently reviewed MR-examinations in view of 6 previously defined MR-features indicating presence and degree of placental invasion (placenta increta, accreta or percreta). For each reader the sensibility, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) were calculated. Interobserver agreements between senior and junior readers were determined. Stepwise logistic regression was performed including the 6 MR-features predictive of placental invasion. Results: Demographics between both groups were statistically equivalent. Overall sensitivity and specificity for placental invasion was 90.9% and 75.0% for seniors and 81.8% and 61.8% for juniors, respectively. The best single MR-feature indicating placental invasion was T2-hypointense placental bands (r2 = 0.28), followed by focally interrupted myometrial border, infiltration of pelvic organs and tenting of the bladder (r2 = 0.36). Interobserver agreement for detecting placental invasion was 0.64 for seniors and 0.41 for juniors, thus substantial and moderate, respectively. Seniors detected placental invasion and depth of infiltration with significantly higher diagnostic certitude than juniors (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0282, respectively). Conclusion: MRI can be a reliable and reproducible tool for the detection of suspected placental invasion, but the diagnostic value significantly depends on observers’ experience

  9. Detection of suspected placental invasion by MRI: Do the results depend on observer’ experience?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor, E-mail: leonor.alamo@chuv.ch [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Anaye, Anass; Rey, Jannick; Denys, Alban [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bongartz, Georg [Universitätsspital Basel (Switzerland); Terraz, Sylvain [Hôpitaux Universitaires Genève (Switzerland); Artemisia, Simona; Meuli, Reto; Schmidt, Sabine [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of previously described MR features used for detecting suspected placental invasion according to observers’ experience. Materials and methods: Our population included 25 pregnant women (mean age 35.16) investigated by prenatal MRI (1.5 T, T1- and T2-weighted MR-sequences without i.v. contrast), among them 12 with histopathologically proven placental invasion and 13 women (52%) without placental invasion used as control group. Two senior and two junior radiologists blindly and independently reviewed MR-examinations in view of 6 previously defined MR-features indicating presence and degree of placental invasion (placenta increta, accreta or percreta). For each reader the sensibility, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) were calculated. Interobserver agreements between senior and junior readers were determined. Stepwise logistic regression was performed including the 6 MR-features predictive of placental invasion. Results: Demographics between both groups were statistically equivalent. Overall sensitivity and specificity for placental invasion was 90.9% and 75.0% for seniors and 81.8% and 61.8% for juniors, respectively. The best single MR-feature indicating placental invasion was T2-hypointense placental bands (r{sup 2} = 0.28), followed by focally interrupted myometrial border, infiltration of pelvic organs and tenting of the bladder (r{sup 2} = 0.36). Interobserver agreement for detecting placental invasion was 0.64 for seniors and 0.41 for juniors, thus substantial and moderate, respectively. Seniors detected placental invasion and depth of infiltration with significantly higher diagnostic certitude than juniors (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0282, respectively). Conclusion: MRI can be a reliable and reproducible tool for the detection of suspected placental invasion, but the diagnostic value significantly depends on observers’ experience.

  10. Diagnostic performance of MRI for detection of intestinal fistulas in patients with complicated inflammatory bowel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, S.; Meuwly, J.Y.; Meuli, R.; Schnyder, P.; Denys, A. [Universitaire Vaudois - CHUV, Service de radiodiagnostic et radiologie interventionnelle, Centre Hospitalier, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chevallier, P. [Hopital Archet II, Imagerie Medicale, Nice (France); Bessoud, B. [Hopital Kremlin-Bicetre, Radiologie Generale, Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Felley, C. [University Hospital, CHUV, Service de Gastroenterologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-11-15

    The diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of intestinal fistulas, other than perianal, in patients with known complicated inflammatory bowel conditions (CIBC) was investigated. Our study group consisted of 20 patients (12 women, mean age 43 years) with CIBC, including Crohn's disease (n=13), colonic diverticulitis (n=3), colitis after radiotherapy (n=3) and of postoperative origin (n=1). Eleven surgically proven enteral fistulas were known in ten (50%) of these patients, being of enterovesical (n=3), enterocolic (n=2), enteroenteral (n=2), rectovaginal (n=2), rectovaginovesical (n=1) and of entercutaneous (n=1) localisation. The other ten patients (50%), used as the control group, showed MR features of CIBC, although without any fistulous tract. Multiplanar T1- and T2-weighted sequences had been performed, including gadolinium-enhanced acquisition with fat saturation (1.5 T). MR findings were independently blindly and retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists for the presence and etiology of any fistula, as well as visualization and characterization of the fistulous tract. Results were compared with surgical findings (n=16) and clinical evolution (n=4). Interobserver agreement was calculated. Interobserver agreement kappa for fistula detection was 0.71. Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for fistula detection were 78.6%, 75% and 77.2%, respectively. Sensitivity for fistula characterization was 80.6%, with visualization of the fistulous tract in all cases, whereby T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated images were considered the most useful sequences. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is a reliable and reproducible tool for detection of enteral fistulas secondary to inflammatory conditions. (orig.)

  11. CLASSIFICATION OF LAND USE LAND COVER CHANGE DETECTION USING REMOTELY SENSED DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.Babykalpana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Image classification is perhaps the most important part of digital image analysis. With supervised classification, the information classes of interest like land cover type image. These are called “training sites”. The image processing software system is then used to develop a statistical characterization of the reflectance foreach information class. This stage is often called “ Signature analysis” .Unsupervised classification is a method which examines a large number of unknown pixels and divides into a number of classes based on natural groupings present in the image values. Unsupervised classification is becoming increasingly popular in agencies involved in long term GIS database maintenance. The reason is thatthere are now systems that use clustering procedures that are extremely fast and require little in the nature of operational parameters. Thus it is becoming possible to train GIS analysis with only a general familiarity with remote sensing to undertake classification that meet typical map accuracy standards. With suitable ground truth accuracy assessment procedures , this tool can provide a remarkably rapid means of producing quality land cover data on a continuing basis.The profusion information of the earth surface offered by the high resolution satellite images for remote sensing applications. Using change detection methodologies to extract the target changes in the areas from high resolution images and rapidly updates geodatabase information processing.However, the traditional method of change detection are not suitable for high resolution remote sensing images. To overcome the limitations of traditional pixel-level change detection of high resolution remote sensing images, based on georeferencing and analysis method, this paper presents a clean way of multi-scaleamalgamation for the high resolution remote sensing images change detection. Experiment shows that this method has a stronger advantage than the traditional pixel-level method of high resolution remote sensing image change detection.

  12. Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma in gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ah Yeong; Kim, Young Kon; Lee, Min Woo; Park, Min Jung; Hwang, Jiyoung; Lee, Mi Hee; Lee, Jae Won [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com

    2012-10-15

    Background As gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been widely used for the evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is clinically relevant to determine the diagnostic efficacy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for detection of HCCs with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis. Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for detection of HCCs with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis. Material and Methods A total of 189 patients with 240 HCCs ({<=}3.0 cm) (Child-Pugh A, 81 patients with 90 HCCs; Child-Pugh B, 65 patients with 85 HCCs; Child-Pugh C, 43 patients with 65 HCCs) underwent DWI and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI at 3.0 T. A gadoxetic acid set (dynamic and hepatobiliary phase plus T2-weighted image) and DWI set (DWI plus unenhanced MRIs) for each Child-Pugh class were analyzed independently by two observers for detecting HCCs using receiver-operating characteristic analysis. The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity were calculated. Results There was a trend toward decreased diagnostic accuracy for gadoxetic acid and DWI set with respect to the severity of cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A [mean 0.974, 0.961], B [mean 0.904, 0.863], C [mean 0.779, 0.760]). For both observers, the sensitivities of both image sets were highest in Child-Pugh class A (mean 95.6%, 93.9%), followed by class B (mean 83.0%, 77.1%), and class C (mean 60.6%, 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Conclusion In HCC detection, the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI were highest in Child-Pugh class A, followed by Child-Pugh class B, and Child-Pugh class C, indicating a tendency toward decreased diagnostic capability with the severity of cirrhosis.

  13. Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma in gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background As gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been widely used for the evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is clinically relevant to determine the diagnostic efficacy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for detection of HCCs with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis. Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for detection of HCCs with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis. Material and Methods A total of 189 patients with 240 HCCs (?3.0 cm) (Child-Pugh A, 81 patients with 90 HCCs; Child-Pugh B, 65 patients with 85 HCCs; Child-Pugh C, 43 patients with 65 HCCs) underwent DWI and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI at 3.0 T. A gadoxetic acid set (dynamic and hepatobiliary phase plus T2-weighted image) and DWI set (DWI plus unenhanced MRIs) for each Child-Pugh class were analyzed independently by two observers for detecting HCCs using receiver-operating characteristic analysis. The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity were calculated. Results There was a trend toward decreased diagnostic accuracy for gadoxetic acid and DWI set with respect to the severity of cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A [mean 0.974, 0.961], B [mean 0.904, 0.863], C [mean 0.779, 0.760]). For both observers, the sensitivities of both image sets were highest in Child-Pugh class A (mean 95.6%, 93.9%), followed by class B (mean 83.0%, 77.1%), and class C (mean 60.6%, 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Conclusion In HCC detection, the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI were highest in Child-Pugh class A, followed by Child-Pugh class B, and Child-Pugh class C, indicating a tendency toward decreased diagnostic capability with the severity of cirrhosis

  14. Mobile Passive Optical Imager for Remote Gas Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tunable filters based on electro-optic effect have shown great potential in detecting gas concentration through obtaining its absorption spectrum. In filter-based...

  15. Feature analysis for detecting people from remotely sensed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmacek, Beril; Reinartz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel approach using airborne image sequences for detecting dense crowds and individuals. Although airborne images of this resolution range are not enough to see each person in detail, we can still notice a change of color and intensity components of the acquired image in the location where a person exists. Therefore, we propose a local feature detection-based probabilistic framework to detect people automatically. Extracted local features behave as observations of the probability density function (PDF) of the people locations to be estimated. Using an adaptive kernel density estimation method, we estimate the corresponding PDF. First, we use estimated PDF to detect boundaries of dense crowds. After that, using background information of dense crowds and previously extracted local features, we detect other people in noncrowd regions automatically for each image in the sequence. To test our crowd and people detection algorithm, we use airborne images taken over Munich during the Oktoberfest event, two different open-air concerts, and an outdoor festival. In addition, we apply tests on GeoEye-1 satellite images. Our experimental results indicate possible use of the algorithm in real-life mass events.

  16. Computer-aided detection (CAD) for breast MRI: evaluation of efficacy at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3.0-T breast MRI interpretation using manual and fully automated kinetic analyses. Manual MRI interpretation was done on an Advantage Workstation. Retrospectively, all examinations were processed with a computer-aided detection (CAD) system. CAD data sets were interpreted by two experienced breast radiologists and two residents. For each lesion automated analysis of enhancement kinetics was evaluated at 50% and 100% thresholds. Forty-nine malignant and 22 benign lesions were evaluated. Using threshold enhancement alone, the sensitivity and specificity of CAD were 97.9% and 86.4%, respectively, for the 50% threshold, and 97.9% and 90%, respectively, for the 100% threshold. Manual interpretation by two breast radiologists showed a sensitivity of 84.6% and a specificity of 68.8%. For the same two radiologists the mean sensitivity and specificity for CAD-based interpretation was 90.4% (not significant) and 81.3% (significant at p < 0.05), respectively. With one-way ANOVA no significant differences were found between the two breast radiologists and the two residents together, or between any two readers separately. CAD-based analysis improved the specificity compared with manual analysis of enhancement. Automated analysis at 50% and 100% thresholds showed a high sensitivity and specificity for readers with varying levels of experience. (orig.)

  17. Brain Tumor Detection and Classification Using Deep Learning Classifier on MRI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Gladis Pushpa Rathi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has become an effective tool for clinical research in recent years and has found itself in applications such as brain tumour detection. In this study, tumor classification using multiple kernel-based probabilistic clustering and deep learning classifier is proposed. The proposed technique consists of three modules, namely segmentation module, feature extraction module and classification module. Initially, the MRI image is pre-processed to make it fit for segmentation and de-noising process is carried out using median filter. Then, pre-processed image is segmented using Multiple Kernel based Probabilistic Clustering (MKPC. Subsequently, features are extracted for every segment based on the shape, texture and intensity. After features extraction, important features will be selected using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA for classification purpose. Finally, deep learning classifier is employed for classification into tumor or non-tumor. The proposed technique is evaluated using sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. The proposed technique results are also compared with existing technique which uses Feed-Forward Back Propagation Network (FFBN. The proposed technique achieved an average sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.88, 0.80 and 0.83, respectively with the highest values as about 1, 0.85 and 0.94. Improved results show the efficiency of the proposed technique.

  18. HICO and RAIDS Experiment Payload - Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzien, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The HICO and RAIDS Experiment Payload - Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (HREP-RAIDS) experiment will provide atmospheric scientists with a complete description of the major constituents of the thermosphere (layer of the Earth's atmosphere) and ionosphere (uppermost layer of the Earth's atmosphere), global electron density profiles at altitudes between 100 - 350 kilometers.

  19. Temporal Forest Change Detection and Forest Health Assessment using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya'acob, Norsuzila; Mohd Azize, Aziean Binti; Anis Mahmon, Nur; Laily Yusof, Azita; Farhana Azmi, Nor; Mustafa, Norfazira

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents the detection of Angsi and Berembun Reserve Forest change for years 1996 and 2013. Forest is an important part of our ecosystem. The main function is to absorb carbon oxide and produce oxygen in their cycle of photosynthesis to maintain a balance and healthy atmosphere. However, forest changes as time changes. Some changes are necessary as to give way for economic growth. Nevertheless, it is important to monitor forest change so that deforestation and development can be planned and the balance of ecosystem is still preserved. It is important because there are number of unfavorable effects of deforestation that include environmental and economic such as erosion of soil, loss of biodiversity and climate change. The forest change detection can be studied with reference of several satellite images using remote sensing application. Forest change detection is best done with remote sensing due to large and remote study area. The objective of this project is to detect forest change over time and to compare forest health indicated by Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) using remote sensing and image processing. The forest under study shows depletion of forest area by 12% and 100% increment of deforestation activities. The NDVI value which is associated with the forest health also shows 13% of reduction.

  20. Coral Pigments: Quantification Using HPLC and Detection by Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottone, Mary C.

    1995-01-01

    Widespread coral bleaching (loss of pigments of symbiotic dinoflagellates), and the corresponding decline in coral reef health worldwide, mandates the monitoring of coral pigmentation. Samples of the corals Porites compressa and P. lobata were collected from a healthy reef at Puako, Hawaii, and chlorophyll (chl) a, peridinin, and Beta-carotene (Beta-car) were quantified using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detailed procedures are presented for the extraction of the coral pigments in 90% acetone, and the separation, identification, and quantification of the major zooxanthellar pigments using spectrophotometry and a modification of the HPLC system described by Mantoura and Llewellyn (1983). Beta-apo-8-carotenal was found to be inadequate as in internal standard, due to coelution with chl b and/or chl a allomer in the sample extracts. Improvements are suggested, which may result in better resolution of the major pigments and greater accuracy in quantification. Average concentrations of peridinin, chl a, and Beta-car in corals on the reef were 5.01, 8.59, and 0.29, micro-grams/cm(exp 2), respectively. Average concentrations of peridinin and Beta-car did not differ significantly between the two coral species sampled; however, the mean chl a concentration in P. compressa specimens (7.81 ,micro-grams/cm(exp 2) was significantly lower than that in P. lobata specimens (9.96 11g/cm2). Chl a concentrations determined spectrophotometrically were significantly higher than those generated through HPLC, suggesting that spectrophotometry overestimates chl a concentrations. The average ratio of chl a-to-peridinin concentrations was 1.90, with a large (53%) coefficient of variation and a significant difference between the two species sampled. Additional data are needed before conclusions can be drawn regarding average pigment concentrations in healthy corals and the consistency of the chl a/peridinin ratio. The HPLC pigment concentration values contribute to the limited database of pigment concentrations in healthy corals, from which quantitative definitions of 'healthy' vs. 'bleached' coral may emerge. They also serve as ground-truth, corresponding to fluorescence data collected from the reef at Puako using airborne remote sensing of laser induced fluorescence. Fluorescence spectra from several overflights using the NASA AOL (airborne oceanographic lidar) system show consistent chlorphyll fluorescence peaks around 685 nm, as well as consistence peaks in the 400-600 nm range which may emanate from granules in the coral tissue. These data, along with results from previous studies of coral fluorescence, suggest that remote sensing of laser-induced fluorescence may become a rapid and efficient means of monitoring coral pigmentation and coral reef bleaching.

  1. MnDPDP-enhanced MRI vs dual-phase spiral CT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were twofold: (a) to assess safety and tolerability of the hepatobiliary MR contrast agent MnDPDP; and (b) to investigate the sensitivity of MnDPDP-enhanced MRI, in comparison with dual-phase spiral CT, in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhosis. Fifty patients with liver cirrhosis and histologically proven HCC were enrolled in a prospective phase-IIIB clinical trial. All patients underwent evaluation with dual-phase spiral CT and pre-contrast and post-contrast MRI at 1.5 T. The MR examination protocol included spin-echo (SE) and gradient-recalled-echo (GRE) T1-weighted images acquired before and 60-120 min after administration of 0.5 ?mol/kg (0.5 ml/kg) MnDPDP (Teslascan, Nycomed Amersham, Oslo, Norway); and fast T2-weighted SE images obtained solely before contrast injection. Gold standard was provided by findings at Lipiodol CT in combination with follow-up spiral CT studies, which were repeated at 4-month intervals over a 10- to 27-month (mean ± SD 20.1 ± 5.1 months) follow-up period. No serious adverse event occurred. Eighty tumors ranging 0.8-9.1 cm in diameter (mean ± SD 3.2 ± 2.4 cm) were detected by Lipiodol CT or confirmed as cancerous foci by follow-up CT studies. Pre-contrast MRI detected 38 of 80 lesions (48 %); MnDPDP-enhanced MRI, 65 of 80 lesions (81 %); pre-contrast plus post-contrast MRI, 69 of 80 lesions (86 %); and dual-phase spiral CT, 64 of 80 lesions (80 %). The difference between unenhanced and MnDPDP-enhanced MRI was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The difference between MRI (pre-contrast plus post-contrast) and dual-phase spiral CT was not statistically significant (p = 0.33). The confidence in the final diagnosis, however, was significantly higher for MRI as compared with spiral CT (p < 0.001). MnDPDP is a safe and well-tolerated hepatobiliary MR contrast agent. Magnetic resonance imaging with use of MnDPDP is significantly more sensitive than unenhanced MRI and as good as dual-phase spiral CT for detection of HCC in cirrhosis. (orig.)

  2. Characterization of in vivo MRI detectable thalamic amyloid plaques from APP/PS1 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyloid deposits are one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies, in transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease showed that, using in vivo, contrast agent-free, MRI, thalamic amyloid plaques are more easily detected than other plaques of the brain. Our study evaluated the characteristics of these thalamic plaques in a large population of APP/PS1, PS1 and C57BL/6 mice. Thalamic spots were detected in all mice but with different frequency and magnitude. Hence, the prevalence and size of the lesions were higher in APP/PS1 mice. However, even in APP/PS1 mice, thalamic spots did not occur in all the old animals. In APP/PS1 mice, spots detection was related to high iron and calcium load within amyloid plaques and thus reflects the ability of such plaque to capture large amounts of minerals. Interestingly, calcium and iron was also detected in extra-thalamic plaques but with a lower intensity. Hypointense lesions in the thalamus were not associated with the iron load in the tissue surrounding the plaques, nor with micro-hemorrhages, inflammation, or a neuro-degenerative context. (authors)

  3. Characterization of in vivo MRI detectable thalamic amyloid plaques from APP/PS1 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenain, M. [URA CEA CNRS 2210, I2BM, SHFJ, 4 Place du General Leclerc, 91401 Orsay Cedex (France); Dhenain, M.; El Tannir El Tayara, N.; Wu, T.D.; Volk, A.; Quintana, C. [U759 INSERM, Centre Universitaire, Laboratoire 112, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dhenain, M.; El Tannir El Tayara, N.; Wu, T.D.; Volk, A.; Quintana, C. [Institut Curie, Centre Universitaire, Laboratoire 112, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Guegan, M.; Delatour, B. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid-CSIC, 8, Isaac Newton, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    Amyloid deposits are one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies, in transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease showed that, using in vivo, contrast agent-free, MRI, thalamic amyloid plaques are more easily detected than other plaques of the brain. Our study evaluated the characteristics of these thalamic plaques in a large population of APP/PS1, PS1 and C57BL/6 mice. Thalamic spots were detected in all mice but with different frequency and magnitude. Hence, the prevalence and size of the lesions were higher in APP/PS1 mice. However, even in APP/PS1 mice, thalamic spots did not occur in all the old animals. In APP/PS1 mice, spots detection was related to high iron and calcium load within amyloid plaques and thus reflects the ability of such plaque to capture large amounts of minerals. Interestingly, calcium and iron was also detected in extra-thalamic plaques but with a lower intensity. Hypointense lesions in the thalamus were not associated with the iron load in the tissue surrounding the plaques, nor with micro-hemorrhages, inflammation, or a neuro-degenerative context. (authors)

  4. Multifunctional fiber-optic microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection

    OpenAIRE

    Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Torben Nørskov; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov; Stubkjær, Kristian

    1998-01-01

    The multifunctionality of microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection (RHD) of signals from a dual-frequency laser transmitter is discussed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. Typically, direct detection (DD) in conjunction with optical intensity modulation is used to implement fiber-optic microwave links. The resulting links are inherently transparent. As opposed to DD links, RHD links can perform radio-system functionalities such as modulation and frequency conversion in...

  5. Multifunctional fiber-optic microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Torben Nørskov; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov; Stubkjær, Kristian

    1998-01-01

    The multifunctionality of microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection (RHD) of signals from a dual-frequency laser transmitter is discussed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. Typically, direct detection (DD) in conjunction with optical intensity modulation is used to implement fiber-optic microwave links. The resulting links are inherently transparent. As opposed to DD links, RHD links can perform radio-system functionalities such as modulation and frequency conversion in ad...

  6. Is MRI better than CT for detecting a vascular component to dementia? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beynon Rebecca

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of causes of dementia soon after symptom onset is important, because appropriate treatment of some causes of dementia can slow or halt its progression or enable symptomatic treatment where appropriate. The accuracy of MRI and CT, and whether MRI is superior to CT, in detecting a vascular component to dementia in autopsy confirmed and clinical cohorts of patients with VaD, combined AD and VaD (“mixed dementia”, and AD remain unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate this question. Methods We searched eight databases and screened reference lists to identify studies addressing the review question. We assessed study quality using QUADAS. We estimated summary diagnostic accuracy according to imaging finding, and ratios of diagnostic odds ratios (RDORs for MRI versus CT and high versus low risk of bias. Results We included 7 autopsy and 31 non-autopsy studies. There was little evidence that selective patient enrolment and risk of incorporation bias impacted on diagnostic accuracy (p?=?0.12 to 0.95. The most widely reported imaging finding was white matter hyperintensities. For CT (11 studies summary sensitivity and specificity were 71% (95% CI 53%-85% and 55% (44%-66%. Corresponding figures for MRI (6 studies were 95% (87%-98% and 26% (12%-50%. General infarcts was the most specific imaging finding on MRI (96%; 95% CI 94%-97% and CT (96%; 93%-98%. However, sensitivity was low for both MRI (53%; 36%-70% and CT (52%; 22% to 80%. No imaging finding had consistently high sensitivity. Based on non-autopsy studies, MRI was more accurate than CT for six of seven imaging findings, but confidence intervals were wide. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence to suggest that MRI is superior to CT with respect to identifying cerebrovascular changes in autopsy-confirmed and clinical cohorts of VaD, AD, and ‘mixed dementia’.

  7. Remote detection of degradation of fire-resistant fluid lubricants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The original work under EPRI contract RP893-1 identified a phosphate ester lubricant as having the necessary lubricating and fire properties for use as a fire resistant lubricant in reactor coolant pump motors. However, these lubricants are subject to self-catalyzing degradation. The purpose of this added effort was to identify, review, and rank existing and innovative methods for remotely monitoring the lubricant degradation. Several possible techniques were identified and preliminary experimental evaluation was performed on three of them. Of the techniques considered, measurement of fluid resistivity or conductivity shows the most promise. The major advantages of conductivity measurement are that it is based on simple, mature hardware, thus providing high reliability of the instrumentation itself, and that there is substantial evidence that it will not give a false satisfactory indication as the fluid starts to degrade. The major disadvantages are that it is not a direct measure of fluid acid number, the pertinent degradation parameter, and that it is also affected by fluid contaminants, such as water, which may accelerate fluid degradation but are not directly related to the immediate condition of the fluid

  8. Elevated radioxenon detected remotely following the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the first measurements of short-lived gaseous fission products detected outside of Japan following the Fukushima nuclear releases, which occurred after a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. The measurements were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), (46o16'47''N, 119o16'53''W) located more than 7000 km from the emission point in Fukushima Japan (37o25'17''N, 141o1'57''E). First detections of 133Xe were made starting early March 16, only four days following the earthquake. Maximum concentrations of 133Xe were in excess of 40 Bq/m3, which is more than x40,000 the average concentration of this isotope is this part of the United States. - Highlights: ? First measurements of radioactivity detected outside of Japan following the nuclear reactor accident. ? High level description of the accident and the use of noble gas as an isotope that can be detected long range. ? Determination of the inventory of xenon-133 released from the accident.

  9. DETECTION OF ILLEGAL CANNABIS CULTIVATION USING REMOTE SENSING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detection of illegal Cannabis cultivation by law enforcement agencies currently relies on low flying aircraft manned by trained aerial spotters. This is physically tiring for the aircrew, inefficient for large or complex landscapes, and is often foiled by camouflaged grow sites. A solution for det...

  10. Comparison of gadolinium-EOB-DTPA-enhanced and diffusion-weighted liver MRI for detection of small hepatic metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Kotaro; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Hirokawa, Yuusuke; Arizono, Shigeki; Shibata, Toshiya; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    To compare the accuracy of gadolinium ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced MRI with that of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in the detection of small hepatic metastases (2 cm or smaller). Forty-five patients underwent abdominal MRI at 3 T, including T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), heavily T2WI (HASTE), DWI with a b-value of 500 s/mm{sup 2} and contrast-enhanced MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA. Two groups were assigned and compared: group A (T1WI, T2WI, HASTE and contrast-enhanced study with Gd-EOB-DTPA), and group B (T1WI, T2WI, HASTE and DWI). Two observers independently interpreted the images obtained in a random order. For all hepatic metastases, the diagnostic performance using each imaging set was evaluated by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A total of 51 hepatic metastases were confirmed. The area under the ROC curve (Az) of group A was larger than that of group B, and the difference in the mean Az values between the two image sets was statistically significant, whereas, there were three metastases that lay near thin vessels or among multiple cysts and were better visualised in group B than in group A. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI showed higher accuracy in the detection of small metastases than DWI. (orig.)

  11. Does the degree of background enhancement in breast MRI affect the detection and staging of breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi [Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Breast Imaging and Breast Intervention Section, Shizuoka (Japan); Kasami, Masako [Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Pathology, Naga-izumi, Shizuoka (Japan); Watanabe, Junichiro [Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Division of Medical Oncology, Naga-izumi, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of background enhancement on the detection and staging of breast cancer using MRI as an adjunct to mammography or ultrasound. One hundred forty-six bilateral breast MRI examinations were evaluated to assess the extent of a known primary tumour and to problem solve after mammography or ultrasound without adjusting for the phase in the patients' menstrual cycle. The background enhancement was classified into four categories by visual evaluation: minimal, mild, moderate and marked. In total, 131 histologically confirmed abnormal cases (104 malignant and 27 benign) and 15 normal cases were included in the analysis. There was no tumour size-related bias between the groups (p = 0.522). For the primary index tumour, the sensitivities of MRI with minimal/mild and moderate/marked background enhancement were 100% and 76% (p = 0.001), respectively. Thus, the degree of background enhancement did not affect the specificity. For evaluating tumour extent (n = 104), the accuracy of MRI with moderate/marked background enhancement (52%) was significantly lower than that with minimal/mild background enhancement (84%; p = 0.002). The degree of background enhancement affected the detection and staging of breast cancer using MRI. (orig.)

  12. Goal-Directed Modulation of Neural Memory Patterns: Implications for fMRI-Based Memory Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncapher, Melina R; Boyd-Meredith, J Tyler; Chow, Tiffany E; Rissman, Jesse; Wagner, Anthony D

    2015-06-01

    Remembering a past event elicits distributed neural patterns that can be distinguished from patterns elicited when encountering novel information. These differing patterns can be decoded with relatively high diagnostic accuracy for individual memories using multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of fMRI data. Brain-based memory detection--if valid and reliable--would have clear utility beyond the domain of cognitive neuroscience, in the realm of law, marketing, and beyond. However, a significant boundary condition on memory decoding validity may be the deployment of "countermeasures": strategies used to mask memory signals. Here we tested the vulnerability of fMRI-based memory detection to countermeasures, using a paradigm that bears resemblance to eyewitness identification. Participants were scanned while performing two tasks on previously studied and novel faces: (1) a standard recognition memory task; and (2) a task wherein they attempted to conceal their true memory state. Univariate analyses revealed that participants were able to strategically modulate neural responses, averaged across trials, in regions implicated in memory retrieval, including the hippocampus and angular gyrus. Moreover, regions associated with goal-directed shifts of attention and thought substitution supported memory concealment, and those associated with memory generation supported novelty concealment. Critically, whereas MVPA enabled reliable classification of memory states when participants reported memory truthfully, the ability to decode memory on individual trials was compromised, even reversing, during attempts to conceal memory. Together, these findings demonstrate that strategic goal states can be deployed to mask memory-related neural patterns and foil memory decoding technology, placing a significant boundary condition on their real-world utility. PMID:26041920

  13. Remotely-Sensed Detection of Foreclosure Effects on Residential Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, B.; Minn, M.; Pavlovic, N. R.; Greenberg, J. A.; Fraterrigo, J.; Turner, V. K.

    2014-12-01

    This project aims to understand whether the foreclosure crisis of 2007-2010 led to change in yard management with consequences for property and neighborhood land cover. By triangulating across analyses that vary in spatial and temporal resolution, this study examines whether foreclosure has resulted in changes in household and neighborhood vegetation structure. One common hypothesis is that the of financial distress is a reduction in lawn management (mowing, irrigating, and fertilizing ) due to economic constraint, vacancy or abandonment. However, changes in these practices differ across space as they are mediated by individual idiosyncrasies as well as complex social norms encoded in formal and informal institutions. The aim of our broader research project is to gain understanding of how foreclosure changes yard management within the context of these institutions. This poster presents preliminary results of analyses that aim to understand the relationship between foreclosure and land cover change in Maricopa County (Phoenix), Arizona. We synthesize foreclosure data with other social data sources focused on demographics, property characteristics, and vacancy to quantify both general and spatially dependent signatures of foreclosure in remotely-sensed NDVI data from MODIS and LANDSAT. Through results from multiple sources of data, we aim to isolate and describe signals that can be correlated with housing distress and foreclosure-induced vacancy. Arizona is analytically advantageous as area with an arid climate where the vegetation changes resulting from cessation of lawn maintenance are often dramatic and clearly observable. Our preliminary analysis indicates that there are specific NDVI signatures reflecting differing landscape-maintenance responses to foreclosure, supporting our central thesis that foreclosure influences land cover. These results provide a foundation upon which we will engage in both detailed investigation of the environmental effects of this phenomenon, as well as the social drivers that have result in the dramatic differences in behavior across space. The broader value of this project is to understand the short and long-term influences of foreclosure over human-environment relationships in urban and suburban developments.

  14. A new method of inshore ship detection in high-resolution optical remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qifeng; Du, Yaling; Jiang, Yunqiu; Ming, Delie

    2015-10-01

    Ship as an important military target and water transportation, of which the detection has great significance. In the military field, the automatic detection of ships can be used to monitor ship dynamic in the harbor and maritime of enemy, and then analyze the enemy naval power. In civilian field, the automatic detection of ships can be used in monitoring transportation of harbor and illegal behaviors such as illegal fishing, smuggling and pirates, etc. In recent years, research of ship detection is mainly concentrated in three categories: forward-looking infrared images, downward-looking SAR image, and optical remote sensing images with sea background. Little research has been done into ship detection of optical remote sensing images with harbor background, as the gray-scale and texture features of ships are similar to the coast in high-resolution optical remote sensing images. In this paper, we put forward an effective harbor ship target detection method. First of all, in order to overcome the shortage of the traditional difference method in obtaining histogram valley as the segmentation threshold, we propose an iterative histogram valley segmentation method which separates the harbor and ships from the water quite well. Secondly, as landing ships in optical remote sensing images usually lead to discontinuous harbor edges, we use Hough Transform method to extract harbor edges. First, lines are detected by Hough Transform. Then, lines that have similar slope are connected into a new line, thus we access continuous harbor edges. Secondary segmentation on the result of the land-and-sea separation, we eventually get the ships. At last, we calculate the aspect ratio of the ROIs, thereby remove those targets which are not ship. The experiment results show that our method has good robustness and can tolerate a certain degree of noise and occlusion.

  15. Image analysis, classification, and change detection in remote sensing with algorithms for ENVI/IDL

    CERN Document Server

    Canty, Morton J

    2011-01-01

    Demonstrating the breadth and depth of growth in the field since the publication of the popular first edition, Image Analysis, Classification and Change Detection in Remote Sensing, with Algorithms for ENVI/IDL, Second Edition has been updated and expanded to keep pace with the latest versions of the ENVI software environment. Effectively interweaving theory, algorithms, and computer codes, the text supplies an accessible introduction to the techniques used in the processing of remotely sensed imagery. This significantly expanded edition presents numerous image analysis examples and algorithms

  16. Incident and Traffic-Bottleneck Detection Algorithm in High-Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.M. Kahaki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important methods to solve traffic congestion is to detect the incident state of a roadway. This paper describes the development of a method for road traffic monitoring aimed at the acquisition and analysis of remote sensing imagery. We propose a strategy for road extraction, vehicle detection and incident detection from remote sensing imagery using techniques based on neural networks, Radon transform for angle detection and traffic-flow measurements. Traffic-bottleneck detection is another method that is proposed for recognizing incidents in both offline and real-time mode. Traffic flows and incidents are extracted from aerial images of bottleneck zones. The results show that the proposed approach has a reasonable detection performance compared to other methods. The best performance of the learning system was a detection rate of 87% and a false alarm rate of less than 18% on 45 aerial images of roadways. The performance of the traffic-bottleneck detection method had a detection rate of 87.5%.

  17. Remote Mine Detection Technologies for Land and Water Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, Eddie R.

    1999-05-11

    The detection of mines, both during and after hostilities, is a growing international problem. It limits military operations during wartime and unrecovered mines create tragic consequences for civilians. From a purely humanitarian standpoint an estimated 100 million or more unrecovered mines are located in over 60 countries worldwide. This paper presents an overview of some of the technologies currently being investigated by Sandia National Laboratories for the detection and monitoring of minefields in land and water environments. The three technical areas described in this paper are: 1) the development of new mathematical techniques for combining or fusing the data from multiple sources for enhanced decision-making; 2) an environmental fate and transport (EF&T) analysis approach that is central to improving trace chemical sensing technique; and 3) the investigation of an underwater range imaging device to aid in locating and characterizing mines and other obstacles in coastal waters.

  18. Remote Detection of Explosive Molecules by a Microfluidic SERS Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorek, Brian; Lee, Seung Joon; Moskovits, Martin; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Meinhart, Carl

    2007-11-01

    Free-surface microfluidics (FSF) is combined with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect trace explosives vapors at room temperature and pressure. A free surface, with a large surface to volume ratio, is created using an open microchannel. Since surface tension is a dominant force at the microscale, it can be used to confine the fluid in the microchannel and create a pressure gradient to drive the flow with velocities ranging from ˜ 1um/s - 1mm/s. The curvature of the free surface is measured by confocal microscopy in order to determine the local Laplace pressure in the free-surface microchannel flow. The system has been used for the molecular-specific detection of vapor emanated from explosives such as DNT, TNT and picric acid. The system does not show signs of performance degradation from common interferents such as saturated gasoline vapor and perfume.

  19. Remote sensing study of detecting of flaws in structural material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshizo; Kaminaga, Fumito; Inagaki, Terumi; Numao, Tatsuya; Fukuzawa, Kimio; Ichikawa, Hiroya

    1993-04-01

    A new thermal radiation technique using an infrared radiometer has been developed to detect flaws of materials, such as inclusion, crack and pinhole. In the present study, several incident radiation energies like sun, lamp and gas, were injected to the test material with an artificial internal flaw. Transient radiation temperature image of the flaw on the CRT represents the existence of the internal flaw with higher radiation temperature than that of the surface without the flaw. The characteristics of various incident energy methods were compared with each other. The detecting limitation of internal flaws is determined by the surface temperature variance of the tested materials. The heat flow around the flaw was numerically analyzed by solving a heat conduction equation to verify the surface temperature behavior above the flaws.

  20. Handy Microwave Sensor for Remote Detection of Structural Vibration

    OpenAIRE

    Papi, Federico; Donati, Nicoletta; Pieraccini, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    The authors propose a novel handy microwave sensor for monitoring structures as bridges, towers, streetlight, floors. It operated at distance by detecting the natural frequency of the structure under test. The device has been designed as a handy instrument with a friend user-interface and a simple measurement procedure. The aim is to provide a portable equipment for the engineering studies. The prototype has been tested in laboratory conditions and in a preliminary in-field measurement sessio...

  1. An Optimized Clustering Approach for Automated Detection of White Matter Lesions in MRI Brain Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anitha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Settings White Matter lesions (WMLs are small areas of dead cells found in parts of the brain. In general, it is difficult for medical experts to accurately quantify the WMLs due to decreased contrast between White Matter (WM and Grey Matter (GM. The aim of this paper is to
    automatically detect the White Matter Lesions which is present in the brains of elderly people. WML detection process includes the following stages: 1. Image preprocessing, 2. Clustering (Fuzzy c-means clustering, Geostatistical Possibilistic clustering and Geostatistical Fuzzy clustering and 3.Optimization using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The proposed system is tested on a database of 208 MRI images. GFCM yields high sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 94% and overall accuracy of 93% over FCM and GPC. The clustered brain images are then subjected to Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The optimized result obtained from GFCM-PSO provides sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 94% and accuracy of 95%. The detection results reveals that GFCM and GFCMPSO better localizes the large regions of lesions and gives less false positive rate when compared to GPC and GPC-PSO which captures the largest loads of WMLs only in the upper ventral horns of the brain.

  2. Using High Spatial Resolution to Improve BOLD fMRI Detection at 3T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claise, Béatrice; Jean, Betty

    2015-01-01

    For different functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, the acquisition of T2*-weighted scans at a high spatial resolution may be advantageous in terms of time-course signal-to-noise ratio and of BOLD sensitivity when the regions are prone to susceptibility artifacts. In this study, we explore this solution by examining how spatial resolution influences activations elicited when appetizing food pictures are viewed. Twenty subjects were imaged at 3 T with two different voxel volumes, 3.4 ?l and 27 ?l. Despite the diminution of brain coverage, we found that high-resolution acquisition led to a better detection of activations. Though known to suffer to different degrees from susceptibility artifacts, the activations detected by high spatial resolution were notably consistent with those reported in published activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses, corresponding to taste-responsive regions. Furthermore, these regions were found activated bilaterally, in contrast with previous findings. Both the reduction of partial volume effect, which improves BOLD contrast, and the mitigation of susceptibility artifact, which boosts the signal to noise ratio in certain regions, explained the better detection noted with high resolution. The present study provides further evidences that high spatial resolution is a valuable solution for human BOLD fMRI, especially for studying food-related stimuli. PMID:26550990

  3. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  4. RoboHound:developing sample collection and preconcentration hardware for a remote trace explosives detection system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David J. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Denning, David J.; Hobart, Clinton G.; Lenz, Michael C.; Anderson, Robert J.; Carlson, Dennis L.; Hunter, John Anthony; Gladwell, T. Scott; Mitchell, Mary-Anne; Hannum, David W.; Baumann, Mark J.

    2005-09-01

    The RoboHound{trademark} Project was a three-year, multiphase project at Sandia National Laboratories to build and refine a working prototype trace explosive detection system as a tool for a commercial robot. The RoboHound system was envisioned to be a tool for emergency responders to test suspicious items (i.e., packages or vehicles) for explosives while maintaining a safe distance. The project investigated combining Sandia's expertise in trace explosives detection with a wheeled robotic platform that could be programmed to interrogate suspicious items remotely for the presence of explosives. All of the RoboHound field tests were successful, especially with regards to the ability to collect and detect trace samples of RDX. The project has gone from remote sampling with human intervention to a fully automatic system that requires no human intervention until the robot returns from a sortie. A proposal is being made for additional work leading towards commercialization.

  5. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Thompson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of the NASA/ESA CO2 and Methane Experiment (COMEX campaign in California during June and August/September 2014. COMEX was a multi-platform campaign to measure CH4 plumes released from anthropogenic sources including oil and gas infrastructure. We discuss principles for real-time spectral signature detection and measurement, and report performance on the NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG. AVIRIS-NG successfully detected CH4 plumes in real-time at Gb s?1 data rates, characterizing fugitive releases in concert with other in situ and remote instruments. The teams used these real-time CH4 detections to coordinate measurements across multiple platforms, including airborne in situ, airborne non-imaging remote sensing, and ground-based in situ instruments. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of real-time trace gas signature detection in an airborne science campaign, and presages many future applications.

  6. Specific detection and imaging of enzyme activity by signal-amplifiable self-assembling (19)F MRI probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kazuya; Kamada, Rui; Mizusawa, Keigo; Imai, Hirohiko; Takayama, Yuki; Narazaki, Michiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Takaoka, Yousuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2013-09-16

    Specific turn-on detection of enzyme activities is of fundamental importance in drug discovery research, as well as medical diagnostics. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most powerful techniques for noninvasive visualization of enzyme activity, both in vivo and ex vivo, promising strategies for imaging specific enzymes with high contrast have been very limited to date. We report herein a novel signal-amplifiable self-assembling (19) F?NMR/MRI probe for turn-on detection and imaging of specific enzymatic activity. In NMR spectroscopy, these designed probes are "silent" when aggregated, but exhibit a disassembly driven turn-on signal change upon cleavage of the substrate part by the catalytic enzyme. Using these (19) F probes, nanomolar levels of two different target enzymes, nitroreductase (NTR) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), could be detected and visualized by (19) F?NMR spectroscopy and MRI. Furthermore, we have succeeded in imaging the activity of endogenously secreted MMP in cultured media of tumor cells by (19) F?MRI, depending on the cell lines and the cellular conditions. These results clearly demonstrate that our turn-on (19) F probes may serve as a screening platform for the activity of MMPs. PMID:23955524

  7. Prostate cancer transrectal HIFU ablation: detection of local recurrences using T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to evaluate T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in detecting local cancer recurrences after prostate high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Fifty-nine patients with biochemical recurrence after prostate HIFU ablation underwent T2-weighted and DCE MRI before transrectal biopsy. For each patient, biopsies were performed by two operators: operator 1 (blinded to MR results) performed random and colour Doppler-guided biopsies (''routine biopsies''); operator 2 obtained up to three cores per suspicious lesion on MRI (''targeted biopsies''). Seventy-seven suspicious lesions were detected on DCE images (n=52), T2w images (n=2) or both (n=23). Forty patients and 41 MR lesions were positive at biopsy. Of the 36 remaining MR lesions, 20 contained viable benign glands. Targeted biopsy detected more cancers than routine biopsy (36 versus 27 patients, p=0.0523). The mean percentages of positive cores per patient and of tumour invasion of the cores were significantly higher for targeted biopsies (p<0.0001). The odds ratios of the probability of finding viable cancer and viable prostate tissue (benign or malignant) at targeted versus routine biopsy were respectively 3.35 (95% CI 3.05-3.64) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.13-1.63). MRI combining T2-weighted and DCE images is a promising method for guiding post-HIFU biopsy towards areas containing recurrent cancer and viable prostate tissue. (orig.)

