WorldWideScience

Sample records for reactive bone change

  1. Reactive changes of disc space and foreign body granuloma due to bone wax in lumbar spine

    OpenAIRE

    Ozdemir Nail; Gelal Mustafa; Minoglu Mustafa; Celik Levent

    2009-01-01

    Bone wax is a well-known agent used to prevent bleeding from the bone that can be used in different surgical procedures. Bone wax is a safe agent, but it may rarely lead to significant foreign body reactions. In this report, we present a patient who developed bone wax-related disc space foreign body granuloma following L4 total laminectomy, extremely rare complication.

  2. Bone changes in tuberous sclerosis mimicking metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sclerotic and lytic bone changes of tuberous sclerosis (TS) can mimic bone metastases. A case is reported of a patient with concomitant sclerotic bone metastases from bronchogenic carcinoma and TS bone changes, diagnosed by bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging. The increased bone uptake and abnormal magnetic resonance signal allowed distinction of TS bone lesions from bone metastases. 6 refs., 4 figs

  3. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of reactive hematopoietic bone marrow in aplastic anemia using MR spectroscopy with variable echo times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Department of Radiology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess quantitative and qualitative differences in water components between normal bone marrow and reactive hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia using magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy with variable echo times (TEs). Design: Water content, T2 value of the water component, and signal change in water related to TE were assessed in normal bone marrow and reactive hematopoietic bone marrow by a stimulated echo acquisition mode with TEs of 30, 45, 60, and 90 ms. Patients: Six patients with aplastic anemia (13-84 years) and seven normal volunteers (25-38 years) were examined. Results and conclusion: Reactive hematopoietic marrow showed significantly higher water content than normal bone marrow. The T2 value of water components tended to be longer in reactive hematopoietic marrow. Water signal ratio related to TE was significantly higher in reactive hematopoietic marrow. These results suggest a quantitative and qualitative difference in water components between normal and reactive hematopoietic bone marrow. (orig.)

  4. Aging changes in the bones - muscles - joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and bones affect the posture and walk, and lead to weakness and slowed movement. AGING CHANGES People lose bone mass or density as they age, especially women after menopause . The bones lose calcium and other minerals. The spine is made up ...

  5. Relationship of Circulating Total Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein to Trabecular Bone in Postmenopausal Women

    OpenAIRE

    Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; ALEKEL, D. LEE; Stewart, Jeanne W.; Hanson, Laura N; SHEDD, KRISTINE M.; Reddy, Manju B.; HANSON, KATHY B.; Van Loan, Marta D.; Genschel, Ulrike; Koehler, Kenneth J.

    2007-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are novel risk factors for osteoporosis. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the relationship of Hcy and CRP to volumetric trabecular bone, but also to assess their relationship to areal composite bone in healthy postmenopausal women (N=184). We used peripheral quantitative computed tomography to assess volumetric bone at the distal tibia and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry to assess areal composite bone at the proximal femur and lumb...

  6. Age changes in human bone: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, W.D.

    1977-12-03

    The human skeleton steadily changes structure and mass during life because of a variety of internal and external factors. Extracellular substance and bone cells get old, characteristic structural remodeling occurs with age and these age-related changes are important in the discrimination between pathological and physiological changes. Perhaps 20 percent of the bone mass is lost between the fourth and the ninth decades, osteoblasts function less efficiently and gradual loss of bone substance is enhanced by delayed mineralization of an increased surface area of thin and relatively less active osteoid seams. After the fifth decade, osteoclasia and the number of Howship's lacunae increase, and with age, the number of large osteolytic osteocytes increases as the number of small osteocytes declines and empty osteocyte lacunae become more common. The result is greater liability to fracture and diminished healing or replacement of injured bone.

  7. Recent changes in anthropogenic reactive nitrogen compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronache, Constantin

    2014-05-01

    Significant anthropogenic perturbations of the nitrogen cycle are the result of rapid population growth, with mounting need for food and energy production. The increase of reactive nitrogen compounds (such as NOx, HNO3, NH3, and N2O) has a significant impact on human health, environment, and climate. NOx emissions contribute to O3 chemistry, aerosol formation and acidic precipitation. Ammonia is a notable atmospheric pollutant that may deteriorate ecosystems and contribute to respiratory problems. It reacts with acidic gases to form aerosols or is deposited back to ecosystems. The application of fertilizers accounts for most of the N2O production, adding to greenhouse gas emissions. We analyze the change of some reactive nitrogen compounds based on observations, in eastern United States. Results show that the control of NOx and SO2 emissions over the last decades caused a significant decrease of acidic deposition. The nitrate deposition is highest in eastern US, while the ammonium ion concentration is highest in central US regions. Overall, the inorganic nitrogen wet deposition from nitrate and ammonium is enhanced in central, and eastern US. Research shows that sensitive ecosystems in northeastern regions exhibit a slow recovery from the accumulated effects of acidic deposition. Given the growing demand for nitrogen in agriculture and industry, we discuss possible pathways to reduce the impact of excess reactive nitrogen on the environment.

  8. Bone Proteoglycan Changes During Skeletal Unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, M.; Uzawa, K.; Pornprasertsuk, S.; Arnaud, S.; Grindeland, R.; Grzesik, W.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal adaptability to mechanical loads is well known since the last century. Disuse osteopenia due to the microgravity environment is one of the major concerns for space travelers. Several studies have indicated that a retardation of the mineralization process and a delay in matrix maturation occur during the space flight. Mineralizing fibrillar type I collagen possesses distinct cross-linking chemistries and their dynamic changes during mineralization correlate well with its function as a mineral organizer. Our previous studies suggested that a certain group of matrix proteoglycans in bone play an inhibitory role in the mineralization process through their interaction with collagen. Based on these studies, we hypothesized that the altered mineralization during spaceflight is due in part to changes in matrix components secreted by cells in response to microgravity. In this study, we employed hindlimb elevation (tail suspension) rat model to study the effects of skeletal unloading on matrix proteoglycans in bone.

  9. Radiographic study of bone changes on TMJ arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author analyzed the morphologic changes of bone structures from 1256 radiographs of 314 patients with temporomandibular joint arthrosis, which were obtained by the oblique-lateral projection and orthopantomography. The interrelations of the bone changes and clinical symptoms were examined. Also, the positional relationships of condylar head, articular fossa and articular eminence in the mouth open and closed state were observed in the patients with bone changes. The results were as follows; 1. The most frequent bone change in the TMJ arthrosis was eburnation of cortical bone (35.64%) of total cases. Then came bone surface erosion and localized radiolucency (26.18%), marginal proliferation (9.7%) and flattening of articular surface (9.58%) in that order. 2. The most frequent site of bone change was articular eminence (41.70%). The came condylar head (21.09%) and articular fossa (20.73%) in that order. 3. In the patients with bone changes, their clinical symptoms were pain (51.55%), clicking sound during mandibular movement (37.71%) and limited mandibular movement (10.73%). In the patients complaining pain, their radiographs showed eburnation of cortical bone (30.68%), bone surface erosion and localized radiolucency (27.45%) and flattening in the (30.68%), bone surface erosion and localized radiolucency (27.45%) and flattening of articular surface (10.68%). 4. The condylar positional changes in the TMJ arthrosis patients with bone changes were as follows: in the mouth closed state, there were the widening of joint space in 624 cases (50.00%), the narrowing of joint space in 543 cases (43.47%) and bone on bone relationships in 82 cases (6.57%). In the mouth open state, there were forward positioning of the condyle in 332 cases (28.55%), limitation of movement in 332 cases (28.55%), bone on bone relationships in 248 cases (21.31%) and downward positioning of condyle in 217 cases (18.66%). Bone on bone relationships in 248 cases (21.32%) and downward positioning of condyle in 217 cases (18.66%). 5. In the TMJ arthrosis patients with bone changes, 1249 cases of abnormal condylar position in the mouth closed state and 1163 cases of abnormal condylar position in the mouth open state could be interpreted. so, for the radiographic interpretation of TMJ arthrosis, the reading of condylar positional changes as well as that of bond changes should be preformed and their interrelations should be profoundly considered.

  10. Method for assessment of vascular reactivity in bone: in vitro studies on resistance arteries isolated from porcine cancellous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard, A; Aalkjær, Christian

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge about vascular regulation in bone is central to the understanding of both normal and pathological bone physiology. This article describes a new method for direct assessment of the reactivity of bone blood vessels. Resistance arteries (diameter approximately 250 microns) were isolated from epiphyseal cancellous bone (porcine femoral condyle). Arterial segments (2 mm long) were mounted as ring preparations on a myograph, and isometric force development was measured continuously. Fifty-nine vessels from 31 pigs were investigated. The active force development was maximal at 0.9 x L100 in nine of 12 investigated arteries (L100 corresponds to the circumference the vessel would have if relaxed and exposed to a luminal pressure of 100 mm Hg [13.3 kPa]). In all subsequent experiments, the vessels were stretched to 0.9 x L100. Noradrenaline (2 x 10(-8) to 10(-5) M) induced a concentration-dependent vasoconstriction; mean maximal tension development was 3.69 N/m. This force development would enable the arteries to contract against a pressure of more than 22 kPa (165 mm Hg), indicating preserved function of the media smooth muscle. Response to acetylcholine (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) was observed in only two of 12 arteries. Bradykinin (10(-11) to 10(-6) M) induced a concentration-dependent and reproducible relaxation in all vessels; the relaxation was endothelium-dependent, since no effect of bradykinin was detected after mechanical removal of the endothelium. Sodium nitroprusside (10(-4) M) induced a reproducible and endothelium-independent vasorelaxation. The results demonstrate preserved function of both smooth muscle and endothelium in this preparation. The model allows pharmacological investigations of bone arteries under well defined conditions and enables studies on focal bone lesions and human bone tissue.

  11. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in osteoclastogenesis, skeletal aging and bone diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Danielle A; Jiang, Jean X

    2015-07-01

    Osteoclasts are cells derived from bone marrow macrophages and are important in regulating bone resorption during bone homeostasis. Understanding what drives osteoclast differentiation and activity is important when studying diseases characterized by heightened bone resorption relative to formation, such as osteoporosis. In the last decade, studies have indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, are crucial components that regulate the differentiation process of osteoclasts. However, there are still many unanswered questions that remain. This review will examine the mechanisms by which ROS can be produced in osteoclasts as well as how it may affect osteoclast differentiation and activity through its actions on osteoclastogenesis signaling pathways. In addition, the contribution of ROS to the aging-associated disease of osteoporosis will be addressed and how targeting ROS may lead to the development of novel therapeutic treatment options. PMID:25804315

  12. Prevention of glucocorticoid induced bone changes with beta-ecdysone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Weiwei; Jiang, Li; Lay, Yu-An Evan; Chen, Haiyan; Jin, Guoqin; Zhang, Hongliang; Kot, Alexander; Ritchie, Robert O; Lane, Nancy E; Yao, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Beta-ecdysone (?Ecd) is a phytoecdysteroid found in the dry roots and seeds of the asteraceae and achyranthes plants, and is reported to increase osteogenesis in vitro. Since glucocorticoid (GC) excess is associated with a decrease in bone formation, the purpose of this study was to determine if treatment with ?Ecd could prevent GC-induced osteoporosis. Two-month-old male Swiss-Webster mice (n=8-10/group) were randomized to either placebo or slow release prednisolone pellets (3.3mg/kg/day) and treated with vehicle control or ?Ecd (0.5mg/kg/day) for 21days. GC treatment inhibited age-dependent trabecular gain and cortical bone expansion and this was accompanied by a 30-50% lower bone formation rate (BFR) at both the endosteal and periosteal surfaces. Mice treated with only ?Ecd significantly increased bone formation on the endosteal and periosteal bone surfaces, and increased cortical bone mass were their controls to compare to GC alone. Concurrent treatment of ?Ecd and GC completely prevented the GC-induced reduction in BFR, trabecular bone volume and partially prevented cortical bone loss. In vitro studies determined that ?Ecd prevented the GC increase in autophagy of the bone marrow stromal cells as well as in whole bone. In summary, ?Ecd prevented GC induced changes in bone formation, bone cell viability and bone mass. Additional studies are warranted of ?Ecd for the treatment of GC induced bone loss. PMID:25585248

  13. Reactive oxygen species on bone mineral density and mechanics in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) knockout mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: ? Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be a factor in the onset of a number of age-associated conditions, including loss of BMD. ? Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) deficient mice have increased ROS, reduced bone mineral density, decreased bending stiffness, and decreased strength compared to WT controls. ? Increased ROS caused by the deficiency of Sod1, may be responsible for the changes in BMD and bone mechanics and therefore represent an appropriate model for studying mechanisms of age-associated bone loss. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role in a number of degenerative conditions including osteoporosis. Mice deficient in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) (Sod1-/- mice) have elevated oxidative stress and decreased muscle mass and strength compared to wild-type mice (WT) and appear to have an accelerated muscular aging phenotype. Thus, Sod1-/- mice may be a good model for evaluating the effects of free radical generation on diseases associated with aging. In this experiment, we tested the hypothesis that the structural integrity of bone as measured by bending stiffness (EI; N/mm2) and strength (MPa) is diminished in Sod1-/- compared to WT mice. Femurs were obtained from male and female WT and Sod1-/- mice at 8 months of age and three-point bending tests were used to determine bending stiffness and strength. Bones were also analyzed for bone mineral density (BMD; mg/cc) using micro-computed tomography. Femurs were approximately equal in length across all groups, and there were no significant differences in BMD or EI with respect to gender in either genotype. Although male and female mice demonstrated similar properties within each genotype, Sod1-/- mice exhibited lower BMD and EI of femurs from both males and females compared with gender matched WT mice. Strength of femurs was also lower in Sod1-/- mice compared to WT as well as between genders. These data indicate that increased oxidative stress, due to the deficiency of Sod1 is associated with decreased bone stiffness and strength and Sod1-/- mice may represent an appropriate model for studying disease processes in aging bone.

  14. Reactive oxygen species on bone mineral density and mechanics in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) knockout mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smietana, Michael J. [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States); Arruda, Ellen M. [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States); Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2250 GG Brown, 2350 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Program in Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2250 GG Brown, 2350 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Faulkner, John A.; Brooks, Susan V. [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States); Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States); Larkin, Lisa M., E-mail: llarkin@umich.edu [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States); Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be a factor in the onset of a number of age-associated conditions, including loss of BMD. {yields} Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) deficient mice have increased ROS, reduced bone mineral density, decreased bending stiffness, and decreased strength compared to WT controls. {yields} Increased ROS caused by the deficiency of Sod1, may be responsible for the changes in BMD and bone mechanics and therefore represent an appropriate model for studying mechanisms of age-associated bone loss. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role in a number of degenerative conditions including osteoporosis. Mice deficient in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) (Sod1{sup -/-} mice) have elevated oxidative stress and decreased muscle mass and strength compared to wild-type mice (WT) and appear to have an accelerated muscular aging phenotype. Thus, Sod1{sup -/-} mice may be a good model for evaluating the effects of free radical generation on diseases associated with aging. In this experiment, we tested the hypothesis that the structural integrity of bone as measured by bending stiffness (EI; N/mm{sup 2}) and strength (MPa) is diminished in Sod1{sup -/-} compared to WT mice. Femurs were obtained from male and female WT and Sod1{sup -/-} mice at 8 months of age and three-point bending tests were used to determine bending stiffness and strength. Bones were also analyzed for bone mineral density (BMD; mg/cc) using micro-computed tomography. Femurs were approximately equal in length across all groups, and there were no significant differences in BMD or EI with respect to gender in either genotype. Although male and female mice demonstrated similar properties within each genotype, Sod1{sup -/-} mice exhibited lower BMD and EI of femurs from both males and females compared with gender matched WT mice. Strength of femurs was also lower in Sod1{sup -/-} mice compared to WT as well as between genders. These data indicate that increased oxidative stress, due to the deficiency of Sod1 is associated with decreased bone stiffness and strength and Sod1{sup -/-} mice may represent an appropriate model for studying disease processes in aging bone.

  15. Changes in bone microstructure and toughness during the healing process of long bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimoto, T; Nakano, T; Umakoshi, Y [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tabata, Y [Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: nakano@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-05-01

    It is of great importance to understand how bone defects regain the microstructure and mechanical function of bone and how the microstructure affects the mechanical function during the bone healing process. In the present study on long bone defects, we investigated the relationship between the recovery process of fracture toughness and biological apatite (BAp)/collagen (Col) alignment as an index of the bone microstructure to clarify the bone toughening mechanisms. A 5-mm defect introduced in the rabbit ulna was allowed to heal naturally and a three-point bending test was conducted on the regenerated site to assess bone toughness. The bone toughness was quite low at the early stage of bone regeneration but increased during the postoperative period. The change in toughness agreed well with the characteristics of the fracture surface morphology, which reflected the history of the crack propagation. SEM and microbeam X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that the toughness was dominated by the degree and orientation of the preferred BAp/Col alignment, i.e. bundles aligned perpendicular to the crack propagation clearly contributed to the bone toughening owing to extra energy consumption for resistance to crack propagation. In conclusion, regenerated bone improves fracture toughness by reconstructing the preferred BAp/Col alignment along the bone longitudinal axis during the healing process of long bones.

  16. Injectable reactive biocomposites for bone healing in critical-size rabbit calvarial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craniofacial injuries can result from trauma, tumor ablation, or infection and may require multiple surgical revisions. To address the challenges associated with treating craniofacial bone defects, an ideal material should have the ability to fit complex defects (i.e. be conformable), provide temporary protection to the brain until the bone heals, and enhance tissue regeneration with the delivery of biologics. In this study, we evaluated the ability of injectable lysine-derived polyurethane (PUR)/allograft biocomposites to promote bone healing in critical-size rabbit calvarial defects. The biocomposites exhibited favorable injectability, characterized by a low yield stress to initiate flow of the material and a high initial viscosity to minimize the adverse phenomena of extravasation and filter pressing. After injection, the materials cured within 10–12 min to form a tough, elastomeric solid that maintained mechanical integrity during the healing process. When injected into a critical-size calvarial defect in rabbits, the biocomposites supported ingrowth of new bone. The addition of 80 µg mL?1 recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) enhanced new bone formation in the interior of the defect, as well as bridging of the defect with new bone. These observations suggest that injectable reactive PUR/allograft biocomposites are a promising approach for healing calvarial defects by providing both mechanical stability as well as local delivery of rhBMP-2. (paper)

  17. Sensitivity of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and C-reactive Protein in Childhood Bone and Joint Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Kallio, Markku J. T.; Kallio, Pentti E.; Peltola, Heikki

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the examination of clinical signs, several laboratory markers have been measured for diagnostics and monitoring of pediatric septic bone and joint infections. Traditionally erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and leukocyte cell count have been used, whereas C-reactive protein (CRP) has gained in popularity. We monitored 265 children at ages 3 months to 15 years with culture-positive osteoarticular infections with a predetermined series of ESR, CRP, and leukocyte count measurem...

  18. Bone and joint changes following electrical burn: plain radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the plain radiographic findings of bone and joint changes following electrical burn. This study involved 19 patients with 27 bone and joints regions which had suffered electrical injury. The most common input and output sites were, respectively, the hand(7/14) and foot (6/10). Three other sites were involved. Four cases involved osteomyelitis, and in four, amputation was performed. We observed bone and joint changes, changes following osteomyelitis and changes in the amputation stump. We analyzed the difference between input and output changes, and when this was interesting, the average time of onset was assessed. In bone and joint changes following electrical burn, the most frequent radiographic finding was joint contracture(n=3D16). Other findings included osteolysis(n=3D8), articular abnormalites (n=3D6), periostitis(n=3D5), fracture(n=3D5), acro-osteolysis(n=3D2), and heterotopic bone formation(n=3D2). In cases involving osteomyelitis(n=3D4), aggravation of underlying bone changes was noted. In electrical burn, various changes were noted in bone and joints, and input injury was more severe than that of output.=20

  19. [Reactivity changes in calves during transportation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planski, B; Georgiev, S; Konov, V; Vasilev, V

    1980-01-01

    The activity of 38 calves aged 15-30 days of the Simenthal breed and of crosses with Ireshire was studied before and after transportaton at a distance of 38-100 km. It was established that transportation causes fatigue, thirst and a weight reduction of 4.3 kg, due to loss of liquid in the calf's organism. Caughing, soft faeces, even diarrhea, 1.5 degrees C higher rectal temperature, and 3.0 degrees C lower skin temperature, were recorded. the MacClure--Oldridge test proved twice as fast. As a result of hemoconcentration hemoglobin and hematocrite were higher. Eosinopaenia and neutrophylia with a nuclear deviation to the left similar to the reaction of experimentally induced lipopolysaccharide fever were established. On the 72d hour lymphocytosis and an enhanced lymhocytal index were observed. Transportation led to 15-18% higher number of phagocyted neutrophyls, 30-35% higher Wright number and nearly two times higher total blood phagocytal ability. Seventy two hours after two times higher total blood phagocytal ability. Seventy two hours after transportation the total blood phagocytal ability was reduced 15%. Another effect of calf transportation was the reduced total immunological reactivity, scored by the skin test of Yoffe. PMID:7414935

  20. Bone and Cartilage Demonstrate Changes Localized to Bone Marrow Edema-like Lesions within Osteoarthritic Knees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakia, Galateia J; Kuo, Daniel; Schooler, Joseph; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Shanbhag, Swetha; Bernstein, Gregory; Horvai, Andrew; Majumdar, Sharmila; Ries, Michael; Li, Xiaojuan

    2012-01-01

    Objective Our objective is to understand the biological and mechanical pathways linking cartilage, bone, and marrow changes in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone structure and composition within bone marrow edema-like lesion (BMEL) regions associated with knee OA. Methods Tibial plateau specimens (n = 18) were collected from 10 subjects with knee OA scheduled for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used to identify BMEL and quantify metrics of cartilage composition. Micro-computed tomography (?CT) and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) were used to quantify density and microstructure of the subchondral trabecular bone. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to quantify tissue composition. Results Trabecular bone within BMEL was higher in volume fraction, with more and thicker trabeculae that were more plate-like in structure compared to unaffected regions. BMEL trabecular tissue composition had decreased phosphate and carbonate content. Marrow infiltration by a fibrous collagen network and evidence of increased bone remodeling were present. Structural and compositional changes were specifically localized to regions underlying cartilage degradation. Conclusion These results support the paradigm of focal interactions among bone, marrow, and cartilage in the progression of knee OA. Quantitative evaluation of tissue changes and interactions may aid in the understanding of disease pathophysiology and provide imaging markers for disease progression. PMID:23025926

  1. Age-related elemental change in bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate age dependence of the bone element contents and structure, lumbar and femur from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were chosen for their more susceptibility to fracture. These rats were divided into to 5 age groups: 1, 4, 7, 11 and 25 month-age, corresponding human beings from the young to the old. The elements contents were detected by external Proton Induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) method was also applied to obtain information about calcium (Ca) and phosphor (P) structure. It was found that Ca content, Ca/P ratio, valance state of Ca and P and their coordinate structure remains unaltered with age variance, whereas the content of strontium (Sr) was significantly decreasing. Sr concentration may provide a new parameter for diagnosis of bone disorder

  2. Bone turnover in elderly men: relationships to change in bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Center Jacqueline R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not clear whether bone turnover markers can be used to make inference regarding changes in bone mineral density (BMD in untreated healthy elderly men. The present study was designed to address three specific questions: (i is there a relationship between bone turnover markers and femoral neck BMD within an individual; (ii is there a relationship between baseline measurements of bone turnover markers and subsequent change in BMD; and (iii is there a relationship between changes in bone turnover markers and changes in femoral neck BMD? Methods The present study was part of the on-going Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study, which was designed as a prospective investigation. Men who had had at least 3 sequential visits with serum samples available during follow-up were selected from the study population. Serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (sICTP, N-terminal propeptide of type I collagen (sPINP and femoral neck BMD were measured by competitive radioimmunoassays. Femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD was measured by a densitometer (GE Lunar Corp, Madison, WI. Various mixed-effects models were used to assess the association between the markers and changes in BMD. Results One hundred and one men aged 70 ± 4.1 years (mean ± SD met the criteria of selection for analysis. On average, sPINP decreased by 0.7% per year (p = 0.026, sICTP increased by 1.7% per year (p = 0.0002, and femoral neck BMD decreased by 0.4% per year (p Conclusion These results suggest that in elderly men of Caucasian background, changes in sPINP were inversely related to changes in BMD within an individual. However, neither sPINP nor sICTP was sufficiently sensitive to predict the rate of change in BMD for a group of individuals or for an individual.

  3. Proactive and Reactive View Change for Fault Tolerant Byzantine Agreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Saini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Dealing with arbitrary failures effectively, while reaching agreement, remains a major operational challenge in distributed transactions. In the contemporary literature, standard protocols such as Byzantine Fault Tolerant Distributed Commit and Practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance handles the problem to a greater extent. However, the limitation with these protocols is that they incur increased message overhead as well as large latency. Approach: To improve the failure resiliency with minimum execution overhead, we propose two new protocols based on proactive view change and reactive view change. Also, both approaches have been analyzed and compared. Results: Our dynamic analysis reflects that, in a faulty scenario, the proactive approach is computationally more efficient with reduced latency as compared to reactive one. Conclusion/Recommendations: Moreover, unlike PBFT and BFTDC, our agreement protocol runs in two phases, which leads to reduced message overhead and total execution time.

  4. Seasonal variations in indices of bone formation precede appropriate bone mineral changes in normal men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 10 normal males aged 23-50 years measurements of serum alkaline phosphatase (s-AP) and the 24-h whole body retention of 99mTc-diphosphonate (WBR), as indices of bone formation, and the fasting urinary hydroxyproline:creatinine ratio (OHPr:Cr), as an index of bone resorption, were performed monthly from January 1983 to May 1984. Bone mineral content of the distal forearm (BMC) was measured in the middle of each quarter. From January to May BMC exhibited a reproducible, significant average increase of 2.5%, returning to baseline level between May and August. During the first quarter of both 1983 and 1984 a significant increase in s-AP and WBR was seen. Subsequently, during the second quarter of 1983, these variables fell below the mean of the year. Confirming their interrelationship, the deviations of s-AP and WBR were positively correlated throughout the study period (r = 0.51, P less than 0.05). Since the urinary OHPr:Cr ratio remained constant, the reported seasonal changes in bone mass of normal, adult males appear to result from primary changes in bone formation

  5. Bone marrow changes during treatment for acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water and fatty elements of hematopoietic bone marrow can dramatically alter during the initial treatment of acute leukemia. Using proton chemical shift imaging (CSI), this study followed up patients with acute leukemia longitudinally during their initial course of chemotherapy and compared the CSI MR findings with the concurrent pathologic findings from bone marrow biopsies. Quantitative CSI of the lumbar spine was performed on a 0.5-T imager, with measurement of T1 and T2 relaxation times and fat fractions. Patients with acute leukemia were studied longitudinally, showing increases in fat fractions from 7% at pretreatment to 18% at 3;-week follow-up, consistent with documented remission. Smaller changes were seen in the water T1 relaxation times. These data support the dominant influence of fat fractions on the bone marrow signal changes during chemotherapy for acute leukemia

  6. Mycetoma bone changes as seen radiogicaly using conventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological features of mycetoma were prospectively described in this study which included two hundred patients with mycetoma. Middle age males were predominant affected group. Black mycetoma was commonest type in various age groups in both sexes followed by yellow, white and red mycetoma in this frequency. The foot was the commonly affected site in all patients. Radiological examinations of the effected sites revealed, soft tissue mass in most of the patients (80%), of them; 36 patients (19%) had obliteration of facial plans and 22 patients (11%) had scattered multiple granulations. No soft tissue calcification was seen in this study. Bone involvement was seen in 45 patients (22.5) and that included periosteal reaction (22,5), cortical erosion (15%), osteoporosis (12.5%), scalloping (11.5%), selerosis(4.5%) and tranlucence (7.5) osteolytic changes (1.5%) pseudocystic spaces without any new bone formation were seen. Intercommunication of the abscess cavities seen in the affected bone were shown as a net like or honey comb appearance. The most remarkable feature in all patients was the absence of sequestra and pathological feature even in patients with massive mycetoma. Few patients (24.5%) presented with sinuses without bone involvement. There was significant correlation between the bone changes and the type of mycetoma, duration of illness, sinus formation and recurrence rate. The painless nature of the disease most probably had contribute to the formation of the bone changes as most patients present late in the course of the disease. Radiological examination of the mycetoma patients is useful for both diagnosis of the disease and follow up of patients and it should be routinely performed. (Author)

  7. Precision of bone densitometry measurements: When is change true change and does it vary across bone density values?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precision error of the bone densitometer is used to interpret significant change in bone mineral density (BMD) in serial studies. The precision error can be expressed as standard deviation (SD) or coefficient of variation (CV). The aims of this study are to determine the precision error over a range of BMD values and to demonstrate the application of the precision error in clinical practice. A bone phantom was used consisting of a perspex block with eight compartments containing varying amounts of hydroxyapatite powder to simulate a range of bone densities. The block was scanned 21 times and manual regions placed over each compartment to measure the BMD in each compartment. There were no significant differences in the variances or SD for all eight compartments, that is, over the range of BMD normally encountered in clinical practice. However, the calculated CV show a progressive fall in values as the BMD rises. Therefore, the SD should be used to calculate significant BMD change. In a practise with quality control procedures in place to detect calibration drift and with appropriately trained personnel, a change of approximately 0.05 g/cm2 is generally regarded as being a significant change at a 95% confidence level. Copyright (2003) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. Change of MRI images in bone metastasis caused by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of radiation therapy on bone metastasis was studied by MR imaging. The study comprised 32 patients with bone metastasis from lung cancer, breast cancer, renal cell carcinoma and various other malignancies that were evaluated by MR imaging before and after radiation therapy (Group I); and 3 patients with preexisting bone metastasis of breast cancer who were free from recurrence for more than 5 years after radiation therapy (Group II). Signal intensities fell into 5 degrees: iso-intense to normal bone marrow within the radiation field (I); iso-intense to the muscles (L); hypointense to the muscles (LL); iso-intense to subcutaneous fat (H); and hyperintense to the fat (HH). Before radition therapy, most bone metastasis was (L) on T1-weighted images or (H) on T2-weighted images with enhancement by Gd-DTPA. MR images within or after 2 years in Group I showed the following T1-/T2-weighted images: LL/HH (31%, Type I), I/I (13%, Type II), LL/LL (9%, Type III), mixed changes (Type IV), and unchanged (NC). Gd-DTPA enhanced images before radiotherapy showed solid pattern in 23 of 27 patients. Among the 23 patients, the enhancement after radiation showed the decrease in 18 patients as follows: mottled (7), ring-shaped (4) and lacking (7). This seemed to have resulted from radiation. Tumor size reduction on MR imags was noted in a total of 12 patients. All 3 patients in Group II had Type III on non-enhanced MR images. Therefore, changes in T1- and T2-weighted images, Gd-DTPA enhancement, and tumor size are considered helpful in the evaluation of therapeutic results of bone metastasis. (N.K.)

  9. Age-related changes in the biochemical properties of human cancellous bone collagen: relationship to bone strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Allen J; Sims, Trevor J

    1999-01-01

    The metabolism of bone collagen has received little attention in relation to age-related loss of bone mass and strength. The aim of the present study was to analyze bone collagen content and metabolism in human bone with respect to age. The material consisted of iliac crest bone biopsies from 94 individuals: 46 women (ages 18-96, mean age 60.8 years) and 48 men (ages 23-92, mean age 59.5 years). Excluded from the study were all individuals with known osteoporotic lumbar vertebral fractures and renal, hepatic, or malignant diseases. Prior to collagen analysis the biopsies were scanned in a pQCT scanner for density assessment and then tested biomechanically. The results showed a decline in apparent bone density with age (P <0.0001), a decline in maximum stress, Young's modulus, and energy absorption with age (P <0.001). Concomittantly, there was an age-related decline in the intrinsic collagen content with age (P <0.001). However, there were no biochemical modifications of the bone collagen during aging. There were no significant differences between women and men in the slopes of the regressions-curves. When multiple regression analyses were performed, only apparent bone density came out as a significant contributor in the correlation to biomechanical properties. Nevertheless, the decrease in bone collagen content with age might indicate an increase in the mineralization degree (probably due to decreased bone turnover) and thereby a change in material properties of bone. In conclusion, the present study has shown that loss of bone mass plays the major role in loss of bone strength. However, there is also a change in bone composition during normal aging, leading to a decrease in collagen content and an increase in the degree of mineralization. At this skeletal site, in a normal population there was no change in the biochemical properties of bone collagen.

  10. Radiodiagnosis of bone changes in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of analysis of roentgenograms and scintigrams of hands and feet of 21 patients with diabetes mellitus are presented. Scintigraphy was carried out with 99mTc-pyrophosphate. The examination was conducted with ON-110 gamma chamber. Changes in scintigrams are detected for 19 of 21 patients examined; 37 foci of pathologic buildup of radiopharmaceuticals are determined. Increased buildup of radiopharmaceuticals in the region of the focus isn't marked in roentgeograms for 48.6% of patients. For 51.4% of patients the results of both methods coincide. Scintigraphy with 99mTc-pyrophosphates allows to refiny the degree of osteal changes propagation in diabetes mellitus as well as to detect them earlier than by the roentgenologic method

  11. Bone Densitometric changes after bone marrow transplantation in 63 patients with leukemia and lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esfahani A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Bone marrow transplantation (BMT is the treatment of choice for many patients with malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Long-term complications such as osteoporosis should be considered, because it is directly associated with the morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to assess the bone mineral density after allogenic or autologous bone marrow transplantation in patients with leukemia or lymphoma.Methods: We prospectively investigated 63 patients undergoing BMT for acute and chronic leukemia and lymphoma. At the end of the study, a total of 28 patients were assessed. Bone mineral density (BMD was measured prior BMT, and 6 and 12 months after BMT. Osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase and C-terminal telopeptides of type 1 collagen (ICTP were assessed. Serum concentration of calcium, phosphorous, vitamin D, PTH and sex hormones (FSH, LH, testosterone and estradiol were also measured.Results: There was a significant decrease in the bone mineral density of the femoral neck six months after BMT (p<0.001, 1.01±0.13g/cm² prior to BMT and 0.96±0.13 g/cm² at six months, but no considerable changes were seen in lumbar vertebrae. Bone loss between the 6th and 12th months was not observed. The levels of ICTP and phosphorus increased significantly by the 12th month (p=0.04. The level of calcium was higher at the 6th month (p=0.002 but the level of vitamin D and PTH decreased by the end of the study (p=0.04 and p=0.01, respectively and the average of osteocalcin did not increase significantly. In women, the level of estradiol decreased by the 6th month (p=0.01, but the testosterone changes were not significant.Conclusion: The risk of bone loss in both allogeneic and autologous BMT is higher in the femoral neck than the lumbar vertebrae, occurring mainly in the first six months after BMT. Preventive and clinical procedures should be considered.

  12. Reactive endplate marrow changes: a systematic morphologic and epidemiologic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the morphology and location of vertebral endplate changes, and to analyze their association with age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). At 1.5 T (T1-weighted, T2-weighted/STIR) 100 lumbar spines were evaluated separately by three observers. The readers classified the endplate bone marrow abnormalities on sagittal MR images according to the definitions of Modic et al. Findings were localized by disc segment; whether in the upper and/or lower endplate; and within each endplate divided into 15 segments. Disc space narrowing, as well as disc desiccation, was also noted at each vertebral level. In addition, endplate changes were correlated with age, gender, and BMI (weight(kg)/height(m)2). A total of 15,000 data points were studied and 422 total changes recorded. A total of 99 vertebral levels were affected in 58 patients. Of these, 171 were of type I, 242 were of type II, and 9 were of type III. L4 - L5 and L5 - S1 vertebral levels were most commonly involved, having (142, 4.73%) and (116, 3.87%) changes respectively (P<0.0001). The upper and lower aspects of the endplate were affected similarly. Changes most frequently occurred at the anterior aspect of the endplate (P<0.0001). Endplate marrow changes were associated with increasing age (P<0.0001) and, surprisingly, male gender (P<0.0001). Endplate changes were not associated with BMI. The fatty pattern was most common, with the sclerotic pattern being rare. Endplate marrow changes most often occurred at the anterior aspect of the endplate, particularly at L4 - L5 and L5 - S1 levels. Modic changes occur more frequently with aging, evidence of their degenerative etiology. They were, however, not related to body habitus, but to weight and male gender. (orig.)

  13. Bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Un; Kim, Hyung Seop; Song, Ju Seop; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon [Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To assess bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in temporomandibualr disorder (TMD) patients. 314 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) images of 163 TMD patients were examined at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonbuk National University. The images were obtained by PSR9000N (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan) and reconstructed by using Asahivision software (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan). The CBCT images were examined three times with four weeks interval by three radiologists. Bone changes of mandibular condyle such as flattening, sclerosis, erosion and osteophyte formation were observed in sagittal, axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images of the mandibular condyle. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.0. Intra-and interobserver agreement were performed by 3 radiologists without the knowledge of clinical information. Osteopathy (2.9%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. Erosion (31.8%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. The intraobserver agreement was good to excellent (k=0.78{sub 0}.84), but interobserver agreement was fair (k=0.45). CBCT can provide high qualified images of bone changes of the TMJ with axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images.

  14. A Gibbs Formulation for Reactive Materials with Phase Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. Scott

    2015-06-01

    A large class of applications have pure, condensed phase constituents that come into contact, chemically react and simultaneously undergo phase change. Phase change in a given molecular material has often been considered to be separate from chemical reaction. Continuum modelers of phase change often use a phase field model whereby an indicator function is allowed to change from one value to another in regions of phase change, governed by evolutionary (Ginzburg-Landau) equations, whereas classic chemical kinetics literally count species concentrations and derive kinetics evolution equations based on species mass transport. We argue the latter is fundamental and is the same as the former, if all species, phase or chemical are treated as distinct chemical species. We pose a self-consistent continuum, thermo-mechanical model to account for significant energetic quantities with correct molecular and continuum limits in the mixture. A single stress tensor, and a single temperature is assumed for the mixture with specified Gibbs potentials for all relevant species, and interaction energies. We discuss recent examples of complex reactive material modeling, drawn from thermitic and propellant combustion that use this new model. Supported by HDTRA1-10-1-0020 (DTRA), N000014-12-1-0555 (ONR) and FA8651-10-1-0004 (AFRL/RW).

  15. Aging mechanisms in bone

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Advancing age and loss of bone mass and strength are closely linked. Elevated osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis and decreased osteoblast number characterize the age-related skeletal changes in humans and rodents. Similar to other tissues, oxidative stress increases in bone with age. This article reviews current knowledge on the effects of the aging process on bone and its cellular constituents, with particular emphasis on the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS). FoxOs, sirtuins and the p53...

  16. Differences in origin of reactive microglia in bone marrow chimeric mouse and rat after transient global ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Deierborg, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Current understanding of microglial involvement in disease is influenced by the observation that recruited bone marrow (BM)-derived cells contribute to reactive microgliosis in BM-chimeric mice. In contrast, a similar phenomenon has not been reported for BM-chimeric rats. We investigated the recruitment and microglial transformation of BM-derived cells in radiation BM-chimeric mice and rats after transient global cerebral ischemia, which elicits a characteristic microglial reaction. Both species displayed microglial hyperplasia and rod cell transformation in the hippocampal CA1 region. In mice, a subpopulation of lesion-reactive microglia originated from transformed BM-derived cells. By contrast, no recruitment or microglial transformation of BM-derived cells was observed in BM-chimeric rats. These results suggest that reactive microglia in rats originate from resident microglia, whereas they have a mixed BM-derived and resident origin in mice, depending on the severity of ischemic tissue damage.

  17. Change in surface morphology of polytetrafluoroethylene by reactive ion etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Tomohiro, E-mail: tmhr_tkhs.d01@ruri.waseda.j [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Hirano, Yuki; Takasawa, Yuya; Gowa, Tomoko; Fukutake, Naoyuki [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Oshima, Akihiro [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Tagawa, Seiichi [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Washio, Masakazu [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was exposed to Ar, CF{sub 4}, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} plasmas using a reactive ion etching facility. After the exposure, the change in the surface morphology of PTFE was examined and characterization studies were performed for the etching rate, surface roughness, radical yields, chemical structures, water repellency and so on. The etching rates of Ar, CF{sub 4}, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} plasmas were 0.58, 7.2, 4.4 and 17 {mu}m/h, respectively. It was observed that needle-like nano-fiber structures on the surface were irregularly fabricated by the CF{sub 4} plasma. In addition, when the water repellency of exposed samples was evaluated by contact angle, they showed super-hydrophobic properties: contact angle over 150{sup o}.

  18. Change in surface morphology of polytetrafluoroethylene by reactive ion etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was exposed to Ar, CF4, N2 and O2 plasmas using a reactive ion etching facility. After the exposure, the change in the surface morphology of PTFE was examined and characterization studies were performed for the etching rate, surface roughness, radical yields, chemical structures, water repellency and so on. The etching rates of Ar, CF4, N2 and O2 plasmas were 0.58, 7.2, 4.4 and 17 ?m/h, respectively. It was observed that needle-like nano-fiber structures on the surface were irregularly fabricated by the CF4 plasma. In addition, when the water repellency of exposed samples was evaluated by contact angle, they showed super-hydrophobic properties: contact angle over 150o.

  19. Induction of systemic bone changes by preconditioning total body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been believed to be a safe procedure that does not cause late morbidity; yet, a recent report raises the suspicion that TBI-induced chondroosseous abnormalities do occur. To evaluate the radiological manifestations of TBI-induced skeletal alterations and their orthopaedic morbidity. Subjects included 11 children with TBI-induced skeletal changes, including 9 in our hospital and 2 in other hospitals. The former were selected from 53 children who had undergone TBI with BMT. Radiographic examinations (n=11), MRI (n=3), CT (n=2), and medical records in the 11 children were retrospectively reviewed. The skeletal alterations included abnormal epiphyseal ossification and metaphyseal fraying (8/11), longitudinal metaphyseal striations (8/11), irregular metaphyseal sclerosis (6/11), osteochondromas (4/11), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (2/10), genu valgum (3/10), and platyspondyly (2/3). MRI demonstrated immature primary spongiosa in the metaphysis. Of the 11 children, 9 had clinical symptoms. TBI can induce polyostotic and/or generalized bone changes, mainly affecting the epiphyseal/metaphyseal regions and occasionally the spine. The epi-/metaphyseal abnormalities represent impaired chondrogenesis in the epiphysis and growth plate and abnormal remodelling in the metaphysis. Generalized spine changes may lead to misdiagnosis of a skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  20. Induction of systemic bone changes by preconditioning total body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Osamu; Okamoto, Reiko; Masaki, Hidekazu [National Centre for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Gen [Tokyo Metropolitan Kiyose Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Kumagai, Masaaki; Shioda, Yoko [National Centre for Child Health and Development, Department of Oncology, Tokyo (Japan); Nozawa, Kumiko [Saitama Children' s Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Saitama (Japan); Kitoh, Hiroshi [Nagoya University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    Preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been believed to be a safe procedure that does not cause late morbidity; yet, a recent report raises the suspicion that TBI-induced chondroosseous abnormalities do occur. To evaluate the radiological manifestations of TBI-induced skeletal alterations and their orthopaedic morbidity. Subjects included 11 children with TBI-induced skeletal changes, including 9 in our hospital and 2 in other hospitals. The former were selected from 53 children who had undergone TBI with BMT. Radiographic examinations (n=11), MRI (n=3), CT (n=2), and medical records in the 11 children were retrospectively reviewed. The skeletal alterations included abnormal epiphyseal ossification and metaphyseal fraying (8/11), longitudinal metaphyseal striations (8/11), irregular metaphyseal sclerosis (6/11), osteochondromas (4/11), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (2/10), genu valgum (3/10), and platyspondyly (2/3). MRI demonstrated immature primary spongiosa in the metaphysis. Of the 11 children, 9 had clinical symptoms. TBI can induce polyostotic and/or generalized bone changes, mainly affecting the epiphyseal/metaphyseal regions and occasionally the spine. The epi-/metaphyseal abnormalities represent impaired chondrogenesis in the epiphysis and growth plate and abnormal remodelling in the metaphysis. Generalized spine changes may lead to misdiagnosis of a skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  1. Changes in bone Pb accumulation: Cause and effect of altered bone turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, José A.; Costa, Isabel M.; Silva, Alexandra M. e; Marques, José M.; Zagalo, Carlos M.; Cavaleiro, Inês I.; Fernandes, Tânia A.; Gonçalves, Luísa L.

    2014-01-01

    "This paper assesses the magnitude of Pb uptake in cortical and trabecular bones in healthy animals and animals with altered balance in bone turnover, and the impact of exposure to Pb on serum markers of bone formation and resorption. The results reported herein provide physiological evidence that Pb distributes differently in central compartments in Pb metabolism, such as cortical and trabecular bone, in healthy animals and animals with altered balance in bone turnover, and that exposure to ...

  2. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: A Neoplasm or a Reactive Condition?

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, Anwar Ul; Moatasim, Ambreen

    2008-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a benign but locally aggressive bone tumor of young adults. It typically presents as a large lytic mass at the end of the epiphysis of long bones. Grossly it is comprised of cystic and hemorrhagic areas with little or no periosteal reaction. Microscopically areas of frank hemorrhage, numerous multinucleated giant cells and spindly stromal cells are present. Telomeric fusions, increased telomerase activity and karyotypic aberrations have been advanced as a pr...

  3. Assessment of cortical and trabecular bone changes in two models of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Hannah M; Larson, Blair E; Coatney, Garrett A; Button, Keith D; DeCamp, Charlie E; Fajardo, Ryan S; Haut, Roger C; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2015-12-01

    Subchondral bone is thought to play a significant role in the initiation and progression of the post-traumatic osteoarthritis. The goal of this study was to document changes in tibial and femoral subchondral bone that occur as a result of two lapine models of anterior cruciate ligament injury, a modified ACL transection model and a closed-joint traumatic compressive impact model. Twelve weeks post-injury bones were scanned via micro-computed tomography. The subchondral bone of injured limbs from both models showed decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density. Surgical transection animals showed significant bone changes primarily in the medial hemijoint of femurs and tibias, while significant changes were noted in both the medial and lateral hemijoints of both bones for traumatic impact animals. It is believed that subchondral bone changes in the medial hemijoint were likely caused by compromised soft tissue structures seen in both models. Subchondral bone changes in the lateral hemijoint of traumatic impact animals are thought to be due to transmission of the compressive impact force through the joint. The joint-wide bone changes shown in the traumatic impact model were similar to clinical findings from studies investigating the progression of osteoarthritis in humans. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1835-1845, 2015. PMID:26147652

  4. Evaluation of temporal scintigraphic changes of bone fractures in rabbits using multiphase bone scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Familiarity with the temporal changes in the scintigraphic pattern of the healing fractures overtime on multiphase bone scan, can be useful to ascertain whether a fracture is of recent origin or long standing, and in improving the specificity for diagnosis of infection when suspected at the site of an old fracture. This could also be useful in avoiding additional imaging studies such as labelled leukocyte imaging, particularly when resources are limited as in many developing countries. The objective of this experimental study was to assess temporal changes of blood flow, blood pool activity and delayed uptake at the site of fracture using Tc-99m MDP and to determine the potential value of quantitation in differentiating non- infected from infected fractures. Twenty-one New Zealand white rabbits of the same age and approximately same weight (2.2 kg each) were studied. Fractures were induced into one femur under general anaesthesia and complete aseptic conditions, and fixed with plaster. Imaging was performed every week for 3 months and every two weeks for another 3 months in all animals using 5 mCi (158 MBq) of Tc-99m MDP for each study. Flow studies for 1 second per frame for 1 minute, blood pool static image for 5 minutes and delayed images for 5 minutes each at 3 hours and at 24 hours post injection were acquired, each time using the same geometrical parameters. Temporal changes of flow and blood pool were determined over the period of the study by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. The time at which flow and blood pool returned to normal was determined. Ratio of radioactivity in the fractured site to normal bone was also determined on the delayed images (3 and 24 hours) and the factor of change in the ratios between 3 and 24 hours was determined in each study. At the end of the studies animals were sacrificed and histopathologic examinations of fracture sites were carried out to determine whether infection was present. In 17 animals with no evidence of infection, flow and blood pool activity returned to normal within 6 months (Range = 8 to 24 weeks). In the remaining four rabbits who had evidence of skeletal infection at the sites of fracture, flow and blood pool activity did not normalize by 6 months. The calculated ratios of radioactivity concentration at fractured site to normal bone at 3 and 24 hours for each animal during the entire period of the study revealed that the mean values of 24 hour to 3 hour ratio for non-infected group was persistently below one (p < 0.001), while in the infected group the mean value was above one(p < 0.05). Our preliminary data suggests that flow and blood pool activity normalize by 6 months at the site of non-infected fractures which also show persistently lower 24 hour fracture to normal bone ratio than the three hour ratio, contrary to that in infected fractures. This quantitative parameter could be potentially helpful in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis at fracture sites by bone scan. (author)

  5. Scintigraphic changes in bone metastasis from prostate cancer after hormonal therapy. Comparison with tumor markers and bone X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scintigraphy is often performed to assess the response to systemic therapy of bone metastasis from prostate cancer. We examined the changes in bone scintigraphic findings and the agreement with alkaline phosphatase(AlP), acid phosphatase(AcP), or other tumor markers measured in the follow-up of patients with known bone metastasis after hormonal therapy. Out of 32 patients, 22 (69%) showed improved scintigraphic findings on the first follow-up bone scintigraphy after hormonal therapy. However, 7 out of 22 patients who showed improvement on the first follow-up scintigraphy, deteriorated thereafter. Changes in the scintigraphic findings were closely correlated with those in the measured tumor markers except for patients with small bone metastasis. Though there were no significant differences in the agreement ratios of the 6 tumor markers evaluated, AlP might be a practical and acceptable indicator. Bone X-ray findings did not change at all in almost half of the cases though the scintigraphic findings showed improvement or deterioration. (author)

  6. Bone changes caused by experimental Solanum malacoxylon poisoning in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre, José Ignacio; Gomar, María Soledad; Igal, Silvio; Quiroga, María Alejandra; Portiansky, Enrique Leo; Gimeno, Eduardo Juan

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the bone changes observed after a daily oral administration of the calcinogenic plant Solanum malacoxylon (syn. S. glaucophyllum) (Sm) during 9 days. The Sm-poisoned rabbits had an increase of bone resorption in the endosteal surface of the cortical zone and an also in the surface covered by osteoblasts of the primary and secondary spongiosa of the trabecular bone compartment. Moreover, the epiphyseal growth plates in long bones appeared narrower than in ...

  7. Glucocorticoid-Induced Changes in the Geometry of Osteoclast Resorption Cavities Affect Trabecular Bone Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderoost, Jef; Søe, Kent; Merrild, Ditte Marie Horslev; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2012-01-01

    Bone fracture risk can increase through bone microstructural changes observed in bone pathologies, such as glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Resorption cavities present one of these microstructural aspects. We recently found that glucocorticoids (GCs) affect the shape of the resorption cavities. Specifically, we found that in the presence of GC osteoclasts (OCs) cultured on bone slices make more trenchlike cavities, compared to rather round cavities in the absence of GCs, while the total erod...

  8. Immobilisation-induced changes in forearm bone quantity and quality: radiographic fourier image analysis vs bone densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Determinants of bone fracture risk include indices of bone 'quantity' such as bone mineral content (BMC, mineral mass per unit scanned bone length), plus 'environmental' (eg impact force) and 'quality' factors (Melton L.J. III et al, Bone and Min 2: 321, 1987). Bone 'quality' refers largely to the micro-geometry of bone (? 10-200?), but has been less well studied because of the need for bone slices from (invasive) bone biopsies. Such studies often compare the geometry of trabecular networks (eg trabecular bone volume, trabecular number) with clinical outcomes such as fracture rates. Another (invasive) approach is to examine the two-dimensional (2-D) Fourier transform (FT) of a high-resolution radiographic image of the bone slice, since structural information is in theory encoded in the 2-D spatial-frequency (?) spectrum. Additionally, the FT method can be applied to bone images obtained in-vivo, though superposition of information from the third dimension is a major confounding factor in their interpretation. Quantitative radiography of the ultradistal (UD) forearm permits determination of BMC (Price R et al; ACPSEM 6: 128- 137, 1983 and ACPSEM 11: 36-43, 1988), and (as a bonus) reveals a pattern (suitable for FT analysis) of the radiographic shadows of the 3-D trabecular network projected onto the image plane. Hemiplegia is associated with excessive bone loss in the paralysed (hemi) forearm, and is a model for the study of immobilisation osteoporosis. Thus, by comparing hemiplegia-induced changes in BMC and trabecular structure, derived from the same in vivo radiographic image, it is possible to compare directly the effects of disease on both bone quantity and quality, using the image of the non-paralysed (non-hemi) arm as a control. Seventy-four patients with hemiplegia of duration 3.6±3.6 (Mean±SD) years were studied cross-sectionally for radiographic BMC of their normal and paralysed UD forearms in AP view, each arm in duplicate. Methods (including water-immersion of the forearm, plus image calibration) and results of the bone densitometry study have been published (Prince RL et al, J Bone and Min Res, 3: 305-310, 1988). In the present study, the original radiographs from a subset of 30 patients (16M and 14F) were re-analysed by specifically-designed software (IMS). Radiographs were digitised and a square (128 x 128 pixels, 256 grey levels) was extracted centrally from the image of the UD radius, with its distal side perpendicular to the forearm long axis and lined up with the base of the ulnar styloid process, representing an area of 16x16 mm2 on the unmagnified image. Following thresholding using a value derived from sampling of the bone-free image, a 2-D FT was derived. It is reasonable to expect that there is (at least) a qualitative relationship between the sizes and orientations of the image elements identified by the FT and those of the trabeculae generating them by superposition. The general orientations (or sizes) of these periodic elements were analysed by dividing up the Fourier plane (described by polar coordinates ?, ?) into contiguous sectors (or annuli) and summing the normalised intensities within each sector (or annulus) (eg Lendaris GG et al, Proc IEEE 58: 198-216, 1970). Principal Components Analysis using all 8 annuli produced a complete separation of male and female non-hemi forearms, marked separation of male hemi and male non-hemi, and no separation in women. We conclude from this preliminary study that FT analysis of in-vivo forearm radiographs reveals gender dimorphism and detects immobilisation-induced changes in bone structure (ie 'quality') in males but not females. Thus the pattern of trabecular bone loss in males may differ from that of women, in a manner not discernible by conventional bone densitometry, which addresses bone 'quantity' only

  9. Galloping exercise induces regional changes in bone density within the third and radial carpal bones of Thoroughbred horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to test the hypothesis that a localised bone hypertrophy could occur within the subchondral cancellous architecture of the third and radial carpal bones. Using 2 levels of controlled and defined exercise, it was observed that a high intensity treadmill exercise protocol resulted in functional adaptation of the carpal bones. The increase in trabecular thickening and density was seen to be localised to those regions underlying common sites of cartilage degradation, the interface of the thickened trabeculae with the normal architecture in the third carpal hone was coincident with a common site of clinical fractures. The bone changes were determined both qualitatively on examination of slab radiographs and quantified by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The findings from this study are relevant to mechanical factors involved in the pathophysiology of joint degeneration. The potential clinical implications of this study are in relation to changes in the type and duration of exercise regimens used in training of equine athletes. The rapid response of bone to mechanical stimulation has implications in the longer term for localised cartilage degradation. Imaging techniques could be developed to monitor these early bone changes in the specific areas identified in this study and thus allow appropriate changes in training intensity to minimise subsequent damage to the articular surface

  10. Marked changes in iliac crest bone structure in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients without any signs of disturbed bone remodeling or balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiniche, T; Christiansen, Peer Michael; Vesterby, A; Hasling, C; Ullerup, R; Mosekilde, L; Melsen, F

    1994-01-01

    Successful iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from 63 women with postmenopausal vertebral crush fracture osteoporosis. Structural and static histomorphometric parameters were compared with 25 age-matched normal females, who had suffered an unexpected and sudden death. The control group for dynamic parameters comprised 13 younger normal females. Marked structural changes were observed in the osteoporotic patients in cortical as well as cancellous bone. Cortical width, trabecular volume, trab...

  11. Proliferative, reparative, and reactive benign bone lesions that may be confused diagnostically with true osseous neoplasms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wick, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic problems attending intraosseous and parosteal pseudoneoplastic lesions can be radiographic, or histological, or both. Proliferations in this category may contain cellular fibro-osseous or chondro-osseous tissues that are difficult to separate microscopically from those seen in various true neoplasms of the bones. This review considers the clinicopathologic features of fibrous dysplasia, benign fibro-osseous lesions of the jawbones, osteofibrous dysplasia, metaphyseal fibrous defect, giant-cell reparative granuloma, "brown tumor" of hyperparathyroidism, synovial chondrometaplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, tumefactive chronic osteomyelitis, proliferative Paget disease, and polyvinylpyrrolidone storage disease of bone.

  12. Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  13. Novel antioxidative nanotherapeutics in a rat periodontitis model: Reactive oxygen species scavenging by redox injectable gel suppresses alveolar bone resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Makiko; Kaneko, Junya; Sato, Takenori; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Kawamata, Ryota; Sakurai, Takashi; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Hamada, Nobushiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in a variety of disorders, but to date, ROS scavengers have not been widely used for local treatment of inflammation, because they are rapidly eliminated from the inflamed site. We have designed a novel redox injectable gel (RIG) that is formed at 37 °C after disintegration of nano-assembled flower micelles allowing nitroxide radicals to act locally as specific ROS scavengers for the treatment of periodontitis. In the present study, we have confirmed retention of the RIG in the periodontal region, along with its antioxidant-related anti-inflammatory effects, and we have subsequently evaluated the inhibitory effect of the RIG against Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis)-induced alveolar bone loss attributed to ROS. Alveolar bone loss was estimated by morphometry, gingival blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry, and osteoclast differentiation was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. The results show that the RIG can inhibit P. gingivalis-induced bone loss by antioxidant-related anti-inflammatory actions, and this suggests that the RIG is a promising novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. gingivalis-induced periodontitis. PMID:26559357

  14. Deletion of filamin A in monocytes protects cortical and trabecular bone from post-menopausal changes in bone microarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, S; Glogauer, J; Grynpas, M D; Glogauer, M

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the in vivo role of Filamin A (FLNA) in osteoclast generation and function, through the assessment of trabecular bone morphology, bone turnover, and the resulting changes in mechanical properties of the skeleton in mice with targeted deletion of FLNA in pre-osteoclasts. Using a conditional targeted knockdown of FLNA in osteoclasts, we assessed bone characteristics in vivo including micro-computed tomography (micro-ct), histomorphometric analyses, and bone mechanical properties. These parameters were assessed in female mice at 5 months of age, in an aging protocol (comparing 5-month-old and 11-month-old mice) and an osteoporosis protocol [ovariectomized (OVX) at 5 months of age and then sacrificed at 6 and 11 months of age]. In vivo bone densitometry, mechanical and histomorphometric analyses revealed a mild osteoporotic phenotype in the FLNA-null 5-month and aging groups. The WT and FLNA-KO bones did not appear to age differently. However, the volumetric bone mineral density decrease associated with OVX in WT is absent in FLNA-KO-OVX groups. The skeleton in the FLNA-KO-OVX group does not differ from the FLNA-KO group both in mechanical and structural properties as shown by mechanical testing of femora and vertebrae and histomorphometry of vertebrae. Additionally, FLNA-KO femora are tougher and more ductile than WT femora. The result of this study indicates that while FLNA-KO bones are weaker than WT bones, they do not age differently and are protected from estrogen-mediated post-menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:25894069

  15. Cardiovascular changes during vertebroplasty do not due to bone cement leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rather serious complication of vertebroplasty is caused by bone cement leakage into adjacent structure but recent research suggests that even without cement leakage during vertebroplasty, patients could also experience with cardiovascular changes sometimes. Cytotoxicity of bone cement, nervous reflex, fat embolism and alteration of intravertebral pressure may be responsible for these changes. (authors)

  16. Early changes in biochemical markers of bone turnover and their relationship with bone mineral density changes after 24 months of treatment with teriparatide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blumsohn, A; Marin, F

    2011-01-01

    We report the changes in biochemical markers of bone formation during the first 6 months of teriparatide therapy in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis according to previous antiresorptive treatment. Prior therapy does not adversely affect the response to teriparatide treatment. Similar bone markers levels are reached after 6 months of treatment. INTRODUCTION: The response of biochemical markers of bone turnover with teriparatide therapy in subjects who have previously received osteoporosis drugs is not fully elucidated. We examined biochemical markers of bone formation in women with osteoporosis treated with teriparatide and determined: (1) whether the response is associated with prior osteoporosis therapy, (2) which marker shows the best performance for detecting a response to therapy, and (3) the correlations between early changes in bone markers and subsequent bone mineral density (BMD) changes after 24 months of teriparatide. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, open-label, 24-month study at 95 centers in 10 countries in 758 postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis (n?=?181 treatment-naïve) who had at least one post-baseline bone marker determination. Teriparatide (20 ?g/day) was administered for up to 24 months. We measured procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (b-ALP), and total alkaline phosphatase (t-ALP) at baseline, 1 and 6 months, and change in BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck from baseline to 24 months. RESULTS: Significant increases in formation markers occurred after 1 month of teriparatide regardless of prior osteoporosis therapy. The absolute increase at 1 month was lower in previously treated versus treatment-naïve patients, but after 6 months all groups reached similar levels. PINP showed the best signal-to-noise ratio. Baseline PINP correlated positively and significantly with BMD response at 24 months. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the long-term responsiveness of bone formation markers to teriparatide is notaffected in subjects previously treated with antiresorptive drugs.

  17. Techniques for computing reactivity changes caused by fuel axial expansion in LMRs [liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation is made of the accuracy of methods used to compute reactivity changes caused by axial fuel relocation in fast reactors. Results are presented to demonstrate the validity of assumptions commonly made such as linearity of reactivity with fuel elongation, additivity of local reactivity contributions, and the adequacy of standard perturbation techniques. Accurate prediction of the reactivity loss caused by axial swelling of metallic fuel is shown to require proper representation of the burnup dependence of the expansion reactivity. Some accuracy limitations in the methods used in transient analyses, which are based on the use of fuel worth tables, are identified, and efficient ways to improve accuracy are described. Implementation of these corrections produced expansion reactivity estimates within 5% of higher-order methods for a metal-fueled FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] core representation

  18. The surface of bones: methods of recording entheseal changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    Entheses, which are macroscopically visible three-dimensional (3D) features on bones where muscles attach, have a complex etiology that includes muscle use in activities, age, and body size. Most studies of entheseal changes are based on scoring methods. Scoring methods often have high observer error rates and are often analyzed with low power statistics. Furthermore, scoring methods fail to capture the complexity of enthesis morphology, which includes proliferative and erosive traits that can be viewed as a 3D topography similar to landscapes. Recent studies have employed both two-dimensional metric data and 3D data from laser scans and CT-scans. Using a variety of software packages, anthropologists have displayed the scanned entheses in color coded topographical maps that can be moved and rotated to reveal entheses’ complex morphology. The quantitative nature of these data, which include 3D surface area and fractal dimensions, is less subjective and statistical tests are easier to apply, but error rates are still problematic for some measures. Additionally, these studies reveal that entheseal changes correlate with age and body size; these correlations are sometimes considered problematic since the correlations hinder activity reconstructions, which is often the goal when examining entheses.

  19. Primary hyperparathyroidism : changes in trabecular bone remodeling following surgical treatment--evaluated by histomorphometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peer Michael; Steiniche, T

    1990-01-01

    Iliac bone biopsies from 11 patients who underwent successful surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism were examined before and median 7 months after surgical treatment. Trabecular bone volume increased (p less than 0.05) and eroded (p less than 0.005) and osteoid covered surfaces decreased (p less than 0.005) in the postoperative period. Also, a decline in tetracycline labeled surfaces was noticed (p less than 0.02). Osteoid thickness, mineral appositional rate and mineralization lag time were unchanged. Bone formation rate at the level of the basic multicellular unit (BMU) was unaffected, but at the tissue level bone formation rate diminished (p less than 0.02). The surgical cure of primary hyperparathyroidism was found accompanied by a change in bone metabolism as the trabecular bone remodeling decreased from a high turnover to a low turnover state. The spongy bone mass increased after parathyroidectomy but the clinical significance of this finding was not clear.

