WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation air model

  1. An approximate local thermodynamic nonequilibrium radiation model for air

    Gally, Thomas A.; Carlson, Leland A.

    1992-01-01

    A radiatively coupled viscous shock layer analysis program which includes chemical and thermal nonequilibrium is used to calculate stagnation point flow profiles for typical aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle conditions. Two methods of predicting local thermodynamic nonequilibrium radiation effects are used as a first and second order approximation to this phenomena. Tabulated results for both nitrogen and air freestreams are given with temperature, species, and radiation profiles for some air conditions. Two body solution results are shown for 45 and 60 degree hyperboloid bodies at 12 km/sec and 80 km altitude. The presented results constitute an advancement in the engineering modeling of radiating nonequilibrium reentry flows.

  2. Modelling geo-magnetic radiation from extensive air showers

    An incoming ultra high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) entering our atmosphere will create a so called extensive air shower (EAS). A cascade of particles flying toward the Earth's surface with extremely high velocities. As a result of this they are concentrated in a thin shower front, which can be visualized by a pancake of particles flying toward the Earth. The deflection of electrons and positrons due to the Earth magnetic field in combination with retardation effects is responsible for an electromagnetic pulse to be emitted within the radio frequency range. Concentrating on a macroscopic description, focussing on the net current created due to the deflection of the electrons and positrons in the Earth magnetic field, a model has been made to simulate the radio signal for a realistic air shower. Several different contributions to the electric pulse have been included to obtain more realistic simulations and have a better comparison with measured data.

  3. Advances in Atmospheric Radiation Measurements and Modeling Needed to Improve Air Safety

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Atwell, William; Beck, Peter; Benton, Eric; Copeland, Kyle; Dyer, Clive; Gersey, Brad; Getley, Ian; Hands, Alex; Holland, Michael; Hong, Sunhak; Hwang, Junga; Jones, Bryn; Malone, Kathleen; Meier, Matthias M.; Mertens, Chris; Phillips, Tony; Ryden, Keith; Schwadron, Nathan; Wender, Stephen A.; Wilkins, Richard; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2015-04-01

    Air safety is tied to the phenomenon of ionizing radiation from space weather, primarily from galactic cosmic rays but also from solar energetic particles. A global framework for addressing radiation issues in this environment has been constructed, but more must be done at international and national levels. Health consequences from atmospheric radiation exposure are likely to exist. In addition, severe solar radiation events may cause economic consequences in the international aviation community due to exposure limits being reached by some crew members. Impacts from a radiation environment upon avionics from high-energy particles and low-energy, thermalized neutrons are now recognized as an area of active interest. A broad community recognizes that there are a number of mitigation paths that can be taken relative to the human tissue and avionics exposure risks. These include developing active monitoring and measurement programs as well as improving scientific modeling capabilities that can eventually be turned into operations. A number of roadblocks to risk mitigation still exist, such as effective pilot training programs as well as monitoring, measuring, and regulatory measures. An active international effort toward observing the weather of atmospheric radiation must occur to make progress in mitigating radiation exposure risks. Stakeholders in this process include standard-making bodies, scientific organizations, regulatory organizations, air traffic management systems, aircraft owners and operators, pilots and crew, and even the public.

  4. Computational model of collisional-radiative nonequilibrium plasma in an air-driven type laser propulsion

    A thrust power of a gas-driven laser-propulsion system is obtained through interaction with a propellant gas heated by a laser energy. Therefore, understanding the nonequilibrium nature of laser-produced plasma is essential for increasing available thrust force and for improving energy conversion efficiency from a laser to a propellant gas. In this work, a time-dependent collisional-radiative model for air plasma has been developed to study the effects of nonequilibrium atomic and molecular processes on population densities for an air-driven type laser propulsion. Many elementary processes are considered in the number density range of 1012/cm3≤N≤1019/cm3 and the temperature range of 300 K≤T≤40,000 K. We then compute the unsteady nature of pulsively heated air plasma. When the ionization relaxation time is the same order as the time scale of a heating pulse, the effects of unsteady ionization are important for estimating air plasma states. From parametric computations, we determine the appropriate conditions for the collisional-radiative steady state, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and corona equilibrium models in that density and temperature range.

  5. An improved mathematical model for prediction of air quantity to minimise radiation levels in underground uranium mines

    Ventilation is the primary means of controlling radon and its daughter concentrations in an underground uranium mine environment. Therefore, prediction of air quantity is the vital component for planning and designing of ventilation systems to minimise the radiation exposure of miners in underground uranium mines. This paper comprehensively describes the derivation and verification of an improved mathematical model for prediction of air quantity, based on the growth of radon daughters in terms of potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC), to reduce the radiation levels in uranium mines. The model also explains the prediction of air quantity depending upon the quality of intake air to the stopes. This model can be used to evaluate the contribution of different sources to radon concentration in mine atmosphere based on the measurements of radon emanation and exhalation. Moreover, a mathematical relationship has been established for quick prediction of air quantity to achieve the desired radon daughter concentration in the mines. - Highlights: • Proposed an improved model to predict air quantity for underground uranium mines. • The model predicts the air quantity depending on the quality of intake air to the stope. • The model will be useful for designing ventilation systems of underground uranium mines. • The mathematical model was used to identify the main sources of radon in mine air. • Established a relationship between air quantity and potential alpha energy concentration

  6. Air pollution and climate response to aerosol direct radiative effects: A modeling study of decadal trends across the northern hemisphere

    Decadal hemispheric Weather Research and Forecast-Community Multiscale Air Quality simulations from 1990 to 2010 were conducted to examine the meteorology and air quality responses to the aerosol direct radiative effects. The model's performance for the simulation of hourly surfa...

  7. Simulation of an ethylene-air jet flame with soot and radiation modeling

    Doom, Jeffrey; Oefelein, Joseph

    2009-11-01

    Large eddy simulation of an ethylene-air diffusion flame and supporting direct numerical simulations are presented. A reduced mechanism recently developed by Wang et al. is used (22 species, 107 reactions) and a systematic study is performed which compares the reduced mechanism to the original full mechanism (USC Mech Version II: 111 species, 784 reactions). A series of calculations are then validated by comparing results with CHEMKIN, Lignell et al. (Combust. Flame 2007) and the premixed experiments from Bhargava & Westmoreland (Combust. Flame 1998). The baseline soot model employed is from Leung et al (Combust. Flame 1991) and accounts for nucleation, growth, oxidation and coagulation. This model is coupled through source terms as a function of C2H2, C O, O2 and H2. The first two moments are considered to account for the number density and soot mass per volume. Initially the radiation model assumes an optically thin medium in a manner consistent with Lignell et al. Results associated with the soot model will be presented along with comparisons with experimental data.

  8. Vibrational and electronic collisional-radiative model in air for Earth entry problems

    The two-temperature collisional-radiative model CoRaM-AIR, working over a wide range for pressure and temperatures, has been developed for the flow conditions around a space vehicle entering the Earth's atmosphere. The species N2, O2, NO, N, O, Ar, N2+, O2+, NO+, N+, O+, Ar+, and free electrons are taken into account. The model is vibrationally specific on the ground electronic state of N2, O2, and NO, and electronically specific for all species, with a total of 169 vibrational states and 829 electronic states, respectively. A wide set of elementary processes is considered under electron and heavy particle impact given the temperatures involved (up to 30 000 K). This set corresponds to almost 700 000 forward and backward elementary processes. The relaxation from initial thermal or chemical nonequilibrium is studied for dissociation-ionization situations in conditions related to the FIRE II flight experiment. Boltzmann plots clearly prove that the vibrational and electronic excitation distributions are far from being Boltzmanian. In particular, high-lying vibrational levels remain underpopulated for most of the duration of the relaxation. This relaxation can be separated in a first phase characterized by the dissociation and the excitation of the molecular species, and a second phase leading to the excitation and the ionization of the dissociation products. Owing to the vibrational relaxation, the time scales are slightly higher than the ones predicted by former kinetic mechanisms usually used in flow simulations. In the present FIRE II conditions, radiation does not play a significant role

  9. Air pollution and climate response to aerosol direct radiative effects: A modeling study of decadal trends across the northern hemisphere

    Xing, Jia; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Hogrefe, Christian; Gan, Chuen-Meei; Wong, David C.; Wei, Chao; Wang, Jiandong

    2015-12-01

    Decadal hemispheric Weather Research and Forecast-Community Multiscale Air Quality simulations from 1990 to 2010 were conducted to examine the meteorology and air quality responses to the aerosol direct radiative effects. The model's performance for the simulation of hourly surface temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and direction was evaluated through comparison with observations from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Integrated Surface Data. The inclusion of aerosol direct radiative effects improves the model's ability to reproduce the trend in daytime temperature range which over the past two decades was increasing in eastern China but decreasing in eastern U.S. and Europe. Trends and spatial and diurnal variations of the surface-level gaseous and particle concentrations to the aerosol direct effect were analyzed. The inclusion of aerosol direct radiative effects was found to increase the surface-level concentrations of SO2, NO2, O3, SO42-, NO3-, and particulate matter 2.5 in eastern China, eastern U.S., and Europe by 1.5-2.1%, 1-1.5%, 0.1-0.3%, 1.6-2.3%, 3.5-10.0%, and 2.2-3.2%, respectively, on average over the entire 21 year period. However, greater impacts are noted during polluted days with increases of 7.6-10.6%, 6.2-6.7%, 2.0-3.0%, 7.8-9.5%, 11.1-18.6%, and 7.2-10.1%, respectively. Due to the aerosol direct radiative effects, stabilizing of the atmosphere associated with reduced planetary boundary layer height and ventilation leads to an enhancement of pollution. Consequently, the continual increase of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in eastern China leads to an increasing trend in the air quality feedback which exacerbates air pollution, while emission reductions in eastern U.S. and Europe result in a declining trend in both AODs and feedback which make the air pollution control strategies more effective.

  10. Sensitivity of modelled sulfate radiative forcing to DMS concentration and air-sea flux formulation

    Tesdal, J.-E.; Christian, J. R.; Monahan, A. H.; von Salzen, K.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we use an atmospheric general circulation model with explicit aerosol chemistry (CanAM4.1) and several climatologies of surface ocean DMS concentration to assess uncertainties about the climate impact of ocean DMS efflux. Despite substantial variation in the spatial pattern and seasonal evolution of simulated DMS fluxes, the global mean radiative forcing is approximately linearly proportional to the global mean surface flux of DMS; the spatial and temporal distribution of ocean DMS efflux has only a minor effect on the global radiation balance. The effect of the spatial structure, however, generates statistically significant changes in the global mean concentrations of some aerosol species. The effect of seasonality on net radiative forcing is larger than that of spatial distribution, and is significant at global scale.

  11. Modelling diurnal patterns of air temperature, radiation, wind speed and relative humidity by equations from daily characteristics

    Calculated data on diurnal patterns from daily averages can be useful as inputs for models simulating plant processes such as photosynthesis and transpiration. A method was developed for the calculation of diurnal patterns of air temperature, wind speed, global radiation and relative humidity from available daily data. Calculated data were validated with measured data collected in Israel, California and The Netherlands. A simple sine-exponential method for describing diurnal air temperature was not sufficient in most cases, and the addition of parameters which specified the time lag of maximum temperature and the effect of buoyancy improved the data accuracy. Diurnal course of wind speed could be described using two sine curves scaled by the measured daily total wind run. Time base of each of the sine curves and the minimum wind speed had to be defined for each location. An accurate description of the diurnal global radiation was obtained, based on the measured daily total global radiation, and the calculated sine of the solar elevation corrected for atmospheric transmissivity. Relative humidity was calculated from the dew point temperature computed as the minimum value of a characteristic seasonal value or the actual air temperature. When the site-specific parameters were known or correctly estimated these methods gave good estimations of the diurnal weather patterns. (author)

  12. Sensitivity of modelled sulfate radiative forcing to DMS concentration and air-sea flux formulation

    Tesdal, J.-E.; Christian, J.R; Monahan, A.H.; Von Salzen, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we use an atmospheric general circulation model with explicit aerosol chemistry (CanAM4.1) and several climatologies of surface ocean DMS concentration to assess uncertainties about the climate impact of ocean DMS efflux. Despite substantial variation in the spatial pattern and seasonal evolution of simulated DMS fluxes, the global mean radiative forcing is approximately linearly proportional to the global mean surface flux of DMS; the spatial and temporal dis...

  13. Assessing the transferability of support vector machine model for estimation of global solar radiation from air temperature

    Highlights: • Transferability of SVM in estimation of solar radiation is investigated. • Radiation at estimation site could be well estimated by SVM developed at source site. • A strategy for selecting a suitable source site is presented. • SVM accuracy is affected by distance and temperature difference between two sites. • RMSE of SVM shows logarithm or linearly relationship with altitude of source site. - Abstract: Exploring novel methods for estimation of global solar radiation from air temperature has been being a focus in many studies. This paper evaluates the transferability of support vector machines (SVM) for estimation of solar radiation in subtropical zone in China. Results suggest that solar radiation at one site (estimation site) could be well estimated by SVM model developed at another site (source site). The accuracy of estimation is affected by the distance and temperature difference between two sites, and altitude of source site. Higher correlations between RMSE of SVM and distance, and temperature differences are observed in northeastern region, increasing the reliability and confidence of SVM model developed at nearby stations. While lower correlations between RMSE and distance, and temperature differences are observed in southwest plateau region. When the altitude of estimation site is lower than 1200 m, RMSE show logarithm relationship with altitude of source sites where the altitude are lower than that of estimation site. Otherwise, RMSE show linearly relationship with altitude of source sites where the altitude are higher than 200 m but lower than that of the estimation site. This result suggests that solar radiation could be also estimated using SVM model developed at the site with similar but lower altitude. Based on these results, a strategy that takes into account the climatic conditions, topography, distance, and altitude for selecting a suitable source site is presented. The findings can guide and ease the appropriate choice of

  14. A simple model to estimate radiation doses to aircrew during air flights in Brazil and abroad

    The objective of this article is to present the results obtained from the development of a simple model used to estimate cosmic radiation doses from crew members taking into consideration the variation of the dose rates with the altitude and the latitude, airplane cruise velocity and other important parameters such as, cruise height, takeoff time, landing time, takeoff angle, landing angle. The model was incorporated into a Brazilian computer program developed using the “mathematica” symbolic software. The data used to calculate the dose rates with altitude and latitude by the authors takes into consideration the mean solar activity from January 1958 to December 2008 (51 years). Twenty two data including international and national American flights were used to test the program and the results between them compared, showing good agreement. The program also gives excellent results for the doses expected for the crew members of three Brazilian national flights (between capitals cities in Brazil) when compared with the doses values measured for these flights using a radiation detector. According to the results the doses expected for the Brazilian crews of domestic flights can, in some cases, depending on the number of annual flights, overcome the limit of 1 mSv/year established by the Brazilian competent authority in Brazil (Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission- CNEN) for public annual exposure. In the case of the simulated international flights the results shows a good agreement with the results found in literature especially when considered the different database series used by the authors and by the other references for the solar activity. (authors)

  15. Markov Chain Method for Radiative Transfer Modeling: A Case Study of Aerosol/Surface Retrieval using AirMSPI Measurements

    Xu, F.; Diner, D. J.; Davis, A. B.; Latyshev, S.; Garay, M. J.; Kalashnikova, O.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    A vector Markov chain (MarCh) radiative transfer (RT) code developed at JPL that includes forward modeling of radiance and polarization fields and linearization (analytical estimation of Jacobians) was incorporated into an aerosol and surface retrieval package for a plane-parallel atmosphere/surface system. The RT computation by MarCh is based on matrix operations. To improve the code's computational efficiency, the forward model is currently undergoing acceleration through the exploration of different strategies for matrix operation and inversion, including numerical optimization, multi-threading/multi-processing techniques on a CPU. Implementation on a graphics processing unit (GPU) is also planned. Following a benchmarking study of the forward model, the performance of MarCh in aerosol and surface retrieval is being tested. With an optimized algorithm, we started from aerosol optical depth and surface retrieval using imagery acquired by Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) over Fresno, CA. Aerosol properties including concentration and size distribution of different species provided by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Chem model were used to constrain the retrieval and reduce the parameter space. The assumptions of spectral invariance in the angular shape of surface bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs) and the magnitude of polarized surface BRFs were tested. The aerosol and surface properties are then relaxed in a stepwise way to refine the aerosol retrieval results and enable comparison with independent retrievals obtained from a collocated AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) station.

  16. Preliminary validation of computational procedures for a new atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) model.

    Clem, John M; De Angelis, Giovanni; Goldhagen, Paul; Wilson, John W

    2003-01-01

    A new computational procedure to determine particle fluxes in the Earth's atmosphere is presented. The primary cosmic ray spectrum has been modeled through an analysis of simultaneous proton and helium measurements made on high altitude balloon flights and spacecraft. An improved global fit to the data was achieved through applying a unique technique utilizing the Fokker-Plank equation with a non-linear rigidity-dependent diffusion coefficient. The propagation of primary particles through the Earth's atmosphere is calculated with a three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport program called FLUKA. Primary protons and helium nuclei (alphas) are generated within the rigidity range of 0.5 GV-20 TV uniform in cos2 theta. For a given location, primaries above the effective cutoff rigidity are transported through the atmosphere. Alpha particles are initially transported with a separate package called HEAVY to simulate fragmentation. This package interfaces with FLUKA to provide interaction starting points for each nucleon originating from a helium nucleus. Results from this calculation are presented and compared to measurements. PMID:14727659

  17. A female pelvic bone shape model for air/bone separation in support of synthetic CT generation for radiation therapy

    Liu, Lianli; Cao, Yue; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Jolly, Shruti; Balter, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Separating bone from air in MR data is one of the major challenges in using MR images to derive synthetic CT. The problem is further complicated when the anatomic regions filled with air are altered across scans due to air mobility, for instance, in pelvic regions, thereby the air regions estimated using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence are invalid in other image series acquired for multispectral classification. This study aims to develop and investigate a female pelvic bone shape model to identify low intensity regions in MRI where air is unlikely to be present in support of synthetic CT generation without UTE imaging. CT scans of 30 patients were collected for the study, 17 of them also have corresponding MR scans. The shape model was built from the CT dataset, where the reference image was aligned to each of the training images using B-spline deformable registration. Principal component analysis was performed on B-spline coefficients for a compact model where shape variance was described by linear combination of principal modes. The model was applied to identify pelvic bone in MR images by deforming the corresponding MR data of the reference image to target MR images, where the search space of the deformation process was constrained within the subspace spanned by principal modes. The local minima in the search space were removed effectively by the shape model, thus supporting an efficient binary search for the optimal solution. We evaluated the model by its efficacy in identifying bone voxels and excluding air regions. The model was tested across the 17 patients that have corresponding MR scans using a leave-one-out cross validation. A simple model using the first leading principal mode only was found to achieve reasonable accuracy, where an averaged 87% of bone voxels were correctly identified. Finally dilation of the optimally fit bone mask by 5 mm was found to cover 96% of bone voxels while minimally impacting the overlap with air (below 0.4%).

  18. SESAM - a model for calculating the radiation exposure associated with the release of pollutants contained in the exhaust air in the case of a multi-source situation

    Within the scope of the research project St.Sch.645, sponsored by the German Federal Minister of Research and Technology (BMFT) a model and computer code called SESAM (calculation of radiation exposure by release of pollutants with the exhaust air in the case of a multi-source situation) was established, allowing to perform all the assessments of long-time exposure required for licensing - as e.g. evaluation of the maximum individual radiation exposure of the different organs at the most unfavorable point of reference - associated with the environmental impact of several nuclear sources of release - as e.g. several units of a nuclear power plant, different sources of a waste management center, or also consideration of the pre-existing exposures of a site caused by nuclear sources. The basis of this multi-source model SESAM are the models for calculating the exposure in the environment of nuclear facilities for the pathways external gamma radiation from the cloud, external beta radiation from the cloud, gamma radiation from material deposited on the ground, inhalation and ingestion, as well as the data material, as e.g. dose constants and radioecological conversion factors (kg 1 and kg 2) for critical groups of the popualation, specified in the German guideline Principles for Calculating the Exposure Caused by the Release of Radioactive Material with the Exhaust Air. (orig./HP)

  19. New combined models for estimating daily global solar radiation from measured air temperature in semi-arid climates: Application in Ghardaïa, Algeria

    Highlights: • New combined models been introduced for estimating daily global solar radiation. • The BNN is the most accurate model compared with combined models. • Results indicate that the new calibrated models are able to estimate the global solar. - Abstract: In this paper, combined empirical models and a Bayesian neural network (BNN) model have been developed to estimate daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface in Ghardaïa, Algeria. An experimental database of daily GSR, maximum and minimum air temperatures of the year 2006 has been used to estimate the coefficients of the empirical models, as well as to train the BNN model. Six months of the year 2007 (summer period: May, June, July, and winter period: October, November, December) have been used to test the calibrated models, while six months of the year 2012 (from 1st February to 31th July) have been used to check generalisation capability of the developed models as well as the BNN model. Results indicate that the new calibrated models are able to estimate the global solar radiation with an excellent accuracy in this location. Calibrated models are also compared with the developed BNN model to show their effectiveness

  20. A female pelvic bone shape model for air/bone separation in support of synthetic CT generation for radiation therapy.