  8. Laser generation and detection of ultrasound for remote inspection of AGR graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-based systems for the generation and detection of ultrasound possess important advantages over conventional ultrasonic techniques. Foremost amongst these is the completely non-contact nature of the technique, which should enable measurements to be made at distances of the order of metres, allowing the remote examination of, for example, hot, radioactive or awkwardly shaped structures. The technique is considered here with particular reference to the problem of in-situ inspection of AGR graphite bricks. Other possible applications include crack detection, the measurement of oxide layer thicknesses on corroded samples, and detection of wall thinning in AGR fuel pins. (author)

  9. Detection of extranodal spread in head and neck cancer with [18F]FDG PET and MRI: improved accuracy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoperative detection of extranodal spread (ENS) in head and neck cancer can have important consequences for patient management. The aim of this study was to determine whether 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG PET) or a combination with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) could more accurately predict ENS, especially with the near availability of fully integrated [18F]FDG PET/MRI scanners. In retrospective cohort design a total of twelve patients, with 18 lymphnode metastases were studied with [18F]FDG PET and MRI. Presence of ENS was scored on MRI, and [18F]FDG PET images using a SUV max cut-off point of 12. Histopathology results were used as reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of [18F]FDG PET for ENS reached 70%,100% and 83%, respectively. The mean SUVmax of ENS positive lymphnodes was 13.6 versus 8.7 for lymphnode metastases without ENS (P=0.03). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI for ENS were 70%, 100% and 83%, respectively. When the [18F]FDG PET and MRI findings were combined sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 100% and 89%, respectively. Thus, accuracy increased from 83% to 89%. When there is no ENS or doubt of ENS on MRI, [18F]FDG PET seems to have additional value since it improves sensitivity and resolves uncertainty in case of high FDG uptake. This benefit needs to be confirmed prospectively in a larger cohort.

  10. Non-contact biopotential sensor for remote human detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new low-cost, low-noise displacement current sensor developed for non-contact measurements of human biopotentials and well suited for detection of human presence applications. The sensor employs a simple, improvised transimpedance amplifier that eliminates the need for ultra high values resistors normally needed in current amplifiers required for this type of measurements. The sensor provides an operational bandwidth of 0.5 - 250 Hz, and a noise level of 7.8?V?Hz at 1 Hz down to 30nV/?Hz at 1 kHz. Reported experimental results demonstrate the sensor's capability in measuring heart related biopotentials within 0.5m off-body distance, and muscle related biopotentials within 10m no obstacles off-body distance, and 5m off-body distance with a concrete wall in between.

  11. Remote calorimetric detection of urea via flow injection analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddes, David E; Demirel, Melik C; Reeves, W Brian; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    The design and development of a calorimetric biosensing system enabling relatively high throughput sample analysis are reported. The calorimetric biosensor system consists of a thin (?20 ?m) micromachined Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) as a temperature sensor placed in close proximity to a fluidic chamber packed with an immobilized enzyme. Layer by layer enzyme immobilization of urease is demonstrated and its activity as a function of the number of layers, pH, and time has been evaluated. This configuration enables a sensing system where a transducer element is physically separated from the analyte solution of interest and is thereby free from fouling effects typically associated with biochemical reactions occuring on the sensor surface. The performance of this biosensing system is demonstrated by detection of 1-200 mM urea in phosphate buffer via a flow injection analysis (FIA) technique. Miniaturized fluidic systems were used to provide continuous flow through a reaction column. Under this configuration the biosensor has an ultimate resolution of less than 1 mM urea and showed a linear response between 0-50 mM. This work demonstrates a sensing modality in which the sensor itself is not fouled or contaminated by the solution of interest and the enzyme immobilized Kapton® fluidic reaction column can be used as a disposable cartridge. Such a system enables reuse and reliability for long term sampling measurements. Based on this concept a biosensing system is envisioned which can perform rapid measurements to detect biomarkers such as glucose, creatinine, cholesterol, urea and lactate in urine and blood continuously over extended periods of time. PMID:26479269

  12. Introducing a new definition towards clinical detection of Microvascular changes using diffusion and perfusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on MRI diffusion's and perfusion, a new criterion for detection and the healing progress of damaged tissue is suggested. The study is based on the ratio of capillary radii in symmetrical damaged and normal tissue neighboring spaces. The apparent diffusion coefficient and cerebral blood flow were measured in the brain tissues of six male wistar rats utilizing suggested MRI measurement techniques. The apparent diffusion coefficient values of damaged and normal regions were (392±34.1) x10-6 mm2s-1 and (659±40.7)x10-6 mm2s-1, respectively. The cerebral blood flow values of damaged and normal regions were 14.5±10.13 mi/min/100 g and 125±41.03 mi/min/100 g, respectively. The geometrical parameters of the capillary for damaged and normal regions midle root/? ?, where midle root is the mean radius and ? is the mean capillary segment length , were calculated to be 5.45±2.01mm0.5g-0.5 (mean±Sd) and 12.8±2.04 mm0.5g-0.5, respectively. Furthermore, based on constant ?, the damaged, versus normal region, mean radius, was shown to follow the criterionmidle root Damaged?0.13xmidle root Normal. A further analysis was conducted through suitable theoretical modeling and assumptions for the above-mentioned criterion. The analysis showed a distinct difference between normal and damaged tissues in various healing progress conditions. Moreover, a new image, namely, Diffusion/Flow map (DF map), which is a mere division of the ADC map to the cerebral blood flow map, was introduced and utilized to contrast between normal and damaged tissue

  13. Detecting functional connectivity change points for single-subject fMRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor Cribben

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies there has been an increased interest in understanding the dynamic manner in which brain regions communicate with one another, as subjects perform a set of experimental tasks or as their psychological state changes. Dynamic Connectivity Regression (DCR is a data-driven technique used for detecting temporal change points in functional connectivity between brain regions where the number and location of the change points are unknown a priori. After finding the change points, DCR estimates a graph or set of relationships between the brain regions for data that falls between pairs of change points. In previous work, the method was predominantly validated using multi-subject data. In this paper, we concentrate on single-subject data and introduce a new DCR algorithm. The new algorithm increases accuracy for individual subject data with a small number of observations and reduces the number of false positives in the estimated undirected graphs. We also introduce a new Likelihood Ratio test for comparing sparse graphs across (or within subjects; thus allowing us to determine whether data should be combined across subjects. We perform an extensive simulation analysis on vector autoregression (VAR data as well as to an fMRI data set from a study (n=23 of a state anxiety induction using a socially evaluative threat challenge. The focus on single-subject data allows us to study the variation between individuals and may provide us with a deeper knowledge of the workings of the brain.

  14. Role of MRI for detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules; Rolle der MRT zur Detektion und Abklaerung pulmonaler Rundherde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, G. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Koenigkam-Santos, M. [University Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto - University of Sao Paulo, Department of Radiology, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Biederer, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, M. [Hufeland-Klinikum GmbH, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Bad Langensalza (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Due to physical and technical limitations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has hitherto played only a minor role in image-based diagnostics of the lungs. However, as a consequence of important methodological developments during recent years, MRI has developed into a technically mature and clinically well-proven method for specific pulmonary questions. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on the currently available sequences and techniques for assessment of pulmonary nodules and analyzes the clinical significance according to the current literature. The main focus is on the detection of lung metastases, the detection of primary pulmonary malignancies in high-risk individuals and the differentiation between pulmonary nodules of benign and malignant character. The MRI technique has a sensitivity of approximately 80 % for detection of malignant pulmonary nodules compared to the reference standard low-dose computed tomography (CT) and is thus somewhat inferior to CT. Advantages of MRI on the other hand are a higher specificity in differentiating malignant and benign pulmonary nodules and the absence of ionizing radiation exposure. A systematic use of MRI as a primary tool for detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules is currently not recommended due to insufficient data. The diagnostic potential of MRI for early detection and staging of malignant pulmonary diseases, however, seems promising. Therefore, further evaluation of MRI as a secondary imaging modality in clinical trials is highly warranted. (orig.) [German] Mit den technischen Weiterentwicklungen in den vergangenen Jahren hat sich die MRT zu einem methodisch ausgereiften und fuer spezifische pulmonale Fragestellungen bereits auch klinisch bewaehrten Untersuchungsverfahren entwickelt. Ohne Strahlenexposition kombiniert sie morphologische und funktionelle Diagnostik und ergaenzt das Spektrum der etablierten Verfahren fuer die bildgebende Diagnostik der Lunge. Diese Arbeit gibt einen Ueberblick ueber die aktuell verwendeten Sequenzen und Techniken zur Darstellung pulmonaler Rundherde und analysiert deren klinischen Stellenwert anhand der aktuellen Studienlage. In Zentrum stehen dabei die Detektion pulmonaler Metastasen, die Detektion primaer pulmonaler Malignome bei Personen mit Risikoprofil und die Abklaerung pulmonaler Rundherde hinsichtlich ihrer Dignitaet. Die MRT besitzt im Vergleich zum Referenzstandard Niedrigdosis-CT eine Sensitivitaet von ca. 80 % fuer die Detektion maligner pulmonaler Rundherde und ist der CT damit etwas unterlegen. Vorteile der MRT gegenueber der Niedrigdosis-CT sind andererseits die hoehere Spezifitaet bei der Differenzierung maligner und benigner pulmonaler Rundherde sowie die fehlende Strahlenexposition. Ausserhalb von Studien kann ein breiter Einsatz der MRT als Screeningverfahren zur Detektion und Abklaerung pulmonaler Rundherde aufgrund der noch ungenuegenden Datenlage derzeit noch nicht empfohlen werden. Das diagnostische Potenzial der MRT fuer die Frueherkennung und das Staging pulmonaler Malignome rechtfertigt aber die weitere Evaluation der MRT als sekundaere Modalitaet im Rahmen von Studien. (orig.)

  15. 'One-stop-shop' staging: Should we prefer FDG-PET/CT or MRI for the detection of bone metastases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of fully diagnostic, contrast-enhanced whole-body FDG-PET/CT and whole-body MRI for detection of bone metastases in patients suffering from newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer and malignant melanoma. Material and Methods: 109 consecutive non-small cell lung cancer (n = 54) and malignant melanoma (n = 55) patients underwent whole-body FDG-PET/CT and whole-body MRI for initial tumor staging. All images were evaluated by four experienced physicians (three radiologists, one nuclear medicine physician). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for detection of bone metastases were determined for both modalities. Statistically significant differences between FDG-PET/CT and MRI were calculated with Fisher's Exact test (p < 0.05). Clinical and imaging follow-up data with a mean follow-up time of 434 days served as the reference standard. Results: According to the reference standard 11 patients (10%) suffered from bone metastases. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for the detection of osseous metastases was 45%, 99%, 83%, 94%, and 94% with whole-body FDG-PET/CT and 64%, 94%, 54%, 96%, and 91% with whole-body MRI. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.6147). Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT and MRI seem to be equally suitable for the detection of skeletal metastases in patients suffering from newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer and malignant melanoma. Both modalities go along with a substantial rate of false-negative findings requiring a close follow-up of patients who are staged free of bone metastases at initial staging.

  16. Diagnostic performance of combined cardiac MRI for detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of a Combined CMR protocol in the detection of significant CAD. ? The invasive coronary angiography was the reference standard. ? Results obtained in our study indicate that combination of perfusion and cine-MR during stress/rest, associated to delayed enhancement in the same protocol improves CMRI diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for patients with significant coronary stenosis. ? The Combined CMR protocol may therefore be helpful for risk stratification and defining treatment strategies. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion cardiac MR (CMR) for detecting significant CAD (?70% narrowing) in comparison with invasive coronary angiography (ICA) as a reference standard. Methods: Examinations of 54 patients who underwent both stress perfusion CMR and ICA for investigation of CAD between 2007 and 2009 were evaluated. The CMR protocol included dipyridamole stress and rest perfusion, stress and rest cine MRI for assessment of ventricular function and delayed gadolinium enhancement for assessment of myocardial viability and detection of infarction. CMR interpretation was performed by 2 observers blinded to the results of ICA and the clinical history. Results: From a total of 54 patients, 37 (68.5%) showed significant CAD in 71 coronary territories. A perfusion defect was detected in 35 patients and in 69 coronary territories. Individual stress perfusion CMR evaluation showed the highest accuracy (83%) of the CMR techniques. The combined analysis using all sequences increased the overall accuracy of CMR to 87%. Conclusion: Combination of perfusion and cine-MR during stress/rest, associated to delayed enhancement in the same protocol improves CMRI diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for patients with significant coronary stenosis, and may therefore be helpful for risk stratification and defining treatment strategies.

  17. Efficacy Evaluation of Different Wavelet Feature Extraction Methods on Brain MRI Tumor Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabizadeh, Nooshin; John, Nigel; Kubat, Miroslav

    2014-03-01

    Automated Magnetic Resonance Imaging brain tumor detection and segmentation is a challenging task. Among different available methods, feature-based methods are very dominant. While many feature extraction techniques have been employed, it is still not quite clear which of feature extraction methods should be preferred. To help improve the situation, we present the results of a study in which we evaluate the efficiency of using different wavelet transform features extraction methods in brain MRI abnormality detection. Applying T1-weighted brain image, Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), Discrete Wavelet Packet Transform (DWPT), Dual Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DTCWT), and Complex Morlet Wavelet Transform (CMWT) methods are applied to construct the feature pool. Three various classifiers as Support Vector Machine, K Nearest Neighborhood, and Sparse Representation-Based Classifier are applied and compared for classifying the selected features. The results show that DTCWT and CMWT features classified with SVM, result in the highest classification accuracy, proving of capability of wavelet transform features to be informative in this application.

  18. Optimization of Visual Tasks for Detecting Visual Cortex Activity in fMRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "A. Mirzajani

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: functional magnetic resonance imaging is a useful non-invasive technique for the evaluation and mapping of human brain, especially the visual cortex. One of the most important subjects in this background is optimizing visual stimuli in various forms of visual tasks for acquiring significant and ro-bust signals. Materials and methods: The effects of physical pa-rameters of visual stimuli on 14 healthy volunteers for detecting visual cortical activity were evaluated by functional magnetic resonance imaging. These pa-rameters were temporal frequency (TF, different pat-terns of activation including, square wave and sine wave grating, and two different states of rest includ-ing black and white screens. Results: The results showed that BOLD signal will be maximally in the TF of 8 Hz, and use the black screen in the rest state. However there was not significant difference between square-¬wave and sine-wave grat-ings in producing visual activation in the cortex. Conclusion: Physical parameters of visual tasks are effective in detecting visual cortical activity, and it is necessary to pay attention to them in order to get sig-nificant and robust signal. Visual tasks with TF of 8 Hz and one pattern of square-wave or sine-wave in activation state, and black screen in rest state are op-timally suitable for fMRI studies.

  19. Incremental value of diffusion weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation treatment: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the incremental value of diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to T2-weighted MRI (T2WI) in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients (median age, 70 years) with a history of radiotherapy-treated prostate cancer underwent multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) and transrectal prostate biopsy. Two readers independently scored the likelihood of cancer on a 1-5 scale, using T2WI alone and then adding DW-MRI and DCE-MRI. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated at the patient and prostate-side levels. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from DW-MRI and the Ktrans, kep, ve, AUGC90 and AUGC180 from DCE-MRI were recorded. Biopsy was positive in 16/24 (67%) and negative in 8/24 (33%) patients. AUCs for readers 1 and 2 increased from 0.64 and 0.53 to 0.95 and 0.86 with MP-MRI, at the patient level, and from 0.73 and 0.66 to 0.90 and 0.79 with MP-MRI, at the prostate-side level (p values -3 mm2/s)], median Ktrans [1.07 vs. 0.34 (1/min)], and kep [2.06 vs 1.0 (1/min)] (p values < 0.05). MP-MRI was significantly more accurate than T2WI alone in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. (orig.)

  20. Incremental value of diffusion weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation treatment: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akin, Oguz; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Gultekin, David H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Pei, Xin; Sperling, Dahlia; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Schwartz, Lawrence H. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-09-15

    To assess the incremental value of diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to T2-weighted MRI (T2WI) in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients (median age, 70 years) with a history of radiotherapy-treated prostate cancer underwent multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) and transrectal prostate biopsy. Two readers independently scored the likelihood of cancer on a 1-5 scale, using T2WI alone and then adding DW-MRI and DCE-MRI. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated at the patient and prostate-side levels. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from DW-MRI and the K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, v{sub e}, AUGC90 and AUGC180 from DCE-MRI were recorded. Biopsy was positive in 16/24 (67%) and negative in 8/24 (33%) patients. AUCs for readers 1 and 2 increased from 0.64 and 0.53 to 0.95 and 0.86 with MP-MRI, at the patient level, and from 0.73 and 0.66 to 0.90 and 0.79 with MP-MRI, at the prostate-side level (p values < 0.05). Biopsy-positive and biopsy-negative prostate sides differed significantly in median ADC [1.44 vs. 1.68 (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s)], median K{sup trans} [1.07 vs. 0.34 (1/min)], and k{sub ep} [2.06 vs 1.0 (1/min)] (p values < 0.05). MP-MRI was significantly more accurate than T2WI alone in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. (orig.)

  1. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of colorectal liver metastases after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Konkuk University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Bo Yun [Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-You [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Yong; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for the detection of colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Our study population comprised 77 patients with 140 CRLMs who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI within 1 month prior to surgery: group A (without NAC, n = 38) and group B (with NAC, n = 39). Two radiologists independently assessed all MR images and graded their diagnostic confidence for CRLM on a 5-point scale. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and positive predictive values (PPV) were calculated and compared between the two groups. Diagnostic accuracy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI in group B was slightly lower than in group A, but a statistically significant difference was not observed (observer 1: A{sub z}, 0.926 in group A, 0.905 in group B; observer 2: A{sub z}, 0.944 in group A, 0.885 in group B; p > 0.05). Sensitivity and PPV of group B were comparable to those of group A (observer 1: sensitivity = 93.5 % vs. 93.6 %, PPV = 95.1 % vs. 86.9 %; observer 2: sensitivity = 96.8 % vs. 91.0 %; PPV = 90.0 % vs. 89.7 %; all p > 0.05). Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI including DWI provided good diagnostic performance with high sensitivity (>90 %) for the detection of CRLMs, regardless of the influence of NAC. (orig.)

  2. Detection of volume loss in hippocampal layers in Alzheimer's disease using 7 T MRI: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Boutet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD, the hippocampus is an early site of tau pathology and neurodegeneration. Histological studies have shown that lesions are not uniformly distributed within the hippocampus. Moreover, alterations of different hippocampal layers may reflect distinct pathological processes. 7 T MRI dramatically improves the visualization of hippocampal subregions and layers. In this study, we aimed to assess whether 7 T MRI can detect volumetric changes in hippocampal layers in vivo in patients with AD. We studied four AD patients and seven control subjects. MR images were acquired using a whole-body 7 T scanner with an eight channel transmit–receive coil. Hippocampal subregions were manually segmented from coronal T2*-weighted gradient echo images with 0.3 × 0.3 × 1.2 mm3 resolution using a protocol that distinguishes between layers richer or poorer in neuronal bodies. Five subregions were segmented in the region of the hippocampal body: alveus, strata radiatum, lacunosum and moleculare (SRLM of the cornu Ammonis (CA, hilum, stratum pyramidale of CA and stratum pyramidale of the subiculum. We found strong bilateral reductions in the SRLM of the cornu Ammonis and in the stratum pyramidale of the subiculum (p < 0.05, with average cross-sectional area reductions ranging from ?29% to ?49%. These results show that it is possible to detect volume loss in distinct hippocampal layers using segmentation of 7 T MRI. 7 T MRI-based segmentation is a promising tool for AD research.

  3. Early detection of femoral head avascular necrosis by bone SPECT compared to MRI in renal allograft recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Yang, Seoung Oh; Lee, Hee Kyung; Han, Duck Jong; Shin, Myung Jin [Asan Mecical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head in patients who receive immunosuppresive agents after renal transplantation is reported to be 4-29%. Among patients who develop AVN after renal transplantation, 80% become symptomatic within 2 years after transplantation. As the number of renal transplantation has been increased recently, early detection of femoral head AVN is very important because early surgical core decompression of femoral head can prevent collapse of the head. MRI is known to be very sensitive to diagnose femoral head AVN. However in three cases we report here, bone SPECT showed early changes of femoral head AVN, whereas MRI showed no specific abnormality. Case 1. A 53-year-old female received an allograft kidney transplantation in 1994. Preoperative bone scan was normal. She complained of both hip pain on Mar. 18 1997. Bone SPECT showed cold defect in both femoral heads but MRI showed no abnormality. After 3 months, bone SPECT and MRI showed AVN of both femoral heads. She underwent bilateral total hip replacement arthroplasty. AVN of femoral heads was confirmed by microscopic examination. Case 2. A 38-year-old female received an allograft kidney transplantation in Feb. 27 1997. Preoperative bone scan was normal. She ran a fever and creatinine was elevated from 1.2 to 2.8 mg/dL. She took high dose methylprednisolone therapy for acute reanl rejection. After two days, she complained pain in both hip joints and knee joints. Bone SPECT showed cold defects in both femoral heads but MRI showed no abnormality. A follow-up bone SPECT and MRI 20 days later revealed AVN of both femoral heads. Case 3. A 50-year-old male received an allograft kidney transplantation on Jul. 12 1995. Preoperative bone scan was normal. He complained of right hip pain on Jul, 26 1995. His bone SPECT showed cold defects in both femoral heads while MRI showed only minimal hip joint effusion. He also complained of left hip pain on Oct. 2 1995. He was admitted on Mar 17 1996 because of both hip pain and fever. MRI showed advanced AVN of femoral heads was confirmed by microscopic examination. Bone SPECT can diagnose early AVN of femoral head in renal allograft recipients when MRI could be normal.

  4. Early detection of femoral head avascular necrosis by bone SPECT compared to MRI in renal allograft recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevalence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head in patients who receive immunosuppresive agents after renal transplantation is reported to be 4-29%. Among patients who develop AVN after renal transplantation, 80% become symptomatic within 2 years after transplantation. As the number of renal transplantation has been increased recently, early detection of femoral head AVN is very important because early surgical core decompression of femoral head can prevent collapse of the head. MRI is known to be very sensitive to diagnose femoral head AVN. However in three cases we report here, bone SPECT showed early changes of femoral head AVN, whereas MRI showed no specific abnormality. Case 1. A 53-year-old female received an allograft kidney transplantation in 1994. Preoperative bone scan was normal. She complained of both hip pain on Mar. 18 1997. Bone SPECT showed cold defect in both femoral heads but MRI showed no abnormality. After 3 months, bone SPECT and MRI showed AVN of both femoral heads. She underwent bilateral total hip replacement arthroplasty. AVN of femoral heads was confirmed by microscopic examination. Case 2. A 38-year-old female received an allograft kidney transplantation in Feb. 27 1997. Preoperative bone scan was normal. She ran a fever and creatinine was elevated from 1.2 to 2.8 mg/dL. She took high dose methylprednisolone therapy for acute reanl rejection. After two days, she complained pain in both hip joints and knee joints. Bone SPECT showed cold defects in both femoral heads but MRI showed no abnormality. A follow-up bone SPECT and MRI 20 days later revealed AVN of both femoral heads. Case 3. A 50-year-old male received an allograft kidney transplantation on Jul. 12 1995. Preoperative bone scan was normal. He complained of right hip pain on Jul, 26 1995. His bone SPECT showed cold defects in both femoral heads while MRI showed only minimal hip joint effusion. He also complained of left hip pain on Oct. 2 1995. He was admitted on Mar 17 1996 because of both hip pain and fever. MRI showed advanced AVN of femoral heads was confirmed by microscopic examination. Bone SPECT can diagnose early AVN of femoral head in renal allograft recipients when MRI could be normal

  5. Detection of local recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in terms of salvage radiotherapy using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI without endorectal coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rischke Hans Christian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI without endorectal coil (EC in the detection of local recurrent prostate cancer (PC after radical prostatectomy (RP. Material and methods Thirty-three patients with recurrent PC underwent DCE-MRI without EC before salvage radiotherapy (RT. At median 15 (mean 16±4.9, range 12–27 months after completion of RT all patients showed complete biochemical response. Additional follow up post RT DCE-MRI scans were available. Prostate specific antigen (PSA levels at the time of imaging were correlated to the imaging findings. Results In 22/33 patients (67% early contrast enhancing nodules were detected in the post-prostatectomy fossa on pre-RT DCE-MRI images. The average pre-RT PSA level of the 22 patients with positive pre-RT DCE-MRI findings was significantly higher (mean, 0.74±0.64 ng/mL compared to the pre-RT PSA level of the 11 patients with negative pre-RT DCE-MRI (mean, 0.24±0.13 ng/mL (p Conclusions This is the first study that shows that DCE-MRI without EC can detect local recurrent PC with an estimated accuracy of 83% at low PSA levels. All false negative DCE-MRI scans were detected using a PSA cut-off of ?0.54 ng/mL.

  6. Fluid motion and solute distribution around sinking aggregates II : Implications for remote detection by colonizing zooplankters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2001-01-01

    Marine snow aggregates are colonized by copepods, and encounter rates inferred from observed abundances of colonizers are high. We examined the potential for hydromechanical and chemical remote detection. The fluid disturbance generated by a sinking aggregate was described by solving the Navier-Stokes' equation for a sinking sphere at Reynolds numbers typical of marine snow (up to 20). Fluid deformation rate, the component of the flow that can be perceived by copepods, attenuates rapidly, and de...

  7. Ship-based detection of glyoxal over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Sinreich, R.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first detection of glyoxal (CHOCHO) over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL). The measurements were conducted by means of the University of Colorado Ship Multi-Axis Differential Optical Spectroscopy (CU SMAX-DOAS) instrument aboard the research vessel Ronald H. Brown. The research vessel was on a cruise in the framework of the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study – Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) ...

  8. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers. PMID:18268323

  9. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpillat, F.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Xu, S.; Michalak, D. J.; Hilty, C.; Bouchard, L.-S.; Antonijevic, S.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2008-01-01

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A “remote-detection” arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic “lab-on-a-chip” applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 ?m. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that ?6 × 1013 protons in a volume of 1,000 ?m3, prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers. PMID:18268323

  10. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiemann, Dora K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Choi, Junoh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  11. Experience acquired by the Mobile Remote-Control Operation and Detection Group of the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years the Mobile Remote-Control Operation and Detection Group of the CEA have intervened on various occasions as follows: to replace personnel required to spend time in working areas in which dose rates were permanently high or very high; to support personnel required to work near high-activity sources producing or likely to produce mobile or short-lived beams of ionizing radiation; and to support personnel required to perform tedious and/or repetitive operations in working areas in which only a limited amount of time may be spent. Among the interventions performed, mention is made of the recovery of radioactive sources which have been placed in abnormal positions as a result of incorrect handling or incidents involving machinery; the transfer of radioactive sources during the loading or unloading of irradiation devices; the inspection by television camera, modification, dismantling or reassembly of protective devices in the neighbourhood of high- or very high-activity sources; and the cleaning of installations polluted by radioactive contaminants which present a high risk of external irradiation of the personnel required to work there. After obtaining a hermetically sealed version of the ''Mobile Remote-Control Intervention Operator'' (TOMI) and an ''Intervention Dose and Dose-Rate Measurement Unit'' (EDDI) in 1979, the Mobile Remote-Control Operation and Detection Group has very recently put into operation a remote-controlled intervention module which takes up very little space and can carry over 100 kg of different types of equipment. The authors summarize development work on the MERITE module and on master-slave remote handling devices with servo control and feedback of the MA-23 type, the flexibility of which has yet again been verified very recently during an intervention at a nuclear installation. (author)

  12. Detection of VX-2 carcinoma in rabbit livers: comparison of sonography, CT, and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our study was designed to investigate the value of different imaging techniques in the early detection of VX-2 carcinoma in rabbit livers by direct comparison of sonography, CT, and MR imaging with pathologic specimens. VX-2 carcinomas were induced in 20 rabbit livers by direct inoculation of 0.1 ml of aliquot of the tumor tissue suspension (1 x 106/mm3) to hepatic parenchyma with an 18 gauge needle after laparotomy. One week after the inoculation of tumor cells, sonography with a 5 MHz transducer, CT after a bolus injection of contrast medium (3 mL/kg), and T1-weighted MR imaging at a 2.0 T with spin-echo techniques (TR/TE : 500/30 msec, 2000/30, 80 msec) as well as enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging with GD-DTPA (0.1 mmole/kg) were performed in each rabbit. At pathologic specimens, adequate induction of tumor nodules were 69 with 3-21 mm size (average 8.3 mm). All 69 tumors had fibrous capsules and central necrosis pathologically. The sensitivities of sonography, contrast enhanced CT and MR imaging were 54%, 61%, and 87%, respectively. Among MR images, the sensitivities of T1-weighted images, proton density images, T2-weighted images, and enhanced T1-weighted images were 33%, 77%, 83%, and 81%, respectively. On sonograms and CT scans, VX-2 carcinomas show variable appearance regardless of the tumor size and histopathologic findings. On MR images, the tumors were ring shape with variable thickness on all pulse sequences. There was no significant correlation among the findings of three imaging techniques. MR imaging has the highest detectability for the VX-2 carcinomas in rabbit liver. Therefore, MRI may be the most valuable imaging technique for the detection of small hepatic tumors with extensive necrosis like VX-2 carcinomas

  13. Real-time remote detection and measurement for airborne imaging spectroscopy: a case study with methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. R.; Leifer, I.; Bovensmann, H.; Eastwood, M.; Fladeland, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Gerilowski, K.; Green, R. O.; Kratwurst, S.; Krings, T.; Luna, B.; Thorpe, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    Localized anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 are highly uncertain and temporally variable. Airborne remote measurement is an effective method to detect and quantify these emissions. In a campaign context, the science yield can be dramatically increased by real-time retrievals that allow operators to coordinate multiple measurements of the most active areas. This can improve science outcomes for both single- and multiple-platform missions. We describe a case study of the NASA/ESA CO2 and MEthane eXperiment (COMEX) campaign in California during June and August/September 2014. COMEX was a multi-platform campaign to measure CH4 plumes released from anthropogenic sources including oil and gas infrastructure. We discuss principles for real-time spectral signature detection and measurement, and report performance on the NASA Next Generation Airborne Visible Infrared Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG). AVIRIS-NG successfully detected CH4 plumes in real-time at Gb s-1 data rates, characterizing fugitive releases in concert with other in situ and remote instruments. The teams used these real-time CH4 detections to coordinate measurements across multiple platforms, including airborne in situ, airborne non-imaging remote sensing, and ground-based in situ instruments. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of real-time trace-gas signature detection in an airborne science campaign, and presages many future applications. Post-analysis demonstrates matched filter methods providing noise-equivalent (1?) detection sensitivity for 1.0 % CH4 column enhancements equal to 141 ppm m.

  14. Cardiac MRI. Diagnostic gain of an additional axial SSFP chest sequence for the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings in the cardiac MRI examination setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roller, F.C.; Schneider, C.; Krombach, G.A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. Radiology; Schuhbaeck, A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. Cardiology; Rolf, A. [Kerckhoff Hospital Bad Nauheim (Germany). Dept. Cardiology

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Cardiac MRI (CMRI) is an effective method for imaging of the heart. The aim of our study was to assess whether an axial chest sequence in addition to the standard CMR examination setting has advantages in the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings (PSEF). Materials and Methods: 400 consecutive patients were imaged at 1.5 T for clinical reasons. In addition to the standard long and short-axis views, an axial SSFP sequence was obtained covering the thorax from the lung apex to the diaphragm. All sequences were separately evaluated for PSEF. Results: A total of 25 PSEF were diagnosed in 400 patients, including 16 pleural effusions, a pulmonary fibrosis, a spondylodiscitis, ascites, lymphadenopathies, relapse of a mamma carcinoma, growth of adrenal glands metastases and diaphragmatic elevation. All 25 PSEF were detected by reading survey sequences. 24 of the 25 PSEF were detected by the additional SSFP chest sequence as well as the CINE sequences. Conclusion: In our study the additional axial SSFP chest sequence didn't show a benefit in the detection of PSEF. With the survey sequences we were able to detect all PSEF. We conclude that survey images should be assessed for additional findings. (orig.)

  15. Comparative study of diffusion weighted imaging and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for the detection of small breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the sensitivity of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) with dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI for the detection of small breast cancers and to evaluate the clinical value of DWI. Methods: Forty-eight patients with benign (n=25) and malignant (n=45) small breast lesions (?2 cm) proved by pathology underwent DWI and DCE MRI. The DCE MRI was performed using FLASH sequence and the time-signal intensity curve was drawn. The DWI was performed using GRAPPA- EPI sequence with different b values (800, 1000 s/mm2) and the ADC values of lesions were measured. The sensitivity and specificity of DWI for the detection of small breast cancers were compared with DCE MRI. Results: Forty of 45 small breast cancers and 19 of 25 small benign breast lesions were correctly diagnosed using DCE MRI. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of TIC were 88.9% (40/45) and 87.0% (40/46). With b values of 800 s/mm2 and 1000 s/mm2, the average ADC values of small breast cancers were (1.153±0.192) x 10-3 and (1.079±0.186) x 10-3 mm2/s, while those of benign ones were (1.473±0.252) x 10-3 and (1.419 ± 0.255) x 10-3 mm2/s, respectively. There was no significant difference for the ADC values with different b values in the same group (P>0.05), while there was a significant difference between the malignant and the benign lesions (P2. Both the sensitivity and positive predictive value of diagnosis were 86.7% (39/45). The abilities of DWI and DCE MRI for the diagnosis of small breast cancers were the same. The sensitivity (93.3%) and positive predictive value (91.3%) were improved with the combination of DCE MRI and DWI. Conclusion: DWI has a high sensitivity for the detection of small breast cancers, the ADC value can provide valuable information in the differential diagnosis. (authors)

  16. MOVING OBSTACLE DETECTION AND REMOTE VIDEO MONITORING SYSTEM USING CORTEX-A8

    OpenAIRE

    V.PADMAJA, KAVITHA MAMINDLA

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the Detection of Moving obstacle and remote video monitoring and extracting the key frames from the captured video system based on high performance SAMSUNG S5PV210 CORTEX-A8 processor core is build and expanding peripheral devices using embedded Linux as the operating system. Today monitoring systems are either webcam based or simple motion detection based. Here we have interfaced both webcam and PIR sensor to the embedded system so that the user can get an immediate alert messa...

  17. Remote Optical Detection of the Fusion State in Laser Deep Penetration Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenner, F.; Brock, C.; Hohenstein, R.; Zalevsky, Z.; Schmidt, M.

    We introduce a novel technique for the determination of the fusion state of laser welded blind joints (e.g. overlap joints) by measuring the vibrations of the workpiece during the welding process. In case of incomplete fusion, the workpiece vibrations differ significantly from the vibrations observed during a sound weld. The detection of the vibrations is performed by observing a speckle pattern on the workpiece surface. The movement of this pattern allows remote detection of the workpiece oscillations close to the keyhole. Those oscillations contain information on the fusion state of the weld.

  18. Ship Detection of Remote Sensing Image on FRHT and Multi-Points Curvature Based Polygon Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Luo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most difficult tasks of ship detection is detecting the ship which is docking at the port in remote sensing image. Traditional methods of automatic detection cannot be used to detect the land/waterboundaries, because both the gray values and textural features of a port are similar to those of the ships which are docking at the port. Therefore, ships cannot be accurately detected in this case. In this study, a novel method of land/water-boundaries detection is proposed, which is based on a polygon approximation method by incorporating two techniques, i.e., Fuzzy Randomized Hough Transform (FRHT and Multi-Points Curvature (MPC. The method considered the feature of human vision that the straight-line of the land/water-boundaries can be detected more accurately and rapidly. With the detection result of land/water-boundaries, ships docking at the port can be accurately detected. The experiment results demonstrate that this method can achieve good result of ship detection.

  19. Capabilities of Remote Sensing Hyperspectral Images for the Detection of Lead Contamination: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliki, A. A.; Owens, G.; Bruce, D.

    2012-07-01

    Advances in remote sensing technologies are increasingly becoming more useful for resource, ecosystem and agricultural management applications to the extent that these techniques can now also be applied for monitoring of soil contamination and human health risk assessment. While, extensive previous studies have shown that Visible and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (VNIRS) in the spectral range 400-2500 nm can be used to quantify various soil constituents simultaneously, the direct determination of metal concentrations by remote sensing and reflectance spectroscopy is not as well examined as other soil parameters. The application of VNIRS, including laboratory hyperpectral measurements, field spectrometer measurements or image spectroscopy, generally achieves a good prediction of metal concentrations when compared to traditional wet chemical methods and has the advantage of being relatively less expensive and faster, allowing chemical assessment of contamination in close to real time. Furthermore, imaging spectroscopy can potentially provide significantly more samples over a larger spatial extent than traditional ground sampling methods. Thus the development of remote sensing techniques (field based and either airborne or satellite hyperspectral imaging) can support the monitoring and efficient mapping of metal contamination (in dust and soil) for environmental and health impact assessment. This review is concerned with the application of remote sensing and reflectance spectroscopy to the detection of heavy metals and discusses how current methods could be applied for the quantification of Pb contaminated soil surrounding mines and smelters.

  20. MRI detection of brain metastases at initial staging of small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prospectively investigated 40 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC) for signs of brain metastasis by neurological examination and MRI of the brain, to determine the significance of MRI for staging. MRI could not be completed in one patient, who was excluded from the study. The MRI studies of the remaining patients showed no abnormalities in 12, cerebral infarcts in 2 and brain metastases in 11 patients, of whom 3 no relevant symptoms. Nonenhancing white matter lesions were found in 14 patients. In 3 of the 4 patients with an abnormal neurological examination at diagnosis, nonenhancing white matter lesions later developed into contrast enhancing lesions compatible with breain metastases; in 2, this occurred during the course of the chemotherapy. MRI did not change the clinical staging in patients with asymptomatic brain metastases. (orig.)

  1. Remote ischemic perconditioning in thrombolysed stroke patients : Randomized study of activating endogenous neuroprotection - design and MRI measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, K D; Hjort, N

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravenous administration of alteplase is the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. Despite the effectiveness of this treatment, 50% of patients suffer chronic neurological disability, which may in part be caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury. Remote ischemic perconditioning, performed as a transient ischemic stimulus by blood-pressure cuff inflation to an extremity, has proven effective in attenuating ischemia-reperfusion injury in animal models of stroke. Remote ischemic perconditioning increases myocardial salvage in patients undergoing acute revascularization for acute myocardial infarction. To clarify whether a similar benefit can be obtained in patients undergoing thrombolysis for acute stroke, we included patients from June 2009 to January 2011. AIM AND DESIGN: The aims of the study are: to estimate the effect of remote ischemic perconditioning as adjunctive therapy to intravenous alteplase of acute ischemic stroke within the 4-h time window and to investigate the feasibilityof remote ischemic perconditioning performed during transport to hospital in patients displaying symptoms of acute stroke. Patients are randomized to remote ischemic perconditioning in a single-blinded fashion during transportation to hospital. Only patients with magnetic resonance imaging-proven ischemic stroke, who subsequently are treated with intravenous alteplase, and in selected cases additional endovascular treatment, are finally included in the study. STUDY OUTCOMES: Primary end-point is penumbral salvage. Penumbra is defined as hypoperfused yet viable tissue identified as the mismatch between perfusion-weighted imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging lesion on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Primary outcome is a mismatch volume not progressing to infarction on one-month follow-up T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery. Secondary end-points include: infarct growth (expansion of the diffusion-weighted imaging lesion) from baseline to the 24-h and one-month follow-up examination. Infarct growth insideand outside the acute perfusion-weighted imaging-diffusion-weighted imaging mismatch zone is quantified by use of coregistration. Clinical outcome after three-months. The influence of physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly score) on effect of remote ischemic perconditioning. Feasibility of remote ischemic perconditioning in acute stroke patients. SUMMARY: This phase 3 trial is the first study in patients with acute ischemic stroke to evaluate the effect size of remote ischemic perconditioning as a pretreatment to intravenous alteplase, measured as penumbral salvage on multimodal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical outcome after three-months follow-up.

  2. Contextualizing Neuro-Collaborations: Reflections on a Transdisciplinary fMRI Lie Detection Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Littlefield

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroscience initiatives (including the E.U.’s Human Brain Project and the U.S.’s BRAIN Initiative have reinvigorated discussions about the possibilities for transdisciplinary collaboration between the neurosciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. As STS scholars have argued for decades, however, such inter- and transdisciplinary collaborations are potentially fraught with tensions between researchers. This essay build on such claims by arguing that the tensions of transdisciplinary research also exist within researchers’ own experiences of working between disciplines – a phenomenon that we call ‘Disciplinary Double Consciousness’ (DDC. Building on previous work that has characterized similar spaces (and especially on the Critical Neuroscience literature, we argue that ‘neuro-collaborations’ inevitably engage researchers in DDC – a phenomenon that allows us to explore the useful dissonance that researchers can experience when working between a “home” discipline and a secondary discipline. Our case study is a five-year case study in fMRI lie detection involving a transdisciplinary research team made up of social scientists, a neuroscientist, and a humanist. In addition to theorizing neuro-collaborations from the inside-out, this essay presents practical suggestions for developing transdisciplinary infrastructures that could support future neuro-collaborations.