  20. Changes in calcitropic hormones, bone markers and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) during pregnancy and postpartum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, U K; við Streym, Susanna; Mosekilde, L; Heickendorff, L; Flyvbjerg, A; Frystyk, J; Jensen, L T; Rejnmark, L

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy and lactation cause major changes in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. This population-based cohort study presents the physiological changes in biochemical indices of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism during pregnancy and lactation

  1. Prevention and Treatment of Bone Changes Associated with Exposure to Glucocorticoids

    OpenAIRE

    Warriner, Amy; SAAG, KENNETH G.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatologic diseases are associated with a pro-inflammatory state which is thought to lead to many of the bone changes seen in treatment-naive patients. However, glucocorticoids remain a common treatment option for rheumatologic diseases and are known to have a negative impact on bone through direct effects on bone cells and indirect effects on calcium absorption. Despite the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids, fracture risk rises within the first three months of treatment. As such...

  2. Early-age volume changes of extrudable reactive powder concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Noirfontaine M.N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study on the early-age autogenous deformations of Extrudable Reactive Powder Concretes (ERPCs, especially designed for the making of concrete pipes by extrusion. Different ERPC mixtures, with variable amounts of polycarboxylate superplasticizer (SP, have been investigated. Results on 28-day mechanical properties, early-age hydration rate, autogenous shrinkage and premature cracking risk are analyzed and discussed in relation with the ERPC mix parameters.

  3. Glucocorticoid-Induced Changes in the Geometry of Osteoclast Resorption Cavities Affect Trabecular Bone Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderoost, Jef; SØe, Kent

    2012-01-01

    Bone fracture risk can increase through bone microstructural changes observed in bone pathologies, such as glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Resorption cavities present one of these microstructural aspects. We recently found that glucocorticoids (GCs) affect the shape of the resorption cavities. Specifically, we found that in the presence of GC osteoclasts (OCs) cultured on bone slices make more trenchlike cavities, compared to rather round cavities in the absence of GCs, while the total eroded surface remained constant. For this study, we hypothesized that trenchlike cavities affect bone strength differently compared to round cavities. To test this hypothesis, we cultured OCs on bone slices in the presence and absence of GC and quantified their dimensions. These data were used to model the effects of OC resorption cavities on bone mechanical properties using a validated beam-shell finite element model of trabecular bone. We demonstrated that a change in the geometry of resorption cavities is sufficient toaffect bone competence. After correcting for the increased EV/BV with GCs, the difference to the control condition was no longer significant, indicating that the GC-induced increase in EV/BV, which is closely related to the shape of the cavities, highly determines the stiffness effect. The lumbar spine was the anatomic site most affected by the GC-induced changes on the shape of the cavities. These findings might explain the clinical observation that the prevalence of vertebral fractures during GC treatment increases more than hip, forearm and other nonvertebral fractures.

  4. Changes observed in radionuclide bone scans during and after teriparatide treatment for osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Amelia E.B.; Blake, Glen M.; Fogelman, Ignac [King' s College London, School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Kathleen A.; Ruff, Valerie A.; Rana, Asad E.; Wan, Xiaohai [Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Visual changes on radionuclide bone scans have been reported with teriparatide treatment. To assess this, serial studies were evaluated and quantified in ten postmenopausal women with osteoporosis treated with teriparatide (20 {mu}g/day subcutaneous) who had {sup 99m}Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scans (baseline, 3 and 18 months, then after 6 months off therapy). Women were injected with 600 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-MDP, and diagnostic bone scan images were assessed at 3.5 h. Additional whole-body scans (10 min, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h) were analysed for {sup 99m}Tc-MDP skeletal plasma clearance (K{sub bone}). Regional K{sub bone} differences were obtained for the whole skeleton and six regions (calvarium, mandible, spine, pelvis, upper and lower extremities). Bone turnover markers (BTM) were also measured. Most subjects showed visual changes on 3- and 18-month bone scan images that disappeared after 6 months off therapy. Enhanced uptake was seen predominantly in the calvarium and lower extremities. Whole skeleton K{sub bone} displayed a median increase of 22% (3 months, p = 0.004) and 34% (18 months, p = 0.002) decreasing to 0.7% (6 months off therapy). Calvarium K{sub bone} changes were three times larger than other sites. After 6 months off therapy, all K{sub bone} and BTM values returned towards baseline. The increased {sup 99m}Tc-MDP skeletal uptake with teriparatide indicated increased bone formation which was supported by BTM increases. After 6 months off therapy, metabolic activity diminished towards baseline. The modulation of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP skeletal uptake during treatment was the result of teriparatide's metabolic activity. These findings may aid the radiological evaluation of similar teriparatide patients having radionuclide bone scans. (orig.)

  5. Urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD), serum bone glia protein (BGP) and bone metabolism change in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of thyroid function on bone metabolism. Methods: Urinary DPD, Serum FT3, FT4 and BGP levels were determined with chemiluminescence assay and RIA in 41 patients with hyperthyroidism and 47 healthy controls. Results: Urinary DPD and serum FT3, FT4, BGP levels were significantly higher in patients with hyperthyroidism than those in healthy controls (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The data showed that hyperthyroidism was correlated with bone metabolism

  6. Research of age changes of bone tissue of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the help of a method dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) mineral density bone tissue was defined in view of age, sex and individual features. Is established, that the parameters (DEXA) have precise interrelation with age changes in bone tissue, which aris with osteoporosis and have the certain clinical value

  7. Inflammatory related changes in bone mineral content in adults with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Haworth, C; Selby, P; Webb, A. (photogr.); Martin, L; Elborn, J; Sharples, L; Adams, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Proinflammatory cytokines stimulate osteoclast activity and this could lead to increased bone resorption in patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether markers of systemic inflammation are related to changes in bone mineral content (BMC) in adults with cystic fibrosis.

  8. Founders lecture 2007. Metabolic bone disease: what has changed in 30 years?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Diagnostic Radiology, MSK, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2009-09-15

    To provide an update on imaging of metabolic bone disease based on new developments, findings, and changing practices over the past 30 years. Literature review of osteoporosis, osteomalacia, renal osteodystrophy, Paget's disease, bisphosphonates, with an emphasis on imaging. Cited references and pertinent findings. Significant developments have occurred in the imaging of metabolic bone disease over the past 30 years. (orig.)

  9. Changes in bone mineral and matrix in response to a soft diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsmill, V J; Boyde, A; Davis, G R; Howell, P G T; Rawlinson, S C F

    2010-05-01

    Alterations in the magnitude of habitual mechanical loads upon the skeleton may not only affect bone architecture, but also influence the nature of the bone matrix. We tested the hypothesis that changing the mechanical consistency of the diet affects both the mineral and non-mineralized moieties of bone matrix. Female rats were fed a soft diet (powdered chow as a paste), while control animals were fed the standard chow. After 8 or 20 wks, animals were killed. Cranial (mandible, maxilla, parietal, and frontal) bones and ulnae were analyzed for mineralization density by quantitative backscattered electron microscopy, and sulphated glycosaminoglycan levels with alcian blue staining were measured by microdensitometry. The soft diet group showed a significant increase in mineralization density distribution at almost all cranial sites and a reduction in alcian blue staining in alveolar bone. Altering the consistency of the diet significantly affects mineral concentration and glycosaminoglycan content of alveolar bone. PMID:20348483

  10. Cystic angiomatosis of bone with sclerotic changes mimicking osteoblastic metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five unusual cases of cystic angiomatosis of bone which presented with the radiologic appearance of osteoblastic lesions are reported. Three patients were female (ages 37, 41, and 65 years) and two were male (ages 24 and 66 years). Although cystic angiomatosis of bone usually produces widespread osteolytic lesions with a honeycombed appearance in the skeletal system, multiple osteoblastic lesions mimicking metastatic osteoblastic carcinoma are sometimes seen. This radiological presentation has not been well emphasized in previous reports. Histologically, in addition to the angiomatous lesions, both mature thickened lamellar bone trabeculae and immature trabeculae of woven bone were found. In one of our patients, increasing density of the osteoblastic lesions was noted over time. One previous study has suggested that the age of the lesions of cystic angiomatosis is related to radiographic density. It is important to recognize this uncommon variant of cystic angiomatosis and to include this entity among the radiologic differential diagnoses when multiple osteoblastic lesions are encountered. (orig.)

  11. Changes in Bone Turnover Markers and Bone Mass with Reducing Levels of Jumping Exercise Regimens in Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foong Kiew Ooi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:To date,little is known about the effects of a reduced level of jumping exercise regimens on bone turnover markers and mass. This study investigates the effects of different jumping exercise regimens with varying exercise loads on serum bone turnover markers and bone mass in female rats.Methods:A total of 144 female rats aged 12 weeks, were divided into 12 groups as follows: no exercise for 8 (8S or 32 weeks (32S, or 8 weeks of standard training program (8STP consisting of 200 jumps per week (200J/w, given at 40 jumps per day (40J/d for 5 days per week (5d/w (8STP24E, followed by 24 weeks of exercise at loads of either 10J/d or 20J/d or 40J/d, for either 5d/w, or 3d/w, or 1d/w. Serum osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, C-terminal telopeptideof type 1 collagen (1CTP concentrations, and tibial fat free dry weight were measured.Results: Tibial mass was significantly higher in 8STP than 8S. No changes were evident in serum markers of bone turnover parameters after 8STP. Significant increases in tibial mass were observed in rats that continued to exercise at workloads of 30J/w and above after 8STP. Serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations increase whereas serum 1CTP concentrations decrease in rats given workloads of 40J/w and above.Conclusions: It appears, an exercise load of 30J/w, i.e. 10J/d for 3d/w,was the minimum level of continuous exercise load that was required to maintain the 8STP-induced bone gains. In addition, significant increases in bone mass in young rats following 8STP might not always be reflected by changes in serum levels of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase and 1CTP.

  12. Changes in total body bone mineral density following a common bone health plan with two versions of a unique bone health supplement: a comparative effectiveness research study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapilmoto Monika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The US Surgeon General's Report on Bone Health suggests America's bone-health is in jeopardy and issued a "call to action" to develop bone-health plans that: (1 improve nutrition, (2 increase health literacy and, (3 increase physical activity. This study is a response to this call to action. Methods After signing an informed consent, 158 adults agreed to follow an open-label bone-health plan for six months after taking a DXA test of bone density, a 43-chemistry blood test panel and a quality of life inventory (AlgaeCal 1. Two weeks after the last subject completed, a second group of 58 was enrolled and followed the identical plan, but with a different bone-health supplement (AlgaeCal 2. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in baseline bone mineral density (BMD or in variables related to BMD (age, sex, weight, percent body fat, fat mass, or fat-free mass. In both groups, no significant differences in BMD or related variables were found between volunteers and non-volunteers or between those who completed per protocol and those who were lost to attrition. Both groups experienced a significant positive mean annualized percent change (MAPC in BMD compared to expectation [AlgaeCal 1: 1.15%, p = 0.001; AlgaeCal 2: 2.79%, p = 0.001]. Both groups experienced a positive MAPC compared to baseline, but only AlgaeCal 2 experienced a significant change [AlgaeCal 1: 0.48%, p = 0.14; AlgaeCal 2: 2.18%, p p = 0.005. The MAPC contrast between compliant and partially compliant subjects was significant for both plans (p = 0.001 and p = 0.003 respectively. No clinically significant changes in a 43-panel blood chemistry test were found nor were there any changes in self-reported quality of life in either group. Conclusions Following The Plan for six months with either version of the bone health supplement was associated with significant increases in BMD as compared to expected and, in AlgaeCal 2, the increase from baseline was significantly greater than the increase from baseline in AlgaeCal 1. Increased compliance was associated with greater increases in BMD in both groups. No adverse effects were reported in either group. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01114685

  13. Quantifying changes in the bone microarchitecture using Minkowski-functionals and scaling vectors: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeth, Christoph W.; Mueller, Dirk; Link, Thomas M.; Boehm, Holger; Monetti, Roberto

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease leading to de-mineralization and increased risk of fracture. The two major factors that determine the biomechanical competence of bone are the degree of mineralization and the micro-architectural integrity. Today, modern imaging modalities exist that allow to depict structural details of trabecular bone tissue. Recently, non-linear techniques in 2D and 3D based on the scaling vector method (SVM) and the Minkowski functionals (MF) have been introduced, which show excellent performance in predicting bone strength and fracture risk. However, little is known about the performance of the various parameters with respect to monitoring structural changes due to progression of osteoporosis or as a result of medical treatment. We test and compare the two methodologies using realistic two-dimensional simulations of bone structures, which model the effect of osteoblasts and osteoclasts on the local change of relative bone density. Different realizations with slightly varying control parameters are considered. Our results show that even small changes in the trabecular structures, which are induced by variation of a control parameter of the system, become discernible by applying both the MF and the locally adapted scaling vector method. The results obtained with SVM are superior to those obtained with the Minkowski functionals. An additive combination of both measures drastically increases the sensitivity to slight changes in bone structures. These findings may be especially important for monitoring the treatment of patients, where the early recognition of (drug-induced) changes in the trabecular structure is crucial.

  14. Prognostic significance of primary bone changes in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a period of 6.5 years, acute leukaemia was diagnosed in 140 children at our hospital: 137 children had long bone radiographs and 45 patients had bone lesions. Eleven of the 115 patients who had skull radiographs had osteolytic lesions and another four had wide sutures. No patients had bone changes at relapse or at cessation of 3 years' successful therapy. In acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the frequence of osseous lesions tended to be higher in patients in sub-groups with a more favourable prognosis. The duration of remission and survival times were higher in patients with ''leukemic'' long bones than in those without them (p<0.10 and <0.05, respectively). Changes in the skull could not be related to the outcome. We found no abnormalities in the bones of the eight patients with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. (orig.)

  15. Metamemory ratings predict long-term changes in reactivated episodic memories

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoby, Amnon; Dudai, Yadin; Mendelsohn, Avi

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of long-term memory can render the memory item temporarily labile, offering an opportunity to modify it via behavioral or pharmacological intervention. Declarative memory reactivation is accompanied by a metamemory ability to subjectively assess the knowledge available concerning the target item (Feeling of knowing, FOK). We set out to examine whether FOK can predict the extent of change of long-term episodic memories by post-retrieval manipulations. To this end, participants wat...

  16. Radiographic bone changes in multibacillary leprosy patients in Aburof mission clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leprosy is an infectious, chronic granulomatous disease, caused by M. leprae. It is one of the most seriously disabling and economically important disease. In Sudan it affects about 20 thousands people. In this study 60 patients of MB leprosy were included. Historry and physical examination were carried out for each patient. BI was done for all patients and were subjected to x-ray investigations of the paranasal sinuses, hands and feet. 85%(51) of these patients were found to have radiographic changes in paranasal sinuses, 35 patients with mucosal thickening and 16 with diffuse opacified sinuses. 86.7% (52) of those patients were found to have radiographic bone changes in their hand and feet. 23.6% and 75.4% were found with specific and non-specific bone changes in their hands and feet respectively. A spectrum of radiographic bone changes was found in the hands and feet including; destruction, fractures, phalangeal resoption, distal phalangeal tapering, flexion deformities, osteoarthritic changes, charcot's joints, osteoporosis cystic bone changes and enlarged nutrient bone foramina. The majority of patients with radiographic changes in the paranasal sinsuses, hands and feet, were found to have long duration of the disease and more bacterial load. The disability in hands and feet is the major risk factor in bone affection in MB leprosy. (Author)

  17. Changes in Mechanical Properties of Rat Bones under Simulated Effects of Microgravity and Radiation†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Azida H.; Perkins, Otis; Mehta, Rahul; Ali, Nawab; Dobretsov, Maxim; Chowdhury, Parimal

    The aim of this study was to determine the changes in elasticity and lattice structure in leg bone of rats which were: 1) under Hind-Limb Suspension (HLS) by tail for 2 weeks and 2) exposed to a total radiation of 10 Grays in 10 days. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 2 weeks and the leg bones were surgically removed, cleaned and fixed with a buffered solution. The mechanical strength of the bone (elastic modulus) was determined from measurement of bending of a bone when under an applied force. Two methodologies were used: i) a 3-point bending technique and ii) classical bending where bending is accomplished keeping one end fixed. Three point bending method used a captive actuator controlled by a programmable IDEA drive. This allowed incremental steps of 0.047 mm for which the force is measured. The data is used to calculate the stress and the strain. In the second method a mirror attached to the free end of the bone allowed a reflected laser beam spot to be tracked. This provided the displacement measurement as stress levels changed. Analysis of stress vs. strain graph together with solution of Euler-Bernoulli equation for a cantilever beam allowed determination of the elastic modulus of the leg bone for (i) control samples, (ii) HLS samples and (iii) HLS samples with radiation effects. To ascertain changes in the bone lattice structure, the bones were cross-sectioned and imaged with a 20 keV beam of electrons in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). A backscattered detector and a secondary electron detector in the SEM provided the images from well-defined parts of the leg bones. Elemental compositions in combination with mechanical properties (elastic modulus and lattice structure) changes indicated weakening of the bones under space-like conditions of microgravity and radiation.

  18. Treatment of Radiation Induced Biological Changes by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preventing the propagation of radiation induced oxidative damage has been a subject of considerable investigations. The ultimate goal of the present study is to use bone marrow cells to ameliorate or to treat the radiation sickness. Transplantation of bone marrow cell has shown promising results in the present experimental radiation treatment. In this report, suspension of bone marrow cells was injected into rats 12 h. after exposure to 4.5 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. Significant results were recorded on the successful control of the radiation induced disorders in a number of biochemical parameters including certain enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and glutathione) and certain parameters related to kidney function including creatinine, urea as well as Atpase Activity in blood serum, urine and kidney tissue

  19. The Role of Nutrition in the Changes in Bone and Calcium Metabolism During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1995-01-01

    On Earth, the primary purpose of the skeleton is provide structural support for the body. In space, the support function of the skeleton is reduced since, without gravity, structures have only mass and no weight. The adaptation to space flight is manifested by shifts in mineral distribution, altered bone turnover, and regional mineral deficits in weight-bearing bones. The shifts in mineral distribution appear to be related to the cephalic fluid shift. The redistribution of mineral from one bone to another or to and from areas in the same bone in response to alterations in gravitational loads is more likely to affect skeletal function than quantitative whole body losses and gains. The changes in bone turnover appear dependent upon changes in body weight with weight loss tending to increase bone resorption as well as decrease bone formation. During bedrest, the bone response to unloading varies depending upon the routine activity level of the subjects with more active subjects showing a greater suppression of bone formation in the iliac crest with inactivity. Changes in body composition during space flight are predicted by bedrest studies on Earth which show loss of lean body mass and increase tn body fat in adult males after one month. In ambulatory studies on Earth, exercising adult males of the same age, height, g weight, body mass index, and shoe size show significantly higher whole body mineral and lean body mass. than non-exercising subjects. Nutritional preference appears to change with activity level. Diet histories in exercisers and nonexercisers who maintain identical body weights show no differences in nutrients except for slightly higher carbohydrate intake in the exercisers. The absence of differences in dietary calcium in men with higher total body calcium is noteworthy. In this situation, the increased bone mineral content was facilitated by the calcium endocrine system. This regulatory system can be by-passed by raising dietary calcium. Increased calcium intake can increase the calcium content in normally loaded bone. However, bone with a higher calcium content still decreases proportionally to normal bone during unloading. Nutritional requirements in space should be reevaluated with respect to these adaptive changes to loading and physical activity.

  20. Association between alveolar bone loss and serum C-reactive protein levels in aggressive and chronic periodontitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Chopra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-reactive protein (CRP is an acute phase reactant that is produced in response to diverse inflammatory stimuli, and is known predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. Aggressive and chronic periodontitis are two main forms of periodontal disease, which differ mainly in the method of disease progression. This study aims at determining and comparing the relative levels of serum CRP and alveolar bone loss in aggressive and chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 subjects, which were divided into 3 groups diagnosed as having generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP, chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP and non-periodontitis controls (NP, were selected for the study. Venous blood samples were collected for quantitative CRP analysis using Turbidimetric immunoassay. Alveolar bone loss (ABL was measured at proximal sites of posterior teeth on a panoramic radiograph. The relationship between the mean ratio of ABL to root length and serum CRP levels was statistically analyzed using Student unpaired t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA and Pearson?s correlation coefficient. Results: Mean CRP levels were significantly greater in both GAP (7.49±2.31 mg/l and CGP (4.88±1.80 mg/l groups as compared to NP (0.68±0.23 mg/l with P value <0.0001. The mean value of ABL (% was 31.58 in CGP group and 36.77 in the GAP group, the difference being statistically significant (P=0.0079. Correlation coefficient between CRP and ABL is 0.9310 in CGP, and 0.9252 in GAP, which indicates a positive correlation between both variables. Conclusion: Both forms of periodontitis are associated with increased systemic inflammatory response with aggressiveness of disease progression determining the degree of response.

  1. Three-dimentional computed tomographic changes of patella tendon after harvesting bone-tendon-bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patella tendon donor site healing after patella tendon autograft evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography is reported. However, there are only a few reports on patella tendon donor site healing evaluated by 3D-CT. In this study, we performed 3D-CT on 23 patients (11 males and 12 females) who received reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament with bone-tendon-bone autograft in our hospital. The average age at the time of operation was 30.3 years, and the average duration of follow-up was 47 months. In 13 of these patients, 3D-CT was performed on both knees for comparative analysis. 3D-CT examination revealed that patella tendon healing after harvested autograft occurred within three years after operation, and healing continued. There were not any length or width differences between operated and non-operated knees. (author)

  2. Reactivity change measurements on plutonium-uranium fuel elements in hector experimental techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques used in making reactivity change measurements on HECTOR are described and discussed. Pile period measurements were used in the majority of oases, though the pile oscillator technique was used occasionally. These two methods are compared. Flux determinations were made in the vicinity of the fuel element samples using manganese foils, and the techniques used are described and an error assessment made. Results of both reactivity change and flux measurements on 1.2 in. diameter uranium and plutonium-uranium alloy fuel elements are presented, these measurements being carried out in a variety of graphite moderated lattices at temperatures up to 450 deg. C. (author)

  3. Changes in bone turnover, bone mineral and fracture risk induced by drugs used to treat epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have traditionally been associated with osteoporosis. However, recent studies have only shown a very limited increase in the risk of fractures with the use of some but not all AEDs. Patients with epilepsy have an increased risk of fractures, but this increase is mainly linked to fractures sustained during seizures. Patients with epilepsy may also have a decreased bone mineral density but this decrease is far too small to explain the increase in fracture risk. The decre...

  4. Comparative changes of morphology and lectin histochemistry characteristics of parathyroid glands and bone tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhura O.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was comparative analysis of guinea pig and human bone tissue due to postnatal changes of parathyroid glands morphology. The object of research were structural elements and cellular carbohydrate determinants of parathyroid glands and bone tissue with comparative characteristics of mineral exchange and parathyroid hormone levels. Were used morphometric, histochemistry, lectin histochemistry, biochemistry and immunology metods. Age- and sex-related morpho-functional and lectin histochemical peculiarities of parathyroid glands and bone tissue were investigated during postnatal ontogenesis in human and guinea pig. Correlations between DNA/RNA contents, nuclear volume of parathyrocytes, blood parathormone level with respect to Ca-, P-, and Mg- content in blood serum and bone tissue were estimated. We detected significant reduction of the width cortical layer and osseous trabecules, increased iliac bone mineralization, with simultaneous enhancement of nuclear volume and DNA/RNA content of parathyrocytes in females of groups III (aged 60-74 and IV (aged 75-90. We revealed age-related changes in lectin binding to cellular and stromal elements of parathyroid glands and bone tissue. The data extend our knowledge on the histochemical peculiarities of parathyroid glands and bone tissue during postnatal ontogenesis and under hyperparathyroidism, demonstrate possibilities of lectin application for selective labelling of chondrocytes, osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts.

  5. The effects of hyperglycemia on ischemic cell change and reactive neuronal change in neonatal rat brain following transient forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hideyuki; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Ohmae, Tadaki; Tanaka, Taro; Sugimoto, Tohru

    2008-02-01

    To examine the effects of hyperglycemia on a transient ischemia in the neonatal brain, neuropathological and biochemical evaluations were performed. In 10-day-old rats, brain ischemia was induced by permanent occlusion of the right external and internal carotid and subclavian arteries and the clamping of the left external and internal carotid arteries for 2h. The peritoneal injection of a 50% glucose solution (0.10 ml/15 g weight) 5 min before the induction of brain ischemia increased the plasma glucose concentration to 20-25 mmol/l during ischemia. It preserved brain tissue glucose levels at 1h of ischemia in the glucose-treated group, while tissue glucose was exhausted in the saline-injected group. Tissue lactate concentrations increased slightly at the end of the ischemic insult (6.7 mmol/kg) in the saline-injected group and remarkably (18.7 mmol/kg) in the glucose-treated group. Two distinct forms of ischemic neuronal change were found in this study: ischemic cell change and reactive neuronal change. A quantitative neuropathological assessment indicated that hyperglycemia significantly reduced the volume of ischemic cell change in the neocortex from 85% to 33%, but not that of reactive neuronal change (from 5.5% to 2.4%). These results indicated that hyperglycemia attenuated ischemic cell change, but not reactive neuronal change, in the neonatal rat brain and suggested that it reduced ischemic cell change probably because of reserved brain glucose. PMID:17826022

  6. Morphological Change of Heat Treated Bovine Bone: A Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Azuan Abu Osman; Belinda Pingguan-Murphy; Asyikin Sasha Mohd Hanif; Sumit Pramanik

    2012-01-01

    In this work, untreated bovine cortical bones (BCBs) were exposed to a range of heat treatments in order to determine at which temperature the apatite develops an optimum morphology comprising porous nano hydroxyapatite (nanoHAp) crystals. Rectangular specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 3–5 mm) of BCB were prepared, being excised in normal to longitudinal and transverse directions. Specimens were sintered at up to 900 °C under ambient pressure in order to produce a...

  7. Bone Structure Changes Induced by Mechanical and Biological Agents.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, František; Ma?ík, I.; Klika, Václav

    Kifissia : International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions, 2006 - (Webster, S.). Ro?. 6, ?. 3 (2006), s. 296-297 ISSN 1108-7161. [ International Workshop of the International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions - ISMNI /5./. 28.09.2006-01.10.2006, Porto Heli] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA106/03/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : bone remodelling * chemical kinetics Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  8. Temperature change in pig rib bone during implant site preparation by low-speed drilling

    OpenAIRE

    Sun-Jong Kim; Jaeyoung Yoo; Young-Soo Kim; Sang-Wan Shin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature change during low-speed drilling using infrared thermography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pig ribs were used to provide cortical bone of a similar quality to human mandible. Heat production by three implant drill systems (two conventional drilling systems and one low-speed drilling system) was evaluated by measuring the bone temperature using infrared thermography. Each system had two different bur sizes. The drill systems used w...

  9. Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: insight into risk factors and microstructural changes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guangyi; Yin, Jimin; Gao, Junjie; Cheng, Tak S; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Zhang, Changqing; Zheng, Ming H.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability in the adult population. As a progressive degenerative joint disorder, OA is characterized by cartilage damage, changes in the subchondral bone, osteophyte formation, muscle weakness, and inflammation of the synovium tissue and tendon. Although OA has long been viewed as a primary disorder of articular cartilage, subchondral bone is attracting increasing attention. It is commonly reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesi...

  10. Seasonal changes in vitamin D status and bone turnover in healthy Irish postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, T.R.; McCarthy, D.; Jakobsen, Jette; Lamberg-Allardt, C.; Kiely, M.; Cashman, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effect of season on biochemical markers of bone turnover in 51-to 75-year-old Irish women and to investigate whether such changes are related to vitamin D status. Design: Longitudinal observational study. Setting: Cork, Ireland (52 degrees N). Subjects: 76 apparently healthy, free-living postmenopausal women (aged 51-75 years), not taking any medication and free from any condition likely to affect vitamin D status or calcium/bone metabolism. Results: Serum 25-hydroxyvi...

  11. Effects of estrogen deficiency on microstructural changes in rat alveolar bone proper and periodontal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongshuang; Liu, Lisha; Kang, Chen; Xie, Qi; Zhang, Bin; Li, Ying

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the effects of estrogen deficiency on buccal alveolar bone proper and the periodontal ligament in ovariectomized (OVX) rats, compared with rats that had been subjected to sham treatment. Morphological and histological changes in the periodontium were analyzed using micro?computed tomography and paraffin sectioning. Sections were stained using hematoxylin and eosin, and tartrate?resistant acid phosphatase. Expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor??B ligand (RANKL), dentin matrix protein 1 C?terminal (DMP1?C) and osteopontin (OPN) were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Histomorphometric analysis of buccal alveolar bone proper samples revealed porotic changes and disorganized bone structure in OVX rats. Furthermore, bone mineral density and pore spacing were significantly lower in OVX rats compared with sham rats. Porosity was significantly higher in OVX rats compared with sham rats (Posteoclasts were observed along the margins of the buccal alveolar bone proper samples from OVX rats compared with those from the sham rats. Expression of OPN and RANKL was significantly higher, and that of DMP1?C was significantly lower, in OVX rats compared with sham rats. Ovariectomy?induced osteoporosis is capable of changing the structure of buccal alveolar bone proper and the periodontal ligament, which is likely to increase the risk of periodontal disease. PMID:26044123

  12. Measurements of bone cements implanted into rats using high-resolution X-ray CT. Time-dependency of form and volume change in bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro-focus X-ray CT has been used for imaging the inner volume change of bone cement implanted into the body of a small animal in living condition. 3-D precise images of the bone cement materials, implanted into the thigh bones of rats, were obtained intermittently for one year using the CT system. The time-dependent 3-D form and volume changes of the bone cement were measured for the same rat continuously. During one year from implantation, the form of the implanted bone cement changed and a significant volume decrease was observed. It was shown that micro-focus X-ray CT was very effective for imaging in bio-research. (author)

  13. Detection of chemical changes in bone after irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Carolina; Santos, Moises O.; Rabelo, Jose S.; Ana, Patrícia A.; Correa, Paulo R.; Zezell, Denise M.

    2011-03-01

    The use of laser for bone cutting can be more advantageous than the use of drill. However, for a safe clinical application, it is necessary to know the effects of laser irradiation on bone tissues. In this study, the Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to verify the molecular and compositional changes promoted by laser irradiation on bone tissue. Bone slabs were obtained from rabbit's tibia and analyzed using ATR-FTIR. After the initial analysis, the samples were irradiated using a pulsed Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2780nm), and analyzed one more time. In order to verify changes due to laser irradiation, the area under phosphate (1300-900cm-1), amides (1680-1200cm-1), water (3600-2400cm-1), and carbonate (around 870cm-1 and between 1600-1300cm-1) bands were calculated, and normalized by phosphate band area (1300-900cm-1). It was observed that Er,Cr:YSGG irradiation promoted a significant decrease in the content of water and amides I and III at irradiated bone, evidencing that laser procedure caused an evaporation of the organic content and changed the collagen structure, suggesting that these changes may interfere with the healing process. In this way, these changes should be considered in a clinical application of laser irradiation in surgeries.

  14. On the estimation of a small reactivity change in critical reactors by Kalman filtering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper we critically review the bank of Kalman filters method for reactivity estimation originally suggested by D'Attellis and Cortina. It is pointed out that the procedure cannot be applied reliably in the form proposed by the authors, because of the invalid interpretation of the decision rule as well as the presence of the filter divergence. An improved method based on D'Attellis' and Cortina's idea, free from divergence problems, is presented. The procedure is applied to the estimation of small reactivity changes occurring after a long critical operation of the reactor. (Author)

  15. Changes in attentional processing and affective reactivity in pregnancy and postpartum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gollan JK

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Jackie K Gollan, Laina Rosebrock, Denada Hoxha, Katherine L Wisner Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the research in attentional processing and affective reactivity in pregnancy and postpartum to inform future research. Numerous changes occur in attentional processing and affective reactivity across the childbearing period. This review focuses on the definition and methods of measuring attentional processing and affective reactivity. We discuss research studies that have examined the changes in these two processes during the perinatal phases of pregnancy and postpartum, with and without depression and anxiety. We evaluate the importance of using multiple levels of measurement, including physiological and neuroimaging techniques, to study these processes via implicit and explicit tasks. Research that has identified regions of brain activation using functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as other physiological assessments is integrated into the discussion. The importance of using sophisticated methodological techniques in future studies, such as multiple mediation models, for the purpose of elucidating mechanisms of change during these processes in pregnancy and postpartum is emphasized. We conclude with a discussion of the effect of these processes on maternal psychological functioning and infant outcomes. These processes support a strategy for individualizing treatment for pregnant and postpartum women suffering from depression and anxiety. Keywords: attentional processing, emotion, affective reactivity, depression, pregnancy, postpartum

  16. Age-related changes in bone in the dog: calcium homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the changes in the relationship between skeletal and Ca2+ homeostasis with age, a study was made of 50 dogs divided into four age groups. The skeletal uptake of 85Sr decreased markedly with age, and the immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level increased. There was a significant correlation between iPTH value and the calculated short-term exchange of Ca in bone. Bone formation and bone resorption decreased with age except that in the oldest group of dogs the resorption increased. The authors suggest that in aging dogs the skeletal exchange of Ca falls to a very low level that decreases the immediate effect of PTH and thus leads to a chronic net increase in circulating PTH. Concomitant with this is an increase in osteoclastic bone resorption and, over a long time, loss of skeletal mass

  17. Changes in blood pressure reactivity and 24-hour blood pressure profile occurring at puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesti, P A; Pela, I; Cecioni, I; Gensini, G F; Serneri, G G; Bartolozzi, G

    1994-06-01

    To evaluate blood pressure reactivity in children and its changes in adolescents, the acute pressor response to a video-game stress test and the noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring were evaluated in 62 healthy children divided into three age groups. Basal blood pressure values were measured according to the NIH Task Force. With baseline measures and body mass index controlled for, analysis of covariance showed that the video game provoked significant and incremental cardiovascular reactivity across the games in adolescents when compared with the two other groups of children. The same group of children showed also a significantly higher systolic ambulatory pressure during the daytime, whereas no significant difference was observed by basal BP measurement. In conclusion an increased reactivity to external stimuli was observed in adolescents, and this pattern was strictly associated with a higher daily blood pressure. PMID:8203770

  18. Time-course of exercise and its association with 12-month bone changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vainionpää Aki

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise has been shown to have positive effects on bone density and strength. However, knowledge of the time-course of exercise and bone changes is scarce due to lack of methods to quantify and qualify daily physical activity in long-term. The aim was to evaluate the association between exercise intensity at 3, 6 and 12 month intervals and 12-month changes in upper femur areal bone mineral density (aBMD and mid-femur geometry in healthy premenopausal women. Methods Physical activity was continuously assessed with a waist-worn accelerometer in 35 healthy women (35-40 years participating in progressive high-impact training. To describe exercise intensity, individual average daily numbers of impacts were calculated at five acceleration levels (range 0.3-9.2 g during time intervals of 0-3, 0-6, and 0-12 months. Proximal femur aBMD was measured with dual x-ray absorptiometry and mid-femur geometry was evaluated with quantitative computed tomography at the baseline and after 12 months. Physical activity data were correlated with yearly changes in bone density and geometry, and adjusted for confounding factors and impacts at later months of the trial using multivariate analysis. Results Femoral neck aBMD changes were significantly correlated with 6 and 12 months' impact activity at high intensity levels (> 3.9 g, r being up to 0.42. Trochanteric aBMD changes were associated even with first three months of exercise exceeding 1.1 g (r = 0.39-0.59, p r = 0.38-0.52, p Conclusion The number of high acceleration impacts during 6 months of training was positively associated with 12-month bone changes at the femoral neck, trochanter and mid-femur. These results can be utilized when designing feasible training programs to prevent bone loss in premenopausal women. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov NCT00697957

  19. Metamemory ratings predict long-term changes in reactivated episodic memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Yacoby

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of long-term memory can render the memory item temporarily labile, offering an opportunity to modify it via behavioral or pharmacological intervention. Declarative memory reactivation is accompanied by a metamemory ability to subjectively assess the knowledge available concerning the target item (Feeling of knowing, FOK. We set out to examine whether FOK can predict the extent of change of long-term episodic memories by post-retrieval manipulations. To this end, participants watched a short movie and immediately thereafter tested on their memory for it. A day later, they were reminded of that movie, and either immediately or one day later, were presented with a second movie. The reminder phase consisted of memory cues to which participants were asked to judge their FOK regarding the original movie. The memory performance of participants to whom new information was presented immediately after reactivating the original episode corresponded to the degree of FOK ratings upon reactivation such that the lower their FOK, the less their memory declined. In contrast, no relation was found between FOK and memory strength for those who learned new information one day after the reminder phase. Our findings suggest that the subjective accessibility of reactivated memories may determine the extent to which new information might modify those memories.

  20. Changes in bone marrow lesions in response to weight-loss in obese knee osteoarthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbergsen, Henrik; Boesen, Mikael; Christensen, Robin; Bartels, Else Marie; Henriksen, Marius; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Patients are susceptible for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) with increasing age and obesity and KOA is expected to become a major disabling disease in the future. An important feature of KOA on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is changes in the subchondral bone, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are related to the future degeneration of the knee joint as well as prevalent clinical symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in BMLs after a 16-week weight-loss period in obese subjec...

  1. Changes observed in radionuclide bone scans during and after teriparatide treatment for osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visual changes on radionuclide bone scans have been reported with teriparatide treatment. To assess this, serial studies were evaluated and quantified in ten postmenopausal women with osteoporosis treated with teriparatide (20 ?g/day subcutaneous) who had 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scans (baseline, 3 and 18 months, then after 6 months off therapy). Women were injected with 600 MBq 99mTc-MDP, and diagnostic bone scan images were assessed at 3.5 h. Additional whole-body scans (10 min, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h) were analysed for 99mTc-MDP skeletal plasma clearance (Kbone). Regional Kbone differences were obtained for the whole skeleton and six regions (calvarium, mandible, spine, pelvis, upper and lower extremities). Bone turnover markers (BTM) were also measured. Most subjects showed visual changes on 3- and 18-month bone scan images that disappeared after 6 months off therapy. Enhanced uptake was seen predominantly in the calvarium and lower extremities. Whole skeleton Kbone displayed a median increase of 22% (3 months, p = 0.004) and 34% (18 months, p = 0.002) decreasing to 0.7% (6 months off therapy). Calvarium Kbone changes were three times larger than other sites. After 6 months off therapy, all Kbone and BTM values returned towards baseline. The increased 99mTc-MDP skeletal uptake with teriparatide indicated increased bone formation which was supported by BTM increases. After 6 months off therapy, metabolic activity diminished towards baseline. The modulation of 99mTc-MDP skeletal uptake during treatment was the result of teriparatide's metabolic activity. These findings may aid the radiological evaluation of similar teriparatide patients having radionuclide bone scans. (orig.)

  2. Bone marrow changes adjacent to the sacroiliac joints after pelvic radiotherapy mimicking metastases on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanberoglu, K.; Mihmanli, I.; Kurugoglu, S.; Ogut, G.; Kantarci, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Istanbul Univ. (Turkey)

    2001-09-01

    Radiation-induced changes in the sacroiliac joints mimicking metastases on MR images were evaluated. Twelve patients who received radiotherapy to the pelvic region due to pelvic malignancy were included in the study. All patients had undergone external beam radiation therapy to the pelvic region, and 2 patients received supplementary internal radiation. The changes in the sacroiliac joints were evaluated. Computed-tomography-guided core bone biopsy from the bone marrow was taken from their corresponding MR sections in 5 of the patients. T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense areas with ill-defined margins in the bone marrow adjacent to the sacroiliac joints were observed in all patients. On bone scintigraphy all the lesions demonstrated increased activity. Other radiological modalities excluded fracture, soft tissue mass, and osseous destruction. Bone biopsies demonstrated peritrabecular fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration. Patients receiving radiotherapy to the pelvis may demonstrate T1 hypointense/T2 hyperintense, ill-defined postradiotherapeutic benign changes in the sacroiliac joints. In the absence of any other signs of disease progression and when the imaging pattern is typical, close radiological follow-up should be sufficient to rule out metastases. (orig.)

  3. Femoroacetabular impingement: bone marrow oedema associated with fibrocystic change of the femoral head and neck junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S.L.J. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom) and Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jamesslj@email.com; Connell, D.A. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); O' Donnell, P. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    Aim: To describe the association of bone marrow oedema adjacent to areas of fibrocystic change at the femoral head and neck junction in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. Materials and methods: The clinical and imaging findings in six patients with bone marrow oedema adjacent to an area of fibrocystic change at the femoral head and neck junction are presented. There were five males and one female (age range 19-42 years, mean age 34.5 years). Three patients were referred with a clinical suspicion of femoroacetabular impingement, two with suspected osteoid osteoma and one with a clinical diagnosis of sciatica. The volume of bone marrow oedema (grade 1: 0-25%, grade 2: 26-50%, grade 3: 51-75% and grade 4: 76-100% of the femoral neck width), presence of labral and articular cartilage abnormality, joint effusion, and femoral head and neck morphology were recorded. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified fibrocystic change in the anterolateral aspect of the femoral head and neck junction in all cases (mean size 9 mm, range 5-14 mm, three multilocular and three unilocular cysts). The volume of oedema was variable (one grade 1, two grade 2, one grade 3 and two grade 4). All patients had abnormality of the anterosuperior labrum with five patients demonstrating chondral loss. An abnormal femoral head and neck junction was identified in five patients. Conclusion: The radiological finding of fibrocystic change at the anterosuperior femoral neck with or without bone marrow oedema should prompt the search for femoroacetabular impingement. Bone marrow oedema may rarely be identified adjacent to these areas of cystic change and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bone marrow oedema in the femoral neck.

  4. Femoroacetabular impingement: bone marrow oedema associated with fibrocystic change of the femoral head and neck junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To describe the association of bone marrow oedema adjacent to areas of fibrocystic change at the femoral head and neck junction in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. Materials and methods: The clinical and imaging findings in six patients with bone marrow oedema adjacent to an area of fibrocystic change at the femoral head and neck junction are presented. There were five males and one female (age range 19-42 years, mean age 34.5 years). Three patients were referred with a clinical suspicion of femoroacetabular impingement, two with suspected osteoid osteoma and one with a clinical diagnosis of sciatica. The volume of bone marrow oedema (grade 1: 0-25%, grade 2: 26-50%, grade 3: 51-75% and grade 4: 76-100% of the femoral neck width), presence of labral and articular cartilage abnormality, joint effusion, and femoral head and neck morphology were recorded. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified fibrocystic change in the anterolateral aspect of the femoral head and neck junction in all cases (mean size 9 mm, range 5-14 mm, three multilocular and three unilocular cysts). The volume of oedema was variable (one grade 1, two grade 2, one grade 3 and two grade 4). All patients had abnormality of the anterosuperior labrum with five patients demonstrating chondral loss. An abnormal femoral head and neck junction was identified in five patients. Conclusion: The radiological finding of fibrocystic change at the anterosuperior femoral neck with or without bone marrow oedema should prompt the search for femoroacetabular impingement. Bone marrow oedema may rarely be identified adjacent to these areas of cystic change and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bone marrow oedema in the femoral neck

  5. Analysis of accident situations of WWER-440 reactors due to reactivity changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach is discussed to the evaluation of accident situations caused by a failure of control and protection systems and the assessment of the consequences of the most probable adverse initiation event. The key parameters of accident analyses with a reactivity change are characteristics of reactivity insertion, power distribution in the reactor core, reactivity coefficients, kinetic parameters, and heat transfer through the fuel-cladding gap. The determination of these characteristics is part of the report on neutron physical characteristics incorporated in the preliminary safety report. In case of a change-in-reactivity accident, technical, organizational and accident protection measures are taken. The following accident types are discussed: uncontrolled sliding-up of control assembly groups, ejection of the control assembly, entry of cold water into the reactor core, uncontrolled reduction in H3BO3 concentration, sudden release of boron sediments from the structure of the reactor core. Calculation analyses show that the accidents can only have grave consequences in case of a complete break-down of the accident protection. (J.C.)

  6. Assessment of trabecular bone changes around endosseous implants using image analysis techniques: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to assess the trabecular bone changes that occurred around functional endosseous dental implants by means of radiographic image analysis techniques. Immediate preoperative and postoperative periapical radiographs of de-identified implant patients at the University Dental Hospital of Manchester were retrieved, screened for specific inclusion criteria, digitized, and quantified for structural elements of the trabecular bone around the endosseous implants, by using image analysis techniques. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 12 implants from 11 patients were selected for the study, and 26 regions of interest were obtained. There was a significant increase in the bone area in terms of the mean distance between nodes (p=0.006) and a significant decrease in the marrow area in terms of the bone area (p=0.006) and the length of marrow spaces (p=0.032). It appeared that the bone around the implant underwent remodeling that resulted in a net increase in bone after implant placement.

  7. Assessment of trabecular bone changes around endosseous implants using image analysis techniques: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuki, Mervet El [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Benghazi University College of Dentistry, Benghazi (Libya); Omami, Galal [Oral Diagnosis and Polyclinics, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Horner, Keith [Dept. of Oral Radiology, University Dental Hospital of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the trabecular bone changes that occurred around functional endosseous dental implants by means of radiographic image analysis techniques. Immediate preoperative and postoperative periapical radiographs of de-identified implant patients at the University Dental Hospital of Manchester were retrieved, screened for specific inclusion criteria, digitized, and quantified for structural elements of the trabecular bone around the endosseous implants, by using image analysis techniques. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 12 implants from 11 patients were selected for the study, and 26 regions of interest were obtained. There was a significant increase in the bone area in terms of the mean distance between nodes (p=0.006) and a significant decrease in the marrow area in terms of the bone area (p=0.006) and the length of marrow spaces (p=0.032). It appeared that the bone around the implant underwent remodeling that resulted in a net increase in bone after implant placement.

  8. Morphological Change of Heat Treated Bovine Bone: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Azuan Abu Osman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, untreated bovine cortical bones (BCBs were exposed to a range of heat treatments in order to determine at which temperature the apatite develops an optimum morphology comprising porous nano hydroxyapatite (nanoHAp crystals. Rectangular specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 3–5 mm of BCB were prepared, being excised in normal to longitudinal and transverse directions. Specimens were sintered at up to 900 °C under ambient pressure in order to produce apatites by two steps sintering. The samples were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM attached to an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy detector. For the first time, morphology of the HAp particles was predicted by XRD, and it was verified by SEM. The results show that an equiaxed polycrystalline HAp particle with uniform porosity was produced at 900 °C. It indicates that a porous nanoHAp achieved by sintering at 900 °C can be an ideal candidate as an in situ scaffold for load-bearing tissue applications.

  9. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarakkala, Simo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Etelae-Savo Hospital District, Mikkeli Central Hospital, Porrassalmenkatu 35-37, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Laasanen, Mikko S [Information Technology R and D Unit, Engineering Kuopio, Savonia Polytechnic, POB 1188, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Jurvelin, Jukka S [Department of Physics, University of Kuopio, POB 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Toeyraes, Juha [Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, POB 1777, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2006-10-21

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair.

  10. Changes in attentional processing and affective reactivity in pregnancy and postpartum

    OpenAIRE

    Gollan JK; Rosebrock L; Hoxha D; Wisner KL

    2014-01-01

    Jackie K Gollan, Laina Rosebrock, Denada Hoxha, Katherine L Wisner Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the research in attentional processing and affective reactivity in pregnancy and postpartum to inform future research. Numerous changes occur in attentional processing and affective...

  11. Local changes in bone marrow at MRI after treatment of extremity soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the prevalence and appearance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal changes that occur in local bone marrow after radiation therapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy for extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Seventy patients with primary STS at the level of a long bone who also had undergone pretreatment MRI and at least one post-treatment MRI of the tumor bed were identified. MRIs of each patient were retrospectively reviewed for new changes in marrow signal in the region of the tumor bed and for the morphology, relative signal intensities, heterogeneity, and progression or regression of changes over time. Focal signal changes in marrow were observed in 26/70 patients (37%) at a median of 9.5 months after RT and/or chemotherapy and diffuse changes in seven (10%) at a median of 8 months. Patients who received neither RT nor chemotherapy did not develop marrow changes. Mean RT doses in patients with changes and those without were 5,867 and 6,076 cGy, respectively. In most patients with focal changes, changes were seen in all sequences and were linear-curvilinear, patchy, or mixed at the level of the tumor bed. Predominant signal intensity of changes was between muscle and fat at T1WI and between muscle and fluid at fat-saturated T2WI or short tau inversion recovery. Most focal changes enhanced heterogeneously and increased or fluctuated in size over time. Changes in MRI appearance of long bone marrow frequently are evident after combined RT and chemotherapy for STS and most commonly increase or fluctuate in size over time. These changes have various non-mass-like configurations and often show signal intensities similar to those of red marrow and thus should not be mistaken for metastases. The marrow changes might represent an early stage of gelatinous transformation of marrow. (orig.)

  12. Local changes in bone marrow at MRI after treatment of extremity soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sinchun; Lefkowitz, Robert; Landa, Jonathan; Akin, Oguz; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Cassie, Conrad; Panicek, David M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Healey, John H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-01-15

    To determine the prevalence and appearance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal changes that occur in local bone marrow after radiation therapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy for extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Seventy patients with primary STS at the level of a long bone who also had undergone pretreatment MRI and at least one post-treatment MRI of the tumor bed were identified. MRIs of each patient were retrospectively reviewed for new changes in marrow signal in the region of the tumor bed and for the morphology, relative signal intensities, heterogeneity, and progression or regression of changes over time. Focal signal changes in marrow were observed in 26/70 patients (37%) at a median of 9.5 months after RT and/or chemotherapy and diffuse changes in seven (10%) at a median of 8 months. Patients who received neither RT nor chemotherapy did not develop marrow changes. Mean RT doses in patients with changes and those without were 5,867 and 6,076 cGy, respectively. In most patients with focal changes, changes were seen in all sequences and were linear-curvilinear, patchy, or mixed at the level of the tumor bed. Predominant signal intensity of changes was between muscle and fat at T1WI and between muscle and fluid at fat-saturated T2WI or short tau inversion recovery. Most focal changes enhanced heterogeneously and increased or fluctuated in size over time. Changes in MRI appearance of long bone marrow frequently are evident after combined RT and chemotherapy for STS and most commonly increase or fluctuate in size over time. These changes have various non-mass-like configurations and often show signal intensities similar to those of red marrow and thus should not be mistaken for metastases. The marrow changes might represent an early stage of gelatinous transformation of marrow. (orig.)

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF CaO AND P2O5 OF BONE ASH UPON THE REACTIVITY AND THE BURNABILITY OF CEMENT RAW MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOMÁŠ IFKA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of CaO and P2O5 upon the reactivity of cement raw meal was investigated in this paper. Ash of bone meal containing Ca3(PO42 - 3CaO·P2O5 was used as the source of P2O5. Two series of samples with different content of the ash of bone meal were prepared. In the first series, the ash of bone was added into cement raw meal. The second series of samples were prepared by considering ash as one of CaO sources. Therefore, the total content of CaO in cement raw meal was kept constant, while the amount of P2O5 increased. These different series of samples were investigated by analyzing free lime content in the clinkers. The XRD analysis and Electron Micro Probe Analyzer analysis of the clinkers were also carried out. Two parameters were used to characterize the reactivity of cement raw meal: content of free lime and Burnability Index (BI calculated from free lime content in both series of samples burnt at 1350 ºC, 1400 ºC, 1450 ºC and 1500 ºC. According to the first parameter, P2O5 content that drastically makes worse the reactivity of cement raw meal was found at 1.11 wt.% in the first series, while this limit has reached 1.52 wt.% in the second one. According to the BI, the limit of P2O5 was found at 1.42 wt. % in the first series and 1, 61 wt.% in the second one. Furthermore, EPMA has demonstrated the presence of P2O5 in both calcium silicate phases forming thus solid solutions.

  14. The chloride channel inhibitor NS3736 [corrected] prevents bone resorption in ovariectomized rats without changing bone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaller, Sophie; Henriksen, Kim; Sveigaard, Christina; Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Hélix, Nathalie; Stahlhut, Martin; Ovejero, Maria C; Johansen, Jens V; Solberg, Helene; Andersen, Thomas L; Hougaard, Dorit; Berryman, Mark; Shiødt, Christine B; Sørensen, Bjørn H; Lichtenberg, Jens; Christophersen, Palle; Foged, Niels T; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Engsig, Michael T; Karsdal, Morten A

    2004-01-01

    Chloride channel activity is essential for osteoclast function. Consequently, inhibition of the osteoclastic chloride channel should prevent bone resorption. Accordingly, we tested a chloride channel inhibitor on bone turnover and found that it inhibits bone resorption without affecting bone formation. This study indicates that chloride channel inhibitors are highly promising for treatment of osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION: The chloride channel inhibitor, NS3736, blocked osteoclastic acidification a...

  15. Normal age-related changes in fluoride content of vertebral trabecular bone--relation to bone quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richards, A; Mosekilde, L

    1994-01-01

    In several clinical osteoporosis studies, fluoride treatment has been shown to have a positive effect on bone mass but without a concomitant decrease in vertebral fracture rate. In contrast, some studies have shown that increases in spinal BMD are also paralleled by decreased vertebral fracture incidence. We have previously demonstrated, in a pig model, that 6-month treatment with fluoride increased bone mass but decreased bone quality. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether normal age-related fluoride accumulation in human bone per se influences bone quality. From 73 normal individuals, aged 20-91 years (36 females, 37 males) two trabecular bone cylinders were obtained from the central part of L3. Biomechanical competence, ash density, and fluoride content were assessed in one cylinder, and trabecular bone volume was determined in the other. The results showed an age-related decrease in bone mass for both men and women. Bone strength normalized for bone mass (bone quality also identical with bone material strength) also showed an age-related decrease in men and women. Bone fluoride concentration increased significantly in both sexes (range 463-4000 ppm). Multiple regression analyses disclosed that fluoride by itself had no influence on bone quality, in this study with a limited number of cases, when the influence of sex and age were taken into account. It is concluded that normal age-related accumulation of fluoride in vertebral trabecular bone does not seem to affect the quality of bone. Whether this is also the case during fluoride therapy has to be assessed.

  16. High burnup modeling changes to NRC fuel performance codes that impact reactivity initiated accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel performance of NRC codes are important to predict fuel rod behavior at high burnup levels. Changes to fuel behavior models impacting fuel rod performance during reactivity initiated (RIA) and slower transients are discussed. These changes are relevant to define the initial conditions for RIA, and they include: radial burnup distribution and fuel thermal conductivity; cladding property changes; gas bubble buildup and fracturing at grain surfaces. Incorporation of these model changes into the NRC fuel performance codes will improve the ability to predict steady state and transient fuel behavior at high burnup levels. These modeling changes can help explain the observed decrease in the fuel rod failure threshold in the recent RIA tests. (R.P.)

  17. Changes in bone mineral density around a stable uncemented total hip arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Korovessis, P.; Piperos, G.; Michael, A; Baikousis, A.; Stamatakis, M.

    1997-01-01

    Changes in bone mineral density (BMD) around the components of the Zweymueller total hip arthroplasty were measured, using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, in 36 women who were operated on for primary osteoarthritis. Seven regions of interest were studied. No changes occurred around the screw socket and the greater trochanter, but there was a significant reduction of BMD, only when measured immediately after the operation at the lesser trochanter and at the distal fem...

  18. Mechanical loading causes detectable changes in morphometric measures of trabecular structure in human cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeni, Yener N; Wu, Brenda; Huang, Lily; Oravec, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The relationships between mechanical loads and bone microstructure are of interest to those who seek to predict bone mechanical properties from microstructure or to predict how organization of bone microstructure is driven by mechanical loads. While strains and displacements in the material are inherently responsible for mechanically caused changes in the appearance of the microstructure, it is the morphometric measures of microstructural organization that are often available for assessment of bone quality. Therefore, an understanding of how strain history is reflected in morphometric measures of bone microstructure has practical implications in that it may provide clinically measurable indices of mechanical history in bone and improve interpretation of bone mechanical properties from microstructural information. The objective of the current study was to examine changes in morphometric measures of cancellous bone microstructure in response to varying levels of continuum level strains. The experimental approach included stereologic analysis of microcomputed tomography (?CT) images of human cancellous bone samples obtained at sequentially increasing levels of strain in a custom-made loading apparatus mounted in a ?CT scanner. We found that the degree of anisotropy (DA) decreased from baseline to failure and from failure to postfailure. DA partially recovered from postfailure levels upon unloading; however, the final DA was less than at failure and less than at baseline. We also found that average trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.Av) increased with displacements at postfailure and did not recover when unloaded. Average trabecular number decreased when the specimens were unloaded. In addition, the heterogeneity of Tb.Th as measured by intra-specimen standard deviation (Tb.Th.SD) increased and that of trabecular number (Tb.N.SD) decreased with displacements at postfailure. Furthermore, the intraspecimen coefficient of variation of trabecular number decreased at postfailure displacements but did not recover upon unloading. Finally, the coefficient of variation of trabecular separation at unload was less than that at baseline. These measures can be developed into image-based indices to estimate strain history, damage, and residual mechanical properties where direct analysis of stresses and strains, such as through finite element modeling, may not be feasible. It remains to be determined how wide a time interval can be used to estimate strain history before remodeling becomes an overriding effect on the trabecular architecture. PMID:24231966

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Clivus and Its Age-Related Changes in the Bone Marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clivus is a bone region between dorsum cella and foramen magnum. It can be evaluated very clearly in routine brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dueto its central location. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the clivus and its changes according to age in a group of healthy people. The transition of clival bone marrow to fatty marrow by the increasein age is examined by MRI in 105 men and 105 women who had no clival and bone marrow pathology on MRI. The clivus/pons, clivus/CSF intensity values and clival bone marrow imaging patterns according to age groups were prospectively evaluated using a 1.5 Tesla MR device. When age groups were individually compared, there were meaningful statistical differences both in men and women in terms of clivus/CSF and clivus/pons intensity ratios (both Ps < 0.05). Clivus/pons and clivus/CSF intensity ratios were found to be increased with age in all cases. The distribution of age groups according to stages in all individuals was statistically meaningful (P < 0.05). When the appearance patterns of both genders in every ten-fold age were examined, stage III bone marrow was observed more in elder ages. As a result, besides the fact that standard ranges determined for clivus/CSF, clivus/pons intensity ratios according to age may be used in the assessment of potential pathological cases involving bone marrow; they can also be leading in the diagnosis of bone marrow diseases when taken into consideration together with clinical and laboratory data

  20. Cystic changes in desmoplastic fibroma of bone: A new MRI finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging features of desmoplastic fibroma (DF) of bone. Materials and methods: Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated imaging findings of pathologically confirmed DFs in eight patients. Involved sites and longitudinal location in long bones were evaluated using radiography and computed tomography (CT). At MRI, the presence of low signal areas on T2-weighted images (low-T2), enhancement, cystic changes, and locations of the mass were evaluated. The location of masses was evaluated, based on cortical disruption and adjacent soft-tissue extension. Results: Involved sites were the femur in three patients, the tibia in two, and the humerus, fibula, and pubic bone in one each. Of the seven masses in the long bones, three were located in the epi- and metaphysis, two in the meta- and diaphysis, one in the diaphysis, and one in the epiphysis. Seven masses had areas of low T2-weighted or heterogeneous enhancement, and three (38%) showed cystic changes. cortical disruption was seen at MRI in six of eight patients (88%). Conclusion: DFs contained cystic change. Cortical disruption may also occur, which may cause confusion with malignant lesions.

  1. Prevention and treatment of bone changes associated with exposure to glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, Amy H; Saag, Kenneth G

    2013-12-01

    Rheumatologic diseases are associated with a proinflammatory state, which is thought to lead to many of the bone changes seen in treatment-naive patients. However, glucocorticoids remain a common treatment option for rheumatologic diseases and are known to have a negative impact on bone through direct effects on bone cells and indirect effects on calcium absorption. Despite the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids, fracture risk rises within the first 3 months of treatment. As such, osteoporosis prevention and treatment needs to be considered in all patients started on chronic glucocorticoids (?3 months of treatment). For very low risk patients, conservative management with non-pharmacologic strategies may be appropriate. For the moderate to high fracture risk patients treated with glucocorticoids, pharmacologic treatment with 1 of the 4 approved medications should be considered. The challenge of educating physicians and patients of the risks of glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis remain. PMID:24097304

  2. Bone metabolic changes during pregnancy: a period of vulnerability to osteoporosis and fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Salvador, Lucía; García-Pérez, Miguel Ángel; Tarín, Juan J; Cano, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Changes in bone density and bone markers suggest that pregnancy is associated with deterioration of bone mass in the mother. The metabolism of calcium resets to allow for the needs imposed by the building of the fetal skeleton. The fetus contributes to the process through the output of regulators from the placenta. Understanding of the whole process is limited, but some changes are unambiguous. There is an increase in the circulating levels of vitamin D, but its functional impact is unclear. Fetal parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related peptide (PTHrp) play an indirect role through support of a calcium gradient that creates hypercalcemia in the fetus. Placental GH, which increases up to the end of pregnancy, may exert some anabolic effects, either directly or through the regulation of the IGF1 production. Other key regulators of bone metabolism, such as estrogens or prolactin, are elevated during pregnancy, but their role is uncertain. An increase in the ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) to osteoprotegerin (OPG) acts as an additional pro-resorbing factor in bone. The increase in bone resorption may lead to osteoporosis and fragility fracture, which have been diagnosed, although rarely. However, the condition is transitory as long-term studies do not link the number of pregnancies with osteoporosis. Prevention is limited by the lack of identifiable risk factors. When fractures are diagnosed, rest, analgesics, or, when indicated, orthopedic intervention have demonstrated efficacy. Systemic treatment with anti-osteoporotic drugs is effective, but the potential harm to the fetus imposes caution in their use. PMID:25209679

  3. Changes in calcitropic hormones, bone markers and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) during pregnancy and postpartum : a controlled cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MØller, U K; við Streym, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy and lactation cause major changes in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. This population-based cohort study presents the physiological changes in biochemical indices of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism during pregnancy and lactation

  4. Three-dimensional measurement of regional bone mineral density change (?rBMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper measures the changes in regional bone mineral density (rBMD) associated with demineralizing bone diseases and/or drug treatment. Serial measurements of rBMD are made with a three-dimensional (3D) protocol with a 4-mm3 effective sampling volume and 0.8 x 0.8 x 1.0-mm voxel spacing. For each serial study, values are computed in a rotated and translated coordinate system with the use of trilinear interpolation at 0.8 x 0.8 x 0.8-mm intervals. Registration of two studies is done by interactively changing the three translation and three rotation variables while viewing transverse, sagittal, and coronal subtraction images. Following registration, the serial 3D data is subtracted to produce a 3D ?rBMD array. Patterns of serial density change and regional averages at particular sites can be computed from the ?rBMD array

  5. Paraphyseal changes on bone-age studies predict risk of delayed radiation-associated skeletal complications following total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazono Hammell, Mary T.; Edgar, J.C.; Jaramillo, Diego [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bunin, Nancy [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Oncology Division, BMT Section, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Children undergoing total body irradiation (TBI) often develop delayed skeletal complications. Bone-age studies in these children often reveal subtle paraphyseal changes including physeal widening, metaphyseal irregularity and paraphyseal exostoses. To investigate whether paraphyseal changes on a bone-age study following TBI indicate a predisposition toward developing other radiation-associated skeletal complications. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and bone-age studies of 77 children receiving TBI at our institution between 1995 and 2008 who had at least 2 years of clinical follow-up and one bone-age study after TBI. We graded bone-age studies according to the severity of paraphyseal changes. All documented skeletal complications following TBI were tabulated. Kendall's tau-b was used to examine associations between degree of paraphyseal change and development of a skeletal complication. Kendall's tau analyses showed that physeal widening and metaphyseal irregularity/sclerosis (tau = 0.87, P < 0.001) and paraphyseal exostoses (tau = 0.68, P < 0.001) seen on bone-age studies were significantly positively associated with the development of delayed skeletal complications following TBI. Thirty percent of children with no or mild paraphyseal changes developed a delayed skeletal complication, compared with 58% of children with moderate paraphyseal changes and 90% of children with severe paraphyseal changes. Paraphyseal changes identified on a bone-age study correlate positively with the development of delayed skeletal complications elsewhere in the skeleton following TBI. (orig.)