    Liu, Lianli; Cao, Yue; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Jolly, Shruti; Balter, James M

    2016-01-01

    Separating bone from air in MR data is one of the major challenges in using MR images to derive synthetic CT. The problem is further complicated when the anatomic regions filled with air are altered across scans due to air mobility, for instance, in pelvic regions, thereby the air regions estimated using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence are invalid in other image series acquired for multispectral classification. This study aims to develop and investigate a female pelvic bone shape model to identify low intensity regions in MRI where air is unlikely to be present in support of synthetic CT generation without UTE imaging. CT scans of 30 patients were collected for the study, 17 of them also have corresponding MR scans. The shape model was built from the CT dataset, where the reference image was aligned to each of the training images using B-spline deformable registration. Principal component analysis was performed on B-spline coefficients for a compact model where shape variance was described by linear combination of principal modes. The model was applied to identify pelvic bone in MR images by deforming the corresponding MR data of the reference image to target MR images, where the search space of the deformation process was constrained within the subspace spanned by principal modes. The local minima in the search space were removed effectively by the shape model, thus supporting an efficient binary search for the optimal solution. We evaluated the model by its efficacy in identifying bone voxels and excluding air regions. The model was tested across the 17 patients that have corresponding MR scans using a leave-one-out cross validation. A simple model using the first leading principal mode only was found to achieve reasonable accuracy, where an averaged 87% of bone voxels were correctly identified. Finally dilation of the optimally fit bone mask by 5 mm was found to cover 96% of bone voxels while minimally impacting the overlap with air (below 0.4%). PMID

  1. Extension of radiative transfer code MOMO, matrix-operator model to the thermal infrared – Clear air validation by comparison to RTTOV and application to CALIPSO-IIR

    1-D radiative transfer code Matrix-Operator Model (MOMO), has been extended from [0.2−3.65μm] the band to the whole [0.2−100μm] spectrum. MOMO can now be used for the computation of a full range of radiation budgets (shortwave and longwave). This extension to the longwave part of the electromagnetic radiation required to consider radiative transfer processes that are features of the thermal infrared: the spectroscopy of the water vapor self- and foreign-continuum of absorption at 12μm and the emission of radiation by gases, aerosol, clouds and surface. MOMO's spectroscopy module, Coefficient of Gas Absorption (CGASA), has been developed for computation of gas extinction coefficients, considering continua and spectral line absorptions. The spectral dependences of gas emission/absorption coefficients and of Planck's function are treated using a k-distribution. The emission of radiation is implemented in the adding–doubling process of the matrix operator method using Schwarzschild's approach in the radiative transfer equation (a pure absorbing/emitting medium, namely without scattering). Within the layer, the Planck-function is assumed to have an exponential dependence on the optical-depth. In this paper, validation tests are presented for clear air case studies: comparisons to the analytical solution of a monochromatic Schwarzschild's case without scattering show an error of less than 0.07% for a realistic atmosphere with an optical depth and a blackbody temperature that decrease linearly with altitude. Comparisons to radiative transfer code RTTOV are presented for simulations of top of atmosphere brightness temperature for channels of the space-borne instrument MODIS. Results show an agreement varying from 0.1 K to less than 1 K depending on the channel. Finally MOMO results are compared to CALIPSO Infrared Imager Radiometer (IIR) measurements for clear air cases. A good agreement was found between computed and observed radiance: biases are smaller than 0

  2. Air and radiation monitoring stations

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)582709

    2015-01-01

    CERN has around 100 monitoring stations on and around its sites. New radiation measuring stations, capable of detecting even lower levels of radiation, were installed in 2014. Two members of HE-SEE group (Safety Engineering and Environment group) in front of one of the new monitoring stations.

  3. Synchrotron Radiation at Radio Frequencies from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    Suprun, Denis A.; Gorham, Peter W.; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2002-01-01

    We review some of the properties of extensive cosmic ray air showers and describe a simple model of the radio-frequency radiation generated by shower electrons and positrons as they bend in the Earth's magnetic field. We perform simulations by calculating the trajectory and radiation of a few thousand charged shower particles. The results are then transformed to predict the strength and polarization of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the whole shower.

  4. SESAM: a model for the calculation of radiation exposure by emission of pollutants with the exhaust air in the case of a multi-source situation

    The report deals with the calculation of the individual radiation exposure in the catchment area of several nuclear emitters. A model and computer program, SESAM - Calculation of the Radiation Exposure by Emission of Pollutants with the Exhaust air in the Case of a Multi-Source Situation -, was developed which makes possible all the evaluations of long-time exposure which are relevant for the licensing process - such as the determination of the maximum individual radiation exposure to the various organs at the worst receiving point - together with the exposure of the environment by several nuclear emission sources - such as, for example, several units of a power plant facility, the various emitters of a waste management center, or even consideration of the previous exposure of a site by nuclear emission sources

  5. Cosmic radiation and air crew exposure

    When the primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they interact with the air nuclei and induce cosmic-ray shower. When an aircraft is in the air, the radiation field within includes many types of radiation of large energy range; the field comprises mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons. Cosmic radiation dose for crews of air crafts A 320 and ATR 42 was measured using TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; radon concentration in the atmosphere was measured using the Alpha Guard radon detector. The total annual dose estimated for the A 320 aircraft crew, at altitudes up to 12000 meters, was 5.3 mSv (including natural radon radiation dose of 1.1 mSv).(author)

  6. Co-60 radiation in air

    One of the responsibilities of the Staatliche Materialpruefungsamt NW (materials testing office) is to run an official personal dosimetry service in the Federal Republic. Approximately 80.000 films, 2000 thermoluminescent (TLD) ring dosemeters and 2000 glass dosemeters are evaluated every month as a part of the official monitoring of doses received by individuals. The service also carries out voluntary monitoring of whole body doses with TLD's and evaluates TLD's for the environmental monitoring of nuclear installations and for other area monitoring purposes. In addition TLD's are evaluated in order to check doses received during medical irradiation programmes and as part of tests on working materials. At the site occupied by the testing office, the Dortmund Weights and Measures Department operates its installations for the calibration of dose and dose-rate meters for photon radiation. The available isotope sources comprise Cs-137 up to 3.7.103 Bq and Co-60 up to 1.85·1013 Bq. If high dose rates are required to produce high doses within a short period when simulating suspected accidents, these installations are also used by the dosimetry service. For the purposes of routine calibration and the production of blind samples, which are introduced in the routine evaluation without the knowledge of the assistants to ensure that the evaluation results are accurate, the dosimetry service runs its own irradiation facilities

  7. Coherent radiation from extensive air showers

    The generic properties of the emission of coherent radiation from a moving charge distribution are discussed. The general structure of the charge and current distributions in an extensive air shower are derived. These are subsequently used to develop a very intuitive picture for the properties of the emitted radio pulse. Using this picture can be seen that the structure of the pulse is a direct reflection of the shower profile. At higher frequencies the emission is suppressed because the wavelength is shorter than the important length scale in the shower. It is shown that radio emission can be used to distinguish proton- and iron-induced air showers.

  8. Thermal computations for electronics conductive, radiative, and convective air cooling

    Ellison, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    IntroductionPrimary mechanisms of heat flowConductionApplication example: Silicon chip resistance calculationConvectionApplication example: Chassis panel cooled by natural convectionRadiationApplication example: Chassis panel cooled only by radiation 7Illustrative example: Simple thermal network model for a heat sinked power transistorIllustrative example: Thermal network circuit for a printed circuit boardCompact component modelsIllustrative example: Pressure and thermal circuits for a forced air cooled enclosureIllustrative example: A single chip package on a printed circuit board-the proble

  9. Mental models of radiation

    Laymen and experts participated in interviews designed to reveal their 'mental models' of the processes potentially causing the miscommunications between experts and the public. We analyzed their responses in terms of an 'expert model' circumscribing scientifically relevant information. From results, there are gaps even between experts. Experts on internal exposure focused mainly on artificial radiation and high level of radiation. Experts on radiation biology focused on medical radiation, level of risk, environmental radiation, and hot springs. Experts on dosimetric performance focused on atomic power generation and needs of radiological protection. It means that even experts, they have interests only on their own specialized field. (author)

  10. Simulation of Radiation Energy Release in Air Showers

    Glaser, Christian; Erdmann, Martin; Hörandel, Jörg R.; Huege, Tim; Schulz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    A simulation study of the energy released by extensive air showers in the form of MHz radiation is performed using the CoREAS simulation code. We develop an efficient method to extract this radiation energy from air-shower simulations. We determine the longitudinal profile of the radiation energy release and compare it to the longitudinal profile of the energy deposit by the electromagnetic component of the air shower. We find that the radiation energy corrected for the geometric dependence o...

  11. Air-crew radiation dosimetry - last development

    Exposure to cosmic radiation increases rapidly with the altitude. At the flight levels of commercial aircraft it is of the order of several μSv per hour. The most of air-crew are exposed regularly to the effective dose exceeding 1 mSv per year, the limit of exposure of non-professionals defined in ICRP 60 recommendation. That is why this problem has been intensively studied from many aspects since the beginning of 90's. This contribution summarises new developments in the field during last two years. First, new international activities are presented, further, new achievement obtained mainly in the author's laboratory are presented and discussed. (authors)

  12. Biomass burning emissions over northern Australia constrained by aerosol measurements: II—Model validation, and impacts on air quality and radiative forcing

    Luhar, Ashok K.; Mitchell, Ross M.; (Mick) Meyer, C. P.; Qin, Yi; Campbell, Susan; Gras, John L.; Parry, David

    This two-part series investigates the emission and transport of biomass burning aerosol (or particulate matter) across the Top End of the Northern Territory of Australia. In Part I, Meyer et al. [2008. Biomass burning emissions over northern Australia constrained by aerosol measurements: I—Modelling the distribution of hourly emissions. Atmospheric Environment, in press, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.10.089.] used a fuel load distribution coupled with a satellite-derived imagery of fire scars and hotspots and the diurnal variation of a fire danger index to estimate hourly emission rates of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less (PM 2.5) for the dry season April-November 2004 at a spatial resolution of 1 km×1 km. In the present paper, these emission rates are used in TAPM, a three-dimensional meteorological and air pollution model, and the modelled PM 2.5 concentrations and aerosol optical depths are compared with satellite and ground-based measurements. This exercise also seeks to fine-tune and validate the emission calculation methodology, a process through which it is found that cases with hotspots without any corresponding fire scars (e.g. in mountainous terrain), which were initially ignored, need to be included to improve the accuracy of model predictions. Overall, the model is able to describe the measurements satisfactorily, considering the issues associated with the model resolution, emission uncertainty, and modelled meteorology. The model hindcasts numerous exceedences of the advisory maximum PM 2.5 exposure limit across the study region, with large areas in excess of 30 exceedences during the study period. Estimated mean top of atmosphere direct radiative forcing due to aerosol shows a seasonal mean of -1.8 W m -2 with a region of strong enhancement over the western portion of the Top End.

  13. Air quality and radiative forcing impacts of anthropogenic volatile organic compound emissions from ten world regions

    M. M. Fry; M. D. Schwarzkopf; Adelman, Z.; West, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) influence air quality and global climate change through their effects on secondary air pollutants and climate forcers. Here we simulate the air quality and radiative forcing (RF) impacts of changes in ozone, methane, and sulfate from halving anthropogenic NMVOC emissions globally and from 10 regions individually, using a global chemical transport model and a standalone radiative transfer model. Halving global NMVOC emissions decreases glo...

  14. Air quality and radiative forcing impacts of anthropogenic volatile organic compound emissions from ten world regions

    M. M. Fry; M. D. Schwarzkopf; Adelman, Z.; West, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) influence air quality and global climate change through their effects on secondary air pollutants and climate forcers. Here we simulate the air quality and radiative forcing (RF) impacts of changes in ozone, methane, and sulfate from halving anthropogenic NMVOC emissions globally and from 10 regions individually, using a global chemical transport model and a standalone radiative transfer model. Halving global NMVOC emissions de...

  15. Response of air stagnation frequency to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing

    Stagnant atmospheric conditions can lead to hazardous air quality by allowing ozone and particulate matter to accumulate and persist in the near-surface environment. By changing atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, global warming could alter the meteorological factors that regulate air stagnation frequency. We analyze the response of the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) air stagnation index (ASI) to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing using global climate model projections of late-21st century climate change (SRESA1B scenario). Our results indicate that the atmospheric conditions over the highly populated, highly industrialized regions of the eastern United States, Mediterranean Europe, and eastern China are particularly sensitive to global warming, with the occurrence of stagnant conditions projected to increase by 12–25% relative to late-20th century stagnation frequencies (3–18 + days yr−1). Changes in the position/strength of the polar jet, in the occurrence of light surface winds, and in the number of precipitation-free days all contribute to more frequent late-21st century air mass stagnation over these high-population regions. In addition, we find substantial inter-model spread in the simulated response of stagnation conditions over some regions using either native or bias corrected global climate model simulations, suggesting that changes in the atmospheric circulation and/or the distribution of precipitation represent important sources of uncertainty in the response of air quality to global warming. (letter)

  16. Response of air stagnation frequency to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing.

    Horton, Daniel E; Harshvardhan; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2012-01-01

    Stagnant atmospheric conditions can lead to hazardous air quality by allowing ozone and particulate matter to accumulate and persist in the near-surface environment. By changing atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, global warming could alter the meteorological factors that regulate air stagnation frequency. We analyze the response of the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) Air Stagnation Index (ASI) to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing using global climate model projections of late-21(st) century climate change (SRES A1B scenario). Our results indicate that the atmospheric conditions over the highly populated, highly industrialized regions of the eastern United States, Mediterranean Europe, and eastern China are particularly sensitive to global warming, with the occurrence of stagnant conditions projected to increase 12-to-25% relative to late-20(th) century stagnation frequencies (3-18+ days/year). Changes in the position/strength of the polar jet, in the occurrence of light surface winds, and in the number of precipitation-free days all contribute to more frequent late-21(st) century air mass stagnation over these high-population regions. In addition, we find substantial inter-model spread in the simulated response of stagnation conditions over some regions using either native or bias corrected global climate model simulations, suggesting that changes in the atmospheric circulation and/or the distribution of precipitation represent important sources of uncertainty in the response of air quality to global warming. PMID:23284587

  17. Assessing the accuracy of mathematical models used in thermoelectric simulation: Thermal influence of insulated air zone and radiation heat

    An accurate mathematical model of thermoelectric modules (TEMs) provides the basis for the analysis and design of thermoelectric conversion system. TEM models from the literature are only valid for the heat transfer of N-type and P-type thermoelectric couples without considering air around the actual thermoelectric couples of TEMs. In fact, air space imposes significant influence on the model computational accuracy, especially for a TEM with large air space inside. In this study, heat transfer analyses of air between the TEM cold and hot plates were carried out in order to propose a new mathematical model that minimises simulation errors. This model was applied to analyse characteristic parameters of two typical TEMs, and the ratio of cross-sectional area of air space to thermocouples were 48.2% and 80.0%, respectively. The average relative errors in simulation decreased from 5.2% to 2.8% and from 12.8% to 3.7%, respectively. It is noted that our new model gives result more accurate than models from the literature provided that higher temperature difference occurs between hot side and cold side of TEM. Thus, the proposed model is of theoretical significance in guiding future design of TEMs for high-power or large-temperature-difference thermoelectric conversion systems. - Highlights: • Built a new accurate model for thermoelectric modules with inner air heat transfer. • Analysed the influence on heat transfer of the air within the TEM∗. • Reduced simulation errors for high-power thermoelectric conversion systems. • Two typical TEMs were measured with a good agreement with theoretical results. • ∗TEM is the abbreviation of thermoelectric module

  18. Determination of the potential radiation exposure of the population close to the Asse II mine caused by deduction of radioactive substances with the discharge air in the normal operation using the ''Atmospheric Radionuclide-Transport-Model'' (ARTM)

    Between 1967 and 1978 125.787 packages filled with low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste were emplaced in the mining plant Asse II. Volatile radioactive substances like H-3, C-14 and Rn-222 are released from the emplaced waste. These substances reach the ventilated parts of the mine and are released with the discharge air. The potential radiation exposure of the population caused by deduction of radioactive substances with the discharge air in the normal operation is determined by the ''Atmospheric Radionuclide-Transport-Model'' (ARTM). As result the maximal deductions of volatile radioactive substances with the discharge air in the normal operation of the Asse II mine lead to radiation exposure of the population, which is considerably lower than the permissible values of application rate.

  19. Radiation risk estimation models.

    Hoel, D. G.

    1987-01-01

    Cancer risk models and their relationship to ionizing radiation are discussed. There are many model assumptions and risk factors that have a large quantitative impact on the cancer risk estimates. Other health end points such as mental retardation may be an even more serious risk than cancer for those with in utero exposures.

  20. Radiation contamination air monitoring basing on NATO normalization documents

    The conditions and actions connected with conducting of the air radiation monitoring have been described in the article. The staff and tasks of special military troops for air sampling as well as commonly used methods for air sampling have been presented and discussed

  1. Backward air mass trajectory analysis for the first cloud and radiation testbed site at Lamont, Oklahoma

    The size distribution and composition of aerosols measured at a specific location depend on the origin and the trajectory of the air mass passing over it. Backward air mass trajectory analysis can be used to (1) identify the characteristics of an air mass and (2) help to determine which aerosol model should be used in LOWTRAN 7 for radiation calculations. Examining the trajectory is not sufficient to characterize the aerosol composition of the air mass at the site. Additional analyses must be performed along the trajectory to understand how the original air mass has or has not been modified. Height analyses, precipitation events, the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere, and the relative humidity field, as well as other physical parameters, are important for classifying an air mass after it has traveled for a few days. The primary objective of this research is to characterize a climatology of air masses that pass over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site at Lamont, Oklahoma. A three-dimensional air mass trajectory model and a method of analysis were developed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML). The classification of the air mass types (rural, marine, urban or desert) is used to decide which aerosol model is appropriate for calculations in a radiation model, such as LOWTRAN 7

  2. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA's regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA's lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants

  3. Geostatistical models for air pollution

    The objective of this paper is to present geostatistical models applied to the spatial characterisation of air pollution phenomena. A concise presentation of the geostatistical methodologies is illustrated with practical examples. The case study was conducted in an underground copper-mine located on the southern of Portugal, where a biomonitoring program using lichens has been implemented. Given the characteristics of lichens as indicators of air pollution it was possible to gather a great amount of data in space, which enabled the development and application of geostatistical methodologies. The advantages of using geostatistical models compared with deterministic models, as environmental control tools, are highlighted. (author)

  4. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  5. 40 CFR 1.41 - Office of Air and Radiation.

    2010-07-01

    ... quality goals; for providing assistance to the States, industry and other organizations through personnel... plans and strategies, technical assistance, and resource requirements and allocations for air related... and directs a national surveillance and investigation program for measuring radiation levels in...

  6. Macroscopic model of radio emission from extensive air showers

    A macroscopic model of radio emission from extensive air showers is developed. This model is appropriate for calculating this radio emission at frequencies below 100 MHz. It is constructed on the basis of an analysis of the radiation integral and is verified by comparing field observables predicted by the model with the respective results obtained within the microscopic approach to calculating radio emission from extensive air showers.

  7. Frontiers in air quality modelling

    A. Colette

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The first pan-European kilometre-scale atmospheric chemistry simulation is introduced. The continental-scale air pollution episode of January 2009 is modelled with the CHIMERE offline chemistry-transport model with a massive grid of 2 million horizontal points, performed on 2000 CPU of a high performance computing system hosted by the Research and Technology Computing Center at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CCRT/CEA. Besides the technical challenge, we find that model biases are significantly reduced, especially over urban areas. The high resolution grid also allows revisiting the contribution of individual city plumes to the European burden of pollution, providing new insights for designing air pollution control strategies.

  8. Molecular Bremsstrahlung Radiation at GHz Frequencies in Air

    Samarai, I Al; Deligny, O; Letessier-Selvon, A; Montanet, F; Settimo, M; Stassi, P

    2016-01-01

    A detection technique for ultra-high energy cosmic rays, complementary to the fluorescence technique, would be the use of the molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by low-energy ionization electrons left after the passage of the showers in the atmosphere. In this article, a detailed estimate of the spectral intensity of photons at ground level originating from this radiation is presented. The spectral intensity expected from the passage of the high-energy electrons of the cascade is also estimated. The absorption of the photons in the plasma of electrons/neutral molecules is shown to be negligible. The obtained spectral intensity is shown to be $2\\times10^{-21} $W cm$^{-2}$ GHz$^{-1}$ at 10 km from the shower core for a vertical shower induced by a proton of $10^{17.5}$ eV. In addition, a recent measurement of Bremsstrahlung radiation in air at gigahertz frequencies from a beam of electrons produced at 95 keV by an electron gun is also discussed and reasonably reproduced by the model.

  9. Molecular bremsstrahlung radiation at GHz frequencies in air

    Al Samarai, Imen; Bérat, Corinne; Deligny, Olivier; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Montanet, François; Settimo, Mariangela; Stassi, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    A detection technique for ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, complementary to the fluorescence technique, would be the use of the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by low-energy ionization electrons left after the passage of the showers in the atmosphere. In this article, a detailed estimate of the spectral intensity of photons at ground level originating from this radiation is presented. The spectral intensity expected from the passage of the high-energy electrons of the cascade is also estimated. The absorption of the photons in the plasma of electrons and neutral molecules is shown to be negligible. The obtained spectral intensity is shown to be 2 ×1 0-21 W cm-2 GHz-1 at 10 km from the shower core for a vertical shower induced by a proton of 1 017.5 eV . In addition, a recent measurement of bremsstrahlung radiation in air at gigahertz frequencies from a beam of electrons produced at 95 keV by an electron gun is also discussed and reasonably reproduced by the model.

  10. Biophysical modelling in radiation protection

    Biophysical models have historically provided essential concepts by which risk estimates have been extrapolated from observations in humans and animals to the low radiation levels of prime relevance in radiation protection. But there remain major uncertainties, and modelling has an essential continuing role to reduce these and seek alternative approaches in the light of advancing knowledge. Particularly important are the capabilities of single radiation tracks in cells, and the great differences between radiations, in perturbing biological processes. (author)

  11. HPCN and air quality modeling

    Blom, Joke; Lioen, W.M.; Verwer, Jan

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the implementation of an off-line air quality model (AQM). More precisely, how to design a code for an AQM that runs efficiently on a variety of computer platforms. We implemented our ideas in an AQM benchmark and we show the performance of this benchmark on the different architectural paradigms. A second subject of the paper is the I/O performance of the Cray~T3E for an off-line model. We implemented the required I/O in different ways and show that none of these results in a truly...

  12. Simulation of Radiation Energy Release in Air Showers

    Glaser, Christian; Hörandel, Jörg R; Huege, Tim; Schulz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    A simulation study of the energy released by extensive air showers in the form of MHz radiation is performed using the CoREAS simulation code. We develop an efficient method to extract this radiation energy from air-shower simulations. We determine the longitudinal profile of the radiation energy release and compare it to the longitudinal profile of the energy deposit by the electromagnetic component of the air shower. We find that the radiation energy corrected for the geometric dependence of the geomagnetic emission scales quadratically with the energy in the electromagnetic component of the air shower with a second-order dependence on the atmospheric density at the position of the maximum shower development $X_\\mathrm{max}$. In a measurement where $X_\\mathrm{max}$ is not accessible, this second order dependence can be approximated using the zenith angle of the incoming direction of the air shower with only a minor loss in accuracy. Our method results in an intrinsic uncertainty of 4% in the determination o...

  13. Radiation exposure during air and ground transportation

    The results of a one year study program of radiation exposure experienced on both domestic and international flights of the China Airline and the Far East Airline in the Pacific, Southeast Asia and Taiwan areas and on trains and buses on Taiwan island are reported. CaSO4:Dy thermoluminescent dosimeters were used. It has been shown that transit exposures may amount to 10 times that on the ground with an altitude varying from 3,050 to 12,200 m. (U.K.)