  3. Memory detection using fMRI - does the encoding context matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peth, Judith; Sommer, Tobias; Hebart, Martin N; Vossel, Gerhard; Büchel, Christian; Gamer, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Recent research revealed that the presentation of crime related details during the Concealed Information Test (CIT) reliably activates a network of bilateral inferior frontal, right medial frontal and right temporal-parietal brain regions. However, the ecological validity of these findings as well as the influence of the encoding context are still unclear. To tackle these questions, three different groups of subjects participated in the current study. Two groups of guilty subjects encoded critical details either only by planning (guilty intention group) or by really enacting (guilty action group) a complex, realistic mock crime. In addition, a group of informed innocent subjects encoded half of the relevant details in a neutral context. Univariate analyses showed robust activation differences between known relevant compared to neutral details in the previously identified ventral frontal-parietal network with no differences between experimental groups. Moreover, validity estimates for average changes in neural activity were similar between groups when focusing on the known details and did not differ substantially from the validity of electrodermal recordings. Additional multivariate analyses provided evidence for differential patterns of activity in the ventral fronto-parietal network between the guilty action and the informed innocent group and yielded higher validity coefficients for the detection of crime related knowledge when relying on whole brain data. Together, these findings demonstrate that an fMRI-based CIT enables the accurate detection of concealed crime related memories, largely independent of encoding context. On the one hand, this indicates that even persons who planned a (mock) crime could be validly identified as having specific crime related knowledge. On the other hand, innocents with such knowledge have a high risk of failing the test, at least when considering univariate changes of neural activation. PMID:25819306

  4. Iqpc 2015 Track: Water Detection and Classification on Multisource Remote Sensing and Terrain Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasz, A.; Kristóf, D.; Belényesi, M.; Bakos, K.; Kovács, Z.; Balázs, B.; Szabó, Sz.

    2015-08-01

    Since 2013, the EU FP7 research project "IQmulus" encourages the participation of the whole scientific community as well as specific user groups in the IQmulus Processing Contest (IQPC). This year, IQPC 2015 consists of three processing tasks (tracks), from which "Water detection and classification on multi-source remote sensing and terrain data" is introduced in the present paper. This processing track addresses a particular problem in the field of big data processing and management with the objective of simulating a realistic remote sensing application scenario. The main focus is on the detection of water surfaces (natural waters, flood, inland excess water, other water-affected categories) using remotely sensed data. Multiple independent data sources are available and different tools could be used for data processing and evaluation. The main challenge is to identify the right combination of data and methods to solve the problem in the most efficient way. Although the first deadline for submitting track solutions has passed and the track has been successfully concluded, the track organizers decided to keep the possibility of result submission open to enable collecting a variety of approaches and solutions for this interesting problem.

  5. The STIR sequence. Comparison with other MRI sequences and bone scan in the detection of vertebral bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective MRI study of the spine comparing short inversion-recovery sequences (STIR) - one the features of which is to potentiate the contrast of both long T1 and T2 sequences - with other spin echo and/or gradient echo MRI sequences, was conducted in 20 patients with suspected vertebral metastases. The features of the signal on STIR sequences were initially defined in 14 healthy volunteers. In the patients, the various MRI sequences were also compared to each other and to standard x-rays and bone scans. The sensitivity of detection of vertebral metastases did not appear to be significantly different between T1 sequences and the STIR sequence. However, these two sequences appeared to be significantly more sensitive than T2-weighted sequences. The STIR sequences therefore appears to be a logical complement to T1-weighted sequences in the detection of vertebral secondaries. This sequence even appears to be superior in the following situations: investigation of the cervical vertebrae, follow-up of irradiated bone, early detection of periduritis and lesions of the posterior arch

  6. Integrating Structural and Functional Imaging for Computer Assisted Detection of Prostate Cancer on Multi-Protocol In Vivo 3 Tesla MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanath, Satish; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Rosen, Mark; Chappelow, Jonathan; Toth, Robert; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert,; Genega, Elisabeth; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2009-01-01

    Screening and detection of prostate cancer (CaP) currently lacks an image-based protocol which is reflected in the high false negative rates currently associated with blinded sextant biopsies. Multi-protocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers high resolution functional and structural data about internal body structures (such as the prostate). In this paper we present a novel comprehensive computer-aided scheme for CaP detection from high resolution in vivo multi-protocol MRI by integrati...

  7. Detection of environmental change using hyperspectral remote sensing at Olkiluoto repository site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report methods related to hyperspectral monitoring of Olkiluoto repository site are described. A short introduction to environmental remote sensing is presented, followed by more detailed description of hyperspectral imaging and a review of applications of hyperspectral remote sensing presented in the literature. The trends of future hyperspectral imaging are discussed exploring the possibilities of long-wave infrared hyperspectral imaging. A detailed description of HYPE08 hyperspectral flight campaign at the Olkiluoto region in 2008 is presented. In addition, related pre-processing and atmospheric correction methods, necessary in monitoring use, and the quality control methods applied, are described. Various change detection methods presented in the literature are described, too. Finally, a system for hyperspectral monitoring is proposed. The system is based on continued hyperspectral airborne flight campaigns and precisely defined data processing procedure. (orig.)

  8. Classification of LULC Change Detection using Remotely Sensed Data for Coimbatore City, Tamilnadu, India

    CERN Document Server

    Babykalpana, Y

    2010-01-01

    Maps are used to describe far-off places . It is an aid for navigation and military strategies. Mapping of the lands are important and the mapping work is based on (i). Natural resource management & development (ii). Information technology ,(iii). Environmental development ,(iv). Facility management and (v). e-governance. The Landuse / Landcover system espoused by almost all Organisations and scientists, engineers and remote sensing community who are involved in mapping of earth surface features, is a system which is derived from the united States Geological Survey (USGS) LULC classification system. The application of RS and GIS involves influential of homogeneous zones, drift analysis of land use integration of new area changes or change detection etc.,National Remote Sensing Agency(NRSA) Govt. of India has devised a generalized LULC classification system respect to the Indian conditions based on the various categories of Earth surface features , resolution of available satellite data, capabilities of se...

  9. Remote detection of oil spilled under ice and snow using nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical challenge of detecting oil that has been accidentally spilled under ice and snow was discussed with particular reference to the tools used to characterize the molecular composition of liquids and solids. One such tool is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which works by releasing electromagnetic energy. The NMR signals from oil and water can be differentiated based on the inherent differences in the NMR signal responses from different fluid types. The method can also use the Earth's magnetic field as the static magnetic field and thereby eliminate the complexity and cost of generating an independent magnetic field for remotely detecting fluids below a surface. This study examined the feasibility of altering existing surface-based instruments and placing them in a helicopter for aerial monitoring. The goal of this research was to develop a tool for remote detection of oil under ice in a marine environment, or for detection of oil under snow on land using an inexpensive tool that can quickly inspect large areas. The proposed tool and technique produces a direct hydrocarbon signal that may not have interference from ice and snow. 9 refs., 6 figs

  10. Three-dimensional accurate detection of lung emphysema in rats using ultra-short and zero echo time MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Andrea; Tibiletti, Marta; Kjørstad, Åsmund; Birk, Gerald; Schad, Lothar R; Stierstorfer, Birgit; Rasche, Volker; Stiller, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    Emphysema is a life-threatening pathology that causes irreversible destruction of alveolar walls. In vivo imaging techniques play a fundamental role in the early non-invasive pre-clinical and clinical detection and longitudinal follow-up of this pathology. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using high resolution radial three-dimensional (3D) zero echo time (ZTE) and 3D ultra-short echo time (UTE) MRI to accurately detect lung pathomorphological changes in a rodent model of emphysema.Porcine pancreas elastase (PPE) was intratracheally administered to the rats to produce the emphysematous changes. 3D ZTE MRI, low and high definition 3D UTE MRI and micro-computed tomography images were acquired 4 weeks after the PPE challenge. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured in PPE-treated and control rats. T2 * values were computed from low definition 3D UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements were made after euthanizing the animals. Both ZTE and UTE MR images showed a significant decrease in the SNR measured in PPE-treated lungs compared with controls, due to the pathomorphological changes taking place in the challenged lungs. A significant decrease in T2 * values in PPE-challenged animals compared with controls was measured using UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements showed a significant increase in the mean linear intercept in PPE-treated lungs. UTE yielded significantly higher SNR compared with ZTE (14% and 30% higher in PPE-treated and non-PPE-treated lungs, respectively).This study showed that optimized 3D radial UTE and ZTE MRI can provide lung images of excellent quality, with high isotropic spatial resolution (400 µm) and SNR in parenchymal tissue (>25) and negligible motion artifacts in freely breathing animals. These techniques were shown to be useful non-invasive instruments to accurately and reliably detect the pathomorphological alterations taking place in emphysematous lungs, without incurring the risks of cumulative radiation exposure typical of micro-computed tomography. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26403226

  11. Prostate cancer transrectal HIFU ablation: detection of local recurrences using T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France); Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Girouin, Nicolas; Glas, Ludivine; Ben Cheikh, Alexandre [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France); Gelet, Albert [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Mege-Lechevallier, Florence [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, Lyon (France); Rabilloud, Muriel [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Biostatistics, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, UMR CNRS, Laboratoire Biostatistiques-Sante, Pierre-Benite (France); Chapelon, Jean-Yves [Inserm, U556, Lyon (France)

    2010-01-15

    The objective was to evaluate T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in detecting local cancer recurrences after prostate high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Fifty-nine patients with biochemical recurrence after prostate HIFU ablation underwent T2-weighted and DCE MRI before transrectal biopsy. For each patient, biopsies were performed by two operators: operator 1 (blinded to MR results) performed random and colour Doppler-guided biopsies (''routine biopsies''); operator 2 obtained up to three cores per suspicious lesion on MRI (''targeted biopsies''). Seventy-seven suspicious lesions were detected on DCE images (n=52), T2w images (n=2) or both (n=23). Forty patients and 41 MR lesions were positive at biopsy. Of the 36 remaining MR lesions, 20 contained viable benign glands. Targeted biopsy detected more cancers than routine biopsy (36 versus 27 patients, p=0.0523). The mean percentages of positive cores per patient and of tumour invasion of the cores were significantly higher for targeted biopsies (p<0.0001). The odds ratios of the probability of finding viable cancer and viable prostate tissue (benign or malignant) at targeted versus routine biopsy were respectively 3.35 (95% CI 3.05-3.64) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.13-1.63). MRI combining T2-weighted and DCE images is a promising method for guiding post-HIFU biopsy towards areas containing recurrent cancer and viable prostate tissue. (orig.)

  12. Detection of an occult transclival cerebrospinal fluid fistula by CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an unusual occult transclival cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula to the sphenoid sinus demonstrated by MRI. CT was performed because of a posterior cerebral infarct caused by cardiac arrhythmia. Axial sections showed fluid in the sphenoid sinus. High-resolution scans revealed a bony defect 3 mm in diameter of the posterior wall of the sphenoid sinus, and MRI showed a transclival CSF fistula. This occult lesion was confirmed by surgery and duraplasty was successfully performed via an endonasal approach. (orig.)

  13. Remote detection of methane with a 1.66-microm diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, K; Tai, H

    1992-02-20

    High-sensitivity real-time remote detection of methane in air with a 1.66-microm distributed-feedback diode laser operating at room temperature is demonstrated by laboratory simulations. The laser current was modulated at a high frequency of ~5 MHz, and the laser-center frequency was locked onto a methane-absorption line. The laser light directed toward the probed region was received after one-way transmission or further reflection from a topographic target. The methane absorption was detected by the second-harmonic component in the optical-power variation. The minimum-detectable concentration-path-length product in the transmission scheme was 0.3 part in 10(6) m for a signal averaging time of 1.3 s. In the reflection scheme, the amount of methane could be measured from the ratio of the fundamental and second-harmonic signal intensities independently of the received power. PMID:20720687

  14. Does low-field dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) reliably detect bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis? : A comparison of two different E-MRI units and conventional radiography with high-resolution CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, A; Ejbjerg, B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the ability of two different E-MRI units and conventional radiography (CR) to identify bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints with CT scanning as the standard reference method. METHODS: 20 patients with RA and 5 controls underwent CR, CT and two E-MRI examinations (Esaote Biomedica Artoscan and MagneVu MV1000) of one hand during a 2-week period. In all modalities, each bone of the wrist and MCP joints was blindly evaluated for erosions. MagneVu images were also assessed for the proportion of each bone being visualised. RESULTS: 550 bones were examined. CT, Artoscan, MagneVu and CR detected 188, 116, 55 and 45 bones with erosions, respectively. The majority were located in the carpal bones. The sensitivity of the Artoscan for detecting erosions was higher than that of the MagneVu and CR (MCP joints: 0.68, 0.54 and 0.57, respectively; wrists: 0.50, 0.23 and 0.29). Corresponding specificities for detecting erosions were 0.94, 0.93 and 0.99, respectively, in the MCP joints and 0.92, 0.98 and 0.98 in the wrist. The MagneVu allowed visualisation of 1.5 cm of the ventral-dorsal diameter of the bone. In the wrist, 31.6% of bones were visualised entirely and 37.9% of bones were 67-99% visualised. In MCP joints, 84.2% of bones were visualised entirely and 15.8% of bones were 67-99% visualised. CONCLUSION: With CT as the reference method for detecting erosions in RA hands, the Artoscan showed higher sensitivity than the MagneVu and CR. All imaging modalities had high specificities. The better performance of the Artoscan should be considered when selecting an imaging method in RA.

  15. Whole-heart dipyridamole stress first-pass myocardial perfusion MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A whole-heart coverage MRI sequence, which employs a hybrid of fast gradient echo and echo planar acquisition imaging (FastCard EchoTrain), has recently been developed. Using this sequence, a first-pass myocardial perfusion MRI was shown to be a good non-invasive modality for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) in a clinical setting. In addition, the clinical usefulness of delayed enhanced MRI has recently been reported. The objectives of this study were to investigate the accuracy of dipyridamole stress first-pass myocardial perfusion MRI for diagnosing CAD (> 50% stenosis) and to clarify whether additional delayed enhancement MRI has any clinical significance. We performed first-pass myocardial perfusion MRI in 102 consecutive patients (66±9 years old) suspected to have CAD or new lesions in patients with well-documented prior myocardial infarction (MI). Using a 1.5 T cardiac MR imager (GE CV/i), eight short axis MR images of the left ventricle were acquired by injecting gadolinium (0.1 mmol/kg) under dipyridamole infusion stress (0.56 mg/kg). Fifteen minutes later, aminophylline (250 mg) was injected and first-pass perfusion MRI was repeated in the resting state in order to evaluate both the presence of perfusion defect and delayed enhancement. The presence of perfusion defect and delayed enhancement was determined based on a visual qualitative analysis by the agreement of two separate readers who were blinded to any clinical information. Based on the stress and rest findings, no defect, reversible defect, or fixed defect with or without delayed enhancement was recorded in any patient. The MR findings revealed 76 CAD patients, including 24 MI patients with new lesions and 26 patients without CAD on coronary angiography. The presence of stress perfusion defect had a 93% sensitivity and an 85% specificity for diagnosing CAD. A fixed defect showed an 86% sensitivity and a 66% specificity for diagnosing a prior MI. Patients with a fixed defect with delayed enhancement had more significant stenosis in the infarct related artery than in those without any enhancement (11/26 vs 15/20, P<0.05). (author)

  16. Comparison of Technetium-99m-MIBI imaging with MRI for detection of spine involvement in patients with multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, radiopharmaceutical scanning with Tc-99m-MIBI was reported to depict areas with active bone disease in multiple myeloma (MM) with both high sensitivity and specificity. This observation was explained by the uptake of Tc-99m-MIBI by neoplastic cells. The present investigation evaluates whether Tc-99m-MIBI imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perform equally well in detecting myelomatous bone marrow lesions. In 21 patients with MM, MRIs of the vertebral region TH12 to S1 and whole body scans with Tc-99m-MIBI were done. Tc-99m-MIBI scanning missed bone marrow infiltration in 43 of 87 vertebrae (50.5%) in which MRI showed neoplastic bone marrow involvement. In patients with disease stage I+II, Tc-99m-MIBI scanning was negative in all of 24 vertebrae infiltrated according to MRI. In patients with disease stage III, Tc-99m-MIBI scanning detected 44 of 63 (70%) vertebrae involved by neoplastic disease. Tc-99m-MIBI scanning underestimated the extent of myelomatous bone marrow infiltration in the spine, especially in patients with low disease stage

  17. Oil spill detection and remote sensing : an overview with focus on recent events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several offshore oil spills occurred during the period from November to December 2007 in various parts of the world, each highlighting the need of quickly detect oil spills in marine settings. Several factors must be considered in order to determine the best technical approach for successful detection and oil spill monitoring. These include the reason for detection or monitoring; the location of the spill; the scale of spatial coverage; availability of detection equipment and time to deploy; high specificity for petroleum oil; weather conditions at and above the spill site; and cost of the detection approach. This paper outlined some of the key attributes of several remote sensing options that are available today or being considered. The approaches used to enhance visualization or detection of spills include traditional electromagnetic spectrum-based approaches such as ultra violet (UV), visible, infra-red (IR), radar, and fluorescence-based systems. Analytical approaches such as chemical analysis for the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or monitoring of electrical conductivity of the water surface may also provide a warning that hydrocarbons have been released. 12 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs

  18. Investigation of performance, noise and detectability characteristics of small-scale remotely piloted vehicle /RPV/ propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiram, D. S.; Scruggs, B. W.

    1981-10-01

    Several small-scale propeller configurations, applicable to a conceptual remotely piloted vehicle, were tested under static and simulated forward flight conditions in a wind tunnel to determine their performance, acoustic, and detectability characteristics. The propellers tested had tractor, pusher, and ducted configurations, designed to develop 4 thrust horsepower at a cruise speed of 75 knots at 4000 ft altitude and 95 F. The acoustic data were used to determine the slant range and altitude of no detection of each propeller configuration. The acoustic and detectability characteristics of small-scale propellers were found to be significantly different from those of the large-scale propellers; this is explained by low disk loading or the low operating Reynolds numbers of the propellers. An increase in forward velocity caused a significant drop in SPLs at higher harmonics of the blade passage frequency. Tip speed had a strong effect on noise and detectability in forward flight: most of the propellers were detected at either the first or second harmonic of their blade passage frequency. Three-bladed propellers were generally less detectable than twoor four-bladed propellers for most of the forward velocities. Finally, ducted and pusher propeller configurations were more detectable and less efficient than their free and tractor counterparts.

  19. Detection and classification of different liver lesions: Comparison of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI versus multiphasic spiral CT in a clinical single centre investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böttcher, Joachim [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, SRH Clinic Gera, Str. des Friedens 122, 07548 Gera (Germany); Hansch, Andreas [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena (Germany); Pfeil, Alexander [Department of Internal Medicine III, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena (Germany); Schmidt, Peter [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena (Germany); Malich, Ansgar [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Suedharz Clinic Nordhausen, Dr. Robert-Koch-Str. 39, 99734 Nordhausen (Germany); Schneeweiss, Albrecht [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena (Germany); Maurer, Martin H.; Streitparth, Florian [Department of Radiology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow Clinic, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Teichgräber, Ulf K. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena (Germany); Renz, Diane M., E-mail: diane.renz@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow Clinic, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic efficacy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) vs. multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for the detection and classification of focal liver lesions, differentiated also for lesion entity and size; a separate analysis of pre- and postcontrast images as well as T2-weighted MRI sequences of focal and exclusively solid lesions was integrated. Methods: Twenty-nine patients with 130 focal liver lesions underwent MDCT (64-detector-row; contrast medium iopromide; native, arterial, portalvenous, venous phase) and MRI (1.5-T; dynamic and tissue-specific phase 20 min after application of Gd-EOB-DTPA). Hepatic lesions were verified against a standard of reference (SOR). CT and MR images were independently analysed by four blinded radiologists on an ordinal 6-point-scale, determining lesion classification and diagnostic confidence. Results: Among 130 lesions, 68 were classified as malignant and 62 as benign by SOR. The detection of malignant and benign lesions differed significantly between combined and postcontrast MRI vs. MDCT; overall detection rate was 91.5% for combined MRI and 80.4% for combined MDCT (p < 0.05). Considering all four readers together, combined MDCT achieved sensitivity of 66.2%, specificity of 79.0%, and diagnostic accuracy of 72.3%; combined MRI reached superior diagnostic efficacy: sensitivity 86.8%, specificity 94.4%, accuracy 90.4% (p < 0.05). Differentiated for lesion size, in particular lesions <20 mm revealed diagnostic benefit by MRI. Postcontrast MRI also achieved higher overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy compared to postcontrast MDCT for focal and exclusively solid liver lesions (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Combined and postcontrast Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI provided significantly higher overall detection rate and diagnostic accuracy, including low inter-observer variability, compared to MDCT in a single centre study.

  20. Detection and classification of different liver lesions: Comparison of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI versus multiphasic spiral CT in a clinical single centre investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic efficacy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) vs. multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for the detection and classification of focal liver lesions, differentiated also for lesion entity and size; a separate analysis of pre- and postcontrast images as well as T2-weighted MRI sequences of focal and exclusively solid lesions was integrated. Methods: Twenty-nine patients with 130 focal liver lesions underwent MDCT (64-detector-row; contrast medium iopromide; native, arterial, portalvenous, venous phase) and MRI (1.5-T; dynamic and tissue-specific phase 20 min after application of Gd-EOB-DTPA). Hepatic lesions were verified against a standard of reference (SOR). CT and MR images were independently analysed by four blinded radiologists on an ordinal 6-point-scale, determining lesion classification and diagnostic confidence. Results: Among 130 lesions, 68 were classified as malignant and 62 as benign by SOR. The detection of malignant and benign lesions differed significantly between combined and postcontrast MRI vs. MDCT; overall detection rate was 91.5% for combined MRI and 80.4% for combined MDCT (p < 0.05). Considering all four readers together, combined MDCT achieved sensitivity of 66.2%, specificity of 79.0%, and diagnostic accuracy of 72.3%; combined MRI reached superior diagnostic efficacy: sensitivity 86.8%, specificity 94.4%, accuracy 90.4% (p < 0.05). Differentiated for lesion size, in particular lesions <20 mm revealed diagnostic benefit by MRI. Postcontrast MRI also achieved higher overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy compared to postcontrast MDCT for focal and exclusively solid liver lesions (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Combined and postcontrast Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI provided significantly higher overall detection rate and diagnostic accuracy, including low inter-observer variability, compared to MDCT in a single centre study

  1. Change detection studies in coastal zone features of Goa, India by remote sensing

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ManiMurali, R.; Vethamony, P.; Saran, A.K.; Jayakumar, S.

    - cover pattern in the co m ing years. In the pr e sent study, an attempt has been made to carry out change detection analysis for the coastal zone of Goa. For this purpose, available cloud - free remote sen s ing data have been subject ed... identifying dif fe r ent features for training the computer. The MLC was applied on all the scenes by using PCIWORKS Ver 7.0 software. Param e ters for the classification are in - built alg o rithms of the PCIWORKS software. Detailed description is avai l...

  2. Use of an Eye-Safe, Portable LIDAR for Remote Wildland Fire and Smoke Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MATTHEW, PARKER

    2004-11-29

    During periods of drought when surface water supplies are severely limited, wildland forest fires tend to become more frequent and often can grow into major fires that threaten valuable timber, real estate, and even human lives. Fire-fighting crews are critically dependent upon accurate and timely weather data to help ensure that individuals are not inadvertently exposed to dangerous conditions and to enhance normal fire-fighting activities. To that end, the use of an eye-safe, portable lidar for remote wildland fire and smoke detection is described.

  3. Technology Gap Analysis for the Detection of Process Signatures Using Less Than Remote Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, John S.; Atkinson, David A.; Lind, Michael A.; Maughan, A. D.; Kelly, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Although remote sensing methods offer advantages for monitoring important illicit process activities, remote and stand-off technologies cannot successfully detect all important processes with the sensitivity and certainty that is desired. The main scope of the program is observables, with a primary focus on chemical signatures. A number of key process signatures elude remote or stand-off detection for a variety of reasons (e.g., heavy particulate emissions that do not propagate far enough for detection at stand-off distances, semi-volatile chemicals that do not tend to vaporize and remain in the environment near the source, etc.). Some of these compounds can provide persistent, process-specific information that is not available through remote techniques; however, the associated measurement technologies have their own set of advantages, disadvantages and technical challenges that may need to be overcome before additional signature data can be effectively and reliably exploited. The main objective of this report is to describe a process to identify high impact technology gaps for important less-than-remote detection applications. The subsequent analysis focuses on the technology development needed to enable exploitation of important process signatures. The evaluation process that was developed involves three interrelated and often conflicting requirements generation activities: • Identification of target signature chemicals with unique intelligence value and their associated attributes as mitigated by environmentally influenced fate and transport effects (i.e., what can you expect to actually find that has intelligence value, where do you need to look for it and what sensitivity and selectivity do you need to see it) • Identification of end-user deployment scenario possibilities and constraints with a focus on alternative detection requirements, timing issues, logistical consideration, and training requirements for a successful measurement • Identification of available measurement technology alternatives and their associated attributes (available off-the-shelf, in near-term development, likely longer-term development and research-phase possibilities). Assembling these requirements into attribute verses generic acceptance criteria level tables and then comparing related attributes between tables allows for rapid visualization of technology gaps and gross estimates of the gap size. By simply weighting the attributes and the requirements in various ways one can also derive the importance of the identified technology gaps. This output can provide the basis for both a near-term technology development roadmap and research focus as well as a decision support tool for selecting the “most likely to succeed” approach. The evaluation process as presented is generally applicable for the determination of measurement technology gaps for a broad range of applications [e.g., nuclear weapons process, chemical weapons production, biological weapons production as well as classical signature categories (e.g., chemical and radionuclide signatures)]. In this paper the method is applied to the specific case of detecting nuclear weapons production processes using semi-volatile chemical signatures as an illustration. This particular case selection allows the leveraging of significant prior knowledge and experience while still being highly relevant to current detection scenario needs.

  4. Remote Field Eddy Current Probes for the Detection of Stress Corrosion in Transmission Pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plamen Alexandroz Ivanov

    2002-08-27

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) is a technique used widely in non-destructive testing (NDT) of natural gas and petroleum transmission pipelines. This inspection method relies on magnetizing the pipe-wall in axial direction. The MFL inspection tool is equipped with an array of Hall sensors located around the circumference of the pipe, which registers the flux leakage caused by any defects present in the pipe-wall. Currently, the tool magnetizes the pipewall in axial direction making it largely insensitive to axially oriented defects. One type of defect, which is of a growing concern in the gas and petroleum industry is the stress corrosion crack (SCC). The SCCs are a result of aging, corrosion, fatigue and thermal stresses. SCCs are predominantly axially oriented and are extremely tight, which makes them impossible to be detected using current inspection technology. A possible solution to this problem is to utilize the remote field eddy current (RFEC) effect to detect axially oriented defects. The RFEC method has been widely used in industry in the inspection of tubular products. The method uses a pair of excitation and pick-up coils. The pick-up coil located in the remote field region, usually two, three pipe-diameters away from the excitation coil. With RFEC the presence of defects is detected by the disturbance in the phase of the signal measured by the pick-up coil relative to that of the excitation coil. Unlike conventional eddy current testing the RFEC method is sensitive to defects on the exterior of the inspected product, which makes it a good candidate for the development of in-line inspection technology. This work focuses on the development of non-destructive testing technique, which uses remote field eddy currents induced by rotating magnetic field (RMF). A major advantage of the RMF is that it makes possible to not only detect a defect but also localize its position in circumferential direction. Also, it could potentially allow detection of defects, regardless of their shape and orientation. In this work the RFEC-RMF technique is investigated and is shown to be a useful tool in the detection of axially oriented, circumferentially oriented and skewed notches, SCCs and round defects. Finally, a data acquisition system is designed, capable of performing the RFEC-RMF measurements automatically.

  5. Airport detection in remote sensing images: a method based on saliency map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Lv, Qi; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Liming

    2013-04-01

    The detection of airport attracts lots of attention and becomes a hot topic recently because of its applications and importance in military and civil aviation fields. However, the complicated background around airports brings much difficulty into the detection. This paper presents a new method for airport detection in remote sensing images. Distinct from other methods which analyze images pixel by pixel, we introduce visual attention mechanism into detection of airport and improve the efficiency of detection greatly. Firstly, Hough transform is used to judge whether an airport exists in an image. Then an improved graph-based visual saliency model is applied to compute the saliency map and extract regions of interest (ROIs). The airport target is finally detected according to the scale-invariant feature transform features which are extracted from each ROI and classified by hierarchical discriminant regression tree. Experimental results show that the proposed method is faster and more accurate than existing methods, and has lower false alarm rate and better anti-noise performance simultaneously. PMID:24427198

  6. Fast Occlusion and Shadow Detection for High Resolution Remote Sensing Image Combined with LIDAR Point Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Li, X.

    2012-08-01

    The orthophoto is an important component of GIS database and has been applied in many fields. But occlusion and shadow causes the loss of feature information which has a great effect on the quality of images. One of the critical steps in true orthophoto generation is the detection of occlusion and shadow. Nowadays LiDAR can obtain the digital surface model (DSM) directly. Combined with this technology, image occlusion and shadow can be detected automatically. In this paper, the Z-Buffer is applied for occlusion detection. The shadow detection can be regarded as a same problem with occlusion detection considering the angle between the sun and the camera. However, the Z-Buffer algorithm is computationally expensive. And the volume of scanned data and remote sensing images is very large. Efficient algorithm is another challenge. Modern graphics processing unit (GPU) is much more powerful than central processing unit (CPU). We introduce this technology to speed up the Z-Buffer algorithm and get 7 times increase in speed compared with CPU. The results of experiments demonstrate that Z-Buffer algorithm plays well in occlusion and shadow detection combined with high density of point cloud and GPU can speed up the computation significantly.

  7. Additional diffusion-weighted imaging in the detection of new, very small hepatocellular carcinoma lesions after interventional therapy compared with conventional 3 T MRI alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the added value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) combined with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of new, very small hepatocellular carcinoma lesions (?1 cm) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma following interventional therapy compared to conventional MRI alone. Materials and methods: After interventional therapy, 45 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma underwent conventional MRI and DWI with a b-value of 0 and 700 s/mm2. Twenty-one new, small hepatocellular carcinoma lesions were confirmed in 16 patients at follow-up MRI. Two observers independently retrospectively analysed the two imaging sets in random order. The diagnostic performance using each imaging set was evaluated by received operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Twenty-one new, very small hepatocellular carcinoma lesions found in 16 patients was confirmed as the final result. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the DWI/conventional MRI combination (observer 1, 0.952; observer 2, 0.976) and conventional MRI images alone (observer 1, 0.905; observer 2, 0.905) were statistically significant. The kappa value of the DWI/conventional MRI combination was 0.884, and that of conventional MRI was 0.722. Among the 21 lesions, 100% (21/21) of the lesions were both recognized by two independent reviewers on DWI, while only 76% (16/21) and 71% (15/21) of the lesions were regarded as very small hepatocellular carcinomas on conventional MRI. Conclusion: Due to the higher detection rate of new subcentimetre lesions in hepatocellular carcinoma patients following interventional therapy, DWI could be considered complementary to conventional MRI in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. Additional diffusion-weighted imaging in the detection of new, very small hepatocellular carcinoma lesions after interventional therapy compared with conventional 3 T MRI alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, J.-R [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Li, H.-L, E-mail: doctor_hnchr@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Shao, N.-N; Li, X. [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Yan, G.-L [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Basic Medicine, Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhengzhou (China); Zhang, H.-K; Luo, J.-P; Zhang, S.-N; Li, Y.-L; Liu, C.-C [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China)

    2012-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the added value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) combined with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of new, very small hepatocellular carcinoma lesions ({<=}1 cm) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma following interventional therapy compared to conventional MRI alone. Materials and methods: After interventional therapy, 45 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma underwent conventional MRI and DWI with a b-value of 0 and 700 s/mm{sup 2}. Twenty-one new, small hepatocellular carcinoma lesions were confirmed in 16 patients at follow-up MRI. Two observers independently retrospectively analysed the two imaging sets in random order. The diagnostic performance using each imaging set was evaluated by received operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Twenty-one new, very small hepatocellular carcinoma lesions found in 16 patients was confirmed as the final result. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the DWI/conventional MRI combination (observer 1, 0.952; observer 2, 0.976) and conventional MRI images alone (observer 1, 0.905; observer 2, 0.905) were statistically significant. The kappa value of the DWI/conventional MRI combination was 0.884, and that of conventional MRI was 0.722. Among the 21 lesions, 100% (21/21) of the lesions were both recognized by two independent reviewers on DWI, while only 76% (16/21) and 71% (15/21) of the lesions were regarded as very small hepatocellular carcinomas on conventional MRI. Conclusion: Due to the higher detection rate of new subcentimetre lesions in hepatocellular carcinoma patients following interventional therapy, DWI could be considered complementary to conventional MRI in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Feasibility study of contaminant detection for food with ULF-NMR/MRI system using HTS-SQUID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Tsunaki, Shingo; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Abe, Takayuki; Hatta, Junichi; Tanaka, Saburo

    2013-11-01

    We have developed an ultra-low frequency (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system utilizing an HTS-SQUID for an application of contaminant detection in food and drink. In the system, a permanent magnet of 1.1 T was used to pre-polarize protons in a water sample. We measured NMR signals from water samples with or without various contaminants, such as stainless steel (SUS304), aluminum, and glass balls using the system. In the case that the contaminant was the SUS304 ball, the NMR signal intensity was reduced compared to that from the sample without the contaminant due to the remnant field of the contaminant. One-dimensional (1D) MRIs of the samples were also acquired to detect non-magnetic contaminants. In the 1D MRIs, changes of the MRI spectra were detected, corresponding to positions of the contaminants. These results show that the feasibility of the system to detect various contaminants in foods.

  10. Tumorsize dependent detection rate of endorectal MRI of prostate cancer-A histopathologic correlation with whole-mount sections in 70 patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roethke, Matthias C., E-mail: Matthias.roethke@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Lichy, Matthias P.; Jurgschat, Leo [Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Hennenlotter, Joerg [Departments of Urology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Vogel, Ulrich [Departments of Pathology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Schilling, David; Stenzl, Arnulf [Departments of Urology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, Claus D.; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of T2w endorectal MRI (eMRI) for correct detection of tumor foci within the prostate regarding tumor size. Materials and Methods: 70 patients with histologically proven prostate cancer were examined with T2w eMRI before radical prostatectomy at a 1.5 T scanner. For evaluation of eMRI, two radiologists evaluated each tumor focus within the gland. After radical prostatectomy, the prostates were prepared as whole-mount sections, according to transversal T2w eMRI. For each slice, tumor surroundings were marked and compared with eMRI. Based on whole-mount section, 315 slices were evaluated and 533 tumor lesions were documented. Results: Based on the T2w eMRI, 213 tumor lesions were described. In 137/213, histology could prove these lesions. EMRI was able to visualize 0/56 lesions with a maximum size of <0.3 cm (detection rate 0%), between 0.3 and 0.5 cm 4/116 (3%), between 1 and 0.5 cm 22/169 (13%), between 2 and 1 cm 61/136 (45%) and for >2 cm 50/56 (89%). False positive eMRI findings were: <0.3 cm n = 0, 0.5-0.3 cm n = 12, 0.5-1 cm n = 34, 1-2 cm n = 28 and >2 cm n = 2. Conclusion: T2w eMRI cannot exclude prostate cancer with lesions smaller 10 mm and 0.4 cm{sup 3} respectively. The detection rate for lesions more than 20 mm (1.6 cm{sup 3}) is to be considered as high.

  11. Cloud Detection Method Based on Feature Extraction in Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changhui, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Minjing, M.; Menglu, Z.

    2013-05-01

    In remote sensing images, the existence of the clouds has a great impact on the image quality and subsequent image processing, as the images covered with clouds contain little useful information. Therefore, the detection and recognition of clouds is one of the major problems in the application of remote sensing images. Present there are two categories of method to cloud detection. One is setting spectrum thresholds based on the characteristics of the clouds to distinguish them. However, the instability and uncertainty of the practical clouds makes this kind of method complexity and weak adaptability. The other method adopts the features in the images to identify the clouds. Since there will be significant overlaps in some features of the clouds and grounds, the detection result is highly dependent on the effectiveness of the features. This paper presented a cloud detection method based on feature extraction for remote sensing images. At first, find out effective features through training pattern, the features are selected from gray, frequency and texture domains. The different features in the three domains of the training samples are calculated. Through the result of statistical analysis of all the features, the useful features are picked up to form a feature set. In concrete, the set includes three feature vectors, respectively, the gray feature vector constituted of average gray, variance, first-order difference, entropy and histogram, the frequency feature vector constituted of DCT high frequency coefficient and wavelet high frequency coefficient, and the texture feature vector constituted of the hybrid entropy and difference of the gray-gradient co-occurrence matrix and the image fractal dimension. Secondly, a thumbnail will be obtained by down sampling the original image and its features of gray, frequency and texture are computed. Last but not least, the cloud region will be judged by the comparison between the actual feature values and the thresholds determined by the sample training process. Experimental results show that the clouds and ground objects can be separated efficiently, and our method can implement rapid clouds detection and cloudiness calculation.

  12. Optimizing Patient Population for MP-MRI and Fusion Biopsy for Prostate Cancer Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Thomas P; Pinto, Peter A; George, Arvin K

    2015-07-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer continue to evolve with advances in science and technology. The utilization of multiparametric MRI (mp-MRI) to identify lesions in the prostate has given clinicians the ability to visualize malignancy in the prostate with greater confidence. With this new ability came the advancement of fusion biopsy platforms, which allow for direct targeting of these lesions. As with any new technology in medicine, the proper use of these modalities and how they fit into current clinical practice need to be addressed. This review summarizes the current knowledge on how to best optimize which men undergo mp-MRI and fusion biopsies both in the screening and treatment settings. PMID:26063625

  13. A Remote Sensor for Detecting Methane Based on Palladium-Decorated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guomin Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID, and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 µm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI and the comparative analog identifier (?AID. Results validate the sensor’s ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ?AID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm.

  14. Protein Remote Homology Detection and Fold Recognition based on Features Extracted from Frequency Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Lin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein remote homology detection and fold recognition are central problems in bioinformatics. Currently, discriminative methods based on support vector machine (SVM are the most effective and accurate methods for solving these problems. The performance of SVM depends on the method of protein vectorization, so a suitable representation of the protein sequence is a key step for the SVM-based methods. In this paper, two kinds of profile-level building blocks of proteins, binary profiles and N-nary profiles, have been presented, which contain the evolutionary information of the protein sequence frequency profile. The protein sequence frequency profiles calculated from the multiple sequence alignments outputted by PSI-BLAST are converted into binary profiles or N-nary profiles. The protein sequences are transformed into fixed-dimension feature vectors by the occurrence times of each binary profile or N-nary profile and then the corresponding vectors are inputted to support vector machines. The latent semantic analysis (LSA model, an efficient feature extraction algorithm, is adopted to further improve the performance of our methods. Experiments with protein remote homology detection and fold recognition show that the methods based on profile-level building blocks give better results compared to related methods.

  15. Lake Storage Change Automatic Detection by Multi-source Remote Sensing without Underwater Terrain Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Changming

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on lake underwater terrain unknown and dynamic storage that is difficult to obtain by the traditional methods, a new method is proposed for lake dynamic storage estimation by multi-source and multi-temporal remote sensing without underwater terrain data. The details are as follows. Firstly, extraction dynamic lake boundary through steps by steps adaptive iteration water body detection algorithm from multi-temporal remote sensing imagery. And then, retrieve water level information from ICESat GLAS laser point data. Thirdly, comprehensive utilizing lake area and elevation data, the lake boundary is converted to contour of water by the water level is assigned to the lake boundary line, according to the time and water level information. Fourthly, through the contour line construction TIN (triangulated irregular network model and Kriging interpolation, it is gotten that the simulated three-dimensional lake digital elevation model. Finally, on the basis of simulated DEM, it is calculated that the dynamic lake volume, lake area distribution and water level information. The Bosten lake is selected as a case studying to verify the algorithm. The area and dynamic water storage variations of Bosten lake are detected since 2000. The results show that, the maximum error is 2.21× 108 m3, the minimum error is 0.00002× 108 m3, the average error is 0.044×108 m3, the root mean square is 0.59 and the correlation coefficient reached 0.99.

  16. Motif kernel generated by genetic programming improves remote homology and fold detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sætrom Pål

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein remote homology detection is a central problem in computational biology. Most recent methods train support vector machines to discriminate between related and unrelated sequences and these studies have introduced several types of kernels. One successful approach is to base a kernel on shared occurrences of discrete sequence motifs. Still, many protein sequences fail to be classified correctly for a lack of a suitable set of motifs for these sequences. Results We introduce the GPkernel, which is a motif kernel based on discrete sequence motifs where the motifs are evolved using genetic programming. All proteins can be grouped according to evolutionary relations and structure, and the method uses this inherent structure to create groups of motifs that discriminate between different families of evolutionary origin. When tested on two SCOP benchmarks, the superfamily and fold recognition problems, the GPkernel gives significantly better results compared to related methods of remote homology detection. Conclusion The GPkernel gives particularly good results on the more difficult fold recognition problem compared to the other methods. This is mainly because the method creates motif sets that describe similarities among subgroups of both the related and unrelated proteins. This rich set of motifs give a better description of the similarities and differences between different folds than do previous motif-based methods.

  17. Machine learning algorithm accurately detects fMRI signature of vulnerability to major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, João R; Moll, Jorge; Green, Sophie; Deakin, John F W; Thomaz, Carlos E; Zahn, Roland

    2015-08-30

    Standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analyses cannot assess the potential of a neuroimaging signature as a biomarker to predict individual vulnerability to major depression (MD). Here, we use machine learning for the first time to address this question. Using a recently identified neural signature of guilt-selective functional disconnection, the classification algorithm was able to distinguish remitted MD from control participants with 78.3% accuracy. This demonstrates the high potential of our fMRI signature as a biomarker of MD vulnerability. PMID:26187550

  18. CLINICALLY LOCALIZED PROSTATE CANCER: CAPACITIES OF MATRIX COIL MRI TO DETECT MINIMAL EXTRACAPSULAR TUMOR SPREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Petrova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Retrospective assessment of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data in 37 patients with prostate cancer, who had undergone radical prostatectomy, established the most diagnostically valuable MRI signs of minimal extracapsular spread (ECS: asymmetry of neurovascular fascicles (72 % accuracy, 93 % sensitivity, 77 % specificity, 73 % positive and 94% negative predictive values and iron outline deformity/irregularity (66/80/64/60/82 %, respectively; as well as their higher diagnostic efficiency versus the clinical and laboratory predictors of ECS: total Gleason scores (58/87/55/57/86 %, respectively and serum PSA levels (uninformative, which permits their consideration while choosing a more or less radical prostatectomy modality.

  19. Early detection by MRI and conservative therapy of lumbar spondylolysis in the growing period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Tohru; Namba, Hiromichi; Kasai, Tsutomu; Ohta, Susumu [Yoshida Orthopaedic Hospital, Toyota, Aichi (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    Since 1991 the early cases of spondylolysis in the growing stage have been diagnosed with MRI and treated conservatively by the authors. The final results were obtained in 153 cases (207 arches). The fusion rate of the separated part of these arches was 82% of the total. Treatment consisted mainly of prohibition of exercise and wearing a hard brace. The brace was more effective when worn not only during the day but also throughout the night. On MRI T{sub 1}-weighted images low signal intensity changes of the pars interarticularis proved that bony fusion had been attained with conservative therapy. (author)

  20. A suspicious breast lesion detected by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and pathologically confirmed as capillary hemangioma: A case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast capillary hemangioma is a type of benign vascular tumor which is rarely seen. Little is known about its presentation on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we describe a case of suspicious breast lesion detected by DCE-MRI and pathologically confirmed as capillary hemangioma. Our case indicates that a small mass with a superficial location, clear boundary, and homogeneous enhancement on DCE-MRI indicates the possible diagnosis of hemangioma, whereby even the lesion presents a washout type curve.