  6. Paraphyseal changes on bone-age studies predict risk of delayed radiation-associated skeletal complications following total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children undergoing total body irradiation (TBI) often develop delayed skeletal complications. Bone-age studies in these children often reveal subtle paraphyseal changes including physeal widening, metaphyseal irregularity and paraphyseal exostoses. To investigate whether paraphyseal changes on a bone-age study following TBI indicate a predisposition toward developing other radiation-associated skeletal complications. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and bone-age studies of 77 children receiving TBI at our institution between 1995 and 2008 who had at least 2 years of clinical follow-up and one bone-age study after TBI. We graded bone-age studies according to the severity of paraphyseal changes. All documented skeletal complications following TBI were tabulated. Kendall's tau-b was used to examine associations between degree of paraphyseal change and development of a skeletal complication. Kendall's tau analyses showed that physeal widening and metaphyseal irregularity/sclerosis (tau = 0.87, P < 0.001) and paraphyseal exostoses (tau = 0.68, P < 0.001) seen on bone-age studies were significantly positively associated with the development of delayed skeletal complications following TBI. Thirty percent of children with no or mild paraphyseal changes developed a delayed skeletal complication, compared with 58% of children with moderate paraphyseal changes and 90% of children with severe paraphyseal changes. Paraphyseal changes identified on a bone-age study correlate positively with the development of delayed skeletal complications elsewhere in the skeleton following TBI. (orig.)

  7. Benefits of omega-3 fatty acid against bone changes in salt-loaded rats: possible role of kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Mona A; Abd EL Samad, Abeer A

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that dietary fats are important components contributing in bone health and that bone mineral density is inversely related to sodium intake. Salt loading is also known to impose negative effects on renal function. The present study aimed to determine the effect of the polyunsaturated fatty acid omega-3 on bone changes imposed by salt loading, highlighting the role of kidney as a potential mechanism involved in this effect. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: cont...

  8. Contribution of Serum Inflammatory Markers to Changes in Bone Mineral Content and Density in Postmenopausal Women: A 1-Year Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Gertz, ER; Silverman, NE; Wise, KS; Hanson, KB; Alekel, DL; Stewart, JW; Perry, CD; Bhupathiraju, SN; Kohut, ML; Van Loan, MD

    2010-01-01

    Bone formation and resorption are influenced by inflammatory processes. We examined the relationships among inflammatory markers and bone mineral content and density (BMC, BMD) and determined the contribution of inflammatory markers to 1-year changes in BMC and BMD in healthy postmenopausal women. This analysis included 242 women at baseline from our parent Soy Isoflavones for Reducing Bone Loss (SIRBL) project who were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: placebo, 80 mg/d soy ...

  9. Evaluation of Bone Change by Digital Subtraction Radiography After Implantation of Tooth ash-plaster Mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the methods for the clinical evaluation of the longitudinal bone changes after implantation of tooth ash-plaster mixture into the defect area of human jaws. Tooth ash-plaster mixtures were implanted into the defects of 8 human jaws. 48 intraoral radiograms taken with copper step wedge as reference at soon, 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 6th week after implantation of mixture were used. X-ray taking was standardized by using Rinn XCP device customized directly to the individual dentition with resin bite block. The images inputted by Quick scanner were digitized and analyzed by NIH image program. Cu-equivalent values were measured at the implanted sites from the periodic digital images. Analysis was performed by the bidirectional subtraction with color enhancement and the surface plot of resliced contiguous image. The obtained results by the two methods were compared with Cu-equivalent value changes. The average determination coefficient of Cu-equivalent equations was 0.9988 and the coefficient of variation of measured Cu values ranged from 0.08-0.10. The coefficient of variation of Cu-equivalent values measured at the areas of the mixture and the bone by the conversion equation ranged from 0.06-0.09. The analyzed results by the bidirectional subtraction with color enhancement were coincident with the changes of Cu-equivalent values. The surface plot of the resliced contiguous image showed the three dimensional view of the longitudinal bone changes on one image and also coincident with Cu-equivalent value changes after implantation. The bidirectional subtraction with color enhancement and the surface plot of the resliced contiguous image was very effective and reasonable to analyze clinically and qualitatively the longitudinal bone change. These methods are expected to be applicable to the non-destructive test in other fields.

  10. Relationship of changing social atmosphere, lifestyle and bone mineral density in college students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decrease of bone mineral density gives rise to the outbreak of osteopenia and makes the possibility of a bone fracture. It makes health problems in society. It's very important to prevent osteopenia in advance. Also it's critical to prevent and take care of it in adolescent because it's the most developing period comparing to middle ages because that bone mineral density decreases. There are genetic, physical and environmental factors that affect bone mineral density. Recently, a lifestyle and eating habits are also changing as the society atmosphere is gradually doing. This study have shown that 134 women and 75 men was chosen and responded to the survey of measuring bone mineral density and investigating a lifestyle. The measure of bone mineral density is to use Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA) and check femoral neck and lumbar spine. Also questionaries was required to pre-made survey about their lifestyles. Analysis of data was done with SPSS program. Multiple regression analysis was used for the relation of bone mineral density, the heigths and BMI. The sample of Groups are checked for drinking, smoking or excercising about differences by t-test. The results of the experiments were; first, there is statistically significant differences in the comparisons between BMD and BMD. But there isn't any special correlation between drinking, smoking and BMD. Secondly, bone mineral density becomes low related to an intake of caffeine. Particularly, this is statically significant on women. Also there is statically significant correlation between femoral neck and quantity of motion for both men and women. Third, there is significant relation between eating habits and bone mineral density on women's lumbar spine. However, there is no significant relation between men's lumbar spine and women's one. Therefore, to prevent osteopenia, it's good to abstain from intaking caffeine within an hour after a meal. In addition, it's helpful to walk or run regularly and have a balanced meal

  11. Relationship of changing social atmosphere, lifestyle and bone mineral density in college students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Ja; Ko, Yo Han; Kim, Chung Kyung; Kim, Hee Sol; Park, Da Jeong; Yoon, Hyeo Min; Jeong, Yu Jin [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Dongnam Health college, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The decrease of bone mineral density gives rise to the outbreak of osteopenia and makes the possibility of a bone fracture. It makes health problems in society. It's very important to prevent osteopenia in advance. Also it's critical to prevent and take care of it in adolescent because it's the most developing period comparing to middle ages because that bone mineral density decreases. There are genetic, physical and environmental factors that affect bone mineral density. Recently, a lifestyle and eating habits are also changing as the society atmosphere is gradually doing. This study have shown that 134 women and 75 men was chosen and responded to the survey of measuring bone mineral density and investigating a lifestyle. The measure of bone mineral density is to use Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA) and check femoral neck and lumbar spine. Also questionaries was required to pre-made survey about their lifestyles. Analysis of data was done with SPSS program. Multiple regression analysis was used for the relation of bone mineral density, the heigths and BMI. The sample of Groups are checked for drinking, smoking or excercising about differences by t-test. The results of the experiments were; first, there is statistically significant differences in the comparisons between BMD and BMD. But there isn't any special correlation between drinking, smoking and BMD. Secondly, bone mineral density becomes low related to an intake of caffeine. Particularly, this is statically significant on women. Also there is statically significant correlation between femoral neck and quantity of motion for both men and women. Third, there is significant relation between eating habits and bone mineral density on women's lumbar spine. However, there is no significant relation between men's lumbar spine and women's one. Therefore, to prevent osteopenia, it's good to abstain from intaking caffeine within an hour after a meal. In addition, it's helpful to walk or run regularly and have a balanced meal.

  12. / Calcium supplementation, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. Predictors of bone mass changes in adolescent mothers during the 6-month postpartum period

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Agustina, Malpeli; María, Apezteguia; José L, Mansur; Alicia, Armanini; Melisa, acías Couret; Rosa, Villalobos; Marta, Kuzminczuk; Horacio F, Gonzalez.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Suplementación con calcio, densidad mineral ósea y contenido mineral óseo. Predictores de cambios en la masa ósea en madres adolescentes a los 6 meses postparto. El objetivo del estudio fue determinar el efecto de dos formas de suplementare calcio sobre la densidad mineral ósea (DMO) y el contenido [...] mineral óseo (CMO), e identificar predictores de cambios en la masa ósea en madres adolescentes a los 6 meses postparto. Se realizó un estudio prospectivo, analítico y clínico en madres adolescentes (?19 años; n=37) de la ciudad de La Plata, Argentina. A partir de los 15 días postparto, las adolescentes fueron distribuidas al azar en 2 grupos y comenzaron con la suplementación con calcio; un grupo recibió productos lácteos (932 mg Ca; n=19) y el otro citrato de calcio (1000 mg calcio/día; n=18). Se midió peso, altura y consumo de alimentos y se determinó la DMO por DEXA a los 15 días (línea de base) y a los 6 meses postparto. También se determinó CMO, DMO corporal total y DMO de columna lumbar, cuello femoral, trocánter y cadera total. Se usaron modelos de regresión para identificar relaciones entre DMO corporal total y CMO con variables independientes (tipo de suplementación, meses de lactancia, peso a los 6 meses, porcentaje de cambio de peso, masa magra a los 6 meses, porcentaje de cambio de masa magra, consumo total de calcio). Los resultados muestran que los cambios en DMO y CMO en los distintos sitios fueron similares en ambos grupos, y que los cambios en los porcentajes de peso corporal e ingesta total de calcio fueron los principales factores predictivos. En conclusión, el efecto del calcio fue similar tanto con productos lácteos como con comprimidos. Los cambios porcentuales en peso corporal e ingesta total de calcio resultaron factores predictivos de los cambios de la DMO corporal total y el CMO. Abstract in english We determined the effect of calcium supplementation on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) and identified predictors of bone mass changes in adolescent mothers 6 months postpartum. A prospective, analytical, clinical study was performed in adolescent mothers (?19 years old; n=3 [...] 7) from La Plata, Argentina. At 15 days postpartum, mothers were randomly assigned into one of two groups and started with calcium supplementation; one group received dairy products (932 mg Ca; n=19) and the other calcium citrate tablets (1000 mg calcium/day; n=18). Weight, height and dietary intake were measured and BMD was determined by DEXA at 15 days (baseline) and 6 months postpartum. BMC, total body BMD and BMD were assessed in lumbar spine, femoral neck, trochanter and total hip. Regression models were used to identify the relationship of total body BMD and BMC with independent variables (calcium supplementation, months of lactation, weight at 6 months, percent weight change, lean mass at 6 months, percent lean mass change, total calcium intake). Results showed that changes in BMD and BMC at the different sites were similar in both groups, and changes in percent body weight and total calcium intake were the main predictive factors. In conclusion, the effect of calcium was similar with either form of supplementation, i.e., dairy products or tablets, and changes in percent body weight and total calcium intake were predictors of total body BMD and BMC changes.

  13. Spinal entheseal new bone formation: the early changes of spinal diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasier, V L; Littlejohn, G; Urowitz, M B; Keystone, E C; Smythe, H A

    1983-12-01

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis is characterized by new bone growth at the point of insertion of ligaments and tendons to bone. We examined retrospectively the anatomical morphologic changes discernible at the insertion of spinal longitudinal ligamentous fibrous tissue to vertebral bodies. The earliest evidence of bone formation was in the "waist" of the vertebral body away from the intervertebral disc area. New bone arose along the insertion of the fibrous tissue to the anterior cortical surface of the vertebral body and progressed along the fibres at an angle to the cortical surface distinct from it until the advanced stages. With disc degeneration the 2 processes were distinct and separate. Degenerative disc disease occurred at the margin of the endplate of the vertebral body with associated changes in the disc itself. Entheseal ossification occurred remote from the margin of the intervertebral disc and remained distinct from the subjacent vertebral body as it followed the ligamentous tissue; fusion with the cortical surface of the subjacent vertebral body was only seen in the most advanced cases of disseminated idiopathic systemic hyperostosis. PMID:6420561

  14. Progression and association with lameness and racing performance of radiographic changes in the proximal sesamoid bones of young Standardbred trotters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic examination of the metacarpo- and metatarsophalangeal joints was performed on 753 Standardbred trotters (6-21 months of age): 21 showed obvious changes in 26 proximal sesamoid bones on lateromedial projection. The radiographic changes were divided into 6 different types: (1) irregular abaxial margin (8 horses); (2) enlargement of the sesamoid bone (6 horses); (3) 'fracture' or separate centre of ossification of the apex (4 horses); (4) vertical, non-articular fracture of the plantar part of the sesamoid bone (1 horse); (5) a small bony fragment located in a defect in the apical part of the bone (2 horses); and (6) multiple areas of decreased radiodensity (1 horse). Each horse displayed only one type of radiographic change except for one which possessed those of types 3 and 5. Follow-up radiographic examination of 21 of the 26 affected proximal sesamoid bones at approximately 6-month intervals revealed a reduction in the changes in 13 bones and an unaltered condition in 8. Lameness examination was performed on 16 of the 21 horses at 3 years of age and 14 (87.5%) were observed to be lame, but detected lameness did not seem to be referrable to the sesamoid changes. Earnings after the racing season as 3- and 4-year-old horses showed no differences (P > 0.05) between horses with radiographic changes in the proximal sesamoid bones and those without such changes

  15. Differential diagnosis between chronic otitis media with and without cholesteatoma by temporal bone CT: focus on bone change and mass effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Cheol Kyu; Park, Dong Woo; Seong, Jin Yong; Lee, Kak Soo; Park Choong Ki; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    In order to determine specific differences, we compared the temporal bone CT findings of chronic otitis media (COM) with and without cholesteatoma, focusing on bone change. Between 1997 and 1998, 82 patients (84 cases) underwent temporal bone CT and were shown to have COM, with or without cholesteatoma after mastoidectomy and tympanoplasty. There were 36 cases of COM with cholesteatoma (26 patients, M:F =3D 11:15; age range, 16-61 (mean, 36,2) years), and 58 cases without chlesteatoma (56 patients, M:F =3D 25:31, age range, 15-61 (mean, 36.2) years). The findings of temporal bone CT were analysed at the point of bony changes including erosion and medial displacement of ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes), erosion or destruction of the scutum, tegmen, facial canal, and lateral semicircular canal, and ballooning of the tympanic cavity and mastoid antrum. In addition, the soft tissue changes seen on temporal bone CT were analyzed at the site of lateral bulging of soft tissue in Prussak's space, perforation of the pars flaccida, tympanic membrane retraction, and tympanosclerosis. We retrospectively compared the findings of temporal bone CT with the surgical findings, and to assess statistical significance, the Chi-square test was used. Bone erosion or destruction was seen in 36.2% of COM cases without cholesteatoma, and in 96.2% of cases with cholesteatoma. Comparing COM with and without cholesteatoma, the erosion of ossicles including the malleus (81%, 24%), incus (88%, 14%), stapes (58%, 10%), scutum (88%, 10%), facial canal (8%, 0%), and lateral semicircular canal (8%, 0%), was more common in COM with cholesteatoma (p-value less than 0.05), with the exception of erosion of the tegmen (8%, 3%). Other bony changes including medial displacement of ossicles (27%, 3%), ballooning of tympanic cavity and mastoid antrum (96%, 16%), and the soft tissue changes including lateral bulging of soft tissue in Prussak's space (58%, 14%) and perforation of the pars flaccida (35%, 9%) were more common in COM with cholesteatoma (p-value less than 0.05). Soft tissue in Prussak's space (58%, 72%), retraction of the tympanic membrane (19%, 9%), and tympanosclerosis (8%, 10%) were not however, important findings (p-value greater than 0.05). Bone erosion or destruction was seen in COM without cholesteatoma, but expansile bone erosion or destruction with mass effect suggested COM with cholesteatoma. These findings of temporal bone CT in COM demonstrate the existence and extent of combined cholesteatoma, and are therefore valuable. (author)

  16. Normal age-related changes in fluoride content of vertebral trabecular bone--relation to bone quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richards, A; Mosekilde, L; Søgaard, Charlotte

    1994-01-01

    In several clinical osteoporosis studies, fluoride treatment has been shown to have a positive effect on bone mass but without a concomitant decrease in vertebral fracture rate. In contrast, some studies have shown that increases in spinal BMD are also paralleled by decreased vertebral fracture incidence. We have previously demonstrated, in a pig model, that 6-month treatment with fluoride increased bone mass but decreased bone quality. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether norma...

  17. Long-term peri-implant bone level changes of non-vascularized fibula bone grafted edentulous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Nack, Claudia; Doll, Christian; Raguse, Jan-Dirk; Hell, Berthold; Stricker, Andres; Nelson, Katja; Nahles, Susanne

    2015-06-01

    Long-term results of reconstructions and prosthetic rehabilitation of patients presenting severely atrophied edentulous ridges remains a challenge for clinicians. Among the various available augmentation materials there is evidence that avascular fibula bone grafts possess a reliable resistance against resorption and may thus provide a valuable source to reduce the loss of vertical bone height after reconstruction of the severely atrophied mandible and maxilla. The purpose of the present study was to assess long-term crestal bone level stability in avascular fibula bone grafts. 8 edentulous female patients (average age 70.6 years) with Class-VI-atrophy and less than 5 mm residual bone volume received onlay-grafting with avascular fibula bone grafts and were monitored with a mean observation time of 133.7 months (121-186). A total of 39 implants were placed in the maxilla and mandible. Three patients received immediate and five patients delayed implant placement 3 months after grafting. All patients were provided with bar-retained dentures. Postoperative evaluation included clinical implant success (Buser) and radiographic examinations (orthopantomogram) to quantify crestal bone resorption. Grafting was successfully performed in all patients with no regrafting necessary. All implants but one, lost 2 years after abutment connection, remained successfully integrated and fulfilled the Buser criteria, rendering to a success rate of 97%. Mean bone resorption after 10 years was mesial 1.4 mm and distal 1.4 mm at each implant-site. Maximum bone resorption occurred between postoperative and first year, thereafter no significant resorption was measured in re-examinations up to 15 years. Avascular fibula grafts are a reliable bone graft for augmentation procedures in atrophied edentulous ridges. Dental implants that integrated in the autogenous fibular bone grafts showed a stable crestal peri-implant bone level up to 15 years after implant placement. PMID:25863644

  18. Serial Scanning and Registration of High Resolution Quantitative Computed Tomography Volume Scans for the Determination of Local Bone Density Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Robert T.; Napel, Sandy; Yan, Chye H.

    1996-01-01

    Progress in development of the methods required to study bone remodeling as a function of time is reported. The following topics are presented: 'A New Methodology for Registration Accuracy Evaluation', 'Registration of Serial Skeletal Images for Accurately Measuring Changes in Bone Density', and 'Precise and Accurate Gold Standard for Multimodality and Serial Registration Method Evaluations.'

  19. TU-A-12A-08: Computing Longitudinal Material Changes in Bone Metastases Using Dual Energy Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study demonstrates a methodology for tracking changes in metastatic bone disease using trajectories in material basis space in serial dual energy computed tomography (DECT) studies. Methods: This study includes patients with bone metastases from breast cancer that had clinical surveillance CT scans using a General Electric CT750HD in dual energy mode. A radiologist defined regions-of-interested (ROI) for bone metastasis, normal bone, and marrow across the serial DECT scans. Our approach employs a Radon transform to forward-projection the basis images, namely, water and iodine, into sinogram space. This data is then repartitioned into fat/bone and effective density/Z image pairs using assumed energy spectrums for the x-ray energies. This approach both helps remove negative material densities and avoids adding spectrum-hardening artifacts. These new basis data sets were then reconstructed via filtered back-projection to create new material basis pair images. The trajectories of these pairs were then plotted in the new basis space providing a means to both visualize and quantitatively measure changes in the material properties of the tumors. Results: ROI containing radiologist defined metastatic bone disease showed well-defined trajectories in both fat/bone and effective density/Z space. ROI that contained radiologist defined normal bone and marrow did not exhibit any discernible trajectories and were stable from scan to scan. Conclusions: The preliminary results show that changes in material composition and effective density/Z image pairs were seen primarily in metastasis and not in normal tissue. This study indicates that by using routine clinical DECT it may be possible to monitor therapy response of bone metastases because healing or worsening bone metastases change material composition of bone. Additional studies are needed to further validate these results and to test for their correlation with outcome

  20. Tumor-induced osteoclast miRNA changes as regulators and biomarkers of osteolytic bone metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Ell B; Mercatali L; Ibrahim T; Campbell N; Schwarzenbach H; Pantel K...; Amadori D; Kang Y

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism by which tumor cells influence osteoclast differentiation is crucial for improving treatment of osteolytic metastasis. Here, we report broad microRNA (miRNA) expression changes in differentiating osteoclasts after exposure to tumor-conditioned media, in part through activation of NF?B signaling by soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (sICAM1) secreted from bone-metastatic cancer cells. Ectopic expression of multiple miRNAs down-regulated during osteoclastogenesi...

  1. Roentgenogrammetry in diagnosis of age-dependent changes of the bone tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roentgenogrammetry was used to analyze 120 x-ray films of the right clavicle obtained at autopsy of female and male corpses aged 20-80. It was determined that the indices of the x-ray film correlated with the age-dependent changes in the bone tissue which occurred due to involution osteoporosis and could be of practical value for personality identification in forensics medical expertise

  2. Changes of lymphocyte subsets in leukemia patients who received allogenic bone marrow transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsuda,Mitsumoto

    1991-01-01

    Proportional changes of lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood were monitored by two-color flow-cytometry in seven leukemia patients who had received allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Lymphocyte counts, and proportions of T and B-cells returned to normal ranges between the 2nd and 12th months after BMT. Activated T-cells prominently increased after BMT, and the values gradually returned toward normal. As to lymphocyte subsets, the proportions of CD 4+ cells had remained low, wh...

  3. Changes in erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein after total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, K; Osterman, K; Peltola, H; Räsänen, J

    1984-04-01

    Uncomplicated total hip arthroplasty (THA) was performed in 40 osteoarthritic patients, and changes in erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were registered. The follow-up period was one year. Preoperative ESR appeared to be slightly elevated, and CRP levels were normal, with no exceptions. A postoperative maximum ESR of 64 mm/hour was reached six days after surgery. A slow decrease followed, but ESR remained slightly elevated one year later. The changes in CRP were more rapid; a maximum of 134 mg/l was registered on the second day after surgery, and the values were consistently normalized three weeks after surgery. Thus, uneventful recovery after THA seems to be indicated by a normalizing CRP, regardless of ESR values. PMID:6705332

  4. Microglia change from a reactive to an age-like phenotype with the time in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Caldeira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Age-related neurodegenerative diseases have been associated with chronic neuroinflammation and microglia activation. However, cumulative evidence supports that inflammation only occurs at an early stage once microglia change the endogenous characteristics with ageing and switch to irresponsive/senescent and dystrophic phenotypes with disease progression. Thus, it will be important to have the means to assess the role of reactive and aged microglia when studying advanced brain neurodegeneration processes and age-associated related disorders. Yet, most studies are done with microglia from neonates since there are no adequate means to isolate degenerating microglia for experimentation. Indeed, only a few studies report microglia isolation from aged animals, using either short-term cultures or high concentrations of mitogens in the medium, which trigger microglia reactivity. The purpose of this study was to develop an experimental process to naturally age microglia after isolation from neonatal mice and to characterize the cultured cells at 2 days in vitro (DIV, 10 DIV and 16 DIV. We found that 2 DIV (young microglia had predominant amoeboid morphology and markers of stressed/reactive phenotype. In contrast, 16 DIV (aged microglia evidenced ramified morphology and increased metalloproteinase (MMP-2 activation, as well as reduced MMP-9, glutamate release and nuclear factor kappa-B activation, in parallel with decreased expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR-2 and TLR-4, capacity to migrate and phagocytose. These findings together with the reduced expression of microRNA (miR-124, and miR-155, decreased autophagy, enhanced senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity and elevated miR-146a expression, are suggestive that 16 DIV cells mainly correspond to irresponsive/senescent microglia. Data indicate that the model represent an opportunity to understand and control microglial aging, as well as to explore strategies to recover microglia surveillance function.

  5. On RELAP5-simulated High Flux Isotope Reactor reactivity transients: Code change and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new and innovative application for the RELAP5 code (hereafter referred to as ''the code''). The code has been used to simulate several transients associated with the (presently) draft version of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) updated safety analysis report (SAR). This paper investigates those thermal-hydraulic transients induced by nuclear reactivity changes. A major goal of the work was to use an existing RELAP5 HFIR model for consistency with other thermal-hydraulic transient analyses of the SAR. To achieve this goal, it was necessary to incorporate a new self-contained point kinetics solver into the code because of a deficiency in the point-kinetics reactivity model of the Mod 2.5 version of the code. The model was benchmarked against previously analyzed (known) transients. Given this new code, four event categories defined by the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) were analyzed: (in ascending order of severity) a cold-loop pump start; run-away shim-regulating control cylinder and safety plate withdrawal; control cylinder ejection; and generation of an optimum void in the target region. All transients are discussed. Results of the bounding incredible event transient, the target region optimum void, are shown. Future plans for RELAP5 HFIR applications and recommendations for code improvements are also discussed

  6. Changes in bone biomarker concentrations and musculoskeletal symptoms among breast cancer patients initiating aromatase inhibitor therapy and women without a history of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    GALLICCHIO, Lisa; MacDonald, Ryan; Wood, Bethany; Rushovich, Errol; Fedarko, Neal S.; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine 1) changes in bone formation (osteocalcin) and bone resorption [cross-linked N-telopeptides of bone type I collagen (NTXs)] markers, as well as calcium, phosphorus, and intact parathyroid hormone, over the first 6-months of aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy among a cohort of breast cancer patients compared to a group of unexposed women without a history of cancer; and, 2) whether bone marker changes were associated with musculoskeletal pain. Eligibl...

  7. Changes in bone geometry and microarchitecture caused by intermittent administration of PTH. Comparison with those by exercise load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been several studies showing that periodical intermittent medication with parathyroid hormone (PTH) causes increases in cancellous bone mass. However, there have been almost no reports comparing the effects of periodical intermittent PTH medication on bone microarchitecture with changes caused by physiological stimulation such as exercise load. In this study, we compared the effects of these two interventions on the microarchitecturural deterioration of femoral cancellous bone associated with unloading, using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and the effects of PTH administration and motion loading on improvement of the deteriorated structure. In the study, 32 eight-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: a control group without tail suspension (CON), a control recovery group after suspension (S+C), a suspension/PTH group (S+P), and a suspension/jumping exercise group (S+J). Periodical intermittent human PTH (1-34) was given periodically to the S+P group rats at a dose of 75 ?g/kg/day five times a week for five weeks, after two weeks of exercise with suspension of the tail. The rats in the S+J group performed 40 cm-high jumping 10 times/day five times a week for five weeks. After this conditioning, upon examination, bilateral femurs were removed and the right distal metaphysis was scanned using micro-CT to obtain images of the cancellous bone region of the femur. Based on the tomographic data, indices of cancellous bone microarchitecture was the index of trabecular bone structure were determined by using three-dimensional image analysis system. In addition, to examine the geometric properties of the diaphysis, mid-portion images of the bone shaft of the left femur were obtained by micro-CT, and then the mechanical bone strength of the left femur was determined by performing a three-point bending test. Compared to the S+C group, the S+P and S+J groups showed significantly higher bone volume, bone surface mass values, superficial bone area, bone volume fraction rates, fractal dimensions, connectivity density, trabecular thickness, trabecular bone number and degrees of anisotropy. They conversely showed significantly lower bone volume ratio values, trabecular bone separation, trabecular bone pattern factors, and structural model indices. However, the area values, thickness, and strength of femoral diaphysis cortical bone in the S+J group were significantly higher than those in the S+C group. The S+P group showed no significant difference other than cortical bone thickness. These data suggest that periodical intermittent medication with PTH could cause changes in the fine structure of the femoral metaphysic cancellous bone microarchitecture that are similar to changes caused by jumping exercise, but the effects of PTH seem to be small on the geometric properties and bone strength of the cortical bone. (author)

  8. Reactivating memories during sleep by odors: odor specificity and associated changes in sleep oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Rihm, Julia S; Diekelmann, Susanne; Born, Jan; Rasch, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Memories are reactivated during sleep. Reexposure to olfactory cues during sleep triggers this reactivation and improves later recall performance. Here, we tested if the effects of odor-induced memory reactivations are odor specific, that is, requiring the same odor during learning and subsequent sleep. We also tested whether odor-induced memory reactivation affects oscillatory EEG activity during sleep, as a putative mechanism underlying memory processing during sleep. Participants learned a...

  9. Changes in Cytokines of the Bone Microenvironment during Breast Cancer Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is commonly accepted that cancer cells interact with host cells to create a microenvironment favoring malignant colonization. The complex bone microenvironment produces an ever changing array of cytokines and growth factors. In this study, we examined levels of MCP-1, IL-6, KC, MIP-2, VEGF, MIG, and eotaxin in femurs of athymic nude mice inoculated via intracardiac injection with MDA-MB-231GFP human metastatic breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 BRMS1GFP, a metastasis suppressed variant, or PBS. Animals were euthanized (day 3, 11, 19, 27 after injection) to examine femoral cytokine levels at various stages of cancer cell colonization. The epiphysis contained significantly more cytokines than the diaphysis except for MIG which was similar throughout the bone. Variation among femurs was evident within all groups. By day 27, MCP-1, MIG, VEGF and eotaxin levels were significantly greater in femurs of cancer cell-inoculated mice. These pro-osteoclastic and angiogenic cytokines may manipulate the bone microenvironment to enhance cancer cell colonization

  10. Methods for modeling impact-induced reactivity changes in small reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallman, Tyler N.; Radel, Tracy E.; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Villa, Daniel L.; Smith, Brandon M. (U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Radel, Ross F.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wilson, Paul Philip Hood (U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes techniques for determining impact deformation and the subsequent reactivity change for a space reactor impacting the ground following a potential launch accident or for large fuel bundles in a shipping container following an accident. This technique could be used to determine the margin of subcriticality for such potential accidents. Specifically, the approach couples a finite element continuum mechanics model (Pronto3D or Presto) with a neutronics code (MCNP). DAGMC, developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is used to enable MCNP geometric queries to be performed using Pronto3D output. This paper summarizes what has been done historically for reactor launch analysis, describes the impact criticality analysis methodology, and presents preliminary results using representative reactor designs.

  11. Methods for modeling impact-induced reactivity changes in small reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes techniques for determining impact deformation and the subsequent reactivity change for a space reactor impacting the ground following a potential launch accident or for large fuel bundles in a shipping container following an accident. This technique could be used to determine the margin of subcriticality for such potential accidents. Specifically, the approach couples a finite element continuum mechanics model (Pronto3D or Presto) with a neutronics code (MCNP). DAGMC, developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is used to enable MCNP geometric queries to be performed using Pronto3D output. This paper summarizes what has been done historically for reactor launch analysis, describes the impact criticality analysis methodology, and presents preliminary results using representative reactor designs.

  12. Ion implantation induced structural changes in reactively sputtered Cr-N layers on Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a study of the structure and composition of reactively sputtered Cr-N layers as a function of deposition parameters, and the effects of ion implantation on these structures. The layers were deposited on (1 0 0) Si substrates to a thickness of 240-280 nm, at different nitrogen partial pressure, and subsequently irradiated with 120 keV Ar ions. Structural characterisation of the samples was performed with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. We also measured their electrical resistivity with a four point probe. It was found that the layers grow in form of columnar structures, and their composition, Cr2N or CrN, strongly depends on the nitrogen partial pressure during deposition. Ion irradiation induces local micro-structural changes, formation of nano-particles and defects, which can be nicely correlated to the measured electrical resistivity

  13. Time course of change in bronchial reactivity with an inhaled corticosteroid in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vathenen, A S; Knox, A J; Wisniewski, A; Tattersfield, A E

    1991-06-01

    The time course of change in FEV1, bronchial reactivity, and daily measures of asthma control (peak expiratory flow, symptoms, and beta 2-agonist inhaler use) was determined during 6 wk of treatment with inhaled budesonide, 800 micrograms twice a day, and for 2 wk following cessation of treatment in 40 asthmatic subjects in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study. Histamine reactivity, expressed as the provocative dose of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PD20), was measured at intervals during the 8 wk of the study, with more frequent measurements after the first and last dose of drug to provide a detailed profile of change at the start and end of treatment. The first dose of budesonide caused a small increase in median values of FEV1 (0.2 L) and PD20 (1.0 doubling dose of histamine), which was maximum at 6 h. There was a further increase in FEV1 and PD20 over the 6 wk in the budesonide group relative to placebo, the maximum increases (0.53 L, 3.4 doubling doses of histamine) being recorded 6 h after the last dose on Day 42. Following cessation of treatment, FEV1 and PD20 declined and PD20 returned to placebo values at 1 wk. Median PEF increased by 40 and 30 L/min in the morning and evening, respectively, with budesonide treatment. Symptom scores and beta 2-agonist inhaler use were lower in the budesonide group than the placebo group during treatment but tended to be similar (symptom scores) or higher (beta 2-agonist) in the 2 wk following cessation of treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2048819

  14. Temperature change in pig rib bone during implant site preparation by low-speed drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Jong Kim

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature change during low-speed drilling using infrared thermography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pig ribs were used to provide cortical bone of a similar quality to human mandible. Heat production by three implant drill systems (two conventional drilling systems and one low-speed drilling system was evaluated by measuring the bone temperature using infrared thermography. Each system had two different bur sizes. The drill systems used were twist drill (2.0 mm/2.5 mm, which establishes the direction of the implant, and finally a 3.0 mm-pilot drill. Thermal images were recorded using the IRI1001 system (Infrared Integrated Systems Ltd.. Baseline temperature was 31±1ºC. Measurements were repeated 10 times, and a static load of 10 kg was applied while drilling. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Statistical analysis was conducted with two-way ANOVA. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Mean values (n=10 drill sequences for maximum recorded temperature (Max TºC, change in temperature (?TºC from baseline were as follows. The changes in temperature (?TºC were 1.57ºC and 2.46ºC for the lowest and the highest values, respectively. Drilling at 50 rpm without irrigation did not produce overheating. There was no significant difference in heat production between the 3 implant drill systems (p>0.05. No implant drill system produced heat exceeding 47ºC, which is the critical temperature for bone necrosis during low-speed drilling. Low-speed drilling without irrigation could be used during implant site preparation.

  15. Temperature change in pig rib bone during implant site preparation by low-speed drilling

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Sun-Jong, Kim; Jaeyoung, Yoo; Young-Soo, Kim; Sang-Wan, Shin.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature change during low-speed drilling using infrared thermography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pig ribs were used to provide cortical bone of a similar quality to human mandible. Heat production by three implant drill systems (two convention [...] al drilling systems and one low-speed drilling system) was evaluated by measuring the bone temperature using infrared thermography. Each system had two different bur sizes. The drill systems used were twist drill (2.0 mm/2.5 mm), which establishes the direction of the implant, and finally a 3.0 mm-pilot drill. Thermal images were recorded using the IRI1001 system (Infrared Integrated Systems Ltd.). Baseline temperature was 31±1ºC. Measurements were repeated 10 times, and a static load of 10 kg was applied while drilling. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Statistical analysis was conducted with two-way ANOVA. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Mean values (n=10 drill sequences) for maximum recorded temperature (Max TºC), change in temperature (?TºC) from baseline were as follows. The changes in temperature (?TºC) were 1.57ºC and 2.46ºC for the lowest and the highest values, respectively. Drilling at 50 rpm without irrigation did not produce overheating. There was no significant difference in heat production between the 3 implant drill systems (p>0.05). No implant drill system produced heat exceeding 47ºC, which is the critical temperature for bone necrosis during low-speed drilling. Low-speed drilling without irrigation could be used during implant site preparation.

  16. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagran, Marcelo A; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A; Pantoja, Diego F; Alarcon, Jose C; Fariña, Macarena A; Amigo, Romina F; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A; Pinilla, Mabel G; Peña, Eduardo A; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R; Rivas, Coralia I; Vera, Juan C; McNerney, Eileen M; Onate, Sergio A

    2015-11-27

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. PMID:26494300

  17. Improvement of bone marrow fibrosis with ruxolitinib: will this finding change our perception of the drug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Colafigli, Gioia; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-08-01

    Ruxolitinib, a JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor, has been tested and approved for the treatment of primary and secondary myelofibrosis. Reduction of spleen volume and improvement of constitutional symptoms and quality of life have been reported as the major findings in sponsored randomized clinical trials. Recent data indicated that the drug improves bone marrow fibrosis and that different targets may be involved in this response. These new data, which require confirmation in prospective trials, may change our perspectives and therapeutic strategies for this disease. PMID:25915176

  18. Assessing joint effusion and bone changes of the head of the mandible in MR images of symptomatic patients

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jefferson Xavier de, Oliveira; Jucely Aparecida da, Rosa; Marcelo Eduardo Pereira, Dutra; Karina Cecilia Panelli, Santos; Cibelle, Gil.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between degenerative bone changes of the head of the mandible and the presence of joint effusion (JE). This study was based on sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reports of 148 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 74 patients comp [...] laining of pain and/or dysfunction in the TMJ area. The mandible heads were surveyed for osteoarthritis characteristics, which were classified as osteophytosis, sclerosis or erosion. The presence of JE was checked whenever high signal intensity was observed in the articular space. The results evidenced the presence of bone changes in 30% of the sample. Osteophytes and erosions were the changes most commonly observed. JE was reported in 10% of TMJs. The results from the statistical tests revealed that bone changes in the head of the mandible are associated with the presence of JE.

  19. Assessing joint effusion and bone changes of the head of the mandible in MR images of symptomatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Xavier de Oliveira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between degenerative bone changes of the head of the mandible and the presence of joint effusion (JE. This study was based on sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI reports of 148 temporomandibular joints (TMJs of 74 patients complaining of pain and/or dysfunction in the TMJ area. The mandible heads were surveyed for osteoarthritis characteristics, which were classified as osteophytosis, sclerosis or erosion. The presence of JE was checked whenever high signal intensity was observed in the articular space. The results evidenced the presence of bone changes in 30% of the sample. Osteophytes and erosions were the changes most commonly observed. JE was reported in 10% of TMJs. The results from the statistical tests revealed that bone changes in the head of the mandible are associated with the presence of JE.

  20. Interactive effects of reactive nitrogen and climate change on US water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, J.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Finlay, J. C.; Chan, F.; Nolan, B. T.; Howarth, B.; Hall, E.; Boyer, E. W.

    2011-12-01

    Water resources and aquatic ecosystems are increasingly strained by withdrawals for agriculture and drinking water supply, nitrogen and other pollutant inputs, and climate change. We describe current and projected effects of the interactions of reactive nitrogen (N) and climate change on water resources of the United States. As perturbations to the N cycle intensify in a warmer less predictable climate, interactions will negatively affect the services we expect of our water resources. There are also feedbacks to the climate system itself through the production of greenhouse gases. We conclude: 1. Nitrogen concentrations will increase in the nation's waters from increased N loading and higher N mineralization rates. N export from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems exhibits a high sensitivity to climate variations. 2. Consequences range from eutrophication and acidification, which reduce natural biodiversity and harm economically valuable fisheries, to adverse impacts on human health. 3. Extreme flood events have the potential to transport N rapidly long distances downstream from its source. 4. A recent national assessment found 67% of streams derived more than 37% of their total nitrate load from base flow often derived from groundwater. Long residence times for groundwater nitrate below agricultural fields may cause benefits from proper N management practices to take decades to be realized under current and future climates. 5. Streams, wetlands, rivers, lakes, estuaries and continental shelves are hotspots for denitrification. Maintenance of N removal capacity thus a critical component of eutrophication management under changing climate and land use conditions. 6. The amount of N inputs from fertilizer and manure use, human population, and deposition is tightly coupled with hydrology to influence the rates and proportion of N emitted to the atmosphere as N2O. About 20% of global N2O emissions come from groundwater, lakes, rivers, and estuaries; stream and wetland emissions add to this value. 7. If current patterns of N and water resource management continue, nitrogen loading to inland waters is expected to increase while the nitrogen retention efficiency within aquatic ecosystems will decline as a function of nitrogen saturation of biological demand. 8. Management that reduces N loss to the nation's water will reduce environmental and economic damage, reduce the risk to human health, and prevent the production of some N2O. Preventing the loss of N to aquatic systems is likely to be most effective at its point of origin. Reducing reactive nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere, increasing N uptake efficiency of crops and greater N retention in soils, better animal management, and improved sewage treatment to remove N from urban waste waters will be increasingly important approaches for the provision of water resources and services in a warmer and highly populated world.

  1. Three-dimensional assessment of maxillary changes associated with bone anchored maxillary protraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tung; Cevidanes, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Bone-anchored maxillary protraction has been shown to be an effective treatment modality for the correction of Class III malocclusions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 3-dimensional changes in the maxilla, the surrounding hard and soft tissues, and the circummaxillary sutures after bone-anchored maxillary protraction treatment. METHODS: Twenty-five consecutive skeletal Class III patients between the ages of 9 and 13 years (mean, 11.10 ± 1.1 years) were treated with Class III intermaxillary elastics and bilateral miniplates (2 in the infrazygomatic crests of the maxilla and 2 in the anterior mandible). Cone-beam computed tomographs were taken before initial loading and 1 year out. Three-dimensional models were generated from the tomographs, registered on the anterior cranial base, superimposed, and analyzed by using color maps. RESULTS: The maxilla showed a mean forward displacement of 3.7 mm, and the zygomas and the maxillary incisors came forward 3.7 and 4.3 mm, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This treatment approach produced significant orthopedic changes in the maxilla and the zygomas in growing Class III patients.

  2. Changes of flavor compounds of hydrolyzed chicken bone extracts during Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Mei; Wang, Jin-Zhi; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Li, Xia; Xu, Xiong; Dong, Xian-Bing; Hu, Li; Li, Chun-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Flavor quality, including non-volatile and volatile compounds, of hydrolyzed chicken bone extracts (HCBE) during Maillard reaction (MR) was evaluated with HPLC, tasting sensory system, Electronic-Nose (E-nose), and GC-MS. Results showed that flavor amino acids (AA) accounted for 72% to 74% of total free AA in HCBE. Taste of umami increased first and then decreased during MR, while equivalent umami concentration remained at a stable level. Results of taste sensing system and bitter AA showed that MR could reduce the bitter taste of HCBE significantly. E-Nose test showed there are great changes of volatile flavor during MR. And total of 59 volatile compounds were identified in HCBE during MR, which should responsible for the increase of flavor in HCBE. Our results indicated that MR could be used as an effective way to change the flavor compounds in HCBE, and therefore provide a strategy for preparation of meaty flavor enhancer from bone residue as a byproduct of meat industry. PMID:25393708

  3. Graft-versus-host reaction and immune function. III. Functional pre-T cells in the bone marrow of graft-versus-host-reactive mice displaying T cell immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seddik, M.; Seemayer, T.A.; Lapp, W.S.

    1986-02-01

    Studies were performed to determine whether pre-T cells develop normally in the bone marrow of mice displaying thymic dysplasia and T cell immunodeficiency as a consequence of a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction. GVH reactions were induced in CBAxAF1 mice by the injection of A strain lymphoid cells. To test for the presence of pre-T cells in GVH-reactive mice, bone marrow from GVH-reactive mice (GVHBM) was injected into irradiated syngeneic F1 mice and 30-40 days later thymic morphology and function were studied. Morphology studies showed nearly normal thymic architectural restoration; moreover, such glands contained normal numbers of Thy-1-positive cells. Functional pre-T cells were evaluated by transferring thymocytes from the irradiated GVHBM-reconstituted mice into T-cell-deprived mice. These thymocytes reconstituted allograft reactivity, T helper cell function and Con A and PHA mitogen responses of T-cell-deprived mice. These results suggest that the pre-T cell population in the bone marrow is not affected by the GVH reaction. Therefore, the T cell immunodeficiency associated with the GVH reaction is not due to a deficiency of pre-T cells in the bone marrow but is more likely associated with GVH-induced thymic dysplasia.

  4. Graft-versus-host reaction and immune function. III. Functional pre-T cells in the bone marrow of graft-versus-host-reactive mice displaying T cell immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were performed to determine whether pre-T cells develop normally in the bone marrow of mice displaying thymic dysplasia and T cell immunodeficiency as a consequence of a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction. GVH reactions were induced in CBAxAF1 mice by the injection of A strain lymphoid cells. To test for the presence of pre-T cells in GVH-reactive mice, bone marrow from GVH-reactive mice (GVHBM) was injected into irradiated syngeneic F1 mice and 30-40 days later thymic morphology and function were studied. Morphology studies showed nearly normal thymic architectural restoration; moreover, such glands contained normal numbers of Thy-1-positive cells. Functional pre-T cells were evaluated by transferring thymocytes from the irradiated GVHBM-reconstituted mice into T-cell-deprived mice. These thymocytes reconstituted allograft reactivity, T helper cell function and Con A and PHA mitogen responses of T-cell-deprived mice. These results suggest that the pre-T cell population in the bone marrow is not affected by the GVH reaction. Therefore, the T cell immunodeficiency associated with the GVH reaction is not due to a deficiency of pre-T cells in the bone marrow but is more likely associated with GVH-induced thymic dysplasia

  5. Efficient integration of stiff kinetics with phase change detection for reactive reservoir processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Rode; Gerritsen, Margot G.

    2007-01-01

    We propose the use of implicit one-step Explicit Singly Diagonal Implicit Runge-Kutta (ESDIRK) methods for integration of the stiff kinetics in reactive, compositional and thermal processes that are solved using operator-splitting type approaches. To facilitate the algorithmic development we construct a virtual kinetic cell model. The model serves both as a tool for the development and testing of tailored solvers as well as a testbed for studying the interactions between chemical kinetics and phase behavior. As case study, two chemical kinetics models with 6 and 14 components, respectively, are implemented for in situ combustion, a thermal oil recovery process. Through benchmark studies using the 14 component reaction model the new ESDIRK solvers are shown to improve computational speed when compared to the widely used multi-step BDF methods DASSL and LSODE. Phase changes are known to cause convergence problems for the integration method. We propose an algorithm for detection and location of phase changes based on discrete event system theory. Experiments show that the algorithm improves the robustness of the integration process near phase boundaries by lowering the number convergence and error test failures by more than 50% compared to direct integration without the new algorithm.

  6. The effect of sea level changes on fault reactivation potential in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, M. C.; Cabral, J.; Luttrell, K.; Figueiredo, P.; Rockwell, T.; Sandwell, D.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the impact of sea level changes on both the stress field and the potential of fault reactivation in west Iberia. The analysis is applied to a set of five active faults distributed across Portugal, selected for representing predominant fault directions and for being seismically active. The results show that the rise of sea level since the Last Glacial Maximum has produced flexural effects with distinct impacts on different faults. The Coulomb stress changes induced by the sea level rise along the S. Marcos-Quarteira (south Portugal) and the Horseshoe (offshore SW Iberia) faults are found to be extremely small, independently of the elastic plate thickness. These faults are thus unaffected by flexural effects related to ocean loading, and are unlikely to possess any paleoseismic record of this phenomenon. In contrast, the eustatic sea level rise during the late Pleistocene could have raised the Coulomb stress by 0.5-1 MPa along the Manteigas-Vilariça-Bragança (north Portugal) and Lower Tagus Valley (Lisbon area) fault systems. Such stress perturbations are probably sufficient to impact the seismic cycle of the Manteigas-Vilariça-Bragança fault, bringing it closer to failure and possibly triggering the earthquake clusters that have been observed in previous paleoseismologic studies.

  7. A magnetic resonance imaging study on changes in rat mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue after high-dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Wonkwang Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Kyoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    This study was designed to evaluate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is appropriate for detecting early changes in the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of rats after high-dose irradiation. The right mandibles of Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 10 Gy (Group 1, n=5) and 20 Gy (Group 2, n=5). Five non-irradiated animals were used as controls. The MR images of rat mandibles were obtained before irradiation and once a week until week 4 after irradiation. From the MR images, the signal intensity (SI) of the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of the incisor was interpreted. The MR images were compared with the histopathologic findings. The SI of the mandibular bone marrow had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. There was little difference between Groups 1 and 2. The SI of the irradiated groups appeared to be lower than that of the control group. The histopathologic findings showed that the trabecular bone in the irradiated group had increased. The SI of the irradiated pulp tissue had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. However, the SI of the MR images in Group 2 was high in the atrophic pulp of the incisor apex at week 2 after irradiation. These patterns seen on MRI in rat bone marrow and pulp tissue were consistent with histopathologic findings. They may be useful to assess radiogenic sclerotic changes in rat mandibular bone marrow.

  8. Bone changes in the condylar head and mandibular fossa in patients with temporomandibular disorders. Helical CT observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we investigated whether bone changes are present in sites impossible to observe by panoramic X-ray and Schuller's X-ray examination, namely the medial of the condylar head and mandibular fossa, in patients with type IV temporomandibular joint disorders. We observed the articular fossa using computed tomography, which is able to obtain detailed 3-dimensional information, in patients with type IV temporomandibular disorders. We examined 120 joints of 60 patiens who visited the Department of Oral Surgery, Osaka Medical College Hospital. Each condylar head was clearly visualized in panoramic X-ray and Schuller's X-ray examination findings, and shown to have possible changes unilaterally. Each joint was diagnosed as type IV, according to the diagnostic guidelines set by Japanese Society for Temporomandibular Joint, and further examined using helical CT. Changes in condylar head; We concluded that bone changes were present with considerable probability in the medial of condylar head in a manner similar to those found in the lateral and center of joints with type IV temporomandibular disorders. Changes in mandibular fossa; The bone changes occurred in various locations of the mandibular fossa, while they appeared significantly more frequently in the condylar head. We think that our finding will contribute to development of treatment strategies for temporomandibular disorders, as they clarify bone changes in sites previously unreported. (author)

  9. Changes of hyoid bone position following treatment of class II div1 malocclusion with Farmand functional appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassaei S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Unlike other bones of the head and neck, hyoid bone has no bony articulations. It is connected to mandible, cranium and pharynx through muscles and ligaments. During treatment with functional appliance in patients with class II div1 malocclusion, mandible is positioned in inferior and anterior direction. Regarding the relation between hyoid and mandibular bone, alterations of hyoid bone position can be a result of functional appliance therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes of hyoid bone position following treatment with Farmand functional appliance in patients with class II div 1 malocclusion. Materials and Methods: In this before-after clinical trial, 28 patients with class II div 1 malocclusion which were under treatment with Farmand functional appliance for 11 months were selected. Facial growth in vertical, normal or horizontal direction was determined by cephalometric measurement. Data were analyzed with Paired-t test to compare the differences of mean values pre and post treatment. Variance analysis was used to compare the three growth patterns. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Results: Hyoid bone shifted significantly forward in horizontal dimension (P<0.01 and non-significantly upward in vertical dimension. There was no significant difference among the three studied groups with respect to hyoid bone position alterations in horizontal dimension but significant difference was observed between horizontal and vertical growth pattern in vertical dimension (P<0.05. There was significant correlation between decrease of ANB angle and forward movement of hyoid bone. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treatment with Farmand functional appliance (Fa II leads to significant alterations in the position and anterior displacement of the hyoid bone.

  10. Comparative reproducibility of dermal microvascular blood flow changes in response to acetylcholine iontophoresis, hyperthermia and reactive hyperaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Doppler fluxmetry (LDF) can non-invasively measure skin microvascular changes in response to acetylcholine (ACh), local heating of the skin and reactive hyperaemia following arterial occlusion. Various studies have used microvascular changes in response to these stimuli, especially ACh iontophoresis and local heating, as a surrogate marker of endothelial function. There are few data in the literature regarding the comparative reproducibility of microvascular perfusion changes induced by the three stimuli. The aim of this study was to systematically assess and compare the reproducibility of skin microcirculatory function in response to each of these challenges. Ten healthy non-smoking subjects (seven males) median age 36 years (range 23–46), with no history of hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease or any connective tissue disorder, were studied. Changes in skin microcirculation in response to ACh iontophoresis, local heating of the skin and post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia, on two separate days (median 31, range 11–42 days), were assessed in all subjects. We measured three parameters: the change in perfusion from baseline perfusion (peak minus baseline perfusion), the relative percentage change in perfusion from baseline (peak ? baseline)/baseline × 100 (%) and also the time-to-peak perfusion. The reproducibility of the change in perfusion had coefficients of variation (CV) of 9.3% for local skin heating, 19.4% for reactive hyperaemia and 25.5% for ACh iontophoresis. The relative percentage change in perfusion from baseline was more variable with CVs ranging from 23% to 39%. The coefficient of variation of time-to-peak perfusion was 7.0% for heating, 15.1% for reactive hyperaemia and 10.4% for ACh iontophoresis. We have shown that microcirculatory changes measured by the change in perfusion from baseline and time-to-peak perfusion in response to ACh, post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia and local skin heating had good reproducibility when carried out in a controlled environment with a standardized protocol. Relative change in perfusion had relatively poor reproducibility. The change in perfusion and time-to-peak perfusion for local skin heating were the most reproducible overall

  11. Changes of serum bone metabolic biochemical markers in elderly subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum bone metabolic biochemical markers levels in elderly subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism. Methods: Serum S-BGP (with RIA), TSH, FT4 (with ECLIA), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), HDL, LDL, ApoA1, ApoB and Ca2+ (with biochemical methods) were measured in 30 elderly subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism and 30 controls. Results: The serum levels of S-BGP and calcium in elderly subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism (2.78 ± 0.96 ?g/L and 2.16 ± 0.17 mmol/L respectively) were significantly lower than those in controls (3.9 ± 1.48 ?g/L and 2.31 ± 0.21 mmol/L respectively, both P<0.01). TC and LDL levels in the subclinical hypothyroid subjects (5.58 ± 0.41 mmol/L and 3.67 ± 0.36 mmol/L) were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01). Conclusion: The lowering of calcium levels in subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism would lead to loss of bone mass. Decreased S-BGP contents might be the chief cause of osteoporosis in these subjects. (authors)

  12. Morphology change of rock-like oxide fuels in reactivity-initiated-accident simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse irradiation tests under simulated reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions were performed with three types of rock-like oxide (ROX) fuels. Single phase yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), homogeneous mixture of YSZ/spinel and YSZ particle dispersed in spinel type ROX fuels were pulse irradiated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR). Mode and threshold of the fuel rod failure including its consequences were investigated under the RIA conditions. The cladding failure occurred in a burst type mode in all the three types of ROX fuel tests with considerable fuel melting. Even though the mode was quite different from those of UO2 fuel, failure threshold enthalpies of the ROX fuels were close to that of UO2 fuel at about 10 GJ m-3. The consequence of the failure of the ROX fuels rods was different from the one of UO2 fuel rods, because molten fuel dispersal occurred at lower enthalpies in the ROX fuel tests. Change of the fuel structure and material interaction in the transient heating conditions were examined through optical and secondary electron microscopy, and electron probe micro analysis

  13. Analysis of the results of reactivity change measurements on plutonium-uranium fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactivity change measurements have been carried out in the graphite-moderated reactor HECTOR on plutonium-uranium fuel elements with a low Pu240 content. The aim of the work was to develop a method in which measurements on small fuel samples (typically 18 in. long) could be used to check the validity of proposed methods of calculation for plutonium-bearing lattices. The experiments were carried out in a variety of lattices and demonstrated that, at a lattice pitch of 8.5 in. which was used for the majority of the measurements, the results were not significantly affected by the lattice environment. In particular, the results showed that it is not necessary to use plutonium-uranium fuel in the lattice surrounding the sample but that uranium fuel with similar properties is adequate. The accuracy obtained corresponded to an error of 0.5% in k? for a lattice containing the plutonium-uranium fuel. The results of the measurements were compared with the predictions of the TRACER method of lattice calculation. It was found that, at room temperature, there was no significant difference between the measured and calculated values of k? but that, at temperatures in the range 400-450 deg. C, the calculated value of k? was about 1 1/2% lower than the measured value. (author)

  14. Changes in the Mechanical Properties and Composition of Bone during Microdamage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Gang WANG; QU, XINHUA; Yu, Zhifeng

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, loading activities result in microdamage in the living skeleton, which is repaired by bone remodeling. However, microdamage accumulation can affect the mechanical properties of bone and increase the risk of fracture. This study aimed to determine the effect of microdamage on the mechanical properties and composition of bone. Fourteen male goats aged 28 months were used in the present study. Cortical bone screws were placed in the tibiae to induce microdamage around th...

  15. PMMA-based composite materials with reactive ceramic fillers: IV. Radiopacifying particles embedded in PMMA beads for acrylic bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, M; Casaubieilh, L; Morvan, F; Fontanille, M; Duguet, E

    2000-01-01

    New acrylic bone cements were prepared from alumina particles previously treated by 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (gamma-MPS) and embedded in poly(methylmethacrylate-co-ethylacrylate) beads with about 7 mol% of ethyl acrylate repeating units. The encapsulation was performed through a conventional suspension polymerization process. The influence of (i) the concentration of the dispersion stabilizer and (ii) the alumina content upon the shape, size, and size distribution of the acrylic beads was studied. Cements were prepared from each batch by hand-mixing alumina-filled acrylic beads with a liquid monomer mixture containing methyl methacrylate, n-butyl methacrylate, and N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine. Benzoyl peroxide was previously added to the solid part. The powder-to-liquid ratio was equal to 2 for each formulation. Compressive strength of cured cement decreases with alumina content, whereas compressive modulus remains roughly constant. These results are in contradiction to those obtained for cements based on a mixture of gamma-MPS-treated alumina and unfilled acrylic beads. Nevertheless, they are interpreted in terms of alumina arrangement in the cement. In the first case, alumina particles contribute to the reinforcement of the dispersed acrylic phase, with poor benefits for the whole materials. In the second case, they allow the reinforcement of the continuous acrylic phase and, therefore, the cement's one. PMID:11074433

  16. Changes in bone mineral density, lean body mass and fat content as measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in patients with prostate cancer without apparent bone metastases given androgen deprivation therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    ANGELI, Alberto; Dogliotti, Luigi; Fontana, Dario; ISAIA, Giovanni Carlo; REIMONDO, Giuseppe Matteo; Berruti, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: We characterize the consequences of androgen deprivation therapy on body composition in elderly men. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry instrument, we determined the changes in bone mineral density, bone mineral content, fat body mass and lean body mass in 35 patients with prostate cancer without bone metastases who received luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue for 12 months. RESULTS: At baseline conditions 46% of cases were classified as osteop...

  17. Age-related changes in the plasticity and toughness of human cortical bone at multiple length-scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Bale, Hrishikesh; Barth, Holly D.; Tang, Simon Y.; Reichert, Peter; Busse, Bjoern; Alliston, Tamara; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-08-10

    The structure of human cortical bone evolves over multiple length-scales from its basic constituents of collagen and hydroxyapatite at the nanoscale to osteonal structures at nearmillimeter dimensions, which all provide the basis for its mechanical properties. To resist fracture, bone’s toughness is derived intrinsically through plasticity (e.g., fibrillar sliding) at structural-scales typically below a micron and extrinsically (i.e., during crack growth) through mechanisms (e.g., crack deflection/bridging) generated at larger structural-scales. Biological factors such as aging lead to a markedly increased fracture risk, which is often associated with an age-related loss in bone mass (bone quantity). However, we find that age-related structural changes can significantly degrade the fracture resistance (bone quality) over multiple lengthscales. Using in situ small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction to characterize sub-micron structural changes and synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and in situ fracture-toughness measurements in the scanning electron microscope to characterize effects at micron-scales, we show how these age-related structural changes at differing size-scales degrade both the intrinsic and extrinsic toughness of bone. Specifically, we attribute the loss in toughness to increased non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking which suppresses plasticity at nanoscale dimensions and to an increased osteonal density which limits the potency of crack-bridging mechanisms at micron-scales. The link between these processes is that the increased stiffness of the cross-linked collagen requires energy to be absorbed by “plastic” deformation at higher structural levels, which occurs by the process of microcracking.

  18. Fat Composition Changes in Bone Marrow During Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify changes in bone marrow fat fraction and determine associations with peripheral blood cell counts. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, 19 patients received either highly myelotoxic treatment (radiation therapy plus cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil mitomycin C [FU/MMC], or cisplatin/5-FU/cetuximab) or less myelotoxic treatment (capecitabine-radiation therapy or no concurrent chemotherapy). Patients underwent MR imaging and venipuncture at baseline, midtreatment, and posttreatment visits. We performed mixed effects modeling of the mean proton density fat fraction (PDFF[%]) by linear time, treatment, and vertebral column region (lumbar [L]4-sacral [S]2 vs thoracic [T]10-L3 vs cervical[C]3-T9), while controlling for cumulative mean dose and other confounders. Spearman rank correlations were performed by white blood cell (WBC) counts versus the differences in PDFF(%) before and after treatment. Results: Cumulative mean dose was associated with a 0.43% per Gy (P=.004) increase in PDFF(%). In the highly myelotoxic group, we observed significant changes in PDFF(%) per visit within L4-S2 (10.1%, P<.001) and within T10-L3 (3.93%, P=.01), relative to the reference C3-T9. In the less myelotoxic group, we did not observe significant changes in PDFF(%) per visit according to region. Within L4-S2, we observed a significant difference between treatment groups in the change in PDFF(%) per visit (5.36%, P=.04). Rank correlations of the inverse log differences in WBC versus the differences in PDFF(%) overall and within T10-S2 ranged from 0.69 to 0.78 (P<.05). Rank correlations of the inverse log differences in absolute neutrophil counts versus the differences in PDFF(%) overall and within L4-S2 ranged from 0.79 to 0.81 (P<.05). Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging fat quantification is sensitive to marrow composition changes that result from chemoradiation therapy. These changes are associated with peripheral blood cell counts. This study supports a rationale for bone marrow-sparing treatment planning to reduce the risk of hematologic toxicity

  19. Bone marrow-derived osteoclast-like cells from a patient with craniometaphyseal dysplasia lack expression of osteoclast-reactive vacuolar proton pump.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, T; Kurihara, N.; Yamaoka, K.; Ozono, K; Okada, M.; Yamamoto, K; Matsumoto, S; Michigami, T.; Ono, J.; S. Okada

    1993-01-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare craniotubular bone dysplasia transmitted in autosomal dominant or recessive form. This disease is characterized by cranial bone hyperostosis and deformity of the metaphyses of the long bones. Using osteoclast-like cells formed from patient bone marrow cells, we investigated the pathophysiology of CMD in a 3-yr-old patient. Untreated bone marrow cells from the patient differentiated into osteoclast-like cells in vitro. These cells were shown to have ...