  14. Characterization of 3D Cirrus Cloud and Radiation Fields Using ARS/AIRS/MODIS data and its Application to Climate Model

    Liou, Kuo-Nan [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ou, S. C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gu, Y. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Takano, Y. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-02-22

    + b ln(IWC) + c ((ln(IWC))2, where a, b, and c are fitting coefficients and are functions of three regions. We demonstrated that this correlation can be effectively incorporated in GCMs and climate models that predict IWC - a significant advance in ice microphysics parameterization for interactive cloud-radiation analysis and feedback. Substantial July mean differences are shown in the OLR (W/m2) and precipitation (mm/day) patterns between UCLA GCM simulations based on Des determined from the De-IWC correlations and the control run using a fixed ice crystal size. Third, in order to improve the computation of spectral radiative transfer processes in the WRF model, we developed a consistent and efficient radiation scheme that can better resolve the spectral bands, determine the cloud optical properties, and provide more reliable and accurate radiative heating fields. In the newly developed radiation module, we have implemented in WRF a modified and improved version referred to as the Fu-Liou-Gu scheme, which includes a combination of delta-four-stream and delta-two-stream approximations for solar and IR flux calculations, respectively. This combination has been proven to be computationally efficient and at the same time to produce a high degree of accuracy. The incorporation of nongray gaseous absorption in multiple scattering atmospheres was based on the correlated k-distribution method. The solar and IR spectra are divided into 6 and 12 bands, respectively, according to the location of absorption bands of H2O, CO2, O3, CH4, N2O, and CFCs. We further included absorption by the water vapor continuum and a number of minor absorbers in the solar spectrum leading to an additional absorption of solar flux in a clear atmosphere on the order of 1-3 W/m2. Additionally, we incorporated the ice microphysics parameterization that includes an interactive mean effective ice crystal size in association with radiation parameterizations. The Fu-Liou-Gu scheme is an ideal tool for the

  15. Air Temperature estimation from Land Surface temperature and solar Radiation parameters

    Lazzarini, Michele; Eissa, Yehia; Marpu, Prashanth; Ghedira, Hosni

    2013-04-01

    Air Temperature (AirT) is a fundamental parameter in a wide range of applications such as climate change studies, weather forecast, energy balance modeling, efficiency of Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells, etc. Air temperature data are generally obtained through regular measurements from meteorological stations. The distribution of these stations is normally sparse, so the spatial pattern of this parameter cannot be accurately estimated by interpolation methods. This work investigated the relationship between Air Temperature measured at meteorological stations and spatially contiguous measurements derived from Remote Sensing techniques, such as Land Surface Temperature (LST) maps, emissivity maps and shortwave radiation maps with the aim of creating a continuous map of AirT. For LST and emissivity, MSG-SEVIRI LST product from Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA-SAF) has been used. For shortwave radiation maps, an Artificial Neural Networks ensemble model has been developed and previously tested to create continuous maps from Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) point measurements, utilizing six thermal channels of MSG-SEVIRI. The testing sites corresponded to three meteorological stations located in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where in situ measurements of Air Temperature were available. From the starting parameters, energy fluxes and net radiation have been calculated, in order to have information on the incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation and the incoming short-wave radiation. The preliminary analysis (day and Night measurements, cloud free) showed a strong negative correlation (0.92) between Outgoing long-wave radiation - GHI and LST- AirT, with a RMSE of 1.84 K in the AirT estimation from the initial parameters. Regression coefficients have been determined and tested on all the ground stations. The analysis also demonstrated the predominant impact of the incoming short-wave radiation in the AirT hourly variation, while the incoming

  16. Lowland rice yield estimates based on air temperature and solar radiation

    Two regression equations were developed to estimate lowland rice yield as a function of air temperature and incoming solar radiation, during the crop yield production period in Pindamonhangaba, SP, Brazil. The following rice cultivars were used: IAC-242, IAC-100, IAC-101 and IAC-102. The value of optimum air temperature obtained was 25.0°C and of optimum global solar radiation was 475 cal.cm-2, day-1. The best agrometeorological model was the one that related least deviation of air temperature and solar radiation in relation to the optimum value obtained through a multiple linear regression. The yield values estimated by the model showed good fit to actual yields of lowland rice (less than 10%). (author)

  17. Solar radiation models - review

    M. Jamil Ahmad, G.N. Tiwari

    2010-01-01

    In the design and study of solar energy, information on solar radiation and its components at a given location is very essential. Solar radiation data are required by solar engineers, architects, agriculturists and hydrologists for many applications such as solar heating, cooking, drying and interior illumination of buildings. For this purpose, in the past, several empirical correlations have been developed in order to estimate the solar radiation around the world. The main objective of this ...

  18. NIRATAM-NATO infrared air target model

    Noah, Meg A.; Kristl, Joseph; Schroeder, John W.; Sandford, B. P.

    1991-08-01

    NIRATAM (the NATO Infrared Air Target Model) was developed by the NATO AC 243, Panel IV, Research Study Group 6 (RSG-6). RSG-6 is composed of representatives from Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and Canada (as an observer). NIRATAM is based on theoretical studies, field measurements, and infrared data analysis performed over many years. The model encompasses all the major signature components required to simulate the infrared signature of an aircraft and the atmosphere. The vehicle fuselage, facet, model includes radiation due to aerodynamic heating, internal heat sources, reflected sky, earth, and solar radiation. Plume combustion gas emissions are calculated for H(subscript 2)O, CO(subscript 2), CO, and other gases as well as solid particles. Lowtran 7 is used for the atmospheric transmission and radiance. The software generates graphical outputs of the target wireframe, plume flowfield, atmospheric transmission, total signature, and plume signature. Imagery data can be used for system development and evaluation. NIRATAM can be used for many applications such as measurement planning, data analysis, systems design, and aircraft development. Ontar has agreed to assist the RSG-6 by being the NIRATAM distribution center in the United States for users approved by the national representatives. Arrangements have also been made to distribute a user-friendly NIRATAM interface. This paper describes the model, presents results, makes comparisons with measured field data, and describes the availability and procedure for obtaining the software.

  19. Long and short-term atmospheric radiation analyses based on coupled measurements at high altitude remote stations and extensive air shower modeling

    Hubert, G.; Federico, C. A.; Pazianotto, M. T.; Gonzales, O. L.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper are described the ACROPOL and OPD high-altitude stations devoted to characterize the atmospheric radiation fields. The ACROPOL platform, located at the summit of the Pic du Midi in the French Pyrenees at 2885 m above sea level, exploits since May 2011 some scientific equipment, including a BSS neutron spectrometer, detectors based on semiconductor and scintillators. In the framework of a IEAv and ONERA collaboration, a second neutron spectrometer was simultaneously exploited since February 2015 at the summit of the Pico dos Dias in Brazil at 1864 m above the sea level. The both high station platforms allow for investigating the long period dynamics to analyze the spectral variation of cosmic-ray- induced neutron and effects of local and seasonal changes, but also the short term dynamics during solar flare events. This paper presents long and short-term analyses, including measurement and modeling investigations considering the both high altitude stations data. The modeling approach, based on ATMORAD computational platform, was used to link the both station measurements.

  20. Water, Air, Earth and Cosmic Radiation

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2015-06-01

    In the context of the origin of life, rocks are considered mainly for catalysis and adsorption-desorption processes. Here it is shown how some rocks evolve in energy and might induce synthesis of molecules of biological interest. Radioactive rocks are a source of thermal energy and water radiolysis producing molecular hydrogen, H2. Mafic and ultramafic rocks evolve in water and dissolved carbon dioxide releasing thermal energy and H2. Peridotites and basalts contain ferromagnesian minerals which transform through exothermic reactions with the generation of heat. These reactions might be triggered by any heating process such as radioactive decay, hydrothermal and subduction zones or post-shock of meteorite impacts. H2 might then be generated from endothermic hydrolyses of the ferromagnesian minerals olivine and pyroxene. In both cases of mafic and radioactive rocks, production of CO might occur through high temperature hydrogenation of CO2. CO, instead of CO2, was proven to be necessary in experiments synthesizing biological-type macromolecules with a gaseous mixture of CO, N2 and H2O. In the geological context, N2 is present in the environment, and the activation source might arise from cosmic radiation and/or radionuclides. Ferromagnesian and radioactive rocks might consequently be a starting point of an hydrothermal chemical evolution towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules. The two usually separate worlds of rocks and life are shown to be connected through molecular and thermodynamic chemical evolution. This concept has been proposed earlier by the author (Bassez J Phys: Condens Matter 15:L353-L361, 2003, 2008a, 2008b; Bassez Orig Life Evol Biosph 39(3-4):223-225, 2009; Bassez et al. 2011; Bassez et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 42(4):307-316, 2012, Bassez 2013) without thermodynamic details. This concept leads to signatures of prebiotic chemistry such as radionuclides and also iron and magnesium carbonates associated with serpentine and/or talc, which

  1. Model test of air-exchange efficiency

    Klobut, K.

    1987-01-01

    The mixing-air flow pattern was studied. Three air flows were tested using the tracer gas technique and decay method. The indices of air exchange efficiency were calculated, namely: overall air-exchange efficiency and room-air mean age for the whole room; local ventilation indices and local mean ages of air at 10 points distributed throughout the room. Experiments were carried out in both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. Based on the theory of similarity requirements, a reduced-scale model, geometrically similar to the laboratory test room, was built. Air flows and temperature differences were calculated for the model tests in order to make them comparable with the full scale, and the tests were repeated. The objective of the study was to determine the relation between the air-exchange efficiency indices obtained in the model and on the full scale.

  2. Stochastic Modeling of Traffic Air Pollution

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, modeling of traffic air pollution is discussed with special reference to infrastructures. A number of subjects related to health effects of air pollution and the different types of pollutants are briefly presented. A simple model for estimating the social cost of traffic related air...... and using simple Monte Carlo techniques to obtain a stochastic estimate of the costs of traffic air pollution for infrastructures....... pollution is derived. Several authors have published papers on this very complicated subject, but no stochastic modelling procedure have obtained general acceptance. The subject is discussed basis of a deterministic model. However, it is straightforward to modify this model to include uncertain parameters...

  3. Cosmic radiation exposure survey of an Air Force Transport Squadron

    A combination of in-flight measurements and calculations from the predictive code for aircrew radiation exposure (PCAire) was used to assess the cosmic radiation conditions for a Transport Squadron in the Canadian Air Force. The equipment suite from the Royal Military College of Canada, including a TEPC and bubble detectors, were flown over a sampling of air routes while the survey of the Squadron members covered a 2½ year period over the recent solar minimum and, thus, maximum radiation conditions. Various comparisons were made between the measurements and calculations to confirm the results of this work. For this period, more than half received more than the general public limit of 1 mSv per year and most received 0.5 or 2.5 mSv, with some receiving almost 4 mSv. This wide variation reflected the varied nature of their deployments. - Highlights: ► Aircrew of a Transport Squadron were surveyed for cosmic radiation exposure. ► A semi-empirical code, PCAire, was used for the first time to conduct this survey. ► Simultaneous in-flight measurements were undertaken on many flights. ► The measurements and survey results were consistent throughout the study. ► The study was conducted during a cosmic radiation peak in the solar cycle

  4. Radiation dependent ionization model

    For laser created plasma simulation, hydrodynamics codes need a non-LTE atomic physics package for both EOS and optical properties (emissivity and opacity). However in XRL targets as in some ICF targets, high Z material can be found. In these cases radiation trapping can induce a significant departure from the optically thin ionization description. The authors present a method to change an existing LTE code into a non-LTE code with coupling of ionization to radiation. This method has very low CPU cost and can be used in 2D simulations

  5. A physically based analytical spatial air temperature and humidity model

    Yang, Yang; Endreny, Theodore A.; Nowak, David J.

    2013-09-01

    Spatial variation of urban surface air temperature and humidity influences human thermal comfort, the settling rate of atmospheric pollutants, and plant physiology and growth. Given the lack of observations, we developed a Physically based Analytical Spatial Air Temperature and Humidity (PASATH) model. The PASATH model calculates spatial solar radiation and heat storage based on semiempirical functions and generates spatially distributed estimates based on inputs of topography, land cover, and the weather data measured at a reference site. The model assumes that for all grids under the same mesoscale climate, grid air temperature and humidity are modified by local variation in absorbed solar radiation and the partitioning of sensible and latent heat. The model uses a reference grid site for time series meteorological data and the air temperature and humidity of any other grid can be obtained by solving the heat flux network equations. PASATH was coupled with the USDA iTree-Hydro water balance model to obtain evapotranspiration terms and run from 20 to 29 August 2010 at a 360 m by 360 m grid scale and hourly time step across a 285 km2 watershed including the urban area of Syracuse, NY. PASATH predictions were tested at nine urban weather stations representing variability in urban topography and land cover. The PASATH model predictive efficiency R2 ranged from 0.81 to 0.99 for air temperature and 0.77 to 0.97 for dew point temperature. PASATH is expected to have broad applications on environmental and ecological models.

  6. Emission scenario model for regional air pollution

    Karvosenoja, Niko

    2008-01-01

    Air pollution emissions are produced in a wide variety of sources. They often result in detrimental impacts on both environments and human populations. To assess the emissions and impacts of air pollution, mathematical models have been developed. This study presents results from the application of an air pollution emission model, the Finnish Regional Emission Scenario (FRES) model, that covers the emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), ammonia (NH3), non-methane volatile or...

  7. Considerations on the microwave radiation emitted by extended air showers

    Conti, E

    2015-01-01

    The emission of microwave radiation by extended air showers produced by high energy cosmic rays has been investigated for more than half a century. We discuss the expected emitted power as a function of the cosmic ray energy and of the microwave frequency, for both coherent and incoherent emission mechanisms. We show that the available experimental data are not sufficient to clearly identify the emission mechanisms and quantify the emission yield. We infer that the bremsstralhung radiation emission could be exploited for the detection of astronomical $\\gamma$-rays with energy above 10 GeV in the 1-10 GHz frequency range, and propose an experimental scheme to verify such idea.

  8. Preclinical models in radiation oncology

    As the incidence of cancer continues to rise, the use of radiotherapy has emerged as a leading treatment modality. Preclinical models in radiation oncology are essential tools for cancer research and therapeutics. Various model systems have been used to test radiation therapy, including in vitro cell culture assays as well as in vivo ectopic and orthotopic xenograft models. This review aims to describe such models, their advantages and disadvantages, particularly as they have been employed in the discovery of molecular targets for tumor radiosensitization. Ultimately, any model system must be judged by its utility in developing more effective cancer therapies, which is in turn dependent on its ability to simulate the biology of tumors as they exist in situ. Although every model has its limitations, each has played a significant role in preclinical testing. Continued advances in preclinical models will allow for the identification and application of targets for radiation in the clinic

  9. How to model radiation carcinogenesis

    Problems encountered in modelling radiation carcinogenesis are examined in the light of the available experimental information and discussed in view of existing attempts. The role of endogenous and exogenous factors is considered. (author)

  10. Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling

    Zlatev, Z.; Brandt, J.; Builtjes, P. J. H.;

    Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998......Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998...

  11. Drying Strategy of Shrimp using Hot Air Convection and Hybrid Infrared Radiation/Hot Air Convection

    Supawan TIRAWANICHAKUL

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the research was to study the effect of drying temperatures using infrared irradiation and electric heating convection on dehydration and was to investigate the effect of drying conditions on the quality of the shrimp. Two sizes of fresh shrimp (100 shrimp/kg and 200 shrimp/kg with initial moisture content of 270 - 350 % dry-basis were dried under various conditions while the final moisture content of dried shrimp was in ranges between 20 and 25 % dry-basis. Hot air flow rates of 1.0 -   1.2 m/s, drying temperatures of 40 - 90 °C and infrared intensities of 1,785.7 - 3,571.4 W/m2 were used in these experiments. The experimental results showed that the rate of moisture content transfer of both sizes of shrimps decreased exponentially with drying time while increasing drying temperature significantly affected to the drying kinetics and quality of the shrimps. Effective diffusion coefficients of both shrimps were determined by a diffusion model forming a finite cylindrical shape was in order of 10-7 m2/s and this effective diffusion coefficient value was relatively dependent on the drying temperature compared to the initial moisture content. The quality analysis of dried shrimp using an infrared source and electric heating source found that the redness value (Hunter a-value of dried samples using hybrid infrared radiation and electric heating had a higher colour uniformity than other drying methods. Additionally, shrinkage and rehydration properties were insignificantly different for all drying strategies (p < 0.05 and drying using infrared radiation had higher drying rates compared to electric heat convection, corresponding to relatively low drying times.

  12. Applied Modeling of Air Pollution (AMAP)

    This report summarizes the activities in the first year of the project Applied Modeling of Air Pollution (AMAP). This project which has a duration of three years aims at concentrating and improve the available air quality modeling expertise in the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf. The overall project consists of the subprojects Dispersion Modeling, Receptor Modeling and Urban Airshed Modeling. During the first year appropriate models (such as ISCST3, CMB, UAM-IV and CALGRID) were installed and tested with data from real and fictive examples as well as with synthetic data. High emphasis was given to the visualization of the model outputs. (author)

  13. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    Limei Ran; Jonathan Pleim

    2011-01-01

    For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic compounds, can be upward into the air as well as downward to the surface and therefore should be modeled as bi-directional fluxes. Model parameterizations of dry deposition in air quality models have been represented by...

  14. Impact of inherent meteorology uncertainty on air quality model predictions

    Gilliam, Robert C.; Hogrefe, Christian; Godowitch, James M.; Napelenok, Sergey; Mathur, Rohit; Rao, S. Trivikrama

    2015-12-01

    It is well established that there are a number of different classifications and sources of uncertainties in environmental modeling systems. Air quality models rely on two key inputs, namely, meteorology and emissions. When using air quality models for decision making, it is important to understand how uncertainties in these inputs affect the simulated concentrations. Ensembles are one method to explore how uncertainty in meteorology affects air pollution concentrations. Most studies explore this uncertainty by running different meteorological models or the same model with different physics options and in some cases combinations of different meteorological and air quality models. While these have been shown to be useful techniques in some cases, we present a technique that leverages the initial condition perturbations of a weather forecast ensemble, namely, the Short-Range Ensemble Forecast system to drive the four-dimensional data assimilation in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with a key focus being the response of ozone chemistry and transport. Results confirm that a sizable spread in WRF solutions, including common weather variables of temperature, wind, boundary layer depth, clouds, and radiation, can cause a relatively large range of ozone-mixing ratios. Pollutant transport can be altered by hundreds of kilometers over several days. Ozone-mixing ratios of the ensemble can vary as much as 10-20 ppb or 20-30% in areas that typically have higher pollution levels.

  15. Heating, ventilation and air conditioning system modelling

    Whalley, R.; Abdul-Ameer, A. [British University in Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

    2011-03-15

    Heating, ventilation and air conditioning modelling methods, for large scale, spatially dispersed systems are considered. Existing techniques are discussed and proposals for the application of novel analysis approaches are outlined. The use of distributed-lumped parameter procedures enabling the incorporation of the relatively concentrated and significantly dispersed, system element characteristics, is advocated. A dynamic model for a heating, ventilation and air conditioning system comprising inlet and exhaust fans, with air recirculation, heating/cooling and filtration units is presented. Pressure, airflow and temperature predictions within the system are computed following input, disturbance changes and purging operations. The generalised modelling advancements adopted and the applicability of the model for heating, ventilation and air conditioning system simulation, re-configuration and diagnostics is emphasised. The employment of the model for automatic, multivariable controller design purposes is commented upon. (author)

  16. Detailed Radiative Transport Modeling of a Radiative Divertor

    Wan, A S; Scott, H A; Post, D; Rognlien, T D

    1995-01-01

    An effective radiative divertor maximizes the utilization of atomic processes to spread out the energy deposition to the divertor chamber walls and to reduce the peak heat flux. Because the mixture of neutral atoms and ions in the divertor can be optically thick to a portion of radiated power, it is necessary to accurately model the magnitude and distribution of line radiation in this complex region. To assess their importance we calculate the effects of radiation transport using CRETIN, a multi-dimensional, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium simulation code that includes the atomic kinetics and radiative transport processes necessary to model the complex environment of a radiative divertor. We also include neutral transport to model radiation from recycling neutral atoms. This paper presents a case study of a high-recycling radiative divertor with a typical large neutral pressure at the divertor plate to estimate the impact of H line radiation on the overall power balance in the divertor region with conside...

  17. Calculation of molecular bremsstrahlung radiation and air shower plasma conditions for CROME

    The possibility of the detection of extensive air showers by observation of isotropic microwave radiation due to molecular bremsstrahlung has been proposed in 2008. Ionization electrons, forming a short-lived, tenuous plasma in the wake of the shower, interact with atmospheric neutrals and produce bremsstrahlung. Concurrent with first measurements of microwave radiation by the CROME experiment in Karlsruhe, an independent, theory based model for emission of isotropic bremsstrahlung emission has been developed. In this talk, the assumptions of the model for bremsstrahlung emission and the findings concerning the state of the plasma in an air shower are discussed. The magnitude of the expected signal is calculated and compared to predictions made in the original proposal by Gorham et al. and to the observed GHz signals.

  18. Biophysical models in radiation biology

    Models serve a variety of purposes: to link physics and biology; to interpolate and extrapolate to dose regions where direct biological measurements of statistical significance are not feasible; to address basic mechanisms; to suggest new experiments designed to test hypotheses predicted by the model. In the past, the modeling arena has been dominated by dose-response curves for cell killing which have slowly but surely incorporated more and more of the biological factors that are known to be important. At the present time, the modelers urgently need to follow the revolution in the new biology as quantitative data become available. There are several areas involved: i. the relation between DNA strand breaks, initial breaks as measured by the premature chromosome condensation technique and cell lethality. ii. modeling of oncogenic transformation as a function of dose and of radiation quality. iii. modeling of oncogenic transformation as a function of oncogene activation. iv. modeling of oncogene activation and suppressor cell deletion as a function of radiation dose and radiation quality. (author)

  19. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    Limei Ran

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic compounds, can be upward into the air as well as downward to the surface and therefore should be modeled as bi-directional fluxes. Model parameterizations of dry deposition in air quality models have been represented by simple electrical resistance analogs for almost 30 years. Uncertainties in surface flux modeling in global to mesoscale models are being slowly reduced as more field measurements provide constraints on parameterizations. However, at the same time, more chemical species are being added to surface flux models as air quality models are expanded to include more complex chemistry and are being applied to a wider array of environmental issues. Since surface flux measurements of many of these chemicals are still lacking, resistances are usually parameterized using simple scaling by water or lipid solubility and reactivity. Advances in recent years have included bi-directional flux algorithms that require a shift from pre-computation of deposition velocities to fully integrated surface flux calculations within air quality models. Improved modeling of the stomatal component of chemical surface fluxes has resulted from improved evapotranspiration modeling in land surface models and closer integration between meteorology and air quality models. Satellite-derived land use characterization and vegetation products and indices are improving model representation of spatial and temporal variations in surface flux processes. This review describes the current state of chemical dry deposition modeling, recent progress in bi-directional flux modeling, synergistic model development research with field measurements, and coupling with meteorological land surface models.