  1. A suspicious breast lesion detected by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and pathologically confirmed as capillary hemangioma: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lian He; Li, Qing Chang; Xu, Hong Tao; Wang, Xin; Wang, En Hua [The First Affiliated Hospital and College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Ma, Shuang [Dept. of Neurology, Sheng Jing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China)

    2013-12-15

    Breast capillary hemangioma is a type of benign vascular tumor which is rarely seen. Little is known about its presentation on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we describe a case of suspicious breast lesion detected by DCE-MRI and pathologically confirmed as capillary hemangioma. Our case indicates that a small mass with a superficial location, clear boundary, and homogeneous enhancement on DCE-MRI indicates the possible diagnosis of hemangioma, whereby even the lesion presents a washout type curve.

  2. Detecting Static and Dynamic Differences between Eyes-Closed and Eyes-Open Resting States Using ASL and BOLD fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Qihong; Yuan, Bin-Ke; Gu, Hong; Liu, Dongqiang; Wang, Danny J.J.; Gao, Jia-Hong; Yang, Yihong; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI studies have increasingly focused on multi-contrast techniques, such as BOLD and ASL imaging. However, these techniques may reveal different aspects of brain activity (e.g., static vs. dynamic), and little is known about the similarity or disparity of these techniques in detecting resting-state brain activity. It is therefore important to assess the static and dynamic characteristics of these fMRI techniques to guide future applications. Here we acquired fMRI data while sub...

  3. Mixture-Tuned, Clutter Matched Filter for Remote Detection of Subpixel Spectral Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R.; Mandrake, Lukas; Green, Robert O.

    2013-01-01

    Mapping localized spectral features in large images demands sensitive and robust detection algorithms. Two aspects of large images that can harm matched-filter detection performance are addressed simultaneously. First, multimodal backgrounds may thwart the typical Gaussian model. Second, outlier features can trigger false detections from large projections onto the target vector. Two state-of-the-art approaches are combined that independently address outlier false positives and multimodal backgrounds. The background clustering models multimodal backgrounds, and the mixture tuned matched filter (MT-MF) addresses outliers. Combining the two methods captures significant additional performance benefits. The resulting mixture tuned clutter matched filter (MT-CMF) shows effective performance on simulated and airborne datasets. The classical MNF transform was applied, followed by k-means clustering. Then, each cluster s mean, covariance, and the corresponding eigenvalues were estimated. This yields a cluster-specific matched filter estimate as well as a cluster- specific feasibility score to flag outlier false positives. The technology described is a proof of concept that may be employed in future target detection and mapping applications for remote imaging spectrometers. It is of most direct relevance to JPL proposals for airborne and orbital hyperspectral instruments. Applications include subpixel target detection in hyperspectral scenes for military surveillance. Earth science applications include mineralogical mapping, species discrimination for ecosystem health monitoring, and land use classification.

  4. Empirical evaluation of bias field correction algorithms for computer-aided detection of prostate cancer on T2w MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Satish; Palumbo, Daniel; Chappelow, Jonathan; Patel, Pratik; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elizabeth; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intensity inhomogeneity refers to an acquisition artifact which introduces a non-linear variation in the signal intensities within the image. Intensity inhomogeneity is known to significantly affect computerized analysis of MRI data (such as automated segmentation or classification procedures), hence requiring the application of bias field correction (BFC) algorithms to account for this artifact. Quantitative evaluation of BFC schemes is typically performed using generalized intensity-based measures (percent coefficient of variation, %CV ) or information-theoretic measures (entropy). While some investigators have previously empirically compared BFC schemes in the context of different domains (using changes in %CV and entropy to quantify improvements), no consensus has emerged as to the best BFC scheme for any given application. The motivation for this work is that the choice of a BFC scheme for a given application should be dictated by application-specific measures rather than ad hoc measures such as entropy and %CV. In this paper, we have attempted to address the problem of determining an optimal BFC algorithm in the context of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for prostate cancer (CaP) detection from T2-weighted (T2w) MRI. One goal of this work is to identify a BFC algorithm that will maximize the CaP classification accuracy (measured in terms of the area under the ROC curve or AUC). A secondary aim of our work is to determine whether measures such as %CV and entropy are correlated with a classifier-based objective measure (AUC). Determining the presence or absence of these correlations is important to understand whether domain independent BFC performance measures such as %CV , entropy should be used to identify the optimal BFC scheme for any given application. In order to answer these questions, we quantitatively compared 3 different popular BFC algorithms on a cohort of 10 clinical 3 Tesla prostate T2w MRI datasets (comprising 39 2D MRI slices): N3 , PABIC, and the method of Cohen et al. Results of BFC via each of the algorithms was evaluated in terms of %CV , entropy, as well as classifier AUC for CaP detection from T2w MRI. The CaP classifier was trained and evaluated on a per-pixel basis using annotations of CaP obtained via registration of T2w MRI and ex vivo whole-mount histology sections. Our results revealed that different BFC schemes resulted in a maximization of different performance measures, that is, the BFC scheme identified by minimization of %CV and entropy was not the one that maximized AUC as well. Moreover, existing BFC evaluation measures (%CV , entropy) did not correlate with AUC (application-based evaluation), but did correlate with each other, suggesting that domain-specific performance measures should be considered in making a decision regarding choice of appropriate BFC scheme. Our results also revealed that N3 provided the best correction of bias field artifacts in prostate MRI data, when the goal was to identify prostate cancer.

  5. Novel MRI methodology to detect human whole-brain connectivity changes after ingestion of fructose or glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Wilkins, Bryce; Page, Kathleen A.; Singh, Manbir

    2012-03-01

    A novel MRI protocol has been developed to investigate the differential effects of glucose or fructose consumption on whole-brain functional brain connectivity. A previous study has reported a decrease in the fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal of the hypothalamus following glucose ingestion, but due to technical limitations, was restricted to a single slice covering the hypothalamus, and thus unable to detect whole-brain connectivity. In another previous study, a protocol was devised to acquire whole-brain fMRI data following food intake, but only after restricting image acquisition to an MR sampling or repetition time (TR) of 20s, making the protocol unsuitable to detect functional connectivity above 0.025Hz. We have successfully implemented a continuous 36-min, 40 contiguous slices, whole-brain BOLD acquisition protocol on a 3T scanner with TR=4.5s to ensure detection of up to 0.1Hz frequencies for whole-brain functional connectivity analysis. Human data were acquired first with ingestion of water only, followed by a glucose or fructose drink within the scanner, without interrupting the scanning. Whole-brain connectivity was analyzed using standard correlation methodology in the 0.01-0.1 Hz range. The correlation coefficient differences between fructose and glucose ingestion among targeted regions were converted to t-scores using the water-only correlation coefficients as a null condition. Results show a dramatic increase in the hypothalamic connectivity to the hippocampus, amygdala, insula, caudate and the nucleus accumben for fructose over glucose. As these regions are known to be key components of the feeding and reward brain circuits, these results suggest a preference for fructose ingestion.

  6. Comparison of abdominal MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging to {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Schmid-Tannwald, Christoph M.; Neumann, Ralph; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schramm, Nicolai; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Rist, Carsten [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Morelli, John N. [Scott and White Hospital Temple, Department of Radiology, Temple, TX (United States); Haug, Alexander R.; Jansen, Nathalie [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW MRI), and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the detection of intermediate to well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the pancreas. Eighteen patients with pathologically proven pancreatic NET who underwent MRI including DW MRI and PET/CT within 6 weeks of each other were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists evaluated T2-weighted (T2w), T2w + DW MRI, T2w + contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (CE T1w) MR images, and PET/CT for NET detection. The sensitivity and level of diagnostic confidence were compared among modalities using McNemar's test and a Wilcoxon signed rank test. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) of pancreatic NETs and normal pancreatic tissue were compared with Student's t test. Of the NETs, 8/23 (34.8 %) and 9/23 (39.1 %) were detected on T2w images by observers 1 and 2, respectively. Detection rates improved significantly by combining T2w images with DW MRI (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05) or CE T1w images (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05). Detection rates of pancreatic NET with PET/CT (both observers: 23/23 = 100 %) were statistically significantly higher than with MRI (p < 0.05). The mean ADC value of NET (1.02 {+-} 0.26 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) was statistically significantly lower than that of normal pancreatic tissue (1.48 {+-} 0.39 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). DW MRI is a valuable adjunct to T2w imaging and comparable to CE T1w imaging in pancreatic NET detection, quantitatively differentiating between NET and normal pancreatic tissue with ADC measurements. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is more sensitive than MRI in the detection of pancreatic NET. (orig.)

  7. Integrated microchip incorporating atomic magnetometer and microfluidic channel for NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Micah P. (Oakland, CA); Savukov, Igor M. (Los Alamos, NM); Budker, Dmitry (El Cerrito, CA); Shah, Vishal K. (Plainsboro, NJ); Knappe, Svenja (Boulder, CO); Kitching, John (Boulder, CO); Michalak, David J. (Berkeley, CA); Xu, Shoujun (Houston, TX); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-08-09

    An integral microfluidic device includes an alkali vapor cell and microfluidic channel, which can be used to detect magnetism for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Small magnetic fields in the vicinity of the vapor cell can be measured by optically polarizing and probing the spin precession in the small magnetic field. This can then be used to detect the magnetic field of in encoded analyte in the adjacent microfluidic channel. The magnetism in the microfluidic channel can be modulated by applying an appropriate series of radio or audio frequency pulses upstream from the microfluidic chip (the remote detection modality) to yield a sensitive means of detecting NMR and MRI.

  8. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI in the detection of spinal arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteriovenous fistulae and malformations (AVFs and AVMs) of the spinal cord are rare, potentially treatable causes of progressive disability. Although a variety of MRI abnormalities has been described, the diagnosis rests on the findings on selective spinal angiography. Collecting T2'-weighted MR images during the passage of a gadolinium bolus gives information about perfusion and blood volume. We carried out dynamic MRI in seven patients with vascular abnormalities (5 dural AVFs, 1 intramedullary AVM, 1 cryptic angioma) and in two patients without an AVM. High resolution T1- and T2-weighted sagittal images of the whole spinal cord were first obtained using a multiarray receiver coil. Sagittal radiofrequency spoilt gradient echo images (GE34/25, flip angle 10 ) were then obtained during bolus injection of gadolinium-DTPA. Abnormalities were seen in all seven patients with AVFs or AVMs. In the patient with an intramedullary AVM and four of the five with dural AVFs transient signal reduction was seen within the perimedullary venous plexus during passage of the bolus. The findings correlated well with those from selective spinal angiography. We conclude that dynamic MRI offers a useful adjunct to angiography and may localise an arteriovenous shunt when conventional MRI fails to do so. In combination with high-resolution imaging of the entire spinal cord the technique may make myelography redundant; it is simple, well tolerated and can be carried out without significant time penalty. (orig.)

  9. Automatic Bright Circular Type Oil Tank Detection Using Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar Kushwaha

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Automatic target detection like oil tank from satellite based remote sensing imagery is one of the important domains in many civilian and military applications. This could be used for disaster monitoring, oil leakage, etc. We present an automatic approach for detection of circular shaped bright oil tanks with high accuracy. The image is first enhanced to emphasize the bright objects using a morphological approach. Then, the enhanced image is segmented using split-and-merge segmentation technique.  Here, we introduce a knowledge base strategy based on the region removal technique and spatial relationship operation for detection of possible oil tanks from the segmented image using minimal spanning tree. Lastly, we introduce a supervised classifier, for identification of oil tanks, based on the knowledge database of large amount data of oil tanks. The uniqueness of the proposed technique is that it is useful for detection bright oil tanks from high as well as low resolution images, but the technique is always better for high-resolution imagery. We have systematically evaluated the algorithm on different satellite images like IRS – 1C, IKONOS, QuickBird and CARTOSAT – 2A. The proposed technique is detected bright structures but unable to detect the dark structure. If the oil tank structures are bright relative to the background illumination in the image then the detection accuracy by the proposed technique for the high resolution image is more than 95 per cent.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(3, pp.298-304, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.2737

  10. Coal fires in Northwest China. Detection, monitoring, and prediction using remote sensing data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal fires in China occur within a region that stretches over 5,000 km in the east- western part and 750 km. in the north-southern part. These fires cause an economic and environmental threat by making a significant contribution to the global CO2 budget. The studies made in this thesis can be divided into two parts. Part one is based on field work and laboratory analysis that includes the dating of the paleo coal fires; part two concerns remote sensing applications for the active coal fires. In Chapter 2, the evolution of the paleo coal fires in Toutunhe and Xinjiang areas are studied. Several age groups of burnt rock have been recognized and their relationships with the river terraces will be discussed. The causes of the paleo coal fires are addressed, and the areas of coal fires with different ages have been dated. In Chapter 3, the physical basis of thermal infrared remote sensing for the detection and measurement of coal fires are addressed with an emphasis on the spatial, spectral, and radiometric resolution. In Chapter 4, a method to reduce the effect of solar heating, the main factor of confusion when investigating the thermal anomalies of coal fires, is discussed with the help of a DEM. In Chapter 5, as the coal fires normally occupy only part of one pixel of the Landsat TM thermal channel data, the capability of sub pixel coal fire detection is addressed. In Chapter 6, the airborne data from different wavelengths acquired at different times are studied to analyze the spatial thermal characteristics of the coal fires. Spreading direction and different types of coal fires are studied. Chapter 7 presents, based on multi-sensor data fusion techniques, a hierarchical methodology for detection and monitoring of the coal fires. 120 refs

  11. Intrusion detection capabilities of smart video: Collaborative efforts to improve remote monitoring for safeguards surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadner, S.P.; Ondrik, M. [Aquila Technologies Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reisman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Collaborative efforts between the International Projects Division (IPD) of the Department of Advanced Technology at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Aquila Technologies Group, Inc. (Aquila), and the General Physics Institute (GPI) in Moscow have developed object recognition technologies to provide real-time intrusion detection capabilities for Aquila`s GEMINI Digital Surveillance System. The research, development and testing for integrating enhanced surveillance capabilities into Aquila`s GEMINI system will receive support from the US Industry Coalition (USIC), an initiative funded by the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP), in the coming year. Oversight of the research and development effort is being provided by the IPD staff to ensure that the technical standards of safeguards systems for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are met. The scientific expertise at GPI is providing breakthroughs in the realm of motion detection for surveillance. Aquila`s contribution to the project focuses on the integration of authenticated digital camera technology for front-end detection. This project illustrates how the application of technology can increase efficiency and reliability of remote monitoring, as well as the timely detection of Safeguards-significant events.

  12. Intrusion detection capabilities of smart video: Collaborative efforts to improve remote monitoring for safeguards surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collaborative efforts between the International Projects Division (IPD) of the Department of Advanced Technology at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Aquila Technologies Group, Inc. (Aquila), and the General Physics Institute (GPI) in Moscow have developed object recognition technologies to provide real-time intrusion detection capabilities for Aquila''s GEMINI Digital Surveillance System. The research, development and testing for integrating enhanced surveillance capabilities into Aquila''s GEMINI system will receive support from the US Industry Coalition (USIC), an initiative funded by the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP), in the coming year. Oversight of the research and development effort is being provided by the IPD staff to ensure that the technical standards of safeguards systems for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are met. The scientific expertise at GPI is providing breakthroughs in the realm of motion detection for surveillance. Aquila''s contribution to the project focuses on the integration of authenticated digital camera technology for front-end detection. This project illustrates how the application of technology can increase efficiency and reliability of remote monitoring, as well as the timely detection of Safeguards-significant events

  13. Remote Pulsed Laser Raman Spectroscopy System for Detecting Qater, Ice, and Hydrous Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nuraul; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra; Refaat, Tamer F.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani; Sandford, Steve

    2006-01-01

    For exploration of planetary surfaces, detection of water and ice is of great interest in supporting existence of life on other planets. Therefore, a remote Raman spectroscopy system was demonstrated at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with University of Hawaii for detecting ice-water and hydrous minerals on planetary surfaces. In this study, a 532 nm pulsed laser is utilized as an excitation source to allow detection in high background radiation conditions. The Raman scattered signal is collected by a 4-inch telescope positioned in front of a spectrograph. The Raman spectrum is analyzed using a spectrograph equipped with a holographic super notch filter to eliminate Rayleigh scattering, and a holographic transmission grating that simultaneously disperses two spectral tracks onto the detector for higher spectral range. To view the spectrum, the spectrograph is coupled to an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), which allows detection of very weak Stokes line. The ICCD is operated in gated mode to further suppress effects from background radiation and long-lived fluorescence. The sample is placed at 5.6 m from the telescope, and the laser is mounted on the telescope in a coaxial geometry to achieve maximum performance. The system was calibrated using the spectral lines of a Neon lamp source. To evaluate the system, Raman standard samples such as calcite, naphthalene, acetone, and isopropyl alcohol were analyzed. The Raman evaluation technique was used to analyze water, ice and other hydrous minerals and results from these species are presented.

  14. A generic discriminative part-based model for geospatial object detection in optical remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanceng; Sun, Xian; Wang, Hongqi; Fu, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Detecting geospatial objects with complex structure has been explored for years and it is still a challenging task in high resolution optical remote sensing images (RSI) interpretation. In this paper, we mainly focus on the problem of rotation variance in detecting geospatial objects and propose a generic discriminative part-based model (GDPBM) to build a practical object detection framework. In our model, a geospatial object with arbitrary orientation is divided into several parts and represented via three terms: the appearance features, the spatial deformation features and the rotation deformation features. The appearance features characterize the local patch appearance of the object and parts, and we propose a new kind of rotation invariant feature to represent the appearance using the local intensity gradients. The spatial deformation features capture the geometric deformation of parts by representing the relative displacements among parts. The rotation deformation features define the pose variances of the parts relative to the objects based on their dominant orientations. In generating the two deformation features, we introduce the statistic methods to encode the features in the category level. Concatenating the three terms of the features, a classifier based on the support vector machine is learned to detect geospatial objects. In the experiments, two datasets in optical RSI are used to evaluate the performance of our model and the results demonstrate its robustness and effectiveness.

  15. Applying remote sensing and GIS for chimpanzee habitat change detection, behaviour and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintea, Lilian

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), our closest living relatives, are declining alarmingly in abundance and distribution all across Africa. Clearing of forests and woodlands has one of the most rapid and devastating impacts, leaving chimpanzees in isolated, small populations that face edge effects and elevated risk of extinction. Satellite imagery could be a powerful tool to map chimpanzee habitats and threats at the landscape scale even in the most remote, difficult to access areas. However, few applications exist to demonstrate how remote sensing methods can be used in Africa for chimpanzee research and conservation in practice. In chapter one, I investigate the use of Landsat MSS and ETM+ satellite imagery to monitor dry tropical forests and miombo woodlands change between 1972-1999 inside and outside Gombe National Park, Tanzania. I show that canopy cover increased in the northern and middle parts of the park but with severe canopy loss outside protected area. Deforestation has had unequal effects on the three chimpanzee communities inside the park. The Kasekela chimpanzees have been least affected by canopy loss outside the park. In contrast, the Mitumba and Kalande communities have likely lost key range areas. In chapter two, I use 25 years of data on Gombe chimpanzees to investigate to what extent vegetation variables detected from multi-temporal satellite images can be applied to understand changes in chimpanzee feeding and party size. NDVI positively correlated with the time chimpanzees spent feeding but had no affect on the average number of adult males in the party. Instead the number of males in the party increased with proximity to hostile neighboring communities. In chapter three, I use Landsat and SPOT satellite imagery as the basis for Threat Reduction Assessment to evaluate conservation outcomes of a ten year community based conservation project in Tanzania. The findings suggest that the remote sensing methods applied in this study could provide new exciting prospects for monitoring chimpanzee habitats, socioecological research and a baseline to measure our conservation success.

  16. Usefulness of MRI detection of cervical spine and brain injuries in the evaluation of abusive head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the evaluation of children younger than 3 years with intracranial hemorrhage it can be difficult to determine whether the cause of hemorrhage was traumatic, and if so, whether abusive head trauma (AHT) is a possibility. Cervical spine MRI is not a routine part of the nationally recommended imaging workup for children with suspected abusive head trauma. There is increasing evidence that spinal injuries are found at autopsy or MRI in abused children. However the prevalence of cervical spine injuries in children evaluated for abusive head trauma is unknown. We sought to determine both the incidence and the spectrum of cervical spine and brain injuries in children being evaluated for possible abusive head trauma. We also examined the relationship between cervical and brain MRI findings and selected study outcome categories. This study is a 3-year retrospective review of children evaluated for abusive head trauma. Inclusion criteria were: children with head trauma seen at our institution between 2008 and 2010, age younger than 36 months, availability of diagnostic-quality brain and cervical spine MRI, and child abuse team involvement because abusive head trauma was a possibility. A child abuse pediatrician and pediatric radiologists, all with board certification, were involved in data collection, image interpretation and data analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata v12.1. The study included 74 children (43 boys, 31 girls) with a mean age of 164 days (range, 20-679 days). Study outcomes were categorized as: n = 26 children with accidental head trauma, n = 38 with abusive head trauma (n = 18 presumptive AHT, n = 20 suspicious for AHT), and n = 10 with undefined head trauma. We found cervical spine injuries in 27/74 (36%) children. Most cervical spine injuries were ligamentous injuries. One child had intrathecal spinal blood and two had spinal cord edema; all three of these children had ligamentous injury. MRI signs of cervical injury did not show a statistically significant relationship with a study outcome of abusive head trauma or help discriminate between accidental and abusive head trauma. Of the 30 children with supratentorial brain injury, 16 (53%) had a bilateral hypoxic-ischemic pattern. There was a statistically significant relationship between bilateral hypoxic-ischemic brain injury pattern and abusive head trauma (P < 0.05). In addition, the majority (81%) of children with bilateral hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries had cervical injuries. Although detection of cervical spine injuries by MRI does not discriminate between accidental and abusive head trauma, it can help to distinguish a traumatic from non-traumatic intracranial subdural hemorrhage. Cervical MRI should be considered in children with acute intracranial bleeds and otherwise non-contributory history, physical examination and ophthalmological findings. There is a statistically significant relationship between diffuse hypoxic-ischemic brain injury patterns and abusive head trauma. The high incidence of cervical injuries in children with hypoxic-ischemic injuries suggests a causal relationship. Overall, increased utilization of brain and spine MRI in children being evaluated for abusive head trauma can be helpful. (orig.)

  17. Usefulness of MRI detection of cervical spine and brain injuries in the evaluation of abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadom, Nadja [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Khademian, Zarir; Vezina, Gilbert; Shalaby-Rana, Eglal [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Rice, Amy [Independent Consultant (Biostatistics), Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Hinds, Tanya [Children' s National Medical Center, Child and Adolescent Protection Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-07-15

    In the evaluation of children younger than 3 years with intracranial hemorrhage it can be difficult to determine whether the cause of hemorrhage was traumatic, and if so, whether abusive head trauma (AHT) is a possibility. Cervical spine MRI is not a routine part of the nationally recommended imaging workup for children with suspected abusive head trauma. There is increasing evidence that spinal injuries are found at autopsy or MRI in abused children. However the prevalence of cervical spine injuries in children evaluated for abusive head trauma is unknown. We sought to determine both the incidence and the spectrum of cervical spine and brain injuries in children being evaluated for possible abusive head trauma. We also examined the relationship between cervical and brain MRI findings and selected study outcome categories. This study is a 3-year retrospective review of children evaluated for abusive head trauma. Inclusion criteria were: children with head trauma seen at our institution between 2008 and 2010, age younger than 36 months, availability of diagnostic-quality brain and cervical spine MRI, and child abuse team involvement because abusive head trauma was a possibility. A child abuse pediatrician and pediatric radiologists, all with board certification, were involved in data collection, image interpretation and data analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata v12.1. The study included 74 children (43 boys, 31 girls) with a mean age of 164 days (range, 20-679 days). Study outcomes were categorized as: n = 26 children with accidental head trauma, n = 38 with abusive head trauma (n = 18 presumptive AHT, n = 20 suspicious for AHT), and n = 10 with undefined head trauma. We found cervical spine injuries in 27/74 (36%) children. Most cervical spine injuries were ligamentous injuries. One child had intrathecal spinal blood and two had spinal cord edema; all three of these children had ligamentous injury. MRI signs of cervical injury did not show a statistically significant relationship with a study outcome of abusive head trauma or help discriminate between accidental and abusive head trauma. Of the 30 children with supratentorial brain injury, 16 (53%) had a bilateral hypoxic-ischemic pattern. There was a statistically significant relationship between bilateral hypoxic-ischemic brain injury pattern and abusive head trauma (P < 0.05). In addition, the majority (81%) of children with bilateral hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries had cervical injuries. Although detection of cervical spine injuries by MRI does not discriminate between accidental and abusive head trauma, it can help to distinguish a traumatic from non-traumatic intracranial subdural hemorrhage. Cervical MRI should be considered in children with acute intracranial bleeds and otherwise non-contributory history, physical examination and ophthalmological findings. There is a statistically significant relationship between diffuse hypoxic-ischemic brain injury patterns and abusive head trauma. The high incidence of cervical injuries in children with hypoxic-ischemic injuries suggests a causal relationship. Overall, increased utilization of brain and spine MRI in children being evaluated for abusive head trauma can be helpful. (orig.)

  18. Whole-body MRI for the detection of bone marrow involvement in lymphoma: prospective study in 116 patients and comparison with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess and compare the value of whole-body MRI with FDG-PET for detecting bone marrow involvement in lymphoma. A total of 116 patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma prospectively underwent whole-body MRI and blind bone marrow biopsy (BMB) of the posterior iliac crest. Of 116 patients, 80 also underwent FDG-PET. Patient-based sensitivities of whole-body MRI for detecting bone marrow involvement were calculated using BMB as reference standard and compared with FDG-PET in aggressive and indolent lymphomas separately. Sensitivity of whole-body MRI in all lymphomas was 45.5 % [95 % confidence interval (CI): 29.8-62.0 %]. Sensitivity of whole-body MRI in aggressive lymphoma [88.9 % (95 % CI: 54.3-100 %)] was significantly higher (P = 0.0029) than that in indolent lymphoma [23.5 % (95 % CI: 9.1-47.8 %)]. Sensitivity of FDG-PET in aggressive lymphoma [83.3 % (95 % CI: 41.8-98.9 %)] was also significantly higher (P = 0.026) than that in indolent lymphoma [12.5 % (95 % CI: 0-49.2 %)]. There were no significant differences in sensitivity between whole-body MRI and FDG-PET (P = 1.00) Sensitivity of whole-body MRI for detecting lymphomatous bone marrow involvement is too low to (partially) replace BMB. Sensitivity of whole-body MRI is significantly higher in aggressive lymphoma than in indolent lymphoma and is equal to FDG-PET in both entities. (orig.)

  19. Influence of imaging and histological factors on prostate cancer detection and localisation on multiparametric MRI: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess factors influencing prostate cancer detection on multiparametric (T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced) MRI. One hundred and seventy-five patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were included. Pre-operative MRI performed at 1.5 T (n = 71) or 3 T (n = 104), with (n = 58) or without (n = 117) an endorectal coil were independently interpreted by two radiologists. A five-point subjective suspicion score (SSS) was assigned to all focal abnormalities (FAs). MR findings were then compared with whole-mount sections. Readers identified 192-214/362 cancers, with 130-155 false positives. Detection rates for tumours of 3), 0.5-2 cc and >2 cc were 33-45/155 (21-29 %), 15-19/35 (43-54 %) and 8-9/12 (67-75 %) for Gleason ?6, 17/27 (63 %), 42-45/51 (82-88 %) and 34/35 (97 %) for Gleason 7 and 4/5 (80 %), 13/14 (93 %) and 28/28 (100 %) for Gleason ?8 cancers respectively. At multivariate analysis, detection rates were influenced by tumour Gleason score, histological volume, histological architecture and location (P < 0.0001), but neither by field strength nor coils used for imaging. The SSS was a significant predictor of both malignancy of FAs (P < 0.005) and aggressiveness of tumours (P < 0.00001). Detection rates were significantly influenced by tumour characteristics, but neither by field strength nor coils used for imaging. The SSS significantly stratified the risk of malignancy of FAs and aggressiveness of detected tumours. (orig.)

  20. Influence of imaging and histological factors on prostate cancer detection and localisation on multiparametric MRI: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratan, Flavie [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France); Niaf, Emilie [Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France); CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Melodelima, Christelle [Universite Joseph Fourier, Laboratoire d' Ecologie Alpine, CNRS UMR 5553, BP 53, Grenoble (France); Chesnais, Anne Laure; Mege-Lechevallier, Florence [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, Lyon (France); Souchon, Remi [Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France); Colombel, Marc [Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Medecine Lyon Est, Lyon (France); Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Rouviere, Olivier [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Medecine Lyon Est, Lyon (France); Hopital E. Herriot, Service de Radiologie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Pavillon P, Lyon Cedex 03 (France)

    2013-07-15

    To assess factors influencing prostate cancer detection on multiparametric (T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced) MRI. One hundred and seventy-five patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were included. Pre-operative MRI performed at 1.5 T (n = 71) or 3 T (n = 104), with (n = 58) or without (n = 117) an endorectal coil were independently interpreted by two radiologists. A five-point subjective suspicion score (SSS) was assigned to all focal abnormalities (FAs). MR findings were then compared with whole-mount sections. Readers identified 192-214/362 cancers, with 130-155 false positives. Detection rates for tumours of <0.5 cc (cm{sup 3}), 0.5-2 cc and >2 cc were 33-45/155 (21-29 %), 15-19/35 (43-54 %) and 8-9/12 (67-75 %) for Gleason {<=}6, 17/27 (63 %), 42-45/51 (82-88 %) and 34/35 (97 %) for Gleason 7 and 4/5 (80 %), 13/14 (93 %) and 28/28 (100 %) for Gleason {>=}8 cancers respectively. At multivariate analysis, detection rates were influenced by tumour Gleason score, histological volume, histological architecture and location (P < 0.0001), but neither by field strength nor coils used for imaging. The SSS was a significant predictor of both malignancy of FAs (P < 0.005) and aggressiveness of tumours (P < 0.00001). Detection rates were significantly influenced by tumour characteristics, but neither by field strength nor coils used for imaging. The SSS significantly stratified the risk of malignancy of FAs and aggressiveness of detected tumours. (orig.)

  1. A combined remote Raman and fluorescence spectrometer system for detecting inorganic and biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Lucey, Paul G.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a combined remote telescopic Raman and laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) spectrograph with 532 nm pulsed laser excitation and a gated CCD detector. With this system, we have measured time-resolved Raman and LINF spectral measurements at 9 m with 10-ns time resolution. A comparison of Raman spectra of calcite crystal and that of chicken eggshell show that the CaCO 3 in the chicken eggshell is arranged in a calcite structure. The strong LINF band in the spectrum of the calcite crystal has lifetime longer than 1 ?s, whereas the lifetime of LINF bands of the eggshell are in 10's of nano-sec (ns). The time-resolved Raman spectra of tomato and poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrimum) green leaves show resonance Raman features of carotenes. The time-resolved remote LINF spectrum of ruby crystals, and LINF spectra of tomato and poinsettia green leaves yield information that the LINF lifetime of ruby lines is much longer (in milliseconds (ms)) as compared with the fluorescence lifetime of the tomato and the poinsettia leaves (in 10s of ns). These results show that it will be possible to discriminate between inorganic and biogenic materials on the basis of LINF lifetimes even with 8 nano-sec laser pulses and gated detection.

  2. Remote Detection and Analysis of Mass Movements in the Catchment Area of the Xiangxi River/ China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, X.; Xiaofang, G.; Frei, M.; Kaufmann, H.

    2009-04-01

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a better understanding of mechanisms and triggers of mass movements in an area influenced by the rising water level in Three Gorges Dam and to estimate the probability of their occurrence. Investigations are carried out for the Xiangxi river catchment area, a tributary of the Yangtze River discharging into the Three-Gorges-Dam reservoir. In this context, we focus at methodological and conceptual strategies that allow the correlation between recent mass movements with associated soils and lithologies, developed slopes, vegetation coverage and rainfall data. The results provide essential contributions to the estimation of the risk potential and thus, to the safety and future usability of the river banks. To meet the requirements, a synergetic approach of optical imaging and InSAR measurements and advanced remote sensing techniques for data extraction and monitoring are investigated: The differential INSAR method to monitor initial movements along the river banks and optical data for the detection and differentiation of varying soil and rock types as well as for the identification and quantification of vegetation canopies. In addition, geologic structures are deduced from high resolution data and correlated with collected field data. The combination and intersection of remotely derived information with existing thematic data and field knowledge within a GIS system allows for the estimation of the envisaged risk potential.

  3. Photonuclear Reaction Studies at HI?S: Developing the Science of Remote Detection of Nuclear Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, C. R.

    2015-10-01

    Development of gamma-ray beam interrogation technologies for remote detection of special nuclear materials and isotope analysis requires comprehensive databases of nuclear structure information and gamma-ray induced nuclear reaction observables. Relevant nuclear structure details include the energy, spin and parity of excited states that have significant probability for electromagnetic transition from the ground state, i.e, the angular momentum transferred in the reaction is ?l ? 2. This talk will report recent Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) measurements to identify and characterize new low-spin states in actinide nuclei at energies from 1 to 4 MeV, which is the energy range most important for remote analysis methods. These measurements are carried out using the nearly mono-energetic linearly polarized gamma-ray beam at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HI?S) at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Also, studies of the (?, n) reaction on a variety of nuclei with linearly polarized beams at HI?S indicate that this reaction might be used to discern between fissile and non-fissile materials. This work will be described. In addition, an overview will be given of a concept for a next generation laser Compton-backing scattering gamma-ray source to be implemented as an upgrade to increase the beam intensity at HI?S by more than an order of magnitude.

  4. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2004-05-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  5. EXTENDED PERFORMANCE HANDHELD AND MOBILE SENSORS FOR REMOTE DETECTION OF NATURAL GAS LEAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael B. Frish; B. David Green; Richard T. Wainner; Francesca Scire-Scappuzzo; Paul Cataldi; Matthew C. Laderer

    2005-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to advance the state-of-the-art of surveying for leaks of natural gas from transmission and distribution pipelines. The principal project goal was to develop means of deploying on an automotive platform an improved version of the handheld laser-based standoff natural gas leak detector previously developed by PSI and known as the Remote Methane Leak Detector or RMLD. A laser beam which interrogates the air for methane is projected from a spinning turret mounted upon a van. As the van travels forward, the laser beam scans an arc to the front and sides of the van so as to survey across streets and to building walls from a moving vehicle. When excess methane is detected within the arc, an alarm is activated. In this project, we built and tested a prototype Mobile RMLD (MRMLD) intended to provide lateral coverage of 10 m and one lateral scan for every meter of forward motion at forward speeds up to 10 m/s. Using advanced detection algorithms developed as part of this project, the early prototype MRMLD, installed on the back of a truck, readily detected simulated gas leaks of 50 liters per hour. As a supplement to the originally planned project, PSI also participated in a DoE demonstration of several gas leak detection systems at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) during September 2004. Using a handheld RMLD upgraded with the advanced detection algorithms developed in this project, from within a moving vehicle we readily detected leaks created along the 7.4 mile route of a virtual gas transmission pipeline.

  6. Hot-Carrier Seebeck Effect: Diffusion and Remote Detection of Hot Carriers in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Juan F.; Neumann, Ingmar; Costache, Marius V.; Valenzuela, Sergio O.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate hot carrier propagation across graphene using an electrical nonlocal injection/detection method. The device consists of a monolayer graphene flake contacted by multiple metal leads. Using two remote leads for electrical heating, we generate a carrier temperature gradient that results in a measurable thermoelectric voltage VNL across the remaining (detector) leads. Due to the nonlocal character of the measurement, VNL is exclusively due to the Seebeck effect. Remarkably, a departure from the ordinary relationship between Joule power P and VNL, VNL ~ P, becomes readily apparent at low temperatures, representing a fingerprint of hot-carrier dominated thermoelectricity. By studying VNL as a function of bias, we directly determine the carrier temperature and the characteristic cooling length for hot-carrier propagation, which are key parameters for a variety of new applications that rely on hot-carrier transport.

  7. Method of remote powering and detecting multiple UWB passive tags in an RFID system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Nekoogar, Faranak (San Ramon, CA); Benzel, David M. (Livermore, CA); Dallum, Gregory E. (Livermore, CA); Spiridon, Alex (Palo Alto, CA)

    2012-05-29

    A new Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), tracking, powering apparatus/system and method using coded Ultra-wideband (UWB) signaling is introduced. The proposed hardware and techniques disclosed herein utilize a plurality of passive UWB transponders in a field of an RFID-radar system. The radar system itself enables multiple passive tags to be remotely powered (activated) at about the same time frame via predetermined frequency UWB pulsed formats. Once such tags are in an activated state, an UWB radar transmits specific "interrogating codes" to put predetermined tags in an awakened status. Such predetermined tags can then communicate by a unique "response code" so as to be detected by an UWB system using radar methods.

  8. Anomaly Detection Rudiments for the Application of Hyperspectral Sensors in Aerospace Remote Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Gerald, E-mail: gw25@hw.ac.u, E-mail: gerald.wong@selexgalileo.co [Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton Campus, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging differs from conventional techniques by exploiting the spectral dimensionality of remote scenes. This additional information promotes discrimination of image elements, especially anomalies that are dissimilar with respect to global features. Algorithms for anomaly detection are designed to overcome the inherent difficulty of analysing hypercubes, which are the higher-dimensional analogues of conventional broadband images. Such algorithms are prolific in their variety and design, which could become an obstacle in choice or application for the neophyte researcher in this field. This paper seeks to consolidate this plethora of algorithms into succinct categories for clarity of rudimentary decision making. A duplicate of article 012048 Snapshot hyperspectral imaging and practical applications was originally published here, in error, as article 012051. The present article replaced the duplicate and was published on 18 August 2009.

  9. Comparison of ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI and triple-phase MDCT for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma in advanced liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic performance of ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI at 1.5-T with triple-phase multidetector-row helical CT (MDCT) to detect hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. Twenty patients with advanced liver cirrhosis (Child's class B:C = 8:12) underwent ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI and triple-phase MDCT prior to liver transplantation. The mean time interval between the two imaging techniques was 18 days (range, 1-35 days). Three radiologists independently reviewed both images on a lesion-by-lesion basis and interpreted them for comparison with the pathologic findings of the explanted livers. As well, the sensitivity and an alternative-free response receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of each technique. The mean area under the ROC curve (Az) was significantly higher for the triple-phase MDCT (0.766) compared to the ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI (0.675) (? < 0.001). Similarly, the mean sensitivity of the triple-phase MDCT (60.3%) exceeded the ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI (43.1%). The results indicate that the triple-phase MDCT provides significantly greater mean sensitivity than the ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI (? < 0.001). The triple-phase MDCT provided a better diagnostic performance and higher sensitivity than the ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI for the detection of hepatocellular carcinomas in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis

  10. Comparison of ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI and triple-phase MDCT for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma in advanced liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Yong Hwan; Kim, Seung Hoon; Choi, Dong Il; Kim, Min Ju [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo; Lee Ji Won; Han, Heon [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Mee [Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI at 1.5-T with triple-phase multidetector-row helical CT (MDCT) to detect hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. Twenty patients with advanced liver cirrhosis (Child's class B:C = 8:12) underwent ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI and triple-phase MDCT prior to liver transplantation. The mean time interval between the two imaging techniques was 18 days (range, 1-35 days). Three radiologists independently reviewed both images on a lesion-by-lesion basis and interpreted them for comparison with the pathologic findings of the explanted livers. As well, the sensitivity and an alternative-free response receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of each technique. The mean area under the ROC curve (Az) was significantly higher for the triple-phase MDCT (0.766) compared to the ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI (0.675) ({rho} < 0.001). Similarly, the mean sensitivity of the triple-phase MDCT (60.3%) exceeded the ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI (43.1%). The results indicate that the triple-phase MDCT provides significantly greater mean sensitivity than the ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI ({rho} < 0.001). The triple-phase MDCT provided a better diagnostic performance and higher sensitivity than the ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI for the detection of hepatocellular carcinomas in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis.

  11. Detection of multifocal osteonecrosis in an adolescent with dermatomyositis using whole-body MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteonecrosis is a well-recognized complication of corticosteroid use resulting in significant morbidity, often requiring surgical intervention. Whole-body MRI is a promising method that allows imaging of the whole patient in a reasonable time without the use of ionizing radiation. This technique has the potential for evaluating nonmalignant multifocal skeletal disease like osteonecrosis. This case highlights the value of whole-body MR in an adolescent with dermatomyositis who developed multifocal osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  12. Detection of multifocal osteonecrosis in an adolescent with dermatomyositis using whole-body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Tania C.M.; Terreri, Maria Teresa A.; Hilario, Maria Odete E. [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy, Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Image Diagnosis Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kaste, Sue C. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Osteonecrosis is a well-recognized complication of corticosteroid use resulting in significant morbidity, often requiring surgical intervention. Whole-body MRI is a promising method that allows imaging of the whole patient in a reasonable time without the use of ionizing radiation. This technique has the potential for evaluating nonmalignant multifocal skeletal disease like osteonecrosis. This case highlights the value of whole-body MR in an adolescent with dermatomyositis who developed multifocal osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  13. Accuracy of abdominal ultrasound and MRI for detection of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziech, Manon L.W.; Smets, Anne M.J.B.; Lavini, Cristina; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [Emma Children' s Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelofs, Joris J.T.H. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Endoscopy is currently the primary diagnostic technique for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. To assess the accuracy of US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and for distinguishing Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in comparison to a reference standard. Consecutive children with suspected IBD underwent diagnostic workup including ileocolonoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as the reference standard, abdominal US, and MR enterography and colonography at 3 T. The protocol included a dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-D sequence. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa values were calculated for one ultrasonographer and two MRI observers. We included 28 children (15 boys) with mean age 14 years (range 10-17 years). The diagnosis was IBD in 23 children (72%), including 12 with Crohn disease, 10 with ulcerative colitis and 1 with indeterminate colitis. For the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease the sensitivity was 55% for US and 57% (both observers) for MR entero- and colonography, and the specificity was 100% for US and 100% (observer 1) and 75% (observer 2) for MR entero- and colonography. Combined MRI and US had sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 100% (observer 1) and 74% and 80% (observer 2), respectively. With the addition of a dynamic contrast-enhanced MR sequence, the sensitivity increased to 83% and 87%. US and MRI could only distinguish between Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis when terminal ileum lesions were present. US and MR entero- and colonography have a high accuracy for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease in children but cannot be used to distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. (orig.)