  20. The relationship of biochemical markers of bone turnover to bone density changes in postmenopausal women: results from the Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions (PEPI) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R; Holloway, L; Wells, B; Greendale, G; James, M K; Wasilauskas, C; Kelaghan, J

    1999-09-01

    We assessed the associations of eight bone turnover markers (BTMs) with baseline and 1-year percentage changes in lumbar spine and hip bone mineral density (BMD) of 293 postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or placebo using squared correlation coefficients (R2). In 239 women assigned to treatment with estrogen alone or with with estrogen plus progestins (active treatment), mean percentage changes for all markers decreased significantly and remained below baseline values through 3 years of study, whereas mean percentage changes for 54 women assigned to the placebo group showed no significant change from baseline in any marker. At baseline, age and body mass index (BMI) together accounted for 16% and 25% of the variance in spine and hip BMD, respectively. The telopeptide resorption marker, cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX), alone accounted for 12% and 8% of variance, respectively. Another telopeptide, carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (Crosslaps), accounted for 8% and 7% of variance, respectively. A bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP-2) accounted for 8% of variance at the spine and 5% at the hip. No other marker accounted for more than 5% of total variance at either site; adding either baseline NTX, Crosslaps, or BAP-2 to regressions containing age and BMI increased R2 values at the spine and hip to about 22% and 28%, respectively. In the placebo group, baseline spine BMD accounted for 4% of the variance in 1-year spine BMD percentage change, whereas baseline values for age and BMI accounted for 1% and 0% of the variance, respectively; none of the three accounted for more than 0% of hip BMD percentage change; Crosslaps and NTX contributed 5% and 4% to the variance in 1-year spine BMD percentage change, but other markers accounted for < 2% of variance at the spine. At the hip, another BALP (BALP-1) accounted for 4% of variance, but no other baseline marker except NTX accounted for more than 1% of variance. In the active treatment group, baseline values for age, BMI, and spine BMD together accounted for 13% of the percentage change in spine BMD and for 4% of the BMD change at the hip. No individual or pair of baseline markers significantly enhanced these R2 values, but addition of 1-year percentage changes in some individual markers did significantly increase it. The largest R2 value was obtained by adding the percentage change in BALP-2, which increased the R2 in spine BMD percentage change to 20% and that at the hip to 8%. Adding baseline and change variables for all eight markers to the regression increased R2 to 28% at the spine and 12% at the hip. Restricting the set of analyses to individuals who suppressed marker activity beyond the precision error for the measurement did not improve R2s for the regressions. When baseline marker values were stratified into quartiles, only NTX and osteocalcin showed significant relationships between quartile and change in spine BMD, and these did not reach significance at the hip. When the 1-year change in markers was stratified into quartiles, significant relationships with percentage change in spine BMD were observed only for BALP phosphatases. We conclude that BTMs are not a surrogate for BMD to identify women with low bone mass and that they offer little useful information for predicting BMD changes for individual untreated or HRT-treated postmenopausal women. PMID:10469288

  1. A radiographic evaluation of progressive loading on crestal and bone density changes around single osseointegrated implants in the posterior maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ommati Shabestari Gh.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to determine the effectiveness of progressive loading procedures on preserving crestal bone height and improving peri-implant bone density around maxillary implants restored with single crowns by an accurate longitudinal radiographic assessment technique. "n "n "nMaterials and Methods: Eleven Micro-Thread Osseo Speed dental implants were placed in 11 subjects and permitted to heal for 6 weeks before surgical uncovering. Following an 8-week healing period, implants underwent a progressive loading protocol by increasing the height of the occlusal table in increments from adding acrylic resin to an acrylic crown. The progressively loaded crowns were placed in 2 mm infraocclusion for the first 2 months, light occlusion for the second 2 months, and full occlusion for the third 2 months. At forth 2 months, a metal ceramic crown replaced the acrylic crown. Digital radiographs of each implant were made at the time of restoration, then after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 months of function. Digital image analysis was done to measure changes in crestal bone height and peri-implant bone density. "n "n "nResults: The mean values of crestal bone loss at 12 months were 0.11 ± 0.19 mm, and when tested with Friedman across the time periods, the differences were not statistically significant (p> 0.05. The mean values of bone density in the crestal, middle, and apical area were tested with Repeated Measure ANOVA across the time periods, the differences were statistically significant (p<0.05. "n "n "nConclusion: Progressive loading doesn’t cause crestal bone loss. The peri-implant density measurements of the progressively loaded implants show continuous increase in crestal, middle and apical peri-implant bone density by time. "n 

  2. Age-related changes in vertebral and iliac crest 3D bone microstructure-differences and similarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Jensen, Michael Vinkel

    2015-01-01

    Age-related changes of vertebra and iliac crest 3D microstructure were investigated, and we showed that they were in general similar. The 95th percentile of vertebral trabecular thickness distribution increased with age for women. Surprisingly, vertebral and iliac crest bone microstructure was only weakly correlated (r?=?0.38 to 0.75), despite the overall similar age-related changes. INTRODUCTION: The purposes of the study were to determine the age-related changes in iliac and vertebral bone microstructure for women and men over a large age range and to investigate the relationship between the bone microstructure at these skeletal sites. METHODS: Matched sets of transiliac crest bone biopsies and lumbar vertebral body (L2) specimens from 41 women (19-96 years) and 39 men (23-95 years) were micro-computed tomography (?CT) scanned, and the 3D microstructure was quantified. RESULTS: For both women and men, bone volume per total volume (BV/TV), connectivity density (CD), and trabecular number (Tb.N) decreased significantly, while structure model index (SMI) and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) increased significantly with age at either skeletal site. Vertebral trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) was independent of age for both women and men, while iliac Tb.Th decreased significantly with age for men, but not for women. In general, the vertebral and iliac age-related changes were similar. The 95th percentile of the Tb.Th distribution increased significantly with age for women but was independent of age for men at the vertebral body, while it was independent of age for either sex at the iliac crest. The Tb.Th probability density functions at the two skeletal sites became significantly more similar with age for women, but not for men. The microstructural parameters at the iliac crest and the vertebral bodies were only moderately correlated from r?=?0.38 for SMI in women to r?=?0.75 for Tb.Sp in men. CONCLUSION: Age-related changes in vertebral and iliac bone microstructure were in general similar. The iliac and vertebral Tb.Th distributions became more similar with age for women. Despite the overall similar age-related changes in trabecular bone microstructure, the vertebral and iliac bone microstructural measures were only weakly correlated (r?=?0.38 to 0.75).

  3. Early bone changes after incorporation of low quantities of alpha emitters in male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work shows the early effects of cancergenic doses of alpha emitters in long bones of rats. The investigations were based on radiographic, morphologic, angiographic, histologic and electronmicroscopic methods. A special method for bone angiography in the rat was elaborated and a new method was developed for measurement of the femur neck-head angle. Numerous disturbances in bone growth and bone structure, in the blood supply of bone and also of the bone building cells were observed. There was a correlation between the severity of the damage and the radiation dose, the spacial distribution of the nuclide and partially the age of the rats. The bone injury due to plutonium was markedly reduced by administration of the chelating agent Zn-DTPA. (orig.)

  4. Study of irradiated bone: Part III. /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate autoradiographic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The macroautoradiographic and microautoradiographic localization of /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate (/sup 99m/TcPPi) was studied in x-irradiated bone of rabbits up to one year post-irradiation. In cortical bone, /sup 99m/TcPPi was concentrated on bone surfaces near vasculature. Both forming and resorbing bone surfaces were comparably labeled at 2 hrs post-injection. Uptake on the surface of sites of haversian bone remodeling was observed to be at least part of the increased /sup 99m/TcPPi observed in irradiated bone in camera images. In irradiated trabecular bone 12 months following irradiation, a patchy decrease in /sup 99m/TcPPi uptake was correlated with localized decreases in vasculature

  5. Volumetric changes of the graft after maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss and autogenous bone in different ratios: a radiographic study in minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas; Schou, Søren; Svendsen, Patricia A; Forman, Julie Lyng; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen G; Terheyden, Hendrik; Holmstrup, Palle

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to learn about the volumetric changes of the graft after maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss and autogenous bone from the iliac crest or the mandible in different ratios in minipigs. Material and methods: Bilateral maxillary sinus floor augmentation was performed in 40 minipigs with: (A) 100% autogenous bone, (B) 75% autogenous bone and 25% Bio-Oss, (C) 50% autogenous bone and 50% Bio-Oss, (D) 25% autogenous bone and 75% Bio-Oss, and ...

  6. Reactivity changes in hybrid thermal-fast reactor systems during fast core flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new space-dependent kinetic model in adiabatic approximation with local feedback reactivity parameters for reactivity determination in the coupled systems is proposed in this thesis. It is applied in the accident calculation of the 'HERBE' fast-thermal reactor system and compared to usual point kinetics model with core-averaged parameters. Advantages of the new model - more realistic picture of the reactor kinetics and dynamics during local large reactivity perturbation, under the same heat transfer conditions, are underlined. Calculated reactivity parameters of the new model are verified in the experiments performed at the 'HERBE' coupled core. The model has shown that the 'HERBE' safety system can shutdown reactor safely and fast even in the case of highly set power trip and even under conditions of big partial failure of the reactor safety system (author)

  7. Mechanistic investigations on the etiology of Risperdal® Consta®-induced bone changes in female Wistar Hannover rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RISPERDAL® CONSTA® is a long-acting, intramuscular formulation of risperidone microspheres for the biweekly treatment of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. In a 24-month carcinogenicity study male and female Wistar Hannover rats received RISPERDAL® CONSTA® by intramuscular injection at dosages of 5 or 40 mg/kg once every 2 weeks. Bone changes described as “osteodystrophy” were observed by routine microscopic examination at 40 mg/kg in the sternum of female rats after 12 months, and in the sternum and stifle joint of both male and female rats after 24 months of treatment, respectively. To investigate the etiology of these bone changes, a 12-month mechanistic study was conducted in female Wistar Hannover rats at dosages of 5, 20 and 40 mg/kg once every 2 weeks. In addition to routine parameters, this study included bone markers, hormone measurements, and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) bone density measurements. It revealed a treatment-related reduction in metaphyseal trabecular bone density of the femur and tibia at 20 and 40 mg/kg, which was evident in the tibia from Week 13 of treatment onwards. There was no convincing evidence for any of the modes of action known to underlie trabecular bone loss in rats including renal, nutritional, or hepatic osteodystrophy, estrogen deficiency, hyperthyroidism or glucocorticoid excess. It is hypothetized that prolonged hyperprolactinemia accompanied by an increase in parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) levels and a slight hypoestrogenic state could have caused the reduced trabecular bone density in RISPERDAL® CONSTA®-treated rats. The relevance of this finding in terms of human risk is unknown.

  8. Mechanistic investigations on the etiology of Risperdal(®) Consta(®)-induced bone changes in female Wistar Hannover rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Eric J; Roosen, Wendy; Vinken, Petra; Vandenberghe, John; Sterkens, Patrick; Lammens, Lieve

    2012-09-28

    RISPERDAL(®) CONSTA(®) is a long-acting, intramuscular formulation of risperidone microspheres for the biweekly treatment of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. In a 24-month carcinogenicity study male and female Wistar Hannover rats received RISPERDAL(®) CONSTA(®) by intramuscular injection at dosages of 5 or 40 mg/kg once every 2 weeks. Bone changes described as "osteodystrophy" were observed by routine microscopic examination at 40 mg/kg in the sternum of female rats after 12 months, and in the sternum and stifle joint of both male and female rats after 24 months of treatment, respectively. To investigate the etiology of these bone changes, a 12-month mechanistic study was conducted in female Wistar Hannover rats at dosages of 5, 20 and 40 mg/kg once every 2 weeks. In addition to routine parameters, this study included bone markers, hormone measurements, and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) bone density measurements. It revealed a treatment-related reduction in metaphyseal trabecular bone density of the femur and tibia at 20 and 40 mg/kg, which was evident in the tibia from Week 13 of treatment onwards. There was no convincing evidence for any of the modes of action known to underlie trabecular bone loss in rats including renal, nutritional, or hepatic osteodystrophy, estrogen deficiency, hyperthyroidism or glucocorticoid excess. It is hypothetized that prolonged hyperprolactinemia accompanied by an increase in parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) levels and a slight hypoestrogenic state could have caused the reduced trabecular bone density in RISPERDAL(®) CONSTA(®)-treated rats. The relevance of this finding in terms of human risk is unknown. PMID:22595365

  9. Fluctuations in [(11)C]SB207145 PET Binding Associated with Change in Threat-Related Amygdala Reactivity in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick MacDonald; Haahr, Mette Ewers

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin critically affects the neural processing of emotionally salient stimuli, including indices of threat, but how alterations in serotonin signaling contribute to changes in brain function is not well understood. Recently, we showed in a placebo-controlled study of 32 healthy males that brain serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT4) binding, assessed with [(11)C]SB207145 PET, was sensitive to a three-week intervention with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, supporting it as an in vivo model for fluctuations in central serotonin levels. Participants also underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a gender discrimination task of fearful, angry and neutral faces. This offered a unique opportunity to evaluate whether individual fluctuations in central serotonin levels, indexed by change in [(11)C]SB207145 binding, predicted changes in threat-related reactivity (i.e., fear & angry versus neutral faces) within a corticolimbic circuit including the amygdala and medial prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex. We observed a significant association such that decreased brain-wide [(11)C]SB207145 binding (i.e., increased brain serotonin levels) was associated with lower threat-related amygdala reactivity, whereas intervention group status did not predict change in corticolimbic reactivity. This suggests that in the healthy brain, inter-individual responses to pharmacologically induced and spontaneously occurring fluctuations in [(11)C]SB207145 binding, a putative marker of brain serotonin levels, affect amygdala reactivity to threat. Our finding also supports that change in brain [(11)C]SB207145 binding may be a relevant marker for evaluating neurobiological mechanisms underlying sensitivity to threat and serotonin signaling.

  10. Subchronic inhalation of coal dust particulate matter 10 changes bone mesostructure, mineral element levels and turnover markers in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Setiawan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to elucidate whether inhalation particulate matter 10 (PM10 of coal dust changes mesostructure, bone mineral elements, and turnover markers of rats. Methods: Thirty-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups; one non-inhaled group and three coal dust exposed groups (concentration 6.25, 12.5, and 25 mg/m3/h/day for 28 days. Femur mesostructure were analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Bone mineral elements was assayed by X-ray fluorescence. Osteocalcin and C-telopeptide of type I collagen were analyzed by ELISA. ANOVA test was used to analyze the difference level of all markers. Results: Mesostructure of non-inhaled rats presented rod like trabeculae with honey comb appearance and minimal hole. Disregular integrity of trabeculae and reduction of trabecular integrity, increasing porocity were found at coal dust exposed groups. The level of osteocalcin and C-telopeptide of type I collagen were significantly lower in coal dust exposed groups compared to control group. The levels of phosphorus and nickel were significantly lower in coal dust exposed groups compared to control group. Conclusion: The present study reported that sub-chronic inhalation of coal dust PM10 changes bone mesostructure, phosporus and nickel levels in bone, and bone turnover markers of rats’ femur. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(2.000: 153-158

  11. Early changes in vascular reactivity in response to 56Fe irradiation in ApoE-/- mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. Roger; Yu, Tao; Gupta, Kiran; Babitz, Stephen K.; Black, Leland L.; Kabarowski, Janusz H.; Kucik, Dennis F.

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have established that radiation from a number of terrestrial sources increases the risk of atherosclerosis. The accelerated heavy ions in the galacto-cosmic radiation (GCR) that astronauts will encounter on in space, however, interact very differently with tissues than most types of terrestrial radiation, so the health consequences of exposure on deep-space missions are not clear. We demonstrated earlier that 56Fe, an important component of cosmic radiation, accelerates atherosclerotic plaque development. In the present study, we examined an earlier, pro-atherogenic event that might be predictive of later atherosclerotic disease. Decreased endothelium-dependent vasodilation is a prominent manifestation of vascular dysfunction that is thought to predispose humans to the development of structural vascular changes that precede the development of atherosclerotic plaques. To test the effect of heavy-ion radiation on endothelium-dependent vasodilation, we used the same ApoE-/- mouse model in which we previously demonstrated the pro-atherogenic effect of 56Fe on plaque development. Ten week old male ApoE mice (an age at which there is little atherosclerotic plaque in the descending aorta) were exposed to 2.6 Gy 56Fe. The mice were then fed a normal diet and housed under standard conditions. At 4-5 weeks post-irradiation, aortic rings were isolated and endothelial-dependent relaxation was measured. Relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly impaired in irradiated mice compared to age-matched, un-irradiated mice. This decrease in vascular reactivity following 56Fe irradiation occurred eight weeks prior to the development of statistically significant exacerbation of aortic plaque formation and may contribute to the formation of later atherosclerotic lesions.

  12. Evaluation of radiographic and metabolic changes in bone metastases in response to systemic therapy with 18FDG-PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunalp Bengul

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate radiographic and metabolic changes in bone metastases in response to systemic therapy with 18FDG-PET/CT and determine their roles on the evaluation of therapy response.

  13. Changes in bone marrow populations after whole-body exposure to different forms of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiation exposure can occur in occupational settings or as the result of nuclear accidents. More recently, terrorist threats of 'dirty bombs' have raised public concern over environmental exposure. The consequences include increased risk for cancer and infectious diseases. However, genetic background can be a major factor in the outcome. The goal of this study was to compare the effects of radiations of differing quality [gamma-rays, protons, protons with aluminum shield, and iron (Fe)], up to a maximum dose of 3 gray (Gy), on two mouse strains (CBA/Ca and C57BL/6) that differ greatly in genetic makeup. Overall bone marrow cellularity, lymphoid cells, and stem cells expressing markers associated with hematopoietic regeneration were quantified at 24 hr and 30 days post-irradiation. At 24 hr, radiation dose-dependent decreases in bone marrow cellularity were evident in both strains of mice under all radiation conditions. However, lymphoid cell susceptibility tended to be greater in C57BL/6 than in CBA/Ca mice. In both strains, the greatest reductions were observed with Fe ions. At this early time, the percentages of stem cells expressing CD34, Ly-6A/E, or both markers increased with increasing dose in all irradiated groups, the only exception being CBA mice exposed to gamma-rays. By 30 days post-exposure, lymphoid cell numbers in all irradiated CBA/Ca, but not C57BL/6, mice were 11% to 160% above normal. In addition, irradiated CBA/Ca animals had high percentages of CD34+ cells, while proportions of Ly-6A/E+ cells were low; in the C57BL/6 strain, these measurements were similar to normal. Overall, these findings indicate that the susceptibility of bone marrow cells is dependent not only on radiation dose, but also on radiation quality and genetic background. In progress studies suggest that cytokines may play a role in the observed cell population changes, and perhaps also in radiation-induced genomic instability, a condition associated with cancer

  14. MRI signal changes in the skull base bone after endoscopic nasopharyngectomy for recurrent NPC: A serial study of 9 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was focused on the serial changes in magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the skull-base bone that occur after endoscopic nasopharyngectomy in patients with local recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (rNPC). Materials and methods: Nine patients with histologically proven rNPC were enrolled in this study. Two experienced radiologists independently reviewed all presurgical and postsurgical MR images for each patient. Results: At 36 sites on the skull base, the MRI signal underwent a change after surgery, which took the form of a heterogeneous pattern of hypointense regions with moderate contrast enhancement on T1WI. The onset of changes ranged between 2 weeks and 3 months after surgery. For 21 of the sites, the changes subsided over the course of follow-up, while in 6 they remained stable. At 9 sites, the alteration MRI signal became more pronounced with time. Changes were more common on the homolateral side of the skull base with respect to the recurrent tumor (P < 0.05). The skull-base bone adjacent to the resection boundary had a higher incidence of signal change than nonadjacent areas (P < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI changes in the skull base bone, having a number of distinguishing characteristics, appear to be a common sequel to endoscopic nasopharyngectomy for rNPC

  15. Changes in reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1? levels in missed abortion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Li-Jun; Chen, Ya-Ping; Chen, Bing-Jin; Mei, Xiao-Hui

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate changes in the expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) in the trophoblasts of patients who had experienced missed abortions. The missed abortion group included 28 patients with missed abortions. The control group was comprised of 35 women who had elected to undergo surgically induced abortion in their first trimester, and whose embryos were confirmed to be alive before surgery. No ...

  16. Reactive automata

    OpenAIRE

    Crochemore, Maxime; Gabbay, Dov M.

    2011-01-01

    A reactive automaton has extra links whose role is to change the behaviour of the automaton. We show that these links do not increase the expressiveness of finite automata but that they can be used to reduce dramatically their state number both in the deterministic case and the non-deterministic case. Typical examples of regular expressions associated with deterministic automata of ex- ponential size according to the length of the expression show that reactive links provide an ...

  17. Clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells at the early stage of T cell development in thymus of radiation bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential appearance of T cell subpopulations occurs in the thymocytes of irradiated C3H/He mice (H-2k, Mls-1b2a, Thy-1.2) after transplantation with bone marrow cells of AKR/J mice (H-2k, Mls-1a2b, Thy-1.1) (AKR----C3H chimeras). The donor-derived thymocytes of AKR----C3H chimeras on day 14 after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) contained a large number of blastlike CD4+CD8+ cells which represent relatively immature thymocytes, whereas those on day 21 after BMT consisted of small sized CD4+,CD8+ cells which represent a great part in normal thymocytes. To define the developmental stage at which clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells occurs in adult thymus, we followed the fate of V beta 6- or V beta 11-bearing T cells in the donor-derived thymocytes at the early stage of AKR----C3H chimeras. Mature thymocytes expressing high intensity of V beta 6 or V beta 11, which are involved in recognition of Mls-1a or MHC I-E gene products, respectively, were deleted from the donor-derived thymocytes on day 21. Immature thymocytes expressing low intensity of V beta 6 in CD3low thymocyte fraction decreased in proportion, whereas those expressing low intensity of V beta 11 rather increased in proportion in the donor-derived thymocytes of AKR----C3H chimeras from day 14 to day 21 after BMT. These results suggest that the clonal deletion of V beta 6-positive cells occurs just at the stage of immature CD3lowCD4+CD8+ cells, whereas the clonal deletion of V beta 11-positive cells may begin at the transitional stage from CD3lowCD4+CD8+ cells to CD3high single positive cells. Timing of negative selection of thymocytes may vary in distinct T cells capable of recognizing different self-Ag

  18. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors...

  19. Traumatic changes of the base of skull and facial bones in computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During emergency CT examination, impression fractures of the skull, fractures of the base or of facial bones may be diagnosed in addition to possible traumatic intracranial manifestations. If the fractures extend to the base of the skull or to the facial bones, a possible involvement of foraminae, orbitae or nasal sinuses may be recognized. The extent of dislocation of loose bone fragments may be visualized without special conventional X-rays. (orig.)

  20. Changes in 3-dimensional bone structure indices in hypoparathyroid patients treated with PTH(1-84)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikjaer, Tanja; Rejnmark, Lars; Tietze, Anna; Andersen, Gratien; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Brüel, Annemarie; Mosekilde, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism (hypoPT) is characterized by a state of low bone turnover and high bone mineral density (BMD) despite conventional treatment with calcium supplements and active vitamin D analogues. To assess effects of PTH substitution therapy on 3-dimensional bone structure, we randomized 62 patients with hypoPT into 24 weeks of treatment with either PTH(1-84) 100?µg/day subcutaneously or similar placebo as an add-on therapy. Micro-computed tomography was performed on 44 iliac crest bone bio...

  1. Pathological changes after bone marrow and skin allograft transplantation in rats inflicted with severe combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow and skin allografts from the same donor were transplanted to rats inflicted with 8 Gy ?-radiation combined with third degree burns of 15% body surface area within 6 hr post injury. Pathological changes of hematopoietic tissues and skin allografts were studied. All injured controls died within 7 days post injury without bone marrow regeneration; 50% of treated rats survived with living skin allografts on 50th day post injury. On days 100 and 480 post operation, grafted skin still survived well on recipients with normal ultrastructure. Epidermic cells of skin allografts proliferated on day 5, developed and repaired on day 10. Histological structure of the skin returned to normal on day 30 post operation. The regeneration of bone marrow appeared on 5th day, increased markedly on day 10, and almost completed on day 15 after bone marrow transplantation. However, the regeneration of lymphocytes in cortex of spleen and lymph nodes did not appear until day 15 of BMT. The results show that bone marrow and skin allograft transplantation at early time post injury in most severe combined radiation-burn injury have tremendous beneficial effects, and the skin allograft can survive for a long time

  2. Evaluation of MR spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted MRI in detecting bone marrow changes in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To prospectively investigate the role of MR spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in assessing vertebral marrow changes in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Materials and methods: Seventy-eight postmenopausal women (mean age 63.7 ± 3.5 years; range 55-81 years), who underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry of the spine, were divided into three bone density groups (24 with normal, 25 with osteopaenic, and 29 with osteoporotic) based on T score. Both MRS and DWI of the L3 vertebral body were performed to calculate the marrow fat content and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The results were compared between three groups and correlated with BMD. Results: Vertebral marrow fat content was significantly increased in the osteoporotic group (59.97 ± 5.78%), when compared with that of the osteopaenic group (53.04 ± 7.66%, p = 0.001) and the normal bone density group (48.79 ± 7.1%, p -3 mm2/s, 0.41 ± 0.02 x 10-3 mm2/s, and 0.47 ± 0.03 x 10-3 mm2/s, respectively, with statistically significant difference (P < 0.001). A statistically significant positive correlation between T scores and ADC existed (r = 0.835, p < 0.001). The vertebral marrow fat content was negatively correlated to the bone density (r = -0.639, p < 0.001) and to marrow ADC (r = -0.554, p < 0.001). Conclusion: The postmenopausal women with osteoporosis exhibited a corresponding increase in vertebral marrow fat content as the bone density decreased. Marrow fat content and ADC were related to the bone density. MRS and DWI are helpful in evaluating the bone marrow changes in postmenopausal women.

  3. Investigation of reactivity changes due to flooding the irradiation sites of the MNSR reactor using the MCNP code and comparison with experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Shirani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the Isfahan Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR has been simulated using the MCNP code, and reactivity worth of flooding the inner irradiation sites of this reactor in an accident has been calculated. Also, by inserting polyethylene capsules containing water inside the inner irradiation sites, reactivity changes of this reactor in same such accident have been measured, the results of which are in good agreements with the calculated results. In this work, the reactivity worth due to flooding one inner irradiation site is 0.53mk , and reactivity worth due to flooding of the whole 5 inner irradiation sites is 2.61 mk.

  4. Changes of lymphocyte subsets in leukemia patients who received allogenic bone marrow transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatsuda,Mitsumoto

    1991-08-01

    Full Text Available Proportional changes of lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood were monitored by two-color flow-cytometry in seven leukemia patients who had received allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Lymphocyte counts, and proportions of T and B-cells returned to normal ranges between the 2nd and 12th months after BMT. Activated T-cells prominently increased after BMT, and the values gradually returned toward normal. As to lymphocyte subsets, the proportions of CD 4+ cells had remained low, while those of CD 8+ cells high for a whole observation period after BMT. The changes of CD 4+ cells were caused by the decrease of suppressor-inducer T-cells (CD 4+ Leu 8+. High proportion of CD 8+ cells was mainly associated with increased suppressor T-cells (CD 8+ CD 11+. Among natural killer (NK cells, highly active NK cells (CD 16+ CD 57- markedly increased shortly after BMT, and gradually returned to normal. CD 16 -CD 57+ NK cells increased beyond normal ranges after the 2nd month. The incidence or degree of acute and chronic graft-versus-host diseases (GVHD did not correlate with the changes of any lymphocyte subsets. The present results suggest that the increase of activated T-cells shortly after BMT reflects lymphocyte reconstitution. The prolonged immune deficiency after BMT might be related to either deficient expression of homing receptor (Leu 8 antigen on CD 4+ cells or increased suppressor T-cells (CD 8+ CD 11+. In addition, the early increase of NK cells after BMT may compensate for the immune deficiency in BMT patients.

  5. Bone and hormonal changes induced by skeletal unloading in the mature male rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehority, W.; Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Curren, T.; Kostenuik, P. J.; Wronski, T. J.; Shen, Y.; Rabkin, B.; Bouraoui, A.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1999-01-01

    To determine whether the rat hindlimb elevation model can be used to study the effects of spaceflight and loss of gravitational loading on bone in the adult animal, and to examine the effects of age on bone responsiveness to mechanical loading, we studied 6-mo-old rats subjected to hindlimb elevation for up to 5 wk. Loss of weight bearing in the adult induced a mild hypercalcemia, diminished serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, decreased vertebral bone mass, and blunted the otherwise normal increase in femoral mass associated with bone maturation. Unloading decreased osteoblast numbers and reduced periosteal and cancellous bone formation but had no effect on bone resorption. Mineralizing surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate decreased during unloading. Our results demonstrate the utility of the adult rat hindlimb elevation model as a means of simulating the loss of gravitational loading on the skeleton, and they show that the effects of nonweight bearing are prolonged and have a greater relative effect on bone formation in the adult than in the young growing animal.

  6. Changes in sample reactivity and catalyst deactivation during early stages of the hydrocracking of a coal extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begon, V.; Megaritis, A.; Lazaro, M.-J.; Herod, A.A.; Dugwell, D.R.; Kandiyoti, R. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology

    1998-10-01

    Changes in sample reactivity and catalyst deactivation during the early stages of the hydrocracking of coal liquefaction extracts, using presulphided supported NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a dispersed Mo catalyst, have been investigated. The characterisation of the liquefaction extract and the hydrocracking products has been made using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), UV-fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-F), matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI-ms) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). A complex sequence of events has been resolved involving the simultaneous development of catalyst activity with parallel deactivation due to carbon deposition alongside thermal cracking of the extract. The balance of evidence suggests that the sharp reduction in the rate of reaction early in the hydrocracking process reported in earlier work is primarily caused by loss of sample reactivity. 31 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Changes in bone mineral density 10 years after marked reduction of cadmium exposure in a Chinese population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main focus of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of Cd on forearm bone mineral density after the cessation of the ingestion of Cd-polluted rice. A total of 458 persons (294 women, 164 men) from three Cd exposure areas (low, moderately, and heavy) participated in this study. Those living in the moderate and heavy exposure areas ceased ingesting Cd-polluted rice (0.51 and 3.7 mg/kg, respectively) in 1996 (10 years prior to present analysis). The participants completed a questionnaire and bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the proximal radius and ulna. The changes and change percentage in forearm bone density and the prevalence of osteoporosis between 1998 and 2006 were used as markers of bone recovery. The Cd concentrations in urine (UCd) and blood (BCd) in 1998 were used as Cd exposure markers. The values of the BMD change and change percentage of groups in which UCd was above 5 ?g/g creatinine (?g/g crea) and BCd was above 10 ?g/L were significantly higher than those of the low-exposure groups (in women, p0.05). The BMD change and change percentage correlated positively with the UCd and BCd (in women, p0.05). Analysis of the Z-score revealed that the prevalence of osteoporosis in 2006 was higher than that in 1998 and increased along with the level of UCd and BCd in both women and men, especially for those subjects with the higher BCd [BCd>5 ?g/L, OR=3.45 (0.95-13.6); BCd>10 ?g/L, OR=4.51(1.57-13.54)] and UCd [UCd>10 ?g/g crea, OR=4.74 (1.82-12.81)] in women. It is concluded that decreasing dietary cadmium exposure at the population level is not associated with bone recovery at the individual level, and the adverse bone effects of Cd exposure persisted after the main source of Cd exposure had been blocked, especially in women.

  8. Changes in bone mineral density 10 years after marked reduction of cadmium exposure in a Chinese population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiao [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Zhu, Guoying, E-mail: zhugy@shmu.edu.cn [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Jin, Taiyi [Department of Occupation Medicine, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umea University, Umea (Sweden); Akesson, Agneta [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Bergdahl, Ingvar A. [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umea University, Umea (Sweden); Lei, Lijian [Department of Occupation Medicine, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Weng, Shifang [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Liang, Yihuai [Department of Occupation Medicine, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umea University, Umea (Sweden)

    2009-10-15

    The main focus of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of Cd on forearm bone mineral density after the cessation of the ingestion of Cd-polluted rice. A total of 458 persons (294 women, 164 men) from three Cd exposure areas (low, moderately, and heavy) participated in this study. Those living in the moderate and heavy exposure areas ceased ingesting Cd-polluted rice (0.51 and 3.7 mg/kg, respectively) in 1996 (10 years prior to present analysis). The participants completed a questionnaire and bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the proximal radius and ulna. The changes and change percentage in forearm bone density and the prevalence of osteoporosis between 1998 and 2006 were used as markers of bone recovery. The Cd concentrations in urine (UCd) and blood (BCd) in 1998 were used as Cd exposure markers. The values of the BMD change and change percentage of groups in which UCd was above 5 {mu}g/g creatinine ({mu}g/g crea) and BCd was above 10 {mu}g/L were significantly higher than those of the low-exposure groups (in women, p<0.001; in men, p>0.05). The BMD change and change percentage correlated positively with the UCd and BCd (in women, p<0.01; in men, p>0.05). Analysis of the Z-score revealed that the prevalence of osteoporosis in 2006 was higher than that in 1998 and increased along with the level of UCd and BCd in both women and men, especially for those subjects with the higher BCd [BCd>5 {mu}g/L, OR=3.45 (0.95-13.6); BCd>10 {mu}g/L, OR=4.51(1.57-13.54)] and UCd [UCd>10 {mu}g/g crea, OR=4.74 (1.82-12.81)] in women. It is concluded that decreasing dietary cadmium exposure at the population level is not associated with bone recovery at the individual level, and the adverse bone effects of Cd exposure persisted after the main source of Cd exposure had been blocked, especially in women.

  9. Changes in Bone Mineral Density in Uterine Cervical Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the changes in bone mineral density (BMD) after pelvic radiation therapy in patients with uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Of 52 cervical cancer patients who received pelvic RT in our university hospital between 2009 and 2011, 46 patients without recurrence and who were followed up for more than 12 months were included in the study. The BMD of the irradiated region and nonirradiated regions, serum estradiol, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b, and N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of collagen 1 were measured before, at 3 months after, and at 12 months after RT. The patient cohort was divided into 2 groups according to estradiol level before RT, and the groups were defined as postmenopausal (2 before RT and 0.746 and 0.841 g/cm2 12 months after RT, respectively. Significant decreases were observed in both groups (P2 before RT and were significantly decreased to 0.706 and 0.921 g/cm2 12 months after RT (P<.01 and P<.05, respectively). Estradiol significantly decreased 3 months after RT, whereas tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b and N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of collagen 1 continued to increase over time in the premenopausal group. Conclusions: A decrease in BMD in the irradiated region after RT was observed within 1 year, regardless of menopausal status. Furthermore, in premenopausal patients, pelvic RT caused a decrease in systemic BMD

  10. Late bone marrow changes in Hodgkin's disease patients: a characterization with proton chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to measure, by quantitative chemical shift imaging (CSI), the late therapy-induced changes in bone marrow (BM) of Hodgkin's disease (HD) patients. Fifteen HD patients treated with radiotherapy alone and radiochemotherapy (age at treatment between 11 and 50 years; post-treatment interval between 15 and 127 months; applied dose 25.5 to 50 Gy), were studied with a 1.5 T MR imager. For the fat-water separation in-phase and opposed-phase (SE 1200/22) images were generated according to the Dixon method, with a modified post-processing. Long-term fatty replacement was seen in the irradiated BM only. The radiation fields were visualized as areas of high signal intensity in the T1-weighted images. There was a marked increase of the relative fat signal fraction in quantitative CSI without time, dose and age dependent recovery within the investigated ranges. Fatty replacement of the irradiated BM is a long-term effect in HD patients, probably induced by an obliteration of the microvasculature with consecutive fatty metaplasia. (orig.)

  11. Age-related changes in rat bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cell plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase P Bryant

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of adult stem cells is known to be compromised as a function of age. This therefore raises questions about the effectiveness of autologous cell therapy in elderly patients. Results We demonstrated that the expression profile of stemness markers was altered in BM-MSCs derived from old rats. BM-MSCs from young rats (4 months expressed Oct-4, Sox-2 and NANOG, but we failed to detect Sox-2 and NANOG in BM-MSCs from older animals (15 months. Chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic potential is compromised in old BM-MSCs. Stimulation with a cocktail mixture of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2, fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 induced cardiomyogenesis in young BM-MSCs but not old BM-MSCs. Significant differences in the expression of gap junction protein connexin-43 were observed between young and old BM-MSCs. Young and old BM-MSCs fused with neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes in co-culture and expressed key cardiac transcription factors and structural proteins. Cells from old animals expressed significantly lower levels of VEGF, IGF, EGF, and G-CSF. Significantly higher levels of DNA double strand break marker ?-H2AX and diminished levels of telomerase activity were observed in old BM-MSCs. Conclusion The results suggest age related differences in the differentiation capacity of BM-MSCs. These changes may affect the efficacy of BM-MSCs for use in stem cell therapy.

  12. MRI signal changes of the bone marrow in HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy: correlation with clinical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Ana I.; Tomas, Xavier; Pomes, Jaume; Amo, Montserrat del [Hospital Clinic, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Milinkovic, Ana; Perez, Inaki; Mallolas, Josep [IDIBAPS-Hospital Clinic, Department of Infectious Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Rios, Jose [Hospital Clinic, Department of Biostatistics, Barcelona (Spain); Vidal-Sicart, Sergi [Hospital Clinic, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    To assess the prevalence, imaging appearance, and clinical significance, of bone marrow MR signal changes in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy syndrome. Twenty-eight HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy syndrome treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy, and 12 HIV-negative controls underwent MRI of the legs. Whole-body MRI, SPECT/CT, and a complete radiographic skeletal survey were obtained in subjects with signal changes in bone marrow. MRI and clinical evaluations were reviewed 6 months after baseline to determine changes after switching from thymidine analogs (TA) to tenofovir-DF (TDF). MRI results correlated with clinical parameters. We observed foci of a serous-like pattern (low signal and no enhancement on T1-weighted, high signal on T2-weighted images) in 4 out of 28 patients (14.3%) and an intermediate signal on T1-weighted images in 4 out of 28 patients (14.3%). Serous-like lesions were located in the lower limbs and scattered in the talus, calcaneus, femurs, and humeral bones; they showed slight uptake on SPECT bone scans and were normal on CT and radiographs. Patients with serous-like lesions had significantly lower peripheral and total fat at baseline than other groups (P < 0.05). No changes at 6 months were observed on MRI, and the serous-like lesion group showed good peripheral fat recovery after changing drug treatment. A serous-like MRI pattern is observed in the peripheral skeletons of HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy, which correlates with peripheral lipoatrophy, and should not be misdiagnosed as malignant or infectious diseases. Although the MR lesions did not improve after switching the treatment, there was evidence of lipoatrophy recovery. (orig.)

  13. MRI signal changes of the bone marrow in HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy: correlation with clinical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the prevalence, imaging appearance, and clinical significance, of bone marrow MR signal changes in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy syndrome. Twenty-eight HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy syndrome treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy, and 12 HIV-negative controls underwent MRI of the legs. Whole-body MRI, SPECT/CT, and a complete radiographic skeletal survey were obtained in subjects with signal changes in bone marrow. MRI and clinical evaluations were reviewed 6 months after baseline to determine changes after switching from thymidine analogs (TA) to tenofovir-DF (TDF). MRI results correlated with clinical parameters. We observed foci of a serous-like pattern (low signal and no enhancement on T1-weighted, high signal on T2-weighted images) in 4 out of 28 patients (14.3%) and an intermediate signal on T1-weighted images in 4 out of 28 patients (14.3%). Serous-like lesions were located in the lower limbs and scattered in the talus, calcaneus, femurs, and humeral bones; they showed slight uptake on SPECT bone scans and were normal on CT and radiographs. Patients with serous-like lesions had significantly lower peripheral and total fat at baseline than other groups (P < 0.05). No changes at 6 months were observed on MRI, and the serous-like lesion group showed good peripheral fat recovery after changing drug treatment. A serous-like MRI pattern is observed in the peripheral skeletons of HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy, which correlates with peripheral lipoatrophy, and should not be misdiagnosed as malignant or infectious diseases. Although the MR lesions did not improve after switching the treatment, there was evidence of lipoatrophy recovery. (orig.)

  14. Benefits of omega-3 fatty acid against bone changes in salt-loaded rats: possible role of kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mona A; Abd El Samad, Abeer A

    2013-10-01

    There is evidence that dietary fats are important components contributing in bone health and that bone mineral density is inversely related to sodium intake. Salt loading is also known to impose negative effects on renal function. The present study aimed to determine the effect of the polyunsaturated fatty acid omega-3 on bone changes imposed by salt loading, highlighting the role of kidney as a potential mechanism involved in this effect. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group, salt-loaded group consuming 2% NaCl solution as drinking water for 8 weeks, and omega-3-treated salt-loaded group receiving 1 g/kg/day omega-3 by gavage with consumption of 2% NaCl solution for 8 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded. Plasma levels of sodium, potassium, calcium, inorganic phosphorus (Pi), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatinine, urea, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D3], and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-?1) were measured. The right tibia and kidney were removed for histologic examination and renal immunohistochemical analysis for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was performed. The results revealed that omega-3 reduced SBP, DBP, and MAP and plasma levels of sodium, potassium, Pi, creatinine, urea, and TGF-?1, but increased plasma levels of calcium, ALP, and 1,25(OH)2D3 as well as renal eNOS. Omega-3 increased cortical and trabecular bone thickness, decreased osteoclast number, and increased newly formed osteoid bone. Renal morphology was found preserved. In conclusion, omega-3 prevents the disturbed bone status imposed by salt loading. This osteoprotective effect is possibly mediated by attenuation of alterations in Ca(2+), Pi, and ALP, and improvement of renal function and arterial blood pressure. PMID:24303178

  15. WISE-2005: bed-rest induced changes in bone mineral density in women during 60 days simulated microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Gisela; Belavý, Daniel L; Sun, Lianwen; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Alexandre, Christian; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-10-01

    To better understand the effects of prolonged bed-rest in women, 24 healthy women aged 25 to 40 years participated in 60-days of strict 6° head-down tilt bed-rest (WISE-2005). Subjects were assigned to either a control group (CON, n=8) which performed no countermeasure, an exercise group (EXE, n=8) undertaking a combination of resistive and endurance training or a nutrition group (NUT, n=8), which received a high protein diet. Using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), bone mineral density (BMD) changes at various sites, body-composition and lower-leg and forearm muscle cross-sectional area were measured up to 1-year after bed-rest. Bone loss was greatest at the distal tibia and proximal femur, though losses in trabecular density at the distal radius were also seen. Some of these bone losses remained statistically significant one-year after bed-rest. There was no statistically significant impediment of bone loss by either countermeasure in comparison to the control-group. The exercise countermeasure did, however, reduce muscle cross-sectional area and lean mass loss in the lower-limb and also resulted in a greater loss of fat mass whereas the nutrition countermeasure had no impact on these parameters. The findings suggest that regional differences in bone loss occur in women during prolonged bed-rest with incomplete recovery of this loss one-year after bed-rest. The countermeasures as implemented were not optimal in preventing bone loss during bed-rest and further development is required. PMID:21723970

  16. A study on the change of bone mineral density (BMD) by life habit and physical condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the correlation between BMD and life habit such as drinking exercise smoking or physical condition such as age, sex, height, weight, body mass index (BMI). I evaluated the BMD of the femoral neck and L2-L4 spines of 321 persons who took a regular health screening in Woosuk university oriental medical hospital from February to April in 2006 by dual energy bone mineral densitometry. The age of persons ranged from 20 years to 75 years (mean 45.10 ± 11.54) and there were 160 males and 161 females. In males, BMD of the femoral head was highest at 2nd decade, BMD of the spine was highest at 4th decade, and BMD of both femoral head and lumbar spine was lowest at 6th decade. In fenales, BMD of both femoral head and lumbar spine was highest at 4th decade and lowest at 6th decade. Among the various physical conditions, only height of persons showed significant correlation with BMD in both males and females, BMD was increased according to increasing height. In males, BMD of persons who had habit such as drinking, exercise or smoking did not show significant change statistically. But in females, drinking group showed high BMD relative to non-drinking group in both femoral head and lumbar spine. BMD was different according to age, sex, height and life habit. Especially aged people showed osteoporotic change progressively. More persistent effort is needed to find out the factors decreasing BMD for prevention of problems by osteoporosis

  17. Pulmonary function changes in long-term survivors of bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to evaluate long-term pulmonary function changes in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT), to assess their clinical significance, and to identify factors influencing these changes. Methods and Materials: Pulmonary function tests (PFT) were evaluated before and after BMT in 111 adult patients undergoing BMT between 1985 and 1991. Forced expiratory volume at 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), diffusing capacity (DLCO), and total lung capacity (TLC) were evaluated. One hundred and three patients (92.8%) received total body irradiation (TBI) to a total dose of 14 Gy in nine equal fractions. The lung dose was restricted to 1, FVC, and TLC were lower than pre transplant values (p 1 did not fall significantly in patients without acute or chronic GVHD and recovered earlier than in patients without post transplant pulmonary infection. Recovery of FVC, TLC, and DLCO was also delayed in patients with acute and chronic GVHD and post transplant pulmonary infection. Multiple regression analysis revealed an association between a higher radiation dose to the lungs, and decreased FVC at 2 years (p = 0.01). Progressive obstructive pulmonary disease was not observed. Conclusions: An initial decline in PFTs with subsequent recovery was observed. Factors associated with delayed recovery and incomplete recovery of PFTs were GVHD, post transplant pulmonary infection, and higher radiation dose to the lungs. The conditioning regimen used at Medical College of Wisconsin, including relatively high TBI doses with partial transmission pulmonary shielding, appears to be well tolerated by the lungs in long-term survivors. No progressive decline in PFTs or symptomatic decline in pulmonary function was observed during the time interval studied

  18. Age dependent T2 changes of bone marrow in pediatric wrist MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperintensity of the bone marrow on fluid-sensitive sequences can be seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during childhood, even in the absence of bone pathology. They can be related to hematopoietic marrow, normal and abnormal bone remodeling. We sought to investigate whether hyper intensity of the bone marrow on MRI of the wrist is age-dependent and to evaluate if this signal follows a consistent age-related pattern. Thirty-one wrist 1.5 T MR images of children (7-18 years) without suspected bone pathology were evaluated for foci of hyperintense bone marrow seen on fluid-sensitive coronal sequences using a scale of 1-3. Correlation of frequency, location and intensity of these foci with age was obtained. Results were analyzed for distribution in single bones and in the following regions: distal forearm, first/second carpal rows, and metacarpal bases. A total of 448 bones were evaluated. Eighty-eight out of 448 (21 out of 31 wrists) showed hyperintense bone marrow seen on fluid-sensitive sequences. The distribution was: radius in 19, ulna in 19, first metacarpal base in 11, scaphoid in 9, lunate in 6, pisiform in 6, and fifth metacarpal base in 1. The involvement of the first and second carpal rows and the metacarpal bases was almost similar (13, 12, and 12 respectively). In the distal forearm, the intensity was similar to or higher than that in the wrist (2.2 vs. 2.0). Frequency decreased with age (100% at 7-9 and 25% at 16-18 years). Foci of hyperintense bone marrow seen on fluid-sensitive sequences can be seen on MRI of the wrist during childhood even without apparent symptoms. It shows a consistent pattern with maturation: frequency and intensity decrease and there is distal-to-proximal resolution. This may be a normal finding that may represent normal bone remodeling or decreasing hematopoietic marrow and should not be confused with pathological bone marrow edema. (orig.)

  19. Exhaustion-related changes in cardiovascular and cortisol reactivity to acute psychosocial stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Peter; Österberg, Kai; Wallergård, Mattias; Hansen, Åse Marie; Garde, Anne Helene; Johansson, Gerd; Karlson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Prior findings indicate that individuals scoring high on vital exhaustion show a dysfunctional stress response (DSR), that is, reduced cortisol reactivity and habituation to psychosocial stressors. The main aim of the present study was to examine whether a DSR may be a vulnerability factor in exhaustion disorder (ED). We examined whether a DSR is present during the early stages of ED, and still is present after recovery. Three groups were studied: 1. Former ED patients (n=14); 2. persons who dur...

  20. Changes in vascular reactivity and geometry of iliac artery in spontaneously hypertensive and hypertriglyceridemic rats.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    ?a?ányiová, S.; Cebová, M.; Kristek, F.; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Dobešová, Zdenka

    Fyziologický ústav AV ?R, v. v. i.. Ro?. 54, ?. 5 (2005), 53P-53P ISSN 0862-8408. [COST844 Meeting: The Role of Nitric Oxide in Cardiovascular System . 08.04.2005-10.04.2005, Bratislava] Grant ostatní: VEGA(SK) 2/3145/23 Keywords : vascular reactivity * geometry * iliac artery * SHR and HTG rat Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  1. Efficient integration of stiff kinetics with phase change detection for reactive reservoir processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Rode; Gerritsen, Margot G.; Thomsen, Per Grove; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2007-01-01

    We propose the use of implicit one-step Explicit Singly Diagonal Implicit Runge-Kutta (ESDIRK) methods for integration of the stiff kinetics in reactive, compositional and thermal processes that are solved using operator-splitting type approaches. To facilitate the algorithmic development we construct a virtual kinetic cell model. The model serves both as a tool for the development and testing of tailored solvers as well as a testbed for studying the interactions between chemical kinetics and ph...

  2. Semiautomated three-dimensional segmentation software to quantify carpal bone volume changes on wrist CT scans for arthritis assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Duryea, J.; Magalnick, M.; Alli, S.; Yao, L.; Wilson, M.; Goldbach-Mansky, R.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid progression of joint destruction is an indication of poor prognosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Computed tomography (CT) has the potential to serve as a gold standard for joint imaging since it provides high resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of bone structure. The authors have developed a method to quantify erosion volume changes on wrist CT scans. In this article they present a description and validation of the methodology using multiple scans of a hand phantom and fi...

  3. Late-onset persistent retinal microvascular changes after bone marrow transplantation: 3-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muccioli Cristina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe a case of persistent retinopathy after bone marrow transplantation in the absence of radiation therapy. Methods: Case Report. Results: A 42 year-old man developed bilateral visual loss 15 months after receiving a bone marrow transplant for acute leukemia. The patient was treated with a high dose of cyclosporin A and oral corticosteroids. No radiation therapy was given. Late-onset, multiple, bilateral cotton-wool spots developed 15 months after the bone marrow transplantation and still persist. After three years other cotton-wool spots arose in the absence of any immunosuppressive therapy. Conclusions: Bone marrow transplantation microvasculopathy of the retina may be related to certain combinations of chemotherapy drugs or immunosuppression itself and may persist in the absence of these immunosuppressive drugs.

  4. Reactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital reactivity meter, realized as an off-line Fortran program, the input to which is a record of 500 consecutive values of n(tsub(i)) obtained by on-line program on CDC 1700 from the linear power channel of the TRIGA reactor, has been tested at low powers at which the reactor fuel temperature feedback reactivity is negligible. Calibration of the meter by the regulating rod, the reactivity of which has been determined by the assymptotic reactor period, shows that the absolute error is below 1,6% for reactivities up to 1 $. The accuracy of the reactivity meter is proportional to the square of the product of the sampling interval and the period at which the neutron density changes. So the relative error of the reactivity remains at all operational states below 0.2% at 1 second sampling intervals and even at 3 seconds sampling it does not rises above 2.0%. The meter is useful for measurements of control rod drops into the reactor at sampling intervals of 0.1 sec. The meter sensitivity is 0.5 c/s at 1 sec sampling

  5. Effects of ethnicity and vitamin D supplementation on vitamin D status and changes in bone mineral content in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrams Steven A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effects on serum 25(OHD and bone mineralization of supplementation of breast-fed Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian infants with vitamin D in infants in Houston, Texas. Methods We measured cord serum 25(OHD levels, bone mineral content (BMC, bone mineral density (BMD and their changes over 3 months of life with 400 IU/day of vitamin D3 supplementation. Results Cord serum 25(OHD was significantly lower in Hispanic than non-Hispanic Caucasian infants (16.4 ± 6.5 ng/mL, n = 27, vs 22.3 ± 9.4 n = 22, p = 0.013. Among 38 infants who completed a 3 month vitamin D supplementation intervention, provision of 400 IU/day of vitamin D increased final 25(OHD to a higher level in non-Hispanic Caucasian compared to Hispanic infants. There was no significant relationship between cord serum 25(OHD and BMC or BMD in the first week of life (n = 49 or after 3 months of vitamin D supplementation. Conclusion Low cord 25(OHD levels are seen in Hispanic infants, but their functional significance is uncertain related to bone health in a southern US setting. Daily vitamin D intake of 400 IU during the first months of life appears adequate to increase serum 25(OHD and support BMC increases despite low initial 25(OHD levels in some infants. Trial Registration ClincalTrials.gov NCT00697294

  6. Diffusion in Bone Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    In order to prevent or modify the processes of bone degeneration the modeling and remodeling of bone tissue must be better understood. In this thesis it is assumed that the primary condition leading to bone growth is a change of the chemical environment caused by transport of matter resulting from stress driven diffusion. The change in the chemical environment may consist of changes in the concentration of different substances stimulating, for example, bone building osteoblast ...

  7. Changes in Bone Mineral Density in Uterine Cervical Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: syoshi@gunma-u.ac.jp; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohno, Tatsuya; Oike, Takahiro; Ohkubo, Yu; Ando, Ken; Sato, Hiro; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the changes in bone mineral density (BMD) after pelvic radiation therapy in patients with uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Of 52 cervical cancer patients who received pelvic RT in our university hospital between 2009 and 2011, 46 patients without recurrence and who were followed up for more than 12 months were included in the study. The BMD of the irradiated region and nonirradiated regions, serum estradiol, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b, and N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of collagen 1 were measured before, at 3 months after, and at 12 months after RT. The patient cohort was divided into 2 groups according to estradiol level before RT, and the groups were defined as postmenopausal (<40 pg/mL) and premenopausal (?40 pg/mL). Results: The mean BMDs within the irradiation field (lumbar vertebra 5) in the postmenopausal and the premenopausal groups were 0.825 and 0.910 g/cm{sup 2} before RT and 0.746 and 0.841 g/cm{sup 2} 12 months after RT, respectively. Significant decreases were observed in both groups (P<.05 and P<.01, respectively). In addition, in the premenopausal group the mean BMDs of the nonirradiated regions at thoracic vertebrae 9-12 and lumbar vertebrae 2-4 were 0.753 and 0.958 g/cm{sup 2} before RT and were significantly decreased to 0.706 and 0.921 g/cm{sup 2} 12 months after RT (P<.01 and P<.05, respectively). Estradiol significantly decreased 3 months after RT, whereas tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b and N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of collagen 1 continued to increase over time in the premenopausal group. Conclusions: A decrease in BMD in the irradiated region after RT was observed within 1 year, regardless of menopausal status. Furthermore, in premenopausal patients, pelvic RT caused a decrease in systemic BMD.

  8. Changes of pulmonary function in patients treated with bone marrow transplantation after total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes of pulmonary functions were studied with time in 10 patients who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after total body irradiation (TBI, total lung dose, 3 to 12 Gy; dose rate, 5.3 to 10.0 cGy/min). Regardless of the total lung dose and the dose rate of irradiation or the period after BMT, the percent vital capacity (%VC) and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1.0%) were kept within normal limits, whereas the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (%DLco) tended to decrease within 100 days after BMT in all of our patients. From the possibility that respiratory insufficiency will rapidly occur due to infection, it seems unfavorable for the patients to return to routine life during this period after BMT, even if in states without any clinical manifestations. It was found that the %DLco began to decrease prior to the onset of interstitial pneumonia (IP) and that the degree was more marked in patients who progressed to IP than in those who did not. Therefore, it is possible to predict the occurrence of IP by frequently measuring pulmonary function. In patients with IP, the %DLco rapidly improved with steroid administration, and it tended to improve gradually even after discontinuing the administration of the drug. But regardless of the total lung dose and dose rate of irradiation, the %DLco in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) did not recover completely when compared with that in patients without chronic GVHD. Thus, it is considered that this persistant pulmonary dysfunction is caused mainly by chronic GVHD rather than by irradiation. (author)

  9. BONE IN OSTEOPETROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteopetrosis, a generalized developmental bone disease due to genetic disturbances, characterized by failure of bone re sorption and continuous bone formation making the bone hard, dense and brittle. Bones of intramembranous ossification and enchondrial ossification are affected genetically and symmetrically. During the process of disease the excess bone formation obliterates the cranial foramina and presses the optic, auditory and facial nerves resulting in defective vision, impaired hearing and facial paralysis. The bone formation in osteopetrosis affects bone marrow function leading to severe anemia and deficient of blood cells. The bone devoid of blood supply due to compression of blood vessels by excess formation of bone are prone to osteomyelitic changes with suppuration and pathological fracture if exposed to infection. Though the condition is chronic progressive, it produces changes leading to fatal condition, it should be studied thoroughly by everyone and hence this article presents a classical case of osteopetrosis with detailed description and discussion for the benefit of readers

  10. Simulation of chemically reactive solute transport under conditions of changing temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical code, THCC, has been developed for simulation of multicomponent solute transport in saturated porous media with aqueous complexation and precipitation/dissolution of stable solid phases in the presence of variable temperature. THCC evolved from the isothermal code CHEMTRN and is capable of simulating the diffusion of solutes along a steady gradient of temperature and the mixing of fluids having different initial compositions and temperatures. Example calculations demonstrate the close coupling that can exist between temperature variations and the transport of chemically reactive solutes. This coupling can be an important consideration in the assessment of performance of nuclear waste repositories

  11. The role of estrogen in bone growth and formation: changes at puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Divya Singh1, Sabyasachi Sanyal2, Naibedya Chattopadhyay11Division of Endocrinology, 2Division of Drug Target Discovery and Development, Central Drug Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaAbstract: A high peak bone mass (PBM at skeletal maturity is a good predictor for lower rate of fracture risks in later life. Growth during puberty contributes significantly to PBM achievement in women and men. The growth hormone (GH/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 axis has a critical role in pubertal bone growth. There is an increase in GH and IGF-1 levels during puberty; thus, it is assumed that sex steroids contribute to higher GH/IGF-1 action during growth. Recent studies indicate that estrogen increases GH secretion in boys and girls, and the major effect of testosterone on GH secretion is via aromatization to estrogen. Estrogen is pivotal for epiphyseal fusion in young men and women. From studies of individuals with a mutated aromatase gene and a case study of male patient with defective estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-?, it is clear that estrogen is indispensable for normal pubertal growth and growth plate fusion. ER-? and estrogen receptor-beta (ER-? have been localized in growth plate and bone. ER knockout studies have shown that ER-?-/- female mice have reduced linear appendicular growth, while ER-?-/- mice have increased appendicular growth. No such effect is seen in ER-?-/- males; however, repressed growth is seen in ER-?-/- males, resulting in shorter long bones. Thus, ER-? represses longitudinal bone growth in female mice, while it has no function in the regulation of longitudinal bone growth in male mice. These findings indicate that estrogen plays a critical role in skeletal physiology of males as well as females.Keywords: peak bone mass, puberty, estrogen, growth plate

  12. CHANGES INDUCED BY SOME NUTRITIONAL FACTORS ON TIBIAL BONE STRUCTURE IN PIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABI DUMITRESCU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The problems approached by our team are represented by the involvement of different sources and levels of calcium, namely calcium carbonate, fructoborate and alfalfa, in the mineralization of bone tissue. So, we made fix histological preparations of tissue fragments taken from tibia bone, from 9 pigs belonging to three batches: the control batch, where calcium was provided in a proportion of 1% through calcium carbonate, experimental batch 1, where calcium was provided in a proportion of 1.04% through fructoborate, on a calcium carbonate support, and experimental batch 2, where calcium was provided in a proportion of 1.13% through fructoborate + alfalfa, on a calcium carbonate support. The histomorphometric parameters assessed were represented by the volume of bone trabeculae (BV/TV, % or the percentage of bone tissue in a given volume and the mean width of bone trabeculae. At the same time, in order to establish fructoborate and alfalfa implication in bone mineralization, we supervised the presence and activity of osteoblasts respectively osteoclasts. In the case of the experimental batch 1, the histomorphometric study shows an increase of bone trabeculae dimension, with a mean width of about 142,5? ?, and also an increase of their mean volume, which is about 37,11%. The trabecular system is dense and present mineralised and ossified territory where are formed by osteoclasts with osteocytes. Peritrabeculary are presented active osteoblasts which are involved in plurilamellar stratification by deposition of young collagen. In the case of individuals from experimental batch 2, trabeculae mean width is about 140,7?, while their volume is 35,62%.

  13. Microarray analysis of changes in bone cell gene expression early after cadmium gavage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed an in vivo model for cadmium-induced bone loss in which mice excrete bone mineral in feces beginning 8 h after cadmium gavage. Female mice of three strains [CF1, MTN (metallothionein-wild-type), and MT1,2KO (MT1,2-deficient)] were placed on a low-calcium diet for 2 weeks. Each mouse was gavaged with 200 ?g Cd or vehicle only. Fecal calcium was monitored daily for 9 days, beginning 4 days before cadmium gavage, to document the bone response. For CF1 mice, bones were taken from four groups: +/- Cd, 2 h after Cd and +/- Cd, 4 h after Cd. MTN and MT1,2KO strains had two groups each: +/-Cd, 4 h after Cd. PolyA+ RNA preparations from marrow-free shafts of femura and tibiae of each +/- Cd pair were submitted to Incyte Genomics for microarray analysis. Fecal Ca results showed that bone calcium excreted after cadmium differed for the three mouse strains: CF1, 0.24 ± 0.08 mg; MTN, 0.92 ± 0.22 mg; and MT1,2KO, 1.7 ± 0.4 mg. Gene array results showed that nearly all arrayed genes were unaffected by cadmium. However, MT1 and MT2 had Cd+/Cd- expression ratios >1 in all four groups, while all ratios for MT3 were essentially 1, showing specificity. Both probes for MAPK 14 (p38 MAPK) had expression ratios >1, while no other MAPK responded to cadmium. Vacuolar proton pump ATPase and integrin alpha v (osteoclast genes), transferrin receptor, and src-like adaptor protein genes were stimulated by Cd; other src-related genes were unaffected. Genes for bone formation, stress response, growth factors, and signaling molecules showed little or no response to cadmium. Results support the hypothesis that Cd stimulates bone demineralization via a p38 MAPK pathway involving osteoclast activation

  14. Histomorphometric analysis of the temporal bone after change of direction of force vector of mandible: an experimental study in rabbits

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Edela, Puricelli; Deise, Ponzoni; Jéssica Cerioli, Munaretto; Adriana, Corsetti; Mauro Gomes Trein, Leite.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The present study aimed at performing a histological evaluation of the response of temporal bone tissue to a change of direction of the force vector of the mandible in relation to the base of the skull. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Adult rabbits were assigned into four groups with two control a [...] nd four experimental animals in each group. experimental animals underwent surgery, which resulted in a change of direction of the force vector on the right temporomandibular joint. Samples were collected after 15, 30, 60 and 90 days for histological analysis. RESULTS: In the two-way analysis of variance, the effect of group and time was statistically significant (p

  15. Antibiotic treatment in patients with low-back pain associated with Modic changes Type 1 (bone oedema): a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, HB; Manniche, C; Sørensen, JS; Deleuran, Bent

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effect of antibiotic treatment in a cohort of patients with low-back pain (LBP) and Modic changes Type 1 (bone oedema) following a lumbar herniated disc. DESIGN: This was a prospective uncontrolled trial of 32 LBP patients who had Modic changes and were treated with Amoxicillin-clavulanate (500 mg/125 mg) 3 x day for 90 days. All patients had previously participated in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) that investigated active conserv...

  16. Antibiotic treatment in patients with low back pain associated with Modic changes Type 1 (bone oedema): a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Hanne B.; Manniche, Claus; Sørensen, Joan S.; Deleuran, Bent

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effect of antibiotic treatment in a cohort of patients with low back pain (LBP) and Modic changes Type 1 (bone oedema) following a lumbar herniated disc. DESIGN: This was a prospective uncontrolled trial of 32 LBP patients who had Modic changes and were treated with Amoxicillin-clavulanate (500 mg/125 mg) 3 x day for 90 days. All patients had previously participated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that investigated active conserv...

  17. A novel biointerface that suppresses cell morphological changes by scavenging excess reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yutaka; Yoshinari, Tomoki; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-09-01

    During cell cultivation on conventional culture dishes, various events results in strong stresses that lead to the production of bioactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide. These reactive species cause variable damage to cells and stimulate cellular responses. Here, we report the design of a novel biocompatible surface that decreases stress by not only morphologically modifying the dish surface by using poly(ethylene glycol) tethered chains, but also actively scavenging oxidative stress by using our novel nitroxide radical-containing polymer. A block copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl)aminomethylstyrene] (PEG-b-PMNT) was used to coat the surface of a dish. Differentiation of undifferentiated human leukemia (HL-60) cells was found to be suppressed on the polymer-coated dish. Notably, HL-60 cell cultivation caused apoptosis under high-density conditions, while spontaneous apoptosis was suppressed in cells plated on the PEG-b-PMNT-modified surface, because a healthy mitochondrial membrane potential was maintained. In contrast, low molecular weight antioxidants did not have apparent effects on the maintenance of mitochondria. We attribute this to the lack of cellular internalization of our immobilized polymer and selective scavenging of excessive ROS generated outside of cells. These results demonstrate the utility of our novel biocompatible material for actively scavenging ROS and thus maintaining cellular morphology. PMID:25691268

  18. Changes in lymphocyte reactivity to modulatory factors following low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) potentiated the proliferative activity of splenic and thymic lymphocytes in response to Con A in concentrations above 1 and 10 nM, respectively, while CS showed a biphasic effect, stimulating proliferation at concentrations below 0.1 nM and suppressing proliferation at concentrations above 10 nM. Combination of CS with E, NE or both in an ineffective concentration of each (0.1 nM) showed stimulatory effects on the proliferative response of both splenic and thymic lymphocytes to Con A. Whole-body irradiation (WBI) of mice with 75 mGy increased the reactivity of splenic and thymic lymphocytes to Con A. It is reported for the first time in the present paper that the proliferative reactivity of splenic and thymic lymphocytes from low dose irradiated mice could be further increased in the presence of suboptimal concentrations of CS and E as well as suboptimal concentrations of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and A23187. These findings may have significance in elucidation of the mechanism of immunologic stimulation after low dose WBI

  19. Changes in the computed tomography (pixel) value of mandibular ramus bone and fixation screws after sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, K; Moroi, A; Iguchi, R; Kosaka, A; Ikawa, H; Yoshizawa, K

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the changes in computed tomography (CT) values of ramus bone and screws after sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) setback surgery. The subjects were 64 patients (128 sides) who underwent bilateral SSRO setback surgery. They were divided into six groups according to the fixation plate type used and the use or not of self-setting ?-tricalcium phosphate (Biopex): group 1: titanium plate and screws; group 2: titanium plate and screws with Biopex; group 3: poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) plate and screws; group 4: PLLA plate and screws with Biopex; group 5: uncalcined and unsintered hydroxyapatite particles and poly-l-lactic acid (uHA/PLLA) plate and screws; group 6: PLLA/uHA plate and screws with Biopex. CT values (pixel values) of the lateral cortex, medial cortex, osteotomy site, and screws were measured preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and 1 year postoperatively using horizontal CT images at the mandibular foramen taken parallel to the Frankfort horizontal plane. There were significant differences in the time-course change of pixel values for the lateral cortex (Pbone alternative material may affect bone quality during the process of bone healing after SSRO. PMID:26139563

  20. Evaluation of spinal bone changes in patients with chronic renal failure by CT and MR imaging with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate bone changes in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF), bone mineral density (BMD) and T1 relaxation times were measured with CT and MR imaging and the results were correlated to histology. Excised lumbar vertebrae from 25 autopsy cases of CRF (18 males and 7 females), including 12 cases in which the patients had been receiving hemodialysis were examined. BMD and T1 relaxation times values were associated with specific histologic findings for cellularity, trabeculae, and peritrabecular fibrosis. Three vertebrae with low BMD showed incresed hematopoietic marrow content, a finding not observed in primary osteoporosis. The vertebrae with osteosclerosis showed prolonged T1 relaxation time, which was due to increased amount of hematopoietic marrow, and the presence of thickened or many small irregular trabeculae or perirabecular fibrosis. (orig.)