  20. Validation of the community radiative transfer model

    To validate the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) developed by the U.S. Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA), the discrete ordinate radiative transfer (DISORT) model and the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) are combined in order to provide a reference benchmark. Compared with the benchmark, the CRTM appears quite accurate for both clear sky and ice cloud radiance simulations with RMS errors below 0.2 K, except for clouds with small ice particles. In a computer CPU run time comparison, the CRTM is faster than DISORT by approximately two orders of magnitude. Using the operational MODIS cloud products and the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) atmospheric profiles as an input, the CRTM is employed to simulate the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances. The CRTM simulations are shown to be in reasonably close agreement with the AIRS measurements (the discrepancies are within 2 K in terms of brightness temperature difference). Furthermore, the impact of uncertainties in the input cloud properties and atmospheric profiles on the CRTM simulations has been assessed. The CRTM-based brightness temperatures (BTs) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), for both thin (τ30) clouds, are highly sensitive to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature and cloud top pressure. However, for an optically thick cloud, the CRTM-based BTs are not sensitive to the uncertainties of cloud optical thickness, effective particle size, and atmospheric humidity profiles. On the contrary, the uncertainties of the CRTM-based TOA BTs resulting from effective particle size and optical thickness are not negligible in an optically thin cloud.

  1. Mathematical Models for Room Air Distribution - Addendum

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    1982-01-01

    removed from the room at constant penetration length is proportional to the cube of the velocities in the occupied zone. It is also shown that a large number of diffusers increases the amount of heat which may be removed without affecting the thermal conditions. Control strategies for dual duct and single......A number of different models on the air distribution in rooms are introduced. This includes the throw model, a model on penetration length of a cold wall jet and a model for maximum velocity in the dimensioning of an air distribution system in highly loaded rooms and shows that the amount of heat...

  2. Mathematical Models for Room Air Distribution

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    1982-01-01

    removed from the room at constant penetration length is proportional to the cube of the velocities in the occupied zone. It is also shown that a large number of diffusers increases the amount of heat which may be removed without affecting the thermal conditions. Control strategies for dual duct and single......A number of different models on the air distribution in rooms are introduced. This includes the throw model, a model on penetration length of a cold wall jet and a model for maximum velocity in the dimensioning of an air distribution system in highly loaded rooms and shows that the amount of heat...

  3. Comparison of box-air-mass-factors and radiances for Multiple-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS geometries calculated from different UV/visible radiative transfer models

    T. Wagner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a comparison exercise of radiative transfer models (RTM of various international research groups for Multiple AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS viewing geometry are presented. Besides the assessment of the agreement between the different models, a second focus of the comparison was the systematic investigation of the sensitivity of the MAX-DOAS technique under various viewing geometries and aerosol conditions. In contrast to previous comparison exercises, box-air-mass-factors (box-AMFs for different atmospheric height layers were modelled, which describe the sensitivity of the measurements as a function of altitude. In addition, radiances were calculated allowing the identification of potential errors, which might be overlooked if only AMFs are compared. Accurate modelling of radiances is also a prerequisite for the correct interpretation of satellite observations, for which the received radiance can strongly vary across the large ground pixels, and might be also important for the retrieval of aerosol properties as a future application of MAX-DOAS. The comparison exercises included different wavelengths and atmospheric scenarios (with and without aerosols. The strong and systematic influence of aerosol scattering indicates that from MAX-DOAS observations also information on atmospheric aerosols can be retrieved. During the various iterations of the exercises, the results from all models showed a substantial convergence, and the final data sets agreed for most cases within about 5%. Larger deviations were found for cases with low atmospheric optical depth, for which the photon path lengths along the line of sight of the instrument can become very large. The differences occurred between models including full spherical geometry and those using only plane parallel approximation indicating that the correct treatment of the Earth's sphericity becomes indispensable. The modelled box-AMFs constitute an

  4. Solar radiation estimation using sunshine hour and air pollution index in China

    Highlights: • Aerosol can affect coefficients of A–P equation to estimate solar radiation. • Logarithmic model performed best, according to MBE, MABE, MPE, MAPE, RMSE and NSE. • Parameters of A–P model can be adjusted by API, geographical position and altitude. • A general equation to estimate solar radiation was established in China. - Abstract: Angström–Prescott (A–P) equation is the most widely used empirical relationship to estimate global solar radiation from sunshine hours. A new approach based on Air Pollution Index (API) data is introduced to adjust the coefficients of A–P equation in this study. Based on daily solar radiation, sunshine hours and API data at nine meteorological stations from 2001 to 2011 in China, linear, exponential and logarithmic models are developed and validated. When evaluated by performance indicators of mean bias error, mean absolute bias error, mean percentage error, mean absolute percentage error, root mean square error, and Nash–Sutcliffe Equation, it is demonstrated that logarithmic model performed better than the other models. Then empirical coefficients for three models are given for each station and the variations of these coefficients are affected by API, geographical position, and altitude. This indicates that aerosol can play an important role in estimation solar radiation from sunshine hours, especially in those highly polluted regions. Finally, a countrywide general equation is established based on the sunshine hour data, API and geographical parameters, which can be used to estimate the daily solar radiation in areas where the radiation data is not available

  5. Hadronic interaction models and air shower simulations

    Extensive air showers can only be interpreted by comparison of the measured observables with simulations, using a suitable model for the shower development in the atmosphere. Due to the complexity of the phenomenon, in the past the models were quite simple and results from air showers were to interpret qualitatively, at best. With a new generation of experiments more advanced detectors became operational and the need for detailed simulations grew. In recent years several new air shower programs were developed. Using the rapid increase of the computing power they have now reached a high level of sophistication. Particle transport, electromagnetic interactions and decay of unstable particles are treated in great detail. However the most crucial ingredient to all these programs is the modeling of hadronic interactions since it requires extrapolation in energy, primary mass and kinematics to regions where no accelerator data exist and where theoretical guidelines are only vague. As a consequence of the model uncertainties, experiments using different models occasionally reached very different conclusions on energy spectra and composition of the cosmic rays. CORSIKA is an extensive air shower simulation program that contains five different hadronic interaction models (VENUS, QGSJET, SIBYLL, HDPM, and DPMJET). It is widely used throughout the cosmic ray community and allows the study of model dependencies and the systematic effects of measurement and event reconstruction. Results for different models concerning inelastic cross-sections and particle production and their influence on air shower variables are discussed and the systematic uncertainties for air shower analyses are investigated. The capability of precise multi-parameter measurements to discriminate between the models is emphasised

  6. On radiofrequency component of transition radiation of extensive air shower

    The mechanism of radio emission caused by the transition radiation of the contrarily charged particles of the expensive air shower in the magnetic field of the Earth is studied for the first time. It is established that for the showers with the energy about 1022 eV the maximum stage whereof is reached at the sea level the electrical field voltage constitutes 60 μV/m MHz at the distance of 500 km from the shower axis. The spectrum intensity maximum is in the area corresponding to the atmospheric disturbances minimum (∼ 1 μHz). These conditions stimulate the formulation of the experiment on the high-energy cosmic ray radio detection, the scheme whereof is proposed in this work

  7. A branching model for hadronic air showers

    Novotny, Vladimir; Ebr, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a simple branching model for the development of hadronic showers in the Earth's atmosphere. Based on this model, we show how the size of the pionic component followed by muons can be estimated. Several aspects of the subsequent muonic component are also discussed. We focus on the energy evolution of the muon production depth. We also estimate the impact of the primary particle mass on the size of the hadronic component. Even though a precise calculation of the development of air showers must be left to complex Monte Carlo simulations, the proposed model can reveal qualitative insight into the air shower physics.

  8. Modeling monthly mean air temperature for Brazil

    Alvares, Clayton Alcarde; Stape, José Luiz; Sentelhas, Paulo Cesar; de Moraes Gonçalves, José Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    Air temperature is one of the main weather variables influencing agriculture around the world. Its availability, however, is a concern, mainly in Brazil where the weather stations are more concentrated on the coastal regions of the country. Therefore, the present study had as an objective to develop models for estimating monthly and annual mean air temperature for the Brazilian territory using multiple regression and geographic information system techniques. Temperature data from 2,400 stations distributed across the Brazilian territory were used, 1,800 to develop the equations and 600 for validating them, as well as their geographical coordinates and altitude as independent variables for the models. A total of 39 models were developed, relating the dependent variables maximum, mean, and minimum air temperatures (monthly and annual) to the independent variables latitude, longitude, altitude, and their combinations. All regression models were statistically significant ( α ≤ 0.01). The monthly and annual temperature models presented determination coefficients between 0.54 and 0.96. We obtained an overall spatial correlation higher than 0.9 between the models proposed and the 16 major models already published for some Brazilian regions, considering a total of 3.67 × 108 pixels evaluated. Our national temperature models are recommended to predict air temperature in all Brazilian territories.

  9. An air quality model for Central Mexico

    A computational air quality model for Central Mexico that includes the Basin of the Valley of Mexico, the Valleys of Toluca, Puebla and Cuernavaca already in experimental operation, is presented. The meteorology of the region is obtained combining two non-hydrostatic models: a model designed for synoptic scales called MM5 provides initial and boundary data to a model specially designed for urban environments and scales called MEMO. The transport model used numerical techniques developed by the authors that eliminate numerical diffusion and dispersion. For the photochemical model several ODE's integrators were tested. The emissions model developed uses the latest inventory data gathered in the region. (Author)

  10. Radiation shielding is not a solution. Radiation protection of air crews

    Boehm, Theresia [Vereinigung Cockpit e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). AG Strahlenschutz

    2012-06-15

    In most working environments it is fairly easy to minimize radiation doses of workers as postulated by radiation protection basics: Increasing the distance to the radiation source, reducing the exposure time, and the use of protective clothing or shielding. With air crews however, being the largest group of exposed persons and receiving the highest collective doses, classical protective measures are difficult or even impossible to enforce. Without neglecting the economical situation, effective measures could nevertheless be realized. Planning flights at slightly lower altitudes and further away from the geomagnetic poles can significantly reduce the radiation exposure for both crew and passengers. Furthermore, affordable high-quality dosimeters with the size of mobile phones have reached marketability. If installed on board, they could measure and display the actually received radiation during normal operation and additionally warn the flight crew in case of an abnormally high dose rate during solar particle events. Pilots could react to such warnings according to procedures that are yet to be installed. (orig.)

  11. Models of Inflammation: Carrageenan Air Pouch.

    Duarte, Djane B; Vasko, Michael R; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2016-01-01

    The subcutaneous air pouch is an in vivo model that can be used to study the components of acute and chronic inflammation, the resolution of the inflammatory response, the oxidative stress response, and potential therapeutic targets for treating inflammation. Injection of irritants into an air pouch in rats or mice induces an inflammatory response that can be quantified by the volume of exudate produced, the infiltration of cells, and the release of inflammatory mediators. The model presented in this unit has been extensively used to identify potential anti-inflammatory drugs. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26995549

  12. Uncertainty in Regional Air Quality Modeling

    Digar, Antara

    Effective pollution mitigation is the key to successful air quality management. Although states invest millions of dollars to predict future air quality, the regulatory modeling and analysis process to inform pollution control strategy remains uncertain. Traditionally deterministic ‘bright-line’ tests are applied to evaluate the sufficiency of a control strategy to attain an air quality standard. A critical part of regulatory attainment demonstration is the prediction of future pollutant levels using photochemical air quality models. However, because models are uncertain, they yield a false sense of precision that pollutant response to emission controls is perfectly known and may eventually mislead the selection of control policies. These uncertainties in turn affect the health impact assessment of air pollution control strategies. This thesis explores beyond the conventional practice of deterministic attainment demonstration and presents novel approaches to yield probabilistic representations of pollutant response to emission controls by accounting for uncertainties in regional air quality planning. Computationally-efficient methods are developed and validated to characterize uncertainty in the prediction of secondary pollutant (ozone and particulate matter) sensitivities to precursor emissions in the presence of uncertainties in model assumptions and input parameters. We also introduce impact factors that enable identification of model inputs and scenarios that strongly influence pollutant concentrations and sensitivity to precursor emissions. We demonstrate how these probabilistic approaches could be applied to determine the likelihood that any control measure will yield regulatory attainment, or could be extended to evaluate probabilistic health benefits of emission controls, considering uncertainties in both air quality models and epidemiological concentration-response relationships. Finally, ground-level observations for pollutant (ozone) and precursor

  13. Estimation of Biomass Burning Influence on Air Pollution around Beijing from an Aerosol Retrieval Model

    Sonoyo Mukai; Masayoshi Yasumoto; Makiko Nakata

    2014-01-01

    We investigate heavy haze episodes (with dense concentrations of atmospheric aerosols) occurring around Beijing in June, when serious air pollution was detected by both satellite and ground measurements. Aerosol retrieval is achieved by radiative transfer simulation in an Earth atmosphere model. We solve the radiative transfer problem in the case of haze episodes by successive order of scattering. We conclude that air pollution around Beijing in June is mainly due to increased emissions of an...

  14. Compartment models in radiation protection

    Full text: This paper presents a brief review of the use of compartment models in radiation protection. These models are widely used for modelling the transport of radionuclides in plants, crops, man and animals. Special models are used for the human respiratory tract, gastro-intestinal tract and skeleton, and for particular radionuclides (e.g. transport of strontium, caesium and iodine in sheep and cattle) or groups of radionuclides (e.g. the actinides). Compartment models are also used for assessing the effects of intakes of radionuclides by man in the natural environment, in the workplace, as a result of medical treatment, or as a result of planned or accidental releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are also used for modelling the transport of radionuclides in rivers, estuaries and enclosed seas. Examples of compartment models currently used for some of these applications are presented, and their limitations are discussed. The methods and assumptions used in solving the equations associated with these models are briefly discussed, with particular reference to the problem of assessing the effects of intakes of radionuclides by man

  15. Dispersion model maps spread of Fukushima radiation

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-01-01

    When water flooded the Japanese Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on 11 March 2011, killing power to the plant and destroying its backup generators, the earthquake-triggered disaster resulted in a major nuclear accident, with the plant pouring radioactive material into the air and the water. Research into the effects of the radiation on humans and the environment has been ongoing, but to ensure the accuracy of these aftermath investigations requires understanding the precise concentrations, distribution patterns, and timing of the radionuclide emissions. To provide such an assessment for the marine environment, Estournel et al. used an ocean and atmosphere dispersion model to simulate the movements of radioactive cesium-137 throughout the Japanese coastal waters for 3.5 months following the earthquake.

  16. Ensemble Filtering in Air Quality Models

    Eben, Kryštof; Juruš, Pavel; Resler, Jaroslav; Belda, M.; Pelikán, Emil

    Brno : Masaryk University, 2007 - (Horová, I.; Hřebíček, J.) ISBN 978-80-210-4333-6. [ TIES 2007. Annual Meeting of the International Environmental Society /18./. 16.08.2007-20.08.2007, Mikulov] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : air quality models * data assimilation * ensemble filtering

  17. Tracks FAQs: What is Modeled Air Data?

    2011-04-25

    In this podcast, CDC Tracking experts discuss modeled air data. Do you have a question for our Tracking experts? Please e-mail questions to trackingsupport@cdc.gov.  Created: 4/25/2011 by National Center for Environmental Health, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Environmental Health Tracking Branch.   Date Released: 4/25/2011.

  18. Air quality modeling for emergency response applications

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) for real-time assessments of the consequences from accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. For the dispersion of hazardous heavier-than-air gases, a time-dependent, three-dimensional finite element model (FEM3) is used. These models have been evaluated extensively against a wide spectrum of field experiments involving the release of chemically inert tracers or heavier-than-air gases. The results reveal that the MATHEW/ADPIC models are capable of simulating the spatial and temporal distributions of tracer concentration to within a factor of 2 for 50% of the measured tracer concentrations for near surface releases in relatively flat terrain and within a factor of 2 for 20% of the comparisons for elevated releases in complex terrain. The FEM3 model produces quite satisfactory simulations of the spatial and temporal distributions of heavier-than-air gases, typically within a kilometer of the release point. The ARAC consists of a centralized computerized emergency response system that is capable of supporting up to 100 sites and providing real-time predictions of the consequence of transportation accidents that may occur anywhere. It utilizes pertinent accident information, local and regional meteorology, and terrain as input to the MATHEW/ADPIC models for the consequence analysis. It has responded to over 150 incidents and exercises over the past decade

  19. Acoustic Radiation by 3D Vortex Rings in Air

    Fedor V. Shugaev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic radiation emitted by three-dimensional (3D vortex rings in air has been investigated on the basis of the unsteady Navier–Stokes equations. Power series expansions of the unknown functions with respect to the initial vorticity which is supposed to be small are used. In such a manner the system of the Navier–Stokes equations is reduced to a parabolic system with constant coefficients at high derivatives. The initial value problem is as follows. The vorticity is defined inside a toroid at t = 0. Other gas parameters are assumed to be constant throughout the whole space at t = 0. The solution is expressed by multiple integrals which are evaluated with the aid of the Korobov grids. Density oscillations are analyzed. The results show that the frequency band depends on the initial size of the vortex ring and its helicity. The presented data may be applied to the study of a flow in a wake region behind an aerodynamic body.

  20. Air Quality – monitoring and modelling

    Marius DEACONU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is a major concern for all nations, regardless of their development. The rapid growth of the industrial sector and urban development have lead to significant quantities of substances and toxic materials, mostly discharged into the atmosphere and having adverse effects both on human health and environment in general. Human society has to recognize that environment has only a limited capacity to process all of its waste without major changes. Each of us is a pollutant but also a victim of pollution. If monitoring of air pollutants is particularly important for assessing the air quality at any moment, by modelling the monitoring data spectacular results are obtained both through the factor analysis and identification of potential pollution mitigation measures. Latest equipment and techniques come and support these problems giving medium and long term solutions.

  1. Assessing Climate Impacts on Air Pollution from Models and Measurements

    Holloway, T.; Plachinski, S. D.; Morton, J. L.; Spak, S.

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that large-scale patterns in temperature, humidity, solar radiation and atmospheric circulation affect formation and transport of atmospheric constituents. These relationships have supported a growing body of work projecting changes in ozone (O3), and to a lesser extent aerosols, as a function of changing climate. Typically, global and regional chemical transport models are used to quantify climate impacts on air pollution, but the ability of these models to assess weather-dependent chemical processes has not been thoroughly evaluated. Quantifying model sensitivity to climate poses the additional challenge of isolating the local to synoptic scale effects of meteorological conditions on chemistry and transport from concurrent trends in emissions, hemispheric background concentrations, and land cover change. Understanding how well models capture historic climate-chemistry relationships is essential in projecting future climate impacts, in that it allows for better evaluation of model skill and improved understanding of climate-chemistry relationships. We compare the sensitivity of chemistry-climate relationships, as simulated by the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, with observed historical response characteristics from EPA Air Quality System (AQS) monitoring data. We present results for O3, sulfate and nitrate aerosols, and ambient mercury concentrations. Despite the fact that CMAQ over-predicts daily maximum 8-hour ground-level O3 concentrations relative to AQS data, the model does an excellent job at simulating the response of O3 to daily maximum temperature. In both model and observations, we find that higher temperatures produce higher O3 across most of the U.S., as expected in summertime conditions. However, distinct regions appear in both datasets where temperature and O3 are anti-correlated - for example, over the Upper Midwestern U.S. states of Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana in July 2002. Characterizing uncertainties

  2. Air pollution model and neural network: an integrated modelling system

    It is well known that neural networks can work as universal approximators of non-linear functions and they have become a useful tool either where any precise phenomenological model is available or when uncertainty complicates the application of deterministic modelling as, for example, in environmental systems. Usually, N N models are using as regression tool. We have developed an integrated modelling system coupling an air dispersion model with a neural network method both to simulate the influence of important parameters on air pollution models and to minimize the input neural net variables. In our approach, an optimised 3-Layer Perception is used to filter the air pollution concentrations evaluated by means of the non-Gaussian analytical model ADMD. We applied this methodology to the well known Indianapolis urban data set which deals with a release of pollutants from an elevated emission source.

  3. Comparative analysis of different approaches to the computation of long-wave radiation balance of water air systems

    In the present paper, the net long-wave radiation balance of the water-air environmental systems is analysed on the base of several semi-empirical approaches. Various theoretical models of infrared atmospheric radiation are reviewed. Factors, affecting their behavior are considered. Special attention is paid to physical conditions under which those models are applicable. Atmospheric and net infrared radiation fluxes are computed and compared under clear and cloudy sky. Results are presented in graphical form. Conclusions are made on the applicability of models considered for evaluating infrared radiation fluxes in environmental conditions of Central Italy. On the base of present analysis Anderson's model is chosen for future calculations of heat budget of lakes in Central Italy

  4. Sensitivity of APSIM/ORYZA model due to estimation errors in solar radiation

    Alexandre Bryan Heinemann; Pepijn A.J. van Oort; Diogo Simões Fernandes; Aline de Holanda Nunes Maia

    2012-01-01

    Crop models are ideally suited to quantify existing climatic risks. However, they require historic climate data as input. While daily temperature and rainfall data are often available, the lack of observed solar radiation (Rs) data severely limits site-specific crop modelling. The objective of this study was to estimate Rs based on air temperature solar radiation models and to quantify the propagation of errors in simulated radiation on several APSIM/ORYZA crop model seasonal outputs, yield, ...

  5. 75 FR 4070 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Notification of a Public Meeting of the Air Quality Modeling...

    2010-01-26

    ... of the Office of Air and Radiation's Second Section 812 Prospective Analysis of the benefits and... are provided to the AQMS: (1) Second Prospective Analysis of Air Quality in the U.S. Air Quality... of Policy Analysis and Review, and (2) Evaluation of CMAQ Model Performance for the 812...

  6. An air spark glow phase model

    A )-dimensional kinetic model is developed for the glow phase of a spark gap in air. The model includes heavy-heavy collisions leading to thermal ionization, and electron collision processes. Rates for the latter are calculated by a Boltzmann analysis and from empirical measurements. These include attachment and ionization, excitation/ionization and dissociation/ionization; detachment was found to be necessary to match experimental closing times. With only those processes, the model predicts closing times well over a wide range above and below the DC breakdown voltage

  7. Model Identification of a Micro Air Vehicle

    Jorge Ni(n)o; Flavius Mitrache; Peter Cosyn; Robin De Keyser

    2007-01-01

    This paper is focused on the model identification of a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) in straight steady flight condition. The identification is based on input-output data collected from flight tests using both frequency and time dontain techniques. The vehicle is an in-house 40 cm wingspan airplane. Because of the complex coupled, multivariable and nonlinear dynamics of the aircraft, linear SISO structures for both the lateral and longitudinal models around a reference state were derived. The aim of the identification is to provide models that can be used in future development of control techniques for the MAV.

  8. FAIRMODE: A FORUM FOR AIR QUALITY MODELLING IN EUROPE

    N. Moussiopoulos; Dilara, P.; Lükewille, A.; B. Denby; Douros, J.; Fragkou, E.; Larssen, S.; Cuvelier, K.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: FAIRMODE (Forum for AIR quality MODelling in Europe) is an air quality modelling network that was established as a joint initiative of the European Environment Agency (EEA) and European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC). In a common effort EEA and JRC aim at responding to the requirements of the new Air Quality Directive, with particular focus on the introduction of modelling as a necessary tool for air quality assessment and air quality management. The main aim of t...