  14. Accuracy of abdominal ultrasound and MRI for detection of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoscopy is currently the primary diagnostic technique for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. To assess the accuracy of US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and for distinguishing Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in comparison to a reference standard. Consecutive children with suspected IBD underwent diagnostic workup including ileocolonoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as the reference standard, abdominal US, and MR enterography and colonography at 3 T. The protocol included a dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-D sequence. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa values were calculated for one ultrasonographer and two MRI observers. We included 28 children (15 boys) with mean age 14 years (range 10-17 years). The diagnosis was IBD in 23 children (72%), including 12 with Crohn disease, 10 with ulcerative colitis and 1 with indeterminate colitis. For the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease the sensitivity was 55% for US and 57% (both observers) for MR entero- and colonography, and the specificity was 100% for US and 100% (observer 1) and 75% (observer 2) for MR entero- and colonography. Combined MRI and US had sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 100% (observer 1) and 74% and 80% (observer 2), respectively. With the addition of a dynamic contrast-enhanced MR sequence, the sensitivity increased to 83% and 87%. US and MRI could only distinguish between Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis when terminal ileum lesions were present. US and MR entero- and colonography have a high accuracy for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease in children but cannot be used to distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. (orig.)

  15. Gd-EOB-DTPA-Enhanced MRI for Detection of Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer: A Surgeon's Perspective!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaro, Kelly J.; Roumanis, Panayota; Demirjian, Aram N.; Lall, Chandana; Imagawa, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer affects over one million people worldwide annually, with the liver being the most common site of metastatic spread. Adequate resection of hepatic metastases is the only chance for a cure in a subset of patients, and five-year survival increases to 35% with complete resection. Traditionally, computed tomographic imaging (CT) was utilized for staging and to evaluate metastases in the liver. Recently, the introduction of hepatobiliary contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents including gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Eovist in the United States, Primovist in Europe, or Gd-EOB-DTPA) has proved to be a sensitive method for detection of hepatic metastases. Accurate detection of liver metastases is critical for staging of colorectal cancer as well as preoperative planning. PMID:23653860

  16. Clinical value of periventricular low-intensity areas detected by fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). Relationships between MRI at near term and long-distant outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) study of neonatal brain to assess the clinical value of periventricular low intensities (PVLI) detected on FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) imaging in 280 preterm and term infants. The incidence of PVLI was 62% on early MRI, obtained before two-months corrected age, and it decreased to 3% and 0% on middle (2-8 months) and late (8-18 months) MRI. On middle and late MRI, we observed periventricular hyperintensities (PVHI) both on FLAIR imaging and T2-weighted imaging, which were considered to be chronic lesions of leukomalacia. The severity of white matter damage diagnosed on early FLAIR imaging had a significant correlation with that of late FLAIR imaging. We conclude that early FLAIR imaging would be a good predictor of chronic white matter damage that may influence the motor and mental development of the infants. (author)

  17. IMAGE PROCESSING AND REMOTE SENSING – A LULC CHANGE DETECTION USING REMOTELY SENSED DATA FOR COIMBATORE DISTRICT, INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.K. Thanushkodi, Y. Baby Kalpana, M. Sharrath

    2012-01-01

    Land Use is clearly constrained by environmental factors like soil characteristics, climatic conditions, water sources and vegetation. Changes in Land Use and Land Cover is a dynamic process taking place on the earth surface, and the spatial distribution of the changes that have taken place over a period of time and space is of immense importance in many natural studies. Whether regional or local in scope, remote sensing offers a means of acquiring and presenting land cover data in timely man...

  18. MOVING OBSTACLE DETECTION AND REMOTE VIDEO MONITORING SYSTEM USING CORTEX-A8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.PADMAJA, KAVITHA MAMINDLA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the Detection of Moving obstacle and remote video monitoring and extracting the key frames from the captured video system based on high performance SAMSUNG S5PV210 CORTEX-A8 processor core is build and expanding peripheral devices using embedded Linux as the operating system. Today monitoring systems are either webcam based or simple motion detection based. Here we have interfaced both webcam and PIR sensor to the embedded system so that the user can get an immediate alert message and can take necessary steps. This system is based on the kernel of Cortex board with the GSM module being triggered by a Pyroelectric Infrared Sensor (PIR, which senses changes in the external temperature, especially in this case when an invader enters in to remote location and send SMS to the user. At the same time, by using a smart device or a PC, the user can link to the video streaming server constructed on the embedded board via the internet and browse the webpage to monitor the surveillance area, here the UVC driver and V4L programming is used to interface USB camera to the board to capture video information and then board will do two parallel works first one is transmits the processed captured video information using wireless network, which will be collected and monitored at client side using wireless network connection through the wireless device, second one is extracts the key frames from captured video using OpenCV and served on a server, the both provides an advantage to surveillance monitoring system.

  19. Detection, Identification, Location, and Remote Sensing using SAW RFID Sensor Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, we will consider the problem of simultaneous detection, identification, location estimation, and remote sensing for multiple objects. In particular, we will describe the design and testing of a wireless system capable of simultaneously detecting the presence of multiple objects, identifying each object, and acquiring both a low-resolution estimate of location and a high-resolution estimate of temperature for each object based on wireless interrogation of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) radiofrequency identification (RFID) sensor tags affixed to each object. The system is being studied for application on the lunar surface as well as for terrestrial remote sensing applications such as pre-launch monitoring and testing of spacecraft on the launch pad and monitoring of test facilities. The system utilizes a digitally beam-formed planar receiving antenna array to extend range and provide direction-of-arrival information coupled with an approximate maximum-likelihood signal processing algorithm to provide near-optimal estimation of both range and temperature. The system is capable of forming a large number of beams within the field of view and resolving the information from several tags within each beam. The combination of both spatial and waveform discrimination provides the capability to track and monitor telemetry from a large number of objects appearing simultaneously within the field of view of the receiving array. In the presentation, we will summarize the system design and illustrate several aspects of the operational characteristics and signal structure. We will examine the theoretical performance characteristics of the system and compare the theoretical results with results obtained from experiments in both controlled laboratory environments and in the field.

  20. Application of remote sensing in coastal change detection after the tsunami event in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.; Saleh, N. Mohd.; Surbakti, M. S.

    2008-10-01

    Shoreline mapping and shoreline change detection are critical in many coastal zone applications. This study focuses on applying remote sensing technology to identify and assess coastal changes in the Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Major changes to land cover were found along the coastal line. Using remote sensing data to detect coastal line change requires high spatial resolution data. In this study, two high spatial data with 30 meter resolution of Landsat TM images captured before and after the Tsunami event were acquired for this purpose. The two satellite images was overlain and compared with pre-Tsunami imagery and with after Tsunami. The two Landsat TM images also were used to generate land cover classification maps for the 24 December 2004 and 27 March 2005, before and after the Tsunami event respectively. The standard supervised classifier was performed to the satellite images such as the Maximum Likelihood, Minimum Distance-to-mean and Parallelepiped. High overall accuracy (>80%) and Kappa coefficient (>0.80) was achieved by the Maximum Likelihood classifier in this study. Estimation of the damage areas between the two dated was estimated from the different between the two classified land cover maps. Visible damage could be seen in either before and after image pair. The visible damage land areas were determined and draw out using the polygon tool included in the PCI Geomatica image processing software. The final set of polygons containing the major changes in the coastal line. An overview of the coastal line changes using Landsat TM images is also presented in this study. This study provided useful information that helps local decision makers make better plan and land management choices.

  1. Land cover changed object detection in remote sensing data with medium spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao tong; Liu, Huiping; Gao, Xiaofeng

    2015-06-01

    Land cover change information is crucial to analyse the process and the change patterns of environments and ecological systems. Recent studies have incorporated object-based image analysis for its ability to generate meaningful geographical objects into studies of change detection. In this research, we developed a systematic methodology to realise multi-type land cover changed object detection with medium spatial resolution remote sensing images in Beijing, China. Optimum index factor (OIF) was applied to determine the best change indicators and the chi-square transformation was carried out to determine the change threshold of the 4 classes of changed object. The clustering change vectors in the feature space were proposed to discriminate the change types. According to the accuracy assessment, the overall accuracy of changed/unchanged object detection was approximately 93.9% with an overall kappa of 0.824, and the change type discrimination also achieved an overall accuracy of 81.67%, indicating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. River Detection in Remotely Sensed Imagery Using Gabor Filtering and Path Opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Detecting rivers from remotely sensed imagery is an initial yet important step in space-based river studies. This paper proposes an automatic approach to enhance and detect complete river networks. The main contribution of this work is the characterization of rivers according to their Gaussian-like cross-sections and longitudinal continuity. A Gabor filter was first employed to enhance river cross-sections. Rivers are better discerned from the image background after filtering but they can be easily corrupted owing to significant gray variations along river courses. Path opening, a flexible morphological operator, was then used to lengthen the river channel continuity and suppress noise. Rivers were consistently discerned from the image background after these two-step processes. Finally, a global threshold was automatically determined and applied to create binary river masks. River networks of the Yukon Basin and the Greenland Ice Sheet were successfully detected in two Landsat 8 OLI panchromatic images using the proposed method, yielding a high accuracy (~97.79%, a high true positive rate (~94.33%, and a low false positive rate (~1.76%. Furthermore, experimental tests validated the high capability of the proposed method to preserve river network continuity.

  3. Upper abdominal gadoxetic acid-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI for the detection of gastric cancer: Comparison with two-dimensional multidetector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of gastric cancer in comparison with that of two-dimensional (2D) multidetector row computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: The study included 189 patients with 170 surgically confirmed gastric cancers and 19 patients without gastric cancer, all of whom underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging, and multidetector contrast-enhanced abdominal CT imaging. Two observers independently analysed three sets of images (CT set, conventional MRI set, and combined conventional and DW MRI set). A five-point scale for likelihood of gastric cancer was used. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were evaluated. Quantitative [apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) analyses with Mann–Whitney U-test were conducted for gastric cancers and the nearby normal gastric wall. Results: The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer were significantly higher on combined conventional and DW MRI set (77.8–78.3%; 75.3–75.9%) than the CT imaging set (67.7–71.4%; 64.1–68.2%) or the conventional MRI set (72–73%; 68.8–70%; p < 0.01). In particular, for gastric cancers with pT2 and pT3, the combined conventional and DW MRI set (91.6–92.6%) yielded significantly higher sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer than did the CT imaging set (76.8–81.1%) by both observers (p < 0.01). The mean ADC of gastric cancer lesions (1 ± 0.23 × 10?3mm2/s) differed significantly from that of normal gastric wall (1.77 ± 0.25 × 10?3 mm2/s; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Abdominal MRI with DW imaging was more sensitive for the detection of gastric cancer than 2D-multidetector row CT or conventional MRI alone. - Highlights: • The sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer is high on abdominal MR imaging. • DW imaging is helpful for detection of gastric cancer. • The stomach should be scrutinized on abdominal MR imaging

  4. IMAGING IN PEDIATRIC EPILEPSY: SPECTRUM OF ABNORMAL ITIES DETECTED ON MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate role of radio-imaging, with emphasis o n MRI in comparison to other modalities, in patients of paediatric age gro up presenting with epilepsy and correlate it with clinical findings in Bundelkhand region. METHODS: Prospective data was obtained from evaluation of patients presenting with epilepsy in paediatric OPD and IPD, between 2010 and 2012. A total of 271 patients presenting with epilepsy (> 2 episodes of seizures were included. CBC, Chest X-ray and CSF analysis were also performed for clinical evalu ation as per need. Neurosonogram was done in 41 children below age of 1year (15.1%, Head CT was ob tained in 167 (61.7%, MRI in all cases. EEG was done in all cases, except in 5 cases of trauma. Epilepsy provoked by causes such as fever, electrolyte imbalance and dehydration were excluded . RESULTS: We observed that generalized seizures were more common presentation, followed by partial seizures, mostly complex. Majority had more than 2 episodes of seizures at the time of presentation. MRI revealed positive findings in 191 cases (70.4% and CT in 64 cases (38.3% of 167 done. MRI had positive findings in 35 cases (34.0% of 103 with normal CT scan. Most common cau se of epilepsy in this region was found to be CNS tuberculosis (Tuberculomas, 15.7% & TBM, 14.6% , followed by Neurocysticercosis (11.0%, Encephalitis (7.9%, Demyelination (6.8%, Gliosis with or without Encephalomalacia (6.8%, Periventricular leukomalacia (5.2%, Infarct (4.7% & porencephaly (3.7%. Rare causes observed were leukodystrophy (7cases, intra-axial bleed (4 case and extra-axial bleed (5case, heterotopias (4 case, abscess (2case and Phakomatosis (Tuberou s Sclerosis, 1 case. CONCLUSION: Since most of the seizures begin in paediatric age-group, whic h is crucial time for physical, psychosocial & mental growth, it is essential to evaluate the dive rse varieties of aetiologies and manage patient accordingly. MRI thus proves to be the best for alm ost all pathologies, causing epilepsy, except trauma.

  5. Cest Analysis: Automated Change Detection from Very-High Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, M.; Klonus, S.; Jarmer, T.; Sofina, N.; Michel, U.; Reinartz, P.; Sirmacek, B.

    2012-08-01

    A fast detection, visualization and assessment of change in areas of crisis or catastrophes are important requirements for coordination and planning of help. Through the availability of new satellites and/or airborne sensors with very high spatial resolutions (e.g., WorldView, GeoEye) new remote sensing data are available for a better detection, delineation and visualization of change. For automated change detection, a large number of algorithms has been proposed and developed. From previous studies, however, it is evident that to-date no single algorithm has the potential for being a reliable change detector for all possible scenarios. This paper introduces the Combined Edge Segment Texture (CEST) analysis, a decision-tree based cooperative suite of algorithms for automated change detection that is especially designed for the generation of new satellites with very high spatial resolution. The method incorporates frequency based filtering, texture analysis, and image segmentation techniques. For the frequency analysis, different band pass filters can be applied to identify the relevant frequency information for change detection. After transforming the multitemporal images via a fast Fourier transform (FFT) and applying the most suitable band pass filter, different methods are available to extract changed structures: differencing and correlation in the frequency domain and correlation and edge detection in the spatial domain. Best results are obtained using edge extraction. For the texture analysis, different 'Haralick' parameters can be calculated (e.g., energy, correlation, contrast, inverse distance moment) with 'energy' so far providing the most accurate results. These algorithms are combined with a prior segmentation of the image data as well as with morphological operations for a final binary change result. A rule-based combination (CEST) of the change algorithms is applied to calculate the probability of change for a particular location. CEST was tested with high-resolution satellite images of the crisis areas of Darfur (Sudan). CEST results are compared with a number of standard algorithms for automated change detection such as image difference, image ratioe, principal component analysis, delta cue technique and post classification change detection. The new combined method shows superior results averaging between 45% and 15% improvement in accuracy.

  6. Detection of coal fire location and change based on multi-temporal thermal remotely sensed data and field measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Jing, L.; Bo, Y.; Shi, P.; Zhang, S. [Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China)

    2007-07-01

    This study focuses on analysis methods for monitoring coal fires, using a combination of multi-temporal thermal infrared data, high spatial resolution remote sensing data and field measurements. This technical note is prepared as a feasibility study for the detection of coal fire dynamics in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in northern China.

  7. Detection of contralateral normal ovary in patients with large(>10 cm) unilateral ovarian mass by using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the usefulness of MRI for determining the presence of a large (> 10 cm) unilateral ovarian tumor by detecting the existence of a normal contralateral ovary, and to establish the difference in detection rates between premenopausal and postmenopausal women, and benign and malignant tumors. Forty-two patients who underwent MR imaging and in whom the intraoperative gross and pathologic findings indicated the presence of a unilateral ovarian mass and a normal contralateral ovary were included in this study. The images obtained were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists, who determined the detection rate of the normal contralateral ovary and whether this differed between premenopausal and postmenopausal women, and benign and malignant tumors. Contralateral normal ovaries were detected in 35 (83.3%) of 42 patients [22 of 23 ovaries (95.7%) in premenopausal women and 13 of 19 (68.4%) in postmenopausal women], with a statistically significant difference (p=0.018). Twelve of 16 of these ovaries (75%) were present in women with malignant tumors, and 23 (88.5%) of 26 in those with benign tumors, but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.256). MR imaging is useful for detecting a normal contralateral ovary and for determining the site at which a large (> 10 cm) unilateral ovarian tumor originates, especially in premenopausal women

  8. In vivo detection of the effects of preconditioning on LNCaP tumors by a TNF-? nanoparticle construct using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, Isabelle; Choi, Jeunghwan; Vollmers, Manda; Shenoi, Mithun; Bischof, John; Metzger, Gregory J

    2014-09-01

    The outcome of systemic and local therapies (e.g. chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, focal ablation) for prostate cancer can be significantly improved by using tumor-specific adjuvants prior to treatment ("preconditioning"). We propose to use dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to monitor the in vivo response of a mouse model of prostate cancer treated with a vascular disruptive agent, TNF-?, delivered on a gold nanoparticle (NP-TNF). Six male nude mice bearing 4-5 week old LNCaP tumors were scanned at 9.4 T. DCE-MRI was performed two days before and 4-5 h after treatment with NP-TNF. An intraperitoneal (i.p.) bolus of gadolinium-DTPA (Gd) was administered and contrast enhancement was measured for 90 min. Concentration-time curves of Gd were calculated and the area under the Gd curve (AUGC) was determined pre- and post-treatment. NP-TNF treatment caused an increase in contrast uptake in tumors. Interestingly, the early concentration (10 min post Gd bolus i.p.) was similar in both untreated and treated conditions; however, 90 min after injection, [Gd] was 3.4 times higher than before treatment. AUGC doubled from (11 ± 6) [Gd] × min before treatment to (22 ± 9) [Gd] × min after treatment. An increase in signal enhancement was also observed in the muscle but to a lesser degree. We also evaluated the kinetics of intravenous Gd administration in mice bearing a jugular vein catheter to mimic the delivery method used in clinical trials. The overall treatment effects were independent of the delivery pathway of the contrast agent. In conclusion, we show that DCE-MRI is suitable to detect changes associated with a vascular disruptive agent in a mouse model of prostate cancer. The ability to characterize the effects of nanoparticle therapy in vivo with non-destructive methods is important, as such compounds, in combination with treatment strategies, are progressing towards clinical trials. PMID:24980267

  9. MRI at 3 Tesla detects no evidence for ischemic brain damage in intensively treated patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is considered a model disease for excessive plasma cholesterol levels. Patients with untreated homozygous FH have a markedly increased risk for premature atherosclerosis. The frequency and extent of ischemic brain damage detectable by high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after long-term intensive treatment are unknown. In a case control study, five patients with homozygous FH (one male and four females; mean age: 23.6 ± 9.2, range: 12-36 years; mean pre-treatment serum total cholesterol level: 26.9 ± 3.24 mmol/L; all patients with documented atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries) and five age- and sex-matched healthy controls were studied. All patients had been on maximal lipid-lowering medication since early childhood, and four of them were also on treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis at bi-weekly intervals. Brain MRI was performed at 3 Tesla field strength with fluid-attenuated T2-weighted inversion recovery and T1-weighted spin-echo MR pulse sequences and subsequently evaluated by two independent readers. The maximal lipid-lowering treatment reduced the total serum cholesterol by more than 50% in the patients, but their serum concentrations were still 3.6-fold higher than those found in the controls (11.9 ± 4.2 vs. 4.5 ± 0.5 mmol/L; p < 0.0047). No brain abnormality was observed in any of the patients with homozygous FH. Homozygous FH patients on intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy have no evidence of ischemic brain damage at 3 Tesla MRI despite the remaining high cholesterol levels. (orig.)

  10. MRI at 3 Tesla detects no evidence for ischemic brain damage in intensively treated patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Stephan A.; O' Regan, Declan P.; Fitzpatrick, Julie; Hajnal, Joseph V. [Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imaging Sciences Department, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Neuwirth, Clare; Potter, Elizabeth; Tosi, Isabella; Naoumova, Rossi P. [MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Clinical Research Facility, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Lipid Clinic, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is considered a model disease for excessive plasma cholesterol levels. Patients with untreated homozygous FH have a markedly increased risk for premature atherosclerosis. The frequency and extent of ischemic brain damage detectable by high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after long-term intensive treatment are unknown. In a case control study, five patients with homozygous FH (one male and four females; mean age: 23.6 {+-} 9.2, range: 12-36 years; mean pre-treatment serum total cholesterol level: 26.9 {+-} 3.24 mmol/L; all patients with documented atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries) and five age- and sex-matched healthy controls were studied. All patients had been on maximal lipid-lowering medication since early childhood, and four of them were also on treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis at bi-weekly intervals. Brain MRI was performed at 3 Tesla field strength with fluid-attenuated T2-weighted inversion recovery and T1-weighted spin-echo MR pulse sequences and subsequently evaluated by two independent readers. The maximal lipid-lowering treatment reduced the total serum cholesterol by more than 50% in the patients, but their serum concentrations were still 3.6-fold higher than those found in the controls (11.9 {+-} 4.2 vs. 4.5 {+-} 0.5 mmol/L; p < 0.0047). No brain abnormality was observed in any of the patients with homozygous FH. Homozygous FH patients on intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy have no evidence of ischemic brain damage at 3 Tesla MRI despite the remaining high cholesterol levels. (orig.)

  11. Probability of malignancy for lesions detected on breast MRI: a predictive model incorporating BI-RADS imaging features and patient characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMartini, Wendy B.; Gutierrez, Robert L.; Peacock, Sue; Lehman, Constance D. [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Breast Imaging, Seattle, WA (United States); Kurland, Brenda F. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Clinical Statics, 1100 Fairview Avenue North, PO Box 19024, Seattle, WA (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA (United States); Blackmore, C.C. [Virginia Mason Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 1100 9th Avenue, PO Box 900, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    To predict the probability of malignancy for MRI-detected breast lesions with a multivariate model incorporating patient and lesion characteristics. Retrospective review of 2565 breast MR examinations from 1/03-11/06. BI-RADS 3, 4 and 5 lesions initially detected on MRI for new cancer or high-risk screening were included and outcomes determined by imaging, biopsy or tumor registry linkage. Variables were indication for MRI, age, lesion size, BI-RADS lesion type and kinetics. Associations with malignancy were assessed using generalized estimating equations and lesion probabilities of malignancy were calculated. 855 lesions (155 malignant, 700 benign) were included. Strongest associations with malignancy were for kinetics (washout versus persistent; OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.5-7.1) and clinical indication (new cancer versus high-risk screening; OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.7-5.1). Also significant were age > = 50 years, size > = 10 mm and lesion-type mass. The most predictive model (AUC 0.70) incorporated indication, size and kinetics. The highest probability of malignancy (41.1%) was for lesions on MRI for new cancer, > = 10 mm with washout. The lowest (1.2%) was for lesions on high-risk screening, <10 mm with persistent kinetics. A multivariate model shows promise as a decision support tool in predicting malignancy for MRI-detected breast lesions. (orig.)

  12. Additional Value of Diffusion-weighted MRI to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced Hepatic MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastasis: the Difference Depending on the Experience of the Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Wataru; Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Iida, Makoto; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study was to investigate whether adding diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (EOB-MRI) improved the detection of liver metastasis in radiology resident and board-certified radiologist groups. It was approved by our institutional review board. We selected 18 patients with 35 liver metastases and 12 patients without liver tumors. Five board-certified radiologists and 5 radiology residents participated in the observer performance study. Each observer first interpreted T1- and T2-weighted-, plain-, arterial phase-, and hepatobiliary phase images and specified the location of the liver metastases. The software subsequently displayed the DWI images simultaneously and all participants repeated the reading. We used Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis to compare the observer performance in detecting liver metastases. The mean values for the area under the curve (AUC) for EOB-MRI without and with DWI were 0.78 ± 0.13 [standard deviation: SD] and 0.87 ± 0.09, respectively, for the radiology residents, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.045). For the board- certified radiologists these values were 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.01, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.092). EOB-MRI with DWI significantly improved the performance of radiology residents in the identification of liver metastases. PMID:26211220

  13. Automated object-based change detection for forest monitoring by satellite remote sensing : applications in temperate and tropical regions/

    OpenAIRE

    Desclée, Baudouin

    2007-01-01

    Forest ecosystems have recently received worldwide attention due to their biological diversity and their major role in the global carbon balance. Detecting forest cover change is crucial for reporting forest status and assessing the evolution of forested areas. However, existing change detection approaches based on satellite remote sensing are not quite appropriate to rapidly process the large volume of earth observation data. Recent advances in image segmentation have led to new opportunitie...

  14. Radiographically occult femoral and pelvic fractures are not mutually exclusive: a review of fractures detected by MRI following low-energy trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to review the MRI examinations of a large group of low-energy trauma patients in whom pelvic MRI had detected radiographically occult fractures, in order to characterize prevailing fracture patterns and determine how often co-existing proximal femoral and pelvic fractures were observed. All patients having pelvic MRI over 5 years were identified. Word-search software selected 269 MRI reports containing the term 'fracture'. Further scrutiny identified 168 with diagnosis of fracture. MRI request and imaging record review identified 102 low-energy trauma cases that had MRI for clinical suspicion of fracture despite normal radiographs. Sixty-six cases were excluded for the following reasons: no expressed clinical suspicion of occult fracture; history suggesting high-energy trauma; skeletal co-morbidity hindering acute fracture identification; interval more than 2 weeks between radiographs and MRI. The 102 study MRI examinations, which employed a limited two-sequence protocol, were reviewed. Any fracture that had not been appreciated on radiographs was recorded and characterized as femoral, pelvic, or co-existing femoral and pelvic fractures. The 102 study cases had a median age of 82 years. The median interval between pelvic radiographs and MRI was 3 days. MRI showed undiagnosed femoral fracture in 48/102 cases (47.1%), sacral fracture in 41/102 (40.2%), and pubic fracture in 55/102 (53.9%). In 11/102 cases (10.8%), MRI showed undiagnosed fractures of both proximal femur and pelvic ring (seven sacral, six pubic bone, two other site fractures). In 10/11 cases with co-existing femoral and pelvic fractures, the femoral fracture was incomplete. Limited pelvic MRI found a high prevalence of radiographically occult femoral and pelvic fractures in low-energy trauma patients, with clinical suspicion of fracture despite normal radiographs. Co-existing occult femoral and pelvic ring fractures were commonly observed, and in such cases, the femoral fracture was likely to be incomplete and multiple pelvic fractures were typically present. (orig.)

  15. Radiographically occult femoral and pelvic fractures are not mutually exclusive: a review of fractures detected by MRI following low-energy trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szewczyk-Bieda, Magdalena; Thomas, Naveena; Oliver, Thomas Barry [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Clinical Radiology, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to review the MRI examinations of a large group of low-energy trauma patients in whom pelvic MRI had detected radiographically occult fractures, in order to characterize prevailing fracture patterns and determine how often co-existing proximal femoral and pelvic fractures were observed. All patients having pelvic MRI over 5 years were identified. Word-search software selected 269 MRI reports containing the term 'fracture'. Further scrutiny identified 168 with diagnosis of fracture. MRI request and imaging record review identified 102 low-energy trauma cases that had MRI for clinical suspicion of fracture despite normal radiographs. Sixty-six cases were excluded for the following reasons: no expressed clinical suspicion of occult fracture; history suggesting high-energy trauma; skeletal co-morbidity hindering acute fracture identification; interval more than 2 weeks between radiographs and MRI. The 102 study MRI examinations, which employed a limited two-sequence protocol, were reviewed. Any fracture that had not been appreciated on radiographs was recorded and characterized as femoral, pelvic, or co-existing femoral and pelvic fractures. The 102 study cases had a median age of 82 years. The median interval between pelvic radiographs and MRI was 3 days. MRI showed undiagnosed femoral fracture in 48/102 cases (47.1%), sacral fracture in 41/102 (40.2%), and pubic fracture in 55/102 (53.9%). In 11/102 cases (10.8%), MRI showed undiagnosed fractures of both proximal femur and pelvic ring (seven sacral, six pubic bone, two other site fractures). In 10/11 cases with co-existing femoral and pelvic fractures, the femoral fracture was incomplete. Limited pelvic MRI found a high prevalence of radiographically occult femoral and pelvic fractures in low-energy trauma patients, with clinical suspicion of fracture despite normal radiographs. Co-existing occult femoral and pelvic ring fractures were commonly observed, and in such cases, the femoral fracture was likely to be incomplete and multiple pelvic fractures were typically present. (orig.)

  16. Effect of surface coating on the biocompatibility and in vivo MRI detection of iron oxide nanoparticles after intrapulmonary administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Faraj, Achraf; Shaik, Abjal Pasha; Shaik, Asma Sultana

    2015-10-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have attracted special attention as novel nanoprobes capable of improving both the therapy and diagnosis of lung diseases. For safe prospective clinical applications, their biocompatibility has to be assessed after intrapulmonary administration. This study was therefore conducted to understand the biological impact of SPIONs and their further surface-functionalization with polyethylene glycol (PEG) having either negative (i.e. carboxyl) or positive (i.e. amine) terminal in a 1-month longitudinal study following acute and sub-acute exposures. Noninvasive free-breathing MR imaging protocols were first optimized to validate SPIONs detection in the lung and investigate possible subsequent systemic translocation to abdominal organs. Pulmonary Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) allowed successful in vivo detection of SPIONs in the lung using ultra-short echo time sequence. Following high-dose lung administration, MR imaging performed on abdominal organs detected transient accumulation of SPIONs in the liver. Iron quantification using Inductive coupled plasma - Mass mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) confirmed MRI readouts. Oxidative stress induction and genotoxicity were then conducted to evaluate the biocompatibility of SPIONs with their different formulations in a mouse model. A significant increase in lipid peroxidation was observed in both acute and sub-acute sets and found to regress in a time-dependent manner. PEG functionalized SPIONs revealed a lower effect with no difference between both terminal modifications. Genotoxicity assessments revealed an increase in DNA damage and gene expression of CCL-17 and IL-10 biomarkers following SPIONs administration, which was significantly higher than surface-modified nanoparticles and decreased in a time-dependent manner. However, SPIONs with carboxyl terminal showed a slightly prominent effect compared to amine modification. PMID:26356541

  17. Detection and quantification of angiogenesis in experimental valve disease with integrin-targeted nanoparticles and 19-fluorine MRI/MRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huiying

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis is a critical early feature of atherosclerotic plaque development and may also feature prominently in the pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis. It has been shown that MRI can detect and quantify specific molecules of interest expressed in cardiovascular disease and cancer by measuring the unique fluorine signature of appropriately targeted perfluorocarbon (PFC nanoparticles. In this study, we demonstrated specific binding of ???3 integrin targeted nanoparticles to neovasculature in a rabbit model of aortic valve disease. We also showed that fluorine MRI could be used to detect and quantify the development of neovasculature in the excised aortic valve leaflets. Methods New Zealand White rabbits consumed a cholesterol diet for ~180 days and developed aortic valve thickening, inflammation, and angiogenesis mimicking early human aortic valve disease. Rabbits (n = 7 were treated with ???3 integrin targeted PFC nanoparticles or control untargeted PFC nanoparticles (n = 6. Competitive inhibition in vivo of nanoparticle binding (n = 4 was tested by pretreatment with targeted nonfluorinated nanoparticles followed 2 hours later by targeted PFC nanoparticles. 2 hours after treatment, aortic valves were excised and 19F MRS was performed at 11.7T. Integrated 19F spectral peaks were compared using a one-way ANOVA and Hsu's MCB (multiple comparisons with the best post hoc t test. In 3 additional rabbits treated with ???3 integrin targeted PFC nanoparticles, 19F spectroscopy was performed on a 3.0T clinical scanner. The presence of angiogenesis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Results Valves of rabbits treated with targeted PFC nanoparticles had 220% more fluorine signal than valves of rabbits treated with untargeted PFC nanoparticles (p ??3 integrin staining revealed the presence of neovasculature within the valve leaflets. Conclusion Integrin-targeted PFC nanoparticles specifically detect early angiogenesis in sclerotic aortic valves of cholesterol fed rabbits. These techniques may be useful for assessing atherosclerotic components of preclinical aortic valve disease in patients and could assist in defining efficacy of medical therapies.

  18. Impact of functional MRI data preprocessing pipeline on default-mode network detectability in patients with disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Andronache

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An emerging application of resting-state functional MRI is the study of patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC, where integrity of default-mode network (DMN activity is associated to the clinical level of preservation of consciousness. Due to the inherent inability to follow verbal instructions, arousal induced by scanning noise and postural pain, these patients tend to exhibit substantial levels of movement. This results in spurious, non-neural fluctuations of the blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal, which impair the evaluation of residual functional connectivity. Here, the effect of data preprocessing choices on the detectability of the DMN was systematically evaluated in a representative cohort of 30 clinically and etiologically heterogeneous DoC patients and 33 healthy controls. Starting from a standard preprocessing pipeline, additional steps were gradually inserted, namely band-pass filtering, removal of co-variance with the movement vectors, removal of co-variance with the global brain parenchyma signal, rejection of realignment outlier volumes and ventricle masking. Both independent-component analysis (ICA and seed-based analysis (SBA were performed, and DMN detectability was assessed quantitatively as well as visually. The results of the present study strongly show that the detection of DMN activity in the sub-optimal fMRI series acquired on DoC patients is contingent on the use of adequate filtering steps. ICA and SBA are differently affected but give convergent findings for high-grade preprocessing. We propose that future studies in this area should adopt the described preprocessing procedures as a minimum standard to reduce the probability of wrongly inferring that DMN activity is absent.

  19. Efficient pro-survival/angiogenic miRNA delivery by an MRI-detectable nanomaterial.

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, RS; das Neves, RP; Cochlin, L; A Lima; Carvalho, R; P Korpisalo; Dragneva, G; Turunen, M.; Liimatainen, T; Clarke, K.; Ylä-Herttuala, S.; Carr, C.; Ferreira, L

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we report the use of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) containing perfluoro-1,5-crown ether (PFCE), a fluorine-based compound (NP170-PFCE) with the capacity to track cells in vivo by magnetic ressonance imaging (MRI) and efficiently release miRNA. NP170-PFCE complexed with miRNAs accumulate whitin the cell's endolysosomal compartment and interact with higher frequency with argonaute2 (Ago2) and GW182 proteins, which are involved in the biological action of miRNAs, than commercial comp...

  20. Multilayer Markov Random Field models for change detection in optical remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Csaba; Shadaydeh, Maha; Kato, Zoltan; Szirányi, Tamás; Zerubia, Josiane

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we give a comparative study on three Multilayer Markov Random Field (MRF) based solutions proposed for change detection in optical remote sensing images, called Multicue MRF, Conditional Mixed Markov model, and Fusion MRF. Our purposes are twofold. On one hand, we highlight the significance of the focused model family and we set them against various state-of-the-art approaches through a thematic analysis and quantitative tests. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of class comparison vs. direct approaches, usage of training data, various targeted application fields and different ways of Ground Truth generation, meantime informing the Reader in which roles the Multilayer MRFs can be efficiently applied. On the other hand we also emphasize the differences between the three focused models at various levels, considering the model structures, feature extraction, layer interpretation, change concept definition, parameter tuning and performance. We provide qualitative and quantitative comparison results using principally a publicly available change detection database which contains aerial image pairs and Ground Truth change masks. We conclude that the discussed models are competitive against alternative state-of-the-art solutions, if one uses them as pre-processing filters in multitemporal optical image analysis. In addition, they cover together a large range of applications, considering the different usage options of the three approaches.

  1. Multifunctional fiber-optic microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Torben NØrskov

    1998-01-01

    The multifunctionality of microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection (RHD) of signals from a dual-frequency laser transmitter is discussed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. Typically, direct detection (DD) in conjunction with optical intensity modulation is used to implement fiber-optic microwave links. The resulting links are inherently transparent. As opposed to DD links, RHD links can perform radio-system functionalities such as modulation and frequency conversion in addition to transparency. All of these three functionalities are presented and experimentally demonstrated with an RHD link based on a dual-frequency laser transmitter with two offset phase-locked semiconductor lasers. In the modulating link, a 1-Gb/s baseband signal is QPSK modulated onto a 9-GHz RF carrier. The frequency converting link demonstrates up-conversion of a 100-Mb/s PSK signal from a 2-GHz carrier to a 9-GHz carrier with penalty-free transmission over 25 km of optical fiber. Finally, the transparent link transmits a standard FM video 7.6-GHz radio-link signal over 25 km of optical fiber without measurable distortion

  2. Electromagnetic material changes for remote detection and monitoring: a feasibility study: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Jordan, David V.; Kelly, James F.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Campbell, Luke W.

    2009-09-01

    A new concept for radiation detection is proposed, allowing a decoupling of the sensing medium and the readout. An electromagnetic material, such as a magnetic ceramic ferrite, is placed near a source to be tracked such as a shipping container. The electromagnetic material changes its properties, in this case its magnetic permeability, as a function of radiation. This change is evident as a change in reflection frequency and magnitude when probed using a microwave/millimeter-wave source. This brief report discusses modeling of radiation interaction of various candidate materials using a radiation detector modeling code Geant4, system design considerations for the remote readout, and some theory of the material interaction physics. The theory of radiation change in doped magnetic insulator ferrites such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG) seems well founded based on literature documentation of the photomagnetic effect. The literature also suggests sensitivity of permittivity to neutrons in some ferroelectrics. Research to date indicates that experimental demonstration of these effects in the context of radiation detection is warranted.

  3. Multisensor remote sensing information fusion for urban area classification and change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palubinskas, Gintautas; Makarau, Aliaksei; Reinartz, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Information extraction from multi-sensor remote sensing imagery is an important and challenging task for many applications such as urban area mapping and change detection. A special acquisition (orthogonal) geometry is of great importance for optical and radar data fusion. This acquisition geometry allows to minimize displacement effects due inaccuracy of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) used for data ortho-rectification and existence of unknown 3D structures in a scene. Final data spatial alignment is performed by recently proposed co-registration method based on a Mutual Information measure. For a combination of features originating from different sources, which are quite often noncommensurable, we propose an information fusion framework called INFOFUSE consisting of three main processing steps: feature fission (feature extraction aiming at complete description of a scene), unsupervised clustering (complexity reduction and feature representation in a common dictionary) and supervised classification realized by Bayesian or Neural networks. An example of urban area classification is presented for the orthogonal acquisition of space borne very high resolution WorldView-2 and TerraSAR-X Spotlight imagery over Munich city, South Germany. Experimental results confirm our approach and show a great potential also for other applications such as change detection.

  4. A fully Bayesian approach to the parcel-based detection-estimation of brain activity in fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makni, S. [Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Oxford Ctr Funct Magnet Resonance Imaging Brain, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Idier, J. [IRCCyN CNRS, Nantes (France); Vincent, T.; Ciuciu, P. [CEA, NeuroSpin, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Vincent, T.; Dehaene-Lambertz, G.; Ciuciu, P. [Inst Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle, IFR 49, Paris (France); Thirion, B. [INRIA Futurs, Orsay (France); Dehaene-Lambertz, G. [INSERM, NeuroSpin, U562, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Within-subject analysis in fMRI essentially addresses two problems, i. e., the detection of activated brain regions in response to an experimental task and the estimation of the underlying dynamics, also known as the characterisation of Hemodynamic response function (HRF). So far, both issues have been treated sequentially while it is known that the HRF model has a dramatic impact on the localisation of activations and that the HRF shape may vary from one region to another. In this paper, we conciliate both issues in a region-based joint detection-estimation framework that we develop in the Bayesian formalism. Instead of considering function basis to account for spatial variability, spatially adaptive General Linear Models are built upon region-based non-parametric estimation of brain dynamics. Regions are first identified as functionally homogeneous parcels in the mask of the grey matter using a specific procedure [Thirion, B., Flandin, G., Pinel, P., Roche, A., Ciuciu, P., Poline, J.B., August 2006. Dealing with the shortcomings of spatial normalization: Multi-subject parcellation of fMRI datasets. Hum. Brain Mapp. 27 (8), 678-693.]. Then, in each parcel, prior information is embedded to constrain this estimation. Detection is achieved by modelling activating, deactivating and non-activating voxels through mixture models within each parcel. From the posterior distribution, we infer upon the model parameters using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. Bayesian model comparison allows us to emphasize on artificial datasets first that inhomogeneous gamma-Gaussian mixture models outperform Gaussian mixtures in terms of sensitivity/specificity trade-off and second that it is worthwhile modelling serial correlation through an AR(1) noise process at low signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. Our approach is then validated on an fMRI experiment that studies habituation to auditory sentence repetition. This phenomenon is clearly recovered as well as the hierarchical temporal organisation of the superior temporal sulcus, which is directly derived from the parcel-based HRF estimates. (authors)

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for the detection of testicular ischemia in experimental induced testicular torsion of rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in detecting experimentally induced testicular ischemia. Methods: Thirty healthy male New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned into 6 groups. There were 5 rabbits in each of the following experimental groups: (1) Normal control, (2) Sham-operated, (3) ischemia of 3 h group, (4) ischemia of 6 h group, (5) ischemia of 12 h group, (6) ischemia of 24 h group. In all experiment groups, the right testis served as the internal control while the left testis served as the experimental side. DCE-MRI for each animal lasts about 10 minutes. Signal enhanced ratios (SERs) of ROI for both sides of each group were calculated by a computer, and parameters of SERs of 30 s, 75 s, 120 s and maximal SER were used for statistical analysis. Time intensity curves (TICs) were made for two sides of each group via Excel 2003 software and classified into 4 types. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the differences of SERs between left and right testis by two independent Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Results: In group 1 and 2, significant enhancement was observed on both testes of 10 rabbits. The enhancement decreased gradually with the elongation of ischemia in torsion groups. Three cases of type ? and 2 cases of type ? were observed in group 1, 5 cases of type ? in group two, 2 cases of type ? and 3 cases of type ? b in group three, 2 cases of type ? and 2 cases of type ? b in group four, 5 cases of type b in group five and 5 cases of type ? in group six were noticed in the left testes. And in TICs of right testes, all cases showed TICs of type ? except 2 cases of type ? a in group six. In four torsion groups, the values for SER75 of the left side were 0.084%, 0.076%, 0.164% and 0.065%, while the right side were 0.255%, 0.410%, 0.586% and 0.302% (P120 in group three, five and six were 0.221%, 0.158% and 0.059% for the left side, and 0.405%, 0.522% and 0.207% for the right side (P<0.05). The values for MSER in group three, five and six were 0.217%, 0.164% and 0.072% for the left side, and 0.405%, 0.586% and 0.302% for the right side (P <0.05). Conclusion: DCE-MRI technique may be useful in the diagnosis of testicular torsion, which shows potential in the clinical application. (authors)

  6. Can we detect water stressed areas in forest thanks thermal infrared remote sensing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourtier, Marie; Chanzy, André; Bes, Bernard; Mariotte, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    In Mediterranean and mountainous areas, an increase of mortality in forest is observed after important drought events. In the context of climate changes, a study of the impact of drought stress on forest is necessary. In order to detect water stress over the whole forest at different periods of the year, we propose the use of a spatialisable indicator, easily measurable: crown surface temperature. As previous works were not conclusive concerning the potentiality of this indicator in forest (Duchemin, 1998a, 1998b, Pierce et al., 1990), we set up an experimentation to study the surface temperature evolution linked to the transpiration at tree scale, during the spring and summer periods on silver fir (Abies alba) forest of Mont Ventoux (south of France). At the same time, several thermal infrared images of the mountainside were acquired corresponding to different levels of transpiration. The signal of surface temperature is studying via the evolution of the difference between measured surface temperature and calculated surface temperature for a tree at maximum transpiration rate. At tree scale, there is a difference of 4 °C of amplitude in the signal of surface temperature between maximum and zero transpiration conditions. The difficulty resides in taking into account the influence of climatic conditions, source of variability in the signal uncorrelated with transpiration evolution. Indices of surface temperature, built to include this influence of climatic conditions, permit to reduce this variability. Another source of variability lies in the percentage of branches present in the area of measurement. Indeed branches have a thermal dynamic differing from the needles one and, considering comparison between trees, the percentage of branches varies. At the mountainside scale, contrasted areas in terms of surface temperature indices are observable. By comparing different dates, corresponding to different levels of drought, it is possible to locate areas with precocious water stress signal. The amplitude of the signal, between wet and dry conditions, is at an average of 3 °C. Thus, by analysing the temporal evolution of this signal, thermal infrared is an interesting tool to detect water stress and identify different levels of stress between forest areas. Duchemin B., D. Guyon, J.P. Lagouarde, 1998. Potential and limits of NOAA-AVHRR temporal composite data forr phenology and water stress monitoring of temperate forest ecosystems. International Journal of remote sensing, volume: 20, 5, p 23. Duchemin B., Lagouarde J.P., 1998. Apport des capteurs satellitaires à large champ pour l'estimation de variables de fonctionnement des écosystèmes forestiers tempérés. Thesis. p120. Pierce L. L., Running S.W., Riggs G.A., 1990. Remote detection of canopy water stress in coniferous forests unsing the NS001 Thematic Mapper Simulator and the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Photogrammetric engineering and remote sensing, volume: 56, 1, p 8.