  1. Cytogenetical changes and their relation to survival of bone marrow hemopoietic cells during continuous irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalina, I.; Ondrussekova, A.; Brezani, P. (Univerzita P.J. Safarika, Kosice (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Vseobecnej Biologie)

    1982-01-01

    The frequency of aberrant cells in the bone marrow of mice continuously irradiated with dose rates 0.05 Gy/day and 0.50 Gy/day was studied. The increase in aberrant cell values was not in proportion with the accumulated doses and their level was influenced mainly by the irradiation period in the dose range 0.5 to 5 Gy. The most significant reduction in the lymphocyte number and to some extent the granuloid cells number in the bone marrow occurred for dose rate 0.50 Gy/day. At the same time the frequency of aberrant cells in the bone marrow increased to 15 to 20%. Possible mechanisms indluencing the different response of cells to irradiation are discussed.

  2. Changes of density distribution of the subchondral bone plate after supramalleolar osteotomy for valgus ankle osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, Christian; Paul, Jochen; Pagenstert, Geert; Vavken, Patrick; Hintermann, Beat; Valderrabano, Victor; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2014-10-01

    CT-osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM) has been used to visualize subchondral bone plate density distribution regarding to its mineralization. The purpose of this study was to display and analyze the density distribution of the subchondral bone plate before and after supramalleolar realignment osteotomies. We retrospectively analysed pre- and postoperative CT images of nine consecutive patients with post-traumatic unilateral valgus ankle OA. The distribution charts of CT-OAM scans were quantitatively analyzed for subchondral bone plate density distribution. VAS for pain and the Tegner activity scale were used to assess clinical outcome. At a mean follow-up of 20?±?5.6 months (range 13-27), we observed a significant pre- to postoperative decrease of the mean high-density area ratio in tibia (lateral and posterior area) (p???0.05) and the talus (lateral area) (p???0.05). Pairwise comparison between the pre- and postoperative mineralization at the articular surface showed a significant decrease of the high-density area ratio for the tibia and the talus. The VAS decreased from 6.2?±?0.9 pre- to 2.8?±?0.9 postoperatively (p?=?0.027), and the Tegner score inclined from 4.5?±?1.1 preoperatively to 5.3?±?0.7 after surgery (p?=?0.082). The tibial and talar subchondral bone plate density, regarding to its mineralization, decreased after supramalleolar medial closing wedge osteotomy in patients with valgus ankle OA. The results of this study suggest that realignment surgery may decrease peak bone density areas corresponding to the alignment correction and contribute to a homogenization of the subchondral bone plate mineralization. PMID:25042395

  3. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects passed down ...

  4. Changing bone marrow micro-environment during development of acute myeloid leukaemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B T; Jensen, P O; Helledie, N; Iversen, P O; Ralfkiaer, E; Larsen, J K; Madsen, M T

    1998-01-01

    The Brown Norwegian rat transplanted with promyelocytic leukaemic cells (BNML) has been used as a model for human acute myeloid leukaemia. We have previously shown that both the blood supply to the bone marrow and the metabolic rate decrease in relation to the leukaemic development in these rats. Here we have investigated how the development and progression of this leukaemia affect oxygenation, pH and proliferation of normal and leukaemic cells in vivo. Bone marrow pH was measured by a needle el...

  5. C omplex approach to investigation of reactivity changes accidents and accidents due to component malfunction with a view to compiling safety documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics are defined of inserting reactivity, the distribution of power in the reactor core, the coefficients of reactivity and kinetic parameters. Measures for reducing the hazard of accidents caused by changes in reactivity are classified into three groups: technical and administrative measures and the system of accident protection. The methodological approach to analyses is described. An analysis is made of failures due to malfunction of components, namely failures caused by partial blocking of coolant flow through the fuel assembly, failures caused by outages of main circulation pumps, failures caused by outages of turbogenerators and failures caused by breakdown of the feed water regime. (E.S.)

  6. Reactive nitrogen in the environment and its effect on climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erisman, J.W. [VU University, Boelelaan 1105, 1081AV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bleeker, A. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Galloway, J. [University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400772, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Seitzinger, S. [International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme IGBP, Secretariat, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Box 50005, SE-104 05 Stockholm (Sweden); Butterbach-Bahl, K. [Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Atmospheric Environmental Research (IMK-IFU), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Kreuzeckbahnstr. 19, 82467 Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Humans have doubled levels of reactive nitrogen in circulation, largely as a result of fertilizer application and fossil fuel burning. This massive alteration of the nitrogen cycle affects climate, food security, energy security, human health and ecosystem services. Our estimates show that nitrogen currently leads to a net-cooling effect on climate with very high uncertainty. The many complex warming and cooling interactions between nitrogen and climate need to be better assessed, taking also into account the other effects of nitrogen on human health, environment and ecosystem services. Through improved nitrogen management substantial reductions in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations could be generated, also allowing for other co-benefits, including improving human health and improved provision of ecosystem services, for example clean air and water, and biodiversity.

  7. Reactive nitrogen in the environment and its effect on climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humans have doubled levels of reactive nitrogen in circulation, largely as a result of fertilizer application and fossil fuel burning. This massive alteration of the nitrogen cycle affects climate, food security, energy security, human health and ecosystem services. Our estimates show that nitrogen currently leads to a net-cooling effect on climate with very high uncertainty. The many complex warming and cooling interactions between nitrogen and climate need to be better assessed, taking also into account the other effects of nitrogen on human health, environment and ecosystem services. Through improved nitrogen management substantial reductions in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations could be generated, also allowing for other co-benefits, including improving human health and improved provision of ecosystem services, for example clean air and water, and biodiversity.

  8. Reactive Kripke semantics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov M

    2013-01-01

    This text offers an extension to the traditional Kripke semantics for non-classical logics by adding the notion of reactivity. Reactive Kripke models change their accessibility relation as we progress in the evaluation process of formulas in the model. This feature makes the reactive Kripke semantics strictly stronger and more applicable than the traditional one. Here we investigate the properties and axiomatisations of this new and most effective semantics, and we offer a wide landscape of applications of the idea of reactivity. Applied topics include reactive automata, reactive grammars, rea

  9. Study on proliferative responses to host Ia antigens in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice: sequential analysis of the reactivity and characterization of the cells involved in the responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation bone marrow chimeras were established by reconstitution of lethally irradiated AKR mice with C57BL/10 marrow cells to permit serial analysis of the developing reactivities of lymphocytes from such chimeras, [B10----AKR], against donor, host, or third party antigens. We found that substantial proliferative responses to Ia antigens of the recipient strain and also to third party antigens were generated by the thymocytes obtained from the irradiation chimeras at an early stage after bone marrow reconstitution. The majority of the responding thymocytes had surfaces lacking demonstrable peanut agglutinin receptors and were donor type Thy-1+, Ly-2-, and L3T4+ in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. In anti-host responses, however, Ly-2+ thymocytes seemed to be at least partially involved. This capacity of thymus cells to mount a response to antigens of the recipient strain declined shortly thereafter, whereas the capacity to mount MLR against third party antigens persisted. The spleen cells of [B10----AKR] chimeras at the same time developed a more durable capability to exhibit anti-host reactivities and a permanent capability of reacting to third party allo-antigens. The stimulator antigens were Ia molecules on the stimulator cells in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. The responding splenocytes were of donor origin and most of them had Thy-1+, Ly-1+2-, and L3T4+ phenotype

  10. Study on proliferative responses to host Ia antigens in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice: sequential analysis of the reactivity and characterization of the cells involved in the responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwabuchi, K.; Ogasawara, K.; Ogasawara, M.; Yasumizu, R.; Noguchi, M.; Geng, L.; Fujita, M.; Good, R.A.; Onoe, K.

    1987-01-01

    Irradiation bone marrow chimeras were established by reconstitution of lethally irradiated AKR mice with C57BL/10 marrow cells to permit serial analysis of the developing reactivities of lymphocytes from such chimeras, (B10----AKR), against donor, host, or third party antigens. We found that substantial proliferative responses to Ia antigens of the recipient strain and also to third party antigens were generated by the thymocytes obtained from the irradiation chimeras at an early stage after bone marrow reconstitution. The majority of the responding thymocytes had surfaces lacking demonstrable peanut agglutinin receptors and were donor type Thy-1+, Ly-2-, and L3T4+ in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. In anti-host responses, however, Ly-2+ thymocytes seemed to be at least partially involved. This capacity of thymus cells to mount a response to antigens of the recipient strain declined shortly thereafter, whereas the capacity to mount MLR against third party antigens persisted. The spleen cells of (B10----AKR) chimeras at the same time developed a more durable capability to exhibit anti-host reactivities and a permanent capability of reacting to third party allo-antigens. The stimulator antigens were Ia molecules on the stimulator cells in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. The responding splenocytes were of donor origin and most of them had Thy-1+, Ly-1+2-, and L3T4+ phenotype.

  11. Detection of radiation-induced changes in electrochemical properties of austenitic stainless steels using miniaturized specimens and the single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of miniaturized (TEM) specimens can provide reliable data comparable to data obtained with larger specimens. Significant changes in electrochemical properties (increased reactivation current and Flade potential) were detected for PCA and type 316 stainless steels irradiated at 200--420 degrees C up to 7--9 dpa. Irradiations in the FFTF Materials Open Test Assembly and in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor are reported on. 45 figs., 5 tabs., 52 refs

  12. A comparative study of changes in immunological reactivity during prolonged introduction of radioactive and chemical substances into the organism with drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study was conducted into the factors of non-specific protection and specific immunity, allergic and autoallergic reactivities during prolonged exposure of experimental animals to 6 different radioactive and 7 harmful chemical substances. Qualitative and quantitative peculiarities were found in the changes in immunological reactivity during the exposure of the organism to radionuclides and stable chemical compounds. Impairment of immunity plays an essential role in the course and the outcome of effects induced by chronic action of the substances examined. (author)

  13. MRI of the cuboid bone: Analysis of changes in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients and their clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude, E-mail: cpierr3@emory.edu [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Musculoskeletal Division, Orthopaedics and Spine Center, 59, Executive Park South, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Reyes, Emmanuel J.; Moncayo, Valeria; Chen, Zhengjia Nelson; Terk, Michael R. [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Musculoskeletal Division, Orthopaedics and Spine Center, 59, Executive Park South, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Objectives: (1) To investigate the association between diabetes and marrow changes in the cuboid; and (2) to evaluate the influence of age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and use of insulin in the occurrence of marrow changes in the cuboid. Research design and methods: MR and X-ray foot examinations of 237 patients [94 males, 143 females; mean age, 47.1 years (range 16–93 years)], five of whom underwent bilateral examinations, were reviewed. MR and radiographic studies were analyzed for the presence of marrow edema and fractures in the cuboid. Findings were correlated with demographic data (age, gender) and clinical information (BMI and use of insulin). Results: Two hundred and forty two feet – 69 diabetic and 173 non-diabetic – were retrospectively evaluated. There was a higher prevalence of marrow edema and fractures in the diabetic cuboid (n = 31, 45%) compared to non-diabetic cuboid (n = 25, 14%, p = 0.02). A fracture line was seen in fourteen (20%) diabetic cuboid bones compared to 4 (2%) in non-diabetic cuboid bones (p < 0.0001). Eleven (79%) cases of cuboid fractures in the diabetic population were radiographically occult. Multivariate data analysis revealed an adjusted odds ratio of 4.416 (95% CI; 2.307, 8.454) for the relationship between marrow changes (edema and fractures) in the cuboid and diabetes. For each year of age, the odds of changes in the cuboid increased by 2.2% (95% CI; 1.001, 1.044). Conclusion: Despite not bearing weight, the cuboid bone is more vulnerable to marrow edema and fractures in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients. Age seems to be an influential factor.

  14. MRI of the cuboid bone: Analysis of changes in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients and their clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: (1) To investigate the association between diabetes and marrow changes in the cuboid; and (2) to evaluate the influence of age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and use of insulin in the occurrence of marrow changes in the cuboid. Research design and methods: MR and X-ray foot examinations of 237 patients [94 males, 143 females; mean age, 47.1 years (range 16–93 years)], five of whom underwent bilateral examinations, were reviewed. MR and radiographic studies were analyzed for the presence of marrow edema and fractures in the cuboid. Findings were correlated with demographic data (age, gender) and clinical information (BMI and use of insulin). Results: Two hundred and forty two feet – 69 diabetic and 173 non-diabetic – were retrospectively evaluated. There was a higher prevalence of marrow edema and fractures in the diabetic cuboid (n = 31, 45%) compared to non-diabetic cuboid (n = 25, 14%, p = 0.02). A fracture line was seen in fourteen (20%) diabetic cuboid bones compared to 4 (2%) in non-diabetic cuboid bones (p < 0.0001). Eleven (79%) cases of cuboid fractures in the diabetic population were radiographically occult. Multivariate data analysis revealed an adjusted odds ratio of 4.416 (95% CI; 2.307, 8.454) for the relationship between marrow changes (edema and fractures) in the cuboid and diabetes. For each year of age, the odds of changes in the cuboid increased by 2.2% (95% CI; 1.001, 1.044). Conclusion: Despite not bearing weight, the cuboid bone is more vulnerable to marrow edema and fractures in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients. Age seems to be an influential factor

  15. Will Global Climate Change Alter Fundamental Human Immune Reactivity: Implications for Child Health?

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwin Swaminathan; Robyn M Lucas; David Harley; Anthony J McMichael

    2014-01-01

    The human immune system is an interface across which many climate change sensitive exposures can affect health outcomes. Gaining an understanding of the range of potential effects that climate change could have on immune function will be of considerable importance, particularly for child health, but has, as yet, received minimal research attention. We postulate several mechanisms whereby climate change sensitive exposures and conditions will subtly impair aspects of the human immune response,...

  16. The Effect of Global Change on Surface Ozone and Reactive Nitrogen Concentrations: Implications for the Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P. G.; Murazaki, K.; Emmons, L.; Lamarque, J.

    2005-12-01

    We simulated two ten year periods using the global chemical transport model MOZART-2 (Model of Ozone and Related chemical Tracers version 2): 1990-2000 and 2090-2100. In each case MOZART-2 is driven by meteorology from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) coupled Climate Systems Model (CSM) 1.0 forced with the (SRES) A1 scenario. Profound future changes in the summertime climate over the U.S. are found including changes in temperature, water vapor and clouds and the frequency of synoptic venting of the boundary layer. Even allowing for no changes in emissions in the future, the changes in climate alone drive a significant increase in the ozone concentration over the eastern U.S. (up to 5 ppbv on average) and an increase in the persistence of pollution events. Implications of these changes on the biosphere are assessed with and without allowing for the impact of climate on biogenic emissions. Furthermore the changes in climate alone cause large changes in the partitioning of NOy, decreasing PAN by over 20% over the U.S. Coupled with changes in precipitation; this induces significant changes in the deposition of nitrogen species to the biosphere in a future climate.

  17. Changes in Bone Density after Cancer Treatment in Patients with Cervical and Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Lim; Yoon, Man Soo; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Ari; Kim, Min Joung; Lee, Ji Young; Song, Yong Jung; Ji, Yong Il; Kim, Ki Hyung; Chun, Sungwook

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of cancer treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine (LS) and femur in the postmenopausal women with cervical or endometrial cancer without bone metastasis compared to normal control postmenopausal women. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the BMD data in the LS, femur neck (FN) and trochanter (FT) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and laboratory data of bone turnover markers at baseline and after one year in 130 patients with cervical cancer, 68 patients with endometrial cancer, and 225 healthy controls. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the T-scores of basal BMD in LS and femur between patients with endometrial cancer and controls, and only T-score of basal BMD at the fourth lumbar vertebra (L4) was significantly lower in patients with cervical cancer compared to controls. One year later, T-scores of BMD at all LS sites and FN in patients with cervical cancer and T-scores of BMD at L3, L4, FN, and FT in those with endometrial cancer after cancer treatment were significantly lower compared to controls. Lower proportions of normal BMD at all skeletal sites except L2 in patients with endometrial cancer and those at L1, L4, and FN in patients with cervical cancer were observed compared to controls after cancer treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that cancer treatment increase bone loss in postmenopausal women with cervical and endometrial cancer. PMID:25553092

  18. Changes of the proliferation kinetics of human bone marrow in vivo through hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 10-hour oral continuous infusion with hydroxyurea (HU) at a non-toxic concentration was performed in 20 malignoma patients with undisturbed bone marrow. Bone marrow taken before, during and after HU-administration was examined for 3H-TdR incorporation by means of autoradiography and liquid scintimetry, for cell phase distribution by means of flow cytophotometry, morphologically and by means of CFUc. 3H-TdR incorporation into bone marrow cells dropped to 16% of the initial value under HU and rose to 156% 10 h after HU-effect terminated. Cytophotometry did not furnish any proof of a decrease of S-phase cells or increase of cells in G1-to-S-transition during HU. S-cells rise to 129% of the initial value 10 h after having fallen below minimum inhibition concentration. Under HU, there is an equal number of cells in S which incorporate much less 3H-thymidine; after HU more S-cells incorporate more 3H-thymidine than before HU. During HU action, DNA synthesis activity is reduced to 17% and reaches the initial value with 105% afterwards. In human bone marrow, hydroxyurea in non-toxic concentration causes a temporary DNA synthesis inhibition in terms of activity reduction and partial arrest in S. A stop-and-go of the cell cycle effected by HU does not occur; the effect is rather a slow-down of DNA synthesis. (orig./MG)

  19. Exhaustion-related changes in cardiovascular and cortisol reactivity to acute psychosocial stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Peter; Österberg, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Prior findings indicate that individuals scoring high on vital exhaustion show a dysfunctional stress response (DSR), that is, reduced cortisol reactivity and habituation to psychosocial stressors. The main aim of the present study was to examine whether a DSR may be a vulnerability factor in exhaustion disorder (ED). We examined whether a DSR is present during the early stages of ED, and still is present after recovery. Three groups were studied: 1. Former ED patients (n=14); 2. persons who during the past 6month had experienced stress at work and had a Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ) score over 3.75, considered to indicate a pre-stage of ED (n=17); 3. persons who had not experienced stress at work during the past 6months and had a SMBQ score below 2.75 (n=20). The participants were exposed twice to a virtual version of the Trier Social Stress Test (V-TSST), during which salivary cortisol samples were collected. In addition, high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV), heart rate (HR), t-wave amplitude (TWA), and ?-amylase were assessed to examine stress reactivity and habituation in the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The initial analyses showed clear hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activations in both V-TSST sessions, together with habituation of cortisol and heart rate in the second session, but without any significant group differences. However, the former ED patients showed considerable variation in self-reported signs of exhaustion (SMBQ). This led us to assign former ED patients with lower ratings into the low SMBQ group (LOWS) and those with higher ratings to the high SMBQ group (HIGHS). When repeating the analyses a different picture emerged; the HIGHS showed a lower cortisol response to the V-TSST than did the LOWS. Both groups' cortisol response habituated to the second V-TSST session. The ANS responses did not differ between the two groups. Thus, persons in a pre-stage of ED and unrecovered former ED patients showed signs of DSR, in contrast to healthy controls and recovered former ED patients. The results may be interpreted as indicating that DSR in the HPA axis is present early on in the stress process, but subsides after successful recovery.

  20. Exhaustion-related changes in cardiovascular and cortisol reactivity to acute psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Peter; Österberg, Kai; Wallergård, Mattias; Hansen, Åse Marie; Garde, Anne Helene; Johansson, Gerd; Karlson, Björn

    2015-11-01

    Prior findings indicate that individuals scoring high on vital exhaustion show a dysfunctional stress response (DSR), that is, reduced cortisol reactivity and habituation to psychosocial stressors. The main aim of the present study was to examine whether a DSR may be a vulnerability factor in exhaustion disorder (ED). We examined whether a DSR is present during the early stages of ED, and still is present after recovery. Three groups were studied: 1. Former ED patients (n=14); 2. persons who during the past 6month had experienced stress at work and had a Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ) score over 3.75, considered to indicate a pre-stage of ED (n=17); 3. persons who had not experienced stress at work during the past 6months and had a SMBQ score below 2.75 (n=20). The participants were exposed twice to a virtual version of the Trier Social Stress Test (V-TSST), during which salivary cortisol samples were collected. In addition, high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV), heart rate (HR), t-wave amplitude (TWA), and ?-amylase were assessed to examine stress reactivity and habituation in the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The initial analyses showed clear hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activations in both V-TSST sessions, together with habituation of cortisol and heart rate in the second session, but without any significant group differences. However, the former ED patients showed considerable variation in self-reported signs of exhaustion (SMBQ). This led us to assign former ED patients with lower ratings into the low SMBQ group (LOWS) and those with higher ratings to the high SMBQ group (HIGHS). When repeating the analyses a different picture emerged; the HIGHS showed a lower cortisol response to the V-TSST than did the LOWS. Both groups' cortisol response habituated to the second V-TSST session. The ANS responses did not differ between the two groups. Thus, persons in a pre-stage of ED and unrecovered former ED patients showed signs of DSR, in contrast to healthy controls and recovered former ED patients. The results may be interpreted as indicating that DSR in the HPA axis is present early on in the stress process, but subsides after successful recovery. PMID:26210042

  1. Framework for reactive mass transport : Phase change modeling of concrete by a coupled mass transport and chemical equilibrium model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads MØnster; Johannesson, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Reactive transport modeling is applicable for a range of porous materials. Here the modeling framework is focused on cement-based materials, where ion diffusion and migration are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation system. A two phase vapor/liquid flow model, with a sorption hysteresis description is coupled to the system. The mass transport is solved by using the finite element method where the chemical equilibrium is solved explicitly by an operator splitting method. The IPHREEQC library is used as chemical equilibrium solver. The equation system, solved by IPHREEQC, is explained for aqueous, pure phase and solid solution reactions. Numerical examples, with cement-based materials, are constructed to demonstrate transient phase change modeling. A simulation of pure multi-species leaching from the material, showing deterioration of the solid phases is described and calculated. A second simulation, showing multi-species ingress with formation of new solid phases in the domain is described and calculated. It is shown that the numerical solution method is capable of solving the reactive mass transport system for the examples considered. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Will Global Climate Change Alter Fundamental Human Immune Reactivity: Implications for Child Health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Swaminathan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The human immune system is an interface across which many climate change sensitive exposures can affect health outcomes. Gaining an understanding of the range of potential effects that climate change could have on immune function will be of considerable importance, particularly for child health, but has, as yet, received minimal research attention. We postulate several mechanisms whereby climate change sensitive exposures and conditions will subtly impair aspects of the human immune response, thereby altering the distribution of vulnerability within populations—particularly for children—to infection and disease. Key climate change-sensitive pathways include under-nutrition, psychological stress and exposure to ambient ultraviolet radiation, with effects on susceptibility to infection, allergy and autoimmune diseases. Other climate change sensitive exposures may also be important and interact, either additively or synergistically, to alter health risks. Conducting directed research in this area is imperative as the potential public health implications of climate change-induced weakening of the immune system at both individual and population levels are profound. This is particularly relevant for the already vulnerable children of the developing world, who will bear a disproportionate burden of future adverse environmental and geopolitical consequences of climate change.

  3. Changes in some parameters on immunological reactivity of irradiated and vaccinated pigs against Aujeszky's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was performed on ten two-month-old pigs irradiated with a dose rate of 2.2 Gy. The vaccination with a standard Aujeszky MK 35 vaccine was done on days 3 and 10, and re-vaccination - on day 17 after irradiation. The following parameters, reflecting the status of the immuno-biological reactivity, were estimated: total leucocyte count (Lc), differential WBC count (NTR, Lm), E-RFC and AEC-RFC, total T- and B-cell count, bacterial activity; phagocytic activity (PhA), antibody titer with RPHA. All parameters were measured before irradiation and on days 3, 7, 10, 17, 24 and 31 after vaccination. The analysis of the results showed that all parameters were influenced by irradiation and the values of most of them remained lower than initial values during the entire experimental period. Lc decreased in both groups, especially because the count of NTR and Lm decreased. That was supported by the E-, EAC-RFC, T- and B-cell count. The phagocyte count, phagocyte index and BA were negatively influenced at a greater extent in animals vaccinated on tenth day. The specific immune response was stronger and earlier manifested in animals vaccinated on the third day. The effect of vaccination, performed on the third day after irradiation, was an earlier activation of compensatory mechanisms in the experimental animals and resulted in a better specific immune response. (author)

  4. Early changes in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levelsand bone markers after monthly risedronatewith cholecalciferol in Korean patients with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung HY

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ho Yeon Chung,1 Jawon Koo,1 Su Kyoung Kwon,2 Moo-IL Kang,3 Seong-Hwan Moon,4 Jin-Young Park,5 Chan Soo Shin,6 Byung-Koo Yoon,7 Hyun-Koo Yoon,8 Jae-Suk Chang,9 Yoon-Sok Chung,10 Hyoung-Moo Park111Department of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 2Department of Statistics, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, 4Department of Orthopedics, Yonsei University, 5Department of Orthopedics, Konkuk University, 6Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University, 7Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sungkyunkwan University, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Kwandong University, 9Department of Orthopedics, University of Ulsan, Seoul, South Korea; 10Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea; 11Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South KoreaPurpose: This study investigated the efficacy and safety of monthly risedronate, with and without cholecalciferol, on 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D levels and bone markers in Korean patients with osteoporosis.Methods: A randomized, double-blinded, prospective, 16-week clinical trial was conducted in ten hospitals. A total of 150 subjects with osteoporosis were randomized to one of the two treatment groups: RSDM+ (monthly risedronate 150 mg and cholecalciferol 30,000 IU combined in a single pill, n = 74 or RSDM (monthly risedronate 150 mg alone, n = 76. We measured serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D, parathyroid hormone (PTH, and bone markers, as well as performing muscle-function tests at baseline and after 16 weeks of treatment.Results: After 16 weeks, serum 25(OHD levels significantly increased from 17.8 to 26.8 ng/mL in the RSDM+ group, but did not change in the RSDM group. The RSDM+ group exhibited significantly decreased serum PTH from 46 to 36.7 pg/mL, while the RSDM group showed a tendency for PTH to increase from 38 to 40.6 pg/mL. In both groups, serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and C-terminal telopeptide rapidly declined, with significance at 16 weeks; there were no significant differences between the groups.Conclusion: A once-monthly pill of risedronate and cholecalciferol provided equivalent antiresorptive efficacy to risedronate alone in terms of bone turnover and improved 25(OHD levels over the 16-week treatment period without significant adverse events in Korean patients with osteoporosis. Keywords: bisphosphonate, cholecalciferol, bone markers, 25(OHD

  5. Volumetric changes of the graft after maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss and autogenous bone in different ratios: a radiographic study in minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas; Schou, SØren

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to learn about the volumetric changes of the graft after maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss and autogenous bone from the iliac crest or the mandible in different ratios in minipigs. Material and methods: Bilateral maxillary sinus floor augmentation was performed in 40 minipigs with: (A) 100% autogenous bone, (B) 75% autogenous bone and 25% Bio-Oss, (C) 50% autogenous bone and 50% Bio-Oss, (D) 25% autogenous bone and 75% Bio-Oss, and (E) 100% Bio-Oss. The autogenous bone graft was harvested from the iliac crest or the mandible and the graft composition was selected at random and placed concomitant with implant placement. Computed tomographies of the maxillary sinuses were obtained preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at euthanasia after 12 weeks. The volumetric changes of the graft were estimated using the Cavalieri principle and expressed as mean percentage with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: The mean volume of the graft was reduced by (A) 65% (95% CI: 60-70%), (B) 38% (95% CI: 35-41%), (C) 23% (95% CI: 21-25%), (D) 16% (95% CI: 12-21%), and (E) 6% (95% CI: 4-8%). The volumetric reduction was significantly influenced by the ratio of Bio-Oss and autogenous bone (P

  6. Volumetric changes of the graft after maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss and autogenous bone in different ratios : a radiographic study in minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas; Schou, SØren

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to learn about the volumetric changes of the graft after maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss and autogenous bone from the iliac crest or the mandible in different ratios in minipigs. Material and methods: Bilateral maxillary sinus floor augmentation was performed in 40 minipigs with: (A) 100% autogenous bone, (B) 75% autogenous bone and 25% Bio-Oss, (C) 50% autogenous bone and 50% Bio-Oss, (D) 25% autogenous bone and 75% Bio-Oss, and (E) 100% Bio-Oss. The autogenous bone graft was harvested from the iliac crest or the mandible and the graft composition was selected at random and placed concomitant with implant placement. Computed tomographies of the maxillary sinuses were obtained preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at euthanasia after 12 weeks. The volumetric changes of the graft were estimated using the Cavalieri principle and expressed as mean percentage with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: The mean volume of the graft was reduced by (A) 65% (95% CI: 60-70%), (B) 38% (95% CI: 35-41%), (C) 23% (95% CI: 21-25%), (D) 16% (95% CI: 12-21%), and (E) 6% (95% CI: 4-8%). The volumetric reduction was significantly influenced by the ratio of Bio-Oss and autogenous bone (P

  7. Platelet reactivity changes significantly throughout all trimesters of pregnancy compared with the nonpregnant state: a prospective study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, N

    2013-12-01

    Platelets play an important role in the pathophysiology of uteroplacental disease and platelet reactivity may be an important marker of uteroplacental disease activity. However, platelet reactivity has not been evaluated comprehensively in normal pregnancy. We sought to evaluate platelet reactivity using a number of agonists at defined time points in pregnancy using a novel platelet assay and compare these with a nonpregnant cohort.

  8. The role of estrogen in bone growth and formation: changes at puberty

    OpenAIRE

    Divya Singh; Sabyasachi Sanyal; Naibedya Chattopadhyay

    2010-01-01

    Divya Singh1, Sabyasachi Sanyal2, Naibedya Chattopadhyay11Division of Endocrinology, 2Division of Drug Target Discovery and Development, Central Drug Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaAbstract: A high peak bone mass (PBM) at skeletal maturity is a good predictor for lower rate of fracture risks in later life. Growth during puberty contributes significantly to PBM achievement in women and men. The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like g...

  9. Morphological and immunohistological changes in the skin in allogeneic bone marrow recipients.

    OpenAIRE

    Sloane, J P; Thomas, J. A.; Imrie, S. F.; Easton, D F; Powles, R L

    1984-01-01

    Skin biopsies from leukaemic patients undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantations and treated prophylactically with cyclosporin A were analysed using histological, morphometric, and immunohistological techniques. Samples from donors were used to establish normal values. Biopsies taken from recipients two days before grafting were all histologically normal, but on immunohistological staining half of them showed a reduction in the number of epidermal Langerhans' cells and 29% a reduction...

  10. Dietary and Urinary Sulfur can Predict Changes in Bone Metabolism During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Sara R.; Heer, Martina; Shackelford, Linda; Smith, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitigating space flight-induced bone loss is critical for space exploration, and diet can play a major role in this effort. Previous ground-based studies provide evidence that dietary composition can influence bone resorption during bed rest. In this study we examined the role of dietary intake patterns as one factor that can influence bone mineral loss in astronauts during space flight. Crew members were asked to consume, for 4 days at a time, prescribed menus with either a low (0.3-0.6 g/mEq) or high (1.0-1.3 g/mEq) ratio of animal protein to potassium (APro:K). Menus were developed for each crewmember, and were designed to meet both crew preferences and study constraints. Intakes of energy, total protein, calcium, and sodium were held relatively constant between the two diets. The order of the menus was randomized, and crews completed each set (low and high) once before and twice during space flight, for a total of 6 controlled diet sessions. One inflight session and three postflight sessions (R+30, R+180, R+365) monitored typical dietary intake. As of this writing, data are available from 14 crew members. The final three subjects' inflight samples are awaiting return from the International Space Station via Space-X. On the last day of each of the 4-d controlled diet sessions, 24-h urine samples were collected, along with a fasting blood sample on the morning of the 5th day. Preliminary analyses show that urinary excretion of sulfate (normalized to lean body mass) is a significant predictor of urinary n-telopeptide (NTX). Dietary sulfate (normalized to lean body mass) is also a significant predictor of urinary NTX. The results from this study, will be important to better understand diet and bone interrelationships during space flight as well as on Earth. This study was funded by the Human Health Countermeasures Element of the NASA Human Research Program.

  11. 3D Modelling and monitoring of denervated muscle under Functional Electrical Stimulation treatment and associated bone structural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gargiulo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel clinical rehabilitation method for patients who have permanent and non recoverable muscle denervation in the legs was developed in the frame of the European Project RISE. The technique is based on FES and the project results shows, in these severely disabled patients, restoration of muscle tissue and function. This study propose novel methods based on image processing technique and medical modelling to monitor growth in denervated muscle treated with FES. Geometrical and structural changes in muscle and bone are studied and modelled. Secondary effects on the bone mineral density produced by the stimulation treatment and due the elicited muscle contraction are also investigated. The restoration process in DDM is an important object of discussion since there isn’t yet a complete understanding of the mechanisms regulating growth in denervated muscle. This study approaches the problem from a macroscopic point of view, developing 3-dimensional models of the whole stimulated muscles and following changes in volume, geometry and density very accurately. The method is based on the acquisition of high resolution Spiral CT scans from patients who have long-term flaccid paraplegia and the use of special image processing tools allowing tissue discriminations and muscle segmentation. Three patients were measured at different points of time during 4 years of electrical stimulation treatment. In this study is quantitatively demonstrated the influences of FES treatment on the different quadriceps bellies. The rectus femoris muscle is positioned in the middle of the quadriceps and responds (in general better to stimulation. In a patient with abundant adipose tissue surrounding the quadriceps, rectus femoris almost doubled the volume during the FES treatment while in the other bellies the changes measured were minimal. The analysis of the density shows clearly a restoration of the muscular structure in the growing muscle. The remarkable increase of muscle mass and the improved quality of the muscle tissue was observed and measured on whole muscle volume. The 3-dimensional approach proposed in this work allows the geometrical changes in denervated muscle to be measured. Central lines in rectus femoris are calculated during the treatment and the relative curvature indexes are used to quantify differences between data sets. The result shows a correlation between degeneration status and changes in shape; the differences in curvature between control and denervated muscle diminish with the growth. Furthermore, bone mineral density is measured on the femur to monitor the structural changes induced by the current flow and to evaluate the effect on the patella bone density due to the quadriceps contraction. Though the evidences aren’t yet statistically relevant a kind of structural change in the femur is measured as secondary effect from the muscle stimulation. Beside, the force applied on the patella through the elicited contraction seems also to have a beneficial effect on bone density. Indeed the mineral loss in the patella is remarkably slowed down.

  12. Ossificans myositis: inflammatory changes and contrast enhancement of adjacent bone shown by MR imaging; Myosite ossifiante circonscrite: remaniements osseux deceles en IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, H.; Jolles, E.; Le Friant, G.; Silvestre, A.; Sarrazin, J.L.; Gordoliani, Y.S. [Hopital des Armees du Val-de-Grace, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-07-01

    The authors report a case of ossificans myositis, in which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed inflammatory changes of the adjacent bone. T 1 weighted fat saturation sequence with gadolinium injection showed enhancement of medullary and cortical bone. This potentially mistaking pattern must be known, to avoid mis diagnosing with malignant osseous tumor, specially before achievement of the characteristic pattern of zonal maturation and its calcified rim. (authors). 15 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Immediate periodontal bone plate changes induced by rapid maxillary expansion in the early mixed dentition: CT findings

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Daniela Gamba, Garib; Maria Helena Ocké, Menezes; Omar Gabriel da, Silva Filho; Patricia Bittencourt Dutra dos, Santos.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar alterações das tábuas ósseas vestibulares e linguais decorrentes da expansão rápida da maxila (ERM), em pacientes na dentição mista, por meio de tomografia computadorizada (TC). MÉTODOS: a amostra foi constituída por exames de TC helicoidal [...] , realizados de 22 pacientes com dentição mista, dos 6 aos 9 anos de idade (média de 8,1 anos), com atresia maxilar, tratados com expansores do tipo Haas. Os pacientes foram submetidos a tomografia computadorizada helicoidal antes da expansão e após o período de ativação de parafuso expansor, com 30 dias de intervalo entre as fases T1 e T2. A reconstrução multiplanar foi usada para medir a espessura da tábua óssea vestibular e lingual e a altura da crista óssea alveolar dos dentes posteriores decíduos e dos dentes permanentes. As alterações induzidas pela expansão foram avaliadas usando o teste t pareado (p Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at evaluating buccal and lingual bone plate changes caused by rapid maxillary expansion (RME) in the mixed dentition by means of computed tomography (CT). METHODS: The sample comprised spiral CT exams taken from 22 mixed dentition patients from 6 to 9 years of age ( [...] mean age of 8.1 years) presenting constricted maxillary arch treated with Haas-type expanders. Patients were submitted to spiral CT scan before expansion and after the screw activation period with a 30-day interval between T1 and T2. Multiplanar reconstruction was used to measure buccal and lingual bone plate thickness and buccal bone crest level of maxillary posterior deciduous and permanent teeth. Changes induced by expansion were evaluated using paired t test (p

  14. Changes in functional activity of bone tissue cells under space flight conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Natalia; Nesterenko, Olga; Kabitskaya, Olga

    The space flight conditions affect considerably the state of bone tissue, leading to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia. Many aspects of reactions of bone tissue cells still remain unclear until now. With the use of electron microscopy we studied the samples gathered from the femoral bon?s metaphyses of rats flown on board the space laboratory (Spacelab - 2) during 2 weeks and samples from tibial bones of mice C57 Black ( Bion ?-1). It was established, that under microgravity conditions there occur remodelling processes in a spongy bone related with a deficit of support load. In this work the main attention is focused on studying the ultrastructure of osteogenetic cells and osteoclasts. The degree of differentiation and functional state are evaluated according to the degree of development of organelles for specific biosynthesis: rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), Golgy complex (GC), as well as the state of mitochondria and cell nucleus. As compared with a synchronous control, the population of osteogenetic cells from zones of bone reconstruction shows a decrease in the number of functionally active forms. We can judge of this from the reduction of a specific volume of RER, GC, mitochondria in osteoblasts. RER loses architectonics typical for osteoblasts and, as against the control, is represented by short narrow canaliculi distributed throughout the cytoplasm; some canals disintegrate. GC is slightly pronounced, mitochondria become smaller in size and acquire an optically dark matrix. These phenomena are supposed to be associated with the desorganization of microtubules and microfilaments in the cells under microgravity conditions. The population of osteogenetic cells shows a decrease in the number of differentiating osteoblasts and an increase in the number of little-differentiated stromal cells. In the population of osteoblasts, degrading and apoptotic cells are sometimes encountered. Such zones show a numerical increase of monocytic cells and osteoclasts. Among them are typical osteoclasts with 3 to 4 nuclei on a section, as well as the "giant" cells with 5 to 6 nuclei and a highly developed zone 2, in which organelles and structures are concentrated, providing for specific functions (primary and secondary lysosomes, heterophagous vacuoles, fibrous layer and "brush border"). The availability of these functionally active osteoclasts testify to the intensification of resorptive processes in remodelling zones. To confirm the obtained electronmicroscopic findings, the experiments were conducted on albino rats under model microgravity conditions ("tail suspension" method) with the use of radionuclides. The experiments with 3H-glycine demonstrated a lower isotope uptake in the osteogenetic cells compared with the control. The autoradiographic studies employing 3H-thymidine, showed that hind limbs unloading leads to a significant acceleration of osteoclast formation in zones of spongy bone reconstruction. Considering the obtained results, the cell mechanisms of osteoclast - osteoblast remodelling and bone tissue loss under the action of space flight factors are discussed.

  15. Fatty acids binding to human serum albumin: Changes of reactivity and glycation level of Cysteine-34 free thiol group with methylglyoxal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavi?evi?, Ivan D; Jovanovi?, Vesna B; Taki?, Marija M; Penezi?, Ana Z; A?imovi?, Jelena M; Mandi?, Ljuba M

    2014-10-17

    Fatty acids (FAs) binding to human serum albumin (HSA) could lead to the changes of Cys-34 thiol group accessibility and reactivity, i.e. its scavenger capacity and antioxidant property. The influence of saturated, mono and poly unsaturated, and fish oil FAs binding to HSA on the carbonylation level and the reactivity of HSA-SH and HSA modified with methylglyoxal (MG-HSA-SH) was investigated. Changes of thiol group reactivity were followed by determination of pseudo first order rate constant (k') for thiols reaction with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). HSA changes were monitored using native PAG electrophoresis and fluorescence spectroscopy. For FA/HSA molar ratios screening, qTLC and GC were used. FAs increase thiol group carbonylation levels from 8% to 20%. The k' values obtained for FAs-free HSA-SH and FAs-free MG-HSA-SH are almost equal (7.5×10(-3) and 7.7×10(-3)s(-1), resp.). Binding of all FAs amplify the reactivity (k' values from 14.6×10(-3) to 26.0×10(-3)s(-1)) of HSA-SH group for 2-3.5times in the order: palmitic, docosahexaenoic, fish oil extract, stearic, oleic, myristic and eicosapentaenoic acid, due to HSA conformational changes. FAs-bound MG-HSA-SH samples follow that pattern, but their k' values (from 9.8×10(-3) to 14.3×10(-3)s(-1)) were lower compared to unmodified HSA due to additional conformation changes of HSA molecules during carbonylation. Carbonylation level and reactivity of Cys34 thiol group of unmodified and carbonylated HSA depend on type of FAs bound to HSA, which implies the possibility for modulation of -SH reactivity (scavenger capacity and antioxidant property) by FAs as a supplement. PMID:25451573

  16. Is 3D-CT reformation using free software applicable to diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Gerhardt de Oliveira

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the agreement of computed tomography (CT imaging using 3D reformations (3DR with shaded surface display (SSD and maximum intensity projection (MIP in the diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and compared findings with multiplanar reformation (MPR images, used as the criterion standard. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Axial CT images of 44 temporomandibular joints (TMJs of 22 patients with RA were used. Images were recorded in DICOM format and assessed using free software (ImageJ. Each sample had its 3DR-SSD and 3DR-MIP results compared in pairs with the MPR results. RESULTS: Slight agreement (k = 0.0374 was found in almost all comparisons. The level of agreement showed that 3DR-SSD and 3DR-MIP yielded a number of false-negative results that was statistically significant when compared with MPR. CONCLUSIONS: 3DR-SSD or 3DR-MIP should only be used as adjuvant techniques to MPR in the diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles.

  17. Is 3D-CT reformation using free software applicable to diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Marília Gerhardt de, Oliveira; Luciano Engelmann, Morais; Daniela Nascimento, Silva; Helena Willhelm de, Oliveira; Cláiton, Heitz; Lêonilson, Gaião.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the agreement of computed tomography (CT) imaging using 3D reformations (3DR) with shaded surface display (SSD) and maximum intensity projection (MIP) in the diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and compared fin [...] dings with multiplanar reformation (MPR) images, used as the criterion standard. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Axial CT images of 44 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 22 patients with RA were used. Images were recorded in DICOM format and assessed using free software (ImageJ). Each sample had its 3DR-SSD and 3DR-MIP results compared in pairs with the MPR results. RESULTS: Slight agreement (k = 0.0374) was found in almost all comparisons. The level of agreement showed that 3DR-SSD and 3DR-MIP yielded a number of false-negative results that was statistically significant when compared with MPR. CONCLUSIONS: 3DR-SSD or 3DR-MIP should only be used as adjuvant techniques to MPR in the diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles.

  18. Analysis by computed tomography of bone changes in the mandibular head and mandibular fossa in relation to clinical findings in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone changes in the mandibular head and mandibular fossa in 33 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders were studied with axial computed tomography in relation to clinical findings to clarify possible factors leading to bone changes in this phenomenon. Bone changes of the mandibular head were observed in 45 (68%) of the 66 TMJs. The mandibular head was juxtaposed to the mandibular fossa in 13 (29%) of the 45 joints in centric occlusion and in 29 joints (64%) in the anterior position on CT, whereas the mandibular head with no pathological bone change was juxtaposed to the mandibular fossa in none of the 21 joints in centric occlusion and in only 1 joint (5%) in the anterior position. In the two groups of patients with and without juxtaposition of the mandibular head and mandibular fossa with bone changes, the incidence of the initial symptoms such as pain, crepitus, and difficulty in opening the mouth was increased compared with the symptoms at presentation. However, the former group had severer symptoms than the latter group. These findings suggest that bony degeneration of the TMJ is accelerated by juxtaposition of the head and fossa. (author)

  19. Heavy-metal-induced reactive oxygen species: phytotoxicity and physicochemical changes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Pourrut, Bertrand; Dumat, Camille; Nadeem, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Pinelli, Eric

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the industrial revolution, anthropogenic activities have enhanced there distribution of many toxic heavy metals from the earth's crust to different environmental compartments. Environmental pollution by toxic heavy metals is increasing worldwide, and poses a rising threat to both the environment and to human health.Plants are exposed to heavy metals from various sources: mining and refining of ores, fertilizer and pesticide applications, battery chemicals, disposal of solid wastes(including sewage sludge), irrigation with wastewater, vehicular exhaust emissions and adjacent industrial activity.Heavy metals induce various morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants, either directly or indirectly, and cause various damaging effects. The most frequently documented and earliest consequence of heavy metal toxicity in plants cells is the overproduction of ROS. Unlike redox-active metals such as iron and copper, heavy metals (e.g, Pb, Cd, Ni, AI, Mn and Zn) cannot generate ROS directly by participating in biological redox reactions such as Haber Weiss/Fenton reactions. However, these metals induce ROS generation via different indirect mechanisms, such as stimulating the activity of NADPH oxidases, displacing essential cations from specific binding sites of enzymes and inhibiting enzymatic activities from their affinity for -SH groups on the enzyme.Under normal conditions, ROS play several essential roles in regulating the expression of different genes. Reactive oxygen species control numerous processes like the cell cycle, plant growth, abiotic stress responses, systemic signalling, programmed cell death, pathogen defence and development. Enhanced generation of these species from heavy metal toxicity deteriorates the intrinsic antioxidant defense system of cells, and causes oxidative stress. Cells with oxidative stress display various chemical,biological and physiological toxic symptoms as a result of the interaction between ROS and biomolecules. Heavy-metal-induced ROS cause lipid peroxidation, membrane dismantling and damage to DNA, protein and carbohydrates. Plants have very well-organized defense systems, consisting of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidation processes. The primary defense mechanism for heavy metal detoxification is the reduced absorption of these metals into plants or their sequestration in root cells.Secondary heavy metal tolerance mechanisms include activation of antioxidant enzymes and the binding of heavy metals by phytochelatins, glutathione and amino acids. These defense systems work in combination to manage the cascades of oxidative stress and to defend plant cells from the toxic effects of ROS.In this review, we summarized the biochemiCal processes involved in the over production of ROS as an aftermath to heavy metal exposure. We also described the ROS scavenging process that is associated with the antioxidant defense machinery.Despite considerable progress in understanding the biochemistry of ROS overproduction and scavenging, we still lack in-depth studies on the parameters associated with heavy metal exclusion and tolerance capacity of plants. For example, data about the role of glutathione-glutaredoxin-thioredoxin system in ROS detoxification in plant cells are scarce. Moreover, how ROS mediate glutathionylation (redox signalling)is still not completely understood. Similarly, induction of glutathione and phytochelatins under oxidative stress is very well reported, but it is still unexplained that some studied compounds are not involved in the detoxification mechanisms. Moreover,although the role of metal transporters and gene expression is well established for a few metals and plants, much more research is needed. Eventually, when results for more metals and plants are available, the mechanism of the biochemical and genetic basis of heavy metal detoxification in plants will be better understood. Moreover, by using recently developed genetic and biotechnological tools it may be possible to produce plants that have traits desirable for imparting heavy meta

  20. Quantitative second-harmonic generation microscopy for imaging porcine cortical bone: comparison to SEM and its potential to investigate age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambekar, Raghu; Chittenden, Michael; Jasiuk, Iwona; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2012-03-01

    We propose the use of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for imaging collagen fibers in porcine femoral cortical bone. The technique is compared with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SHG microscopy is shown to have excellent potential for bone imaging primarily due its intrinsic specificity to collagen fibers, which results in high contrast images without the need for specimen staining. Furthermore, this technique's ability to quantitatively assess collagen fiber organization is evaluated through an exploratory examination of bone structure as a function of age, from very young to mature bone. In particular, four different age groups: 1 month, 3.5 months, 6 months, and 30 months, were studied. Specifically, we employ the recently developed Fourier transform-second harmonic generation (FT-SHG) imaging technique for the quantification of the structural changes, and observe that as the bone develops, there is an overall reduction in porosity, the number of osteons increases, and the collagen fibers become comparatively more organized. It is also observed that the variations in structure across the whole cross-section of the bone increase with age. The results of this work show that quantitative SHG microscopy can serve as a valuable tool for evaluating the structural organization of collagen fibers in ex vivo bone studies. PMID:22155019

  1. Changes in human bone marrow colony-forming cells following chemotherapy using an agar diffusion-chamber technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have been made of the effects of cyclophosphamide on the early granulocytic precursor cells in the marrow of patients receiving intermittent high doses (5 g) of the drug. This study was designed to investigate the effect of a single cytotoxic agent on normal granulocytic precursor cells; measurements have been made of the initial cytotoxicity, recovery, and changes in proliferation rate. The growth of granulocytic colonies was assayed in agar diffusion chambers. For this, bone marrow cells were suspended in semisolid agar medium, introduced into diffusion chambers for intraperitoneal incubation in radiated (900 rad 60Co ?) mice. The colonies present in the agar were scored 8-9 days later. In addition to measuring the effect of treatment on the colony-forming capacity of the patients' marrow, full dose-response curves were obtained by injecting graded doses of cyclophosphamide into chamber-bearing mice--the method allows some account to be taken of the continuous changes in drug activity, which occurs during its degradation in vivo. Comparison of these results with measurements of the sensitivity of mouse femoral cells under the same conditions or exposed to cyclophosphamide in situ in the donor mouse has been used to detect any effect of the culture environment or the response of the cells. Following treatment with cyclophosphamide, the incidence of colony precursor cells in the patients' marrow has been monitored. Changes in the proliferation rate of these cells during the recovery period have also been estimated by measuring their sensitivity to the S-phase specific drug, cytosine arabinoside. Information on the timing of changes in the incidence and proliferation rate of granulocytic precursor cells may provide guidelines for improving schedules of treatment in an attempt to reduce the attendant bone marrow toxicity

  2. Changes in chemical composition of bone matrix in ovariectomized (OVX) rats detected by Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Iimura, Tadahiro; Saitou, Takashi; Imamura, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a major bone disease that connotes the risk of fragility fractures resulting from alterations to bone quantity and/or quality to mechanical competence. Bone strength arises from both bone quantity and quality. Assessment of bone quality and bone quantity is important for prediction of fracture risk. In spite of the two factors contribute to maintain the bone strength, only one factor, bone mineral density is used to determine the bone strength in the current diagnosis of osteoporosis. On the other hand, there is no practical method to measure chemical composition of bone tissue including hydroxyapatite and collagen non-invasively. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique to analyze chemical composition and material properties of bone matrix non-invasively. Here we demonstrated Raman spectroscopic analysis of the bone matrix in osteoporosis model rat. Ovariectomized (OVX) rat was made and the decalcified sections of tibias were analyzed by a Raman microscope. In the results, Raman bands of typical collagen appeared in the obtained spectra. Although the typical mineral bands at 960 cm-1 (Phosphate) was absent due to decalcified processing, we found that Raman peak intensities of amide I and C-C stretching bands were significantly different between OVX and sham-operated specimens. These differences on the Raman spectra were statistically compared by multivariate analyses, principal component analysis (PCA) and liner discrimination analysis (LDA). Our analyses suggest that amide I and C-C stretching bands can be related to stability of bone matrix which reflects bone quality.

  3. Aging and Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Boskey, A.L.; Coleman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Bones provide mechanical and protective function, while also serving as housing for marrow and a site for regulation of calcium ion homeostasis. The properties of bones do not remain constant with age; rather, they change throughout life, in some cases improving in function, but in others, function deteriorates. Here we review the modifications in the mechanical function and shape of bones, the bone cells, the matrix they produce, and the mineral that is deposited on this matrix, while presen...

  4. Small Animal Bone Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2008-01-01

    Animal models, in particular mice, offer the possibility of naturally achieving or genetically engineering a skeletal phenotype associated with disease and conducting destructive fracture tests on bone to determine the resulting change in bone’s mechanical properties. Several recent developments, including nano- and micro- indentation testing, microtensile and microcompressive testing, and bending tests on notched whole bone specimens, offer the possibility to mechanically probe small animal ...

  5. Evaluation of sequential FDG-PET/CT for monitoring bone metastasis of breast cancer during therapy. Correlation between morphological and metabolic changes with tumor markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the significance of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) findings for evaluating the bone metastasis of breast cancer during therapy. Forty-seven patients with bone metastases from breast cancer who underwent sequential 18F-flourodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT studies during therapy were enrolled. A total of 771 lesions were identified. The changes in the PET and CT findings were compared with the tumor marker levels in each patient by calculating the weighted kappa value. The correlation between the PET and CT findings was examined for each lesion by an adjusted Chi-square test. The change in the tumor marker levels was substantially correlated with the PET findings and moderately correlated with the CT findings (weighted kappa=0.780 and 0.585 for quadratic weighting, respectively). An increase in FDG uptake was correlated with lytic changes on the CT images (62/65, 95.4%, p<0.05). Sclerotic changes suggested improvement, but sclerosis and progression occurred at the same time in some lesions. Changes of FDG uptake are useful for evaluating individual bone metastases in cases of breast cancer during therapy. Lytic change on CT images suggests progression of bone metastasis. The lysis-progression/sclerosis-improvement pattern was observed in the majority of subjects, but a sclerosis-progression pattern was also observed. The hybrid pattern of increase of FDG uptake on PET/lytic change on CT is most accurate to show progression of bone metastases. Assessments of these processes during therapy are necessary for the precise evaluation of bone metastases. (author)

  6. Time-dependent changes in dynamic mechanical properties of irradiated bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardas, Marcin; Kubisz, Leszek; Biskupski, Piotr; Mielcarek, S?awomir

    2015-08-14

    The increased use of allograft tissue for musculoskeletal repair has brought more focus to the safety of allogenic tissue and the efficacy of various sterilization techniques. The currently available literature contains few examples of studies on long-lasting strains of bones but no example for irradiated bones. In this study the bovine femurs from a 2-year-old animal were machine cut and irradiated with the doses of 10, 15, 25, 35, 45 and 50 kGy. The dynamic mechanical analysis was performed at 1 Hz at the room temperature in a 3-point bending configuration for 2880 minutes. The final values of E' and E? were dose independent but they were reached at different periods. For this reason, so called "critical point" was introduced for the further analysis. All the examined sample groups were characterized by statistically significant lower values of the critical point in comparison with the control samples (p<0.05) but the biggest differences were observed between the control samples and the samples irradiated with the doses of 10, 15 and 25 kGy. Current results and literature review suggest that the dose of 35 kGy is the optimal dose for ionizing radiation sterilization. PMID:26407201

  7. Bone fragility: current reviews and clinical features

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquilli Leali, Paolo; Doria, Carlo; Zachos, Alexandros; Ruggiu, Adriano; Milia, Fabio; Barca, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Bone strength is determined by a number of important factors, including bone mass and bone shape. A reduction in bone strength is clearly related to fracture. Bone fragility results from a reduction in bone mass and density. If there is a reduction in the connectivity of bone and impact from a mechanical load occurs, bone will fracture. Rather than considering bone fragility as being the result of a reduced amount of bone, we recognize that bone fragility is the result of changes in the mater...

  8. Physico-chemical changes of the ground waters related to the 2011 El Hierro magmatic reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionis, S.; Melián, G.; Padrón, E.; Padilla, G.; Nolasco, D.; Rodríguez, F.; Hernández, I.; Peraza, D.; Barrancos, J.; Hernández, P.; Calvo, D.; Pérez, N.

    2012-04-01

    The island of El Hierro (278 Km2), is the smallest, the southwesternmost and the youngest island (˜1.12 My) of the Canarian archipelago. The main geological characteristics of El Hierro consist on the presence of three convergent ridges of volcanic cones on a truncated trihedron shape and giant landslides between the three rift zones, being the most recent El Golfo on the northwest flank of the island. On July 2011 an anomalous seismic activity at Hierro Island started and suggested the initial stage of a volcanic unrest in the volcanic system. On October 10, after the occurrence of more than 10,000 earthquakes, a submarine eruption started. Evidences of this submarine volcanic eruption were visible on the sea surface to the south of La Restinga village, at the south of the island, in the form of large light-green coloured area, turbulent gas emission and the appearance of steamy volcanic fragments three days later. As part of its volcanic surveillance activities, the Instituto Volcanologico de Canarias (INVOLCAN) started a hydrogeochemical monitoring program on August 2011 in order to evaluate the temporal evolution of several physico-chemical parameters of the ground water system of El Hierro. Four observation sites were selected: three wells on the north of the island, where the seismic activity was located at the beginning of the volcano-seismic unrest (SIMO, FRON and PADO) and one horizontal well (gallery) in the south (TACO). Ground water sampling is being regularly collected, three times per week, at each observation site, and in-situ measurements of pH, conductivity and temperature measurements are performed. After 6 month of monitoring, no significant changes have been observed on pH and temperature measurements from all the observation sites. However, clear sharp decrease of conductivity was observed at SIMO on October 10 when the seismic tremor started. In addition, the strongest conductivity decrease pattern was observed later on at SIMO and PADO on November 4; one week earlier of the largest seismic event registered during this volcanic crisis on November 11 (M = 4.6). This observed physico-chemical changes in the ground water system might be explained as a result of the changes on the strain/stress field due to the seismic activity enhancing mixing of water bodies with different conductivities.

  9. A new islanding detection technique for multiple mini hydro based on rate of change of reactive power and load connecting strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The requirement of DG interconnection with existing power system is discussed. • Various islanding detection techniques are discussed with their merits and demerits. • New islanding detection strategy is proposed for multiple mini hydro type DGs. • The proposed strategy is based on dq/dt and load connecting strategy. • The effectiveness of strategy is verified on various other cases. - Abstract: The interconnection of distributed generation (DG) into distribution networks is undergoing a rapid global expansion. It enhances the system’s reliability, while simultaneously reduces pollution problems related to the generation of electrical power. To fully utilize the benefits of DGs, certain technical issues need to be addressed. One of the most important issues in this context is islanding detection. This paper presents a new islanding detection technique that is suitable for multiple mini-hydro type DG units. The proposed strategy is based on the rate of change of reactive power and load connecting strategy to detect islanding within the system. For a large power mismatch, islanding is detected by rate of change of reactive power only. However, for a close power mismatch, the rate of change of reactive power initiates a load connecting strategy, which in turn alters the load on the distribution network. This load variation in the distribution network causes a variation in the rate of change of reactive power, which is utilized to distinguish islanding and other events. The simulation results show that the proposed strategy is effective in detecting islanding occurrence in a distribution network

  10. Reactive potential for the study of phase-change materials: GeTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a classical potential to model phase-change materials based on the binary chalcogenide alloy of GeTe that are currently exploited for memory applications. Our potential is based on the recently proposed extension of the Tersoff potential plus additional terms to better reproduce the structure of the amorphous and the crystalline phases of GeTe. The parameters defining the potential reported in this work were fitted to reproduce the energies and forces of a database of reference structures obtained via density-functional theory molecular-dynamics simulations. This paper reports on the method used to construct the potential and on its validation against first-principles calculations either available in literature or part of this work. We found that the structural properties of amorphous GeTe were well reproduced. The advantage of the current implementation toward more flexible neural network-based methods is that most of the parameters can be reconnected to physical properties. Moreover, the relatively small number of parameters results in a simple implementation and facilitates the introductions of further interactions among additional species. (paper)

  11. Radiation-induced changes in the patterns of free ninhydrin-reactive substances of meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of minced lean beef and pork, breast muscle of chicken, and white meat of carp packed in polyethylene/Hostaphan bags were irradiated in the presence of air at about 250C with 10-MeV electrons. The doses applied were for beef 0.5-20 Mrad, and for other meat samples 10 Mrad. In the dose range of 0-5 Mrad, no statistically significant changes in the composition of the free amino acids and similar compounds usually present in beef were found. In the dose range between 10 and 20 Mrad a tendency towards small losses in such components became obvious. In beef samples irradiated at doses >= 0.5 Mrad a new substance (Y) appeared distinctly in the zone of the basic amino-acids. This compound was detected by two independent methods, column chromatography and high-voltage electrophoresis. The yellow colour of the band appearing above carnosine in the pherogram was striking. Substance Y was also found after irradiation of pork and chicken meat. At a dose of 10 Mrad the concentration of Y in white chicken meat was nearly three times higher than in beef and pork. After irradiation of white carp muscle no Y, but another new basic compound (X) was observed. In the pherograms it appeared as a brwonish-red band above ?-alanine. (orig./AJ)

  12. Acid-induced change in ozone-reactive site in indole ring of tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well established that ozone as well as oxygen activated by tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase or indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase cleave the 2,3-C=C bond of the indole ring of tryptophan to produce N-formylkynurenine. In the present study, however, we found that exposure of tryptophan to aqueous ozone at and below pH 4.5 generated a different compound. The compound was identified as kynurenine by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Exposure of N-formylkynurenine to acidic ozone did not generate a significant amount of kynurenine, indicating that the kynurenine was not produced via N-formylkynurenine. Acidic ozone thus appears to cleave the 1, 2-N-C bond in place of the 2,3-C=C bond of the indole ring, followed by liberation of the 2-C atom. The 1,2-N-C bond and 2,3-C=C bond are likely to undergo changes in their nature of bonding on acidification, enabling ozone to react with the former bond but not with the latter bond.

  13. Antibiotic treatment in patients with chronic low back pain and vertebral bone edema (Modic type 1 changes): a double-blind randomized clinical controlled trial of efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, H. B.; Sørensen, Joan S.; Berit Schiott, Christensen; Manniche, C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Modic type 1 changes/bone edema in the vertebrae are present in 6 % of the general population and 35-40 % of the low back pain population. It is strongly associated with low back pain. The aim was to test the efficacy of antibiotic treatment in patients with chronic low back pain (>6 months) and Modic type 1 changes (bone edema). METHODS: The study was a double-blind RCT with 162 patients whose only known illness was chronic LBP of greater than 6 months duration occurring after a previo...

  14. Chemical shift imaging of bone marrow changes during remission and relapse in leukemic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assess the ability of quantitative chemical shift imaging to monitor treatment response in leukemic patients during chemotherapy. Seven patients with acute leukemia were followed up longitudinally during the initial course of chemotherapy. A total of 28 quantitative during the initial course of chemotherapy. A total of 28 quantitative chemical shift images were obtained at multiple time point before, during, and following chemotherapy, corresponding to the time of bone marrow biopsies. Images were obtained with a 0.6-T whole-body imager and a 20-cm surface coil beneath the lumbar spine. Sagittal in-phase and out-of-phase spin-echo images were obtained (400/25 and 3,000/25--50 multiecho)

  15. The Role of Sleep in Changing Our Minds: A Psychologist's Discussion of Papers on Memory Reactivation and Consolidation in Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Rosalind D.