  9. Radiation environment models and the atmospheric cutoff

    Konradi, Andrei; Hardy, Alva C.; Atwell, William

    1987-01-01

    The limitations of radiation environment models are examined by applying the model to the South Atlantic anomaly (SAA). The local magnetic-field-intensity (in gauss) and McIlwain (1961) drift-shell-parameter contours in the SAA are analyzed. It is noted that it is necessary to decouple the atmospheric absorption effects from the trapped radiation models in order to obtain accurate radiation dose predictions. Two methods for obtaining more accurate results are proposed.

  10. Economic Modeling of Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Rui Bo; Ming Ni; Yang Gu; James McCalley

    2013-01-01

    Due to the variable nature of wind resources, the increasing penetration level of wind power will have a significant impact on the operation and planning of the electric power system. Energy storage systems are considered an effective way to compensate for the variability of wind generation. This paper presents a detailed production cost simulation model to evaluate the economic value of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in systems with large-scale wind power generation. The co-optimizatio...

  11. Comparison of box-air-mass-factors and radiances for Multiple-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) geometries calculated from different UV/visible radiative transfer models

    Wagner, T.; J. P. Burrows; Deutschmann, T.; Dix, B.; Von Friedeburg, C.; Frieß, U.; F. Hendrick; K.-P. Heue; Irie, H.; H. Iwabuchi; Y. Kanaya; Keller, J.; Mclinden, C. A.; Oetjen, H.; Palazzi, E.

    2007-01-01

    International audience The results of a comparison exercise of radiative transfer models (RTM) of various international research groups for Multiple AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) viewing geometry are presented. Besides the assessment of the agreement between the different models, a second focus of the comparison was the systematic investigation of the sensitivity of the MAX-DOAS technique under various viewing geometries and aerosol conditions. In contrast to...

  12. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  13. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  14. Phenomenological model of nuclear primary air showers

    Tompkins, D. R., Jr.; Saterlie, S. F.

    1976-01-01

    The development of proton primary air showers is described in terms of a model based on a hadron core plus an electromagnetic cascade. The muon component is neglected. The model uses three parameters: a rate at which hadron core energy is converted into electromagnetic cascade energy and a two-parameter sea-level shower-age function. By assuming an interaction length for the primary nucleus, the model is extended to nuclear primaries. Both models are applied over the energy range from 10 to the 13th power to 10 to the 21st power eV. Both models describe the size and age structure (neglecting muons) from a depth of 342 to 2052 g/sq cm.

  15. A mathematical correlation between variations in solar radiation parameters. 2. Global radiation, air temperature and specific humidity

    We derive from first principles, an equation which expresses global radiation as a function of specific humidity and air temperature at screen height. The practical validity of this equation is tested by using humidity, air temperature and global radiation data from Tanzania. It is shown that global radiation values calculated on the basis of the derived equation agree with measured radiation values to within ± 8% as long as the prevalent (horizontal) winds are either calm or light. It is noted that the equation is equally valid at times of strong horizontal winds provided that the temperature and humidity measuring site is sufficiently shielded from the winds. This implies that meteorological stations that are (for some unavoidable reasons) unable to stock pyranometers can still procure reasonable estimates of local global radiation as long as they can, at least, stock the relatively cheaper barometers and wet- and dry-bulb psychrometers. (author). 12 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  16. A coupled dynamical-radiational model of stratocumulus

    Ye, Weizuo

    1990-05-01

    A model dealing with interactions between the air and low stratiform clouds is presented based on the mixed-layer model Lilly (1968) pioneered and on Deardorff's three dimensional numerical model results. Its main new aspects lie in 1) consideration of the natures of both the atmosphere and cloud; 2) a new entrainment velocity scheme with few arbitrary assumptions; 3) transition from one-mixed layer to two-mixed layer model; and 4) parameterization of radiation and precipitation calculations. The model results for radiation, moisture, and heat turbulent fluxes turn out to be in good agreement with those calculated or observed by Kawa (1988), Nicholls (1984), and Schmets et al. (1981) in California, the North Sea, and the North Atlantic, respectively. Basically, this paper furnishes the theoretical basis for a model to address questions concerning the time-evolution of thermodynamical profiles both in cloud and out of cloud. The applications of this model wil be in a separate paper.

  17. A dispersion modelling system for urban air pollution

    Karppinen, A.; Kukkonen, J.; Nordlund, G.; Rantakrans, E.; Valkama, I.

    1998-10-01

    An Urban Dispersion Modelling system UDM-FMI, developed at the Finnish Meteorological Institute is described in the report. The modelling system includes a multiple source Gaussian plume model and a meteorological pre-processing model. The dispersion model is an integrated urban scale model, taking into account of all source categories (point, line, area and volume sources). It includes a treatment of chemical transformation (for NO{sub 2}) wet and dry deposition (for SO{sub 2}) plume rise, downwash phenomena and dispersion of inert particles. The model allows also for the influence of a finite mixing height. The model structure is mainly based on the state-of-the-art methodology. The system also computes statistical parameters from the time series, which can be compared to air quality guidelines. The relevant meteorological parameters for the dispersion model are evaluated using data produced by a meteorological pre-processor. The model is based mainly on the energy budget method. Results of national investigations have been used for evaluating climate-dependent parameters. The model utilises the synoptic meteorological observations, radiation records and aerological sounding observations. The model results include the hourly time series of the relevant atmospheric turbulence 51 refs.

  18. PAT-2 (Plutonium Air Transportable Model 2)

    The PAT-2 (Plutonium Air Transportable Model 2) package is designed for the safe transport of plutonium and/or uranium in small quantities, especially as used in international safeguards activities, and especially as transported by air. The PAT-2 package is resistant to severe accidents, including that of a high-speed jet aircraft crash, and is designed to withstand such environments as extreme impact, crushing, puncturing and slashing loads, severe hydrocarbon-fueled fires, and deep underwater immersion, with no escape of contents. The accident environments may be imposed upon the package singly or seqentially. The package meets the requirements of 10 CFR 71 for Fissile Class I packages with a cargo of 15 grams of Pu-239, or other isotopic forms described herein, not to exceed 2 watts of thermal activity. Packaging, operational features, and contents of package, are discussed

  19. Comparison of the effects of gamma radiation on hydrated and air dried rye grass seeds

    This is a comparative study of the effects of gamma radiation on the growth of hydrated and air dried seeds during the first weeks of primary growth. Four groups of seeds were used in the study: 1) hydrated sweet corn, 2) air dried sweet corn, 3) hydrated rye grass, and 4) air dried rye grass. Each group was then further subdivided and exposed to various levels of gamma radiation using a Cobalt-60 irradiator, except for the control samples of the four groups which received no radiation above background level. All seeds samples were then planted, allowed to grow for approximately 12 days, and harvested. Growth of both shoot and root of each seed was recorded for data analysis according to specific groups. Analyses of data from this study shows that the mean growth of air dried seeds when exposed to gamma radiation prior to planting

  20. Distributed modeling of monthly air temperatures over the rugged terrain of the Yellow River Basin

    2009-01-01

    Our analyses of the monthly mean air temperature of meteorological stations show that altitude,global solar radiation and surface effective radiation have a significant impact on air temperature.We set up a physically-based empirical model for monthly air temperature simulation.Combined the proposed model with the distributed modeling results of global solar radiation and routine meteorological observation data,we also developed a method for the distributed simulation of monthly air temperatures over rugged terrain.Spatial distribution maps are generated at a resolution of 1 km×1 km for the monthly mean,the monthly mean maximum and the monthly mean minimum air temperatures for the Yellow River Basin.Analysis shows that the simulation results reflect to a considerable extent the macro and local distribution characteristics of air temperature.Cross-validation shows that the proposed model displays good stability with mean absolute bias errors of 0.19℃-0.35℃.Tests carried out on local meteorological station data and case year data show that the model has good spatial and temporal simulation capacity.The proposed model solely uses routine meteorological data and can be applied easily to other regions.

  1. Predictive models of radiative neutrino masses

    Julio, J.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss two models of radiative neutrino mass generation. The first model features one-loop Zee model with Z4 symmetry. The second model is the two-loop neutrino mass model with singly- and doubly-charged scalars. These two models fit neutrino oscillation data well and predict some interesting rates for lepton flavor violation processes.

  2. Mutiple simultaneous event model for radiation carcinogenesis

    Theoretical Radiobiology and Risk Estimates includes reports on: Multiple Simultaneous Event Model for Radiation Carcinogenesis; Cancer Risk Estimates and Neutron RBE Based on Human Exposures; A Rationale for Nonlinear Dose Response Functions of Power Greater or Less Than One; and Rationale for One Double Event in Model for Radiation Carcinogenesis

  3. Combined effects of air temperature, wind, and radiation on the resting metabolism of avian raptors

    American kestrels, Falco sparverius; red-tailed hawks, Buteo jamaicensis; and golden eagles, Aquila chrysaetos, were perched in a wind tunnel and subjected to various combinations of air temperature, wind, and radiation. Oxygen consumption was measured under the various combinations of environmental variables, and multiple regression equations were developed to predict resting metabolism as a function of body mass, air temperature, wind speed, and radiation load

  4. Updraft Model for Development of Autonomous Soaring Uninhabited Air Vehicles

    Allen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Large birds and glider pilots commonly use updrafts caused by convection in the lower atmosphere to extend flight duration, increase cross-country speed, improve range, or simply to conserve energy. Uninhabited air vehicles may also have the ability to exploit updrafts to improve performance. An updraft model was developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) to investigate the use of convective lift for uninhabited air vehicles in desert regions. Balloon and surface measurements obtained at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Surface Radiation station (Desert Rock, Nevada) enabled the model development. The data were used to create a statistical representation of the convective velocity scale, w*, and the convective mixing-layer thickness, zi. These parameters were then used to determine updraft size, vertical velocity profile, spacing, and maximum height. This paper gives a complete description of the updraft model and its derivation. Computer code for running the model is also given in conjunction with a check case for model verification.

  5. Modeling solar radiation at the Earth's surface recent advances

    Badescu, Viorel

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation data is important for a wide range of applications, e.g. in engineering, agriculture, health sector, and in many fields of the natural sciences. A few examples showing the diversity of applications may include: architecture and building design e.g. air conditioning and cooling systems; solar heating system design and use; solar power generation; weather and climate prediction models; evaporation and irrigation; calculation of water requirements for crops; monitoring plant growth and disease control; skin cancer research. Solar radiation data must be provided in a variety of f

  6. Air Dispersion Modeling for Building 3026C/D Demolition

    Ward, Richard C [ORNL; Sjoreen, Andrea L [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2010-06-01

    This report presents estimates of dispersion coefficients and effective dose for potential air dispersion scenarios of uncontrolled releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) buildings 3026C, 3026D, and 3140 prior to or during the demolition of the 3026 Complex. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) AERMOD system1-6 was used to compute these estimates. AERMOD stands for AERMIC Model, where AERMIC is the American Meteorological Society-EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee. Five source locations (three in building 3026D and one each in building 3026C and the filter house 3140) and associated source characteristics were determined with the customer. In addition, the area of study was determined and building footprints and intake locations of air-handling systems were obtained. In addition to the air intakes, receptor sites consisting of ground level locations on four polar grids (50 m, 100 m, 200 m, and 500 m) and two intersecting lines of points (50 m separation), corresponding to sidewalks along Central Avenue and Fifth Street. Three years of meteorological data (2006 2008) were used each consisting of three datasets: 1) National Weather Service data; 2) upper air data for the Knoxville-Oak Ridge area; and 3) local weather data from Tower C (10 m, 30 m and 100 m) on the ORNL reservation. Annual average air concentration, highest 1 h average and highest 3 h average air concentrations were computed using AERMOD for the five source locations for the three years of meteorological data. The highest 1 h average air concentrations were converted to dispersion coefficients to characterize the atmospheric dispersion as the customer was interested in the most significant response and the highest 1 h average data reflects the best time-averaged values available from the AERMOD code. Results are presented in tabular and graphical form. The results for dose were obtained using radionuclide activities for each of the buildings provided by the customer.7

  7. Numerical time integration for air pollution models

    Verwer, Jan; Hundsdorfer, Willem; Blom, Joke

    1998-01-01

    Due to the large number of chemical species and the three space dimensions, off-the-shelf stiff ODE integrators are not feasible for the numerical time integration of stiff systems of advection-diffusion-reaction equations [ fracpar{c{t + nabla cdot left( vu{u c right) = nabla cdot left( K ,nabla, c right) + R left( c right), c=c(vu{x,t), c in IR^m, vu{x in Omega subset IR^3 ] from the field of air pollution modelling. This has led to the use of special time integration techniques. This paper...

  8. A Realistic Treatment of Geomagnetic Cherenkov Radiation from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    Werner, Klaus; de Vries, Krijn D.; Scholten, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    We present a macroscopic calculation of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays, based on currents obtained from three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of air showers in a realistic geo-magnetic field. We discuss the importance of a correct treatment of the index of refraction in air, given by the law of Gladstone and Dale, which affects the pulses enormously for certain configurations, compared to a simplified treatment using a const...

  9. TH-C-17A-09: Direct Visualization and Monitoring of Medical Radiation Beams in Air

    Fahimian, B; Ceballos, A; Turkcan, S; Kapp, D; Pratx, G [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy errors are rare but potentially catastrophic. Recent fatal incidents could have been avoided by utilizing real-time methods of monitoring delivery of radiation during treatment. However, few existing methods are practical enough to be used routinely. The study presents the first experimental demonstration of a novel non-perturbing method of monitoring radiation therapy through the phenomena of air scintillation. Methods: Monitoring of radiation delivery was devised by leveraging the phenomena of nitrogen excitation in air by ionizing radiation. The excitation induced weak luminescence in the 300–400 nm range, a process called air scintillation. An electron-multiplication charge-coupled device camera (f/0.95 lens; 440 nm shortpass) was set-up in a clinical treatment vault and was used to capture air scintillation images of kilovoltage and megavoltage beams. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the correlation of radiation dose to air scintillation. Results: Megavoltage beams from a Varian Clinac 21EX and kilovoltage beams from an orthovoltage unit (50 kVp, 30 mA) were visualized with a relatively short exposure time (10 s). Cherenkov luminescence produced in a plastic transparent phantom did not interfere with detection of air scintillation. The image intensity displayed an inverse intensity falloff (r{sup 2} = 0.89) along the central axis and was proportional to dose rate (r{sup 2} = 0.9998). As beam energy increased, the divergence of the imaged beam decreased. Last, air scintillation was visualized during a simulated total skin irradiation electron treatment. Conclusion: Air scintillation can be clinically detected to monitor a radiation beam in an inexpensive and non-perturbing manner. This new method is advantageous in monitoring for gross delivery and uniquely capable of wide area in a single acquisition, such as the case for online verification of total body / skin / lymphoid irradiation treatments.

  10. ACREM: A new air crew radiation exposure measuring system

    Cosmic radiation has already been discovered in 1912 by the Austrian Nobel Laureate Victor F. Hess. After Hess up to now numerous measurements of the radiation exposure by cosmic rays in different altitudes have been performed, however, this has not been taken serious in view of radiation protection.Today, with the fast development of modern airplanes, an ever increasing number of civil aircraft is flying in increasing altitudes for considerable time. Members of civil aircrew spending up to 1000 hours per year in cruising altitudes and therefore are subject to significant levels of radiation exposure. In 1990 ICRP published its report ICRP 60 with updated excess cancer risk estimates, which led to significantly higher risk coefficients for some radiation qualities. An increase of the radiation weighting factors for mean energy neutron radiation increases the contribution for the neutron component to the equivalent dose by about 60%, as compared to the earlier values of ICRP26. This higher risk coefficients lead to the recommendation of the ICRP, that cosmic radiation exposure in civil aviation should be taken into account as occupational exposure. Numerous recent exposure measurements at civil airliners in Germany, Sweden, USA, and Russia show exposure levels in the range of 3-10 mSv/year. This is significantly more than the average annual dose of radiation workers (in Austria about 1.5 mSv/year). Up to now no practicable and economic radiation monitoring system for routine application on board exits. A fairly simple and economic approach to a practical, active in-flight dosimeter for the assessment of individual crew exposure is discussed in this paper

  11. Air quality and radiative forcing impacts of anthropogenic volatile organic compound emissions from ten world regions

    Fry, M. M.; Schwarzkopf, M. D.; Adelman, Z.; West, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) influence air quality and global climate change through their effects on secondary air pollutants and climate forcers. Here we simulate the air quality and radiative forcing (RF) impacts of changes in ozone, methane, and sulfate from halving anthropogenic NMVOC emissions globally and from 10 regions individually, using a global chemical transport model and a standalone radiative transfer model. Halving global NMVOC emissions decreases global annual average tropospheric methane and ozone by 36.6 ppbv and 3.3 Tg, respectively, and surface ozone by 0.67 ppbv. All regional reductions slow the production of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), resulting in regional to intercontinental PAN decreases and regional NOx increases. These NOx increases drive tropospheric ozone increases nearby or downwind of source regions in the Southern Hemisphere (South America, Southeast Asia, Africa, and Australia). Some regions' NMVOC emissions contribute importantly to air pollution in other regions, such as East Asia, the Middle East, and Europe, whose impact on US surface ozone is 43%, 34%, and 34% of North America's impact. Global and regional NMVOC reductions produce widespread negative net RFs (cooling) across both hemispheres from tropospheric ozone and methane decreases, and regional warming and cooling from changes in tropospheric ozone and sulfate (via several oxidation pathways). The 100 yr and 20 yr global warming potentials (GWP100, GWP20) are 2.36 and 5.83 for the global reduction, and 0.079 to 6.05 and -1.13 to 18.9 among the 10 regions. The NMVOC RF and GWP estimates are generally lower than previously modeled estimates, due to the greater NMVOC/NOx emissions ratios simulated, which result in less sensitivity to NMVOC emissions changes and smaller global O3 burden responses, in addition to differences in the representation of NMVOCs and oxidation chemistry among models. Accounting for a fuller set of RF contributions may change the

  12. Air quality and radiative forcing impacts of anthropogenic volatile organic compound emissions from ten world regions

    M. M. Fry

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs influence air quality and global climate change through their effects on secondary air pollutants and climate forcers. Here we simulate the air quality and radiative forcing (RF impacts of changes in ozone, methane, and sulfate from halving anthropogenic NMVOC emissions globally and from 10 regions individually, using a global chemical transport model and a standalone radiative transfer model. Halving global NMVOC emissions decreases global annual average tropospheric methane and ozone by 36.6 ppbv and 3.3 Tg, respectively, and surface ozone by 0.67 ppbv. All regional reductions slow the production of PAN, resulting in regional to intercontinental PAN decreases and regional NOx increases. These NOx increases drive tropospheric ozone increases nearby or downwind of source regions in the Southern Hemisphere (South America, Southeast Asia, Africa, and Australia. Some regions' NMVOC emissions contribute importantly to air pollution in other regions, such as East Asia, Middle East, and Europe, whose impact on US surface ozone is 43%, 34%, and 34% of North America's impact. Global and regional NMVOC reductions produce widespread negative net RFs (cooling across both hemispheres from tropospheric ozone and methane decreases, and regional warming and cooling from changes in tropospheric ozone and sulfate (via several oxidation pathways. The total global net RF for NMVOCs is estimated as 0.0277 W m−2 (~1.8% of CO2 RF since the preindustrial. The 100 yr and 20 yr global warming potentials (GWP100, GWP20 are 2.36 and 5.83 for the global reduction, and 0.079 to 6.05 and −1.13 to 18.9 among the 10 regions. The NMVOC RF and GWP estimates are generally lower than previously modeled estimates, due to differences among models in ozone, methane, and sulfate sensitivities, and the climate forcings included in each estimate. Accounting for a~fuller set of RF contributions may change the relative magnitude of each

  13. Illumination of the Air Environment Using Radiation of HF Broadcast Stations

    Lutsenko, V. I.; Lutsenko, I. V.; Popov, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the possibility of using illumination of the HF broadcast stations for location of air objects. The relationships for estimation of the detection range are obtained and requirements for the degree of suppression of a direct signal from the broadcast station are determined. Spectral characteristics of the signals from HF broadcast stations are studied experimentally for different polarizations of the received radiation. The possibility of air object detection using the Doppler effect is shown. Theoretical estimates of the radar cross section of air objects for different polarizations of the incident radiation are given. It is found experimentally that the radar cross section is about the same for the vertical and horizontal polarizations.

  14. Data assimilation for air quality models

    Silver, Jeremy David

    2014-01-01

    higher uncertainties. It is possible, however, to combine information from measurements and models to more accurately estimate the state of the atmosphere using a statistically consistent framework known as “data assimilation”. In this study, three data assimilation schemes are implemented and evaluated....... The data assimilation schemes are coupled to the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM), a large-scale three-dimensional off-line CTM, and the data ingested were retrievals of atmospheric composition from polar-orbiting satellites. The three assimilation techniques applied were: a three......-dimensional optimal interpolation procedure (OI), an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), and a three-dimensional variational scheme (3D-var). The three assimilation procedures are described and tested. A multi-faceted approach is taken for the verification, using independent measurements from surface air...

  15. Modeling the radiation characteristics of woodwind instruments

    Caussé, René; Noisternig, Markus; Le Piouffle, Vincent; Misdariis, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    In reverberant acoustic environments the perception of timbre at a listener’s position depends on the radiation characteristics of the sound source. Numerous studies have shown that radiation patterns of acoustic instruments vary with frequency and time. Thus, one area of large concern that is a topic of ongoing research is the measurement, reproduction, and compact description of sound source radiation patterns. A simple and efficient physical model for calculating the directional pattern of...

  16. Evaluation of gas radiation models in CFD modeling of oxy-combustion

    Highlights: • CFD modeling of a typical industrial water tube boiler is conducted. • Different combustion processes were considered including air and oxy-fuel combustion. • SGG, EWBM, Leckner, Perry and WSGG radiation models were considered in the study. • EWBM is the most accurate model and it’s considered to be the benchmark model. • Characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion are compared to those of air–fuel combustion. - Abstract: Proper determination of the radiation energy is very important for proper predictions of the combustion characteristics inside combustion devices using CFD modeling. For this purpose, different gas radiation models were developed and applied in the present work. These radiation models vary in their accuracy and complexity according to the application. In this work, a CFD model for a typical industrial water tube boiler was developed, considering three different combustion environments. The combustion environments are air–fuel combustion (21% O2 and 79% N2), oxy-fuel combustion (21% O2 and 79% CO2) and oxy-fuel combustion (27% O2 and 73% CO2). Simple grey gas (SGG), exponential wide band model (EWBM), Leckner, Perry and weighted sum of grey gases (WSGG) radiation models were examined and their influences on the combustion characteristics were evaluated. Among those radiation models, the EWBM was found to provide close results to the experimental data for the present boiler combustion application. The oxy-fuel combustion characteristics were analyzed and compared with those of air–fuel combustion

  17. Are passive smoking, air pollution and obesity a greater mortality risk than major radiation incidents?

    Smith Jim T

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following a nuclear incident, the communication and perception of radiation risk becomes a (perhaps the major public health issue. In response to such incidents it is therefore crucial to communicate radiation health risks in the context of other more common environmental and lifestyle risk factors. This study compares the risk of mortality from past radiation exposures (to people who survived the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs and those exposed after the Chernobyl accident with risks arising from air pollution, obesity and passive and active smoking. Methods A comparative assessment of mortality risks from ionising radiation was carried out by estimating radiation risks for realistic exposure scenarios and assessing those risks in comparison with risks from air pollution, obesity and passive and active smoking. Results The mortality risk to populations exposed to radiation from the Chernobyl accident may be no higher than that for other more common risk factors such as air pollution or passive smoking. Radiation exposures experienced by the most exposed group of survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to an average loss of life expectancy significantly lower than that caused by severe obesity or active smoking. Conclusion Population-averaged risks from exposures following major radiation incidents are clearly significant, but may be no greater than those from other much more common environmental and lifestyle factors. This comparative analysis, whilst highlighting inevitable uncertainties in risk quantification and comparison, helps place the potential consequences of radiation exposures in the context of other public health risks.