  7. Detection of Shoreline and Land Cover Changes around Rosetta Promontory, Egypt, Based on Remote Sensing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Masria

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rosetta Promontory, Egypt has been suffering from a continuous erosion problem. The dramatic retreatment was observed during the last century. It is basically due to the construction of Aswan High Dam in 1964, which reduced the flow and sediment discharges. In this paper, four Landsat images (two Thematic Mapper and two Enhanced Thematic Mapper covering the period from 1984 to 2014 were used. These Landsat images were radio-metrically and geometrically corrected, and then, multi-temporal post-classification analysis was performed to detect land cover changes, extracting shoreline positions to estimate shoreline change rates of the Nile delta coast around Rosetta Promontory. This method provides a viable means for examining long-term shoreline changes. Four categories, including seawater, developed (agriculture and urban, sabkhas (salt-flat, and undeveloped areas, were selected to evaluate their temporal changes by comparing the four selected images. Supervised classification technique was used with support vector machine algorithm to detect temporal changes. The overall accuracy assessment of this method ranged from 97% to 100%. In addition, the shoreline was extracted by applying two different techniques. The first method is based on a histogram threshold of Band 5, and the other uses the combination of histogram threshold of Band 5 and two band ratios (Band 2/Band 4 and Band 2/Band 5. For land cover change detection from 1984 to 2014, it was found that the developed area that increased by 9% although the land in the study area has been contracted by 1.6% due to coastal erosion. The shoreline retreat rate has decreased more than 70% from 1984 to 2014. Nevertheless, it still suffers from significant erosion with a maximum rate of 37 m/year. In comparison to ground survey and different remote sensing techniques, the established trend of shoreline change extracted using histogram threshold was found to be closely consistent with these studies rather than combining band ratio with histogram threshold.

  8. GPU implementation of target and anomaly detection algorithms for remotely sensed hyperspectral image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Abel; Plaza, Antonio

    2010-08-01

    Automatic target and anomaly detection are considered very important tasks for hyperspectral data exploitation. These techniques are now routinely applied in many application domains, including defence and intelligence, public safety, precision agriculture, geology, or forestry. Many of these applications require timely responses for swift decisions which depend upon high computing performance of algorithm analysis. However, with the recent explosion in the amount and dimensionality of hyperspectral imagery, this problem calls for the incorporation of parallel computing techniques. In the past, clusters of computers have offered an attractive solution for fast anomaly and target detection in hyperspectral data sets already transmitted to Earth. However, these systems are expensive and difficult to adapt to on-board data processing scenarios, in which low-weight and low-power integrated components are essential to reduce mission payload and obtain analysis results in (near) real-time, i.e., at the same time as the data is collected by the sensor. An exciting new development in the field of commodity computing is the emergence of commodity graphics processing units (GPUs), which can now bridge the gap towards on-board processing of remotely sensed hyperspectral data. In this paper, we describe several new GPU-based implementations of target and anomaly detection algorithms for hyperspectral data exploitation. The parallel algorithms are implemented on latest-generation Tesla C1060 GPU architectures, and quantitatively evaluated using hyperspectral data collected by NASA's AVIRIS system over the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York, five days after the terrorist attacks that collapsed the two main towers in the WTC complex.

  9. Remote-controlled robotic platform ORPHEUS as a new tool for detection of bacteria in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejdl, Lukas; Kudr, Jiri; Cihalova, Kristyna; Chudobova, Dagmar; Zurek, Michal; Zalud, Ludek; Kopecny, Lukas; Burian, Frantisek; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Krizkova, Sona; Konecna, Marie; Hynek, David; Kopel, Pavel; Prasek, Jan; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-08-01

    Remote-controlled robotic systems are being used for analysis of various types of analytes in hostile environment including those called extraterrestrial. The aim of our study was to develop a remote-controlled robotic platform (ORPHEUS-HOPE) for bacterial detection. For the platform ORPHEUS-HOPE a 3D printed flow chip was designed and created with a culture chamber with volume 600 ?L. The flow rate was optimized to 500 ?L/min. The chip was tested primarily for detection of 1-naphthol by differential pulse voltammetry with detection limit (S/N = 3) as 20 nM. Further, the way how to capture bacteria was optimized. To capture bacterial cells (Staphylococcus aureus), maghemite nanoparticles (1 mg/mL) were prepared and modified with collagen, glucose, graphene, gold, hyaluronic acid, and graphene with gold or graphene with glucose (20 mg/mL). The most up to 50% of the bacteria were captured by graphene nanoparticles modified with glucose. The detection limit of the whole assay, which included capturing of bacteria and their detection under remote control operation, was estimated as 30 bacteria per ?L. PMID:24634313

  10. Remote sensing analysis for fault-zones detection in the Central Andean Plateau (Catamarca, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traforti, Anna; Massironi, Matteo; Zampieri, Dario; Carli, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing techniques have been extensively used to detect the structural framework of investigated areas, which includes lineaments, fault zones and fracture patterns. The identification of these features is fundamental in exploration geology, as it allows the definition of suitable sites for the exploitation of different resources (e.g. ore mineral, hydrocarbon, geothermal energy and groundwater). Remote sensing techniques, typically adopted in fault identification, have been applied to assess the geological and structural framework of the Laguna Blanca area (26°35'S-66°49'W). This area represents a sector of the south-central Andes localized in the Argentina region of Catamarca, along the south-eastern margin of the Puna plateau. The study area is characterized by a Precambrian low-grade metamorphic basement intruded by Ordovician granitoids. These rocks are unconformably covered by a volcano-sedimentary sequence of Miocene age, followed by volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of Upper Miocene to Plio-Pleistocene age. All these units are cut by two systems of major faults, locally characterized by 15-20 m wide damage zones. The detection of main tectonic lineaments in the study area was firstly carried out by classical procedures: image sharpening of Landsat 7 ETM+ images, directional filters applied to ASTER images, medium resolution Digital Elevation Models analysis (SRTM and ASTER GDEM) and hill shades interpretation. In addition, a new approach in fault zone identification, based on multispectral satellite images classification, has been tested in the Laguna Blanca area and in other sectors of south-central Andes. In this perspective, several prominent fault zones affecting basement and granitoid rocks have been sampled. The collected fault gouge samples have been analyzed with a Field-Pro spectrophotometer mounted on a goniometer. We acquired bidirectional reflectance spectra, from 0.35?m to 2.5?m with 1nm spectral sampling, of the sampled fault rocks. Subsequently, two different Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) classifications were applied to ASTER images: the first one based on fault rock spectral signatures resampled at the ASTER sensor resolution; the second one based on spectral signatures retrieved from specific Region of Interest (ROI), which were directly derived from the ASTER image on the analyzed fault zones. The SAM classification based on the spectral signatures of fault rocks gave outstanding results since it was able to classify the analyzed fault zone, both in terms of length and width. Moreover, in some specific cases, this SAM classification identified not only the sampled fault zone, but also other prominent neighboring faults cutting the same host rock. These results define the SAM supervised classification on ASTER images as a tool to identify prominent fault zones directly on the base of fault-rocks spectra.

  11. Semi-automatic detection of Gd-DTPA-saline filled capsules for colonic transit time assessment in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, Christian; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Keil, Andreas; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Mussack, Thomas; Lienemann, Andreas; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders result in a significant number of consultations in primary care facilities. Chronic constipation and diarrhea are regarded as two of the most common diseases affecting between 2% and 27% of the population in western countries 1-3. Defecatory disorders are most commonly due to dysfunction of the pelvic floor or the anal sphincter. Although an exact differentiation of these pathologies is essential for adequate therapy, diagnosis is still only based on a clinical evaluation1. Regarding quantification of constipation only the ingestion of radio-opaque markers or radioactive isotopes and the consecutive assessment of colonic transit time using X-ray or scintigraphy, respectively, has been feasible in clinical settings 4-8. However, these approaches have several drawbacks such as involving rather inconvenient, time consuming examinations and exposing the patient to ionizing radiation. Therefore, conventional assessment of colonic transit time has not been widely used. Most recently a new technique for the assessment of colonic transit time using MRI and MR-contrast media filled capsules has been introduced 9. However, due to numerous examination dates per patient and corresponding datasets with many images, the evaluation of the image data is relatively time-consuming. The aim of our study was to develop a computer tool to facilitate the detection of the capsules in MRI datasets and thus to shorten the evaluation time. We present a semi-automatic tool which provides an intensity, size 10, and shape-based 11,12 detection of ingested Gd-DTPA-saline filled capsules. After an automatic pre-classification, radiologists may easily correct the results using the application-specific user interface, therefore decreasing the evaluation time significantly.

  12. Implant detectibility of intervertebral disc spacers in post fusion MRI: evaluation of the MRI scan quality by using a scoring system - an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intervertebral spacers for anterior spine fusion are made of different materials, such as titanium and cobalt chromium alloys and carbon fiber-reinforced polymers. Implant-related susceptibility artifacts can decrease the quality of MRI scans. The aim of this cadaveric study was to demonstrate the extent that implant-related MRI artifacting affects the postfusion differentiation of determined regions of interest (ROIs). In six cadaveric porcine spines, we evaluated the postimplantation MRI scans of a titanium, cobalt-chromium and carbon spacer that differed in shape and surface qualities. A spacer made of human cortical bone was used as a control. A defined evaluation unit was divided into ROIs to characterize the spinal canal as well as the intervertebral disc space. Considering 15 different MRI sequences read independently by an interobserver-validated team of specialists the artifact-affected image quality of the median MRI slice was rated on a score of 0-3. A maximum score of 18 points (100%) for the determined ROIs was possible. Turbo spin echo sequences produced the best scores for all spacers and the control. Only the control achieved a score of 100%. For the determined ROI maximum scores for the cobalt-chromium, titanium and carbon spacers were 24%, 32% and 84%, respectively. By using favored T1 TSE sequences the carbon spacer showed a clear advantage in postfusion spinal imaging. Independent of artifact dimensions, the scoring system used allowed us to create an implant-related ranking of MRI scan quality in reference to the bone control. (orig.)

  13. MRI-based flow measurements in the main pulmonary artery to detect pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) is a common problem in the course of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). This study was performed to evaluate MRI based flow measurements (MRvenc; Velocity ENCoding) to detect signs of an evolving PH in patients suffering from CF. 48 patients (median age: 16 years, range: 10 - 40 years, 25 female) suffering from CF of different severity (mean FEV1: 74 % ± 23, mean Shwachman-score: 63 ± 10) were examined using MRI based flow measurements of the main pulmonary artery (MPA). Phase-contrast flash sequences (TR: 9.6 ms, TE: 2.5 ms, bandwidth: 1395 Hertz/Pixel) were utilized. Results were compared to an age- and sex-matched group of 48 healthy subjects. Analyzed flow data where: heart frequency (HF), cardiac output (HZV), acceleration time (AT), proportional acceleration time related to heart rate (ATr), mean systolic blood velocity (MFG), peak velocity (Peak), maximum flow (Flussmax), mean flow (Flussmitt) and distensibility (Dist). The comparison of means revealed significant differences only for MFG, Flussmax and Dist, but overlap was marked. However, using a scatter-plot of AT versus MFG, it was possible to identify five CF-patients demonstrating definite signs of PH: AT = 81 ms ± 14, MFG = 46 ± 11 cm/s, Dist = 41 % ± 7. These CF-patients where the most severely affected in the investigated group, two of them were listed for complete heart and lung transplantation. The comparison of this subgroup and the remaining CF-patients revealed a highly significant difference for the AT (p = 0.000001) without overlap. Screening of CF-patients for the development of PH using MRvenc of the MPA is not possible. In later stages of disease, the quantification of AT, MFG and Dist in the MPA may be useful for the detection, follow-up and control of therapy of PH. MRvenc of the MPA completes the MRI-based follow-up of lung parenchyma damage in patients suffering from CF. (orig.)

  14. Detecting Land Cover Change by Trend and Seasonality of Remote Sensing Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J. C.; Epiphanio, J. N.; Mello, M. P.

    2013-05-01

    Natural resource managers demand knowledge of information on the spatiotemporal dynamics of land use and land cover change, and detection and characteristics change over time is an initial step for the understanding of the mechanism of change. The propose of this research is the use the approach BFAST (Breaks For Additive Seasonal and Trend) for detects trend and seasonal changes within Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series. BFAST integrates the decomposition of time series into trend, seasonal, and noise components with methods for detecting change within time series without the need to select a reference period, set a threshold, or define a change trajectory. BFAST iteratively estimates the time and number of changes, and characterizes change by its magnitude and direction. The general model is of the form Yt = Tt + St + et (t= 1,2,3,…, n) where Yt is the observed data at time t, Tt is the trend component, St is the seasonal component, and et is the remainder component. In this study was used MODIS NDVI time series datasets (MOD13Q1) over 11 years (2000 - 2010) on an intensive agricultural area in Mato Grosso - Brazil. At first it was applied a filter for noise reduction (4253H twice) over spectral curve of each MODIS pixel, and subsequently each time series was decomposed into seasonal, trend, and remainder components by BFAST. Were detected one abrupt change from a single pixel of forest and two abrupt changes on trend component to a pixel of the agricultural area. Figure 1 shows the number of phonological change with base in seasonal component for study area. This paper demonstrated the ability of the BFAST to detect long-term phenological change by analyzing time series while accounting for abrupt and gradual changes. The algorithm iteratively estimates the dates and number of changes occurring within seasonal and trend components, and characterizes changes by extracting the magnitude and direction of change. Changes occurring in the seasonal component indicate phenological changes, while changes occurring in the trend component indicate gradual and abrupt change. BFAST can be used to analyze different types of remotely sensed time series and can be applied to other time series such as econometrics, climatology, and hydrology. The algorithm used in this study is available in BFAT package for R from CRAN (http://cran.r-project.org/package=bfast).; Figure 1 - Number of the phonological change with base in seasonal component.

  15. SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Nathan Dean

    2009-12-14

    This thesis describes an implementation of the so-called"zero-field MRI" (ZFMRI) pulse sequence, which allows for imaging in an arbitrarily low B(0) field. The ZFMRI sequence created an effective unidirectional gradient field by using a train of pi pulses to average out the concomitant gradient components during encoding. The signals were acquired using a low-transition temperature dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (low-Tc dc SQUID) coupled to a first-order axial gradiometer. The experiments were carried out in a liquid helium dewar which was magnetically shielded with a single-layer mu-metal can around the outside and a superconducting Pb can contained within the helium space. We increased the filling factor of the custom-made, double-walled Pyrex insert by placing the liquid alcohol sample, at a temperature of approximately -50 degrees C, at the center of one loop of the superconducting gradiometer, which was immersed in the helium bath.

  16. Detectability of low and intermediate or high risk prostate cancer with combined T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Sung, Deuk Jae; Park, Beom Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Cho, Sung Bum; Oh, Yu Whan [Department of Radiology, Anam Hospital, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Young Hwii [College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Anam Hospital, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Kyung Sook [College of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    To evaluate the incremental value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in combination with T2-weighted imaging to detect low (Gleason score, {<=} 6) and intermediate or high risk (Gleason score, {>=} 7) prostate cancer. Fifty-one patients who underwent MRI before prostatectomy were evaluated. Two readers independently scored the probability of tumour in eight regions of prostate on T2-weighted images (T2WI) and T2WI combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Data were divided into two groups - low risk and intermediate or high risk prostate cancer - and correlated with histopathological results. Diagnostic performance parameters, areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUCs) and interreader agreement were calculated. For both readers, AUCs of combined T2WI and ADC maps were greater than those of T2WI in intermediate or high risk (reader 1, 0.887 vs. 0.859; reader 2, 0.732 vs 0.662, P < 0.05) prostate cancers, but not in low risk (reader 1, 0.719 vs 0.725; reader 2, 0.685 vs. 0.680, P > 0.05) prostate cancers. Weighted {kappa} value of combined T2WI and ADC maps was 0.689. The addition of DWI to T2-weighted imaging improves the accuracy of detecting intermediate or high risk prostate cancers, but not for low risk prostate cancer detection. (orig.)

  17. Remote sensing for greenhouse detection from stereo pairs of WorldView-2 satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Aguilar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The successful launch of the first very high resolution (VHR satellites capable of capturing panchromatic imagery of the land surface with ground sample distance even lower than 1 m (e.g. IKONOS in 1999 or QuickBird in 2001 marked the beginning of a wholly new age in remote sensing. On January 4, 2010, images of WorldView-2 were placed on the market. Possibly it is the most sophisticated commercial VHR satellite currently orbiting the Earth and the exploitation of its data poses a challenge to researchers worldwide. Moreover, the practice of under plastic agriculture had a great development in the Mediterranean area during the past 60 years, especially in Almeria, acting as a key economic driver in the area. The goal of this work is the automatic greenhouse mapping by using Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA. The required input data will be a pan-sharpened orthoimage and a normalized digital surface model (nDSM for objects, both products generated from a WorldView-2 stereo pair. The attained results show that the very high resolution 8-band multispectral and the nDSM data improve the greenhouses automatic detection. In this way, overall accuracies higher than 90% can be achieved.

  18. DETECTION OF COASTAL GEOMORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES FOR EFFECTIVE COASTAL MANAGEMENT USING REMOTE SENSING & GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS.Asadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the Geomorphological changes Detection study in Pulicat Lagoon. The study involves identifying the geomorphologic changes occurred due to the natural disasters and man made activities using 2008, 2010, 2013 satellite Images by adopting Remote Sensing Technologies and GIS tools. The study area is located in Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh, India located between longitude 80° 3?3? to 80° 18?6? and 13 °28? 32? to 13° 57?6? latitude. The study area is covered under the Survey of India (SOI toposheet no 66C/1,2,3,5,6 and 7 with scale 1:50000 and Multi-Spectral imageries from IRS-P6,LISS III,IV data of 2008, 2010 and 2013 Geocoded Satellite data are acquired as primary and secondary data for analysis. Visual Interpretation techniques are used to identify the Geomorphology classes from 2008, 2010 satellite imageries, ground truthing and post interpretation of the satellite image for preparation of 2013 Geomorphology map in this different classes like Creek, Flood Plain, Coastal Plain Moderate, Buried Pedi plain etc. are identified. These spatial data maps generate statistical values of geomorphological classes, from this data analysis was carried out to find out the changes in the Geomorphology classes of 2008 to 2010 and 2010 to 2013. These type of model studies are very useful to identify the coastal geomorphological changes, its impact on coastal environment and in preparing the action plans to protect the coastal environmental.

  19. Remote detection of physiological depression in crop plants with infrared thermal imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infrared thermal imagery was measured concurrently with physiological status in stressed and non-stressed corn and wheat canopies. Thermal images were obtained with an infrared thermography system from a distance of 5 to 20 m. Each thermal image, composed of 512 (H) × 240 (V) pixels with a sensitivity of 0.05°C, was recorded in a video tape every 8 seconds in the field, and analyzed in a laboratory later. A root-reducing treatment was used for simulating environmental stresses, which treatment was carried out by cutting a root system with a thin metal plate at the depth of 20 cm, but brought little apparent change in plant stands. Photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance in the stressed canopy were depressed, which were accompanied with an inverse change in the canopy surface temperature. The maximum difference in mean surface temperatures of the stressed and non-stressed parts of the canopy was no less than 4.2°C in corn and 3.1°C in wheat. Gaussian distribution of spatial temperature frequency in the stressed part shifted toward higher temperature from that of non-stressed part of the canopy, which was visualized clearly on the pseudo-color thermal image while no visible changes were observed directly from the distance. The infrared imagery was effective, especially, for detecting phisiological depression or for comparing various canopies in their physiological status on a remote and real-time basis

  20. Contribution of the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI to Dynamic MRI in the detection of hypovascular small ({<=}2 cm) HCC in cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golfieri, Rita; Renzulli, Matteo; Lucidi, Vincenzo; Corcioni, Beniamino [University of Bologna, Radiology Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant' Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Trevisani, Franco [University of Bologna, Unit of Semeiotica, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant' Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Bolondi, Luigi [University of Bologna, Unit of Internal Medicine, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant' Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    To prospectively assess the additional value of the hepatobiliary (HB) phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI in identifying and characterising small ({<=}2 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) undetermined in dynamic phases alone because of their atypical features, according to the AASLD criteria. 127 cirrhotic patients were evaluated with Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI in two sets: unenhanced and dynamic phases; unenhanced, dynamic and HB phases. Sixty-two out of 215 nodules (29%) were atypical in 42 patients (33%). 62 atypical nodules were reported at histology: high-grade dysplastic nodules (HGDN)/early HCC (n = 20), low-grade DN (LGDN) (n = 21), regenerative nodules (n = 17) and nodular regenerative hyperplasia (n = 4). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV) were increased by the addition of the HB phase: 88.4-99.4%, 88-95%, 88-98.5%, 97-99%, and 65-97.5%, respectively. Twenty atypical nodules were malignant (32%), 19 of which were characterised only during the HB phase. The HB phase is 11% more sensitive in the classification of HGDN/early HCC than dynamic MRI, with an added value of 32.5% in the NPV. The high incidence (33%) of atypical nodules and their frequent malignancy (32%) suggest the widespread employment of Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI in the follow-up of small nodules ({<=}2 cm) in cirrhosis. (orig.)

  1. Surface biosignatures of exo-earths: remote detection of extraterrestrial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Siddharth; Paulino-Lima, Ivan G; Kent, Ryan; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Rothschild, Lynn

    2015-03-31

    Exoplanet discovery has made remarkable progress, with the first rocky planets having been detected in the central star's liquid water habitable zone. The remote sensing techniques used to characterize such planets for potential habitability and life rely solely on our understanding of life on Earth. The vegetation red edge from terrestrial land plants is often used as a direct signature of life, but it occupies only a small niche in the environmental parameter space that binds life on present-day Earth and has been widespread for only about 460 My. To more fully exploit the diversity of the one example of life known, we measured the spectral characteristics of 137 microorganisms containing a range of pigments, including ones isolated from Earth's most extreme environments. Our database covers the visible and near-infrared to the short-wavelength infrared (0.35-2.5 µm) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum and is made freely available from biosignatures.astro.cornell.edu. Our results show how the reflectance properties are dominated by the absorption of light by pigments in the visible portion and by strong absorptions by the cellular water of hydration in the infrared (up to 2.5 µm) portion of the spectrum. Our spectral library provides a broader and more realistic guide based on Earth life for the search for surface features of extraterrestrial life. The library, when used as inputs for modeling disk-integrated spectra of exoplanets, in preparation for the next generation of space- and ground-based instruments, will increase the chances of detecting life. PMID:25775594

  2. Detection and mapping of oil contaminated soils by remote sensing of laser induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contamination of soil by aromatic mineral hydrocarbons (MHC) (e.g. gasoline, oil etc) has become a severe environmental problem because not only men, animals and plants are threatened but also the water and air. With the unification of Germany a great number of suspected contaminated sites in the new counties were registered. An estimation of the German Federal Ministry of Environment (BMU) counts 180,000 areas contaminated with different pollutants, 55,000 are situated in the former GDR. On military settlements for example more than fifty percent of the chemicals are MHC's. Hence one can get an idea of the importance of soil pollution by hydrocarbons. Other zones contaminated due to carelessness or accidents are civil petrolstations, airports, refineries, pipelines and traffic disasters. At the present time for most of these areas the contamination is assumed due to recent use. Due to the large extension of the problem an estimation and evaluation of the potential hazard for the environment is difficult and expensive to perform. In the case of actual endangering the total area must be mapped in detail and expensive to perform. In the case of an actual endangering the total area must be mapped in detail resulting in increasing costs for the owner. Nevertheless it is necessary to find reliable timesaving areal mapping and monitoring methods. One opportunity presented in this paper is the application of remote sensing by laser induced fluorescence from an airborne platform. It promises to fulfill these requirements in a sufficient fast manner with very high spatial resolution. The access to the pollutant detection is the specific laser inducted fluorescence omitted by the MHC (finger print). The present work shows the requirements for a helicopter-borne lidar system for MHC mapping and how the detected signals are to be evaluated and interpreted

  3. Detection and mapping of oil-contaminated soils by remote sensing of laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedeker, Wilhelm; Guenther, Kurt P.; Dahn, Hans-Guenter

    1995-10-01

    The contamination of soil by aromatic mineral hydrocarbons (MHC) (e.g., gasoline, oil, etc.) has become a severe environmental problem because not only men, animals, and plants are threatened but also the water and air. With the unification of Germany a great number of suspected contaminated sites in the new countries were registered. An estimation of the German Federal Ministry of Environment (BMU) counts 180,000 areas contaminated with different pollutants, 55,000 are situated in the former GDR. On military settlements for example more than fifty percent of the chemicals are MHCs. Hence one can get an idea of the importance of soil pollution by hydrocarbons. Other zones contaminated due to carelessness or accidents are civil petrolstations, airports, refineries, pipelines, and traffic disasters. At the present time for most of these areas the contamination is assumed due to recent use. Due to the large extension of the problem an estimation and evaluation of the potential hazard for the environment is difficult and expensive to perform. In the case of an actual endangering the total area must be mapped in detail resulting in increasing costs for the owner. Nevertheless it is necessary to find reliable timesaving areal mapping and monitoring methods. One opportunity presented in this paper is the application of remote sensing by laser induced fluorescence from an airborne platform. It promises to fulfill these requirements in a sufficiently fast manner with very high spatial resolution. The access to the pollutant detection is the specific laser induced fluorescence emitted by the MHC (finger print). The present work shows the requirements for a helicopterborne lidar system for MHC mapping and how the detected signals are to be evaluated and interpreted.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principle of MRI, its history and future prospect are described. There is no radiation exposure in MRI and it is suitable for imaging lesions in the soft tissue. MRI gives images by detection of electromagnetic wave generated from excited hydrogen nuclear spin in the magnetic field and therefore the image is the information mainly from body water and fat. The MRI machine was made firstly in 1980 and introduced in Japan in 1982. Progress and present/future aspects are described on hardware of the magnet and radiofrequency coil arrays, on software of pulse-sequencing and image processing, and on applied technology like MRS (MR spectroscopy), functional MRI and therapeutic application. Further development of MRI is expected in the medical robot supporting surgery, in application for myocardial viability diagnosis, in molecular imaging with contrast medium with the specific affinity for a gene product and in the preventive medicine. (N.I.)

  5. Dual-echo fMRI can detect activations in inferior temporal lobe during intelligible speech comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halai, Ajay D.; Parkes, Laura M.; Welbourne, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The neural basis of speech comprehension has been investigated intensively during the past few decades. Incoming auditory signals are analysed for speech-like patterns and meaningful information can be extracted by mapping these sounds onto stored semantic representations. Investigation into the neural basis of speech comprehension has largely focused on the temporal lobe, in particular the superior and posterior regions. The ventral anterior temporal lobe (vATL), which includes the inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) and temporal fusiform gyrus (TFG) is consistently omitted in fMRI studies. In contrast, PET studies have shown the involvement of these ventral temporal regions. One crucial factor is the signal loss experienced using conventional echo planar imaging (EPI) for fMRI, at tissue interfaces such as the vATL. One method to overcome this signal loss is to employ a dual-echo EPI technique. The aim of this study was to use intelligible and unintelligible (spectrally rotated) sentences to determine if the vATL could be detected during a passive speech comprehension task using a dual-echo acquisition. A whole brain analysis for an intelligibility contrast showed bilateral superior temporal lobe activations and a cluster of activation within the left vATL. Converging evidence implicates the same ventral temporal regions during semantic processing tasks, which include language processing. The specific role of the ventral temporal region during intelligible speech processing cannot be determined from this data alone, but the converging evidence from PET, MEG, TMS and neuropsychology strongly suggest that it contains the stored semantic representations, which are activated by the speech decoding process. PMID:26037055

  6. The Value of Non-EPI Diffusion-Weighted (DW MRI versus EPI and Conventional MR Sequences in the Detection of Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Farjad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The non-echo planar imaging diffusion-weighted (non-EPI DW MRI sequence has recently emerged as a new imaging technique in detecting cholesteatoma. We have compared the diagnostic efficacy of conventional MRI with this new sequence. "nPatients and Methods: A group of 23 patients (also including second look patients (16 male, seven female; mean age:34±17.5[9-76] years were evaluated with MRI, consisting delayed post-contrast, EPI and non-EPI DW sequences, prior to surgery as gold standard. Two experienced radiologists reported images. For each sequence, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values (positive [PPV] and negative [NPV] of MRI were calculated and the interobserver agreement between the two radiologists was assessed by kappa statistics."nResults: Surgery proved 16 cases of cholesteatoma (size: 1.5-60mm. For delayed post-contrast, the mean sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 75.1%, 85.7%, 92.3% and 60.6%, respectively. These findings were 56.3%, 85.7%, 89.9% and 46.5% for EPI and 90.7%, 100%, 100% and 82.7% for non-EPI. Kappa agreement for delayed post-contrast, EPI and non-EPI DW MRI were 0.83, 0.58 and 0.91, respectively. The detection rate of non-EPI was significantly better than EPI DW MRI for both radiologists (ps<0.05. The mean detection rate (sensitivity of non-EPI (90.7% was statistically better than the delayed post-contrast (75.1% (P<0.05. One patient had cholesteatoma sized 1.5mm in surgery that was missed in all the sequences. There was a false positive case in EPI sequence that was proved as eosinophilic granuloma. "nConclusion: Both delayed post-contrast and non-EPI DW MRI are valuable methods in detecting cholesteatoma. Non-EPI DW sequence is, however, much more accurate. EPI DW sequence does not show enough efficacy in detecting cholesteatoma.

  7. 'One-stop-shop' staging: Should we prefer FDG-PET/CT or MRI for the detection of bone metastases?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusner, Till; Goelitz, Philipp [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University at Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Hamami, Monia [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University at Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Eberhardt, Wilfried [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Tumor Centre, University Hospital Essen, University at Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Esser, Stefan [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Essen, University at Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University at Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Bockisch, Andreas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University at Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: gerald.antoch@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University at Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45122 Essen (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of fully diagnostic, contrast-enhanced whole-body FDG-PET/CT and whole-body MRI for detection of bone metastases in patients suffering from newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer and malignant melanoma. Material and Methods: 109 consecutive non-small cell lung cancer (n = 54) and malignant melanoma (n = 55) patients underwent whole-body FDG-PET/CT and whole-body MRI for initial tumor staging. All images were evaluated by four experienced physicians (three radiologists, one nuclear medicine physician). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for detection of bone metastases were determined for both modalities. Statistically significant differences between FDG-PET/CT and MRI were calculated with Fisher's Exact test (p < 0.05). Clinical and imaging follow-up data with a mean follow-up time of 434 days served as the reference standard. Results: According to the reference standard 11 patients (10%) suffered from bone metastases. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for the detection of osseous metastases was 45%, 99%, 83%, 94%, and 94% with whole-body FDG-PET/CT and 64%, 94%, 54%, 96%, and 91% with whole-body MRI. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.6147). Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT and MRI seem to be equally suitable for the detection of skeletal metastases in patients suffering from newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer and malignant melanoma. Both modalities go along with a substantial rate of false-negative findings requiring a close follow-up of patients who are staged free of bone metastases at initial staging.

  8. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  9. Impact of delay after biopsy and post-biopsy haemorrhage on prostate cancer tumour detection using multi-parametric MRI: A multi-reader study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess impact of haemorrhage and delay after biopsy on prostate tumour detection using multi-parametric (MP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients underwent prostate MRI at 1.5 T using a pelvic phased-array coil, including T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging, before prostatectomy. Three radiologists independently reviewed images during four sessions [T2WI, DWI, DCE, and all parameters combined (MP-MRI)] to assess for tumour in each sextant. In a separate session, readers reviewed T1WI to score the extent of haemorrhage per sextant. Accuracy was assessed using logistic regression for correlated data. Results: There was no significant difference in accuracy between readers for any session (p ? 0.166), and results were averaged across the three readers for remaining comparisons. Accuracy was significantly greater for MP-MRI than for any parameter alone (p ? 0.020). For T2WI alone, there was a trend toward decreased sensitivity in sextants with extensive haemorrhage (p = 0.072). However, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were otherwise similar for sextants with and without extensive haemorrhage for all sessions (p = 0.192–0.934). No session showed a significant improvement in accuracy, sensitivity, or specificity in cases with delay after biopsy of over 4 weeks compared with shorter delay. Conclusion: Extensive haemorrhage and short delay after biopsy did not negatively impact accuracy for tumour detection using MP-MRI. Further studies using MP-MRI protocols and interpretation schemes from other institutions are required to confirm these observations.

  10. Remote Life Detection Criteria, Habitable Zone Boundaries, and the Frequency of Earthlike Planets around M and Late-K Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Kasting, James F; Kopparapu, Ravikumar; Ramirez, Ramses M.; Harman, Chester E.

    2013-01-01

    The habitable zone (HZ) around a star is typically defined as the region where a rocky planet can maintain liquid water on its surface. That definition is appropriate, because this allows for the possibility that carbon-based, photosynthetic life exists on the planet in sufficient abundance to modify the planet's atmosphere in a way that might be remotely detected. Exactly what conditions are needed, however, to maintain liquid water remains a topic for debate. Historically,...

  11. Axillary lymph node metastases in breast cancer: preoperative detection with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic involvement of axillary lymph nodes is one of the most important prognostic variables in breast cancer. The aim of our work was to study the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging in revealing axillary lymph node metastases from breast cancer. A total of 65 patients with invasive breast cancer treated with axillary lymph node dissection were preoperatively evaluated by MRI. T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D images were acquired using a coil covering the breast and the axilla. The dynamic contrast enhancement, size, and morphology of the axillary lymph nodes were registered. Histopathological examination revealed axillary lymph node metastases in 24 patients. When using a signal intensity increase in the lymph nodes of > 100 % during the first postcontrast image as a threshold for malignancy, 57 of 65 patients were correctly classified (sensitivity 83 %, specificity 90 %, accuracy 88 %). These results were not improved when lymph node size and morphology were used as additional criteria. Axillary lymph nodes can be evaluated as a part of an MR-mammography study without substantial increase in examination time, and provide the surgeon with knowledge about the localization of possible metastatic lymph nodes. (orig.)

  12. Functional MRI Detection of Hemodynamic Response of Repeated Median Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Leo; Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew; Xiong, Jinhu

    2012-01-01

    Median nerve stimulation is a commonly used technique in the clinical setting to determine areas of neuronal function in the brain. Neuronal activity of repeated median nerve stimulation is well studied. The cerebral hemodynamic response of the stimulation, on the other hand, is not very clear. In this study, we investigate how cerebral hemodynamics behaves over time using the same repeated median nerve stimulation. Ten subjects received constant repeated electrical stimulation to the right median nerve. Each subject had fMRI scans while receiving said stimulations for seven runs. Our results show that the BOLD signal significantly decreases across each run. Significant BOLD signal decreases can also be seen within runs. These results are consistent with studies that have studied the hemodynamic habituation effect with other forms of stimulation. However, the results do not completely agree with the findings of studies where evoked potentials were examined. Thus, further inquiry of how evoked potentials and cerebral hemodynamics are coupled when using constant stimulations is needed. PMID:23228312

  13. Inner ear malformations in patients with sensorineural heating loss: detection with gradient-echo (3DFT-CISS) MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casselman, J.W. [Dept. of Radiology, A.Z. St.-Jan Brugge, Bruges (Belgium); Kuhweide, R. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, A.Z. St.-Jan Brugge, Bruges (Belgium); Ampe, W. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, A.Z. St.-Jan Brugge, Bruges (Belgium); D`Hont, G.D. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, A.Z. St.-Jan Brugge, Bruges (Belgium); Offeciers, E.F. [ENT Dept., Sint-Augustinus Medical Inst., Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium); Faes, W.K. [Dept. of Radiology, A.Z. St.-Jan Brugge, Bruges (Belgium); Pattyn, G. [Dept. of Radiology, A.Z. St.-Jan Brugge, Bruges (Belgium)

    1996-04-01

    The sensitivity of different MRI sequences in the detection of inner ear malformations in patients presenting with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and/or vertigo was evaluated. We studied 650 patients presenting with SNHL and/or vertigo, clinically not suspected of having inner ear malformations. The sensitivity of T1-weigted, Gd-enhanced T1-weighted and (when available) T2-weighted spin-echo images, and three-dimensional Fourier transformation-constructive interference in steady state (3DFT-CISS) gradient-echo images, to unexpected malformations was assessed. Inner ear malformations were found in 15 (2.3%) of these patients. Enlargement of the endolymphatic duct and sac was the most frequent malformation, found in 11 patients. The 3DFT-CISS images showed all lesions; the other sequences were less sensitive and the pathology was missed, partially or only retrospectively seen in 11 of the 15 patients. Therefore, in addition to the routine unenhanced and Gd-enhanced T1-weighted and T2-weighted images, thin gradient-echo (3DFT-CISS) images are necessary to detect all clinically unexpected inner ear malformations in patients presenting with vertigo and/or SNHL. (orig.)

  14. Inner ear malformations in patients with sensorineural heating loss: detection with gradient-echo (3DFT-CISS) MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of different MRI sequences in the detection of inner ear malformations in patients presenting with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and/or vertigo was evaluated. We studied 650 patients presenting with SNHL and/or vertigo, clinically not suspected of having inner ear malformations. The sensitivity of T1-weigted, Gd-enhanced T1-weighted and (when available) T2-weighted spin-echo images, and three-dimensional Fourier transformation-constructive interference in steady state (3DFT-CISS) gradient-echo images, to unexpected malformations was assessed. Inner ear malformations were found in 15 (2.3%) of these patients. Enlargement of the endolymphatic duct and sac was the most frequent malformation, found in 11 patients. The 3DFT-CISS images showed all lesions; the other sequences were less sensitive and the pathology was missed, partially or only retrospectively seen in 11 of the 15 patients. Therefore, in addition to the routine unenhanced and Gd-enhanced T1-weighted and T2-weighted images, thin gradient-echo (3DFT-CISS) images are necessary to detect all clinically unexpected inner ear malformations in patients presenting with vertigo and/or SNHL. (orig.)

  15. Surface-length index: a novel index for rapid detection of right ventricles with abnormal ejection fraction using cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnemains, Laurent; Mandry, Damien; Felblinger, Jacques; Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHU Nancy, Departments of Cardiology and Medical Imaging and INSERM (IADI U947, CICIT 801 and U684), Vandoeuvre les nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les nancy (France); Menini, Anne; Vuissoz, Pierre-Andre [CHU Nancy, Departments of Cardiology and Medical Imaging and INSERM (IADI U947, CICIT 801 and U684), Vandoeuvre les nancy (France); Stos, Bertrand [Marie Lannelongue Chirurgical Centre, Le Plessis-Robinson (France)

    2013-09-15

    To validate a new index, the surface-length index (SLI) based on area change in a short-axis view and length reduction in the horizontal long-axis view, which is used to quickly (<1 min) detect right ventricles with an abnormal ejection fraction (EF) during a cardiac MRI examination. SLI can be used to avoid a complete delineation of the endocardial contours of normal right ventricles. Sixty patients (group A) were retrospectively included to calibrate the SLI formula by optimisation of the area under the ROC curves and SLI thresholds were chosen to obtain 100 % sensitivity. Another 340 patients (group B) were prospectively recruited to test SLI's capacity to detect right ventricles (RVs) with an abnormal EF (<0.5). The appropriate threshold to obtain 100 % sensitivity in group A was 0.58. In group B, with the 0.58 threshold, SLI yielded a sensitivity of 100 % and specificity of 51 %. SLI would have saved 35 % of the RV studies in our population, without inducing any diagnostic error. SLI and EF correlation was good (r {sup 2} = 0.64). SLI combines two simple RV measures, and brings significant improvement in post-processing efficiency by preselecting RVs that require a complete study. (orig.)

  16. Multiparametric MRI of the prostate. Method for early detection of prostate cancer?; Multiparametrische MRT der Prostata. Methode zur Frueherkennung des Prostatakarzinoms?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radiologie

    2010-12-15

    Current approaches for the early detection of prostate cancer are controversially discussed because the disease is characterized by a high incidence rate with a relatively low morbidity rate, availability of only limited prognostic markers, and continued therapy-related morbidity. Conventional morphological MRI does not play a role in early detection since small tumor foci cannot be delineated. However, if there is clinical suspicion for prostate cancer, multiparametric MRI is currently the most accurate method for detecting and characterizing suspicious lesions in the prostate. The potential to identify the so-called 'index lesion', i.e., the tumor area that is most aggressive and determines treatment, is particularly important. This information can increase the accuracy of prostate biopsy and serve as a biomarker for follow-up during active surveillance. The method may considerably contribute to the urgently required separation of clinically significant from clinically insignificant prostate cancers. (orig.)

  17. IMAGE PROCESSING AND REMOTE SENSING – A LULC CHANGE DETECTION USING REMOTELY SENSED DATA FOR COIMBATORE DISTRICT, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.K. Thanushkodi, Y. Baby Kalpana, M. Sharrath

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Land Use is clearly constrained by environmental factors like soil characteristics, climatic conditions, water sources and vegetation. Changes in Land Use and Land Cover is a dynamic process taking place on the earth surface, and the spatial distribution of the changes that have taken place over a period of time and space is of immense importance in many natural studies. Whether regional or local in scope, remote sensing offers a means of acquiring and presenting land cover data in timely manner. The environmental factors reflect the importance of land as a key and finite resource for most human activities including agriculture, industry, forestry, energy production, settlement, recreation and water sources and storage.Often improper land use is causing various forms of environmental humiliation. For sustainable utilization of the land ecosystems, it is essential to know the natural characteristics, extent and location, its quality, productivity, suitability and limitations of various land uses. Land use is a product of interactions between a society’s cultural background, state and itsphysical needs on the one hand, and the natural potential of land on the other. In order to improve the economic condition of the area without further deteriorating the bio environment, every bit of the available land has to be used in the most rational way. This requires the present and the past land use/land cover data of the Coimbatore district.Land use / Land cover change has become an important component in current strategies for managing natural resources and monitoring environmental changes. The advancement in the concept of vegetation of the spread and health of the world’s forest, grassland and agricultural resources has become an important priority. Viewing the earth from space is now crucial to the understanding of the influence of man’s activities on his natural resource base over time. Over past years, data fromEarth sensing satellites (digital imagery has become vital in mapping the Earth’s features and infrastructures, managing natural resources and studying environmental change.