    2004-01-01

    The group of papers on memory reactivation and consolidation during sleep included in this volume represents cutting edge work in both animals and humans. They support that the two types of sleep serve different necessary functions. The role of slow wave sleep (SWS) is reactivation of the hippocampal-neocortical circuits activated during a waking…

  16. Bone marrow edema-like lesions change in volume in the majority of patients with osteoarthritis; associations with clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that bone marrow edema-like (BME) lesions in the knee are associated with progression of osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of our study in patients with OA was to evaluate prospectively changes of BME lesions over 2 years and their relationship with clinical features. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee were obtained from 182 patients (20% male; aged 43-76 years; mean age 59 years) who had been diagnosed with familial symptomatic OA at multiple joint sites. MR images were made at baseline and at 2 years follow-up. BME lesions in 2 years were associated with clinical features assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) scores. A total of 327 BME lesions were recorded. Total size of BME lesions changed in 90 patients (66%). Size of individual lesions changed in 147 foci (45%): new lesions appeared in 69 (21%), existing lesions disappeared in 32 (10%), increased in size in 26 (8%) and decreased in size in 20 (6%) lesions. Increase or decrease of BME lesions, over a 2-year time period, was not associated with severity of WOMAC scores. BME lesions fluctuated in the majority of patients with OA over a 2-year time period. These changes were not associated with severity of WOMAC scores at the study end point. (orig.)

  17. Longitudinal changes in C-reactive protein, proform of eosinophil major basic protein, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A during weight changes in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Gamborg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is associated with several complications, including cardiovascular comorbidity. Several biomarkers, such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), proform of eosinophil major basic protein (Pro-MBP) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), have equally been linked to increased cardiovascular susceptibility. This study investigates these biomarkers during weight loss and regain in obese children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A longitudinal study during a 12-week weight loss program with a 28 months follow-up was conducted. Anthropometrics and plasma concentrations of hs-CRP, Pro-MBP, and PAPP-A were measured at baseline; at days 14, 33 and 82 during weight loss; and at months 10, 16, and 28 during follow-up. RESULTS: Fifty-three boys and 62 girls aged 8-15 years with a median body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS) at baseline of 2.78 (boys), and 2.70 (girls) were included. Ninety children completed the weight loss program and 68 children entered the follow-up program. Pro-MBP and PAPP-A, but not hs-CRP, exhibited individual-specific levels (tracking) during weight loss and regain. The PAPP-A/Pro-MBP correlation was strong, whereas the hs-CRP/PAPP-A correlation was weak during weight fluctuations. CONCLUSION: Hs-CRP changes reflect weight changes. PAPP-A and Pro-MBP exhibited tracking during weight perturbations and may contribute as early risk markers of cardiovascular susceptibility.

  18. Variation of excess of reactivity due to the change of an irradiation box with a graphitized irradiation box in H4 position of RP-10 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, there was a proposal for a core configuration for the RP-10 reactor core 39, but because of an excess of reactivity with a value equal to 2407 pcm, it did not achieve one of the conditions of operation. Although optimization works for fuel management were made, the value with the current condition of some fuel assemblies cannot raise more. Thus, we choose the possibility of making changes outside the active region of the fuel area and replacing the H4 position irradiation box by a graphitized irradiation box, taking advantage that graphite is a better reflector than water. With that aim, a geometric model of the new core was designed and neutronic calculations with CITVAP were made. As a result, a value of excess of reactivity equal to 2935.5 pcm was obtained in the H4 position, achieving an increase of the excess of reactivity for core 39, covering all the conditions of operation. (author).

  19. Evaluation of radiographic and metabolic changes in bone metastases in response to systemic therapy with 18FDG-PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunalp, Bengul; Oner, Ali Ozan; Ince, Semra; Alagoz, Engin; Ayan, Asl?; Arslan, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate radiographic and metabolic changes in bone metastases in response to systemic therapy with 18FDG-PET/CT and determine their roles on the evaluation of therapy response. Patients and methods. We retrospectively evaluated radiographic and metabolic characteristics of bone metastases in 30 patients who were referred for the evaluation of response to systemic therapy with 18FDG-PET/CT. All patients underwent integrated 18FDG-PET/CT before and after treatment. Results. The baseline radiographic patterns of the target lesions in responders group were lytic, sclerotic, mixed and CT negative; after treatment the radiographic patterns of all target lesions changed to a sclerotic pattern and attenuation increased (p = 0.012) and metabolic activity decreased (p = 0.012). A correlation was found between decreasing metabolic activity and increasing attenuation of the target lesions (r = ?0.55) (p = 0.026). However, in nonresponders group, the baseline radiologic patterns of the target lesions were lytic, blastic, mixed and CT negative; after treatment all lytic target lesions remained the same and one CT negative lesion turned to lytic pattern and the attenuation of the target lesions decreased (p ± 0.12) and metabolic activity increased (p = 0.012). A correlation was found between increasing metabolic activity and decreasing attenuation (r = ?0.65) (p = 0.032). An exception of this rule was seen in baseline blastic metastases which progressed with increasing in size, metabolic activity and attenuation. Conclusions. This study shows that the metabolic activity of lesions is a more reliable parameter than the radiographic patterns for the evaluation of therapy response. PMID:26029021

  20. Evaluation of radiographic and metabolic changes in bone metastases in response to systemic therapy with 18FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate radiographic and metabolic changes in bone metastases in response to systemic therapy with 18FDG-PET/CT and determine their roles on the evaluation of therapy response. We retrospectively evaluated radiographic and metabolic characteristics of bone metastases in 30 patients who were referred for the evaluation of response to systemic therapy with 18FDG-PET/CT. All patients underwent integrated 18FDG-PET/CT before and after treatment. The baseline radiographic patterns of the target lesions in responders group were lytic, sclerotic, mixed and CT negative; after treatment the radiographic patterns of all target lesions changed to a sclerotic pattern and attenuation increased (p = 0.012) and metabolic activity decreased (p = 0.012). A correlation was found between decreasing metabolic activity and increasing attenuation of the target lesions (r = ?0.55) (p = 0.026). However, in nonresponders group, the baseline radiologic patterns of the target lesions were lytic, blastic, mixed and CT negative; after treatment all lytic target lesions remained the same and one CT negative lesion turned to lytic pattern and the attenuation of the target lesions decreased (p ± 0.12) and metabolic activity increased (p = 0.012). A correlation was found between increasing metabolic activity and decreasing attenuation (r = ?0.65) (p = 0.032). An exception of this rule was seen in baseline blastic metastases which progressed with increasing in size, metabolic activity and attenuation. This study shows that the metabolic activity of lesions is a more reliable parameter than the radiographic patterns for the evaluation of therapy response

  1. Using the Enhanced Daily Load Stimulus Model to Quantify the Mechanical Load and Bone Mineral Density Changes Experienced by Crew Members on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, K. O.; Gopalakrishnan, R.; Kuklis, M. M.; Maender, C. C.; Rice, A. J.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the use of exercise countermeasures during long-duration space missions, bone mineral density (BMD) and predicted bone strength of astronauts continue to show decreases in the lower extremities and spine. This site-specific bone adaptation is most likely caused by the effects of microgravity on the mechanical loading environment of the crew member. There is, therefore, a need to quantify the mechanical loading experienced on Earth and on-orbit to define the effect of a given "dose" of loading on bone homeostasis. Gene et al. recently proposed an enhanced DLS (EDLS) model that, when used with entire days of in-shoe forces, takes into account recently developed theories on the importance of factors such as saturation, recovery, and standing and their effects on the osteogenic response of bone to daily physical activity. This algorithm can also quantify the tinting and type of activity (sit/unload, stand, walk, run or other loaded activity) performed throughout the day. The purpose of the current study was to use in-shoe force measurements from entire typical work days on Earth and on-orbit in order to quantify the type and amount of loading experienced by crew members. The specific aim was to use these measurements as inputs into the EDLS model to determine activity timing/type and the mechanical "dose" imparted on the musculoskeletal system of crew members and relate this dose to changes in bone homeostasis.

  2. The Study on Bone Mineral Density Measurement Error in Accordance with Change in ROI by Utilizing Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Hong [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Ja [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Dongnam Health College, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hyung Jin [Dept. of Medicine Physics, The Graduate School of Biomedical Science Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry(DEXA) is commonly used to diagnose Osteoporosis. The errors of DEXA bone density operation are caused by operator, bone mineral density meter, blood testing, patient. We focus on operator error then study about how much influence operator's region of intest(ROI) in bone testing result. During from March to July in 2011. 50 patients ware selected respectively from 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 age groups who came to Korea University Medical Center(KUMC) for their Osteoporosis treatment. A-test was performed with usually ROI and B-test was performed with most widely ROI. Then, We compare A-test and B-test for find maximum difference of T-score error which occurred operator ROI controlling. Standard deviation of T-score of B-test showed 0.1 higher then A-test in femur neck. Standard deviation of B-test showed 0.2 higher then A-test in Ward's area which in Greater trocanter and Inter trocanter. Standard deviation of B-test showed 0,1 lower then A-test in L-1. Bone density testing about Two hundred patients results are as follow. When operator ROI was changed wider than normal ROI, bone density of femur was measured more higher but bone density of L-spine was measured more lower then normal bone density. That means, sometime DEXA bone density testing result is dependent by operator ROI controlling. This is relevant with the patient's medicine and health insurance, thus, tester always keep the size of ROI for to prevent any problem in the patient.

  3. Analysis of trabecular bone architectural changes induced by osteoarthritis in rabbit femur using 3D active shape model and digital topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, P. K.; Rajapakse, C. S.; Williams, D. S.; Duong, L.; Coimbra, A.

    2007-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic joint disease, which causes the cartilage between the bone joints to wear away, leading to pain and stiffness. Currently, progression of OA is monitored by measuring joint space width using x-ray or cartilage volume using MRI. However, OA affects all periarticular tissues, including cartilage and bone. It has been shown previously that in animal models of OA, trabecular bone (TB) architecture is particularly affected. Furthermore, relative changes in architecture are dependent on the depth of the TB region with respect to the bone surface and main direction of load on the bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a new method for accurately evaluating 3D architectural changes induced by OA in TB. Determining the TB test domain that represents the same anatomic region across different animals is crucial for studying disease etiology, progression and response to therapy. It also represents a major technical challenge in analyzing architectural changes. Here, we solve this problem using a new active shape model (ASM)-based approach. A new and effective semi-automatic landmark selection approach has been developed for rabbit distal femur surface that can easily be adopted for many other anatomical regions. It has been observed that, on average, a trained operator can complete the user interaction part of landmark specification process in less than 15 minutes for each bone data set. Digital topological analysis and fuzzy distance transform derived parameters are used for quantifying TB architecture. The method has been applied on micro-CT data of excised rabbit femur joints from anterior cruciate ligament transected (ACLT) (n = 6) and sham (n = 9) operated groups collected at two and two-to-eight week post-surgery, respectively. An ASM of the rabbit right distal femur has been generated from the sham group micro-CT data. The results suggest that, in conjunction with ASM, digital topological parameters are suitable for analyzing architectural changes induced by OA.

  4. [Bone metabolism: molecular mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, E; Schett, G

    2007-07-01

    In order to accommodate individual load, the skeletal system is in a continual state of change. Bone metabolism guarantees optimal bone structure. The osteoblasts are responsible for the synthesis and the osteoclasts for resorption of the bone. A finely adjusted interplay between molecular mechanisms leads, via cytokines, hormones and growth factors, to an homeostasis in bone metabolism. Disturbances of this process lead via increased bone resorption to osteoporosis, and via increased synthesis to osteopetrosis. This contribution describes the known molecular mechanisms in this remodelling process. PMID:17562055

  5. Alcoholic liver disease and changes in bone mineral density / Enfermedad hepática alcohólica y alteraciones de la densidad mineral ósea

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Germán, López-Larramona; Alfredo J., Lucendo; Laura, González-Delgado.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La osteoporosis y la osteopenia son alteraciones de la densidad mineral ósea (DMO) que se desarrollan frecuentemente en la enfermedad hepática crónica (EHC). Dichas alteraciones han sido estudiadas predominantemente en la enfermedad colestásica crónica y en la cirrosis hepática. El consumo de alcoho [...] l es un factor de riesgo independiente para la aparición de osteoporosis, cuya prevalencia estimada en pacientes con enfermedad hepática por alcohol (EHA) varía entre un 5 % y un 40 %. La pérdida de DMO en la EHA se produce por un disbalance entre formación y resorción ósea. Su etiopatogenia es multifactorial y comprende la toxicidad del alcohol sobre el hueso, las alteraciones endocrinológicas y nutricionales secundarias al alcoholismo y el déficit de osteocalcina, vitamina D e IGF-1, entre otras. El diagnóstico de las alteraciones de la DMO en la EHA se basa en su medición mediante densitometría ósea. El tratamiento incluye el abandono del alcohol y medidas generales de tipo nutricional, abandono del tabaco y ejercicio físico. La suplementación con calcio y vitamina D se recomienda en todos los pacientes con EHA y osteoporosis. Los bisfosfonatos son los principales fármacos para el tratamiento específico de esta entidad. Otras alternativas son el raloxifeno, el tratamiento hormonal sustitutivo y la calcitonina. La presente revisión abordará los aspectos más relevantes para el manejo clínico de las alteraciones de la DMO en el contexto de la EHA, incluyendo su prevalencia, etiopatogenia y diagnóstico. Por otra parte, se efectuará una revisión del tratamiento de la osteoporosis en la EHC en general, incidiendo en los aspectos específicos relacionados con la pérdida de masa ósea en la EHA. Abstract in english Osteoporosis and osteopenia are alterations in bone mineral density (BMD) that frequently occur in the context of chronic liver disease (CLD). These alterations have been studied predominantly in chronic cholestatic disease and cirrhosis of the liver. Alcohol consumption is an independent risk facto [...] r for the onset of osteoporosis, whose estimated prevalence in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) ranges between 5 % and 40 %. The loss of BMD in ALD is the result of an imbalance between bone formation and resorption. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes the toxic effects of alcohol on bone and endocrine and nutritional disorders secondary to alcoholism and a deficiency of osteocalcin, vitamin D and insulin growth factor-1. The diagnosis of BMD alterations in ALD is based on its measurement using bone densitometry. Treatment includes smoking and alcohol cessation and general measures such as changes in nutrition and exercise. Calcium and vitamin D supplements are recommended in all patients with ALD and osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the specific treatment of this condition. Alternatives include raloxifene, hormone replacement therapy and calcitonin. This review will address the most important aspects involved in the clinical management of abnormal BMD in the context of ALD, including its prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnosis. We will also review the treatment of osteoporosis in CLD in general, focusing on specific aspects related to bone loss in ALD.

  6. The role of heating, cavitation and acoustic streaming in mediating ultrasound-induced changes of TGF-? gene expression in bone cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper relates ultrasound-induced changes in bone cell function to quantitative data assessing the level of several interaction mechanisms within the exposure environment. Characterisation of ultrasound fields in terms of resultant levels of heating, cavitation and acoustic streaming may provide a novel means of accurately assessing the likelihood of biological effects in vitro

  7. The mechanism of uptake of bone-seeking isotopes by skeletal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although skeletal scintigraphy has become accepted as an extremely useful method of examining the skeleton, particularly for the early detection of skeletal metastases and the assessment of their response to therapy, the underlying pathological changes which allow this use of isotopes are not well understood. This study was undertaken in man and in the experimental animal in an attempt to explain the underlying mechanism for skeletal scintigraphy. Autopsy specimens indicated that tumour invasion of bone, with the possible exception of lymphomata, is associated with a significant increase in new bone production, shown by an increase in the amount of osteoid tissue and particularly immature woven bone. The animal experiments indicated that there are two mechanisms for this new bone formation. These different mechanisms may explain the different radiographic appearances. Irrespective of the mechanism of production, this new bone had a markedly increased avidity for bone-seeking isotopes. When the tumour was successfully irradiated the bone lost its osteoblastic reaction, and the production of immature new bone ceased as did the increased uptake of bone-seeking isotopes. Investigation of the vascularity of the lesion showed that there was an increase in small vessels in the neighbourhood of the tumour. The results of the study suggest that the uptake of isotope occurs in two phases. During the first phase, which occurs very rapidly, large amounts of isotope accumulate in the extracellular fluid following the increased vascularity. In the second slower phase, the isotope is gradually concentrated by the reactive immature new woven bone. (author)

  8. Age-related changes in the hemodynamics of the femoral head as evaluated by early phase of bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The femoral head is reported to be in a markedly hypoemic state as compared with other tissues even under normal conditions, and it is therefore necessary to understand its hemodynamics to investigate the pathogenesis of hip disorders. It is known that aspects of intraosseous hemodynamics including blood flow and blood pool can be evaluated soon after radioisotope administration. In this study, hemodynamic changes in the femoral head according to gender and age were examined by investigating accumulation of radioisotope in the tissue during the early phase of bone scintigraphy. The subjects of this study consisted of 58 joints of 31 men and 75 joints of 41 women, whose ages ranged from 15 to 87 years (average age: 67.9 years). Images of bone scintigraphy were obtained for 15 to 20 minutes at 5 minutes and at 3 hours after radioisotope administration. The ratio of accumulation in the femoral head to that in the diaphysis (head-to-diaphysis ratio, HD ratio) was calculated. HD ratios obtained 15-20 minutes later ranged from 0.01 to 7.35 (1.88±0.91, mean±SD). HD ratios decreased with age, and a significant inverse correlation was observed between age and HD ratio, demonstrating a correlation coefficient of -0.27 (p=0.001). The HD ratio among men was 0.01-3.57 (1.66±0.71), while that among women was 0.53-7.35 (2.05±1.01), and a significant difference was observed in HD ratio between men and women (p=0.02). There was a significant difference in HD ratios between men and women in their teens to forties (p=0.03), while no significant differences was observed in the other age groups. HD ratios obtained 3 hours later ranged from 0.44 to 6.32 (1.95±0.79, mean±SD), and no significant correlation was observed between age and HD ratio, demonstrating a correlation coefficient of -0.14. The present study demonstrated that blood flow and blood pool of the femoral head decrease with aging particularly in women. This hemodynamic deterioration of the femoral head caused by aging may have an effect on the onset and progression of hip disorders by influencing bone metabolism. (author)

  9. The role of sleep in changing our minds: A psychologist's discussion of papers on memory reactivation and consolidation in sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Cartwright, Rosalind D.

    2004-01-01

    The group of papers on memory reactivation and consolidation during sleep included in this volume represents cutting edge work in both animals and humans. They support that the two types of sleep serve different necessary functions. The role of slow wave sleep (SWS) is reactivation of the hippocampal-neocortical circuits activated during a waking learning period, while REM sleep is responsible for the consolidation of this new learning into long-term memory. These studies provide further insi...

  10. Biochemical and morphological changes in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells induced by treatment of rats with p-Nonylphenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Abnosi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:In previous investigations, we have shown para-nonylphenol (p-NP caused significant reduction of proliferation and differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in vitro. In this study, we first treat the rats with p-NP, then carried out the biochemical and morphological studies on MSCs. Materials and Methods: Proliferation property of cells was evaluated with the help of MTT assay, trypan blue, population doubling number, and colony forming assay. Differentiation property was evaluated with quantitative alizarin red assay, measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity as well as intracellular calcium content. In addition; morphological study, TUNEL test, activated caspase assay, and comet assay were performed to evaluate the mechanism of the cell death. Results: The results showed significant reduction in the colony-forming-ability and population-doubling-number of extracted cells when compared to control ones. In addition, it was revealed that the p-NP treatment of rats caused significant reduction in nuclear diameter, cytoplasm shrinkage, and induction of caspase-dependent-apoptosis. Also there was significant reduction in ALP activity, intracellular calcium content, and intracellular matrix following osteogenic differentiation. Conclusion: As MSCs are the cellular back up for bone remodeling and repair, we suggest more investigations to be conducted regarding the correlation between the increasing number of patients suffering from osteoporosis and p-NP toxicity. Also, we strongly recommend WHO and local health organization to prevent industries of using p-NP in formulation of industrial products which may cause changes in proliferation and differentiation properties of stem cells.

  11. Changes of rat plasma total low molecular weight antioxidant level after tabun exposure and consequent treatment by acetylcholinesterase reactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Musilek, Kamil; Kuca, Kamil; Jung, Young-Sik; Kassa, Jiri

    2011-02-01

    These experiments were performed on a rat model. The rats were divided into eight groups and consequently exposed to either a saline solution (control), atropine or a combination of atropine and tabun. The reactivation efficacy of the oximes was estimated on the rats exposed to tabun, atropine and a reactivator of AChE. The oximes HI-6, obidoxime, trimedoxime, K203 and KR-22836 were used as representative compounds of commonly available and new AChE reactivators. Besides the positive effect of the administered reactivators on blood AChE activity, the sizable modulation of low molecular weight antioxidant (LMWA) levels was also determined. The LMWA levels in the the animals treated with the oxime reactivators were decreased in comparison with the animals treated by atropine alone. It was found that the levels of LMWA returned to the level found in the control animals when either trimedoxime, K203 or KR-22836 were administered. The principle of oxime reactivator function and a novel insight into AChE activity regulation and oxidative stress is discussed. PMID:20569082

  12. Changes in bone metastases of prostatic cancer during total systems radiotherapy with 89SrCl as shown by osteoscintigraphy and magnetic resonance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex radiation evaluation of changes in the bone metastases is carried out on the basis of the data on the skeleton scintigraphy with 99mTc methylenediphosphonate and magnetic resonance tomography by treatment of wide-spread prostatic cancer forms with 89SrCl. It is shown that 89SrCl system therapy causes reliable regression of metastatic centers in their whole volume. It makes it possible to consider 89SrCl as a pharmaceutical causing not only weakening of the pain syndrome, but therapeutical effect in form of regression of the prostatic cancer bone metastases

  13. Measurement of bone marrow lesions by MR imaging in knee osteoarthritis: The sensitivity to change assessed by two quantitative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Flemming Kromann; Jurik, Anne Grethe

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two quantitative methods of measuring BMLs in knee osteoarthritis (KOA), one with computer assisted automatic segmentation (CAS) and one with manual segmentation (MS). Methods and Materials: Eighteen females and four males (mean age 61 years) with KOA confined to the medial femorotibial compartment obtained MRI at baseline and follow-up (median 334 days in between) using a 1.5T system. STIR, T1-weighted and T1 post-contrast sequences were obtained in all. The sagittal STIR sequences of the 44 examinations were separated, anonymized and independently assessed by two readers. Mean values and standard deviations (STD) of the signal intensity (SI) of the normal marrow of the lateral femoral and tibial condyles were obtained by both methods. In three slices of the medial femoral condyle the volume of bone marrow with SIs exceeding the threshold values (BML) were measured. Threshold values were defined by mean value of normal bone marrow SI plus one or two STDs. STCwas calculated by comparing the relative BML-involvement at baseline between the two readers using a Bland-Altman analysis. Any change in BML-volume exceeding the 95 % limits of agreement was considered significant. Results: The threshold values of CAS and MS were almost identical. The median BML-volume in the femur was 522 mm3 and 777 mm3, in the tibia 286 mm3 and 968 mm3, using CAS and MS, respectively. This corresponded to a relative BML-involvement in the femur of 3.9 % and 5.6 %, in the tibia 2.9 % and 8.8 %, using CAS and MS, respectively. The two methods were thus not comparable; the CAS method recorded the volume of voxels exceeding the threshold values whereas manual segmentation included varying, up to 70 % voxels with normal SI. The inter-observer agreement was best by CAS with bias values of ?0.1– 0.01 %BML compared with 0.26–0.36 by MS. Also the confidence intervals were narrowest by CAS. The STC was good using CAS. A significant change of BML by CAS was outside thelimits of ?3.4 %–3.4 % whereas the limits by MS were up to ?7.2 %–8.4 %. Conclusion: CAS was good and superior to MS in detecting changes over time. The BML-volumes measured by the two methods were not comparable.

  14. Temperature changes caused by the difference in the distance between the ultrasound transducer and bone during 1?mhz and 3?mhz continuous ultrasound: a phantom study

    OpenAIRE

    Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Ikeda, Satoshi; Harada, Katsuhiro; Kamikawa, Yurie; YOSHIDA, AKIRA; Inoue, Kazuhiro; Yanagida, Nobuhiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Kiyama, Ryoji; Ohshige, Tadasu; Maeda, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to use a thermograph to observe temperature changes caused by different distances between an ultrasound transducer and bone during 1?MHz and 3?MHz continuous ultrasound emission on a phantom. [Materials and Methods] We observed the distribution of temperature elevations on a phantom consisting of pig ribs and tissue-mimicking material. One megahertz and 3?MHz ultrasound were delivered at 2.0?W/cm2 for 5 minutes. To record the temperature changes on th...

  15. Biochemical prediction of changes in spinal bone mass in juvenile chronic (or rheumatoid) arthritis treated with glucocorticoids.

    OpenAIRE

    Reeve, J; Loftus, J; Hesp, R.; Ansell, BM; Wright, DJ; Woo, PM

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify biochemical predictors of spinal bone mineral growth and the development of spinal osteoporosis in children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) treated with glucocorticoids. METHODS: Bone mass measurements were made at 3 monthly intervals for one year in 31 children. At each visit, blood and urine were obtained for assessment of laboratory indices related to the acute phase response and bone remodelling rates. Assessments were also made of joint inflammation (simple j...

  16. Three-D imaging of dental alveolar bone change after fixed orthodontic treatment in patients with periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Zhi-Gui; Yang, Chi; FANG, BING; Xia, Yun-Hui; Mao, Li-Xia; Feng, Yi-Miao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to radiographically quantify bone height and bone density in patients with periodontitis after fixed orthodontic treatment using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: A total of 81 patients including 40 patients with chronic periodontitis (group 1) and 41 patients with normal periodontal tissues (group 2) were selected. CBCT scanning for anterior teeth were taken before and after orthodontic treatment. Measurements of bone hei...

  17. Changes in 3-dimensional bone structure indices in hypoparathyroid patients treated with PTH(1-84) : A randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikjaer, Tanja; Rejnmark, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism (hypoPT) is characterized by a state of low bone turnover and high bone mineral density (BMD) despite conventional treatment with calcium supplements and active vitamin D analogues. To assess effects of PTH substitution therapy on 3-dimensional bone structure, we randomized 62 patients with hypoPT into 24 weeks of treatment with either PTH(1-84) 100?µg/day subcutaneously or similar placebo as an add-on therapy. Micro-computed tomography was performed on 44 iliac crest bone biopsies (23 on PTH treatment) obtained after 24 weeks of treatment. Compared with placebo, PTH caused a 27% lower trabecular thickness (p?

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part ... bone growths and bony changes seen in metabolic conditions. assist in the detection and diagnosis of bone ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... changes seen in metabolic conditions. assist in the detection and diagnosis of bone cancer . locate foreign objects ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shin), ankle or foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone ... or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays ...

  1. A new MCNP option: KCORR -- The use of the correlated sampling method to study reactivity effects due to changes of a reactor arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The planned advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor has a compact core surrounded by a large pool of heavy water containing a complex arrangement of reflector experimental components. Mocking up the reactor system without the reflector components results in an azimuthally symmetric geometry for which the eigenvalue keff can be calculated accurately with diffusion or discrete ordinates methods by using two-dimensional geometry. Here, a new option KCORR for calculating the eigenvalue keff of fission reactor arrangements has been implemented in the MCNP Monte Carlo code. This option is based on a matrix method and has the additional feature of applying correlated sampling methods to investigate small reactivity effects that are very likely lost in the statistical uncertainties of two independent program runs with the old option KCODE. For verification of the new program option, calculations of the reactivity worths of the control rod and the safety rod of the FOEHN reactor and the reactivity effects of various components in the reflector pool of the FOEHN reactor were performed with both KCODE and KCORR and compared with measured data. The efficient of MCNP in calculating reactivity changes by using KCORR is improved not only by means of lower statistical uncertainties but also by reducing of computing time

  2. System Re-set: High LET Radiation or Transient Musculoskeletal Disuse Cause Lasting Changes in Oxidative Defense Pathways Within Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, A.; Alwood, Joshua S.; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Six months post-IR, there were no notable changes in skeletal expression of 84 principal genes in the p53 signaling pathway due to low dose IR (0.5Gy), HU, or both. In contrast, numerous genes relevant to oxidative stress were regulated by the treatments, typically in a direction indicative of increased oxidative stress and impaired defense. IR and HU independently reduced (between 0.46 to 0.88 fold) expression levels of Noxa1, Gpx3, Prdx2, Prdx3, and Zmynd17. Surprisingly, transient HU alone (sham-irradiated) decreased expression of several redox-related genes (Gpx1,Gstk1, Prdx1, Txnrd2), which were not affected significantly by IR alone. Irradiation increased (1.13 fold) expression of a gene responsible for production of superoxides by neutrophils (NCF2). Of interest, only combined treatment with HU and IR led to increased expression levels of Ercc2, (1.19 fold), a DNA excision repair enzyme. Differences in gene expression levels may reflect a change in gene expression on a per cell basis, a shift in the repertoire of specific cell types within the tissue, or both. Serum nitrite/nitrate levels were elevated to comparable levels (1.6-fold) due to IR, HU or both, indicative of elevated systemic nitrosyl stress. CONCLUSIONS The magnitude of changes in skeletal expression of oxidative stress-related genes six months after irradiation and/or transient unloading tended to be relatively modest (0.46-1.15 fold), whereas the p53 pathway was not affected. The finding that many different oxidative stress-related genes differed from controls at this late time point implicates a generalized impairment of oxidative defense within skeletal tissue, which coincides with both profound radiation damage to osteoprogenitors/stem cells in bone marrow and impaired remodeling of mineralized tissue.

  3. MRI findings of bone tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamanaka, Hideaki; Kashiwagi, Teruyuki; Chosa, Etuo; Kuwahara, Shigeru; Tajima, Naoya [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    To investigate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, of bone tumors, we retrospectively reviewed 32 MRI examination already diagnosed pathologically. Subjects included 18 males and 14 females, ranging in age from 5 to 63 years, with a means of 29.3 years. These included 25 benign bone tumors and 7 malignant bone tumors. The accuracy of a qualitative diagnosis was observed in giant cell tumor, osteoid osteoma, fibrous dysplasia and ossifying fibroma. In malignant bone tumors, it is difficult to accurately diagnose with MRI, although MRI was useful in showing interaction of the tumor and host tissue, extension, edema and reactive zone. (author)

  4. 18F-Fluoride bone positron emission tomography demonstrating changes related to finger clubbing and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy is manifested by clubbing and periostitis of bones. We present a very rare documentation of increased F18-sodium fluoride uptake in the distal phalanges of both hands correlating to clubbing of the fingers in a 55-year-old female patient with carcinoma of lung in whom bone positron emission tomography was performed for metastatic work-up

  5. Age Dependent Changes in Cartilage Matrix, Subchondral Bone Mass, and Estradiol Levels in Blood Serum, in Naturally Occurring Osteoarthritis in Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yin Yan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Dunkin Hartley (DH guinea pig is a widely used naturally occurring osteoarthritis model. The aim of this study was to provide detailed evidence of age-related changes in articular cartilage, subchondral bone mineral density, and estradiol levels. We studied the female Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age (eight animals in each group. Histological analysis were used to identify degenerative cartilage and electron microscopy was performed to further observe the ultrastructure. Estradiol expression levels in serum were assessed, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 and glycosaminoglycan expression in cartilage was performed by immunohistochemistry. Bone mineral density of the tibia subchondral bone was measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry. Histological analysis showed that the degeneration of articular cartilage grew more severe with increasing age starting at 3 months, coupled with the loss of normal cells and an increase in degenerated cells. Serum estradiol levels increased with age from 1 to 6 months and thereafter remained stable from 6 to 12 months. Matrix metalloproteinase 3 expression in cartilage increased with age, but no significant difference was found in glycosaminoglycan expression between 1- and 3-month old animals. The bone mineral density of the tibia subchondral bone increased with age before reaching a stable value at 9 months of age. Age-related articular cartilage degeneration occurred in Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs beginning at 3 months of age, while no directly positive or negative correlation between osteoarthritis progression and estradiol serum level or subchondral bone mineral density was discovered.

  6. Effect of antioxidants on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances of mechanically de boned chicken meat irradiated with ionizing radiation: cobalt-60 and electron beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Pomarico Neto, Walter; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Brusqui, Armando Luiz, E-mail: hgomes@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: abrusqui@cnen.gov.b [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Haguiwara, Marcia Mayumi Harada; Miyagusku, Luciana, E-mail: marciamh@ital.gov.b, E-mail: lucianam@ital.gov.b [Food Technology Institute (ITAL), SP (Brazil). Meat Technology Center

    2011-07-01

    Samples of MDCM with skin were divided into three groups: control (without antioxidants), Antioxidant 1 - A1 (0.3% Sodium Polyphosphate and Sodium Erythorbate 0.05%) and Antioxidant 2 - A2 (Rosemary Extract 0.02% and {alpha}-Tocopherol 0.01%). The three batches of samples were divided into nine groups: no antioxidant and non-irradiated (Cn/I), with antioxidant A1 and non-irradiated (A1n/I), with antioxidant A2 and non-irradiated (A2n/I) without antioxidant and irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (CCo), with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Cobalt 60 source (A1Co) with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (A2Co) with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Electron beam (A1Eb) and with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Electron beam (A2Eb). Each 100 g sample was conditioned in a transparent, low density polyethylene oxygen permeable bag, frozen overnight at a temperature of -18 +- 1 deg C in a chamber, and irradiated in this state, maintaining the temperature low with dry ice. The samples were irradiated with a dose of 3.0 kGy, used two sources of radiation: Cobalt-60 (3.1 kGy.h{sup -1}) and electron beam (2.9 kGy.s{sup -1}). After this process, the samples were evaluated during the refrigeration period (2 +- 1 deg C) for 11 days for the following analysis: total psychotropic bacteria count, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The addition of antioxidants was able to reduce lipid oxidation caused by the irradiation. There were no differences between the radiation sources used in the same parameters. The better antioxidants mixture in the TBARS reducing it was rosemary extract and {alpha}-tocopherol (A2). (author)

  7. Effect of antioxidants on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances of mechanically de boned chicken meat irradiated with ionizing radiation: cobalt-60 and electron beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of MDCM with skin were divided into three groups: control (without antioxidants), Antioxidant 1 - A1 (0.3% Sodium Polyphosphate and Sodium Erythorbate 0.05%) and Antioxidant 2 - A2 (Rosemary Extract 0.02% and ?-Tocopherol 0.01%). The three batches of samples were divided into nine groups: no antioxidant and non-irradiated (Cn/I), with antioxidant A1 and non-irradiated (A1n/I), with antioxidant A2 and non-irradiated (A2n/I) without antioxidant and irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (CCo), with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Cobalt 60 source (A1Co) with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (A2Co) with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Electron beam (A1Eb) and with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Electron beam (A2Eb). Each 100 g sample was conditioned in a transparent, low density polyethylene oxygen permeable bag, frozen overnight at a temperature of -18 +- 1 deg C in a chamber, and irradiated in this state, maintaining the temperature low with dry ice. The samples were irradiated with a dose of 3.0 kGy, used two sources of radiation: Cobalt-60 (3.1 kGy.h-1) and electron beam (2.9 kGy.s-1). After this process, the samples were evaluated during the refrigeration period (2 +- 1 deg C) for 11 days for the following analysis: total psychotropic bacteria count, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The addition of antioxidants was able to reduce lipid oxidation caused by the irradiation. There were no differences between the radiation sources used in the same parameters. The better antioxidants mixture in the TBARS reducing it was rosemary extract and ?-tocopherol (A2). (author)

  8. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly ... childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about ...

  9. Bone Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor • Enchondroma • Fibrous dysplasia • Chondroblastoma • Aneurysmal bone cyst • Osteoid osteoma Cause For most bone tumors, the cause is ... benign tumors that occur in children, such as osteoid osteoma. Bone Tumor cont. Femur (thighbone) tumor. This x- ...

  10. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  11. Electron Microscopy and Analytical X-ray Characterization of Compositional and Nanoscale Structural Changes in Fossil Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatman, Elizabeth Marie

    The nanoscale structure of compact bone contains several features that are direct indicators of bulk tissue mechanical properties. Fossil bone tissues represent unique opportunities to understand the compact bone structure/property relationships from a deep time perspective, offering a possible array of new insights into bone diseases, biomimicry of composite materials, and basic knowledge of bioapatite composition and nanoscale bone structure. To date, most work with fossil bone has employed microscale techniques and has counter-indicated the survival of bioapatite and other nanoscale structural features. The obvious disconnect between the use of microscale techniques and the discernment of nanoscale structure has prompted this work. The goal of this study was to characterize the nanoscale constituents of fossil compact bone by applying a suite of diffraction, microscopy, and spectrometry techniques, representing the highest levels of spatial and energy resolution available today, and capable of complementary structural and compositional characterization from the micro- to the nanoscale. Fossil dinosaur and crocodile long bone specimens, as well as modern ratite and crocodile femurs, were acquired from the UC Museum of Paleontology. Preserved physiological features of significance were documented with scanning electron microscopy back-scattered imaging. Electron microprobe wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) revealed fossil bone compositions enriched in fluorine with a complementary loss of oxygen. X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrated that all specimens were composed of apatite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging revealed preserved nanocrystallinity in the fossil bones and electron diffraction studies further identified these nanocrystallites as apatite. Tomographic analyses of nanoscale elements imaged by TEM and small angle X-ray scattering were performed, with the results of each analysis further indicating that nanoscale structure is highly conserved in these four fossil specimens. Finally, the results of this study indicate that bioapatite can be preserved in even the most ancient vertebrate specimens, further supporting the idea that fossilization is a preservational process. This work also underlines the importance of using appropriately selected characterization and analytical techniques for the study of fossil bone, especially from the perspective of spatial resolution and the scale of the bone structural features in question.

  12. Persistence of back pain symptoms after pregnancy and bone mineral density changes as measured by quantitative ultrasound - a two year longitudinal follow up study

    OpenAIRE

    Wong Margaret WN; To William WK

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous research has shown a loss of bone mineral density (BMD) during pregnancy. This loss has been correlated to the occurrence of back pain symptoms during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether persistence of back pain symptoms 2 years after pregnancy could be associated with BMD changes as measured by quantitative USG of the os calcis. Methods A cohort of patients who reported significant back pain symptoms during pregnancy were surveyed for p...

  13. Changes in T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow following treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow were performed in 11 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. Nine of the children were re-examined after chemotherapeutic treatment. The results were compared with histological data from bone marrow biopsies obtained in close association to the MR examinations. Ten age matched children were examined as a control group. A 1.5 Tesla whole body scanner was used for the measurements. The pretreatment T1 relaxation times of the bone marrow were significantly prolonged, compared to the age matched controls. After chemotherapy the T1 relaxation times of the children with ALL decreased significantly towards or into the normal range. A significant correlation was found between the T1 relaxation time and the content of malignant blast cells in the bone marrow. (orig.)

  14. Calculations of Changes in Reactivity during some regular periods of operation of JEN-1 MOD Reactor; Calculo de vairaciones de reactividad en algunos periodos regulares de operacion del reactor JEN-1 Mod.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1973-07-01

    By a Point-Reactor model and Perturbation Theory, changes in reactivity during some regular operating periods of JEN-1 MOD Reactor have been calculated and compared with available measured values. they were in good agreement. Also changes in reactivity have been calculated during operations at higher power levels than the present one, concluding some practical consequences for the case of increasing the present power of this reactor. (Author)

  15. Comparison of calcium and phosphorus excretion with bone density changes during restraint in immature Macaca nemestrina primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Hood, W. N.; Mack, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Calcium and phosphorus balance data on Macaca nemestrina monkeys during immobilization are presented and correlated with X-ray bone densitometry findings. A positive mineral balance was maintained during the immobilized period. A reduced bone density was observed in most skeletal sites examined with increased density observed in epiphyseal regions. Migration of mineral from one site to another is suggested as a possible explanation for the findings.

  16. Thermomechanical strengthening of titanium nickelide and structure changes upon generation and forced isothermal relaxation of reactive stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of high temperature mechanical tests, high temperature X-ray diffraction analysis, texture analysis and transmission electron microscopy are used to study structural, dimensional and orientation variations in conditions of reactive stress generation and stress relaxation under isothermal unloading near AK? temperature for thermomechanically treated alloys Ti-50.5 and Ti-50.7 at.% Ni. The correspondence of the type of deformation process with the level of total thermomechanical and strain hardening is established

  17. Bone health in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The skeleton undergoes rapid change with respect to growth, modeling and remodeling processes in adolescence. Consequently, the effects of factors that affect bone health positively or negatively can be greater. Between 40% and 60% of, peak bone mass which serves as the bone bank for life, is accrued during adolescence. Lifetime risk of osteoporosis and fracture may be increased if optimal peak bone mass cannot be reached.Accrual of peak bone mass is affected by unmodifiable intrinsic factors and less important extrinsic factors. Higher body mass index and body fat and lower dietary calcium intake increase fracture risk in healthy adolescents. Bone mass was found to be 5% to 10% lower in adolescents with fracture than their peers. Adequate nutrition in amount and composition and life style factors are important for skeletal health. While diets rich in saturated fats and refined sugars and lower in protein may be detrimental to bone health, optimal quantities of polyunsaturated fatty acids and complex carbohydrates may be beneficial to bone health. Dietary calcium and vitamin D are key factors in promoting bone health and preventing bone loss. Phosphorus and magnesium as well as other elements and especially vitamin C and K have been shown to play important roles in bone health. While weight bearing regular exercise and a healthy bodyweight are beneficial to bone health, alcohol consumption and smoking contribute to poor bone health. Adolescence may serve as a period of opportunity for reduction of the incidence of osteoporosis in adulthood through implication of effective intervention strategies. (Turk Arch Ped 2011; 46 Suppl: 54-8

  18. Study of a Cohort of 1,886 Persons To Determine Changes in Antibody Reactivity to Borrelia burgdorferi 3 Months after a Tick Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessau, Ram B; Fryland, Linda; Wilhelmsson, Peter; Ekerfelt, Christina; Nyman, Dag; Forsberg, Pia; Lindgren, Per-Eric

    2015-07-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a tick-borne disease caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. The most frequent clinical manifestation is a rash called erythema migrans. Changes in antibody reactivity to B. burgdorferi 3 months after a tick bite are measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). One assay is based on native purified flagellum antigen (IgG), and the other assay is based on a recombinant antigen called C6 (IgG or IgM). Paired samples were taken at the time of a tick bite and 3 months later from 1,886 persons in Sweden and the Åland Islands, Finland. The seroconversion or relative change is defined by dividing the measurement units from the second sample by those from the first sample. The threshold for the minimum level of significant change was defined at the 2.5% level to represent the random error level. The thresholds were a 2.7-fold rise for the flagellar IgG assay and a 1.8-fold rise for the C6 assay. Of 1,886 persons, 102/101 (5.4%) had a significant rise in antibody reactivity in the flagellar assay or the C6 assay. Among 40 cases with a diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, the sensitivities corresponding to a rise in antibodies were 33% and 50% for the flagellar antigen and the C6 antigen, respectively. Graphical methods to display the antibody response and to choose thresholds for a rise in relative antibody reactivity are shown and discussed. In conclusion, 5.4% of people with tick bites showed a rise in Borrelia-specific antibodies above the 2.5% threshold in either ELISA but only 40 (2.1%) developed clinical Lyme borreliosis. PMID:25994550

  19. The effect of the composition of plutonium loaded on the reactivity change and the isotopic composition of fuel produced in a fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandinskiy, V. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical investigation into burnup and breeding of nuclides in metallic fuel consisting of a mixture of plutonium and depleted uranium in a fast reactor with sodium coolant. The feasibility of using plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from domestic thermal reactors and weapons-grade plutonium is discussed. It is shown that the largest production of secondary fuel and the least change in the reactivity over the reactor lifetime can be achieved when employing plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from a reactor of the RBMK-1000 type.

  20. The effect of the composition of plutonium loaded on the reactivity change and the isotopic composition of fuel produced in a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a numerical investigation into burnup and breeding of nuclides in metallic fuel consisting of a mixture of plutonium and depleted uranium in a fast reactor with sodium coolant. The feasibility of using plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from domestic thermal reactors and weapons-grade plutonium is discussed. It is shown that the largest production of secondary fuel and the least change in the reactivity over the reactor lifetime can be achieved when employing plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from a reactor of the RBMK-1000 type

  1. The effect of the composition of plutonium loaded on the reactivity change and the isotopic composition of fuel produced in a fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandinskiy, V. Yu., E-mail: blandinsky@mail.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents the results of a numerical investigation into burnup and breeding of nuclides in metallic fuel consisting of a mixture of plutonium and depleted uranium in a fast reactor with sodium coolant. The feasibility of using plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from domestic thermal reactors and weapons-grade plutonium is discussed. It is shown that the largest production of secondary fuel and the least change in the reactivity over the reactor lifetime can be achieved when employing plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from a reactor of the RBMK-1000 type.

  2. Protective Effects of Estradiol on Ethanol-induced Bone Loss Involves Inhibition of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Osteoblasts and Downstream Activation of the ERK/STAT3/RANKL Signaling Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone loss occurs following chronic ethanol (EtOH) consumption in males and cycling females in part as a result of increased bone resorption. We have demonstrated in vivo that estradiol treatment can reverse this effect. Using osteoclast precursors from bone marrow and osteoblast/pre-osteoclast co-cu...

  3. Female Reproductive System and Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Bart L.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2010-01-01

    The female reproductive system plays a major role in regulating the acquisition and loss of bone by the skeleton from menarche through senescence. Onset of gonadal sex steroid secretion at puberty is the major factor responsible for skeletal longitudinal and radial growth, as well as significant gain in bone density, until peak bone density is achieved in third decade of life. Gonadal sex steroids then help maintain peak bone density until menopause, including during the transient changes in ...

  4. The acutely ACL injured knee assessed by MRI: changes in joint fluid, bone marrow lesions, and cartilage during the first year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, R B; Le Graverand, M-P; Buck, R; Roos, E M; Roos, H P; Tamez-Pena, J; Totterman, S; Lohmander, L S

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate changes in the knee during the first year after acute rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of volumes of joint fluid (JF), bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and cartilage volume (VC), and cartilage thickness (ThCcAB) and cartilage surface area (AC). To identify factors associated with these changes. METHODS: Fifty-eight subjects (mean age 26 years, 16 women) with an ACL rupture to a previously un-injured knee were followed prospectively using a 1.5T MR imager at b...

  5. Incidence and clinical importance of chronic reactive periostal new formations of bone in the cervical region in patients with varying neurological symptomatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, S.; Fruehwald, F.; Schwaighofer, B.; Huebsch, P.; Reisner, T.; Binder, H.

    1989-02-01

    81 patients classed into three groups with clinical evidence of neurological symptoms and posttraumatic pain of the cervical spine and the incidence of degenerative disorders were studied noninvasively via CT scanning. In about half of the patients with nerve-root symptomatology as well as with signs of involvement of long tracts, narrowing of the foramen intervertebrale, respectively of the spinal tract, was seen, attributable to degenerative osseous apposition with excellent clinical segmental and (according to radicular symptoms) side correlation. In contrast to these results the group of patients with posttraumatic clinical symptoms showed almost 50% less preexisting degenerative disorders of the cervical spine. Hypertrophic changes of the processus articulares with narrowing of the spinal canal occurred in 14% and were therefore of minor clinical significance. (orig./GDG).

  6. 2D/3D Quantification of bone morphometric parameter changes using X-ray microtomograpphy with different pixel sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, bone quantification led to a deeper knowledge of the 3D microarchitecture. In this study the bone architecture of rats was investigated based on 2D/3D morphometric analysis using microcomputed tomography, aiming at determining the effect of the image acquisition pixel on the quality of some 2D/3D morphometric parameters, such as porosity and trabecular density. Six pairs of bone samples were used and the scans were carried out using high microcomputed tomography system, operating at three different pixel sizes of 33.3 ?m, 15.0 ?m and 9.5 ?m. The results showed 2D parameters values lower than those obtained in the 3D analysis, mainly for trabecular density, separation and thickness. - Highlights: ? Bone quantification led to a deeper knowledge of the 3D microarchitecture. ? ?CT was used in order to investigate condyles bone in 03 different pixel sizes. ? The results showed 2D parameters values lower than those obtained in the 3D analysis. ? The parameters trabecular density, separation and thickness were the most affected

  7. Temperature changes caused by the difference in the distance between the ultrasound transducer and bone during 1?mhz and 3?mhz continuous ultrasound: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Ikeda, Satoshi; Harada, Katsuhiro; Kamikawa, Yurie; Yoshida, Akira; Inoue, Kazuhiro; Yanagida, Nobuhiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Kiyama, Ryoji; Ohshige, Tadasu; Maeda, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to use a thermograph to observe temperature changes caused by different distances between an ultrasound transducer and bone during 1?MHz and 3?MHz continuous ultrasound emission on a phantom. [Materials and Methods] We observed the distribution of temperature elevations on a phantom consisting of pig ribs and tissue-mimicking material. One megahertz and 3?MHz ultrasound were delivered at 2.0?W/cm(2) for 5 minutes. To record the temperature changes on the phantom, we took a screenshot of the thermograph with a digital camera every 20 seconds. [Results] With 1?MHz ultrasound at the distances of 2 and 3?cm, the temperature elevation near the bone was higher than that near the transducer. However, with 3?MHz ultrasound, the temperature elevation was higher near the transducer rather than near the bone. At this point, we consider that there is a possibility of heat injury to internal organs in spite of there being no elevation of skin temperature. [Conclusion] When performing ultrasonic therapy, not only should the frequency be taken into consideration, but also the influence of the absorption coefficient and the reflection of the tissue. We visually confirmed the thermal ultrasound effect by thermography. Special attention to the temperature elevation of the internal organs is necessary to avoid injuries. PMID:25642074

  8. Bone cement

    OpenAIRE

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface ...

  9. Longitudinal changes in C-reactive protein, proform of eosinophil major basic protein, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A during weight changes in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Gamborg, Michael; Bøjsøe, Christine; Hedley, Paula L; Hagen, Christian Munch; Christiansen, Michael; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is associated with several complications, including cardiovascular comorbidity. Several biomarkers, such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), proform of eosinophil major basic protein (Pro-MBP) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), have equally been linked to increased cardiovascular susceptibility. This study investigates these biomarkers during weight loss and regain in obese children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A longitudinal study during a 12...

  10. Changes to the cell, tissue and architecture levels in cranial suture synostosis reveal a problem of timing in bone development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Regelsberger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Premature fusion of cranial sutures is a common problem with an incidence of 3-5 per 10,000 live births. Despite progress in understanding molecular/genetic factors affecting suture function, the complex process of premature fusion is still poorly understood. In the present study, corresponding excised segments of nine patent and nine prematurely fused sagittal sutures from infants (age range 3-7 months with a special emphasis on their hierarchical structural configuration were compared. Cell, tissue and architecture characteristics were analysed by transmitted and polarised light microscopy, 2D-histomorphometry, backscattered electron microscopy and energy-dispersive-x-ray analyses. Apart from wider sutural gaps, patent sutures showed histologically increased new bone formation compared to reduced new bone formation and osseous edges with a more mature structure in the fused portions of the sutures. This pattern was accompanied by a lower osteocyte lacunar density and a higher number of evenly mineralised osteons, reflecting pronounced lamellar bone characteristics along the prematurely fused sutures. In contrast, increases in osteocyte lacunar number and size accompanied by mineralisation heterogeneity and randomly oriented collagen fibres predominantly signified woven bone characteristics in patent, still growing suture segments. The already established woven-to-lamellar bone transition provides evidence of advanced bone development in synostotic sutures. Since structural and compositional features of prematurely fused sutures did not show signs of pathological/defective ossification processes, this supports the theory of a normal ossification process in suture synostosis – just locally commencing too early. These histomorphological findings may provide the basis for a better understanding of the pathomechanism of craniosynostosis, and for future strategies to predict suture fusion and to determine surgical intervention.

  11. Changes of basic bone turnover parameters in short-term and long-term patients with spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Reiter, Andreas Ludwig; Volk, Andreas; Vollmar, Jens; Fromm, Bernd; Gerner, Hans Juergen

    2006-01-01

    The bone mineral density (BMD), the cross- links (PYD, DPD and NTx) and the bone specific alcaline phosphatase (BAP) was investigated in a cross-sectional study in 62 male patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), n = 28 short-term (0–1 year after SCI) and n = 34 long-term SCI patients (> 5 years after SCI). Knowledge about this parameters are necessary to find an adequate therapy for this special kind of osteoporosis. Immobilisation osteoporosis in SCI patients is a well-known problem that may...

  12. Hyaluronan protects against cartilage damage by decreasing stiffness and changing3-D microarchitecture of subchondral bone in guinea pig primary osteoarthrosis : Ming Ding, Carl C. Danielsen and Ivan Hvid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    Introduction: Hyaluronan (HA) is a biologic material, and a major component of synovial fluid. HA has received increasing interest as a potential agent of therapeutic intervention in osteoarthrosis (OA). High molecular weight HA has been shown to reduce arthritic lesions in experimental animal models of articular cartilage injury. It is not known whether HA has any effect on the underlying subchondral bone tissues, e.g. three-dimensional (3-D) microarchitecture, density, collagen and mineral. The aims of the current study were to investigate the effects of high molecular weight HA (1.5x106 Daltons) intra-articular injection on subchondral bone tissues.   Methods: Fifty-six male guinea pigs (6.5 months of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups studied in a short-term and a long-term experimental period (Fig. 1). In the short-term study: HA-I group received intra-articular injection of HA 0.4 mg/kg/week for 5 weeks in both knee joints; the control group received vehicle. In the long-term study: HA-II received 0.4mg/kg/week intra-articular injection for additional 5 weeks; HA-III received no more injection; and the control group received vehicle. After the injection periods the guinea pigs were left untreated until sacrifice (9 and 12 months of age), the left tibiae were harvested and micro-CT scanned to quantify 3-D microarchitecture of subchondral bone plate, cancellous bone and cortical bone, followed by mechanical testing and collagen and mineral determination.   Results: The HA-treated groups had almost normal cartilage, whereas the control groups had typical OA-related cartilage degradation. In the short-term study, compared with the control group, HA-injection resulted in a significantly decreased subchondral plate volume fraction and plate thickness. HA-treated cancellous bone had significantly lower bone volume fraction, and typical rod-like structure. In the long-term study, these latter changes were more pronounced, with an additionally significant decrease in connectivity and bone surfacedensity (Fig. 2). In the short-term study, HA-treated cortical bone had significantly greater volume fraction, and surface density. In the long-term study, both HA groups had greater volume fraction and cortical thickness. HA groups had greater bone mineral concentration and mineral density, lower collagen to mineral ratio, and preserved the mechanical properties of cancellous bone. The effects of HA on cartilage and subchondral bone were maintained when HA treatment was discontinued (Table 1).   Discussion: The current study has investigated the effects of HA on the properties of subchondral bone tissues in a primary guinea pig OA model. Significant positive effects of high molecular weight HA on the articular cartilage and subchondral bone tissues were seen. HA protects against OA-related cartilage degradation to almost normal level, and effectively changes the subchondral bone tissue microarchitecture, collagen and mineral content and density without altering the mechanical properties of cancellousbone. The most striking features are the microarchitectural changes in the subchondral cancellous bone that lead to lower bone density and markedly rod-like structure, and thus reducing cartilage stress during impact loading. Still, the subchondral bone has a greater mineral concentration, and a lower collagen to mineral ratio, and thus preserves the mechanical properties of cancellous bone. Our results also suggest that short-term high molecular HA administration is sufficient to maintain the effects of HA, since there are no significant difference in the properties between the continuous and the discontinuous HA groups. These findings are in favor of Radin’s hypothesis that increased subchondral density leads to cartilage damage, and that subchondral bone sclerosis may actually precede cartilage degeneration and loss.                    We conclude that HA protects against cartilage degeneration through decreasing subchondral bone density and thickness, changing trabecular structure toward rod-like, asthat

  13. Low Bone Density (Osteopenia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home » Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  14. Changes in apparent metabolizable energy and digestive tract of broiler chickens fed diets containing irradiated meat-bone meal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Masri, M.R. E-mail: atomic@aec.org.sy

    2003-05-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study the effect of feeding broiler chickens with irradiated meat-bone meal (0, 5, 10, 25, 50 kGy), at a rate of 100 g/kg diet, on the apparent metabolizable energy (AME) values, using total collection of feed and excreta, during different age periods (14-21, 21-28, 28-35 and 35-42 days) and on the biological aspects of the digestive organs during the last 4 weeks of chickens'age (14-42 days). Results indicated that feeding of broiler chickens with diets containing irradiated meat-bone meal had insignificant effects on the AME values which amounted to an average of 18.6 MJ/kg diet during the four weeks of experimental periods. The AME values increased significantly by 0.36-0.99 MJ/kg diet during the late fourth age period compared with the other earlier three age periods. No significant difference was noticed in the AME values between the second and third experimental age periods. Feeding chickens with irradiated meat-bone meal for 4 weeks (14-42 day of age) had no significant effects on the relative weights of crop, proventriculus, gizzard, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caeca, colon, pancreas and liver. Therefore, radiation sterilized meat-bone meal could be used as feedstuff in poultry diets without any deleterious effect on the diet energy utilization and biological aspects of chickens'digestive tract.

  15. Changes in apparent metabolizable energy and digestive tract of broiler chickens fed diets containing irradiated meat-bone meal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been carried out to study the effect of feeding broiler chickens with irradiated meat-bone meal (0, 5, 10, 25, 50 kGy), at a rate of 100 g/kg diet, on the apparent metabolizable energy (AME) values, using total collection of feed and excreta, during different age periods (14-21, 21-28, 28-35 and 35-42 days) and on the biological aspects of the digestive organs during the last 4 weeks of chickens'age (14-42 days). Results indicated that feeding of broiler chickens with diets containing irradiated meat-bone meal had insignificant effects on the AME values which amounted to an average of 18.6 MJ/kg diet during the four weeks of experimental periods. The AME values increased significantly by 0.36-0.99 MJ/kg diet during the late fourth age period compared with the other earlier three age periods. No significant difference was noticed in the AME values between the second and third experimental age periods. Feeding chickens with irradiated meat-bone meal for 4 weeks (14-42 day of age) had no significant effects on the relative weights of crop, proventriculus, gizzard, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caeca, colon, pancreas and liver. Therefore, radiation sterilized meat-bone meal could be used as feedstuff in poultry diets without any deleterious effect on the diet energy utilization and biological aspects of chickens'digestive tract

  16. Changes in apparent metabolizable energy and digestive tract of broiler chickens fed diets containing irradiated meat-bone meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masri, M. R.

    2003-05-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study the effect of feeding broiler chickens with irradiated meat-bone meal (0, 5, 10, 25, 50 kGy), at a rate of 100 g/kg diet, on the apparent metabolizable energy (AME) values, using total collection of feed and excreta, during different age periods (14-21, 21-28, 28-35 and 35-42 days) and on the biological aspects of the digestive organs during the last 4 weeks of chickens'age (14-42 days). Results indicated that feeding of broiler chickens with diets containing irradiated meat-bone meal had insignificant effects on the AME values which amounted to an average of 18.6 MJ/kg diet during the four weeks of experimental periods. The AME values increased significantly by 0.36-0.99 MJ/kg diet during the late fourth age period compared with the other earlier three age periods. No significant difference was noticed in the AME values between the second and third experimental age periods. Feeding chickens with irradiated meat-bone meal for 4 weeks (14-42 day of age) had no significant effects on the relative weights of crop, proventriculus, gizzard, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caeca, colon, pancreas and liver. Therefore, radiation sterilized meat-bone meal could be used as feedstuff in poultry diets without any deleterious effect on the diet energy utilization and biological aspects of chickens'digestive tract.

  17. Torsional force applied to the tibia of living lambs in an attempt to change the bone rotational axis

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jose Batista, Volpon; Mauricio Jose, Falcai; Carlos Alberto, Moro; Daniel Mendes, Leal.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of torsional force on the rotational axis of living lamb tibias. METHODS: An external fixator device was designed to apply rotation to the tibias of lambs. Once a week, the bone distal extremity was rotated 2º. After achieving ~20º of internal rotation, the turn [...] ing was discontinued and the device was maintained in situ for one month and euthanasia occurred in group A (n=10) after this. In group B (n=9) euthanasia occurred three months after removing the device. Computed tomography scans evaluated the rotational angle; dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry assessed the bone mineral density, and conventional and polarized light microscopy studied the bone microstructure. RESULTS: In group A, the mean angle of the external rotation in the control tibias was 24º and 8º in the twisted tibias (p0.05). Microscopically, the twisted tibias showed asymmetrical subperiosteal bone deposition on the lateral cortex surface. CONCLUSION: Gradual torsion applied to the immature tibia significantly modified its rotational axis.

  18. Bone Mineral Density Changes after Physical Training and Calcium Intake in Students with Attention Deficit and Hyper Activity Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab ameri, Elahe; Dehkhoda, Mohammad Reza; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with attention deficit and hyper activity (ADHD) disorder. For this reason 54 male students with ADHD (age 8-12 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  19. Total body bone mineral density changes in healthy Japanese children as assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For 68 healthy children (38 male and 30 female) ranging in age from 1 to 16 years, we measured the bone mineral density (BMD) of different regions (skull, upper extremities, ribs, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, pelvis and lower extremities) and the total body BMD using a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA; QDR-1000/W, Hologic Co.). The total body BMD increased linearly with age for both sexes (male: r=0.9501, female: r=0.9715; p<0.0001). The increase was more prominent in boys compared to girls. There was also a positive correlation between the ratio of total body bone mineral content to lean body mass and age, although total body BMD showed a stronger correlation with age. Furthermore, the total body BMD correlated highly with body height and weight. There were positive correlations between the BMD of different regions and age. Specifically, the BMD of the lower extremities correlated strongly with age. In addition, the BMD of the skull increased at the highest rate. Considering convenience, accuracy and precision, measurement time, radiation exposure dose and the strong correlation with age, measurement of the total body BMD by DEXA is thought to be an effective method of quantifying bone mineral, useful in the evaluation of bone metabolism kinetics in children. (author)

  20. Effects of food enriched with egg yolk hydrolysate (bone peptide) on bone metabolism in orchidectomized dogs

    OpenAIRE

    KOBAYASHI, Toyokazu; Koie, Hiroshi; WATANABE, Arisa; INO, Arisa; Watabe, Kazuya; KIM, Mujo; KANAYAMA, Kiichi; OTSUJI, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of chicken egg hydrolysate (also known as “bone peptide” or BP) on bone metabolism in 5- to 8-month-old orchidectomized dogs. The bone formation marker serum bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and the bone resorption marker urine deoxypyridinoline (DPD) were used as indicators to measure changes in bone metabolism. The following results were observed that Serum BAP was higher in dogs fed BP-enriched food throughout the clinical investigation. Serum BAP was ...

  1. Field-based landslide risk of deep-seated landslides reactivating based on changes in infrastructure: an example from Kelso, Washington, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Large, deep-seated landslides always have the potential to reactivate in the future - generally locally and not the whole slide. How does one determine if one of these large landslides has reactivated if there are houses on it? In April of 2014 a 25 year old house was investigated to see if it was creeping on an ancient landslide near Kelso, Washington. In 1998 we had worked on nearby prehistoric slides to determine if they had reactivated. We developed a list of 17 points to investigate on a lot and in a house that showed that stress was causing movement. Inside the house we checked for: propagation of cracks in the walls, nails popping out of the walls, bulging walls, separation of internal and external chimney from walls, creaking and popping noises in the house, light switches coming out of the walls, doors and windows that are hard to shut, twisted ceiling and floor beams, cracks in concrete floors, and water seeping into the basement. On the lot outside we looked for changes in surface water drainage, bulges in retaining walls, scarps developing in the soils, pistol butt trees, and broken sewage and water lines. A stable site is defined as a site having none of the above characteristics. Slight movement is defined as having 1-5 of the above characteristics. Moderate movement is from 6 to 10 and considerable movement is from 11+. The house we investigated had a score of 14 - definitely was moving! It had had two electrical fires in the past year from severed electrical wires. We recommend that areas of slight movement be monitored, and lots with moderate to considerable movement to be dewatered to slow the movement. If engineering geologists know that movement has started early enough, proper mitigation can be installed that might stop the movement and save the homes.