  18. Distributed modeling of monthly air temperatures over the rugged terrain of the Yellow River Basin

    ZENG Yan; QIU XinFa; HE YongJian; SHI GuoPing; LIU ChangMing

    2009-01-01

    Our analyses of the monthly mean air temperature of meteorological stations show that altitude, global solar radiation and surface effective radiation have a significant impact on air temperature. We set up a physically-based empirical model for monthly air temperature simulation. Combined the proposed model with the distributed modeling results of global solar radiation and routine meteorological ob-servation data, we also developed a method for the distributed simulation of monthly sir temperatures over rugged terrain. Spatial distribution maps are generated at a resolution of 1 km×1 km for the monthly mean, the monthly mean maximum and the monthly mean minimum air temperatures for the Yellow River Basin. Analysis shows that the simulation results reflect to a considerable extent the macro and local distribution characteristics of air temperature. Cross-validation shows that the pro-posed model displays good stability with mean absolute bias errors of 0.19℃-0.35℃. Tests carried out on local meteorological station data and case year data show that the model has good spatial and temporal simulation capacity. The proposed model solely uses routine meteorological data and can be applied easily to other regions.

  19. Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models

    Michael J Iacono

    2011-04-07

    This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

  20. Exposure Modeling of Residential Air Exchange Rates for NEXUS Participants.

    Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, air pollution health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect personal exposures, we developed the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) to improv...

  1. The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

  2. The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

  3. Refined weighted sum of gray gases model for air-fuel combustion and its impacts

    Yin, Chungen

    2013-01-01

    in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of air-fuel combustion processes. It represents a reasonable compromise between an oversimplified gray gas model and a comprehensive approach addressing high-resolution dependency of radiative properties and intensity upon wavelength. The WSGGM......Radiation is the principal mode of heat transfer in utility boiler furnaces. Models for radiative properties play a vital role in reliable simulations of utility boilers and simulation-based design and optimization. The weighted sum of gray gases model (WSGGM) is one of the most widely used models...... coefficients evaluated by Smith et al. for several partial pressures of CO2 and H2O vapor are often used for gas temperatures up to 2400 K, which is supplemented by the coefficient values presented by Coppalle and Vervisch for higher temperatures until 3000 K. This paper refines the air-fuel WSGGM in terms of...

  4. A numerical model for multigroup radiation hydrodynamics

    We present in this paper a multigroup model for radiation hydrodynamics to account for variations of the gas opacity as a function of frequency. The entropy closure model (M1) is applied to multigroup radiation transfer in a radiation hydrodynamics code. In difference from the previous grey model, we are able to reproduce the crucial effects of frequency-variable gas opacities, a situation omnipresent in physics and astrophysics. We also account for the energy exchange between neighbouring groups which is important in flows with strong velocity divergence. These terms were computed using a finite volume method in the frequency domain. The radiative transfer aspect of the method was first tested separately for global consistency (reversion to grey model) and against a well-established kinetic model through Marshak wave tests with frequency-dependent opacities. Very good agreement between the multigroup M1 and kinetic models was observed in all tests. The successful coupling of the multigroup radiative transfer to the hydrodynamics was then confirmed through a second series of tests. Finally, the model was linked to a database of opacities for a Xe gas in order to simulate realistic multigroup radiative shocks in Xe. The differences with the previous grey models are discussed.

  5. Modelling of ground-level UV radiation

    Koepke, P.; Schwander, H.; Thomalla, E.

    1996-06-01

    A number of modifications were made on the STAR radiation transmission model for greater ease of use while keeping its fault liability low. The improvements concern the entire aerosol description function of the model, the option of radiation calculation for different receiver geometries, the option of switching off temperature-dependent ozone absorption, and simplications of the STAR menu. The assets of using STAR are documented in the studies on the accuracy of the radiation transmission model. One of these studies gives a detailed comparison of the present model with a simple radiation model which reveals the limitations of approximation models. The other examines the error margin of radiation transmission models as a function of the input parameters available. It was found here that errors can be expected to range between 5 and 15% depending on the quality of the input data sets. A comparative study on the values obtained by measurement and through the model proved this judgement correct, the relative errors lying within the predicted range. Attached to this final report is a comprehensive sensitivity study which quantifies the action of various atmospheric parameters relevant to UV radiation, thus contributing to an elucidation of the process.

  6. Radiation protection: Measurement, modelling, documentation. Proceedings

    The focus of this conference is on the practical aspects of radiation protection and embraces a ''core business'' of radiation protection, namely: measuring, modeling, documentation, and all the activities and good professional practices in this context. The radiation protection experts and the radiation safety officers who contributed papers to this conference are ''practitioners'' in their fields. To round up the subject matter, there are papers dealing with legal aspects, elaborating on recent regulatory provisions and requirements, and papers dicsussing new approaches in designing and disseminating information to the public. (orig./CB)

  7. Inter-comparisons of thermodynamic sea-ice modeling results using various parameterizations of radiative flux

    2006-01-01

    Radiative fluxes are of primary importance in the energy and mass balance of the sea-ice cover. Various parameterizations of the radiative fluxes are studied in a thermodynamic sea-ice model. Model outputs of the surface radiative and heat fluxes and mass balance are compared with observations. The contribution of short-wave radiation is limited to a long part of winter. Therefore, simple schemes are often sufficient. Errors in estimations of the short-wave radiation are due mainly to cloud effects and occasionally to multi-reflection between surface and ice crystals in the air. The long-wave radiation plays an important role in the ice surface heat and mass balance during most part of a winter. The effect of clouds on the accuracy of the simple radiative schemes is critical, which needs further attention. In general, the accuracy of an ice model depends on that of the radiative fluxes.

  8. Seeing the invisible: Direct visualization of therapeutic radiation beams using air scintillation

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Türkcan, Silvan; Kapp, Daniel S.; Pratx, Guillem, E-mail: pratx@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Ceballos, Andrew [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To assess whether air scintillation produced during standard radiation treatments can be visualized and used to monitor a beam in a nonperturbing manner. Methods: Air scintillation is caused by the excitation of nitrogen gas by ionizing radiation. This weak emission occurs predominantly in the 300–430 nm range. An electron-multiplication charge-coupled device camera, outfitted with an f/0.95 lens, was used to capture air scintillation produced by kilovoltage photon beams and megavoltage electron beams used in radiation therapy. The treatment rooms were prepared to block background light and a short-pass filter was utilized to block light above 440 nm. Results: Air scintillation from an orthovoltage unit (50 kVp, 30 mA) was visualized with a relatively short exposure time (10 s) and showed an inverse falloff (r{sup 2} = 0.89). Electron beams were also imaged. For a fixed exposure time (100 s), air scintillation was proportional to dose rate (r{sup 2} = 0.9998). As energy increased, the divergence of the electron beam decreased and the penumbra improved. By irradiating a transparent phantom, the authors also showed that Cherenkov luminescence did not interfere with the detection of air scintillation. In a final illustration of the capabilities of this new technique, the authors visualized air scintillation produced during a total skin irradiation treatment. Conclusions: Air scintillation can be measured to monitor a radiation beam in an inexpensive and nonperturbing manner. This physical phenomenon could be useful for dosimetry of therapeutic radiation beams or for online detection of gross errors during fractionated treatments.

  9. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species. This complicates the chemistry solution, easily causing large errors for such species. In the framework of an operational global air pollution model, we focus on the problem formed by chemistry and vertical transport, which is based on diffusion, cloud-related vertical winds, and wet deposition. Its specific nature leads to full Jacobian matrices, ruling out standard implicit integration. We compare Strang operator splitting with two alternatives: source splitting and an (unsplit) Rosenbrock method with approximate matrix factorization, all having equal computational cost. The comparison is performed with real data. All methods are applied with half-hour time steps, and give good accuracies. Rosenbrock is the most accurate, and source splitting is more accurate than Strang splitting. Splitting errors concentrate in short-lived species sensitive to solar radiation and species with strong emissions and depositions. 30 refs

  10. Economic Modeling of Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Rui Bo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the variable nature of wind resources, the increasing penetration level of wind power will have a significant impact on the operation and planning of the electric power system. Energy storage systems are considered an effective way to compensate for the variability of wind generation. This paper presents a detailed production cost simulation model to evaluate the economic value of compressed air energy storage (CAES in systems with large-scale wind power generation. The co-optimization of energy and ancillary services markets is implemented in order to analyze the impacts of CAES, not only on energy supply, but also on system operating reserves. Both hourly and 5-minute simulations are considered to capture the economic performance of CAES in the day-ahead (DA and real-time (RT markets. The generalized network flow formulation is used to model the characteristics of CAES in detail. The proposed model is applied on a modified IEEE 24-bus reliability test system. The numerical example shows that besides the economic benefits gained through energy arbitrage in the DA market, CAES can also generate significant profits by providing reserves, compensating for wind forecast errors and intra-hour fluctuation, and participating in the RT market.

  11. Validation of spectral gas radiation models under oxyfuel conditions

    Becher, Johann Valentin

    2013-05-15

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels with pure oxygen results in a different flue gas composition than combustion with air. Standard computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) spectral gas radiation models for air combustion are therefore out of their validity range in oxyfuel combustion. This thesis provides a common spectral basis for the validation of new spectral models. A literature review about fundamental gas radiation theory, spectral modeling and experimental methods provides the reader with a basic understanding of the topic. In the first results section, this thesis validates detailed spectral models with high resolution spectral measurements in a gas cell with the aim of recommending one model as the best benchmark model. In the second results section, spectral measurements from a turbulent natural gas flame - as an example for a technical combustion process - are compared to simulated spectra based on measured gas atmospheres. The third results section compares simplified spectral models to the benchmark model recommended in the first results section and gives a ranking of the proposed models based on their accuracy. A concluding section gives recommendations for the selection and further development of simplified spectral radiation models. Gas cell transmissivity spectra in the spectral range of 2.4 - 5.4 {mu}m of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the temperature range from 727 C to 1500 C and at different concentrations were compared in the first results section at a nominal resolution of 32 cm{sup -1} to line-by-line models from different databases, two statistical-narrow-band models and the exponential-wide-band model. The two statistical-narrow-band models EM2C and RADCAL showed good agreement with a maximal band transmissivity deviation of 3 %. The exponential-wide-band model showed a deviation of 6 %. The new line-by-line database HITEMP2010 had the lowest band transmissivity deviation of 2.2% and was therefore recommended as a reference model for the

  12. Radiation exposure of the crew in commercial air traffic

    The routine radiation exposure of the crews in Yugoslav Airlines (JAT) has been studied and some previous results are presented. The flights of four selected groups of pilots (four aircraft types) have been studied during one year. Annual exposures and dose equivalents are presented. Some additional results and discussions are given. (1 fig., 4 tabs.)

  13. Handbook of anatomical models for radiation dosimetry

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-01-01

    Covering the history of human model development, this title presents the major anatomical and physical models that have been developed for human body radiation protection, diagnostic imaging, and nuclear medicine therapy. It explores how these models have evolved and the role that modern technologies have played in this development.

  14. Assessing solar radiation models using multiple variables over Turkey

    Evrendilek, Fatih [Abant Izzet Baysal University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Bolu (Turkey); Ertekin, Can [Akdeniz University, Department of Farm Machinery, Faculty of Agriculture, Antalya (Turkey)

    2008-08-15

    Solar radiation drives many environmental processes; however, needs to be estimated indirectly from more commonly measured meteorological variables since these data are not readily available from most climate stations. A geo-referenced dataset from 159 climate stations of 17 variables (maximum possible sunshine duration, mean, minimum and maximum air temperature, soil temperature, mean and maximum relative humidity, precipitation, cloudiness, evapotranspiration, extraterrestrial radiation, day length, declination angle, day of the year, latitude, longitude, and altitude) was used to model spatio-temporal dynamics of solar radiation over Turkey. A total of 78 empirical models of different mathematical functions with a different combination of 17 explanatory variables were compared based on the error statistics of the Jackknifing validation. The empirical models had adjusted coefficient of determination (R{sub adj} {sup 2}) values of 22.7-96.5% based on the parameterization dataset (P < 0.05). Models 46 and 22.2 provided the most robust performance and were identified as generic models for the estimation of monthly changes in solar radiation over topographically complex terrain of the entire Turkey as a function of maximum possible sunshine hours, extraterrestrial solar radiation, mean temperature, and precipitation. The quadratic and cubic models performed best in terms of the error statistics (P > 0.05), while the performance of the hybrid models was worse than that of the linear, quadratic and cubic models in terms of maximum relative percentage error (e) (P < 0.01). In comparing the interpolation methods of inverse distance weighting and universal co-kriging, anisotropic spherical semi-variogram model of universal co-kriging was found to provide the best description of spatial autocorrelation and variability latent in these data based on the spatial leave-one-out cross-validation. (orig.)

  15. Evaluating NOx emission inventories for regulatory air quality modeling using satellite and air quality model data

    Kemball-Cook, Susan; Yarwood, Greg; Johnson, Jeremiah; Dornblaser, Bright; Estes, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of NOx emissions in the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality's (TCEQ) State Implementation Plan (SIP) modeling inventories of the southeastern U.S. We used retrieved satellite tropospheric NO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) together with NO2 columns from the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) to make top-down NOx emissions estimates using the mass balance method. Two different top-down NOx emissions estimates were developed using the KNMI DOMINO v2.0 and NASA SP2 retrievals of OMI NO2 columns. Differences in the top-down NOx emissions estimates made with these two operational products derived from the same OMI radiance data were sufficiently large that they could not be used to constrain the TCEQ NOx emissions in the southeast. The fact that the two available operational NO2 column retrievals give such different top-down NOx emissions results is important because these retrievals are increasingly being used to diagnose air quality problems and to inform efforts to solve them. These results reflect the fact that NO2 column retrievals are a blend of measurements and modeled data and should be used with caution in analyses that will inform policy development. This study illustrates both benefits and challenges of using satellite NO2 data for air quality management applications. Comparison with OMI NO2 columns pointed the way toward improvements in the CAMx simulation of the upper troposphere, but further refinement of both regional air quality models and the NO2 column retrievals is needed before the mass balance and other emission inversion methods can be used to successfully constrain NOx emission inventories used in U.S. regulatory modeling.

  16. Validation of a model for estimating the net radiation over a canopy under reference conditions

    A study was performed to evaluate a net radiation model in the Panguilemo (UAP) and Corvallis (UAC) agroclimatological plot located in Talca (Chile) and Oregon (USA), respectively. In both location, an automatic meteorological station was installed over a grass canopy maintained in reference conditions to measure net radiation, solar radiation, air temperature and air vapor pressure on hourly basis. Results indicated that there was an excellent correlation between measured (Rno) and estimated (Rne) values of net radiation, with a correlation coefficient of 0,97 and 0,98 for UAP and UAC, respectively. Greater disagreements were observed during the nighttime, but they did not significantly affect the final calculation of net radiation. This analysis suggests that the net radiation model could be used in the Penman-Montieth equation to compute crop water requirement in Talea and Oregon. (author)

  17. Air Quality Modelling and the National Emission Database

    Jensen, S. S.

    The project focuses on development of institutional strengthening to be able to carry out national air emission inventories based on the CORINAIR methodology. The present report describes the link between emission inventories and air quality modelling to ensure that the new national air emission...

  18. Radiação solar estimada com base na temperatura do ar para três regiões de Minas Gerais Estimation of solar radiation by air temperature models for three regions of Minas Gerais

    Cláudio R. da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A radiação solar incidente (Rs é uma variável importante em estudos agrícolas, particularmente para a estimativa da evapotranspiração e em modelos para produtividade. Entretanto, sua medição não é, em geral, realizada em estações meteorológicas convencionais. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar nove modelos empíricos de estimativa de Rs, a partir da temperatura, para as regiões Metropolitana, Vale do Rio Doce e Zona da Mata em Minas Gerais. Dados de Rs diários foram obtidos por estações meteorológicas automáticas instaladas nessas regiões e pertencentes ao Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia (INMET. Para todos os modelos foram gerados coeficientes locais de calibração. O desempenho de cada método foi avaliado através dos seguintes indicadores: coeficiente de determinação (R², raiz quadrada do quadrado médio do erro (RQME, erro médio (EM e teste t. A pequena diferença entre os modelos avaliados indica que qualquer um desses modelos é passível de utilização mas, dado à simplicidade, desempenho e significância, o modelo de Hargreaves, calibrado e com dois coeficientes, é o mais aplicável para estimar a radiação solar incidente.The incident solar radiation (Rs is an important variable in agricultural studies, particularly for the estimation of evapotranspiration and yield models. However, its measurement is not commonly performed in conventional meteorological stations. The aim of this study was to evaluate nine empirical models to estimate Rs from the temperature for the Metropolitan, Vale do Rio Doce and Zona da Mata areas in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The models used were Hargreaves, Annandale, Chen, Bristow & Campbell, Donatelli & Campbell and Hunt. Data used were obtained by Rs daily automatic weather stations installed in these regions and belonging to Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia (INMET. For all models local calibration coefficients were derived. The performance of each method was evaluated

  19. Mathematical models for radiation effects on human health

    In this paper, we are proposing a theoretical approach of basic mathematical models for radiation effect on human health. The largest natural sources of radiation exposure to humans are radon gas. While radon gas has always been in the environment, awareness of its contribution to human radiation exposure has increased in recent years. Radon's primary pathway is through air space in soil and rock. Pressure differences between the soil and the inside of buildings may cause radon gas to move indoors. Radon decays to radon daughters, some of which emit alpha radiation. Alpha-emitting radon daughters are adsorbed on to dust particles which, when inhaled, are trapped in the lungs and may cause gene damage, mutations and finally cancer. Exposure to excess UV radiation increases risk of skin cancer but there is also a dark side. The incidence of all types of skin cancer is related to exposure to UV radiation. Non-melanoma skin cancer, eye melanoma, and lip cancer have also been related to natural UV light

  20. Ultraviolet-B radiation enhancement in dielectric barrier discharge based xenon chloride exciplex source by air

    A single barrier dielectric barrier discharge tube of quartz with multi-strip Titanium-Gold (Ti-Au) coatings have been developed and utilized for ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation production peaking at wavelength 308 nm. The observed radiation at this wavelength has been examined for the mixtures of the Xenon together with chlorine and air admixtures. The gas mixture composition, chlorine gas content, total gas pressure, and air pressure dependency of the UV intensity, has been analyzed. It is found that the larger concentration of Cl2 deteriorates the performance of the developed source and around 2% Cl2 in this source produced optimum results. Furthermore, an addition of air in the xenon and chlorine working gas environment leads to achieve same intensity of UV-B light but at lower working gas pressure where significant amount of gas is air.

  1. Good manufacturing practice for modelling air pollution: Quality criteria for computer models to calculate air pollution

    Dekker, C. M.; Sliggers, C. J.

    To spur on quality assurance for models that calculate air pollution, quality criteria for such models have been formulated. By satisfying these criteria the developers of these models and producers of the software packages in this field can assure and account for the quality of their products. In this way critics and users of such (computer) models can gain a clear understanding of the quality of the model. Quality criteria have been formulated for the development of mathematical models, for their programming—including user-friendliness, and for the after-sales service, which is part of the distribution of such software packages. The criteria have been introduced into national and international frameworks to obtain standardization.

  2. Mathematical model of water droplets evaporation in air stream

    Дикий, Микола Олександрович; Соломаха, Андрій Сергійович; Петренко, Валерій Георгієвич

    2013-01-01

    Capacity of a gas turbine power plant strongly depends on the ambient temperature, making it profitable in many cases to cool air supplying water in the air stream. The article identifies the key provisions and presents the equations that describe the process of evaporation of water droplets in the air stream. The model is based on commonly known and chacked dependences of Nu = f (Re, Pr); Sh = f (Re, Sc). The developed system of equations allows finding the parameters of humid air, depending...

  3. MODELING OF GENERIC AIR POLLUTION DISPERSION ANALYSIS FROM CEMENT FACTORY

    Moses E EMETERE

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution from cement factory is classified as one of the sources of air pollution. The control of the air pollution by addressing the wind field dynamics was the main objective of the paper. The dynamics of dispersion showed a three way flow which was calculated and explained accordingly. The 3D model showed good level of accuracy by determining field values of air deposited pollutants. Mean concentration of diffusing pollutants was shown to be directly proportional to the plume angular displacement. The 2D model explained the details of the wind field dynamics and proffers a solution which may be relevant in controlling air pollution from anthropogenic sources.

  4. Robust comparison of climate models with observations using blended land air and ocean sea surface temperatures

    Cowtan, Kevin; Hausfather, Zeke; Hawkins, Ed; Jacobs, Peter; Mann, Michael E.; Miller, Sonya K.; Byron A. Steinman; Stolpe, Martin B.; Way, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The level of agreement between climate model simulations and observed surface temperature change is a topic of scientific and policy concern. While the Earth system continues to accumulate energy due to anthropogenic and other radiative forcings, estimates of recent surface temperature evolution fall at the lower end of climate model projections. Global mean temperatures from climate model simulations are typically calculated using surface air temperatures, while the corresponding observation...

  5. Impact of inherent meteorology uncertainty on air quality model predictions

    It is well established that there are a number of different classifications and sources of uncertainties in environmental modeling systems. Air quality models rely on two key inputs, namely, meteorology and emissions. When using air quality models for decision making, it is impor...