  18. Aiming for a shorter rheumatoid arthritis MRI protocol: can contrast-enhanced MRI replace T2 for the detection of bone marrow oedema?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    To determine whether T1 post-gadolinium chelate images (T1Gd) can replace T2-weighted images (T2) for evaluating bone marrow oedema (BME), thereby allowing a shorter magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In 179 early arthritis patients and 43 advanced RA patients, wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints were examined on a 1.5-T extremity MRI system with a standard protocol (coronal T1, T2 fat-saturated and coronal and axial T1 fat-saturated after Gd). BME was scored according to OMERACT RAMRIS by two observers with and without T2 images available. Agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for semi-quantitative scores and test characteristics with T2 images as reference. Agreement between scores based on T2 and T1Gd images was excellent ICC (0.80-0.99). At bone level, sensitivity and specificity of BME on T1Gd compared to T2 were high for both patient groups and both readers (all ?80 %). T1Gd and T2 images are equally suitable for evaluating BME. Because contrast is usually administered to assess (teno)synovitis, a short MRI protocol of T1 and T1Gd is sufficient in RA. (orig.)

  19. Overview of the iCATSI multi-pixels standoff chemical detection sensor and the MR-i imaging spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Lavoie, Hugo; Bouffard, François; Vallières, Christian; Roy, Claude; Levesque, Luc

    2010-10-01

    ABB Bomem is expanding its line of infrared remote sensing products with the addition of a new imaging spectroradiometer. The instrument is modular and support several configurations. One of its configurations is a multipixels sensor optimised for differential acquisition in the VLWIR to support research related to chemical detection. In that configuration, the instrument is equipped with a dual-input telescope to perform optical background subtraction. The resulting signal is the differential between the spectral radiance entering each input port. The other configuration is a general purpose imaging spectroradiometer designed to acquire the spectral signature of rapid events and fast targets in infrared. Overview of the design and results from tests and first field trials will be presented.

  20. [An object-oriented remote sensing image segmentation approach based on edge detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu-Min; Huai, Jian-Zhu; Tang, Zhong-Shi

    2010-06-01

    Satellite sensor technology endorsed better discrimination of various landscape objects. Image segmentation approaches to extracting conceptual objects and patterns hence have been explored and a wide variety of such algorithms abound. To this end, in order to effectively utilize edge and topological information in high resolution remote sensing imagery, an object-oriented algorithm combining edge detection and region merging is proposed. Susan edge filter is firstly applied to the panchromatic band of Quickbird imagery with spatial resolution of 0.61 m to obtain the edge map. Thanks to the resulting edge map, a two-phrase region-based segmentation method operates on the fusion image from panchromatic and multispectral Quickbird images to get the final partition result. In the first phase, a quad tree grid consisting of squares with sides parallel to the image left and top borders agglomerates the square subsets recursively where the uniform measure is satisfied to derive image object primitives. Before the merger of the second phrase, the contextual and spatial information, (e. g., neighbor relationship, boundary coding) of the resulting squares are retrieved efficiently by means of the quad tree structure. Then a region merging operation is performed with those primitives, during which the criterion for region merging integrates edge map and region-based features. This approach has been tested on the QuickBird images of some site in Sanxia area and the result is compared with those of ENVI Zoom Definiens. In addition, quantitative evaluation of the quality of segmentation results is also presented. Experiment results demonstrate stable convergence and efficiency. PMID:20707163

  1. Road Detection from Remote Sensing Images using Impervious Surface Characteristics: Review and Implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P. P.; Garg, R. D.

    2014-11-01

    The extraction of road network is an emerging area in information extraction from high-resolution satellite images (HRSI). It is also an interesting field that incorporates various tactics to achieve road network. The process of road detection from remote sensing images is quite complex, due to the presence of various noises. These noises could be the vehicles, crossing lines and toll bridges. Few small and large false road segments interrupt the extraction of road segments that happens due to the similar spectral behavior in heterogeneous objects. To achieve a better level of accuracy, numerous factors play their important role, such as spectral data of satellite sensor and the information related to land surface area. Therefore the interpretation varies on processing of images with different heuristic parameters. These parameters have tuned according to the road characteristics of the terrain in satellite images. There are several approaches proposed and implemented to extract the roads from HRSI comprising a single or hybrid method. This kind of hybrid approach has also improved the accuracy of road extraction in comparison to a single approach. Some characteristics related to impervious and non-impervious surfaces are used as salient features that help to improve the extraction of road area only in the correct manner. These characteristics also used to utilize the spatial, spectral and texture features to increase the accuracy of classified results. Therefore, aforesaid characteristics have been utilized in combination of road spectral properties to extract road network only with improved accuracy. This evaluated road network is quite accurate with the help of these defined methodologies.

  2. Whole-body MRI in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in patients with plasma cell neoplasms in comparison to the radiological skeletal survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanem, Nadir; Lohrmann, Christian; Pache, Gregor; Uhl, Markus; Saueressig, Ulrich; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Engelhardt, Monika [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    To compare the diagnostic value of whole-body MRI versus radiological skeletal survey (RSS) in staging patients with plasma cell neoplasms (PCN) and to evaluate the possible therapeutic impact of the replacement of RSS by whole-body MRI. Fifty-four patients with PCN [multiple myeloma (MM), n=47; monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS), n=7] were studied by whole-body MRI and RSS in a monocenter prospective analysis from August 2002 to May 2004. The MRIs were performed using a rolling table platform ''AngioSURF'' for unlimited field of view with a 1.5-T system (Magnetom Sonata/Maestro Class, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). A coronal STIR sequence (TR5500-4230/TE102-94/TI160) was used for imaging of the different body regions, including the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and upper and lower extremities. The RSS consisted of eight different projections of the axial and appendicular skeleton. In 41/54 (74%) patients, the results of the whole-body MRI and RSS were concordant. In 11/54 (20%) patients, both imaging techniques were negative. Bone involvement was observed in 30/54 (55%) patients; however, whole-body MRI revealed this more extensively than the RSS in 27/30 (90%) patients with concordant positive imaging findings. In 3/30 (10%) patients, both imaging techniques demonstrated a similar extent of bone marrow infiltration. In 10/54 (19%) patients, the whole-body MRI was superior to RSS in detecting bone marrow infiltration, whereas the RSS was negative. In 3/54 (6%) patients, the RSS was proven to be false positive by the clinical course, whereas the whole-body MRI was truly negative. Whole-body MRI is a fast and highly effective method for staging PCN patients by the use of a rolling table platform. Moreover, it is more sensitive and specific than RSS and reveals bone marrow infiltration and extensive disease more reliably. Therefore, whole-body MRI should be performed as an additional method of exactly staging PCN patients and - with more data in the field - may even prove to be an alternate and more sensitive staging procedure than RSS in PCN patients. (orig.)

  3. Whole-body MRI in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in patients with plasma cell neoplasms in comparison to the radiological skeletal survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic value of whole-body MRI versus radiological skeletal survey (RSS) in staging patients with plasma cell neoplasms (PCN) and to evaluate the possible therapeutic impact of the replacement of RSS by whole-body MRI. Fifty-four patients with PCN [multiple myeloma (MM), n=47; monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS), n=7] were studied by whole-body MRI and RSS in a monocenter prospective analysis from August 2002 to May 2004. The MRIs were performed using a rolling table platform ''AngioSURF'' for unlimited field of view with a 1.5-T system (Magnetom Sonata/Maestro Class, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). A coronal STIR sequence (TR5500-4230/TE102-94/TI160) was used for imaging of the different body regions, including the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and upper and lower extremities. The RSS consisted of eight different projections of the axial and appendicular skeleton. In 41/54 (74%) patients, the results of the whole-body MRI and RSS were concordant. In 11/54 (20%) patients, both imaging techniques were negative. Bone involvement was observed in 30/54 (55%) patients; however, whole-body MRI revealed this more extensively than the RSS in 27/30 (90%) patients with concordant positive imaging findings. In 3/30 (10%) patients, both imaging techniques demonstrated a similar extent of bone marrow infiltration. In 10/54 (19%) patients, the whole-body MRI was superior to RSS in detecting bone marrow infiltration, whereas the RSS was negative. In 3/54 (6%) patients, the RSS was proven to be false positive by the clinical course, whereas the whole-body MRI was truly negative. Whole-body MRI is a fast and highly effective method for staging PCN patients by the use of a rolling table platform. Moreover, it is more sensitive and specific than RSS and reveals bone marrow infiltration and extensive disease more reliably. Therefore, whole-body MRI should be performed as an additional method of exactly staging PCN patients and - with more data in the field - may even prove to be an alternate and more sensitive staging procedure than RSS in PCN patients. (orig.)

  4. Detection and mapping of delays in early cortical folding derived from in utero MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A.; Kim, Kio; Roosta, Ahmad; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Understanding human brain development in utero and detecting cortical abnormalities related to specific clinical conditions is an important area of research. In this paper, we describe and evaluate methodology for detection and mapping of delays in early cortical folding from population-based studies of fetal brain anatomies imaged in utero. We use a general linear modeling framework to describe spatiotemporal changes in curvature of the developing brain and explore the ability to detect and localize delays in cortical folding in the presence of uncertainty in estimation of the fetal age. We apply permutation testing to examine which regions of the brain surface provide the most statistical power to detect a given folding delay at a given developmental stage. The presented methodology is evaluated using MR scans of fetuses with normal brain development and gestational ages ranging from 20.57 to 27.86 weeks. This period is critical in early cortical folding and the formation of the primary and secondary sulci. Finally, we demonstrate a clinical application of the framework for detection and localization of folding delays in fetuses with isolated mild ventriculomegaly.

  5. Far-ultraviolet imaging spectrograph and scanning grating spectrometers for the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) experiment is an optical remote sensing platform consisting of eight sensors, (spectrographs, spectrometers, and photometers) covering the wavelength range 550 to 8744 angstrom. RAIDS employs a mechanical scan platform to view the Earth's limb and measure line-of-sight column emission from tangent altitudes from 50 to 750 km. These measurements provide vertical profiles of atmospheric dayglow and nightglow from the mesosphere to the upper regions of the F-region ionosphere. RAIDS will be flown on the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) J weather satellite through the auspices of the US Air Force Space Test Program. The RAIDS wavelength and altitude coverage allows remote sensing of the major and many minor constituents in the thermosphere and ionosphere. These measurements will be used as part of a proof of concept for remote sensing of ionospheric and neutral density profiles. The RAIDS database will be used to study composition, thermal structure, and couplings between the mesosphere, thermosphere, thermal structure, and couplings between the mesosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere. RAIDS is a joint venture of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the Aerospace Corporation. The authors describe the subset of RAIDS instruments developed at NRL covering the far to near UV regions (1,300 to 4,000 angstrom)

  6. Assessment of the diagnostic value of dual-energy CT and MRI in the detection of iatrogenically induced injuries of anterior cruciate ligament in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fickert, S.; Niks, M.; Lehmann, L. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Center of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Mannheim (Germany); Dinter, D.J.; Hammer, M.; Weckbach, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Jochum, S. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard of reference for the non-invasive evaluation of ligament injuries of the knee. The development of dual-energy CT (DE-CT) made it possible to differentiate between tissues of different density by two simultaneous CT measurements with different tube voltages. This approach enables DE-CT to discriminate ligament structures without intra-articular contrast media injection. The aims of this study were on the one hand to determine the delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and on the other hand to assess the diagnostic value of DE-CT and MRI in the detection of iatrogenically induced injury of the ACL in a porcine knee joint model. Twenty porcine hind legs, which were placed in a preformed cast in order to achieve a standardized position, were scanned using DE-CT. Thereafter, a 1.5-T MRI using a standard protocol was performed. The imaging procedures were repeated with the same parameters after inducing defined lesions (total or partial incision) on the ACL arthroscopically. After post-processing, two radiologists and two orthopedic surgeons first analyzed the delineation of the ACL and then, using a consensus approach, the iatrogenically induced lesions. The result of the arthrotomy was defined as the standard of reference. The ACL could be visualized both on DE-CT and MRI in 100% of the cases. As for the MRI, the sensitivity and specificity of detecting the cruciate ligament lesion respectively compared with the defined arthrotomy was 66.7% and 78.6% for intact cruciate ligaments, 100% and 75% in the case of a complete lesion, 33.3% and 78.6% for lesions of the anteromedial bundle, and 0% and 100% for lesions of the posterolateral bundle. In comparison, DE-CT demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 66.7% and 71.4% in the case of intact cruciate ligaments, 75% and 68.8% in the case of completely discontinued ACLs, 0% and 92.9% in the case of lesions of the anteromedial bundle, and 25% and 87.5% in the case of lesions of the posterolateral bundle. The present ex vivo experiment shows that both study modalities (DE-CT and MRI) are equal with regard to the delineation of the ACL, while MRI achieved higher sensitivity and specificity regarding iatrogenically induced complete ACL lesions. DE-CT could be a possible alternative to MRI for certain indications in the diagnosis of a knee ligament injury. (orig.)

  7. Assessment of the diagnostic value of dual-energy CT and MRI in the detection of iatrogenically induced injuries of anterior cruciate ligament in a porcine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard of reference for the non-invasive evaluation of ligament injuries of the knee. The development of dual-energy CT (DE-CT) made it possible to differentiate between tissues of different density by two simultaneous CT measurements with different tube voltages. This approach enables DE-CT to discriminate ligament structures without intra-articular contrast media injection. The aims of this study were on the one hand to determine the delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and on the other hand to assess the diagnostic value of DE-CT and MRI in the detection of iatrogenically induced injury of the ACL in a porcine knee joint model. Twenty porcine hind legs, which were placed in a preformed cast in order to achieve a standardized position, were scanned using DE-CT. Thereafter, a 1.5-T MRI using a standard protocol was performed. The imaging procedures were repeated with the same parameters after inducing defined lesions (total or partial incision) on the ACL arthroscopically. After post-processing, two radiologists and two orthopedic surgeons first analyzed the delineation of the ACL and then, using a consensus approach, the iatrogenically induced lesions. The result of the arthrotomy was defined as the standard of reference. The ACL could be visualized both on DE-CT and MRI in 100% of the cases. As for the MRI, the sensitivity and specificity of detecting the cruciate ligament lesion respectively compared with the defined arthrotomy was 66.7% and 78.6% for intact cruciate ligaments, 100% and 75% in the case of a complete lesion, 33.3% and 78.6% for lesions of the anteromedial bundle, and 0% and 100% for lesions of the posterolateral bundle. In comparison, DE-CT demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 66.7% and 71.4% in the case of intact cruciate ligaments, 75% and 68.8% in the case of completely discontinued ACLs, 0% and 92.9% in the case of lesions of the anteromedial bundle, and 25% and 87.5% in the case of lesions of the posterolateral bundle. The present ex vivo experiment shows that both study modalities (DE-CT and MRI) are equal with regard to the delineation of the ACL, while MRI achieved higher sensitivity and specificity regarding iatrogenically induced complete ACL lesions. DE-CT could be a possible alternative to MRI for certain indications in the diagnosis of a knee ligament injury. (orig.)

  8. Detection and monitoring of super sandstorm and its impacts on Arabian Sea-Remote sensing approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.; Aswini, M.A.

    pressure, wind speed and direction, geo-potential height for different pressure level, and remote sensing methods. Finally, an attempt is made to investigate the impact of super sandstorm on the Arabian Sea by studying sea surface temperature...

  9. Applications in Bioastronautics and Bioinformatics: Early Radiation Cataracts Detected by Noninvasive, Quantitative, and Remote Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; King, James F.; Giblin, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars is a key goal in NASA's exploration planning in the next 20 years. Maintaining crew health and good vision is certainly an important aspect of achieving a successful mission. Continuous radiation exposure is a risk factor for radiation-induced cataracts in astronauts because radiation exposure in space travel has the potential of accelerating the aging process (ref. 1). A patented compact device (ref. 2) based on the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) was designed for monitoring an astronaut's ocular health during long-duration space travel. This capability of early diagnosis, unmatched by any other clinical technique in use today, may enable prompt initiation of preventive/curative therapy. An Internet web-based system integrating photon correlation data and controlling the hardware to monitor cataract development in vivo at a remote site in real time (teleophthalmology) is currently being developed. The new technology detects cataracts very early (at the molecular level). Cataract studies onboard the International Space Station will be helpful in quantifying any adverse effect of radiation to ocular health. The normal lens in a human eye, situated behind the cornea, is a transparent tissue. It contains 35 wt % protein and 65 wt % water. Aging, disease (e.g., diabetes), smoking, dehydration, malnutrition, and exposure to ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation can cause agglomeration of the lens proteins. Protein aggregation can take place anywhere in the lens, causing lens opacity. The aggregation and opacification could produce nuclear (central portion of the lens) or cortical (peripheral) cataracts. Nuclear and posterior subcapsular (the membrane's capsule surrounds the whole lens) cataracts, being on the visual optical axis of the eye, cause visual impairment that can finally lead to blindness. The lens proteins, in their native state, are small in size. As a cataract develops, this size grows from a few nanometers (transparent) to several micrometers (cloudy). Ansari and Datiles have shown that DLS can detect cataracts at least two to three orders of magnitude earlier noninvasively and quantitatively than the best imaging (Scheimpflug) techniques in clinical use today (ref. 3).

  10. Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion detected by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion by MRI. A total of 57 patients with palsy following a supratenotorial cerebrovascular lesion were prospectively studied. Wallerian degeneration was detected as a high signal intensity (HSI) in 37 patients between 70 days and 100 days after the onset, but not detected in the remaining 27 patients. Patient with as HSI in all areas of the cerebral peduncle had a large lesion involving the hemisphere. Patient with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion confined to the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. Patient with an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion of parietal lobe or temporal lobe which spares the corticospinal tract originating from the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. These findings suggest that as HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle may reveal Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract, and an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle may show Wallerian degeneration of the corticopontine tract. The functional recovery of paresis was poor in all patients with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle, while it was good in all patients without an HSI in that region. Our data suggested that somatotopical localization of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle may be identified by detecting Wallerian degeneration following a supratentorial lesion, and the functional recovery of patients with paresis could be predicted according to presence or absence of Wallerian degeneration at the center of the cerebral peduncle. (author)

  11. Diagnostic value of whole-body MRI and bone scintigraphy in the detection of osseous metastases in patients with breast cancer - a prospective double-blinded study at two hospital centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) and bone scintigraphy (BS) for the screening of bone metastases for the first time in a large and homogeneous patient collective with breast cancer in a systematic and controlled study. 213 breast cancer patients were evaluated for bone metastases under randomized, double-blinded and prospective conditions at two hospitals. All participants were examined by WB-MRI and BS over an average period of four days. The examinations were performed separately at two different locations. The WB-MRI protocol included T 1-TSE and STIR sequences. WB-MRI and BS were reviewed independently by experienced radiologists and nuclear medicine specialists in a consensus reading. In 66 % of cases bone metastases were excluded by both procedures, and bone metastases were detected concordantly in 2 % of cases. In 7 % of cases there were discrepant results: in 7 cases BS was false-positive when WB-MRI was negative. In 5 / 7 cases BS was negative when WB-MRI identified bone metastases. In 89 % of cases BS was uncertain when WB-MRI was true-negative. In 17 % of cases WB-MRI showed important (non-) tumor-associated findings. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy for WB-MRI were 90 %, 94 %, 82 %, 98 % and 99 % and for BS those were 40 %, 81 %, 36 %, 91 % and 93 %. (orig.)

  12. The occipital cortex in detection and categorisation abilities: an fMRI study in hemianopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows: Previous studies have shown that the right and left hemispheres are predominant for detection and categorization tasks, respectively. This asymmetry appears to be instantiated at a processing stage as early as the occipital cortex. The present study was intended to assess the cerebral network responsible for natural scenes perception in hemianopic patients suffering from an occipital cortex lesion. One Left and one Right hemianopic patient (LH or RH; respectively right and left occipital damage) were compared with 14 healthy controls in detection and categorisation tasks of natural scenes. Both tasks were performed in a 1.5 T scanner to collect anatomical and functional data. In healthy controls, occipital activation was observed in the extra-striate areas of both hemispheres in the detection task but only of the left hemisphere in the categorization task. The LH (patient showed a bilateral occipital activation in both tasks. while, the RH patient showed unilateral right (intact) occipital activation in both tasks. These results highlight the importance of the perceptual task (detection vs. categorization) on the hemispheric asymmetry. They also suggest that different cortical reorganisations take place depending on the occipital lesion side

  13. Breast-conserving surgery and autogenous tissue reconstruction in patients with breast cancer: efficacy of MRI of the breast in the detection of recurrent disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieber, Andrea; Schramm, Katharina; Nuessle, Karin; Brambs, Hans-Juergen [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Ulm, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Helms, Gisela; Pueckler, Stephanie von; Kreienberg, Rolf; Kuehn, Thorsten [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ulm, Prittwitzstrasse 43, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    The objective of the present study was the evaluation of MRI of the breast in the follow-up of patients who had undergone autogenous tissue breast reconstruction using either a latissimus-dorsi muscle flap or a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap as correlated with patients' clinical, conventional mammographic and sonographic findings. Included in the study were 41 patients. The MRI consisted of T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences and dynamic measurements pre- and postcontrast using T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) sequence. The following factors were evaluated: recognition of the flap; evidence of edema; skin thickening; and focally increased contrast medium uptake. Contrast medium dynamics were documented in instances of increased focal uptake. Flaps could be distinguished from surrounding residual breast tissue in all cases. Edema and skin thickening in the residual mammary tissue and flap implant were observed in 72.7% of patients undergoing radiation, but in only 15.8% of those not undergoing radiotherapy. The MRI excluded disease recurrence in 4 patients with suspicious mammographic and/or sonographic findings. One instance of multifocal disease recurrence identified at MRI evaded detection with all other imaging techniques used. The MRI returned false-positive findings in three cases. Because of their configuration and contrast medium uptake dynamics and their location immediately adjacent to the contact zone between the flap implant and residual mammary tissue, these findings were impossible to differentiate from a recurrent carcinoma. The MRI of the breast is generally suitable for follow-up examination of autogenous tissue reconstructions. Problems may be encountered in the evaluation of the contact zone between local adipose tissue and the flap leading to false-positive results. (orig.)

  14. Breast-conserving surgery and autogenous tissue reconstruction in patients with breast cancer: efficacy of MRI of the breast in the detection of recurrent disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present study was the evaluation of MRI of the breast in the follow-up of patients who had undergone autogenous tissue breast reconstruction using either a latissimus-dorsi muscle flap or a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap as correlated with patients' clinical, conventional mammographic and sonographic findings. Included in the study were 41 patients. The MRI consisted of T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences and dynamic measurements pre- and postcontrast using T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) sequence. The following factors were evaluated: recognition of the flap; evidence of edema; skin thickening; and focally increased contrast medium uptake. Contrast medium dynamics were documented in instances of increased focal uptake. Flaps could be distinguished from surrounding residual breast tissue in all cases. Edema and skin thickening in the residual mammary tissue and flap implant were observed in 72.7% of patients undergoing radiation, but in only 15.8% of those not undergoing radiotherapy. The MRI excluded disease recurrence in 4 patients with suspicious mammographic and/or sonographic findings. One instance of multifocal disease recurrence identified at MRI evaded detection with all other imaging techniques used. The MRI returned false-positive findings in three cases. Because of their configuration and contrast medium uptake dynamics and their location immediately adjacent to the contact zone between the flap implant and residual mammary tissue, these findings were impossible to differentiate from a recurrent carcinoma. The MRI of the breast is generally suitable for follow-up examination of autogenous tissue reconstructions. Problems may be encountered in the evaluation of the contact zone between local adipose tissue and the flap leading to false-positive results. (orig.)

  15. Utilization of combined remote sensing techniques to detect environmental variables influencing malaria vector densities in rural West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dambach Peter

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The use of remote sensing has found its way into the field of epidemiology within the last decades. With the increased sensor resolution of recent and future satellites new possibilities emerge for high resolution risk modeling and risk mapping. Methods A SPOT 5 satellite image, taken during the rainy season 2009 was used for calculating indices by combining the image's spectral bands. Besides the widely used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI other indices were tested for significant correlation against field observations. Multiple steps, including the detection of surface water, its breeding appropriateness for Anopheles and modeling of vector imagines abundance, were performed. Data collection on larvae, adult vectors and geographic parameters in the field, was amended by using remote sensing techniques to gather data on altitude (Digital Elevation Model = DEM, precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission = TRMM, land surface temperatures (LST. Results The DEM derived altitude as well as indices calculations combining the satellite's spectral bands (NDTI = Normalized Difference Turbidity Index, NDWI Mac Feeters = Normalized Difference Water Index turned out to be reliable indicators for surface water in the local geographic setting. While Anopheles larvae abundance in habitats is driven by multiple, interconnected factors - amongst which the NDVI - and precipitation events, the presence of vector imagines was found to be correlated negatively to remotely sensed LST and positively to the cumulated amount of rainfall in the preceding 15 days and to the Normalized Difference Pond Index (NDPI within the 500 m buffer zone around capture points. Conclusions Remotely sensed geographical and meteorological factors, including precipitations, temperature, as well as vegetation, humidity and land cover indicators could be used as explanatory variables for surface water presence, larval development and imagines densities. This modeling approach based on remotely sensed information is potentially useful for counter measures that are putting on at the environmental side, namely vector larvae control via larviciding and water body reforming.

  16. Optimization of Visual Tasks for Detecting Visual Cortex Activity in fMRI Studies

    OpenAIRE

    "A. Mirzajani; Oghabian, M. A.; N. Riyahi Alam; k. Firouznia; Saberi, H.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: functional magnetic resonance imaging is a useful non-invasive technique for the evaluation and mapping of human brain, especially the visual cortex. One of the most important subjects in this background is optimizing visual stimuli in various forms of visual tasks for acquiring significant and ro-bust signals. Materials and methods: The effects of physical pa-rameters of visual stimuli on 14 healthy volunteers for detecting visual cortical activity were evaluated by functional ...

  17. Investigation of atmospheric insect wing-beat frequencies and iridescence features using a multispectral kHz remote detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebru, Alem; Rohwer, Erich; Neethling, Pieter; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative investigation of insect activity in their natural habitat is a challenging task for entomologists. It is difficult to address questions such as flight direction, predation strength, and overall activities using the current techniques such as traps and sweep nets. A multispectral kHz remote detection system using sunlight as an illumination source is presented. We explore the possibilities of remote optical classification of insects based on their wing-beat frequencies and iridescence features. It is shown that the wing-beat frequency of the fast insect events can be resolved by implementing high-sampling frequency. The iridescence features generated from the change of color in two channels (visible and near-infrared) during wing-beat cycle are presented. We show that the shape of the wing-beat trajectory is different for different insects. The flight direction of an atmospheric insect is also determined using a silicon quadrant detector.

  18. Follow-up MRI in dural arteriovenous malformations involving the cavernous sinus: Emphasis on detection of venous thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabuki, N.; Fujita, N.; Hashimoto, T.; Fujii, K.; Miura, T.; Mitomo, M.; Kawai, R.; Kozuka, T. (Osaka Univ. Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-10-01

    Six patients with a dural arteriovenous malformation (dural AVM) involving the cavernous sinus were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging in order to assess change in the lesions. Spin-echo (SE) imaging of three patients in whom the AVM appeared to have closed at least 1 month earlier showed neither apparent flow void in the involved cavernous sinus nor evidence of venous thrombosis. SE images of the other three patients who had not been cured by external carotid artery embolization, detected persisting arteriovenous shunts, including high-flow cortical venous drainage, seen as flow void. Two-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (2D TOF MRA) was performed simultaneously in three patients. Whereas shunting blood and the normal cavernous sinus were of high intensity, presumed thrombosed cavernous sinuses were isointense with stationary brain tissue. The aims of this report were to assess the state of a dural AVM of the cavernous sinus by MRI, and to describe a preliminary application of two-dimensional time-of-flight (2D TOF) MRA. (orig./GDG).

  19. Remote Detection of Marine Microbes, Small Invertebrates, Harmful Algae, and Biotoxins using the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Scholin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The advent of ocean observatories is creating unique opportunities for deploying novel sensor systems. We are exploring that potential through the development and application of the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP. ESP is an electromechanical/fluidic system designed to collect discrete water samples, concentrate microorganisms, and automate application of molecular probe technologies. Development and application of ESP grew from extensive partnerships galvanized by the National Oceanographic Partnership Program. Near-real-time observations are currently achieved using low-density DNA probe and protein arrays. Filter-based sandwich hybridization methodology enables direct detection of ribosomal RNA sequences diagnostic for groups of bacteria and archaea, as well as a variety of invertebrates and harmful algal species. An antibody-based technique is used for detecting domoic acid, an algal biotoxin. To date, ESP has been deployed in ocean waters from the near surface to 1000 m. Shallow-water deployments demonstrated application of all four types of assays in single deployments lasting up to 30 days and provided the first remote detection of such phylogenetically diverse organisms and metabolites on one platform. Deep-water applications focused on detection of invertebrates associated with whale falls, using remotely operated vehicle-based operations lasting several days. Current work emphasizes incorporating a four-channel, real-time polymerase chain reaction module, extending operations to 4000-m water depth, and increasing deployment duration.

  20. A robust active contour edge detection algorithm based on local Gaussian statistical model for oil slick remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yu; Wang, Yaxuan; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2015-08-01

    Edge detection is a crucial method for the location and quantity estimation of oil slick when oil spills on the sea. In this paper, we present a robust active contour edge detection algorithm for oil spill remote sensing images. In the proposed algorithm, we define a local Gaussian data fitting energy term with spatially varying means and variances, and this data fitting energy term is introduced into a global minimization active contour (GMAC) framework. The energy function minimization is achieved fast by a dual formulation of the weighted total variation norm. The proposed algorithm avoids the existence of local minima, does not require the definition of initial contour, and is robust to weak boundaries, high noise and severe intensity inhomogeneity exiting in oil slick remote sensing images. Furthermore, the edge detection of oil slick and the correction of intensity inhomogeneity are simultaneously achieved via the proposed algorithm. The experiment results have shown that a superior performance of proposed algorithm over state-of-the-art edge detection algorithms. In addition, the proposed algorithm can also deal with the special images with the object and background of the same intensity means but different variances.

  1. Detection and Monitoring of E-Waste Contamination through Remote Sensing and Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garb, Yaakov; Friedlander, Lonia

    2015-04-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of today's fastest growing waste streams, and also one of the more problematic, as this end-of-life product contains precious metals mixed with and embedded in a variety of low value and potentially harmful plastic and other materials. This combination creates a powerful incentive for informal value chains that transport, extract from, and dispose of e-waste materials in far-ranging and unregulated ways, and especially in settings where regulation and livelihood alternatives are sparse, most notably in areas of India, China, and Africa. E-waste processing is known to release a variety of contaminants, such as heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants, including flame retardants, dioxins and furans. In several sites, where the livelihoods of entire communities are dependent on e-waste processing, the resulting contaminants have been demonstrated to enter the hydrological system and food chain and have serious health and ecological effects. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time the usefulness of multi-spectral remote sensing imagery to detect and monitor the release and possibly the dispersal of heavy metal contaminants released in e-waste processing. While similar techniques have been used for prospecting or for studying heavy metal contamination from mining and large industrial facilities, we suggest that these techniques are of particular value in detecting contamination from the more dispersed, shifting, and ad-hoc kinds of release typical of e-waste processing. Given the increased resolution and decreased price of multi-spectral imagery, such techniques may offer a remarkably cost-effective and rapidly responsive means of assessing and monitoring this kind of contamination. We will describe the geochemical and multi-spectral image-processing principles underlying our approach, and show how we have applied these to an area in which we have a detailed, multi-temporal, spatially referenced, and ground-validated inventory of several hundred e-waste processing and disposal sites. We have compiled these data in recent years using field observation, interviews with e-waste workers, and systematic manual inspection of high resolution ortho-photo imagery (Garb and Davis, 2015). Drawing on this inventory, we offer a proof-of-concept demonstration of an image-processing algorithm that can reliably detect such sites. We will also discuss several ways in which we are extending this research. One of these is testing our ability to scale up and apply this approach to similar contamination sites in other geologic contexts. Relatedly, drawing on our extensive chrono-sequence of sites with differing contextual and use characteristics, we are exploring the factors shaping if and how certain soil types and/or local and regional mineral assemblages retain heavy metal contaminants more strongly (and for longer periods of time) than others, or whether these factors mediate contaminant transport.

  2. Lesion detection and assessment of extrahepatic findings in abdominal MRI using hepatocyte specific contrast agents – comparison of Gd-EOB-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA

    OpenAIRE

    Ringe, Kristina I.; Boll, Daniel T; Husarik, Daniela B; Bashir, Mustafa R; Gupta, Rajan T; Merkle, Elmar M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the contrast agent performance of Gd-EOB-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA for detection and assessment of extrahepatic findings, semi-quantitatively and qualitatively. METHODS: 13 patients with 19 extrahepatic lesions underwent liver MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA. Quantitative and relative SNR measurements were performed in each dataset in the arterial and portalvenous phase within the extrahepatic lesion, aorta, inferior vena cava, portal vein, spleen, pancreas and renal corte...

  3. Remote ballistic emplacement of an electro-optical and acoustic target detection and localization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Aaron; Mellini, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled non line of sight (NLOS) and beyond line of sight (BLOS) environments is critical in the asymmetric battlefield of future conflicts. The ability to detect and accurately locate hostile forces in difficult terrain or urban environments can dramatically increase the survivability and effectiveness of dismounted soldiers, especially when they are limited to the resources available only to the small unit. The Sensor Mortar Network (SMortarNet) is a 60mm Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) mortar designed to give the Squad near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled NLOS environments. SMortarNet is designed to track targets both acoustically and electro optically and can fuse tracks between, the acoustic, EO, and magnetic modalities on board. The system is linked to other mortar nodes and the user via a masterless frequency hopping spread spectrum ad-hoc mesh radio network. This paper will discuss SMortarNet in the context of a squad level dismounted soldier, its technical capabilities, and its benefit to the small unit Warfighter. The challenges with ballistic remote emplacement of sensitive components and the on board signal processing capabilities of the system will also be covered. The paper will also address how the sensor network can be integrated with existing soldier infrastructure, such as the NettWarrior platform, for rapid transition to soldier systems. Networks of low power sensors can have many forms, but the more practical networks for warfighters are ad hoc radio-based systems that can be rapidly deployed and can leverage a range of assets available at a given time. The low power long life networks typically have limited bandwidth and may have unreliable communication depending on the network health, which makes autonomous sensors a critical component of the network. SMortarNet reduces data to key information features at the sensor itself. The smart sensing approach enables significant data reduction before transmission, to facilitate sharing data among sensors in challenging environments, without requiring high bandwidth communication channels. When required by the user, SMortarNet can transmit full frame images and streaming audio by using the full network bandwidth.

  4. Systematic study of protein detection mechanism of self-assembling 19F NMR/MRI nanoprobes toward rational design and improved sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Yousuke; Kiminami, Keishi; Mizusawa, Keigo; Matsuo, Kazuya; Narazaki, Michiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Hamachi, Itaru

    2011-08-01

    (19)F NMR/MRI probe is expected to be a powerful tool for selective sensing of biologically active agents owing to its high sensitivity and no background signals in live bodies. We have recently reported a unique supramolecular strategy for specific protein detection using a protein ligand-tethered self-assembling (19)F probe. This method is based on a recognition-driven disassembly of the nanoprobes, which induced a clear turn-on signal of (19)F NMR/MRI. In the present study, we conducted a systematic investigation of the relationship between structure and properties of the probe to elucidate the mechanism of this turn-on (19)F NMR sensing in detail. Newly synthesized (19)F probes showed three distinct behaviors in response to the target protein: off/on, always-on, and always-off modes. We clearly demonstrated that these differences in protein response could be explained by differences in the stability of the probe aggregates and that "moderate stability" of the aggregates produced an ideal turn-on response in protein detection. We also successfully controlled the aggregate stability by changing the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity balance of the probes. The detailed understanding of the detection mechanism allowed us to rationally design a turn-on (19)F NMR probe with improved sensitivity, giving a higher image intensity for the target protein in (19)F MRI. PMID:21699190

  5. Experimental early detection of acute mesenteric ischemia with functional MRI (DWI) and parallel imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of diagnosing in statu nascendi mesenteric ischemia using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in a porcine model. All experiments were approved by the animal care committee at the district administration. Materials and Methods: Mesenteric blood supply was studied in ten healthy female pigs (weight ?50 kg) with artificially induced mesenteric ischemia. In the DSA technique a branch of the superior mesenteric artery was embolized with tissue glue or small particles. DWI was performed using a 1.5 T MR scanner before embolization and 30 and 60 minutes after embolization using a 32-channel receiver coil. ADC maps were calculated for all animals. The findings were correlated to angiographic and autoptic findings. The image quality of DWI was assessed by means of SNR measurements and diagnostic impact by CNR measurements. Results: Embolization of the mesenteric branches was technically successful in all cases. DWI of the bowel was feasible with the applied sequences. In all animals, DWI displayed distinct cytotoxic edema as the earliest sign of ischemia thirty minutes after induction of ischemia. Furthermore, DWI yielded a distinct reduction in the water diffusion coefficient in all animals. Variance analysis showed good correlation between CNR measurements and infarction areas. Autoptic findings could confirm the detected infarction areas by DWI. Conclusion: DWI using parallel imaging techniques is feasible for the early detection of acute mesenteric ischemia. The presented DWI results offer encouraging prospects regarding more rapid disease diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. An Efficient Scheme for Brain Tumor Detection of MRI Brain Images Using Euclidean Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandhir Kaur Kaur

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumor is one the most common or major reason for death among individuals. It is apparent that survival of chances of patient could be expanded if tumor is identified at its initial stage. In this research work, we have developed a simple approach for detection of brain tumor which is based on the method using Euclidean distance classifier and making use of feature vector table and which over comes the limitations of conventional in which combination of supervised and unsupervised learning have been implemented to build cancer detection system, as there is huge overhead in this approach and there is a need to maintain large size training datasets. The new proposed method first convert the image into indexed image, than after de noising it with 3*3 mean filter, it conducts the block wise scanning to get feature set of statistical features in both frequency and time domain and finally based on Euclidean distance measures an optimized tumor part is segmented which is ROI (region of interest then this segmented part is validated and test to arrive at exact brain tumor part required. The result show high reduction of time, increases specificity with better accuracy in terms of true positive rates.

  7. The accuracy of clinical symptoms in detecting cauda equina syndrome in patients undergoing acute MRI of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahad, Abdul; Elsayed, Mohammed; Tohid, Hassaan

    2015-08-01

    A large number of patients do not have cauda equina syndrome (CES) on MRI to account for their clinical findings; consequently, the majority of urgent scans requested are normal. We aimed to determine whether any clinical manifestation of CES, as stated in Royal College of Radiology guidelines, could predict the presence of established CES on MRI. We also aimed to support a larger study to develop a more universal assessment tool for acute lower back pain.A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who warranted urgent MRI was conducted. Seventy-nine patients were eligible for study. The Kendall's tau test was used for statistical analysis of all data. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered to be significant. MRI was performed in 62 patients out of 79.A total of 32.9% of patients had scans within 24 hours of admission. Nine of these patients were referred to neurosurgery for urgent neurosurgical review. Of these, 6.3% of patients had an established CES on MRI scan. One patient who had an out-patient MRI spine (15 days from hospital presentation) was found to have an established CES, was urgently referred to spinal surgery and underwent primary fenestration excision of the lumbar vertebra. No clinical features that were able to predict the presence of an established CES on MRI were elucidated. Findings included decreased anal tone 7.6% (p?=?0.282), faecal incontinence 3.8% (p?=?0.648), urinary retention 7.6% (p?=?0.510), bladder incontinence 8.9% (p?=?0.474), constipation 2.5% (p?=?0.011) and saddle anaesthesia 8.9% (p?=?0.368). Patients who had an abnormal MRI spine for back pain prior to this presentation showed a correlation with a newly diagnosed CES on MRI (p?=?0.016) with a correlation coefficient of 0.272. PMID:26306934

  8. Retinoblastoma: CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beets-Tan, R.G.H. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Hendriks, M.J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Ramos, L.M.P. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Tan, K.E.W.P. (Dept. of Ophthalmology, Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of CT and MRI at 0.5 T in the diagnosis and staging of retinoblastoma, we studied 11 patients in whom retinoblastoma was clinically suspected. Nine of the eleven had surgically proven retinoblastoma; in the other two a diagnosis of Coats' desease was made. MRI was not as specific as CT for diagnosing retinoblastoma, due to its lack of sensitivity in detecting calcification; it did, however, have superior contrast resolution. On MRI, Coats' disease was reliably diagnosed and easily differentiated from retinoblastoma. Moreover, the greater ability of MRI to differentiate subretinal fluid from tumour also confers high accuracy in measuring tumour size. CT is still the study of choice in the diagnosis of retinoblastoma, but when MRI is available, it should be performed for better differentiation from lesions such as Coats' disease. (orig.)

  9. Heart-induced movements in the thorax as detected by MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Solberg, Lars Erik; Fosse, Erik; Hol, Per Kristian

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide information for the use of radar in diagnostics a qualitative map of movements in the thorax has been obtained. This map was based on magnetic resonance image sequences of a human thorax during suspended respiration. The movements were measured using two distinct techniques. Segmentation provided measures of aorta dilatation and displacements, and image edge detection indicated other movements. The largest heart movements were found in the anterior and left regions of the heart with in-plane displacements on the order of 1 cm and which caused lung vessels displacements on the order of 2-3mm especially on the left side due to the heart ventricular. Mechanical coupling between the heart and aorta caused aorta displacements and shape distortions. Despite this coupling, aorta dilatations most likely reflected blood pressure variations.

  10. Use of a remote sensing approach to detect landslide thermal behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondini, A.; Carlà, R.; Reichenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Guzzetti, F.