  2. Scintiscanning in the diagnosis of primary bone growths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tumors rebuilding of a bone and fast growth of the tumor entail an accelerated incorporation of the osteotrope radiopharmacal in the reactive area in comparison with normal bone tissue. In the scintigraphic image this is recognized as a ''positive contrast''. Some examples of bone tumor types of varying histologic character are used to deal with the results of clinical scintiscanning. (APR)

  3. (18)F and (18)FDG PET imaging of osteosarcoma to non-invasively monitor in situ changes in cellular proliferation and bone differentiation upon MYC inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Constadina; Bendapudi, Pavan K; Tseng, Jeffrey R; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Felsher, Dean W

    2008-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common pediatric cancers. Accurate imaging of osteosarcoma is important for proper clinical staging of the disease and monitoring of the tumor's response to therapy. The MYC oncogene has been commonly implicated in the pathogenesis of human osteosarcoma. Previously, we have described a conditional transgenic mouse model of MYC-induced osteosarcoma. These tumors are highly invasive and are frequently associated with pulmonary metastases. In our model, upon MYC inactivation osteosarcomas lose their neoplastic properties, undergo proliferative arrest and differentiate into mature bone. We reasoned that we could use our model system to develop noninvasive imaging modalities to interrogate the consequences of MYC inactivation on tumor cell biology in situ. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) combining the use of both (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)FDG) and (18)F-flouride ((18)F) to detect metabolic activity and bone mineralization/remodeling. We found that upon MYC inactivation, tumors exhibited a slight reduction in uptake of (18)FDG and a significant increase in the uptake of (18)F along with associated histological changes. Thus, these cells have apparently lost their neoplastic properties based upon both examination of their histology and biologic activity. However, these tumors continue to accumulate (18)FDG at levels significantly elevated compared to normal bone. Therefore, PET can be used to distinguish normal bone cells from tumors that have undergone differentiation upon oncogene inactivation. In addition, we found that (18)F is a highly sensitive tracer for detection of pulmonary metastasis. Collectively, we conclude that combined modality PET/CT imaging incorporating both (18)FDG and (18)F is a highly sensitive means to non-invasively measure osteosarcoma growth and the therapeutic response, as well as to detect tumor cells that have undergone differentiation upon oncogene inactivation. PMID:18981708

  4. Bone Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  5. Bone scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injecting a very small amount of radioactive material (radiotracer) into a vein. The substance travels through your ... body. The camera takes pictures of how much radiotracer collects in the bones. If a bone scan ...

  6. Dissolved Organic Matter: a Master Variable for Predicting and Modeling the Effects of Climatic and Environmental Change on Mercury Transport and Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, G.

    2013-12-01

    It is known that dissolved organic matter (DOM) exerts strong controls on the transport and reactivity of Hg in aquatic systems. Our research has demonstrated that DOM binds Hg strongly, interacts with nanoparticulate HgS to stabilize and enhance reactivity, and controls, in part, the availability of Hg for methylation by micro-organisms. In many rivers and streams, DOM and dissolved Hg concentrations are strongly positively correlated and DOM optical properties have been shown to be excellent proxies for Hg concentration. Of particular importance is the hydrophobic acid fraction of DOM that contains primarily terrestrially derived aquatic humic substances. This fraction is derived, in large part, from watershed soils and plant litter, is chromophore-rich, and strongly influences DOM optical properties, such as ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, fluorescence, and specific UV absorbance (SUVA - an indicator of DOM aromaticity). In most rivers and streams studied by our group, the relationships between total dissolved Hg concentration and hydrophobic organic acid (HPOA) content are often stronger than those observed between dissolved Hg and DOM. These results and those of lab studies support the hypothesis that interactions between Hg and the HPOA fraction are important drivers for the transport and reactivity of dissolved Hg in aquatic systems. Therefore, understanding how climate or land use related changes may influence DOM and HPOA export and yield within a particular watershed is key to predicting in the fate and bioaccumulation of Hg in that system. Watershed hydrology, the nature of source materials, and biogeochemical processes throughout the entire ecosystem drive DOM composition. In particular, the abundance of wetlands within a river basin is an excellent indicator of DOM concentration, DOM optical properties, and the concentration of HPOA. For instance, for 17 major North American rivers we found significant positive correlations between basin wetland-cover and bulk DOC concentration (R2=0.78; pBased on watershed characteristics, it is unlikely that all systems will respond similarly to changing climate factors. In this paper, the results of studies designed to define DOM-Hg transport relationships and those focused on watershed DOM dynamics and DOM optical data will be used to describe what we know about the drivers of both Hg and DOM in different river systems (e.g. arid to wet regions; wetland-rich to wet-land-poor; permafrost impacted) with the goal of assessing future changes in DOM and Hg export. In addition, the effects of unusual climate related events, such as record discharge or forest fire, on watershed DOM and Hg export will be presented.

  7. Especies reactivas de oxígeno y su efecto sobre la actividad de las células óseas / Reactive oxygen species on bone cells activity / Espécies reativas de oxigênio e seu efeito na atividade das células ósseas

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Clarisa, Marotte; Susana Noemí, Zeni.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitocôndrias geram espécies reativas de oxigênio (ERO) que cumprem uma grande variedade de processos celulares; se produzidas em excesso são responsáveis pelo estresse oxidativo e por múltiplos processos patológicos, incluindo a osteoporose. Os fatores de transcrição FoxO 1.3 e 4 funcionam como molé [...] culas sensoras de ERO transformando o sinal de estresse oxidativo na indução de mecanismos de proteção ou sinais apoptóticos. A insulina e os fatores de crescimento insulínicos (IGFs) regulam em forma negativa Foxos em mamíferos. As ERO estão envolvidos na remodelação óssea através do seu efeito nos osteoblastos e osteoclastos. Os Foxos controlam a ação de ERO na osteoblastogênese e na osteoclastogênese. Com a idade, o aumento do estresse oxidativo acelera a adipogênese à custa de osteoblastogênese; ao mesmo tempo que aumentam a oxidação de ácidos graxos gerando compostos pró-oxidantes que incrementam o estresse oxidativo. Além disso, a queda estrogênica acelera a osteoclastogênese por via genômica ou não genômica. Devido à importância de FoxOs e ERO na fisiologia óssea e durante o envelhecimento, esclarecer os eventos celulares e passos moleculares envolvidos no controle do estresse oxidativo seria vital para a compreensão da regulação da osteoporose relacionada com a idade. Abstract in spanish Las mitocondrias generan especies reactivas de oxígeno (ERO) que cumplen con una multiplicidad de procesos celulares; cuando se producen en exceso son responsables del estrés oxidativo y de múltiples procesos patológicos, incluyendo osteoporosis. Los factores de transcripción FoxO 1, 3 y 4 actúan co [...] mo moléculas sensoras de ERO convirtiendo la señal de estrés oxidativo en la inducción de mecanismos de protección o señales apoptóticas. La insulina y los factores de crecimiento insulínicos (IGFs) regulan negativamente a FoxOs en mamíferos. Las ERO están involucradas en el remodelamiento óseo a través del efecto que ejercen sobre osteoblastos y osteoclastos. Los FoxOs controlan la acción de ERO sobre la osteoblastogénesis y la osteoclastogénesis. Con la edad, el aumento del estrés oxidativo acelera la adipogénesis a expensas de la osteoblastogénesis, al mismo tiempo que aumenta la oxidación de ácidos grasos generando compuestos pro-oxidantes que incrementan el estrés oxidativo. Asimismo, la caída estrogénica acelera la osteoclastogénesis por vía genómica o no genómica. Dada la importancia de FoxOs y ERO en la fisiología ósea y durante el envejecimiento, clarificar los eventos celulares y pasos moleculares involucrados en el control del estrés oxidativo sería vital para entender la regulación de la osteoporosis relacionada a la edad. Abstract in english Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key players in oxidative stress, and they are generated as by-products of cellular metabolism, primarily in the mitochondria. ROS are well recognised for playing a dual role as both deleterious and beneficial species. FoxOs transcription factors are activated in oxi [...] dative stress responses and participate in the regulation of cellular functions, including cell cycle arrest, cell death, and protection from stress stimuli. FoxO activity is inhibited by growth factors and the insulin signaling pathways. They play a fundamental role in skeletal homeostasis by exerting both ROS céludependent and independent effects on bone cells. FoxOs modulate osteoblastogenesis and attenuate osteoclastogenesis through both cell autonomous and indirect mechanisms. With aging there is an inevitable increment in oxidative stress that accelerates adipogenesis at the expense of osteoblastogenesis. There is also an increment in lipid oxidation to form pro-oxidant products that enhance oxidative stress generation. In addition, the estrogen withdrawal accelerates osteoclastogenesis. Given the importance of both FoxOs and ROS in aging and bone biology, understanding the cellular events and molecular pathways that are controlled by FoxOs during aging may be vital to

  8. Reactive Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reactive arthritis. For example, the doctor may order rheumatoid factor or antinuclear antibody tests ( see “Key Words” ). Most ... the outer lining of the heart and lungs. Rheumatoid factor. A kind of antibody found in the blood ...

  9. Reactive Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Rüdiger Ehlers; Bernd Finkbeiner

    2011-01-01

    The distinction between safety and liveness properties is a fundamental classification with immediate implications on the feasibility and complexity of various monitoring, model checking, and synthesis problems. In this paper, we revisit the notion of safety for reactive systems, i.e., for systems whose behavior is characterized by the interplay of uncontrolled environment inputs and controlled system outputs. We show that reactive safety is a strictly larger class of proper...

  10. Thoracic and Lumbar Vertebral Bone Mineral Density Changes in a Natural Occurring Dog Model of Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis

    OpenAIRE

    De Decker, Steven; Lam, Richard; Packer, Rowena M. A.; Gielen, Ingrid M. V. L.; Volk, Holger A

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spinal disorders can be associated with alterations in vertebral bone mineral density (BMD). There is however controversy about vertebral BMD in patients wuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). DISH in Boxer dogs has been considered a natural occurring disease model for DISH in people. The purpose of this study was to compare vertebral BMD between Boxers with and without DISH. Fifty-nine Boxers with (n=30) or without (n=29) DISH that underwent computed tomography were include...

  11. MRI quantification of infiltrative bone marrow changes and follow-up in patients with hairy cell leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of treatment on bone marrow infiltration in hairy cell leukaemia was followed by means of MRT in five patients. A semi-quantitative methods has been developed in order to judge the effect of treatment. The results corelate well with the findings on iliac crest biopsies. The method could partly replace the invasive iliac crest biopsies, which are used for therapy monitoring. (orig.)

  12. Changes of vessel-cells complex in zones of adaptive remodeling of the bone tissue under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, N.; Oganov, V.; Nosova, L.

    The development and differentiation of osteogenic cells in organism happen in closely topographical and functional connection with blood capillaries. We formerly proofed, that small-differentiated cells, which are in the population of perivascular cells are osteogenic cells -precursors . At the present time it is actually to clear up, how these biostructures react on conditions of less of biomechanical load on skeleton bones. We researched peculiarities of blood-bed structure and perivascular cells in metaphises of thighbones and tibial bones in rats, which were onboard the American space station SLS-2 and in experiments of modeling hypokinesia. There were used methods of cytochemistry, histology and electron microscopy. We established, that under the support and functional load decreasing in zones of bones adaptive remodeling, comparatively to control, on histosections the own volume of sinusoid capillaries reduces. The small vessels prevail here. The spaces of sinusoid capillaries are limited by 1 2 cells of the endothelia. Endotheliocytes in- general have the typical ultrastructure. Basal membranes are expressed not-distinctly. Perivascular cells don't create the unbroken layer. The population of these cells is not-homogeneous. It includes enclosed to endothelia small-differentiated forms and separating cells with sings of fibroblastic differentiation (the own volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm induces). The part of these cells reacts on the alkaline phosphatase (the marker of the osteogenic differentiation). Under the conditions of support load decreasing (especially under the microgravity) there is a tendency to reducing of separating osteogenic cells number. We noted the priority of differentiating fibroblasts. It leads to further development in zones of bone remodeling of hearths of fibrous tissue, that doesn't mineralize. The obtained data are seen as one of mechanisms of osteoporosis and osteopenia development under the deficite of support load.

  13. Changes in bone mineral density of the acetabulum, femoral neck and femoral shaft, after hip resurfacing and total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, J O; Brixen, K; Varmarken, J E; Ovesen, O; Overgaard, S

    2012-01-01

    It is accepted that resurfacing hip replacement preserves the bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur better than total hip replacement (THR). However, no studies have investigated any possible difference on the acetabular side. Between April 2007 and March 2009, 39 patients were randomised into two groups to receive either a resurfacing or a THR and were followed for two years. One patient's resurfacing subsequently failed, leaving 19 patients in each group. Resurfaced replacements maintained p...

  14. Paget Disease of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rashid, Mamun; Ramkumar, Dipak B; Raskin, Kevin; Schwab, Joseph; Hornicek, Francis J; Lozano-Calderón, Santiago A

    2015-10-01

    The current understanding of Paget disease of bone (PDB) has vastly changed since Paget described the first case in 1877. Medical management of this condition remains the mainstay of treatment. Surgical intervention is usually only used in fractures through pagetic bone, need for realignment to correct deformity in major long bones, prophylactic treatment of impending fractures, joint arthroplasty in severe arthritis, or spinal decompression in cases of bony compression of neural elements. Advances in surgical technique have allowed early return to function and mobilization. Despite medical and surgical intervention, a small subset of patients with PDB develops Paget sarcoma. PMID:26410646

  15. Periodontal bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of life the periodontum is subject to changes which may be physiological or pathological. Intraoral radiographs give insight into the hard structures of the dentomaxillar region and provides information on lesions in the bone of the periodontum in that they show radiopacities and radiolucencies caused by such lesions. In this thesis the relation is investigated between the true shape and dimensions of periodontal bone lesions and their radiographic images. A method is developed and tested of making standardized and reproducible radiographs suitable for longitudinal studies of periodontal lesions. Also the possibility is demonstrated of an objective and reproducible interpretation of radiographic characteristics of periodontal bone lesions. (Auth.)

  16. Mechanisms of Guided Bone Regeneration: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jie; Kerns, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Post-extraction crestal bone resorption is common and unavoidable which can lead to significant ridge dimensional changes. To regenerate enough bone for successful implant placement, Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR) is often required. GBR is a surgical procedure that uses barrier membranes with or without particulate bone grafts or/and bone substitutes. There are two approaches of GBR in implant therapy: GBR at implant placement (simultaneous approach) and GBR before implant placement to increa...

  17. SKG arthritis as a model for evaluating therapies in rheumatoid arthritis with special focus on bone changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Kresten Krarup; Lindgaard, Lisa Mejlvang

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to further characterize the SKG model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its potential for studying intervention treatments, with special focus on bone targeting therapies. Three individual studies were conducted, using a total of 71 SKG mice, comparing arthritis induction with mannan versus zymosan A, female versus male mice, and the effect of dexamethasone intervention treatment initiated at different time points after arthritis induction. Hind paws were embedded undecalcified in methyl methacrylate, and sections were stained with Masson-Goldner trichrome. Areal Bone Mineral Density (aBMD) of the femora was determined with pDXA. RNA was extracted from the hind paws followed by the quantification by reverse transcriptase PCR. SKG mice stimulated with mannan presented a higher arthritis score than mice stimulated with zymosan A. Female SKG mice developed a more severe arthritis than male SKG mice. Dexamethasone inhibited arthritis clinically as well as histologically when the treatment was initiatedprophylactically or within the first week of arthritis. Femoral aBMD was lower in animals with arthritis than in control animals. The RANKL RNA expression was elevated in arthritic mice, whereas OPG RNA expression was unchanged. The results suggest mannan as arthritis inductor and female instead of male mice in experiments as well as an optimal time window for the initiation of treatment. Systemic bone loss as well as local up regulation of RANKL was present early in SKG arthritis. These results demonstrate that SKG arthritis is a suitable new model for evaluating therapies in RA.

  18. Structural changes in alcohol-solubilized coals by hydrogenation over a Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst and effects on pyrolysis reactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, H.; Isoda, T.; Kusakabe, K.; Morooka, S. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry

    1998-07-01

    Coals were mildly oxidized in an aqueous solution of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the presence of 1-propanol. The ethanol-soluble fractions were then recovered and hydrogenated over a Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst to give yellowish white solids after solvent removal. Aromatic rings and side chains of the original coals were partially hydrogenated, and some of the sp{sup 2} carbon bondings were changed into the sp{sup 3} structure. Pyrolysis reactivity was improved by oxidation and hydrogenation and correlated well with the H/C and O/C atomic ratios for the raw, oxidized and hydrogenated coals. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Diffuse lymphangiomatosis of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of lymphangiomatosis of bone, a very rare systemic condition characterised by both skeletal and parenchymal lesions, are presented. The skeletal changes have an appearance similar to haemangiomas in the spine, and soap-bubbly lesions in the flat bones. One case carried the diagnosis of eosinophilic granuloma for 18 years. The findings on MRI, which have not been previously well-established, are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Bone marrow scintigraphy in Paget's disease of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixteen patients with 20 lesions of Paget's disease of bone were studied with bone marrow scintigraphy (colloid), bone tissue scintigraphy and radiography. Bone marrow scintigraphy showed normal or incrased colloid uptake in 15 of 20 pagetic lesions, and decreased uptake in 4. Bone tissue scintigraphy showed increased metabolic activity in all lesions and was useful in detecting polyostotic disease as well as the extent of the lesions. Conventional radiography most often showed the typical appearance of Paget's disease, but the changes observed were sometimes difficult to differentiate from malignant disease. However, a preserved or increased reticuloendothelial function in the pagetic lesion contradicts metastatic disease as a differential diagnosis. Bone marrow scintigraphy with radiocolloid is a valuable method in the analysis of Paget's disease of bone. (orig.)

  1. Changes in the vitamin D endocrine system and bone turnover after oral vitamin D3 supplementation in healthy adults: results of a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holvik Kristin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is uncertainty as to which intake of vitamin D is needed to suppress PTH and maintain normal bone metabolism throughout winter at northern latitudes. We aimed to investigate whether four weeks’ daily supplementation with 10??g vitamin D3 from fish oil produced a greater change in serum vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, and bone turnover in healthy adults compared with solid multivitamin tablets. Furthermore, it was studied whether age, gender, ethnic background, body mass index, or serum concentrations at baseline predicted the magnitude of change in these parameters. Methods Healthy adults aged 19–48?years living in Oslo, Norway (59°N were randomised to receive a daily dose of 10??g vitamin D3 given as fish oil capsules or multivitamin tablets during four weeks in late winter. Serum samples from baseline and after 28?days were analysed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OHD, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (s-1,25(OH2D, intact parathyroid hormone (s-iPTH, and osteoclast-specific tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (s-TRACP. Fifty-five eligible participants completed the intervention (74% of those randomised. Results S-25(OHD increased by mean 34.1 (SD 13.1 nmol/l, p?2D increased by mean 13 (SD 48 pmol/l, p?=?0.057; and s-TRACP increased by mean 0.38 (SD 0.33 U/l, p? Conclusions Four weeks of daily supplementation with 10??g vitamin D3 decreased mean s-iPTH and increased s-TRACP concentration, and this did not differ by mode of administration. Our results suggest an increased bone resorption following vitamin D supplementation in young individuals, despite a decrease in parathyroid hormone levels. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01482689

  2. MRI of bone marrow abnormalities in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jose Roberto; Hayashi, Daichi; Yonenaga, Takenori; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Genant, Harry K; Lin, Chieh; Rahmouni, Alain; Guermazi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential for evaluating bone marrow. Bone marrow undergoes constant modification and its appearance on MRI changes in response. Knowledge of the types of changes and their origins is essential for analysis of MRI findings of bone marrow infiltration with hematological malignancies. This pictorial review describes the MRI pulse sequences used for imaging of bone marrow, and illustrates bone marrow changes due hematological malignancies, including changes following treatment. PMID:23748035

  3. Employee participation in organizational change: Investigating the effects of proactive vs. reactive implementation of downsizing in Swedish hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Sverke, Magnus; Hellgren, Johnny; Näswall, Katharina; Göransson, Sara; Öhrming, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Whereas employee participation is generally conceived to facilitate implementation of organizational change, only limited research has investigated whether it may reduce the negative effects of downsizing. The present study compares two Swedish hospitals that implemented downsizing in different ways. While there were no major differences in stressors between hospitals, proactive implementation was associated with more employee participation. Moreover, employee participation variables were pos...

  4. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and exercise-induced changes in subjects suspected of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Mette Rauhe; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammation plays a major role in the development of atherosclerosis. We wanted to investigate the effects of exercise on high-sensitivity (hs) C-reactive protein (CRP) in subjects who were suspected of having coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: Blood samples were obtained before, 5 minutes after, and 20 hours after an exercise test in 155 subjects who were suspected of CAD. Coronary anatomy was evaluated by computed tomography coronary angiography and/or coronary angiography. RESULTS: Median baseline hs-CRP was higher in subjects with ?50% coronary artery lumen diameter stenosis (n=41), compared with non-CAD-subjects (n=114), 2.93 mg/L (interquartile range 1.03-5.06 mg/L) and 1.30 mg/L (interquartile range 0.76-2.74 mg/L), respectively, P=0.007. In multivariate analyses testing conventional risk factors, hs-CRP proved borderline significant, odds ratio =2.32, P=0.065. Adding baseline hs-CRP to the results of the exercise test did not improve the diagnostic evaluation. Baseline natural logarithm (Ln) hs-CRP was positively associated with body mass index and baseline Ln-transformed hs troponin T levels, and negatively associated with the daily life activity level. An increase in hs-CRP of 0.13 mg/L (interquartile range 0.05-0.24 mg/L) from baseline to 5 minutes after peak exercise was found (P<0.0001), but the increase was not associated with presence of CAD. From baseline to 20 hours after exercise, no increase in hs-CRP was found. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, hs-CRP was not independently associated with CAD. Hs-CRP increased immediately as a response to the exercise, and the increase was modest and not associated with CAD. The results indicate that exercise has potential to cause unwanted variations in hs-CRP and that exercise prior to hs-CRP measurements in subjects included in epidemiological studies, therefore, should be avoided.

  5. Fluctuations in [(11)C]SB207145 PET Binding Associated with Change in Threat-Related Amygdala Reactivity in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick MacDonald; Haahr, Mette Ewers; Jensen, Christian Gaden; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Siebner, Hartwig Roman; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin critically affects the neural processing of emotionally salient stimuli, including indices of threat; however, how alterations in serotonin signaling contribute to changes in brain function is not well understood. Recently, we showed in a placebo-controlled study of 32 healthy males that brain serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT4) binding, assessed with [(11)C]SB207145 PET, was sensitive to a 3-week intervention with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, supporting it as an in ...

  6. Bone marrow scintigraphy in haematological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow scintigraphy was performed in 40 patients with haematological disorders (lymphomas, multiple myeloma, myeloid leukaemia, panmyelopathy and others). Routine skeletal scintigraphy was available for comparison in 18 patients. In agreement with the literature it became evident that marrow scintigraphy can show infiltrations of the bone marrow in haematological disorders earlier than skeletal scintigraphy. Hot lesions were caused by reactive proliferation of the bone marrow such as may occur with acute inflammatory joint diseases, osteomyelitis, fracture healing or other entities. Marrow imaging demonstrated reliably the actual distribution of the functioning bone marrow, a characteristic that is important for diagnosis and staging, especially in myeloproliferative diseases. (orig.)

  7. Bone infection in patients suspected of complicating osteomyelitis: the diagnostic value of dual isotope bone-granulocyte scintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Thora; Stentzer, Kim; Hede, Adam; Kjaer, Andreas; Hesse, Birger

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of dual isotope bone-granulocyte scintigraphy in patients with known bone pathology clinically suspected of osteomyelitis, i.e. complicating osteomyelitis, using per-operative bacterial culture from bone as reference. METHODS: Simultaneous dual isotope bone-granulocyte scintigraphic images were obtained in 42 consecutive patients in whom conventional X-ray, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein were also availab...

  8. Effects of Spaceflight on Bone: The Rat as an Animal Model for Human Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, B.; Weider, T.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1999-01-01

    The loss of weight bearing during spaceflight results in osteopenia in humans. Decrements in bone mineral reach 3-10% after as little as 75-184 days in space. Loss of bone mineral during flight decreases bone strength and increases fracture risk. The mechanisms responsible for, and the factors contributing to, the changes in bone induced by spaceflight are poorly understood. The rat has been widely used as an animal model for human bone loss during spaceflight. Despite its potential usefulness, the results of bone studies performed in the rat in space have been inconsistent. In some flights bone formation is decreased and cancellous bone volume reduced, while in others no significant changes in bone occur. In June of 1996 Drs. T. Wronski, S. Miller and myself participated in a flight experiment (STS 78) to examine the effects of glucocorticoids on bone during weightlessness. Technically the 17 day flight experiment was flawless. The results, however, were surprising. Cancellous bone volume and osteoblast surface in the proximal tibial metaphysis were the same in flight and ground-based control rats. Normal levels of cancellous bone mass and bone formation were also detected in the lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck of flight rats. Furthermore, periosteal bone formation rate was found to be identical in flight and ground-based control rats. Spaceflight had little or no effect on bone metabolism! These results prompted us to carefully review the changes in bone observed in, and the flight conditions of previous spaceflight missions.

  9. Secretory IgA, albumin, and bone-density level changes as markers of biostimulatory effects from laser radiation on the healing process after extraction of human molars on the lower jaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucerova, Hana; Dostalova, Tatjana; Himmlova, Lucia; Bartova, Jirina; Mazanek, Jiri

    1999-05-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser radiation on the healing process after human lower molar extraction. Frequencies of 5 Hz, 292 Hz and 9000 Hz were used in this experiment. Monitoring the secretory IgA and albumin levels in saliva and changes in bone density were used as a marker of biostimulatory effect. Bone density after extraction and six month after surgical treatment was examined using the dental digital radiography. Wound closure was followed by healing of bone structure in extraction site. Changes of secretory IgA, albumin levels and bone density were compared in groups of patients with laser treatment and control group without any laser therapy. Differences in levels of the saliva markers were found to be significant comparing irradiated and non-irradiated groups, as well as comparing groups irradiated by various modulatory frequencies. Density of alveolar bone was examined on five slices acquired from every digital radiography image. Histogram were evaluated wit a computer program for microscopic image analysis. Density differences were verified in area of the whole slice. There were no significant differences found between bone density in irradiated and non irradiated groups perhaps due to our used therapeutical diagram.

  10. Diagnosis of metabolic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents a reference on the radiologic evaluation, features, and differential diagnosis of metabolic diseases involving the whole skeleton, calcium deficiencies resulting from pharmacologic agents, and bone changes related to endocrine disturbances. It also stresses how radiology, nuclear medicine, and biochemistry - either alone or in concert - contribute to clinical diagnosis. It covers renal bone disease, Paget's disease, hyperphosphatasia, extraskeletal mineralization, metabolic bone disorders related to malnutrition, tumors, plus radionuclide studies including materials and methods

  11. Bone Metabolism after Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Elaine W.

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a popular and effective treatment for severe obesity, but may have negative effects on the skeleton. This review summarizes changes in bone density and bone metabolism from animal and clinical studies of bariatric surgery, with specific attention to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Skeletal imaging artifacts from obesity and weight loss are also considered. Despite challenges in bone density imaging, the prepo...

  12. Bone and cancer: the osteoncology

    OpenAIRE

    IBRAHIM, TONI; Mercatali, Laura; AMADORI, DINO

    2013-01-01

    In recent years clinicians have witnessed a radical change in the relationship between bone and cancer, with in particular an increase in bone metastases incidence due to an improvement of patients survival. Bone metastases are responsible for the high morbidity in cancer patients with a strong clinical impact. For all these reasons, efforts have been directed to this important field with the foundation of the osteoncology, a new scientific and clinical branch involved in the management of pa...

  13. Immunoregulation of bone remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajai; Mehdi, Abbass A; Srivastava, Rajeshwer N; Verma, Nar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling, a continuous physiological process maintains the strength of the bones, which maintains a delicate balance between bone formation and resorption process. This review gives an insight to the complex interaction and correlation between the bone remodeling and the corresponding changes in host immunological environment and also summarises the most recent developments occuring in the understanding of this complex field. T cells, both directly and indirectly increase the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL); a vital step in the activation of osteoclasts, thus positively regulates the osteoclastogenesis. Though various cytokines, chemikines, transcription factors and co-stimulatory molecules are shared by both skeletal and immune systems, but researches are being conducted to establish and analyse their role and / or control on this complex but vital process. The understanding of this part of research may open new horizons in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, resulting into bone loss and that of osteoporosis also. PMID:22837895

  14. Serum Bone Biomarkers and Oral/Systemic Bone Loss in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, J.B.; Stoner, J.A.; Lee, H.-M.; Nummikoski, P.V.; Reinhardt, R.A.; Golub, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported that subantimicrobial-dose doxycycline (SDD) significantly reduced serum bone-resorption biomarkers in subgroups of post-menopausal women. We hypothesize that changes in serum bone biomarkers are associated not only with systemic bone mineral density (BMD) changes, but also with alveolar bone changes over time. One hundred twenty-eight eligible post-menopausal women with periodontitis and systemic osteopenia were randomly assigned to receive SDD or placebo tablets twice d...

  15. Diagnosis of initial changes in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. A comparison between low-field magnetic resonance imaging, 3-phase bone scintigraphy and conventional X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides conventional X-rays, in the diagnostic work up of initial changes in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 3-phase bone scintigraphy (3P-Sz) is as well established as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of the newly developed low field MRI with the proven methods X-rays and 3P-Sz. Methods: 65 patients (47f, 18m; 20-86 yrs) were studied on a one day protocol with 3P-Sz (550 MBq Tc-99m DPD), MRI and X-rays of the hands. Images were visually analysed by two blinded nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists and classified as a) RA-typical, b) inflammatory, non-RA-typical and c) non inflammatory changes. All methods were compared to 3P-Sz as golden standard. Results: In comparison to 3P-Sz, low field MRI presents with almost equal sensitivity and specificity in rheumatoid-typical and inflammatory changes. Conventional X-rays revealed in arthritis-typical changes as well as in inflammatory changes a significantly lower sensitivity and also a lower negative predictive value while specificity equals the one of MRI. Quantitative analysis of 3P-Sz using ROI-technique unveiled significantly higher values in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in those with no inflammatory changes. Conclusion: MRI represents an equally sensitive method in the initial diagnosis of rheumatoid-typical and inflammatory changes in the region of the hands as compared to the 3P-Sz. Besides the basic diagnosis with conventional X-rays, 3P-Sz is still the recommended method of choice to evaluate the whole body when RA is suspected. Additionally, quantitative analysis of the 3P-Sz using the ROI technique in the region of the hands reveals statistically significant results and should therefore be taken into account in the assessment of inflammatory changes. (orig.)

  16. Resveratrol Increases Bone Mineral Density and Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Obese Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornstrup, Marie Juul; Harsløf, Torben; Kjær, Thomas Nordstrøm; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke

    2014-01-01

    Context: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with low-grade inflammation, which may harmfully affect bone. Resveratrol (RSV) possesses anti-inflammatory properties, and rodent studies suggest bone protective effects. Objective: This study sought to evaluate effects of RSV treatment on bone in men with MetS. Setting and Design: The study was conducted at Aarhus University Hospital as a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial assessing changes in bone turnover markers, bone minera...

  17. Aging and bone. X-ray bone densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone mass at all ages of the individuals is the integration of genetic factors, nutrition, physical exercise, hormonal environments, and other factors influencing the bone. It is also a measurable risk factor for osteoporosis which may subsequently cause bone fractures. Thus measuring bone mass is required to predict the probability of developing bone fractures subsequent to osteoporosis, and to diagnose osteoporosis, and to manage the osteoporosis patient. This paper discusses bone mineral measurements according to their characteristics and clinical application. Methodology for measuring bone mass has rapidly progressed during the past 15 years, which covers photodensitometry, photon absorptiometry (single energy X-ray absorptiometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), quantitative CT, and ultrasound. These techniques have allowed noninvasive measurement of bone mineral density in any site of the skeleton with high accuracy and precision, although a single use of the technique cannot satisfy the complete clinical requirements. Thus the most appropriate method for measuring bone mineral density is important to monitor bone mass change and according to the specific site. (N.K.)

  18. Laboratory Studies of the Reactive Chemistry and Changing CCN Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol, Including Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scot Martin

    2013-01-31

    The chemical evolution of secondary-organic-aerosol (SOA) particles and how this evolution alters their cloud-nucleating properties were studied. Simplified forms of full Koehler theory were targeted, specifically forms that contain only those aspects essential to describing the laboratory observations, because of the requirement to minimize computational burden for use in integrated climate and chemistry models. The associated data analysis and interpretation have therefore focused on model development in the framework of modified kappa-Koehler theory. Kappa is a single parameter describing effective hygroscopicity, grouping together several separate physicochemical parameters (e.g., molar volume, surface tension, and van't Hoff factor) that otherwise must be tracked and evaluated in an iterative full-Koehler equation in a large-scale model. A major finding of the project was that secondary organic materials produced by the oxidation of a range of biogenic volatile organic compounds for diverse conditions have kappa values bracketed in the range of 0.10 +/- 0.05. In these same experiments, somewhat incongruently there was significant chemical variation in the secondary organic material, especially oxidation state, as was indicated by changes in the particle mass spectra. Taken together, these findings then support the use of kappa as a simplified yet accurate general parameter to represent the CCN activation of secondary organic material in large-scale atmospheric and climate models, thereby greatly reducing the computational burden while simultaneously including the most recent mechanistic findings of laboratory studies.

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in metabolic conditions. assist in the detection and diagnosis of bone cancer . locate foreign objects in soft tissues around or ...

  20. The response of bone to unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, D. D.; Halloran, B. P.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal unloading leads to decreased bone formation and decreased bone mass. Bone resorption is uncoupled from bone formation, contributing to the bone loss. During spaceflight bone is lost principally from the bones most loaded in the 1-g environment, and some redistribution of bone from the lower extremities to the head appears to take place. Although changes in calcitropic hormones have been demonstrated during skeletal unloading (PTH and 1,25(OH)2D decrease), it remains unclear whether such changes account for or are in response to the changes in bone formation and resorption. Bed rest studies with human volunteers and hindlimb elevation studies with rats have provided useful data to help explain the changes in bone formation during spaceflight. These models of skeletal unloading reproduce a number of the conditions associated with microgravity, and the findings from such studies confirm many of the observations made during spaceflight. Determining the mechanism(s) by which loading of bone is sensed and translated into a signal(s) controlling bone formation remains the holy grail in this field. Such investigations couple biophysics to biochemistry to cell and molecular biology. Although studies with cell cultures have revealed biochemical responses to mechanical loads comparable to that seen in intact bone, it seems likely that matrix-cell interactions underlie much of the mechanocoupling. The role for systemic hormones such as PTH, GH, and 1,25(OH)2D compared to locally produced factors such as IGF-I, PTHrP, BMPs, and TGF-beta in modulating the cellular response to load remains unclear. As the mechanism(s) by which bone responds to mechanical load with increased bone formation are further elucidated, applications of this knowledge to other etiologies of osteoporosis are likely to develop. Skeletal unloading provides a perturbation in bone mineral homeostasis that can be used to understand the mechanisms by which bone mineral homeostasis is maintained, with the expectation that such understanding will lead to effective treatment for disuse osteoporosis.

  1. Echinacea and Parsley Oil Ameliorate the Changes Induced by gamma-radiation in Uterus, Ovaries and Bone Marrow of Female Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of Echinacea and parsley oil some biochemical, histological and bone marrow abnormalities, induced by g-irradiation exposure. Echinacea and parsley oil were orally administrated to female rats (50 mg /100 g b.wt./ day and 0.2 ml/100g b.wt./day, respectively) 7 days before and during exposure to radiation for 3 weeks since female rats were submitted to fractionated whole body gamma-radiation 1 Gy every week up to 3 Gy total dose. The results obtained revealed that treatment with Echinacea and parsley oil induced significant amelioration to the harmful effect of radiation on red blood corpuscles (RBCs), white blood corpuscles (WBCs), haemoglobin concentration (Hb), calcium level (Ca), in addition to estradiol (E2) and progesterone (p4) hormones in serum. Moreover, the treatment with Echinacea and parsley oil diminished the increase in urea, uric acid, creatinine and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels recorded in the serum of irradiated rats. Our findings demonstrated that exposure to g-radiation caused an increase in the apoptotic cells, while the treatment with Echinacea and parsley oil decreased the apoptotic cells and increased the alive cells in the bone marrow of female rats. Histological observations of the ovary and uterus sections showed that radiation induced deformation in the follicular tissue, dis organization of granulosa cells, abnormal Graafian follicle which appeared without ova, haemorrhage, dilated blood vessels and vacuolation ovarian tissue. Also, the uterus of female rats showed increase in endometrium thickness, decreased muscularis thickness and muscle fibres appeared with pyknotic nuclei. All these changes were obviously improved in animals supplied with echinacea and parsley oil. It could be concluded that Echinacea and parsley oil could be useful and adjunct for maintaining the integrity of biochemical changes, restored the original histological architecture of the ovary and uterus and decreased the apoptotic cells induced after irradiation

  2. Talking Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  3. Dairy products, yogurts, and bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli, René

    2014-05-01

    Fracture risk is determined by bone mass, geometry, and microstructure, which result from peak bone mass (the amount attained at the end of pubertal growth) and from the amount of bone lost subsequently. Nutritional intakes are an important environmental factor that influence both bone mass accumulation during childhood and adolescence and bone loss that occurs in later life. Bone growth is influenced by dietary intake, particularly of calcium and protein. Adequate dietary calcium and protein are essential to achieve optimal peak bone mass during skeletal growth and to prevent bone loss in the elderly. Dairy products are rich in nutrients that are essential for good bone health, including calcium, protein, vitamin D, potassium, phosphorus, and other micronutrients and macronutrients. Studies supporting the beneficial effects of milk or dairy products on bone health show a significant inverse association between dairy food intake and bone turnover markers and a positive association with bone mineral content. Fortified dairy products induce more favorable changes in biochemical indexes of bone metabolism than does calcium supplementation alone. The associations between the consumption of dairy products and the risk of hip fracture are less well established, although yogurt intake shows a weakly positive protective trend for hip fracture. By consuming 3 servings of dairy products per day, the recommended daily intakes of nutrients essential for good bone health may be readily achieved. Dairy products could therefore improve bone health and reduce the risk of fractures in later life. PMID:24695889

  4. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection

  5. New laboratory tools in the assessment of bone quality

    OpenAIRE

    CHAPPARD, Daniel; Baslé, Michel-Félix; Legrand, Erick; Audran, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Bone quality is a complex set of different factors that are interdependent. The bone matrix organization can be described at five different levels of anatomical organization: nature (organic and mineral), texture (woven or lamellar), structure (osteons in the cortices and arch-like packets in trabecular bone), microarchitecture and macroarchitecture. Any change in one of these levels can alter bone quality. An altered bone remodeling can affect bone quality by influencing one or more of these...

  6. Bone Graft Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... graft that comes from a donor is called allograft bone . Allograft bone usually comes from bone banks that harvest the bone from cadavers. The types of allograft bone used for spine surgery include fresh frozen and ...

  7. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition causes simultaneous bone loss and excess bone formation within growing bone in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During postnatal skeletal growth, adaptation to mechanical loading leads to cellular activities at the growth plate. It has recently become evident that bone forming and bone resorbing cells are affected by the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor imatinib mesylate (STI571, Gleevec (registered) ). Imatinib targets PDGF, ABL-related gene, c-Abl, c-Kit and c-Fms receptors, many of which have multiple functions in the bone microenvironment. We therefore studied the effects of imatinib in growing bone. Young rats were exposed to imatinib (150 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-7, or 100 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-13), and the effects of RTK inhibition on bone physiology were studied after 8 and 70 days (3-day treatment), or after 14 days (9-day treatment). X-ray imaging, computer tomography, histomorphometry, RNA analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate bone modeling and remodeling in vivo. Imatinib treatment eliminated osteoclasts from the metaphyseal osteochondral junction at 8 and 14 days. This led to a resorption arrest at the growth plate, but also increased bone apposition by osteoblasts, thus resulting in local osteopetrosis at the osteochondral junction. The impaired bone remodelation observed on day 8 remained significant until adulthood. Within the same bone, increased osteoclast activity, leading to bone loss, was observed at distal bone trabeculae on days 8 and 14. Peripheral quantitative computer tomography (pQCT) and micro-CT analysis confirmed that, at the osteochondral junction, imatinib shifted the balance from bone resorption towards bone formation, thereby altering bone modeling. At distal trabecular bone, in turn, the balance was turned towards bone resorption, leading to bone loss. - Research highlights: ? 3-Day imatinib treatment. ? Causes growth plate anomalies in young rats. ? Causes biomechanical changes and significant bone loss at distal trabecular bone. ? Results in loss of osteoclasts at osteochondral junction.

  8. Reactive changes in dorsal roots and dorsal root ganglia after C7 dorsal rhizotomy and ventral root avulsion/replantation in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, N; Asan, E; Hofmann, G O; Lang, E M

    2007-03-01

    Current surgical treatment of spinal root injuries aims at reconnecting ventral roots to the spinal cord while severed dorsal roots are generally left untreated. Reactive changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and in injured dorsal roots after such complex lesions have not been analysed in detail. We studied dorsal root remnants and lesioned DRGs 6 months after C7 dorsal rhizotomy, ventral root avulsion and immediate ventral root replantation in adult rabbits. Replanted ventral roots were fixed to the spinal cord with fibrin glue only or with glue containing ciliary neurotrophic factor and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Varying degrees of degeneration were observed in the deafferented dorsal spinal cord in all experimental groups. In cases with well-preserved morphology, small myelinated axons extended into central tissue protrusions at the dorsal root entry zone, suggesting sprouting of spinal neuron processes into the central dorsal root remnant. In lesioned DRGs, the density of neurons and myelinated axons was not significantly altered, but a slight decrease in the relative frequency of large neurons and an increase of small myelinated axons was noted (significant for axons). Unexpectedly, differences in the degree of these changes were found between control and neurotrophic factor-treated animals. Central axons of DRG neurons formed dorsal root stumps of considerable length which were attached to fibrous tissue surrounding the replanted ventral root. In cases where gaps were apparent in dorsal root sheaths, a subgroup of dorsal root axons entered this fibrous tissue. Continuity of sensory axons with the spinal cord was never observed. Some axons coursed ventrally in the direction of the spinal nerve. Although the animal model does not fully represent the situation in human plexus injuries, the present findings provide a basis for devising further experimental approaches in the treatment of combined motor/sensory root lesions. PMID:17331182

  9. Technetium-99m Bone Scan and Panoramic Radiography in Detection of Bone Invasion by Oral Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jamdade, Anshuman Suresh; John, Ani

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The correct extension of cancer in the bone usually remains undetected on static imaging which may lead to inadequate or over excision. The conventional radiography as well as other anatomical imaging modalities like computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging often fails to detect functional changes in the bone. However, bone scinitigraphy is highly sensitive in detecting earlier changes in the bone but lack anatomical definition. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the a...

  10. Viability of impacted bone allografts under metal mesh at the calcar in revision surgery of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttaro, M; Araujo, G S; Araujo, E S; Comba, F; Piccaluga, F

    2008-02-01

    Metal meshes are used in revision surgery of the hip to contain impacted bone grafts in cases with cortical or calcar defects in order to provide rotational stability to the stem. However, the viability of bone allografts under these metal meshes has been uncertain. We describe the histological appearances of biopsies obtained from impacted bone allografts to the calcar contained by a metal mesh in two femoral reconstructions which needed further surgery at 24 and 33 months after the revision procedure. A line of osteoid and viable new bone was observed on the surface of necrotic trabeculae. Active bone marrow between these trabeculae showed necrotic areas in some medullary spaces with reparative fibrous tissue and isolated reactive lymphocytes. This is interpreted as reparative changes after revascularisation of the cancellous allografts. These pathological findings are similar to those reported in allografts contained by cortical host bone and support the hypothesis that incorporation of morcellised bone under metal meshes is not affected by these devices. PMID:18256094

  11. Radiodiagnosis of hemophiliac bone pseudotumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 259 hemophiliacs bone pseudotumors were diagnosed in 11 (4.3 %); they were localised in the femur (6 cases), calcaneus (4) and in the iliac bone (3). Two cases of combined fermoral and calcaneal lesions and 4 cases of bone fracture were observed. As a rule, pseudotumors developed in hemophiliacs with severe disease. An x-ray picture of a pseudotumor depended on its site and was characterized by a large soft tissue tumor shadow, often with calcinosis, and serious destructive changes in bones in the form or round foci of 7 cm in diameter with clear-cut contours. An adge defect of the cortical layer was defined in the diaphysis of the femoral bone (15 cm long). Destructive changes were often accompanied by osteosclerosis and periostitis

  12. Bone scintigraphy in chondroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphry, A.; Gilday, D.L.; Brown, R.G.

    1980-11-01

    Scintigraphy in 3 patients with chondroblastoma showed that the tumors were hyperemic and avidly accumulated the radionuclide. These changes were also present in adjacent normal bone, but to a lesser degree. This suggests that radionuclide uptake in chondroblastoma is a function of the blood supply to the tumor rather than primary matrix extraction.

  13. Primary leiomyosarcoma of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jens; Frederiksen, P

    1977-01-01

    A case of primary leiomyosarcoma of bone in the femur of an 18-year-old girl is described. Light and electron microscopy showed characteristic changes with cytoplasmic myofilaments, dense bodies, pinocytic vesicles and basal lamina fragments. Clinically, the patient is well and without evidence of tumor 9 months after the femur amputation without further treatment.

  14. Biogeochemical analysis of ancient Pacific Cod bone suggests Hg bioaccumulation was linked to paleo sea level rise and climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Maribeth S.; McRoy, C. Peter; Duffy, Lawrence K.; Hirons, Amy C.; Schaaf, Jeanne M.; Trocine, Robert P.; Trefry, John

    2015-01-01

    Deglaciation at the end of the Pleistocene initiated major changes in ocean circulation and distribution. Within a brief geological time, large areas of land were inundated by sea-level rise and today global sea level is 120 m above its minimum stand during the last glacial maximum. This was the era of modern sea shelf formation; climate change caused coastal plain flooding and created broad continental shelves with innumerable consequences to marine and terrestrial ecosystems and human popul...

  15. Solid variant of aneurysmal bone cyst of the heel: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Stanc-Giannakopoulos Gabriela A; Gavresea Theofani V; Lekka Joanna A; Demertzis Nikolaos S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction An aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign but often rapidly expanding osteolytic multi-cystic osseous lesion that occurs as a primary, secondary, intra-osseous, extra-osseous, solid or conventional lesion. It frequently coexists with other benign and malignant bone tumors. Although it is considered to be reactive in nature, there is evidence that some aneurysmal bone cysts are true neoplasms. The solid variant of aneurysmal bone cyst is a rare subtype of aneurysmal bone cyst w...

  16. Bone apatite composition of necrotic trabecular bone in the femoral head of immature piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruwajoye, Olumide O; Kim, Harry K W; Aswath, Pranesh B

    2015-04-01

    Ischemic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (IOFH) can lead to excessive resorption of the trabecular bone and collapse of the femoral head as a structure. A well-known mineral component to trabecular bone is hydroxyapatite, which can be present in many forms due to ionic substitution, thus altering chemical composition. Unfortunately, very little is known about the chemical changes to bone apatite following IOFH. We hypothesized that the apatite composition changes in necrotic bone possibly contribute to increased osteoclast resorption and structural collapse of the femoral head. The purpose of this study was to assess the macroscopic and local phosphate composition of actively resorbed necrotic trabecular bone to isolate differences between areas of increased osteoclast resorption and normal bone formation. A piglet model of IOFH was used. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), histology, X-ray absorbance near edge structure (XANES), and Raman spectroscopy were performed on femoral heads to characterize normal and necrotic trabecular bone. Backscattered SEM, micro-computed tomography and histology showed deformity and active resorption of necrotic bone compared to normal. XANES and Raman spectroscopy obtained from actively resorbed necrotic bone and normal bone showed increased carbonate-to-phosphate content in the necrotic bone. The changes in the apatite composition due to carbonate substitution may play a role in the increased resorption of necrotic bone due to its increase in solubility. Indeed, a better understanding of the apatite composition of necrotic bone could shed light on osteoclast activity and potentially improve therapeutic treatments that target excessive resorption of bone. PMID:25660159

  17. Comparison of the changes of alveolar bone thickness in maxillary incisor area in extraction and non-extraction cases: computerized tomography evaluation

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Paulo Roberto Barroso, Picanço; Fabricio Pinelli, Valarelli; Rodrigo Hermont, Cançado; Karina Maria Salvatore de, Freitas; Gracemia Vasconcelos, Picanço.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar, por meio de tomografia computadorizada, a alteração da espessura óssea alveolar na região de incisivos superiores durante o tratamento ortodôntico, com e sem extração dentária. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados 12 pacientes, divididos em dois grupos: G1, seis pacientes tratados com extraç [...] ões de dois primeiros pré-molares superiores, com idade média inicial de 15,83 anos, e tratados por um tempo médio de 2,53 anos; G2, seis pacientes tratados sem extrações, com idade média inicial de 18,26 anos e tratados por um período de 2,39 anos. Foram utilizadas tomografias computadorizadas, telerradiografias em norma lateral e radiografias periapicais ao início (T1) e após 18 meses de tratamento (T2), desde que o espaço da extração já estivesse fechado nos casos tratados com extrações. A comparação intragrupo foi realizada por meio do teste t dependente, e a comparação intergrupos por meio do com o teste t independente. RESULTADOS: o grupo 1 apresentou uma retração e verticalização do incisivo central, enquanto o grupo 2 apresentou uma vestibularização desse dente. Além disso, o grupo 1 apresentou maior aumento da espessura óssea cervical vestibular durante o tratamento, quando comparado ao grupo 2. A incidência de reabsorção radicular não apresentou diferenças significativas entre os grupos. CONCLUSÕES: não houve alteração nas espessuras ósseas alveolares quando comparados casos tratados com e sem extrações, com exceção da espessura óssea vestibular na região cervical dos incisivos superiores. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To compare, through computed tomography, alveolar bone thickness changes at the maxillary incisors area during orthodontic treatment with and without tooth extraction. METHODS: Twelve patients were evaluated. They were divided into 2 groups: G1 - 6 patients treated with extraction of righ [...] t and left maxillary first premolars, with mean initial age of 15.83 years and mean treatment length of 2.53 years; G2 - 6 patients treated without extraction, with mean initial age of 18.26 years and mean treatment length of 2.39 years. Computed tomographies, lateral cephalograms and periapical radiographs were used at the beginning of the treatment (T1) and 18 months after the treatment had started (T2). Extraction space closure occurred in the extraction cases. Intragroup and intergroup comparisons were performed by dependent and independent t test, respectively. RESULTS: In G1, the central incisor was retracted and uprighted, while in G2 this tooth showed vestibularization. Additionally, G1 presented a higher increase of labial alveolar bone thickness at the cervical third in comparison with G2. The incidence of root resorption did not present significant differences between groups. CONCLUSION: There were no changes in alveolar bone thickness when extraction and nonextraction cases were compared, except for the labial alveolar bone thickness at the cervical third of maxillary incisors.

  18. Population doubling level-dependent change of secreted glycosaminoglycan in equine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    SASAO, Takafumi; FUKUDA, Yuki; YOSHIDA, Sayako; MIYABARA, Shihori; KASASHIMA, Yoshinori; KUWANO, Atsutoshi; ARAI, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In regenerative medicine using transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the importance of regulating the quality of MSCs has been well recognized; however, there is little information concerning the relationship between the population doubling level (PDL) and the stemness of MSCs in equine medicine. In this study, we showed that the amount of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) secreted by bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs) decreases with increase of PDL. Enzymatic digestion and two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that a main component of GAG produced by BMSCs was hyaluronan with a small amount of chondroitin sulfate. Increase of PDL downregulated the expression of MSC CD markers, including CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD146, along with loss of differentiation capacity. Thus, the effect of hyaluronan supplement to the growth medium on both expression of CD markers and the tri-lineage potential of BMSCs was evaluated. Expression of CD73 and CD90 was preserved by continuous addition of hyaluronan to the growth medium, whereas mRNA levels corresponding to CD44, CD105 and CD146 were not preserved by supplementation of hyaluronan. BMSCs subcultured with hyaluronan-supplemented growth medium to PDL-12 showed osteogenic capacity, however adipogenic and chondrogenic activities at PDL-12 were not preserved by exogenous hyaluronan. These results suggest that downregulation of CD44, CD105 and CD146 might not affect the osteogenic capacity. Taken together, the results suggested that supplementation of hyaluronan to the growth medium might be effective at maintaining the osteogenic capacity of equine BMSCs.

  19. Rapid, divergent changes in spinal and forearm bone density following short-term intravenous treatment of Paget's disease with pamidronate disodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R I; Gutteridge, D H; Stuckey, B G; Kent, G N; Retallack, R W; Prince, R L; Bhagat, C I; Johnston, C A; Nicholson, G C; Stewart, G O

    1993-02-01

    Intravenous disodium 3-amino-1-hydroxypropylidene-1,1-bisphosphonate pentahydrate (pamidronate disodium) was used to treat 39 patients (22 males and 17 females, age range 48-85 years) with symptomatic Paget's disease. Patients were stratified into three groups based on the biochemical severity of the disease as assessed by fasting urinary hydroxyproline excretion (HypE, mumol/liter GF, glomerular filtrate): group I (n = 23), HypE 10.0, 240 mg over 4 or 8 days. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured before and 3 and 6 months following treatment in the spine (L1-4) using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and in the forearm at an ultradistal and a shaft site using single-photon absorptiometry. When groups I-III were combined, nonpagetic and pagetic lumbar spinal BMD had both risen significantly at 3 months compared with the pretreatment values (p < 0.001). In each group, lumbar spinal BMD in pagetic vertebrae rose markedly by 3 months, with no further significant change at 6 months. The percentage rises in the three groups were not different from each other at 3 or 6 months. Nonpagetic lumbar spinal BMD followed a similar and significant trend but with a significantly smaller rise than for pagetic bone. (For the combined groups, nonpagetic BMD rose 5.1 +/- 1.1% SEM, above pretreatment at 6 months; pagetic BMD rose 17.8 +/- 1.6%: significance of comparison = p < 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8442439

  20. Metastatic potential of an aneurysmal bone cyst

    OpenAIRE

    van de Luijtgaarden, Addy C.M.; Veth, Rene P. H.; Slootweg, Piet J.; Wijers-Koster, Pauline M.; Schultze Kool, Leo J.; Bovee, Judith V.M.G.; Winette T. A. van der Graaf

    2009-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are benign bone tumors consisting of blood-filled cavities lined by connective tissue septa. Recently, the hypothesis that ABCs are lesions reactive to local hemodynamics has been challenged after the discovery of specific recurrent chromosomal abnormalities. Multiple cases of malignant transformation of ABC into (osteo)sarcoma have been described, as well as a number of cases of telangiectatic osteosarcoma which had been misdiagnosed as ABC. We herewith document ...

  1. The primary cilium as a novel extracellular sensor in bone

    OpenAIRE

    Hoey, David A.; Chen, Julia C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2012-01-01

    Mechanically induced adaptation of bone is required to maintain a healthy skeleton and defects in this process can lead to dramatic changes in bone mass, resulting in bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Therefore, understanding how this process occurs could yield novel therapeutics to treat diseases of excessive bone loss or formation. Over the past decade the primary cilium has emerged as a novel extracellular sensor in bone, being required to transduce changes in the extracellular mechanica...

  2. 3D Image Registration Is Critical to Ensure Accurate Detection of Longitudinal Changes in Trabecular Bone Density, Microstructure, and Stiffness Measurements in Rat tibiae by In vivo Micro Computed Tomography (?CT)

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Shenghui; Luo, Shiming; Huh, Beom Kang; Chandra, Abhishek; Altman, Allison R.; Qin, Ling; Liu, X Sherry

    2013-01-01

    In the recent decade, in vivo ?CT scanners have become available to monitor temporal changes in rodent bone in response to diseases and treatments. We investigated short-term and long-term precision of in vivo ?CT measurements of trabecular bone density, microstructure and stiffness of rat tibiae and tested whether they can be improved by 3D image registration. Rats in the short-term precision group underwent baseline and follow-up scans within the same day (n=15) and those in the long-term p...

  3. Bone - marrow postirradiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative and qualitative changes in haemopoietic cells in chicken bone Marrow were investigated after acute single irradiation with doses 4.5 Gy and 5 Gy. Samples of bone marrow were obtained from proximal femoral epiphysis of decapitated chickens. Marrow smears were prepared and stained according to Pappenheim. Qualitative examination of myelogram showed proliferation of adipose tissue, hypocellularity, caryolyosis, caryorexis, disintegration of cells and proliferation of cells which could not be differentiated. Quantitative examination revealed high radiosensitivity of blast cells and lymphocytes shortly after irradiation. (authors)

  4. Fat-free mass change after nutritional rehabilitation in weight losing COPD: role of insulin, C-reactive protein and tissue hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Baldi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Simonetta Baldi, Roberto Aquilani, Gian Domenico Pinna, Paolo Poggi, Angelo De Martini, Claudio BruschiDepartment of Pneumology and Biomedical Engineering, Scientific Institute of Montescano, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation I.R.C.C.S. Pavia, ItalyBackground: Fat-free mass (FFM depletion marks the imbalance between tissue protein synthesis and breakdown in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. To date, the role of essential amino acid supplementation (EAAs in FFM repletion has not been fully acknowledged. A pilot study was undertaken in patients attending pulmonary rehabilitation.Methods: 28 COPD patients with dynamic weight loss > 5% over the last 6 months were randomized to receive EAAs embedded in a 12-week rehabilitation program (EAAs group n = 14, or to the same program without supplementation (C group n = 14. Primary outcome measures were changes in body weight and FFM, using dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA.Results: At the 12th week, a body weight increment occurred in 92% and 15% of patients in the EAAs and C group, respectively, with an average increase of 3.8 ± 2.6 kg (P = 0.0002 and ?0.1 ± 1.1 kg (P = 0.81, respectively. A FFM increment occurred in 69% and 15% of EAAs and C patients, respectively, with an average increase of 1.5 ± 2.6 kg (P = 0.05 and ?0.1 ± 2.3 kg (P = 0.94, respectively. In the EAAs group, FFM change was significantly related to fasting insulin (r2 0.68, P < 0.0005, C-reactive protein (C-RP (r2 = 0.46, P < 0.01, and oxygen extraction tension (PaO2x (r2 = 0.46, P < 0.01 at end of treatment. These three variables were highly correlated in both groups (r > 0.7, P < 0.005 in all tests.Conclusions: Changes in FFM promoted by EAAs are related to cellular energy and tissue oxygen availability in depleted COPD. Insulin, C-RP, and PaO2x must be regarded as clinical markers of an amino acid-stimulated signaling to FFM accretion.Keywords: COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, branched chain amino acids, insulin, systemic inflammation

  5. Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the International Federation for Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommend two blood tests for evaluating bone ... For Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  6. Broken bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following are common causes of broken bones: Fall from a height Motor vehicle accidents Direct blow Child abuse Repetitive forces, such as those caused by running, can cause stress fractures of the foot, ankle, tibia, or hip

  7. No red cell alloimmunization or change of clinical outcome after using fresh frozen cancellous allograft bone for acetabular reconstruction in revision hip arthroplasty: a follow up study

    OpenAIRE

    Mittag Falk; Straub Matthias; Schäfer Richard; Kluba Torsten; Ipach Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Possible immunization to blood group or other antigens and subsequent inhibition of remodeling or incorporation after use of untreated human bone allograft was described previously. This study presents the immunological, clinical and radiological results of 30 patients with acetabular revisions using fresh frozen non-irradiated bone allograft. Methods AB0-incompatible (donor-recipient) bone transplantation was performed in 22 cases, Rh(D) incompatible transplantation in 6 ...

  8. Skeletal changes in osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappab ligand mRNA levels in primary hyperparathyroidism: effect of parathyroidectomy and association with bone metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stilgren, L S; Rettmer, E; Eriksen, E F; Hegedüs, L; Beck-Nielsen, H; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    The effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on the production of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and ligand of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANKL) in human bone is incompletely understood. Most in vitro studies indicate that PTH decreases OPG and increases RANKL production. In primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), hypersecretion of PTH leads to enhanced bone resorption and formation with increased risk of fracture. Decreasing PTH levels by surgery normalizes bone metabolism, but the effects on skeletal OPG ...

  9. Raman spectroscopy of bone metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Sottnik, Joseph; Morris, Michael; Keller, Evan

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy of bone has been used to characterize chemical changes occurring in diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and osteomyelitis. Metastasis of cancer into bone causes changes to bone quality that are similar to those observed in osteoporosis, such as decreased bone strength, but with an accelerated timeframe. In particular, osteolytic (bone degrading) lesions in bone metastasis have a marked effect on patient quality of life because of increased risk of fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. We use Raman spectroscopy to examine bone from two different mouse models of osteolytic bone metastasis. Raman spectroscopy measures physicochemical information which cannot be obtained through standard biochemical and histological measurements. This study was reviewed and approved by the University of Michigan University Committee on the Care and Use of Animals. Two mouse models of prostate cancer bone metastasis, RM1 (n=3) and PC3-luc (n=4) were examined. Tibiae were injected with RM1 or PC3-luc cancer cells, while the contralateral tibiae received a placebo injection for use as controls. After 2 weeks of incubation, the mice were sacrificed and the tibiae were examined by Raman microspectroscopy (?=785 nm). Spectroscopic markers corresponding to mineral stoichiometry, bone mineralization, and mineral crystallinity were compared in spectra from the cancerous and control tibiae. X-ray imaging of the tibia confirmed extensive osteolysis in the RM1 mice, with tumor invasion into adjoining soft tissue and moderate osteolysis in the PC3-luc mice. Raman spectroscopic markers indicate that osteolytic lesions are less mineralized than normal bone tissue, with an altered mineral stoichiometry and crystallinity.

  10. Reactive transport modeling to study changes in water chemistry induced by CO2 injection at the Frio-I brine pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharaka, Y.K; Doughty, C.; Freifeld, B.M.; Daley, T.M.; Xu, T.

    2009-11-01

    To demonstrate the potential for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers, the Frio-I Brine Pilot was conducted, during which 1600 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into a high-permeability sandstone and the resulting subsurface plume of CO{sub 2} was monitored using a variety of hydrogeological, geophysical, and geochemical techniques. Fluid samples were obtained before CO{sub 2} injection for baseline geochemical characterization, during the CO{sub 2} injection to track its breakthrough at a nearby observation well, and after injection to investigate changes in fluid composition and potential leakage into an overlying zone. Following CO{sub 2} breakthrough at the observation well, brine samples showed sharp drops in pH, pronounced increases in HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and aqueous Fe, and significant shifts in the isotopic compositions of H{sub 2}O and dissolved inorganic carbon. Based on a calibrated 1-D radial flow model, reactive transport modeling was performed for the Frio-I Brine Pilot. A simple kinetic model of Fe release from the solid to aqueous phase was developed, which can reproduce the observed increases in aqueous Fe concentration. Brine samples collected after half a year had lower Fe concentrations due to carbonate precipitation, and this trend can be also captured by our modeling. The paper provides a method for estimating potential mobile Fe inventory, and its bounding concentration in the storage formation from limited observation data. Long-term simulations show that the CO{sub 2} plume gradually spreads outward due to capillary forces, and the gas saturation gradually decreases due to its dissolution and precipitation of carbonates. The gas phase is predicted to disappear after 500 years. Elevated aqueous CO{sub 2} concentrations remain for a longer time, but eventually decrease due to carbonate precipitation. For the Frio-I Brine Pilot, all injected CO{sub 2} could ultimately be sequestered as carbonate minerals.

  11. Disorders of Bone Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Xu; McDonald, Jay M.

    2011-01-01

    The skeleton provides mechanical support for stature and locomotion, protects vital organs, and controls mineral homeostasis. A healthy skeleton must be maintained by constant bone modeling to carry out these crucial functions throughout life. Bone remodeling involves the removal of old or damaged bone by osteoclasts (bone resorption) and the subsequent replacement of new bone formed by osteoblasts (bone formation). Normal bone remodeling requires a tight coupling of bone resorption to bone f...