  6. The NIAID Radiation Countermeasures Program business model.

    Hafer, Nathaniel; Maidment, Bert W; Hatchett, Richard J

    2010-12-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Radiation/Nuclear Medical Countermeasures Development Program has developed an integrated approach to providing the resources and expertise required for the research, discovery, and development of radiation/nuclear medical countermeasures (MCMs). These resources and services lower the opportunity costs and reduce the barriers to entry for companies interested in working in this area and accelerate translational progress by providing goal-oriented stewardship of promising projects. In many ways, the radiation countermeasures program functions as a "virtual pharmaceutical firm," coordinating the early and mid-stage development of a wide array of radiation/nuclear MCMs. This commentary describes the radiation countermeasures program and discusses a novel business model that has facilitated product development partnerships between the federal government and academic investigators and biopharmaceutical companies. PMID:21142762

  7. KREAM: Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model for Aviation Route Dose

    Hwang, J.; Dokgo, K.; Choi, E. J.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, H. P.; Cho, K. S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Since Korean Air has begun to use the polar route from Seoul/ICN airport to New York/JFK airport on August 2006, there are explosive needs for the estimation and prediction against cosmic radiation exposure for Korean aircrew and passengers in South Korea from public. To keep pace with those needs of public, Korean government made the law on safety standards and managements of cosmic radiation for the flight attendants and the pilots in 2013. And we have begun to develop our own Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model (KREAM) for aviation route dose since last year funded by Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). GEANT4 model and NRLMSIS 00 model are used for calculation of the energetic particles' transport in the atmosphere and for obtaining the background atmospheric neutral densities depending on altitude. For prediction the radiation exposure in many routes depending on the various space weather effects, we constructed a database from pre-arranged simulations using all possible combinations of R, S, and G, which are the space weather effect scales provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To get the solar energetic particles' spectrum at the 100 km altitude which we set as a top of the atmospheric layers in the KREAM, we use ACE and GOES satellites' proton flux observations. We compare the results between KREAM and the other cosmic radiation estimation programs such as CARI-6M which is provided by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA). We also validate KREAM's results by comparison with the measurement from Liulin-6K LET spectrometer onboard Korean commercial flights and Korean Air Force reconnaissance flights.

  8. Dry deposition modelling of air pollutants over urban areas

    Cherin, N.; Roustan, Y.; Seigneur, C.; Musson Genon, L.

    2012-04-01

    More than one-half of the world's inhabitants lives in urban areas. Consequently, the evolution of pollutants inside these urban areas are problems of great concern in air quality studies. Though the dry deposition fluxes of air pollutants, which are known to be significant in the neighborhood of sources of pollution, like urban areas, have not been modeled precisely until recently within urban areas. By reviewing the physics of the processes leading to the dry deposition of air pollutants, it is clear that atmosphere turbulence is crucial for dry deposition. Urban areas, and particularly buildings, are known to significantly impact flow fields and then by extension the dry deposition fluxes. Numerous urban schemes have been developed in the past decades to approximate the effect of the local scale urban elements on drag, heat flux and radiative budget. The most recent urban canopy models are based on quite simple geometries, but sufficiently close to represent the aerodynamic and thermal characteristics of cities. These canopy models are generally intended to parameterize aerodynamic and thermal fields, but not dry deposition. For dry deposition, the current classical "roughness" approach, uses only two representative parameters, z0 and d, namely the roughness length and the zero-plane displacement height to represent urban areas. In this work, an innovative dry deposition model based on the urban canyon concept, is proposed. It considers a single road, bordered by two facing buildings, which are treated separately. It accounts for sub-grid effects of cities, especially a better parameterization of the turbulence scheme, through the use of local mixing length and a more detailled description of the urban area and key parameters within the urban canopy. Three different flow regimes are distinguished in the urban canyon according to the height-to-width ratio: isolated roughness flow, wake interference flow and skimming flow regime. The magnitude of differences in

  9. A survey of air flow models for multizone structures

    Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

    1991-03-01

    Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Modeling Impaired Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Radiation Exposure.

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-03-01

    Radiation impairment of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of several factors associated with cognitive detriments after treatment of brain cancers in children and adults with radiation therapy. Mouse models have been used to study radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis, however the models are limited in the number of doses, dose fractions, age and time after exposure conditions that have been studied. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel predictive mathematical model of radiation-induced changes to neurogenesis using a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to represent the time, age and dose-dependent changes to several cell populations participating in neurogenesis as reported in mouse experiments exposed to low-LET radiation. We considered four compartments to model hippocampal neurogenesis and, consequently, the effects of radiation treatment in altering neurogenesis: (1) neural stem cells (NSCs), (2) neuronal progenitor cells or neuroblasts (NB), (3) immature neurons (ImN) and (4) glioblasts (GB). Because neurogenesis is decreasing with increasing mouse age, a description of the age-related dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis is considered in the model, which is shown to be an important factor in comparisons to experimental data. A key feature of the model is the description of negative feedback regulation on early and late neuronal proliferation after radiation exposure. The model is augmented with parametric descriptions of the dose and time after irradiation dependences of activation of microglial cells and a possible shift of NSC proliferation from neurogenesis to gliogenesis reported at higher doses (∼10 Gy). Predictions for dose-fractionation regimes and for different mouse ages, and prospects for future work are then discussed. PMID:26943452

  11. Aerosol-Radiation Feedback and PM10 Air Concentrations Over Poland

    Werner, Małgorzata; Kryza, Maciej; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Wałaszek, Kinga; Dore, Anthony J.; Ojrzyńska, Hanna; Kapłon, Jan

    2016-03-01

    We have implemented the WRF-Chem model version 3.5 over Poland to quantify the direct and indirect feedback effects of aerosols on simulated meteorology and aerosol concentrations. Observations were compared with results from three simulations at high spatial resolutions of 5 × 5 km: (1) BASE—without any aerosol feedback effects; (2) DIR—with direct aerosol-radiative effects (3) INDIR—with direct and indirect aerosol-radiative effects. We study the overall effect during January 2011 as well as selected episodes of the highest differences in PM10 concentrations between the three simulations. For the DIR simulation, the decrease in monthly mean incoming solar radiation (SWDOWN) appears for the entire study area. It changes geographically, from about -8.0 to -2.0 W m-2, respectively for the southern and northern parts of the country. The highest changes do not correspond to the highest PM10 concentration. Due to the solar radiation changes, the surface mean monthly temperature (T2) decreases for 96 % of the area of Poland, but not more than 1.0 °C. Monthly mean PBLH changes by more than ±5 m for 53 % of the domain. Locally the differences in PBLH between the DIR and BASE are higher than ± 20 m. Due to the direct effect, for 84 % of the domain, the mean monthly PM10 concentrations increase by up to 1.9 µg m-3. For the INDIR simulation the spatial distribution of changes in incoming solar radiation as well as air temperature is similar to the DIR simulation. The decrease of SWDOWN is noticed for the entire domain and for 23 % of the domain is higher than -5.0 W m-2. The absolute differences of PBLH are slightly higher for INDIR than DIR but similarly distributed spatially. For daily episodes, the differences between the simulations are higher, both for meteorology and PM10 concentrations, and the pattern of changes is usually more complex. The results indicate the potential importance of the aerosol feedback effects on modelled meteorology and PM10

  12. Dispersion modeling of selected PAHs in urban air: A new approach combining dispersion model with GIS and passive air sampling

    Sáňka, O.; Melymuk, L.; Čupr, P.; Dvorská, Alice; Klánová, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, oct (2014), s. 88-95. ISSN 1352-2310 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : passive air sampling * air dispersion modeling * GIS * polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * emission inventories Subject RIV: DI - Air Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 3.281, year: 2014

  13. Net radiative forcing and air quality responses to regional CO emission reductions

    M. M. Fry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO emissions influence global and regional air quality and global climate change by affecting atmospheric oxidants and secondary species. We simulate the influence of halving anthropogenic CO emissions globally and individually from 10 regions on surface and tropospheric ozone, methane, and aerosol concentrations using a global chemical transport model (MOZART-4 for the year 2005. Net radiative forcing (RF is then estimated using the GFDL (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory standalone radiative transfer model. We estimate that halving global CO emissions decreases global annual average concentrations of surface ozone by 0.45 ppbv, tropospheric methane by 73 ppbv, and global annual net RF by 36.1 mW m−2, nearly equal to the sum of changes from the 10 regional reductions. Global annual net RF per unit change in emissions and the 100 yr global warming potential (GWP100 are estimated as −0.124 mW m−2 (Tg CO−1 and 1.34, respectively, for the global CO reduction, and ranging from −0.115 to −0.131 mW m−2 (Tg CO−1 and 1.26 to 1.44 across 10 regions, with the greatest sensitivities for regions in the tropics. The net RF distributions show widespread cooling corresponding to the O3 and CH4 decreases, and localized positive and negative net RFs due to changes in aerosols. The strongest annual net RF impacts occur within the tropics (28° S–28° N followed by the northern midlatitudes (28° N–60° N, independent of reduction region, while the greatest changes in surface CO and ozone concentrations occur within the reduction region. Some regional reductions strongly influence the air quality in other regions, such as East Asia, which has an impact on US surface ozone that is 93% of that from North America. Changes in the transport of CO and downwind ozone production clearly exceed the direct export of ozone from each reduction region. The small variation in CO GWPs among world regions suggests that future international

  14. Net radiative forcing and air quality responses to regional CO emission reductions

    M. M. Fry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO emissions influence global and regional air quality and global climate change by affecting atmospheric oxidants and secondary species. We simulate the influence of halving anthropogenic CO emissions globally and individually from 10 regions on surface and tropospheric ozone, methane, and aerosol concentrations using a global chemical transport model (MOZART-4 for the year 2005. Net radiative forcing (RF is then estimated using the GFDL standalone radiative transfer model. We estimate that halving global CO emissions decreases global annual average concentrations of surface ozone by 0.45 ppbv, tropospheric methane by 73 ppbv, and global annual net RF by 36.1 mW m−2, nearly equal to the sum of changes from the 10 regional reductions. Global annual net RF per unit change in emissions and the 100-yr global warming potential (GWP100 are estimated as −0.124 mW m−2 (Tg CO yr−1−1 and 1.34, respectively, for the global CO reduction, and ranging from −0.115 to −0.131 mW m−2 (Tg CO yr−1−1 and 1.26 to 1.44 across 10 regions, with the greatest sensitivities for regions in the tropics. The net RF distributions show widespread cooling corresponding to the O3 and CH4 decreases, and localized positive and negative net RFs due to changes in aerosols. The strongest annual net RF impacts occur within the tropics (28° S–28° N followed by the northern mid-latitudes (28° N–60° N, independent of reduction region, while the greatest changes in surface CO and ozone concentrations occur within the reduction region. Some regional reductions strongly influence the air quality in other regions, such as East Asia, which has an impact on US surface ozone that is 93% of that from North America. Changes in the transport of CO and downwind ozone production clearly exceed the direct export of ozone from each reduction region

  15. Cluster radiative emission and statistical models

    Lusanna, L

    1974-01-01

    After reviewing some statistical models of multiple production, a cluster radiative emission picture in configuration space is proposed and, with the aid of an extension of the Gottfried model, the rapidity and mass distributions of clusters are determined. They agree with the independent cluster production model of Pokorski and Van Hove. (see CERN preprint TH-1772 (1971). Some connections with the thermodynamical model and some problems about the mass spectra are discussed. (17 refs).

  16. Canonical Ensemble Model for Black Hole Radiation

    Jingyi Zhang

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a canonical ensemble model for the black hole quantum tunnelling radiation is introduced. In this model the probability distribution function corresponding to the emission shell is calculated to second order. The formula of pressure and internal energy of the thermal system is modified, and the fundamental equation of thermodynamics is also discussed.

  17. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  18. Letter to the Editor: Applications Air Q Model on Estimate Health Effects Exposure to Air Pollutants

    , Gholamreza Goudarzi; Sahar Geravandi; Elaheh Jame Porazmey; Mohammad Javad Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies in worldwide have measured increases in mortality and morbidity associated with air pollution (1-3). Quantifying the effects of air pollution on the human health in urban area causes an increasingly critical component in policy discussion (4-6). Air Q model was proved to be a valid and reliable tool to predicts health effects related to criteria  pollutants (particulate matter (PM), ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and carbon monoxide (CO)),...

  19. Validation of a 3-D hemispheric nested air pollution model

    Frohn, L. M.; Christensen, J.H.; Brandt, J; C. Geels; Hansen, K. M.

    2003-01-01

    Several air pollution transport models have been developed at the National Environmental Research Institute in Denmark over the last decade (DREAM, DEHM, ACDEP and DEOM). A new 3-D nested Eulerian transport-chemistry model: REGIonal high resolutioN Air pollution model (REGINA) is based on modules and parameterisations from these models as well as new methods. The model covers the majority of the Northern Hemisphere with currently one nest...

  20. Hydrodynamic modeling of semi-planing hulls with air cavities

    Matveev Konstantin I.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available High-speed heavy loaded monohull ships can benefit from application of drag-reducing air cavities under stepped hull bottoms. The subject of this paper is the steady hydrodynamic modeling of semi-planing air-cavity hulls. The current method is based on a linearized potential-flow theory for surface flows. The mathematical model description and parametric calculation results for a selected configuration with pressurized and open air cavities are presented.

  1. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML

  2. Updating Ontario's air dispersion models : a discussion paper

    This paper described air dispersion models and technical information relating to Ontario Regulation 346 under the Environmental Protection Act. The Ontario Ministry of the Environment plans to phase out existing air dispersion models and replace them with a series of models from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (in particular AERMOD and ISC-PRIME). However, before adopting the widespread use of the new models in Ontario, the Ministry is undergoing consultation with stakeholders. The Ministry's most recent initiatives in the development of better air quality standards have included the use of the latest scientific information to develop protective, effects-based air standards and the development of a risk management framework to implement the new standards while allowing for time, technology and economic issues to be considered. An update of Regulation 346 air dispersion models ensures that the latest scientific tools are being used to asses compliance with air standards. This will promote the use of the most modern scientific tools available to assess compliance with air quality standards. The major advantage of introducing new air dispersion models is the ability to use effects-based standards with appropriate averaging times to assess compliance. This makes it possible to better assess the health and environmental impacts from air emissions. 3 tabs., 3 figs

  3. Measuring Air Temperature in Glazed Ventilated Facades in the Presence of Direct Solar Radiation

    Kalyanova, Olena; Zanghirella, Fabio; Heiselberg, Per;

    2007-01-01

    part of the complete ventilation system. Assessment of necessary cooling/heating loads and of the whole building energy performance will then depend on the accuracy of measured air temperature. The presence of direct solar radiation is an essential element for the façade operation, but it can heavily...

  4. A coupled surface/subsurface flow model accounting for air entrapment and air pressure counterflow

    Delfs, Jens Olaf; Wang, Wenqing; Kalbacher, Thomas; Singh, Ashok; Kolditz, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    This work introduces the soil air system into integrated hydrology by simulating the flow processes and interactions of surface runoff, soil moisture and air in the shallow subsurface. The numerical model is formulated as a coupled system of partial differential equations for hydrostatic (diffusive...... the mass exchange between compartments. A benchmark test, which is based on a classic experimental data set on infiltration excess (Horton) overland flow, identified a feedback mechanism between surface runoff and soil air pressures. Our study suggests that air compression in soils amplifies surface...

  5. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter performance following service and radiation exposure

    Small HEPA filters were exposed to a 60Co source with a radiation strength of 3 x 107 rads per hour and then exposed to steam--air mixtures at several times filter design flow, followed by extended exposure to steam and air at reduced flow. Additional filters were exposed to air flow in a reactor confinement system and then similarly tested with steam--air mixture flows. The test data and calculated effects of filter pluggage with moisture on confinement system performance following potential reactor accidents are described. Gamma radiation exposure impaired the performance of new filters only slightly and temporarily improved performance of service aged filters. Normal confinement system service significantly impaired filter performance although not sufficiently to prevent adequate performance of the SRP confinement system following an unlikely reactor accident. Calculations based on measured filter pluggage indicate that during an accident air flow could be reduced approximately 50 percent with service-degraded HEPA filters present, or approximately 10 percent with new filters damaged by the radiation exposure. (U.S.)

  6. Radiation model for row crops: II. Model evaluation

    Relatively few radiation transfer studies have considered the impact of varying vegetation cover that typifies row crops, and meth¬ods to account for partial row crop cover have not been well investigated. Our objective was to evaluate a widely used radiation model that was modified for row crops ha...

  7. Model of optical nonlinearity of air in the mid-IR wavelength range

    A model of optical nonlinearity of air (atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen) is developed. This model can be used to calculate numerically the propagation of radiation with a wavelength close to 10 μm. It takes into account the electronic Kerr effect, higher order nonlinearities, ionisation of a gas medium by electron impact, and pulse group-velocity dispersion. The applicability limits of the Drude approximation for calculating the impact-ionisation rate are also considered. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  8. Propagation speed of {gamma}-radiation in air

    Cavalcante, Jose T.P.D.; Silva, Paulo R.J.; Saitovitch, Henrique [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Macedo Junior, Marcelo A.V. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Quimica de Nilopolis (CEFET), RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    To perform such measurements the availability of a gamma radiation source in which two {gamma}-rays are emitted simultaneously in opposite directions -as already used(5,6) as well as applied in the present case- turns out to be essential to the feasibility of the experiment, as far as no reflection techniques could be used. Such suitable source was the positron emitter {sup 22}Na placed in a metal container in which the positrons are stopped and annihilated when reacting with the medium electrons, in such way originating -as it is very well established from momentum/energy conservation laws(7)- two {gamma}-rays, energy 511 KeV each, both emitted simultaneously in opposite directions. In all these previous experiments were used photomultiplier detectors coupled to NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators, which have a good energy resolution but a deficient time resolution for such purposes. Presently, as an innovatively improvement, were used BaF{sub 2} and CsF crystal scintillators which display a much better time resolution. (author)

  9. Dynamic evaluation of air quality models over European regions

    Thunis, P.; Pisoni, E.; Degraeuwe, B.; Kranenburg, R.; Schaap, M.; Clappier, A.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry-transport models are increasingly used in Europe for estimating air quality or forecasting changes in pollution levels. But with this increased use of modeling arises the need of harmonizing the methodologies to determine the quality of air quality model applications. This is complex for planning applications, i.e. when models are used to assess the impact of realistic or virtual emission scenarios. In this work, the methodology based on the calculation of potencies proposed by Thun...

  10. Fired Models of Air-gun Source and Its Application

    Luo Guichun; Ge Hongkui; Wang Baoshan; Hu Ping; Mu Hongwang; Chen Yong

    2008-01-01

    Air-gun is an important active seismic source. With the development of the theory about air-gun array, the technique for air-gun array design becomes mature and is widely used in petroleum exploration and geophysics. In order to adapt it to different research domains,different combination and fired models are needed. At the present time, there are two firedmodels of air-gun source, namely, reinforced initial pulse and reinforced first bubble pulse.The fired time, space between single guns, frequency and resolution of the two models are different. This comparison can supply the basis for its extensive application.

  11. A physical approach to air pollution climatological modelling in a complex site

    A Gaussian climatological model which takes into account physical factors affecting air pollutant dispersion, such as nocturnal radiative inversion and mixing height evolution, associated with land breeze and sea breeze regimes, respectively, has been applied to the topographically complex area of La Spezia (a basin surrounded by hilly terrain, located on the Italian coast). Results from the measurements of the dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the lower atmosphere, obtained by a series of field experiments, are utilized in the model to calculate SO2 seasonal average concentrations. The model has been tested on eight three-monthly periods by comparing the simulated values with the ones measured at the SO2 stations of the local air pollution monitoring network. Comparison of simulated and measured values was very satisfactory and proved the applicability of the implemented model for urban planning and establishment of air quality strategies also at a topographically complex site. (author)

  12. Experimental technique of calibration of symmetrical air pollution models

    P Kumar

    2005-10-01

    Based on the inherent property of symmetry of air pollution models,a Symmetrical Air Pollution Model Index (SAPMI)has been developed to calibrate the accuracy of predictions made by such models,where the initial quantity of release at the source is not known.For exact prediction the value of SAPMI should be equal to 1.If the predicted values are overestimating then SAPMI is > 1and if it is underestimating then SAPMI is < 1.Specific design for the layout of receptors has been suggested as a requirement for the calibration experiments.SAPMI is applicable for all variations of symmetrical air pollution dispersion models.

  13. Modelling, interpolation and stochastic simulation in space and time of global solar radiation

    Bechini, L.; Ducco, G.; Donatelli, M.; Stein, A.

    2000-01-01

    Global solar radiation data used as daily inputs for most cropping systems and water budget models are frequently available from only a few weather stations and over short periods of time. To overcome this limitation, the Campbell–Donatelli model relates daily maximum and minimum air temperatures to

  14. A model of interband radiative transition

    Dittrich, Jaroslav; Exner, Pavel; Hirokawa, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2004), s. 753-786. ISSN 0025-5645 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048101; GA MŠk ME 482 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : radiative transition * two-band model Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.366, year: 2004

  15. Estimation of solar radiation for use in crop modelling

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy and applicability of a number of existing and newly developed formulae for calculating solar radiation from other weather variables. Data were taken from eight sites in Ontario, Canada, that had long-term daily weather data sets which included solar radiation. Daily recorded values of minimum and maximum air temperature and precipitation, together with calculated values for clear sky radiation, were used in the formulae. Clear sky radiation was calculated as a function of latitude, day of year, solar angle, and solar constant. Coefficients for five formulae were fitted using data from Elora, Canada. Correlation coefficients between values calculated for individual days and measured data, and errors, were then computed. A newly developed formula that included the maximum temperature, the difference between maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation, and precipitation squared, provided estimates with less error than other formulae. Coefficients for this model and for one other formula were then fitted to data from seven sites. The root mean square error (RMSE) between values calculated for individual days with the newly developed model and measured data for Ontario (Elora) was 4.1 MJ m−2 day−1 with a standard deviation of 0.29 MJ m−2 day−1. When coefficients from one site were used for other sites, the RMSE increased as a linear function of distance between sites; in contrast, when measurements from one site were used for other sites, the RMSE increased curvilinearly with distance. Comparison of errors involved when using coefficients from one site as contrasted to using measured solar radiation indicated that it would be preferable to use measured radiation values if the distance between sites was less than 390 km. Because the RMSE at this separation may not be acceptable for some applications, it was suggested that the curve relating RMSE to separation of sites could be used to establish a &apos

  16. FUZZY MODELLING OF LIQUID DESICCANT BASED AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION SYSTEM

    Harpreet Singh; Jagdev Singh; Simranpreet Singh Gill

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Mamdani fuzzy models of heat exchanger and dehumidifier (absorber) of an air dehumidification process occurring in a packed bed using liquid desiccant. Temperature of water used ascooling medium at the inlet of heat exchanger, temperature of desiccant solution(from the regenerator) ,inlet air humidity ratio of humid air, flow rate per unit cross-sectional area, temperature of desiccant solution(from the heat exchanger) have been taken as different variables for packed...

  17. Computer models for optimizing radiation therapy

    The aim of this contribution is to outline how methods of system analysis, control therapy and modelling can be applied to simulate normal and malignant cell growth and to optimize cancer treatment as for instance radiation therapy. Based on biological observations and cell kinetic data, several types of models have been developed describing the growth of tumor spheroids and the cell renewal of normal tissue. The irradiation model is represented by the so-called linear-quadratic model describing the survival fraction as a function of the dose. Based thereon, numerous simulation runs for different treatment schemes can be performed. Thus, it is possible to study the radiation effect on tumor and normal tissue separately. Finally, this method enables a computer-assisted recommendation for an optimal patient-specific treatment schedule prior to clinical therapy. (orig.)