    2009-04-01

    The type, abundance and distribution of landsides in an area are controlled by the morphological, lithological and land use settings, and by the intensity and frequency of the triggers. Knowing the location and abundance of landslides is important for scientific and societal reasons. Most commonly, geomorphologists map landslides in the field or through the interpretation of stereoscopic aerial photographs. These are expensive and time consuming operations that require experienced personnel. The possibility to detect and map landslides over large area using remote sensing technology will improve the current capability to predict landslides, and to evaluate the susceptibility of an area to slope instability phenomena. In this work, we exploit airborne and space borne optical (thermal) imagery to evaluate the possibility to detect and map landslides. For the experiment, we select the Collazzone study area, that extend for about 80 square kilometers in Umbria, central Italy. For this area, detailed geomorphological information exists, including a multi-temporal landslide inventory map at 1:10,000 scale. We make the hypothesis that a difference in surface temperature exists between landslide and stable areas, due to different soil moisture conditions. We verify the hypothesis at two geographical scales: (i) at the (large) "single landslide" scale, and (ii) at the (small) catchment scale. Both approaches require the measurement of surface temperature at multiple sites, and the production of Land Surface Temperature (LST) maps. For individual landslides, we use images obtained on 3 May 2004 by a Daedalus 1268 Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM), flown onboard a Dornier 228-110 aircraft operated by the Airborne Research and Survey Facility (ARSF) of the UK National Environment Research Council (NERC). For our catchment scale analysis, we use a L1A satellite image obtained on 3 July 2004 and acquired by ASTER sensor onboard TERRA satellite and a L1G satellite image obtained on 3 August 2001 by ETM+ sensor onboard LANDSAT 7. For our large scale, individual landslide, analysis we perform a pixel by pixel comparison of the surface temperature measurements obtained by processing the ATM data inside individual landslides, and in the immediately surrounding stable areas. For our basin scale analysis, we overlay in a GIS a map of surface temperature, obtained by processing the ASTER and LANDSAT images, on the landslide inventory map. We then compare the statistical distributions of the surface temperature measured in landslide and in stable areas. Preliminary results indicate that the mean and the mode of the distribution of surface temperature in landslide areas are lower than in the stable areas. This is consistent with the observation that in the study area landslides are wetter than stable areas. When studying individual landslides the distinction is less clear, but pixels located inside landslides are, in general, colder (i.e., wetter) than those located in the immediately surrounding stable areas where land cover types are similar.

  11. The role of FDG-PET, HMPAO-SPET and MRI in the detection of brain involvement in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao Chiahung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Lan Jungliang [Division of Rheumatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); ChangLai Shengping [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chung-Shan Medical and Dental College, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Liao Kokaung [Electron Microscopic Laboratory, Chung-Shan Medical and Dental College, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Yen Rouhfang; Chieng Poonung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1999-02-01

    Involvement of the brain is one of the most important complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); however, its diagnosis is difficult due to the lack of effective imaging methods. We combined three brain imaging modalities - positron emission tomography with fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG-PET), single-photon emission computed tomography with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO-SPET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - in order to detect brain involvement in SLE. Thirty-seven SLE patients, aged 22-45 years, were divided into three groups. Group 1 (G1) consisted of ten patients with major neuropsychiatric manifestations; group 2 (G2) consisted of 15 patients with minor manifestations; and group 3 (G3) consisted of 12 patients without manifestations. FDG-PET findings were abnormal in 51% of patients: 90% of G1, 67% of G2 and 0% of G3 patients respectively. HMPAO-SPET findings were abnormal in 62% of patients: 100% of G1, 73% of G2 and 17% of G3 patients respectively. MRI findings were abnormal in 35% of patients: 70% of G1, 40% of G2 and 0% of G3 patients respectively. Grey matter was more commonly involved than white matter; 62% of patients presented with lesions in the cerebral cortex, 27% with lesions in the basal ganglion, 5% with lesions in the cerebellum, and 19% with lesions in white matter. No white matter lesions were found on FDG-PET or HMPAO-SPET. However, in 19% of patients, MRI demonstrated abnormally high signal lesions in white matter. Forty-three percent of cases had positive serum anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA). However, ACA was not related to FDG-PET, HMPAO-SPET or MRI findings. It may be concluding that HMPAO-SPET is a more sensitive tool for detecting brain involvement in SLE patients when compared with FDG-PET or MRI. However, MRI is necessary for detecting lesions in white matter. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 46 refs.

  12. Study on the photoacoustic spectroscopy capabilities with remote detection for monitoring of actinide species in nuclear fuel reprocessing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A LIPAS (Laser Induced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy) system has been developed for remote analysis of weakly absorbing species in solution. A number of photoacoustic cells of various configurations have been examined in remote arrangement of PA spectrometer with application of an optical fiber for the laser light transmission to PA cell. A microscope objective was tested in optical fiber launching arrangement to collimate laser beam after the fiber. It has been shown that short optical pathlengh cuvette type cells in combination with a disk type piezoelectric transducer (PZT) are superior to previously used cylindrical PA cell with a tube type PZT as regards more effective elimination of scattered and reflected light contribution to PZT response. This allows to improve the linearity of calibration curve and to lower the detection limit absorptivity down to 4.2x10-5cm-1, which has been evaluated using an absorption band of Nd at 511.4 nm. The newly designed PA cell has been applied for investigation of PAS capabilities to detection of Pu(III), Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) simulated species in uranium containing solutions relevant to the nuclear fuel reprocessing technology. It has been shown that the proper selection of plutonium absorption band for each oxidation state allows to reduce high background contribution from U(VI) ions to the analytical PA signal and to keep detection limit absorptivity within a 1-3x10-5cm-1 range in the 525-562 nm wavelength region. (author)

  13. MRI-detected skull-base invasion. Prognostic value and therapeutic implication in intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With advances in imaging and radiotherapy, the prognostic value of skull-base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) needs to be reassessed. We aimed to define a classification system and evaluate the prognostic value of the classification of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected skull-base invasion in NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed 749 patients who underwent MRI and were subsequently histologically diagnosed with nondisseminated NPC and treated with IMRT. MRI-detected skull-base invasion was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), or disease-free survival (DFS; p > 0.05 for all). Skull-base invasion was classified according to the incidence of each site (type I sites inside pharyngobasilar fascia and clivus vs. type II sites outside pharyngobasilar fascia). The 5-year OS, DMFS, LRFS, and DFS rates in the classification of skull-base invasion in NPC were 83 vs. 67 %, 85 vs.75 %, 95 vs. 88 %, and 76 vs. 62 %, respectively (p < 0.05 for all). Multivariate analysis indicated the classification of skull-base invasion was an independent prognostic factor. MRI-detected skull-base invasion is not an independent prognostic factor in patients with NPC treated with IMRT. However, classification according to the site of invasion has prognostic value. Therefore, patients with various subclassifications of stage T3 disease may receive treatment with different intensities; however, further studies are warranted to prove this. (orig.)

  14. Sensitivity of MRI in detecting alveolar infiltrates. Experimental studies; Sensitivitaet der MRT fuer alveolaere Infiltrate. Experimentelle Untersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biederer, J.; Busse, I.; Grimm, J.; Reuter, M.; Heller, M. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinikum fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Muhle, C. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Freitag, S. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Informatik und Statistik

    2002-08-01

    Purpose: An experimental study using porcine lung explants and a dedicated chest phantom to evaluate the signal intensity of artificial alveolar infiltrates with T{sub 1}- and T{sub 2}-weighted MRI sequences. Material and Methods: 10 porcine lung explants were intubated, transferred into the cavity of a MRI-compatible chest phantom and inflated by continuous evacuation of the artificial pleural space. All lungs were examined with MRI at 1.5 T before and after intra-tracheal instillation of either 100 or 200 ml gelatine-stabilised liquid to simulate alveolar infiltrates. MR-examination comprised gradient echo (2D- and 3D-GRE) and fast spin echo sequences (T{sub 2}-TSE and T{sub 2}-HASTE). The signal intensity of lung parenchyma was evaluated at representative cross sections using a standardised scheme. Control studies were acquired with helical CT. Results: The instilled liquid caused patchy confluent alveolar infiltrates resembling the findings in patients with pneumonia or ARDS. CT revealed typical ground-glass opacities. Before the application of the liquid, only T{sub 2}-HASTE and T{sub 2}-TSE displayed lung parenchyma signals with a signal/noise ratio of 3.62 and 1.39, respectively. After application of the liquid, both T{sub 2}-weighted sequences showed clearly visible infiltrates with an increase in signal intensity of approx. 30% at 100 ml (p<0.01) and 60% at 200 ml (p<0.01). With 2D- and 3D-GRE the infiltrates were not visible, although the lung parenchyma signal increase was statistically significant. On 2D-GRE the increase in signal intensity reached 0.74% (p=0.32) after 100 ml and 5.6% (p<0.01) after 200 ml for 3D-GRE: 2.2% [p=0.02] at 100 ml and 4.4% at 200 ml [p<0.001]. The CT controls revealed a significant increase of lung density of 17. H.E. at 100 ml (p=0.02) and 75 H.E. at 200 ml (p<0.01). Conclusions: MRI with T{sub 2}-weighted sequences detects artificial alveolar infiltrates with high signal intensity and may be a highly sensitive tool to detect pneumonia in patients. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Eine experimentelle Studie zur Untersuchung des Signalverhaltens artifizieller alveolaerer Infiltrate mit T{sub 1}- und T{sub 2}-gewichteten MR-Sequenzen. Material und Methoden: 10 Lungen-Explantate von Schweinen wurden tracheal intubiert, in der kuenstlichen Thoraxhoehle eines Phantoms durch Unterdruck entfaltet und an einem klinischen Magnetresonanztomographen bei 1,5 T untersucht. Mit gezielter Instillation von 100-200 ml Gelatineloesung wurden alveolaere Infiltrate erzeugt und mit Gradientenecho- (2D-, 3D-GRE) und schnellen Spinechosequenzen (T{sub 2}-TSE, T{sub 2}-HASTE) dargestellt. Die Signalintensitaet des Lungenparenchyms nativ und mit Infiltrat wurde an repraesentativen Querschnitten erfasst. Zum Vergleich erfolgten Kontrollen mit Spiral-CT. Ergebnisse: Die instillierte Fluessigkeit simulierte alveolaere Infiltrate mit typischem Milchglasmuster im CT, wie es an Patienten mit Pneumonie oder ARDS beobachtet wird. Vor dem Versuch zeigten nur T{sub 2}-HASTE und T{sub 2}-TSE ein Lungenparenchymsignal (Signal/Rausch-Verhaeltnis von 3,62 bzw. 1,39). Nach Instillation von Fluessigkeit fand sich in diesen Sequenzen ein Signalanstieg von ca. 30% bei 100 ml (p<0,01) bzw. 60% bei 200 ml (p<0,01). Bei 2D-GRE betrug die Signalintensitaetszunahme 0,74% (p=0,32) nach 100 ml und 5,6% (p<0,01) nach 200 ml (fuer 3D-GRE 2,2% [p=0,02] bzw. 4,4% [p<0,01]). Die CT-Kontrollen zeigten fuer 100 ml eine Dichtezunahme um durchschnittlich 17 H.E. (p=0,02) und fuer 200 ml um 75 H.E. (p<0,01). Schlussfolgerungen: Mit T{sub 2}-gewichteten Sequenzen ist die MRT zur Darstellung artifizieller alveolaerer Infiltrate geeignet. (orig.)

  15. Pictorial essay: MRI of the fetal brain

    OpenAIRE

    B, Ganesh Rao; Ramamurthy, BS

    2009-01-01

    MRI is a useful supplement to USG for the assessment of fetal brain malformations. Superior soft tissue contrast and the ability to depict sulcation and myelination are the strengths of MRI. Subtle or inconclusive USG abnormalities can be confirmed or ruled out by MRI. In some cases, additional findings detected with MRI often help in arriving at a definitive diagnosis, which is necessary for parental counseling and for guiding management. Fast T2W sequences form the basis of fetal MRI. There...

  16. Recent Progress in the Remote Detection of Vapours and Gaseous Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, A. J.; And Others

    Work has been continuing on the correlation spectrometry techniques described at previous remote sensing symposiums. Advances in the techniques are described which enable accurate quantitative measurements of diffused atmospheric gases to be made using controlled light sources, accurate quantitative measurements of gas clouds relative to…

  17. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS USING FIELD PORTABLE AND AIRBORNE REMOTE IMAGING SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote sensing technologies are a class of instrument and sensor systems that include laser imageries, imaging spectrometers, and visible to thermal infrared cameras. These systems have been successfully used for gas phase chemical compound identification in a variety of field e...

  18. Technical evaluation of optical remote detection instruments: DOAS and LIDAR; Evaluation technique des instruments a teledetection optique: DOAS et LIDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menard, T.; Nomine, M.; Tatry, V.; Godet, Y. [Institut National de l`Environnement Industriel et des Risques, 60 - Verneuil en Halatte (INERIS) (France)

    1998-11-01

    The new generation of optical remote detection instruments such as FTIR, DOAS and LIDAR is issued from various technical developments during the last years. They offer new perspectives in the determination of the atmospheric characteristics since they allow measuring simultaneously several pollutants over long distances. The integration of these instruments into an experimental site or air quality control network involves the evaluation of their potentiality and the determination of their metrology performances. In this work, we focus on the estimate of DOAS and LIDAR. (authors) 21 refs.

  19. Using Advanced Remote Sensing Data Fusion Techniques for Studying Earth Surface Processes and Hazards: A Landslide Detection Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulslander, D.

    2014-12-01

    A major problem in earth surface process and hazards research is we have little to no knowledge of precisely where and when the next significant event may occur. This makes it nearly impossible to set up adequate instrumentation and observation ahead of time. Furthermore, it is not practical to overcome this challenge by instrumenting and observing everywhere all the time. We can't be everywhere and see everything. Remote sensing helps us to fill that gap with missions such as Landsat and WorldView2 offering regular global coverage. However, remote sensing systems for global monitoring have several inherent compromises. Tradeoffs must be made between data storage, processing capacity, spatial resolution, spectral resolution, and temporal resolution. Additionally, instruments and systems must be designed in advance and from a generalized standpoint to serve as many purposes as possible, often at the expense of high performance in specific tasks. Because of these practical constraints, when using remote sensing data to study earth surface processes it is critical to maximize signal content or information obtained from all available data. Several approaches, including multi-temporal data fusion, multi-sensor data fusion, and fusion with derivative products such as band ratios or vegetation indices can help expand how much information can be extracted from remote sensing acquisitions. Fused dataset results contain more coherent information than the sum of their individual constituents. Examples using Landsat and WorldView2 data in this study show this added information makes it possible to map earth surface processes and events, such as the 2011 Cinque Terre landslides, in a more automated and repeatable fashion over larger areas than is possible with manual imagery analysis techniques and with greater chance of successful detection.

  20. Automated detection of arterial input function in DSC perfusion MRI in a stroke rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, M.-Y.; Lee, T.-H.; Yang, S.-T.; Kuo, H.-H.; Chyi, T.-K.; Liu, H.-L.

    2009-05-01

    Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimation requires deconvolution of the tissue concentration time curves with an arterial input function (AIF). However, image-based determination of AIF in rodent is challenged due to limited spatial resolution. We evaluated the feasibility of quantitative analysis using automated AIF detection and compared the results with commonly applied semi-quantitative analysis. Permanent occlusion of bilateral or unilateral common carotid artery was used to induce cerebral ischemia in rats. The image using dynamic susceptibility contrast method was performed on a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner with a spin-echo echo-planar-image sequence (TR/TE = 700/80 ms, FOV = 41 mm, matrix = 64, 3 slices, SW = 2 mm), starting from 7 s prior to contrast injection (1.2 ml/kg) at four different time points. For quantitative analysis, CBF was calculated by the AIF which was obtained from 10 voxels with greatest contrast enhancement after deconvolution. For semi-quantitative analysis, relative CBF was estimated by the integral divided by the first moment of the relaxivity time curves. We observed if the AIFs obtained in the three different ROIs (whole brain, hemisphere without lesion and hemisphere with lesion) were similar, the CBF ratios (lesion/normal) between quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses might have a similar trend at different operative time points. If the AIFs were different, the CBF ratios might be different. We concluded that using local maximum one can define proper AIF without knowing the anatomical location of arteries in a stroke rat model.

  1. Automated detection of arterial input function in DSC perfusion MRI in a stroke rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, M-Y; Liu, H-L [Graduate Institute of Medical Physics and Imaging Science, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, T-H; Yang, S-T; Kuo, H-H [Stroke Section, Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chyi, T-K [Molecular Imaging Center Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hlaliu@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2009-05-15

    Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimation requires deconvolution of the tissue concentration time curves with an arterial input function (AIF). However, image-based determination of AIF in rodent is challenged due to limited spatial resolution. We evaluated the feasibility of quantitative analysis using automated AIF detection and compared the results with commonly applied semi-quantitative analysis. Permanent occlusion of bilateral or unilateral common carotid artery was used to induce cerebral ischemia in rats. The image using dynamic susceptibility contrast method was performed on a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner with a spin-echo echo-planar-image sequence (TR/TE = 700/80 ms, FOV = 41 mm, matrix = 64, 3 slices, SW = 2 mm), starting from 7 s prior to contrast injection (1.2 ml/kg) at four different time points. For quantitative analysis, CBF was calculated by the AIF which was obtained from 10 voxels with greatest contrast enhancement after deconvolution. For semi-quantitative analysis, relative CBF was estimated by the integral divided by the first moment of the relaxivity time curves. We observed if the AIFs obtained in the three different ROIs (whole brain, hemisphere without lesion and hemisphere with lesion) were similar, the CBF ratios (lesion/normal) between quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses might have a similar trend at different operative time points. If the AIFs were different, the CBF ratios might be different. We concluded that using local maximum one can define proper AIF without knowing the anatomical location of arteries in a stroke rat model.

  2. Detection of viable myocardium by low dose dobutamine cine MRI: experimental study in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of dobutamine stress magnetic resonance imaging (MR) for myocardial viability. Methods: Mini swine (n = 10) underwent left ventriculography and coronary angiography, followed by stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) using aneroid constrictor. More than 1 month later left ventriculography and coronary angiography were performed again, followed by cine-MR at rest and during stress with incremental dose of dobutamine 5-20 ?g · kg-1 · min-1. Traditional and/or breath-hold cine-MR were used to evaluate regional left ventricular wall motion, corresponding to basal, mid ventricular and apical short-axis tomograms. Regional wall motion score index (WMSI) was calculated. Mini swine were finally sacrificed for pathological examination. Triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) assessed myocardial infarction. Microscopy was used to identify myocardial cellular changes. Results: One pig died, 1 pig suffered from aneurysm and another 1 showed negative findings. The other 7 pigs were found with hypokinetic (n=4) or akinetic (n = 3) myocardial regions related to stenosed LCX, their mean WMSI at rest for the lateral and postero-inferior walls (ischemic regions) of the left ventricle was 2.27 +- 0.32 compared with 1.00 +- 0.00 (x2 = 106.27, P 2 = 20.57, P -1·min-1. However, the mean WMSI at the dose of dobutamine 10 and 20 ?g·kg-1·min-1 was 1.70 +- 0.76, 1.75 +- 0.83, respectively, compared with the mean WSCI at rest (x2=3.25 versus 2.33, P > 0.05). The pathologic examination showed viable myocardium at the ischemic regions. Conclusion: Low dose dobutamine (5 ?g·kg-1·min-1) can recover hypokinetic or akinetic myocardial regions, Dobutamine stress MR can detect myocardial viability

  3. Remote Continuous Wave and Pulsed Laser Raman Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants and Toxic Industrial Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rivera, William; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2010-09-01

    This study describes the design, assembly, testing and comparison of two Remote Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) systems intended for standoff detection of hazardous chemical liquids. Raman spectra of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants (CWAS) and Toxic Industrial Compounds (TIC) were measured in the laboratory at a 6.6 m source-target distance using continuous wave (CW) laser detection. Standoff distances for pulsed measurements were 35 m for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) detection and 60, 90 and 140 m for cyclohexane detection. The prototype systems consisted of a Raman spectrometer equipped with a CCD detector (for CW measurements) and an I-CCD camera with time-gated electronics (for pulsed laser measurements), a reflecting telescope, a fiber optic assembly, a single-line CW laser source (514.5, 488.0, 351.1 and 363.8 nm) and a frequency-doubled single frequency Nd:YAG 532 nm laser (5 ns pulses at 10 Hz). The telescope was coupled to the spectrograph using an optical fiber, and filters were used to reject laser radiation and Rayleigh scattering. Two quartz convex lenses were used to collimate the light from the telescope from which the telescope-focusing eyepiece was removed, and direct it to the fiber optic assembly. To test the standoff sensing system, the Raman Telescope was used in the detection of liquid TIC: benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, carbon tetrachloride, cyclohexane and carbon disulfide. Other compounds studied were CWAS: dimethylmethyl phosphonate, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-(butylamino)-ethanethiol. Relative Raman scattering cross sections of liquid CWAS were measured using single-line sources at 532.0, 488.0, 363.8 and 351.1 nm. Samples were placed in glass and quartz vials at the standoff distances from the telescope for the Remote Raman measurements. The mass of DMMP present in water solutions was also quantified as part of the system performance tests.

  4. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  5. Automated detection of breast tumor in MRI and comparison of kinetic features for assessing tumor response to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used increasingly in diagnosis of breast cancer and assessment of treatment efficacy in current clinical practice. The purpose of this preliminary study is to develop and test a new quantitative kinetic image feature analysis method and biomarker to predict response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using breast MR images acquired before the chemotherapy. For this purpose, we developed a computer-aided detection scheme to automatically segment breast areas and tumors depicting on the sequentially scanned breast MR images. From a contrast-enhancement map generated by subtraction of two image sets scanned pre- and post-injection of contrast agent, our scheme computed 38 morphological and kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal regions. We applied a number of statistical data analysis methods to identify effective image features in predicting response of the patients to the chemotherapy. Based on the performance assessment of individual features and their correlations, we applied a fusion method to generate a final image biomarker. A breast MR image dataset involving 68 patients was used in this study. Among them, 25 had complete response and 43 had partially response to the chemotherapy based on the RECIST guideline. Using this image feature fusion based biomarker, the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve is AUC = 0.850±0.047. This study demonstrated that a biomarker developed from the fusion of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired pre-chemotherapy has potentially higher discriminatory power in predicting response of the patients to the chemotherapy.

  6. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, Elke R. [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Maderwald, Stefan [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Linn, Jennifer; Bochmann, Katja [LMU Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Dassinger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Giessen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  7. Frequency Domain Detection with Nearest Neighbor Clustering to Detect Dynamically Triggered Remote Small Earthquakes within the Footprint of the EarthScope USArray Transportable Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilb, D. L.; Linville, L. M.; Pankow, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand earthquake source processes involved in dynamically triggering remote aftershocks, we design and test an automated algorithm to detect far-field aftershocks from two large earthquakes. Our goal is to create a method that is tractable for large datasets, ensures robust catalogs, and delivers lower magnitude of completeness than current catalogs. We use data recorded by the EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA), which has a uniform 70km grid spacing and large spatial coverage. We test 3-hours of data following the 12 September 2007 Sumatra M8.5 earthquake and the 07 November 2012 M7.4 Guatemala earthquake, when the TA network was on the west-coast and east-coast of the contiguous US, respectively. This allows exploration of a broad range of tectonic environments and regions of both small tectonic earthquakes (2007 data) and significant extraction sector activity, such as mine blasts (2012 data). The main steps in our data processing include: (1) A frequency domain detection algorithm to identify signals above the noise floor in the 4-12 Hz range to create a detection catalog. (2) Iteratively implementing a nearest-neighbor technique to remove detection outliers from the catalog. (3) Partitioning the detections into high density clusters. (4) Building an earthquake catalog where, for each cluster, we assume the station location that first recorded the seismic energy is a good proxy for the location of the local earthquake and this signal's arrival time is a good proxy for the time of the earthquake. Our results identify 7 and 9 events in the 2007 and 2012 data, respectively, which is a significant increase over the 3 and 2 earthquakes listed in the ANF catalog during the same time periods. This method is ideal for identifying the signature of small earthquakes within the wavetrain of large remote mainshocks recorded by the TA network.

  8. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  9. Effects of observer on the diagnostic accuracy of low-field MRI for detecting canine meniscal tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Peter; Armbrust, Laura; Blond, Laurent; Brühschwein, Andreas; Gavin, Patrick R; Gielen, Ingrid; Hecht, Silke; Jurina, Konrad; Kneissl, Sibylle; Konar, Martin; Pujol, Esteban; Robinson, Andrew; Schaefer, Susan L; Theyse, Lars F H; Wigger, Antje; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    Low-field MRI (lfMRI) has become increasingly accepted as a method for diagnosing canine meniscal tears in clinical practice. However, observer effects on diagnostic accuracy have not been previously reported. In this study, 50 consecutive stifle joints with clinical and radiologic evidence of cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency were investigated by lfMRI and arthroscopy. Fifteen observers who had varying levels of experience and who were unaware of arthroscopic findings independently reviewed lfMRI studies and recorded whether lateral and medial meniscal tears were present. Diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV)) was determined for each observer and median values were calculated for all observers, using arthroscopy as the reference standard. Interrater agreement was determined based on intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis. Observer level of experience was compared with diagnostic sensitivity and specificity using correlation analysis. Based on pooled data for all observers, median sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for lfMRI diagnosis of lateral meniscal tears were 0.00, 0.94, 0.05, and 0.94, respectively. Median sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for medial meniscal tears were 0.74, 0.89, 0.83, and 0.79, respectively. Interrater agreement for all menisci was fair (0.51). Menisci were less consistently scored as having no tears (ICC = 0.13) than those scored as having tears (ICC = 0.50). No significant correlations between observer experience and diagnostic sensitivity/specificity were identified. Findings indicated that the accuracy of lfMRI for diagnosing canine meniscal tears was poor to fair and observer-dependent. Future studies are needed to develop standardized and widely accepted lfMRI criteria for diagnosing meniscal tears. PMID:22897385

  10. Remote Monitoring of Cardiovascular Implantable Devices in the Pediatric Population Improves Detection of Adverse Events

    OpenAIRE

    Malloy, Lindsey E.; Gingerich, Jean; Olson, Mark D.; Atkins, Dianne L

    2013-01-01

    With the exponential growth of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) in pediatric patients, a new method of long-term surveillance, remote monitoring (RM), has become the standard of care. The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of RM as a monitoring tool in the pediatric population. A retrospective review was performed of 198 patients at the University of Iowa Children’s Hospital who had CIEDs. Data transmitted by RM were analyzed. The following data were ex...

  11. Textural kernel for SVM classification in remote sensing: Application to forest fire detection and urban extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Lafarge, Florent; Descombes, Xavier; Zerubia, Josiane

    2005-01-01

    We present a textural kernel for "Support Vector Machines" classification applied to remote sensing problems. SVMs constitute a method of supervised classification well adapted to deal with data of high dimension, such as images. We introduce kernel functions in order to favor the distiction between our class of interest and the other classes : it gives an information of similarity. In our case this similarity is based on radiometric and textural characteristics. One of the main difficulties ...

  12. Use of Remote Sensing to Detect Soybean Cyst Nematode-Induced Plant Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Nutter, F. W.; Tylka, G. L.; Guan, J; Moreira, A. J. D.; Marett, C. C.; Rosburg, T. R.; Basart, J. P.; Chong, C. S.

    2002-01-01

    Integrating remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) technologies offers tremendous opportunities for farmers to more cost effectively manage the causes of crop stress. Initial soybean cyst nematode (SCN) population densities from 995 2-×-3-m quadrats were obtained from a soybean field near Ames, Iowa, in 2000. The percentage of sunlight reflected from each quadrat was measured weekly using a multispectral radiometer beginning in mid-May and continuing through mid-September. Ae...

  13. Automatic solution for detection, identification and biomedical monitoring of a cow using remote sensing for optimised treatment of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeny Beiderman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show how a novel photonic remote sensing system assembled on a robotic platform can extract vital biomedical parameters from cattle including their heart beating, breathing and chewing activity. The sensor is based upon a camera and a laser using selfinterference phenomena. The whole system intends to provide an automatic solution for detection, identification and biomedical monitoring of a cow. The detection algorithm is based upon image processing involving probability map construction. The identification algorithms involve well known image pattern recognition techniques. The sensor is used on top of an automated robotic platform in order to support animal decision making. Field tests and computer simulated results are presented.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence of green plants. I - A technique for the remote detection of plant stress and species differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Wood, F. M., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Newcomb, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of green plants was evaluated as a means of remotely detecting plant stress and determining plant type. Corn and soybeans were used as representatives of monocots and dicots, respectively, in these studies. The fluorescence spectra of several plant pigments was excited with a nitrogen laser emitting at 337 nm. Intact leaves from corn and soybeans also fluoresced using the nitrogen laser. The two plant species exhibited fluorescence spectra which had three maxima in common at 440, 690, and 740 nm. However, the relative intensities of these maxima were distinctly different for the two species. Soybeans had an additional slight maxima at 525 nm. Potassium deficiency in corn caused an increase in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. Simulated water stress in soybeans resulted in increased fluorescence at 440, 525, 690, and 740 nm. The inhibition of photosynthesis in soybeans by 3-(3-4-dichlorophenyl)-1-1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) gave incresed fluorescence primarily at 690 and 740 nm. Chlorosis as occurring in senescent soybean leaves caused a decrease in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of plants offer the potential for remotely detecting certain types of stress condition and also for differentiating plant species.

  15. Spatio-contextual fuzzy clustering with Markov random field model for change detection in remotely sensed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subudhi, Badri Narayan; Bovolo, Francesca; Ghosh, Ashish; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a novel spatio-contextual fuzzy clustering algorithm for unsupervised change detection from multispectral and multitemporal remote sensing images. The proposed technique uses fuzzy Gibbs Markov Random Field (GMRF) to model the spatial gray level attributes of the multispectral difference image. The change detection problem is solved using the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimation principle. The MAP estimator of the fuzzy GMRF modeled difference image is found to be exponential in nature. Convergence of conventional fuzzy clustering based search criterion is more likely to lead the clustering solutions to be getting trapped in a local minimum. Hence we adhered to the variable neighborhood searching (VNS) based global convergence criterion for iterative estimation of the fuzzy GMRF parameters. Experiments are carried out on different multispectral and multitemporal remote sensing images. Results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed technique. It is also noticed that the proposed scheme provides better results with less misclassification error as compared to the existing techniques. The computational time taken by the proposed technique is comparable with that of the HTNN scheme.

  16. Hybrid nanoparticle–microcavity-based plasmonic nanosensors with improved detection resolution and extended remote-sensing ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Markus A.; Lei, Dang Yuan; Wondraczek, Lothar; Nazabal, Virginie; Maier, Stefan A.

    2012-01-01

    Optical nanosensors based on plasmonic nanoparticles have great potential for chemical and biological sensing applications, but their spectral detection resolution is severely constrained by their broad resonance linewidth, and their spatial sensing depth is limited to several tens of nanometres. Here we demonstrate that coupling a strong dipolar plasmonic resonance of a single metallic nanoparticle to the narrow bandwidth resonances of an optical microcavity creates a hybrid mode and discretizes the broad localized resonance, boosting the sensing figure-of-merit by up to 36 times. This cavity–nanoparticle system effectively combines the advantages of Fabry–Perot microresonators with those of plasmonic nanoparticles, providing interesting features such as remote-sensing ability, incident-angle independent resonances, strong polarization dependence, lateral ultra small sensing volume and strongly improved detection resolution. Such a hybrid system can be used not only to locally monitor specific dynamic processes in biosensing, but also to remotely sense important film parameters in thin-film nanometrology. PMID:23047666

  17. MRI Stealth” robot for prostate interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Stoianovici, Dan; Song, Danny; PETRISOR, DORU; URSU, DANIEL; Mazilu, Dumitru; MUTENER, MICHAEL; SCHAR, MICHAEL; Patriciu, Alexandru

    2007-01-01

    The paper reports an important achievement in MRI instrumentation, a pneumatic, fully actuated robot located within the scanner alongside the patient and operating under remote control based on the images. Previous MRI robots commonly used piezoelectric actuation limiting their compatibility. Pneumatics is an ideal choice for MRI compatibility because it is decoupled from electromagnetism, but pneumatic actuators were hardly controllable. This achievement was possible due to a recent technolo...

  18. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuro-inflammation. (authors)

  19. MRI of intracranial calcifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently computed tomography(CT) has been rapidly replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosis of majority of intracranial diseases. But MRI still has some limitation, one of which is its inferiority in detecting calcification. MRI of intracranial calcification has been known to be variable in signal intensity. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI of 26 patients with intracranial calcified lesions in order to evaluate the MR intensity of calcification and to assess the capability of MRI in detecting calcification in various intracranial lesions. All the MRI were obtained using routine T1-and T2-weighted spin eco pulse sequences on 2.0T superconducting system. The 26 patients consisted of 13 brain tumors (4 oligodendrogliomas, 2 craniopharyngiomas, 2 astrocytomas, 1 gem cell tumor, 1 medulloblastoma, 1 ependympma, and pathologically unconfirmed 2 cases), 11 infectious diseases (1 paragonimiasis, 1 sparganosis, 2 cysticercosis, 3 tuberculosis, and 4 unknown cases), and 2 undetermined pathologies. Eighty-two percent (9/11) of infections disease, and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group showed signal diminution or signal void on both T1-and T2-weighted image (T1W1, T2W1). Twenty-four percent (3/13) of brain tumors showed signal diminution on both T1W1 and T2W1. In 46% (6/13) and 61% (8/13) of brain tumors the signal intensities were isointense on T1W1 and T1W1, respectively. Unexpectedly, 3 oligodendrogliomas showed high signal intensity on T1W1, two of which showed com plexed signal intensity mixed with high, iso, and low signal intensities on T2W1. In remained cases (18% (2/11) of infectious diseases and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group) the signal intensities were mixed. With simultaneous review of CT and MRI in each case, the calcification (at least one in cases showing multiple ones) was identifiable on MRI in 62% (8/13) of rumors, 82% (9/11) of infectious diseases, and 100% (2/2) in undetermined group. In 36% (4/11) of infectious diseases, fewer number of calcific nodules were identifiable on MRI compared with CT. In 27% (7/26), any calcification was not identifiable on MRI. The identification of calcification of intracranial calcification on MRI seemed to be due to multiple factors including small size (less than 3mm), location (within CSF space) and the signal intensity identical to the lesion adjacent to it. It is suggested that new pulse sequence (i.e. gradient echo etc.) may well be used as adjunctive method for detecting more calcifications and CT is still needed to detect the intracranial calcification.

  20. Review of the embryologic development of the pituitary gland and report of a case of hypophyseal duplication detected by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the clinical manifestations, associated abnormalities, MRI appearances and pathologic significance of a case of hypophyseal duplication. A 16-year-old girl presented with delayed sexual development and history of midline craniofacial anomalies. MRI revealed paired infundibula extending inferiorly to two small pituitary glands, a midline hypothalamic mass, and a midline cleft in the basisphenoid. Twelve cases of pituitary duplication have previously been described. The suggested pathogenesis is duplication of the prechordal plate and anterior end of the notochord during early embryologic development. (orig.)

  1. Climate and infectious disease: use of remote sensing for detection of Vibrio cholerae by indirect measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobitz, B.; Beck, L.; Huq, A.; Wood, B.; Fuchs, G.; Faruque, A. S.; Colwell, R.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been known that cholera outbreaks can be initiated when Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes cholera, is present in drinking water in sufficient numbers to constitute an infective dose, if ingested by humans. Outbreaks associated with drinking or bathing in unpurified river or brackish water may directly or indirectly depend on such conditions as water temperature, nutrient concentration, and plankton production that may be favorable for growth and reproduction of the bacterium. Although these environmental parameters have routinely been measured by using water samples collected aboard research ships, the available data sets are sparse and infrequent. Furthermore, shipboard data acquisition is both expensive and time-consuming. Interpolation to regional scales can also be problematic. Although the bacterium, V. cholerae, cannot be sensed directly, remotely sensed data can be used to infer its presence. In the study reported here, satellite data were used to monitor the timing and spread of cholera. Public domain remote sensing data for the Bay of Bengal were compared directly with cholera case data collected in Bangladesh from 1992-1995. The remote sensing data included sea surface temperature and sea surface height. It was discovered that sea surface temperature shows an annual cycle similar to the cholera case data. Sea surface height may be an indicator of incursion of plankton-laden water inland, e.g., tidal rivers, because it was also found to be correlated with cholera outbreaks. The extensive studies accomplished during the past 25 years, confirming the hypothesis that V. cholerae is autochthonous to the aquatic environment and is a commensal of zooplankton, i.e., copepods, when combined with the findings of the satellite data analyses, provide strong evidence that cholera epidemics are climate-linked.

  2. On the use of Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS to detect NO2 in the Troposphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Zebitz

    2012-01-01

    This thesis studies the spatio-temporal patterns and trends in NO2 air pollution over Denmark using the satellite remote sensing product OMNO2e retrieved from the OMI instrument on the NASA AURA satellite. These data are related to in situ measurements of NO2 made at four rural and four urban stations in the Danish Air Quality Measurement network to find correlation between the two datasets. Clear weekly and annual cycles are found in both datasets and they are shown to be significantly correlat...

  3. Remote sensing for greenhouse detection from stereo pairs of WorldView-2 satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, M. A.; M.A. Montalbán; M.M. Saldaña; F.J. Aguilar; I. FERNÁNDEZ; A.M. García-Lorca

    2014-01-01

    The successful launch of the first very high resolution (VHR) satellites capable of capturing panchromatic imagery of the land surface with ground sample distance even lower than 1 m (e.g. IKONOS in 1999 or QuickBird in 2001) marked the beginning of a wholly new age in remote sensing. On January 4, 2010, images of WorldView-2 were placed on the market. Possibly it is the most sophisticated commercial VHR satellite currently orbiting the Earth and the exploitation of its data poses a challenge...

  4. Environmental data analysis and remote sensing for early detection of dengue and malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Z.; Roytman, Leonid; Kadik, Abdelhamid; Rosy, Dilara A.

    2014-06-01

    Malaria and dengue fever are the two most common mosquito-transmitted diseases, leading to millions of serious illnesses and deaths each year. Because the mosquito vectors are sensitive to environmental conditions such as temperature, precipitation, and humidity, it is possible to map areas currently or imminently at high risk for disease outbreaks using satellite remote sensing. In this paper we propose the development of an operational geospatial system for malaria and dengue fever early warning; this can be done by bringing together geographic information system (GIS) tools, artificial neural networks (ANN) for efficient pattern recognition, the best available ground-based epidemiological and vector ecology data, and current satellite remote sensing capabilities. We use Vegetation Health Indices (VHI) derived from visible and infrared radiances measured by satellite-mounted Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) and available weekly at 4-km resolution as one predictor of malaria and dengue fever risk in Bangladesh. As a study area, we focus on Bangladesh where malaria and dengue fever are serious public health threats. The technology developed will, however, be largely portable to other countries in the world and applicable to other disease threats. A malaria and dengue fever early warning system will be a boon to international public health, enabling resources to be focused where they will do the most good for stopping pandemics, and will be an invaluable decision support tool for national security assessment and potential troop deployment in regions susceptible to disease outbreaks.

  5. Narrow CSF space at high convexity and high midline areas in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus detected by axial and coronal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Morioka (Japan); Honda, Satoshi [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Yuasa, Tatsuhiko; Iwamura, Akihide [Kohnodai Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Ichikawa (Japan); Shibata, Eri [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Morioka (Japan); Ohba, Hideki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology, Morioka (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the performance of axial and coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the narrowing of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space at the high convexity and high midline areas, which is speculated to be one of the clinical characteristics of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). We retrospectively examined axial and coronal T1-weighted images of 14 iNPH patients and 12 age-matched controls. The narrowness of the CSF space at the high convexity/midline was blindly evaluated by five raters using a continuous confidence rating scale for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Axial and coronal imaging accurately determined the presence of the narrow cisterns/sulci at the high convexity/midline and was capable of predicting probable/definite iNPH with a high degree of accuracy. there were also no significant differences in the detection of this finding between the axial and coronal images. Both axial and coronal T1-weighted MRI can detect the narrow CSF space at the high convexity/midline accurately and may therefore facilitate clinicians in choosing a management strategy for iNPH patients. (orig.)

  6. Clinical value of periventricular low-intensity areas detected by fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). Relationships between perinatal vital parameter and neonatal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A follow-up study was performed to assess the correlation among the incidence of periventricular low intensities (PVLI) on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) imaging, clinical evidence of perinatal insults that may cause white matter damage, and the outcome of the infants. We evaluated periventricular white matter lesions of 329 neonates whose MRI were obtained before two months corrected age. The detective rate of periventricular abnormalities on FLAIR imaging was significantly higher than that of T1-T2 weighted imaging. The most typical lesion detected on FLAIR imaging was periventricular low intensities (PVLI), frequently observed in the neonates with a history of preterm labour, very low birth weight, birth asphyxia and severe respiratory failure. Although we could not characterize the risk factors of PVLI, the incidence of PVLI had a strong correlation with the scores of motor and developmental tests at 12 and 36-months corrected age. In conclusion, FLAIR imaging, detecting the border zone damage of white matter, would be a strong tool to pick out neonates at high risk of neurological disturbances from those without clinical evidence of neurological insults in the neonatal period. (author)

  7. Clinical value of periventricular low-intensity areas detected by fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). Relationships between perinatal vital parameter and neonatal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadowaki, Sachiko; Iwata, Osuke; Tamura, Masanori [Nagano Children' s Hospital, Toyoshina (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-01-01

    A follow-up study was performed to assess the correlation among the incidence of periventricular low intensities (PVLI) on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) imaging, clinical evidence of perinatal insults that may cause white matter damage, and the outcome of the infants. We evaluated periventricular white matter lesions of 329 neonates whose MRI were obtained before two months corrected age. The detective rate of periventricular abnormalities on FLAIR imaging was significantly higher than that of T1-T2 weighted imaging. The most typical lesion detected on FLAIR imaging was periventricular low intensities (PVLI), frequently observed in the neonates with a history of preterm labour, very low birth weight, birth asphyxia and severe respiratory failure. Although we could not characterize the risk factors of PVLI, the incidence of PVLI had a strong correlation with the scores of motor and developmental tests at 12 and 36-months corrected age. In conclusion, FLAIR imaging, detecting the border zone damage of white matter, would be a strong tool to pick out neonates at high risk of neurological disturbances from those without clinical evidence of neurological insults in the neonatal period. (author)

  8. Narrow CSF space at high convexity and high midline areas in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus detected by axial and coronal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the performance of axial and coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the narrowing of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space at the high convexity and high midline areas, which is speculated to be one of the clinical characteristics of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). We retrospectively examined axial and coronal T1-weighted images of 14 iNPH patients and 12 age-matched controls. The narrowness of the CSF space at the high convexity/midline was blindly evaluated by five raters using a continuous confidence rating scale for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Axial and coronal imaging accurately determined the presence of the narrow cisterns/sulci at the high convexity/midline and was capable of predicting probable/definite iNPH with a high degree of accuracy. there were also no significant differences in the detection of this finding between the axial and coronal images. Both axial and coronal T1-weighted MRI can detect the narrow CSF space at the high convexity/midline accurately and may therefore facilitate clinicians in choosing a management strategy for iNPH patients. (orig.)

  9. Analyzing Knowledge Based Feature Selection to Detect Remote to Local Attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Mya Thidar Myo Win, Kyaw Thet Khaing

    2013-01-01

    Intrusion Detection (ID) is the most significant component in Network Security System as it is responsible to detect several types of attacks. The IDS commonly deals with a large amount of data traffic, which involves irrelevant and redundant features. The feature selection is one of the prominent factors that influence the quality of IDS. We observe that performing feature selection improves the attack detection accuracy as well as the efficiency of the system. In our experiments, we perform...

  10. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI breast for lesion detection and characterization with histopathological co relation: preliminary experience at tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the morphological and enhancement characteristics significantly associated with malignant breast lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced MRI by considering the histopathological findings as a gold standard. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 70 patients who underwent MRI breast during the study period because of suspicious mammographic abnormalities. MR imaging was perfor