  12. Building healthy bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverwood, Brian

    2003-06-01

    Environmental factors have an important role in deciding whether the skeleton will achieve the genetically determined peak bone mass. Children's lifestyles have changed over the years; with an increasing trend towards computer and television-related non-physical activities and a greater reliance on convenience foods. Childhood and adolescence are critical periods for building healthy, strong bones, therefore the children's nurse should consider the following advice when discussing bone-related conditions with parents of children of all ages: sufficient Vitamin D intake during infancy, childhood and adolescence, sufficient consumption of milk, cheese and yoghurt products, regular physical, weight-bearing activity, maintenance of a healthy body weight, avoidance of smoking during adolescence and adulthood. PMID:12830703

  13. Microarchitectural adaptations in aging and osteoarthrotic subchondral bone tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2010-01-01

    The human skeleton optimizes its microarchitecture by elaborate adaptations to mechanical loading during development and growth. The mechanisms for adaptation involve a multistep process of cellular mechanotransduction stimulating bone modelling, and remodeling resulting in either bone formation or resorption. This process causes appropriate microarchitectural changes tending to adjust and improve the bone structure to its prevailing mechanical environment. Normal individual reach peak bone mass...

  14. Assessing bone health in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During normal childhood and adolescence, the skeleton undergoes tremendous change. Utilizing the processes of modeling and remodeling, the skeleton acquires its adult configuration and ultimately achieves peak bone mass. Optimization of peak bone mass requires the proper interaction of environmental, dietary, hormonal, and genetic influences. A variety of acute and chronic conditions, as well as genetic polymorphisms, are associated with reduced bone density, which can lead to an increased risk of fracture both in childhood and later during adulthood. Bone densitometry has an established role in the evaluation of adults with bone disorders, and the development of suitable reference ranges for children now permits the application of this technology to younger individuals. We present a brief overview of the factors that determine bone density and the emerging role of bone densitometry in the assessment of bone mass in growing children and adolescents.

  15. Effect of epimedium pubescen flavonoid on bone mineral status and bone turnover in male rats chronically exposed to cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Shu-guang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epimedii herba is one of the most frequently used herbs in formulas that are prescribed for the treatment of osteoporosis in China and its main constituent is Epimedium pubescen flavonoid (EPF. However, it is unclear whether EPF during chronic exposure to cigarette smoke may have a protective influence on the skeleton. The present study investigated the effect of EPF on bone mineral status and bone turnover in a rat model of human relatively high exposure to cigarette smoke. Methods Fifty male Wistar rats were randomized into five groups: controls, passive smoking groups and passive smoking rats administered EPF at three dosage levels (75, 150 or 300?mg/kg/day in drinking water for 4?months. A rat model of passive smoking was prepared by breeding male rats in a cigarette-smoking box. Bone mineral content (BMC, bone mineral density (BMD, bone turnover markers, bone histomorphometric parameters and biomechanical properties were examined. Results Smoke exposure decreased BMC and BMD, increased bone turnover (inhibited bone formation and stimulated its resorption, affected bone histomorphometry (increased trabecular separation and osteoclast surface per bone surface; decreased trabecular bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, cortical thickness, bone formation rate and osteoblast surface per bone surface, and reduced mechanical properties. EPF supplementation during cigarette smoke exposure prevented smoke-induced changes in bone mineral status and bone turnover. Conclusion The results suggest that EPF can prevent the adverse effects of smoke exposure on bone by stimulating bone formation and inhibiting bone turnover and bone resorption.

  16. Formaldehyde-Associated Changes in microRNAs: Tissue and Temporal Specificity in the Rat Nose, White Blood Cells, and Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of gene expression, yet much remains unknown regarding their changes resulting from environmental exposures as they influence cellular signaling across various tissues. We set out to investigate miRNA responses to formaldehyde, a critical air pollutant and known carcinogen that disrupts miRNA expression profiles. Rats were exposed by inhalation to either 0 or 2 ppm formaldehyde for 7, 28, or 28 days followed by a 7-day recovery. Genome-wide miRNA expression profiles were assessed within the nasal respiratory epithelium, circulating white blood cells (WBC), and bone marrow (BM). miRNAs showed altered expression in the nose and WBC but not in the BM. Notably in the nose, miR-10b and members of the let-7 family, known nasopharyngeal carcinoma players, showed decreased expression. To integrate miRNA responses with transcriptional changes, genome-wide messenger RNA profiles were assessed in the nose and WBC. Although formaldehyde-induced changes in miRNA and transcript expression were largely tissue specific, pathway analyses revealed an enrichment of immune system/inflammation signaling in the nose and WBC. Specific to the nose was enrichment for apoptosis/proliferation signaling, involving let-7a, let-7c, and let-7f. Across all tissues and time points assessed, miRNAs were predicted to regulate between 7% and 35% of the transcriptional responses and were suggested to play a role in signaling processes including immune/inflammation-related pathways. These data inform our current hypothesis that formaldehyde-induced inflammatory signals originating in the nose may drive WBC effects. PMID:24304932

  17. The acutely ACL injured knee assessed by MRI: changes in joint fluid, bone marrow lesions, and cartilage during the first year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, R B; Le Graverand, M-P

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate changes in the knee during the first year after acute rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of volumes of joint fluid (JF), bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and cartilage volume (VC), and cartilage thickness (ThCcAB) and cartilage surface area (AC). To identify factors associated with these changes. METHODS: Fifty-eight subjects (mean age 26 years, 16 women) with an ACL rupture to a previously un-injured knee were followed prospectively using a 1.5T MR imager at baseline (within 5 weeks from injury), 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year. Thirty-four subjects were treated with ACL reconstruction followed by a structured rehabilitation program and 24 subjects were treated with structured rehabilitation only. Morphometric data were acquired from computer-assisted segmentation of MR images. Morphometric cartilage change was reported as mean change divided by the standard deviation of change (standard response mean, SRM). RESULTS: JF and BML volumes gradually decreased over the first year, although BML persisted in 62% of the knees after 1 year. One year after the ACL injury, a reduction of VC, AC and ThCcAB (SRM -0.440 or greater) was found in the trochlea femur (TrF), while an increase of VC and ThCcAB was found in the central medial femur (cMF) (SRM greater than 0.477). ACL reconstruction was directly and significantly related to increased JF volume at 3 and 6 months (P<0.001), BML volume at 6 months (P=0.031), VC and ThCcAB in cMF (P<0.002) and decreased cartilage area in TrF (P=0.010) at 12 months. CONCLUSION: Following an acute ACL tear, cMF and TrF showed the greatest consistent changes of cartilage morphometry. An ACL reconstruction performed within a mean of 6 weeks from injury was associated with increased ThCcAB and VC in cMF and decreased AC in TrF, compared to knees treated without reconstruction. This may suggest a delayed structural restitution in ACL reconstructed knees.

  18. Inverse association of carotenoid intakes with 4-year change in bone mineral density in elderly men and women: the Framingham Osteoporosis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that carotenoids may inhibit bone resorption and stimulate proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Few studies have examined the association between carotenoid intake (other than beta-carotene) and bone mineral density (BMD). We evaluated associations b...

  19. Early changes in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levelsand bone markers after monthly risedronatewith cholecalciferol in Korean patients with osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chung HY; Koo J; Kwon SK; Kang MI; Moon SH; Park JY; Shin CS; Yoon BK; Yoon HK; Chang JS; Chung YS; Park HM

    2013-01-01

    Ho Yeon Chung,1 Jawon Koo,1 Su Kyoung Kwon,2 Moo-IL Kang,3 Seong-Hwan Moon,4 Jin-Young Park,5 Chan Soo Shin,6 Byung-Koo Yoon,7 Hyun-Koo Yoon,8 Jae-Suk Chang,9 Yoon-Sok Chung,10 Hyoung-Moo Park111Department of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 2Department of Statistics, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, 4Department of Orthopedics, Yonsei University, 5Department of Orthopedics, Konkuk University, 6Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University, 7...

  20. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  1. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... needle is gently pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  2. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hollow part of most bones. Bone marrow aspiration is the removal of a small amount of ... tissue in liquid form for examination. Bone marrow aspiration is not the same as bone marrow biopsy . ...

  3. [Bone transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Julián, M; Valentí, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe the methodology of the Bone and Soft Tissue Bank, from extraction and storage until use. Since the year 1986, with the creation of the Bone Bank in the University Clinic of Navarra, more than 3,000 grafts have been used for very different types of surgery. Bone grafts can be classified into cortical and spongy; the former are principally used in surgery to save tumour patients, in large post-traumatic reconstructions and in replacement surgery where there are massive bone defects and a structural support is required. The spongy grafts are the most used due to their numerous indications; they are especially useful in filling cavities that require a significant quantity of graft when the autograft is insufficient, or as a complement. They are also of special help in treating fractures when there is bone loss and in the treatment of delays in consolidation and pseudoarthrosis in little vascularized and atrophic zones. They are also used in prosthetic surgery against the presence of cavity type defects. Allografts of soft tissues are specially recognised in multiple ligament injuries that require reconstructions. Nowadays, the most utilised are those employed in surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament although they can be used for filling any ligament or tendon defect. The principal difficulties of the cortical allografts are in the consolidation of the ends with the bone itself and in tumour surgery, given that these are patients immunodepressed by the treatment, the incidence of infection is increased with respect to spongy grafts and soft tissues, which is irrelevant. In short, the increasingly widespread use of allografts is an essential therapeutic weapon in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. It must be used by expert hands. PMID:16998521

  4. Contribution of Bone Tissue Modulus to Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Guelcher, Scott A.; Julie A. Sterling

    2011-01-01

    Certain tumors, such as breast, frequently metastasize to bone where they can induce bone destruction. Currently, it is well-accepted that the tumor cells are influenced by other cells and growth factors present in the bone microenvironment that lead to tumor-induced bone disease. Over the past 20 years, many groups have studied this process and determined the major contributing factors; however, these results do not fully explain the changes in gene expression and cell behavior that occur wh...

  5. Premature loss of bone remodeling compartment canopies is associated with deficient bone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Andersen, Thomas Levin; Søe, Kent; Hauge, Ellen Margrethe; Bollerslev, Jens; Amling, Michael; Barvencik, Florian; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    A remarkable property of bone remodeling is that osteoblasts form bone matrix exactly where and when osteoclasts have removed it. The bone remodeling compartment (BRC) canopies that cover bone surfaces undergoing remodeling, were proposed to be critical players in this mechanism. Here, we provide support to this hypothesis by analyzing the changes in prevalence of BRC canopies during the progress of the remodeling cycle in a cohort of healthy individuals and in patients with endogenous Cushing's...

  6. Reactivity Constraint On The Reactor Power Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automation of nuclear reactors, especially research reactors, needs to be done in order to avoid human error that raise from human. One of the important operation parameters that should be automatically controlled that of a reactor power. Until now, the reactor power control still need an operator intervention due to lack of recently used conventional control method. This paper describes the automation of a reactor power controlled by reactivity constraint. Reactivity constraint is needed to solve the problem that is present in the classic control method, e.g, overshoot and/or undershoot at transient condition. Reactivity constraint method is developed from the dynamic periods equation, which gives the instantaneous reactivity period as a function of the reactivity and the rate of change of reactivity. By experimental testing in the MITR-II research reactor, automatic controlling of the reactor power by reactivity constraint method proved to be good

  7. Reproductive Hormones and Longitudinal Change in Bone Mineral Density and Incident Fracture Risk in Older Men: The Concord Health and Aging in Men Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Benjumin; Cumming, Robert G; Seibel, Markus J; Naganathan, Vasi; Blyth, Fiona M; Bleicher, Kerrin; Dave, Aneesh; Le Couteur, David G; Waite, Louise M; Handelsman, David J

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine relationships between baseline levels of reproductive hormones in older men and (1) change in bone mineral density (BMD) over 5 years and (2) incident fractures over an average of 6 years' follow-up. A total of 1705 men aged 70 years and older from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP) study were assessed at baseline (2005-2007), 2 years follow-up (2007-2009), and 5 years follow-up (2010-2013). At baseline, testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol (E2), and estrone (E1) were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) by immunoassay. Hip BMD was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at all three time-points. Fracture data were collected at 4-monthly phone calls and verified radiographically. Statistical modeling was by general estimating equations and Cox model regression. Univariate analyses revealed inverse associations for serum SHBG, FSH, and LH and positive association for E1 but not DHT or E2 with BMD loss at the hip across the three time points. Serum levels of SHBG (? = -0.071), FSH (? = -0.085), LH (? = -0.070), and E1 (? = 0.107) remained significantly associated with BMD loss in multivariate-adjusted models; however, we were unable to identify any thresholds for accelerated BMD loss according to reproductive steroids. Incident fractures (all, n = 171; hip, n = 44; and nonvertebral, n = 139) were all significantly associated with serum SHBG, FSH, and LH levels in univariate models but none remained significantly associated in multivariate-adjusted model. Serum T, DHT, E2, and E1 levels were not associated with incident fractures in univariate or multivariate-adjusted analyses. In older men, lower serum SHBG, FSH, and LH and higher E1 levels protected against loss of BMD without increasing fracture rate. This means these reproductive variables may be considered as novel biomarkers of bone health during male aging. PMID:25736139

  8. Changes in Physical Fitness, Bone Mineral Density and Body Composition During Inpatient Treatment of Underweight and Normal Weight Females with Longstanding Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solfrid Bratland-Sanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine changes in aerobic fitness, muscular strength, bone mineral density (BMD and body composition during inpatient treatment of underweight and normal weight patients with longstanding eating disorders (ED. Twenty-nine underweight (BMI < 18.5, n = 7 and normal weight (BMI ? 18.5, n = 22 inpatients (mean (SD age: 31.0 (9.0 years, ED duration: 14.9 (8.8 years, duration of treatment: 16.6 (5.5 weeks completed this prospective naturalistic study. The treatment consisted of nutritional counseling, and 2 × 60 min weekly moderate intensive physical activity in addition to psychotherapy and milieu therapy. Underweight patients aimed to increase body weight with 0.5 kg/week until the weight gain goal was reached. Aerobic fitness, muscular strength, BMD and body composition were measured at admission and discharge. Results showed an increase in mean muscular strength, total body mass, fat mass, and body fat percentage, but not aerobic capacity, among both underweight and normal weight patients. Lumbar spine BMD increased among the underweight patients, no changes were observed in BMD among the normal weight patients. Three out of seven underweight patients were still underweight at discharge, and only three out of nine patients with excessive body fat (i.e., >33% managed to reduce body fat to normal values during treatment. These results calls for a more individualized treatment approach to achieve a more optimal body composition among both underweight and normal to overweight patients with longstanding ED.

  9. Kinetics of changes in serum concentrations of procalcitonin, interleukin-6, and C- reactive protein after elective abdominal surgery. Can it be used to detect postoperative complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbi?, Jerko; Ivi?, Dubravka; Alkhamis, Tamara; Drenjancevi?, Domagoj; Ivi?, Josip; Harsanji-Drenjancevi?, Ivana; Turina, Ivana; Vcev, Aleksandar

    2013-03-01

    Postoperative increase in inflammation biologic markers is associated with a nonspecific inflammatory response to a surgical injury. We investigated the kinetics of changes in serum concentrations of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) after abdominal surgeries and we focused on the behaviour of those markers in the case of development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). In the single centre we conducted a prospective observational study and we included patients admitted to the ICU after elective abdominal surgery. A total of 41 patients were included and 8 (19.5%) of them had clinical and laboratory signs of SIRS. Sepsis was confirmed in one of the patients, a 72-year old patient operated due to having an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Plasma concentrations of PCT, CRP and IL-6 were measured in all the patients before surgery and at the postoperative day 1 (POD1), postoperative day 2 (POD2) and postoperative day 3 (POD3). Systemic release of PCT, CRP and IL-6 was present in all the measured time points after the abdominal surgery. Median concentrations of IL-6 (100.4 pg/mL) and PCT (1, 17 pg/mL) production were measured highest at POD1 and the median of CRP (147 mg/L) was measured at highest POD2. A larger increase of all three measured markers was found in patients with SIRS compared to those without. IL-6 at POD1 and POD2 was a good predictor of SIRS (areas under curves were 0.71 and 0.765, respectively), showing the highest accuracy among investigated markers at those time points. CRP at POD3 was a good predictor of SIRS (AUC was 0.76). A cut-off of 95 mg/mL in the level of CRP at POD3 yielded a sensitivity of 87.5% and specificity of 66.7% in detecting SIRS. IL-6 and CRP were the best in detecting postoperative SIRS after abdominal surgery with the highest area under ROC curve. This study is showing that PCT is not a good marker of SIRS caused only by surgical injury without sepsis. PMID:23697273

  10. No red cell alloimmunization or change of clinical outcome after using fresh frozen cancellous allograft bone for acetabular reconstruction in revision hip arthroplasty: a follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittag Falk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Possible immunization to blood group or other antigens and subsequent inhibition of remodeling or incorporation after use of untreated human bone allograft was described previously. This study presents the immunological, clinical and radiological results of 30 patients with acetabular revisions using fresh frozen non-irradiated bone allograft. Methods AB0-incompatible (donor-recipient bone transplantation was performed in 22 cases, Rh(D incompatible transplantation in 6 cases. The mean follow up of 23 months included measuring Harris hip score and radiological examination with evaluation of remodeling of the bone graft, implant migration and heterotopic ossification. In addition, all patients were screened for alloimmunization to Rh blood group antigens. Results Compared to the whole study group, there were no differences in clinical or radiological measurements for the groups with AB0- or Rh(D-incompatible bone transplantation. The mean Harris Hip Score was 80.6. X-rays confirmed total remodeling of all allografts with no acetabular loosening. At follow up, blood tests revealed no alloimmunization to Rh blood group donor antigens. Conclusions The use of fresh frozen non-irradiated bone allograft in acetabular revision is a reliable supplement to reconstruction. The risk of alloimmunization to donor-blood group antigens after AB0- or Rh-incompatible allograft transplantation with a negative long-term influence on bone-remodeling or the clinical outcome is negligible.

  11. Chronological study for solitary bone metastasis in the sternum from breast cancer with bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since breast cancer is frequently associated with bone metastasis, bone scintigraphies have been performed to determine pre-operative staging and to survey postoperative bone metastasis. The sternum, in particular, is a site at which is difficult to differentiate between benign bone disease and bone metastasis, because of varied uptake and wide individual variations. In this study, chronological bone images were scintigraphied in six cases with solitary sternal metastasis and three cases with benign bone disease including two fracture cases and one arthritis case. On bone scintigrams in which solitary sternal metastasis appeared, increased uptake was found in five cases, and photon deficiency was observed in one case. During follow-up scintigraphies, abnormal accumulations, such as hot spots and cold lesions, increased in the bone metastasis while abnormal uptake disappeared or was unchanged in the benign bone disease cases. On CT, four cases showed osteolytic change, and one exhibited osteosclerotic change. These findings indicate that sternal metastasis usually shows osteolytic change, even if a hot lesion is recognized on bone scintigraphy. In solitary sternal metastasis, for which early diagnosis is difficult, both an integrated diagnosis using other imaging techniques and chronological bone scintigraphy are important. (author)

  12. Effect of degenerative change of lumbar spine on lateral bone mineral density measurement using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry: usefulness of measurement in the supine lateral projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of supine lateral bone mineral density (BMD) measurement using DXA by comparing AP and lateral spine BMD in patients with degenerative change Six hundred and seventy-two women underwnet AP and lateral BMD measurement of L-spine, using DXA. Spur changes and end-plate sclerosis were considered as degenerative change, and osteoporosis was defined according to WHO criteria. The ratio of mid-lateral BMD to AP BMD was calculated and the differences in ratio were analyzed in the degenerative group and controls, according to aging and osteoporosis, using the t test and ANOVA. The correlation coefficiency between aging and AP BMD and lateral BMD, respectively, was calculated. The mLat/AP ratio in the control and degenerative group was 0.710±0.005/0.622±0.028(p=3D0.003) in the 40-49-year-old group, 0.663±0.006/0.612±0.016 (p=3D0.002) in the 50-59-year-old group. 0.626±0.015/0.552±0.023 (p+0.007) in the 60-69-year-old group, and 0.717±0.028/0.600±0.045 (p=3D0.076) in those aged over 70. The ratio was 0.656±0.015/0.598±0.038(p=3D0.099) in osteoporosis, 0.684±0.008/0.596±0.016 (p=3D0.000) in osteopenia, and 0.688±0.005/0.583±0.019 (p=3D0.000) in normal subjects, showing that lateral BMD is more sensitive than AP BMD, espectially in the degenerative group. There was negative correlation between aging and AP BMD(r=3D-0.545), lateral BMD(r=3D0.571), and mid-lateral BMD(r=3D-0.583). In a selective group of patients with degenerative change, supine lateral BMD measurement of L-spine is useful

  13. Bone tissue material properties are altered during osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    PRENDERGAST, PATRICK JOHN

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of the effects of osteoporosis on the mechanical behavior of bone has been performed using whole bone testing, or testing of volumes of ovariectomized cancellous bone1-3 and these studies revealed a decrease in macro-level bone strength. However, it is not clear whether these changes were due only to the reduction in bone mass or whether a reduction in tissue strength also contributed. A number of studies report that the mineral content is unchanged or slig...

  14. The role of P2X receptors in bone biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N R; Syberg, S; Ellegaard, M

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a highly dynamic organ, being constantly modeled and remodeled in order to adapt to the changing need throughout life. Bone turnover involves the coordinated actions of bone formation and bone degradation. Over the past decade great effort has been put into the examination of how P2X receptors regulate bone metabolism and especially for the P2X7 receptor an impressive amount of evidence has now documented its expression in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes as well as important fun...

  15. Radiologically Guided Bone Biopsy: Results of 502 Biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the results of 502 biopsies over a 19-year period for the purpose of highlighting the results that can be expected from such a large study, with emphasis on needle choice and anesthetic methods. Methods: The histological, cytological, and microbiological results of 477 patients who had 502 bone biopsies carried out between July 1977 and March 1996 were studied. Less than 5% of patients required second biopsies. There were almost equal numbers of males and females in the group. The lesions were visible radiologically and most of the biopsies were carried out by a single operator. The lesions were classified on their histopathological, cytopathological, and microbiological findings. Results: Tumors accounted for 40% of the biopsies, and infection for 16%. Biopsies which did not yield a 'positive' diagnosis accounted for 31%; these included specimens reported as normal, or as showing reactive changes, repair, remodelling, non-specific features, inflammation (but not clearly infective), or no evidence of malignancy or inflammation. Less than 4% of biopsies were incorrect, and some of these were re-biopsied. Conclusion: Bone biopsy is a valuable technique for positive diagnosis of malignancy or infection, as it enables a definitive plan for treatment and management of patients to be established. Exclusion of serious pathology is almost equally important. In principle, any osseous site can be biopsied using fluoroscopic or computed tomographic guidance. Care in the biopsy technique and selection of the bone needle is required

  16. Bone scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oftentimes, in managing podiatric complaints, clinical and conventional radiographic techniques are insufficient in determining a patient's problem. This is especially true in the early stages of bone infection. Bone scanning or imaging can provide additional information in the diagnosis of the disorder. However, bone scans are not specific and must be correlated with clinical, radiographic, and laboratory evaluation. In other words, bone scanning does not provide the diagnosis but is an important bit of information aiding in the process of diagnosis. The more useful radionuclides in skeletal imaging are technetium phosphate complexes and gallium citrate. These compounds are administered intravenously and are detected at specific time intervals postinjection by a rectilinear scanner with minification is used and the entire skeleton can be imaged from head to toe. Minification allows visualization of the entire skeleton in a single image. A gamma camera can concentrate on an isolated area. However, it requires multiple views to complete the whole skeletal image. Recent advances have allowed computer augmentation of the data received from radionucleotide imaging. The purpose of this chapter is to present the current radionuclides clinically useful in podiatric patients

  17. Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) are rare disorders in which there is usually some form of aplastic anemia (failure of the bone marrow to produce blood), associated with a family history of the same disorder. Some of these conditions have typical changes in physical appearance or in laboratory findings which suggest a specific diagnosis. There are several well-described syndromes, which can be recognized by health care experts.

  18. Short- and long-term effects of vertebroplastic bone cement on cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Renfu; Ni, Yueming; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Jinwei; Zheng, Xuan; Yang, Disheng

    2014-07-01

    Vertebroplasty using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement is the most common method to treat osteoporotic vertebral fractures. However, several questions of interest remain to be clarified, including how does PMMA affect the cement-bone interface area and surrounding bone tissue, can damaged bone tissues be repaired, how will PMMA change the bone interface over the long-term, and what happens to PMMA itself? The purpose of this study is to investigate these concerns and provide a basis for clinical evaluation. We made bone defects in the lumbar vertebrae of New Zealand rabbits as a model of osteoporosis and injected them with bone cement. A mechanical testing machine was used to perform axial compression, three-point bending, and twisting resistance tests to observe and investigate the short- and long-term biomechanical properties of PMMA after implantation. Optical, fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, and nanoindentation were used to observe the changes in the interface microstructure. PMMA can rapidly establish the strong support with stable function in the near future. Biomechanical experiments showed that biomechanical property of bone cement group was significantly higher than those in the other two groups (PNano-indentation testing shows that the young modulus and stiffness of the interface among bone, material and interface were significantly differences (Pnano indentation hardness, then was interface and bone tissue. PMMA bone cement was able to quickly support and stabilize the defect in the short term, and bone growth restarted at the bone interface and was tightly integrated. However, over the long-term, fluorescent signal was weakened, osteoclasts appeared, the mechanical indicators for both the interface and the whole vertebra decreased, and bone resorption was eventually greater than bone formation, resulting in bone loss. Therefore, vertebroplasty is not the end of treatment, and we need to further study ways to improve the bone cement material, which is crucial for long-term vertebroplasty efficacy, to better treat osteoporosis. PMID:24762857

  19. The Digital Astronaut Project Computational Bone Remodeling Model (Beta Version) Bone Summit Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, James; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2013-01-01

    Under the conditions of microgravity, astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1% to 2% a month, particularly in the lower extremities such as the proximal femur [1-3]. The most commonly used countermeasure against bone loss in microgravity has been prescribed exercise [4]. However, data has shown that existing exercise countermeasures are not as effective as desired for preventing bone loss in long duration, 4 to 6 months, spaceflight [1,3,5,6]. This spaceflight related bone loss may cause early onset of osteoporosis to place the astronauts at greater risk of fracture later in their lives. Consequently, NASA seeks to have improved understanding of the mechanisms of bone demineralization in microgravity in order to appropriately quantify this risk, and to establish appropriate countermeasures [7]. In this light, NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with the NASA Bone Discipline Lead to implement well-validated computational models to help predict and assess bone loss during spaceflight, and enhance exercise countermeasure development. More specifically, computational modeling is proposed as a way to augment bone research and exercise countermeasure development to target weight-bearing skeletal sites that are most susceptible to bone loss in microgravity, and thus at higher risk for fracture. Given that hip fractures can be debilitating, the initial model development focused on the femoral neck. Future efforts will focus on including other key load bearing bone sites such as the greater trochanter, lower lumbar, proximal femur and calcaneus. The DAP has currently established an initial model (Beta Version) of bone loss due to skeletal unloading in femoral neck region. The model calculates changes in mineralized volume fraction of bone in this segment and relates it to changes in bone mineral density (vBMD) measured by Quantitative Computed Tomography (QCT). The model is governed by equations describing changes in bone volume fraction (BVF), and rates of changes in bone cell populations that remove and replace bone in packets within the bone region. The DAP bone model is unique in several respects. In particular in takes former models of volume fraction changes one step higher in fidelity and separates BVF into separate equations for mineralized and osteoid volume fractions governed by a mineralization rate. This more closely follows the physiology of the remodeling unit cycles where bone is first resorbed and then followed by the action of osteoblasts to lay down collagen matrix which eventually becomes mineralized. In another respect, the modules allow the functional description of the time rate of change of other parameters and variables in the model during a computational simulation. More detailed description of the model, preliminary validation results, current limitation and caveats, and planned advancements are provided in sections 2 through 5. The DAP bone model is being developed primarily as a research tool, and not as a clinical tool like QCT. Even if it transitions to a clinical tool, it is not intended to replace QCT or any other clinical tool. Moreover, the DAP bone model does not predict bone fracture. Its purpose is to provide valuable additional data via "forward prediction" simulations for during and after spaceflight missions to gain insight on, (1) mechanisms of bone demineralization in microgravity, and (2) the volumetric changes at the various bone sites in response to in-flight and post-flight exercise countermeasures. This data can then be used as input to the Keyak [8] (or equivalent) FE analysis method to gain insight on how bone strength may change during and after flight. This information can also be useful to help optimize exercise countermeasure protocols to minimize changes in bone strength during flight, and improve regain of bone strength post-flight. To achieve this goal, the bone model will be integrated with DAP's exercise countermeasure models to simulate the effect of exercise prescriptions on preserving bone. More specifically, the model will accept loading histor

  20. Changes in T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow following treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A magnetic resonance imaging study.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow were performed in 11 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. Nine of the children were re-examined after chemotherapeutic treatment. The results were compared with histological data from bone marrow biopsies obtained in close association to the MR examinations. Ten age matched children were examined as a control group. A 1.5 Tesla whole body scanner was used for the measurements. The pretreatment T1 relaxation times of the bone marrow were significantly prolonged, compared to the age matched controls. After chemotherapy the T1 relaxation times of the children with ALL decreased significantly towards or into the normal range. A significant correlation was found between the T1 relaxation time and the content of malignant blast cells in the bone marrow.

  1. Sodium and bone health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teucher, B.; Dainty, J. R.; Spinks, C. A.; Majsak-Newman, G.; Berry, D. J.; Hoogeweff, J. A.; Foxall, R. J.; Jakobsen, Jette; Cashman, K. D.; Flynn, A.; Fairweather-Tait, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    High salt intake is a well-recognized risk factor for osteoporosis because it induces calciuria, but the effects of salt on calcium metabolism and the potential impact on bone health in postmenopausal women have not been fully characterized. This study investigated adaptive mechanisms in response to changes in salt and calcium intake in postmenopausal women. Eleven women completed a randomized cross-over trial consisting of four successive 5-wk periods of controlled dietary intervention, each se...

  2. Bone matrix, cellularity, and structural changes in a rat model with high-turnover osteoporosis induced by combined ovariectomy and a multiple-deficient diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Parameswari; Böcker, Wolfgang; El Khassawna, Thaqif; Kampschulte, Marian; Schlewitz, Gudrun; Huerter, Britta; Sommer, Ursula; Dürselen, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Bauer, Natali; Szalay, Gabor; Wenisch, Sabine; Lips, Katrin S; Schnettler, Reinhard; Langheinrich, Alexander; Heiss, Christian

    2014-03-01

    In estrogen-deficient, postmenopausal women, vitamin D and calcium deficiency increase osteoporotic fracture risk. Therefore, a new rat model of combined ovariectomy and multiple-deficient diet was established to mimic human postmenopausal osteoporotic conditions under nutrient deficiency. Sprague-Dawley rats were untreated (control), laparatomized (sham), or ovariectomized and received a deficient diet (OVX-Diet). Multiple analyses involving structure (micro-computed tomography and biomechanics), cellularity (osteoblasts and osteoclasts), bone matrix (mRNA expression and IHC), and mineralization were investigated for a detailed characterization of osteoporosis. The study involved long-term observation up to 14 months (M14) after laparotomy or after OVX-Diet, with intermediate time points at M3 and M12. OVX-Diet rats showed enhanced osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Bone matrix markers (biglycan, COL1A1, tenascin C, and fibronectin) and low-density lipoprotein-5 (bone mass marker) were down-regulated at M12 in OVX-Diet rats. However, up-regulation of matrix markers and existence of unmineralized osteoid were seen at M3 and M14. Osteoclast markers (matrix metallopeptidase 9 and cathepsin K) were up-regulated at M14. Micro-computed tomography and biomechanics confirmed bone fragility of OVX-Diet rats, and quantitative RT-PCR revealed a higher turnover rate in the humerus than in lumbar vertebrae, suggesting enhanced bone formation and resorption in OVX-Diet rats. Such bone remodeling caused disturbed bone mineralization and severe bone loss, as reported in patients with high-turnover, postmenopausal osteoporosis. Therefore, this rat model may serve as a suitable tool to evaluate osteoporotic drugs and new biomaterials or fracture implants. PMID:24384131

  3. Changes in T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow following treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O; Hertz, H; Johansen, H K; Yssing, M

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow were performed in 11 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. Nine of the children were re-examined after chemotherapeutic treatment. The results were compared with histological data from bone marrow biopsies obtained in close association to the MR examinations. Ten age matched children were examined as a control group. A 1.5 Tesla whole body scanner was used for the measuremen...

  4. New insights to the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in bone phenotype and in dioxin-induced modulation of bone microarchitecture and material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone is a target for high affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands, such as dioxins. Although bone morphology, mineral density and strength are sensitive endpoints of dioxin toxicity, less is known about effects on bone microarchitecture and material properties. This study characterizes TCDD-induced modulations of bone tissue, and the role of AHR in dioxin-induced bone toxicity and for normal bone phenotype. Six AHR-knockout (Ahr?/?) and wild-type (Ahr+/+) mice of both genders were exposed to TCDD weekly for 10 weeks, at a total dose of 200 ?g/kg bw. Bones were examined with micro-computed tomography, nanoindentation and biomechanical testing. Serum levels of bone remodeling markers were analyzed, and the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation was profiled using PCR array. In Ahr+/+ mice, TCDD-exposure resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner and more porous cortical bone, and a more compact trabecular bone compartment. Bone remodeling markers and altered expression of a number of osteogenesis related genes indicated imbalanced bone remodeling. Untreated Ahr?/? mice displayed a slightly modified bone phenotype as compared with untreated Ahr+/+ mice, while TCDD exposure caused only a few changes in bones of Ahr?/? mice. Part of the effects of both TCDD-exposure and AHR-deficiency were gender dependent. In conclusion, exposure of adult mice to TCDD resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner cortical bone, mechanically weaker bones and most notably, increased trabecular bone volume fraction in Ahr+/+ mice. AHR is involved in bone development of a normal bone phenotype, and is crucial for manifestation of TCDD-induced bone alterations. - Highlights: • TCDD disrupts bone remodeling resulting in altered cortical and trabecular bone. • In trabecular bone an anabolic effect is observed. • Cortical bone is thinner, more porous, harder, stiffer and mechanically weaker. • AHR ablation results in increased trabecular bone and softer cortical bone. • TCDD does not affect the bones of Ahr–/– mice

  5. Bone and marrow imaging in sickle cell disease: diagnosis of infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sickling of erythrocytes in patients with S-hemoglobin causes marrow and bone infarction. The former can be demonstrated as a lack of /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid uptake on marrow imaging examination. These defects may resolve or persist long after the acute episode. If the bone is involved in the acute episode, imaging within the first few days of onset of symptoms can show lack of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled phosphate uptake, usually in a smaller area than that shown by marrow scanning. Follow-up bone imaging shows increased activity, particularly along the circumference of the bone where periosteal reaction can be demonstrated radiographically. Magnification by use of the pinhole collimator provides better definition of the uptake defect and the distribution of the increased reactive uptake. Timing of examination is important. If marrow imaging is performed in an asymptomatic period, the repeat examination during a painful crisis permits differentiation of old and acute marrow infarction. If /sup 99m/Tc-phosphate imaging is performed after about 2 days of symptoms, acute infarction can be differentiated from osteomyelitis, which it may mimic clinically. To assist in differentiating bone infection in a site of marrow infarction demonstrated by marrow imaging, serial bone imaging with magnification may be useful. The uptake defect, followed in several days to 2 weeks, by circumferential increased activity, is a different pattern than the homogeneously intense activity of osteomyelitis, but the peripheral distribution may not be apparent on routine imaging. It is hoped that the utilization of these techniques can decrease the emotional and economic costs of prolonged hospitalization for suspected infection and can also expand our knowledge of the complex pathophysiologic changes of sickle cell bone disease

  6. Multifunctional reactive nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatis, Demitrios

    Many multifunctional nanocomposite materials have been developed for use in propellants, explosives, pyrotechnics, and reactive structures. These materials exhibit high reaction rates due to their developed reaction interfacial area. Two applications addressed in this work include nanocomposite powders prepared by arrested reactive milling (ARM) for burn rate modifiers and reactive structures. In burn rate modifiers, addition of reactive nanocomposite powders to aluminized propellants increases the burn rate of aluminum and thus the overall reaction rate of an energetic formulation. Replacing only a small fraction of aluminum by 8Al·MoO3 and 2B·Ti nanocomposite powders enhances the reaction rate with little change to the thermodynamic performance of the formulation; both the rate of pressure rise and maximum pressure measured in the constant volume explosion test increase. For reactive structures, nanocomposite powders with bulk compositions of 8Al·MoO3, 12Al·MoO3, and 8Al·3CuO were prepared by ARM and consolidated using a uniaxial die. Consolidated samples had densities greater than 90% of theoretical maximum density while maintaining their high reactivity. Pellets prepared using 8Al·MoO3 powders were ignited by a CO2 laser. Ignition delays increased at lower laser powers and greater pellet densities. A simplified numerical model describing heating and thermal initiation of the reactive pellets predicted adequately the observed effects of both laser power and pellet density on the measured ignition delays. To investigate the reaction mechanisms in nanocomposite thermites, two types of nanocomposite reactive materials with the same bulk compositions 8Al·MoO3 were prepared by different methods. One of the materials was manufactured by ARM and the other, so called metastable interstitial composite (MIC), by mixing of nano-scaled individual powders. Clear differences in the low-temperature redox reactions, welldetectable by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), were established between MIC and ARM-prepared materials. However, the materials behaved similarly to each other in the ignition experiments. It is proposed that the ignition of both MIC and ARM-prepared materials at the same temperature can be explained by a thermodynamically driven transformation of a protective amorphous alumina into a crystalline polymorph. Low temperature redox reactions in ARM-prepared Al-CuO nanocomposites were characterized using DSC and isothermal microcalorimetry. The results were interpreted using a Cabrera-Mott reaction model. Simultaneous processing of both experimental data sets identified the parameters for the respective Cabrera-Mott kinetics. The low temperature kinetic model was coupled with a multi-step oxidation model describing diffusion-controlled growth of amorphous and gamma-Al2O3 polymorphs. The kinetic parameters for the multistep oxidation model from previous research were adjusted based on DSC measurements. The combined heterogeneous reactions model was used to interpret results of ignition experiments. It is proposed that the heterogeneous reactions considered serve as ignition triggers and ensuing gas release processes contributes to additional heat release and temperature runaway.

  7. Three-Dimensional Bone Adaptation of the Proximal Femur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Mette

    1998-01-01

    The bone remodeling of a three-dimensional model of the proximal femur is considered. The bone adaptation is numerically described as an evolution in time formulated such that the structural change goes in an optimal direction within each time step for the optimal boundary conditions. In the bone remodeling scheme is included the memory of past loadings to account for the delay in the bone response to the load changes. In order to get a realistic bone adaptation process, the bone structure at the onset of the remodeling needs to be realistic too. A start design is obtained by structural optimization for maximum stiffness with multiple loading conditions

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse malignant bone marrow diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-four patients with malignant bone marrow involvement or polycythemia vera, 8 patients with reactive bone marrow and 7 healthy individuals were examined with spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging at 0.35 T and 0.5 T. Signs of an increased longitudinal relaxation time, T1, were found when normal bone marrow was replaced by malignant cells, polycythemia vera or reactive marrow. A shortened T1 was indicated in 4 patients in bone marrow regions treated by radiation therapy; the marrow was most likely hypocellular in these cases. The estimated T1 relaxation times were highly correlated to the cellularity of the bone marrow as assessed by histology. Among patients with close to 100% cellularity neither T1 nor T2 discriminated between the various malignancies or between malignant and reactive, non-malignant bone marrow. Characterization of tissues in terms of normalized image intensities was also attempted, the motive being to avoid approximations and uncertainties in the assessment of T1 and T2. The normalization was carried out with respect to the image of highest intensity, i.e. the proton density weighted image. The results were in agreement with those for T1 and T2. It was concluded that MRI is valuable for assessing bone marrow cellularity, but not for differentiating between various bone marrow disorders having a similar degree of cellularity. (orig.)

  9. Pre- to postsleep change in psychophysiological reactivity to emotional films: Late-night REM sleep is associated with attenuated emotional processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Gabriela G; Schabus, Manuel; Blechert, Jens; Kolodyazhniy, Vitaliy; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2015-06-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep has been postulated to facilitate emotional processing of negative stimuli. However, empirical evidence is mixed and primarily based on self-report data and picture-viewing studies. This study used a full-length aversive film to elicit intense emotion on one evening, and an emotionally neutral control film on another evening while psychophysiological and experiential responses were measured. Subsequent sleep was monitored polysomnographically, and specific film scenes were presented again on the next morning. Correlation analyses revealed that participants with longer late-night REM sleep after the aversive film showed higher increase of electrodermal reactivity and less reduction of facial corrugator muscle reactivity to negative film scenes on the next morning. This indicates that REM sleep may be associated with attenuated emotional processing of prolonged and intense emotional stimuli from pre- to postsleep. PMID:25588962

  10. A crucial role for thiol antioxidants in estrogen-deficiency bone loss

    OpenAIRE

    Lean, Jenny M.; Davies, Julie T.; Fuller, Karen; Jagger, Christopher J.; Kirstein, Barrie; Partington, Geoffrey A.; Urry, Zoë L.; Chambers, Timothy J.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms through which estrogen prevents bone loss are uncertain. Elsewhere, estrogen exerts beneficial actions by suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS stimulate osteoclasts, the cells that resorb bone. Thus, estrogen might prevent bone loss by enhancing oxidant defenses in bone. We found that glutathione and thioredoxin, the major thiol antioxidants, and glutathione and thioredoxin reductases, the enzymes responsible for maintaining them in a reduced state, fell substantia...

  11. Systemic reactive amyloidosis associated with Castleman's disease: serial changes of the concentrations of acute phase serum amyloid A and interleukin 6 in serum.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, S; Chisuwa, H; Kawasaki, S.; Ozawa, J; Hoshii, Y; Yokota, T; Aoi, T

    1997-01-01

    A case is reported of a 21 year old woman who suffered from Castleman's disease and systemic reactive amyloidosis. The serum concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were extremely high and amyloid protein was immunohistochemically identified as AA. After surgical excision of a large retroperitoneal lymph node with the pathological findings of plasma cell type of Castleman's disease, both serum SAA and IL-6 declined, showing a similar pattern of reduction curves. All c...

  12. Changes in plasma C-reactive protein and hemostatic factors prior to and after a first myocardial infarction with a median follow-up time of 8 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, Anna; Nilsson, Torbjörn; Weinehall, Lars; Boman, Kurt; Eliasson, Mats; Hallmans, Göran; Jansson, Jan-Håkan

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a first myocardial infarction leads to increased plasma levels of hemostatic factors and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and whether the association between theses biomarkers and myocardial infarction was greater at follow-up compared with baseline. Of more than 36 000 persons screened in northern Sweden, 78 developed a first myocardial infarction (on average 18 months after sampling) in a population-based, prospective, nested patie...

  13. Investigation of coupled geometrical and mechanical feedback controls in bone remodelling---A theoretical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pivonka, Peter; Scheiner, Stefan; Dunstan, Colin R

    2012-01-01

    Bone is a continuously renewed biomaterial. The renewal process is known as bone remodelling and is operated by bone-resorbing cells (osteoclasts) and bone-forming cells (osteoblasts). Both biochemical and biomechanical regulatory mechanisms have been identified in the interaction between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Here we focus on an additional and poorly understood potential regulatory mechanism of bone cells, that involves the morphology of the microstructure of bone. Bone cells can only remove and replace bone at a bone surface. However, the microscopic availability of bone surface depends in turn on the ever-changing bone microstructure. The importance of this geometrical dependence is unknown and difficult to quantify experimentally. Therefore, we develop a mathematical model of bone cell interactions that takes into account both biochemical and biomechanical regulations, and investigate numerically the influence of the specific surface (surface density) on bone remodelling within a small bone tissue ...

  14. Bone banking and sterilization of bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamisawa, I.; Itoman, M.; Maehara, H.; Kobayashi, A.; Watanabe, T.

    1995-08-01

    The use of banked bone (preserved allograft bone) is various and essential, because it has numerous advantages including the relative ease in retrieval a large amount of bone material and requisite shape and size. But bone banking and allografting must be promoted under obligation to stably supply safe and high-quality bone. To avoid transferring disease perfectly, irradiation sterilization is especially recommended at the present time.

  15. Bone development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendsen, Agnes D; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2015-11-01

    The development of the vertebrate skeleton reflects its evolutionary history. Cartilage formation came before biomineralization and a head skeleton evolved before the formation of axial and appendicular skeletal structures. This review describes the processes that result in endochondral and intramembranous ossification, the important roles of growth and transcription factors, and the consequences of mutations in some of the genes involved. Following a summary of the origin of cartilage, muscle, and tendon cell lineages in the axial skeleton, we discuss the role of muscle forces in the formation of skeletal architecture and assembly of musculoskeletal functional units. Finally, ontogenetic patterning of bones in response to mechanical loading is reviewed.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Muscle Bone Interactions". PMID:26453494

  16. Reader's digest of the pathophysiology of bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Reinhard

    2012-09-01

    Bone metastases are a process originally proposed as the "seed and soil theory" in the eighteenth century. Tumor cell disseminating from patients with breast or prostate cancer typically use the bony environment to grow outside the primary tumor location. The severe clinical consequences of bone metastasis such as pain, fractures, and hypercalcemia result from a serious misbalance of bone turnover. Most bone metastases cause catabolic changes of bone turnover. The severity of bone resorption is associated with tumor growth, suggesting the existence of a vicious cycle that needs to be interrupted. Osteoblastic metastasis showing signs of osteosclerotic lesions are observed in prostate cancer. Understanding the pathophysiology of bone metastases and their detrimental consequence provide the scientific basis for therapeutic interventions at various levels including homing of tumors to bone, survival and growth of the tumor cell in the bone niche, and the mechanisms causing bone destruction. PMID:22797871

  17. Bone remodelling markers in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardellone, Patrice; Séjourné, Alice; Paccou, Julien; Goëb, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients results from chronic inflammation and can lead to osteoporosis and fractures. A few bone remodeling markers have been studied in RA witnessing bone formation (osteocalcin), serum aminoterminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP), serum carboxyterminal propeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin (OC), and bone resorption: C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (I-CTX), N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (I-NTX), pyridinolines (DPD and PYD), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). Bone resorption can be seen either in periarticular bone (demineralization and erosion) or in the total skeleton (osteoporosis). Whatever the location, bone resorption results from activation of osteoclasts when the ratio between osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (OPG/RANKL) is decreased under influence of various proinflammatory cytokines. Bone remodeling markers also allow physicians to evaluate the effect of drugs used in RA like biologic agents, which reduce inflammation and exert a protecting effect on bone. We will discuss in this review changes in bone markers remodeling in patients with RA treated with biologics. PMID:24839355

  18. New predictive model for monitoring bone remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougherara, Habiba; Klika, Václav; Marsík, Frantisek; Marík, Ivo A; Yahia, L'hocine

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this article was to present a new thermodynamic-based model for bone remodeling which is able to predict the functional adaptation of bone in response to changes in both mechanical and biochemical environments. The model was based on chemical kinetics and irreversible thermodynamic principles, in which bone is considered as a self-organizing system that exchanges matter, energy and entropy with its surroundings. The governing equations of the mathematical model have been numerically solved using Matlab software and implemented in ANSYS software using the Finite Element Method. With the aid of this model, the whole inner structure of bone was elucidated. The current model suggested that bone remodeling was a dynamic process which was driven by mechanical loading, metabolic factors and other external contributions. The model clearly indicated that in the absence of mechanical stimulus, the bone was not completely resorbed and reaches a new steady state after about 50% of bone loss. This finding agreed with previous clinical studies. Furthermore, results of virtual computations of bone density in a composite femur showed the development of a dense cortical bone around the medullary canal and a dense trabeculae bone between the femoral head and the calcar region of the medial cortex due to compressive stresses. The comparison of the predicted bone density with the structure of the proximal femur obtained from X-rays and using strain energy density gave credibility to the current model. PMID:20540092

  19. Clinical effect and change of serum fPSA levels after nucleotide 89Sr therapy in patients with multiple foci bone metastasis from prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical effect of 89Sr therapy in patients with bone metastasis from prostatic cancer. Methods: Thirty one patients with multiple foci (over 3) bone metastasis from prostatic cancer were treated with intravenous 89SrCl2 (40-50 ?Ci/kg) as a single dose (21 patients) or with a second dose given 3-6 months apart. Serum fPSA levels and 99mTc-MDP whole body scan were performed both before and after the treatment. Results: Treatment result was considered to be significantly improved (significantly decreased requirement of analgesics/narcotics) in 18 patients and with remission (no need of analgesics) in 5 patients. Serum fPSA levels measured in 22 patients 1-3 months after treatment were significantly lower than those before treatment and bone scan in 15 patients studied 3-6 months after treatment revealed regression of the lesions. Conclusion: 89Sr treatment for bone metastasis was quite satisfactory with high improvement rate in pain control and very few side effects of mild transient bone marrow depression only. (authors)

  20. Premenopausal and postmenopausal changes in bone mineral density of the proximal femur measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Hetland, M L

    1994-01-01

    Total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femur was measured by DXA in 1238 healthy white women. In the 389 premenopausal women, aged 21-54 years, no bone loss was observed before the menopause, except in the femoral neck and Ward's triangle, in which BMD decreased by 0.3%/year (SEE 0.2-0.9%/year, p < 0.001) and 0.6%/year (SEE 0.4-0.8%/year, p < 0.001), respectively. In the postmenopausal women aged 48-75 years, there was a highly significant exponential decay in BMD with age and years since menopause (YSM) in all regions (-0.58 < r < -0.48, p < 0.001). However, YSM was a better predictor of BMD than age. The decrease in BMD in the first 5 years postmenopause reached values of 9-13%. The estimated bone loss after 20 years was 17-30%, greatest in Ward's triangle and smallest in the intertrochanteric region. BMD correlated highly significantly with BMI (0.26 < r < 0.48, p < 0.001). In conclusion, the present study indicates a stable premenopausal bone mass of the proximal femur and a postmenopausal bone loss, which is influenced mainly by YSM within the first 10-15 years after menopause. BMD correlated with body mass index (BMI) in the postmenopausal years, confirming that low BMI constitutes a potential risk factor for osteoporosis.

  1. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Rucci; Adriano Angelucci

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing c...

  2. Ossicular bone modeling in acute otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Rasmus Lysholdt; Hermansson, Ann; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2010-01-01

    A number of middle ear diseases are associated with pathologic bone modeling, either formative or resorptive. As such, the pathogenesis of a sclerotic mastoid has been controversial for decades. Experimental studies on acute middle ear infection have shown progressive osteoneogenesis in the bone structures surrounding the middle ear cavity, and a few studies have reported acute changes of the ossicular chain. However, detailed qualitative and quantitative information on ossicular bone modeling d...

  3. Assessing bone health in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    During normal childhood and adolescence, the skeleton undergoes tremendous change. Utilizing the processes of modeling and remodeling, the skeleton acquires its adult configuration and ultimately achieves peak bone mass. Optimization of peak bone mass requires the proper interaction of environmental, dietary, hormonal, and genetic influences. A variety of acute and chronic conditions, as well as genetic polymorphisms, are associated with reduced bone density, which can lead to an increased ri...

  4. Predicting bone loss following orthotopic liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    CROSBIE, O; Freaney, R.; McKenna, M; Curry, M; Hegarty, J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Hepatic osteodystrophy occurs in the majority of patients with advanced chronic liver disease with the abnormalities in bone metabolism accelerating following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). ?AIMS—To examine changes in bone mineral density (BMD) following OLT and to investigate factors that lead to bone loss. ?METHODS—Twelve patients had BMD (at both the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN)) and biochemical markers measured preoperatively and for 24 ...

  5. Changes in body weight, C-reactive protein, and total adiponectin in non-obese women after 12 months of a small-volume, home-based exercise program

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mauro Felippe Felix, Mediano; Fabiana Alves, Neves; Alessandra Cordeiro de Souza Rodrigues, Cunha; Erica Patricia Garcia de, Souza; Anibal Sanchez, Moura; Rosely, Sichieri.

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to evaluate the effects of small-volume, home-based exercise combined with slight caloric restriction on the inflammatory markers C-reactive protein and adiponectin. METHODS: In total, 54 women were randomly assigned to one of two groups for exercise intervention: the [...] control or home-based exercise groups. Weight, waist and hip circumferences, and inflammatory markers were measured at baseline and after 6 and 12 months. Women allocated to the home-based exercise group received a booklet explaining the physical exercises to be practiced at home at least 3 times per week, 40 minutes per session, at low-to-moderate intensity. All participants received dietary counseling aimed at reducing caloric intake by 100-300 calories per day, with a normal distribution of macro-nutrients (26-28% of energy as fat). Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01206413 RESULTS: The home-based exercise group showed a significantly greater reduction in weight and body mass index at six months, but no difference between groups was observed thereafter. With regard to the inflammatory markers, a greater but non-statistically significant reduction was found for C-reactive protein in the home-based exercise group at six months; however, this difference disappeared after adjusting for weight change. No differences in adiponectin were found at the 6- or 12-month follow-up. CONCLUSION: Small-volume, home-based exercise did not promote changes in inflammatory markers independent of weight change.

  6. Extrinsic Mechanisms Involved in Age-Related Defective Bone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinquier, Anne Marie-Pierre Emilie; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    Context: Age-related bone loss is associated with progressive changes in bone remodeling characterized by decreased bone formation relative to bone resorption. Both trabecular and periosteal bone formation decline with age in both sexes, which contributes to bone fragility and increased risk of fractures. Studies in rodents and humans revealed that, independent of sex hormone deficiency, the age-related decline in bone formation is characterized by decreased osteoblast number and lifespan and reduced bone-forming capacity of individual osteoblasts. An important clinical question is to identify the mechanisms involved in the age-related defective bone formation. Evidence Acquisition: The mechanisms discussed in this review are based on a PubMed search and knowledge of the authors in the field. Evidence Synthesis: Available basic and clinical studies indicate that multiple mechanisms are involved in the alterations of osteoblastogenesis and the resulting decline in bone formation with aging. Notably, the age-related osteoblast dysfunctions and defective bone formation are caused by a number of extrinsic clinical factors that inhibit anabolic signaling pathways in bone. Thus, targeting these pathways can abolish age-related bone loss. Conclusions: The identification of extrinsic mechanisms involved in osteoblast dysfunctions associated with aging improves our knowledge of age-related bone loss and provides a basis for therapeutic intervention to improve bone formation and bone mass in the aging population.

  7. Enhancing Reactivity via Structural Distortion

    OpenAIRE

    Schweitzer, Dirk; Shearer, Jason; Rittenberg, Durrell K.; Shoner, Steven C.; Ellison, Jeffrey J.; Loloee, Reza; Lovell, Scott; Barnhart, David; KOVACS, JULIE A.

    2002-01-01

    To examine how small structural changes influence the reactivity and magnetic properties of biologically relevant metal complexes, the reactivity and magnetic properties of two structurally related five-coordinate Fe(III) thiolate compounds are compared. (Et,Pr)-ligated [Fe(III)(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))]PF6 (3) is synthesized via the abstraction of a sulfur from alkyl persulfide ligated [Fe(III)(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))-Spers]PF6 (2) using PEt3. (Et,Pr)-3 is structurally related to (Pr,Pr)-ligated [Fe(III)(S2M...

  8. A non-synonymous coding change in the CYP19A1 gene Arg264Cys (rs700519 does not affect circulating estradiol, bone structure or fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jenny Z

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biosynthesis of estrogens from androgens is catalyzed by aromatase P450 enzyme, coded by the CYP19A1 gene on chromosome 15q21.2. Genetic variation within the CYP19A1 gene sequence has been shown to alter the function of the enzyme. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a non-synonymous Arg264Cys (rs700519 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP is associated with altered levels of circulating estradiol, areal bone mineral density or fracture. Methods This population- based study of 1,022 elderly Caucasian women (mean age 74.95 ± 2.60 years was genotyped for the rs700519 SNP were analyzed to detect any association with endocrine and bone phenotypes. Results The genotype frequencies were 997 wildtype (97.6%, 24 heterozygous (2.3% and 1 homozygous (0.1%. When individuals were grouped by genotype, there was no association between the polymorphism and serum estradiol (wildtype 27.5 ± 16.0; variants 31.2 ± 18.4, P = 0.27. There was also no association seen on hip bone mineral density (wildtype 0.81 ± 0.12; 0.84 ± 0.14 for variants, P = 0.48 or femoral neck bone mineral density (0.69 ± 0.10 for wildtype; 0.70 ± 0.12 for variants, P = 0.54 before or after correction of the data with age, height, weight and calcium therapy. There were also no associations with quantitative ultrasound measures of bone structure (broadband ultrasound attenuation, speed of sound and average stiffness. Conclusions In a cohort of 1,022 elderly Western Australian women, the presence of Arg264Cys (rs700519 polymorphism was not found to be associated with serum estradiol, bone structure or phenotypes.

  9. Selective loss of younger erythrocytes from blood circulation and changes in erythropoietic patterns in bone marrow and spleen in mouse anemia induced by poly-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Nitin; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2015-11-01

    Administration of poly-dispersed acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs, 10?µg intravenously on alternate days) induced a sustained anemia in mice. Using a modified double in vivo biotinylation (DIB) technique, blood counts of reticulocytes and erythrocytes of different age groups were simultaneously enumerated in control and AF-SWCNT treated mice. A sustained reticulocytosis was observed in AF-SWCNT treated mice. Young erythrocytes (up to 7 days old) that are normally resistant to elimination in control mice were eliminated at a significant rate in AF-SWCNT treated mice. Old erythrocytes, however, accumulated in circulation indicating that younger erythrocytes were selectively eliminated from the blood circulation of AF-SWCNT treated mice. Cells representing various stages of erythroid differentiation in bone marrow and spleen were enumerated flow cytometrically by double staining with anti-Ter119 and anti-transferrin receptor (CD71) monoclonal antibodies. Proportion of erythroid cells was significantly reduced (up to 27%) in bone marrow (BM) indicating a fall in erythropoietic activity. A concomitant increase in the spleen erythroid population was however observed that could be a compensatory response. Changes in erythroid populations in bone marrow and spleen correlated with changes in erythroblast-A population in these organs that represent an early stage of erythroid differentiation. Uptake of intravenously administered fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs (FAF-SWCNTs) was relatively low (3-4%) in erythroid cells in bone marrow and spleen. A significantly higher proportion of pro-erythroblasts and erythroblast-A (early stages of erythroid differentiation) took-up FAF-SWCNTs. Uptake of AF-SWCNTs by early precursors of erythroid differentiation with toxic consequences may be a contributing factor in AF-SWCNT induced anemia. PMID:25831400

  10. The rs1800629 polymorphism in the TNF gene interacts with physical activity on the changes in C-reactive protein levels in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas; Laaksonen, D E; Lakka, T A; Herder, C; Koenig, W; Lindström, J; Eriksson, J G; Uusitupa, M; Kolb, H; Laakso, M; Tuomilehto, J

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity exerts anti-inflammatory effects, but genetic variation may modify its influence. In particular, the rs1800629 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the tumor necrosis factor ( TNF) gene and the rs1800795 SNP in the interleukin-6 ( IL6) gene have been found to modify the effect of exercise training on circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and IL-6, respectively. We assessed whether rs1800629 and rs1800795 modified the effect of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity ...

  11. Reactivity monitoring in ADS systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring reactivity in an ADS should be performed on-line with a simple, accurate and robust technique. Within the range of experimental reactor techniques, no single technique can be selected which meet these requirements. Therefore a combination of different techniques has to be chosen in a way that various off-line techniques serve as a calibration for the on-line measurement technique. As an on-line measurement technique, the current/flux reactivity indicator is the most simple and robust solution. It is based on the fact that in a subcritical multiplying medium with a driving source the flux level is proportional to the driving source intensity, hence the beam current, and the reactivity level. However, since the proportionality constant depends on a number of core dependent parameters and detector characteristics, this current-to-flux indicator has to be calibrated on a regular basis. For this calibration, one could benefit from the occurrence of accelerator beam trips to determine the reactivity level in dollars by means of a prompt jump analysis of the flux level change. Hence, the prompt jump reactivity indicator could act as a first calibration tool of the current-to-flux indicator. Since the prompt jump indicator still relies on the value for the effective delayed neutron fraction to determine reactivity level, complementary techniques have to be used to obtain a more accurate determination of the reactivity. Techniques based on reactor noise methods such as RAPJA technique which is combination of the Rossi-alpha method and Prompt jump analysis can be used in this respect. In the future the bi-spectral ratio from the Cf - source driven noise analysis could be used for this purpose. (author)

  12. Malignant bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinicoroentgenologic semiotics of malignant bone tumors as well as metastatic bone tumors are presented. Diagnosis of malignant and metastatic bone tumors should be always complex, representing a result of cooperation of a physician, roentgenologist, pathoanatomist

  13. Food and Your Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Food and Your Bones Food and Your Bones The food that you eat ... taking multivitamins or supplements . Good-for-Your-Bones Foods Food Nutrient Dairy products such as low-fat ...

  14. Osteoporosis: The Bone Thief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this makes your bones weaker. Who Has Osteoporosis? Ten million Americans have osteoporosis. They are mostly ... a bone. What Can I Do For My Osteoporosis? Treating osteoporosis means stopping the bone loss and ...

  15. Broken Bones (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone fragments in place. When Will a Broken Bone Heal? Fractures heal at different rates, depending upon ... doctor says it's OK. Back Continue Preventing Broken Bones Although fractures are a common part of childhood, ...

  16. Bone marrow biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may be taken from the pelvic or breast bone. Sometimes, other areas are used. Marrow is removed ...

  17. Changes in clot lysis levels of reteplase and streptokinase following continuous wave ultrasound exposure, at ultrasound intensities following attenuation from the skull bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roijer Anders

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound (US has been used to enhance thrombolytic therapy in the treatment of stroke. Considerable attenuation of US intensity is however noted if US is applied over the temporal bone. The aim of this study was therefore to explore possible changes in the effect of thrombolytic drugs during low-intensity, high-frequency continuous-wave ultrasound (CW-US exposure. Methods Clots were made from fresh venous blood drawn from healthy volunteers. Each clot was made from 1.4 ml blood and left to coagulate for 1 hour in a plastic test-tube. The thrombolytic drugs used were, 3600 IU streptokinase (SK or 0.25 U reteplase (r-PA, which were mixed in 160 ml 0.9% NaCl solution. Continuous-wave US exposure was applied at a frequency of 1 MHz and intensities ranging from 0.0125 to 1.2 W/cm2. For each thrombolytic drug (n = 2, SK and r-PA and each intensity (n = 9 interventional clots (US-exposed, n = 6 were submerged in thrombolytic solution and exposed to CW-US while control clots (also submerged in thrombolytic solution, n = 6 were left unexposed to US. To evaluate the effect on clot lysis, the haemoglobin (Hb released from each clot was measured every 20 min for 1 hour (20, 40 and 60 min. The Hb content (mg released was estimated by spectrophotometry at 540 nm. The difference in effect on clot lysis was expressed as the difference in the amount of Hb released between pairs of US-exposed clots and control clots. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results Continuous-wave ultrasound significantly decreased the effects of SK at intensities of 0.9 and 1.2 W/cm2 at all times (P 2 and at 1.2 W/cm2, following 40 min exposure at 0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and at 1.2 W/cm2, and following 60 min of exposure at 0.05 0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and at 1.2 W/cm2 (all P Conclusion Increasing intensities of CW-US exposure resulted in increased clot lysis of r-PA-treated blood clots, but decreased clot lysis of SK-treated clots.

  18. An evaluation of changes over time in serum creatine kinase activity and C-reactive protein concentration in dogs undergoing hemilaminectomy or ovariohysterectomy

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    B, Nevill; A, Leisewitz; A, Goddard; P, Thompson.

    Full Text Available The extent of trauma in a patient can be difficult for a clinician to quantify. A prospective study was performed on 2 groups of dogs undergoing either ovariohysterectomy or hemilaminectomy. The serum activity of creatine kinase and serum concentration of C-reactive protein were evaluated preoperati [...] vely and then at 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 and 48 hours postoperatively in both groups. The results were compared statistically both within and between the 2 groups. A wide range of results was found at each time point for both analytes although there were no significant differences for either analyte between the 2 surgical groups preoperatively. Thereafter there were significant differences in creatine kinase activity levels between the 2 groups. C-reactive protein concentration results were very similar in the 2 groups with no statistical difference at any time point. The results of this study suggest that the evaluation of CK and CRP at any one time point in a traumatised animal is of limited value. However, the evaluation of the trend of these 2 analytes, even over a relatively short time period, may allow for useful prognostication in clinical cases.

  19. [Dynamic changes in the reactivity of the hormonal system regulation with the impact by LBNP sessions in long-term space mission