  18. Effects of radiative transfer modelling on the dynamics of a propagating electrical discharge

    Kahhali, Nicolas; Riviere, Philippe; Perrin, Marie-Yvonne; Soufiani, Anouar [Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS UPR 288, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Gonnet, Jean-Paul, E-mail: Anouar.Soufiani@em2c.ecp.f [Schneider Electric, Power Business, LV Arc Breaking-Modeling and Expertise Site 38 EQI Eybens, 38050 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-10-27

    A radiative transfer methodology is developed for the modelling of coupled radiation, hydrodynamic and electromagnetic phenomena in unsteady air plasma flows. Absorption spectra are discretized according to the distribution functions of the absorption coefficients resulting from different types of radiative transitions, and this spectral model is combined with the differential P{sub 1} approximation which is shown to predict quite accurately radiative source terms. The study of a propagating electrical arc in a 2D channel shows that radiative transfer modelling significantly affects the shape of the plasma and its dynamics. In particular, when compared with the results from the net emission coefficient method, the arc velocity is found to increase due to radiation absorption in the arc boundaries.

  19. Eight Year Climatologies from Observational (AIRS) and Model (MERRA) Data

    Hearty, Thomas; Savtchenko, Andrey; Won, Young-In; Theobalk, Mike; Vollmer, Bruce; Manning, Evan; Smith, Peter; Ostrenga, Dana; Leptoukh, Greg

    2010-01-01

    We examine climatologies derived from eight years of temperature, water vapor, cloud, and trace gas observations made by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument flying on the Aqua satellite and compare them to similar climatologies constructed with data from a global assimilation model, the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). We use the AIRS climatologies to examine anomalies and trends in the AIRS data record. Since sampling can be an issue for infrared satellites in low earth orbit, we also use the MERRA data to examine the AIRS sampling biases. By sampling the MERRA data at the AIRS space-time locations both with and without the AIRS quality control we estimate the sampling bias of the AIRS climatology and the atmospheric conditions where AIRS has a lower sampling rate. While the AIRS temperature and water vapor sampling biases are small at low latitudes, they can be more than a few degrees in temperature or 10 percent in water vapor at higher latitudes. The largest sampling biases are over desert. The AIRS and MERRA data are available from the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). The AIRS climatologies we used are available for analysis with the GIOVANNI data exploration tool. (see, http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  20. Modification of Saharan air layer and environmental shear over the eastern Atlantic Ocean by dust-radiation effects

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Waylonis, Mark

    2010-11-01

    This study investigates the influence of dust-radiation effects on the modification of the Saharan air layer (SAL) and environmental shear. A tracer model based on the Weather Research and Forecast model was developed to examine the influence using a dust outbreak event. Two numerical experiments were conducted with (ON) and without (OFF) the dust-radiation effects. Both simulations reasonably reproduced SAL's features. However, the 700 hPa maximum temperature within SAL was slightly underestimated and shifted northwestward from OFF. These were improved from ON, but the maximum temperature became slightly overestimated, which might be due to inaccurate optical properties. The dust-radiation interactions mainly warmed the dusty air between 750 and 550 hPa because dust shortwave absorption dominated dust longwave cooling. Another major warming area was found near the surface over the ocean due to longwave radiative heating by dust aloft. The modification of temperature resulted in an adjustment of the vertical wind shear. To the south of SAL, where easterly wave disturbances and tropical storms usually occur, the vertical zonal wind shear increased by about 1˜2.5 m s-1 km-1 from 750 to 550 hPa, resulting in a maximum wind change of 3˜5 m s-1, a 30˜40% increase, around the top of this layer. The enhancement of the vertical shear in this layer could potentially have an impact on TC genesis and development. The dust-radiation effects also modified the moisture and dust distribution, which can have a feedback (i.e., a secondary effect) on the heating profile and the vertical shear.

  1. Radiatively induced Quark and Lepton Mass Model

    Nomura, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    We propose a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the first and second generation with extra $U(1)$ gauge symmetry and vector-like fermions. Then we analyze the allowed regions which simultaneously satisfy the FCNCs for the quark sector, LFVs including $\\mu-e$ conversion, the quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. Also we estimate the typical value for the $(g-2)_\\mu$ in our model.

  2. Correlation between indoor radon concentration and dose rate in air from terrestrial gamma radiation in Japan.

    Fujimoto, K

    1998-09-01

    A correlation between the indoor radon concentration and dose rate in air from terrestrial gamma radiation is studied using the results of nationwide indoor radon and external exposure surveys, although the surveys were not conducted at the same time nor at the same location. The radon concentration shows a log-normal-like distribution, whereas the terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in air shows a normal-like distribution. A log-linear scatterplot for each pair of the indoor radon concentration and gamma-ray dose rate in air in each city reveals a clear relationship. The average, maximum, and minimum as well as regression line of radon concentration were found to increase with the gamma-ray dose rate in air. The group in higher quantile of radon concentration shows larger dependence on the gamma-ray dose rate. The rate of increase of radon concentration with the gamma-ray dose rate in air depends on the house structure. The wooden house has a larger rate of increase than the concrete house, and the regression lines cross at high air dose rate. Based on the finding in the present study a certain criterion level of air dose rate could be established and used for an effective survey to find out which houses might require a remedial action in conjunction with other screening tools. The criterion level of air dose rate might be more effective if the level is set for each house structure since the rate of increase of radon concentration depends on house structure. PMID:9721838

  3. ARAMIS a regional air quality model for air pollution management: evaluation and validation

    The aim of this research was to better understand the dynamics of air pollutants and to forecast the air quality over regional areas in order to develop emission abatement strategies for air pollution and adverse health effects. To accomplish this objective, we developed and applied a high resolution Eulerian system named ARAMIS (A Regional Air Quality Modelling Integrated System) over the north-east of Spain (Catalonia), where several pollutants exceed threshold values for the protection of human health. The results indicate that the model reproduced reasonably well observed concentrations, as statistical values fell within Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommendations and European (EU) regulations. Nevertheless, some hourly O3 exceedances in summer and hourly peaks of NO2 in winter were underestimated. Concerning PM10 concentrations less accurate model levels were obtained with a moderate trend towards underestimation during the day. (Author)

  4. Air pollution modelling on the street canyon

    Bezpalcová, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2003), s. 375-386. ISSN 1210-2717 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK3012103; GA MŠk OC 715.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : atmosphere * air pollution * wind tunnel Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  5. Dark radiation confronting LHC in Z′ models

    Recent cosmological data favour additional relativistic degrees of freedom beyond the three active neutrinos and photons, often referred to as “dark radiation”. Extensions of the SM involving TeV-scale Z′ gauge bosons generically contain superweakly interacting light right-handed neutrinos which can constitute this dark radiation. In this Letter we confront the requirement on the parameters of the E6Z′ models to account for the present evidence of dark radiation with the already existing constraints from searches for new neutral gauge bosons at LHC7

  6. Air pollution in Damascus city, radiation, gases, air particulates and heavy elements

    The purposes of the study were to have a general survey for pollutants in Damascus City, to define the polluted areas and to determine the relationship between the pollutants and its sources, in addition of determining the regretion coefficient for the following elements: K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Pb and Br. Samples of leaves from different regions of Damascus city were analysed by using x-ray flourescence (XRF) for the mentioned elements. Stat graphics computerized and Surfur programmes were used in order to plot the map of Pb pollutant for Damascus city. Chemical detector tubes produced by Drager Company were used in the absorbtion of air samples for Co, NO2 and ozon where its colours were changed according to the concentration of the interested gases. While, for the measurement of suspended particles, 1400 3m of air samples were taken through fiber gass filter (Wahtman 8x10 in) to measure the concentration of suspended particles. leaves samples were a good indicator for the level of pollution. Results of analysing, a samples by using XRF to determine the concentration of the following elements: Ca, K, Cu, Mn, Fe, Zn, Pb, Rb, Br, and Sr, by using gamma spectroscopy system to difine the isotopes included in it, and to define the activity of 212Pb show that dust and lead are the main pollutants in Damascus city, where the concentration of the suspended particles increased in the crowded transportation areas and reach to more than 700 mg/3m in which it decreases in holidays and at hight, as well as the decrease of the concentration of carbon monoxide at night, which increase in the morning due to the high trafic motion. Rains make a good cleaning factor for the suspended particles in about 80% of it, where the ratio of particles having a diameter less than 10μ to the whole particles range from 30% - 80%. (author)., 25 figs., 35 tabs

  7. Utilization of radon progeny in air for education experiment on radiation

    Radon progeny with short half-lives in the natural air was utilized in the education experiment on radiation that is for the students in the university of Tokyo. Advantage points of the radon progeny are; 1) their short half-lives around 30-50 minutes whose feature is adequate to draw the decay curve in the class and 2) that they exist in the natural air. The most important point of this education experiment is to perform sampling and measuring the radioactivity in the natural area, not in the radiation controlled area. Through the procedure, the students can understand that natural radio-nuclides surely exist around us. Sampling time is 30 minutes at a flow rate of around 60 litters per minute and a glass-fiber filter of GF/F is used, waiting time is one minute and measuring time is sequence of 10 times of 5 minutes (total measuring time; 35 minutes). The total experiment time is around 100 minutes. In the home-tasks, they calculate the radon progeny's concentration in air using the alpha decay curve of the radon progeny on the sampling filter: In addition, they investigate and learn the natural radiation/radioactivity. The radon progeny is useful and effective natural radioactivity for the radiation education. (author)

  8. Air core Bragg fibers for delivery of near-infrared laser radiation

    Jelínek, Michal; Frank, Milan; Kubeček, Václav; Matějec, Vlastimil; Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej

    2014-12-01

    Optical fibers designed for high power laser radiation delivery represent important tools in medicine, solar systems, or industry. For such purposes several different types of glass optical fibers such as silica, sapphire, or chalcogenide ones as well as hollow-glass fibers, photonic crystal fibers and Bragg fibers have been investigated. Air-core Bragg fibers or photonic crystal fibers offer us the possibility of light transmission in a low dispersive material - air having a high damage threshold and small non-linear coefficient. However, preforms for drawing Bragg fibers can be fabricated by MCVD method similarly as preforms of standard silica fibers. In this paper we present fundamental characteristics of laboratory-designed and fabricated Bragg fibers with air cores intended for delivery of laser radiation at a wavelength range from 0.9 to 1.5 μm. Bragg fibers with different air core diameters of 5, 45 and 73 mm were prepared. The fiber core was surrounded by three pairs of circular Bragg layers. Each pair was composed of one layer with a high and one layer with a low refractive index with a contrast up to 0.03. Several laser sources emitting at 0.975, 1.06, and 1.55 μm were used as radiation sources. Attenuation coefficients, overall transmissions, bending losses, and spatial profiles of output beams from fibers were determined at these wavelengths. The lowest attenuation coefficient of 70 dB/km was determined for the 45 μm and 73 mm air-core fiber when radiation from a laser was launched into the fibers by using optical lenses. However, multimodal transmission has been observed in such condition. It has also been found that bending losses of such fibers are negligible for bending diameters higher than 15 mm.

  9. Response of tomato to radiation intensity and air temperature under plastic-house ultraviolet protection

    Enhance of ultraviolet radiation intensity on the earth surface affected by ozon depletion on stratospheric layer cause changing on the response of plant to radiation quality. One technique for reducing photo destructive UV radiation is micro climate modification by using mulch and plastic-cover UV protection. So that, growth and yield of plant can be optimalized. This research designed an experiment to find out the effect of two kinds of plastic-cover, UV plastic and conventional plastic, on microclimate condition and tomato performance under plastic-house. The result of this research described that mulch and plastic cover can modify radiation and air temperature under plastics-house, but it can not improve growth and yield of the tomato

  10. Radiation impact caused by activation of air from the future GSI accelerator facility fair

    The Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt is planning a new accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). Two future experimental areas are regarded to be the most decisive points concerning the activation of air. One is the area for the production of antiprotons. A second crucial experimental area is the so-called Super Fragment Separator. The production of radioactive isotopes in air is calculated using the residual nuclei option of the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The results are compared with the data for the activation of air given by Sullivan and in IAEA report 283. The resulting effective dose is calculated using a program package from the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection, the Bundesamt fuer Stranlenschutz. The results demonstrate that a direct emission of the total radioactivity produced into the air will probably conflict with the limits of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. Special measures have to be planned in order to reduce the amount of radioactivity released into the air. (authors)

  11. Optimization model for air quality analysis in energy facility siting

    Emanuel, W. R.; Murphy, B. D.; Huff, D. D.; Begovich, C. L.; Hurt, J. F.

    1977-09-01

    The siting of energy facilities on a regional scale is discussed with particular attention to environmental planning criteria. A multiple objective optimization model is proposed as a framework for the analysis of siting problems. Each planning criterion (e.g., air quality, water quality, or power demand) is treated as an objective function to be minimized or maximized subject to constraints in this optimization procedure. The formulation of the objective functions is illustrated by the development of a siting model for the minimization of human exposure to air pollutants. This air quality siting model takes the form of a linear programming problem. A graphical analysis of this type of problem, which provides insight into the nature of the siting model, is given. The air quality siting model is applied to an illustrative siting example for the Tennessee Valley area.

  12. FUZZY MODELLING OF LIQUID DESICCANT BASED AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION SYSTEM

    Harpreet Singh,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Mamdani fuzzy models of heat exchanger and dehumidifier (absorber of an air dehumidification process occurring in a packed bed using liquid desiccant. Temperature of water used ascooling medium at the inlet of heat exchanger, temperature of desiccant solution(from the regenerator ,inlet air humidity ratio of humid air, flow rate per unit cross-sectional area, temperature of desiccant solution(from the heat exchanger have been taken as different variables for packed bed using liquid desiccant .Mamdani Fuzzy model is developed using the above mentioned variables to predict the water condensation rate from the air to the desiccant solution in terms of known operating parameters. The model predictions were compared against a reliable set of experimental data available in the literature and respective mathematical models for their validation. Integrated fuzzy model was also developed forliquid desiccant system

  13. Comparative Study of Radiative Effects on Double Diffusive Convection in Nongray Air-CO2 Mixtures in Cooperating and Opposing Flow

    Siham Laouar-Meftah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the effects of nongray gas radiation on double diffusive convection, in a square differentially heated cavity filled with air-CO2 mixtures, when the buoyancy forces (thermal and mass are cooperating or opposing. The radiative source term in the energy equation is evaluated by the discrete ordinate method (solving the radiative transfer equation and the SLW spectral model (accounting for real radiative properties of absorbing species. Here, gas absorption varies with the local temperature and concentration of pollutant, which induces a strong direct coupling between the concentration and thermal fields that would not exist with gray gas. Simulations are performed at different concentrations of CO2 corresponding to different flow regimes (thermal, transitional, and mass. Results show the following: (i in cooperating flow, radiation modifies essentially the heat transfer and the characteristics of temperature and concentration fields; (ii in opposing flow, radiation effects are more important and depend on the nature of the flow regime.

  14. Gas radiation effects on opposing double-diffusive convection in a non-gray air-H2O mixture

    We studied numerically the effects of gas radiation on double-diffusive convection in a square enclosure filled with a non-gray air-H2O mixture at different concentrations. Uniform temperatures and concentrations are imposed along the two vertical side walls of the enclosure so as to induce opposing thermal and mass buoyancy forces within the fluid. In this work, the radiative aspect of the problem is treated by the discrete ordinate method (to solve the radiative transfer equation) and the SLW spectral model (to account for the radiative properties of the non-gray mixture). Gas absorption varies with the local concentration of H2O, which induces a strong direct coupling between the concentration and thermal fields that otherwise would not exist. Numerical results show that radiative effects on the characteristics of streamline, temperature and concentration fields are important, and depend on the nature of the flow regime (thermal at 5% H2O, transitional at 10% and mass at 25%). The total heat transfer is reduced whatever the flow regime and the mass transfer is also affected, outside the thermal flow. (authors)

  15. Mixed deterministic statistical modelling of regional ozone air pollution

    Kalenderski, Stoitchko Dimitrov

    2011-03-17

    We develop a physically motivated statistical model for regional ozone air pollution by separating the ground-level pollutant concentration field into three components, namely: transport, local production and large-scale mean trend mostly dominated by emission rates. The model is novel in the field of environmental spatial statistics in that it is a combined deterministic-statistical model, which gives a new perspective to the modelling of air pollution. The model is presented in a Bayesian hierarchical formalism, and explicitly accounts for advection of pollutants, using the advection equation. We apply the model to a specific case of regional ozone pollution-the Lower Fraser valley of British Columbia, Canada. As a predictive tool, we demonstrate that the model vastly outperforms existing, simpler modelling approaches. Our study highlights the importance of simultaneously considering different aspects of an air pollution problem as well as taking into account the physical bases that govern the processes of interest. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd..

  16. A Physically Based Model for Air-Lift Pumping

    FrançOis, Odile; Gilmore, Tyler; Pinto, Michael J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1996-08-01

    A predictive, physically based model for pumping water from a well using air injection (air-lift pumping) was developed for the range of flow rates that we explored in a series of laboratory experiments. The goal was to determine the air flow rate required to pump a specific flow rate of water in a given well, designed for in-well air stripping of volatile organic compounds from an aquifer. The model was validated against original laboratory data as well as data from the literature. A laboratory air-lift system was constructed that consisted of a 70-foot-long (21-m-long) pipe, 5.5 inches (14 cm) inside diameter, in which an air line of 1.3 inches (3.3 cm) outside diameter was placed with its bottom at different elevations above the base of the long pipe. Experiments were conducted for different levels of submergence, with water-pumping rates ranging from 5 to 70 gallons/min (0.32-4.4 L/s), and air flow ranging from 7 to 38 standard cubic feet/min (0.2-1.1 m3 STP/min). The theoretical approach adopted in the model was based on an analysis of the system as a one-dimensional two-phase flow problem. The expression for the pressure gradient includes inertial energy terms, friction, and gas expansion versus elevation. Data analysis revealed that application of the usual drift-flux model to estimate the air void fraction is not adequate for the observed flow patterns: either slug or churn flow. We propose a modified drift-flux model that accurately predicts air-lift pumping requirements for a range of conditions representative of in-well air-stripping operations.

  17. Improving the marketing abilities of some egyptian exports using radiation technology in cairo air port

    The economics of establishing a food irradiation facility at cairo airport are discussed together with the effect of various parameters on uint processing costs. This study comprises the determination of the commodity mix for the egyptian food commodities that are proposed for irradiation and export from the cairo airport. The commodity mix is distributed for the full utilization of the working capacity and the evaluation of the type of the irradiation facility and also the radiation source strength. The financial analysis for such an irradiation facility is also carried out. It provides a model for calculating specific unit processing costs by correlating known capital costs with annual operation cost and annual throughputs. We analyzed the cost- benefit of the proposed food irradiation facility. We took into account the cost of the capital investment, operation and other additional parameters and then estimated the unit cost. The investment criteria utilized for commercial evaluation were internal rate of return (I.I.R.) and pay back period (P.B.P.). The irradiation cost and the additional income are also discussed. The results of this analysis showed that the installation of the an irradiation unit for the establishment of food irradiation unit in cairo air port in would be economically feasible

  18. Air Quality – monitoring and modelling

    Marius DEACONU; Cretu, Mihaiella

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution is a major concern for all nations, regardless of their development. The rapid growth of the industrial sector and urban development have lead to significant quantities of substances and toxic materials, mostly discharged into the atmosphere and having adverse effects both on human health and environment in general. Human society has to recognize that environment has only a limited capacity to process all of its waste without major changes. Each of us is a pollutant but also a v...

  19. Modeling air quality over China: Results from the Panda project

    Katinka Petersen, Anna; Bouarar, Idir; Brasseur, Guy; Granier, Claire; Xie, Ying; Wang, Lili; Wang, Xuemei

    2015-04-01

    China faces strong air pollution problems related to rapid economic development in the past decade and increasing demand for energy. Air quality monitoring stations often report high levels of particle matter and ozone all over the country. Knowing its long-term health impacts, air pollution became then a pressing problem not only in China but also in other Asian countries. The PANDA project is a result of cooperation between scientists from Europe and China who joined their efforts for a better understanding of the processes controlling air pollution in China, improve methods for monitoring air quality and elaborate indicators in support of European and Chinese policies. A modeling system of air pollution is being setup within the PANDA project and include advanced global (MACC, EMEP) and regional (WRF-Chem, EMEP) meteorological and chemical models to analyze and monitor air quality in China. The poster describes the accomplishments obtained within the first year of the project. Model simulations for January and July 2010 are evaluated with satellite measurements (SCIAMACHY NO2 and MOPITT CO) and in-situ data (O3, CO, NOx, PM10 and PM2.5) observed at several surface stations in China. Using the WRF-Chem model, we investigate the sensitivity of the model performance to emissions (MACCity, HTAPv2), horizontal resolution (60km, 20km) and choice of initial and boundary conditions.

  20. Letter to the Editor: Applications Air Q Model on Estimate Health Effects Exposure to Air Pollutants

    Gholamreza Goudarzi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies in worldwide have measured increases in mortality and morbidity associated with air pollution (1-3. Quantifying the effects of air pollution on the human health in urban area causes an increasingly critical component in policy discussion (4-6. Air Q model was proved to be a valid and reliable tool to predicts health effects related to criteria  pollutants (particulate matter (PM, ozone (O3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, sulfur dioxide (SO2, and carbon monoxide (CO, determinate  the  potential short term effects of air pollution  and allows the examination of various scenarios in which emission rates of pollutants are varied (7,8. Air Q software provided by the WHO European Centre for Environment and Health (ECEH (9. Air Q model is based on cohort studies and used to estimates of both attributable average reductions in life-span and numbers of mortality and morbidity associated with exposure to air pollution (10,11. Applications

  1. How air influences radiation dose deposition in multiwell culture plates. A Monte Carlo simulation of radiation geometry

    Radiation of experimental culture cells on plates with various wells can cause a risk of underdosage as a result of the existence of multiple air-water interfaces. The objective of our study was to quantify this error in culture plates with multiple wells. Radiation conditions were simulated with the GAMOS code, based on the GEANT4 code, and this was compared with a simulation performed with PENELOPE and measured data. We observed a slight underdosage of ∼4% on the most superficial half of the culture medium. We believe that this underdosage does not have a significant effect on the dose received by culture cells deposited in a monolayer and adhered to the base of the wells. (author)

  2. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  3. Evaluation of Observation-Fused Regional Air Quality Model Results for Population Air Pollution Exposure Estimation

    Chen, Gang; Li, Jingyi; Ying, Qi; Sherman, Seth; Perkins, Neil; Rajeshwari, Sundaram; Mendola, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was applied to predict ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations during 2001 to 2010 in 15 hospital referral regions (HRRs) using a 36-km horizontal resolution domain. An inverse distance weighting based method was applied to produce exposure estimates based on observation-fused regional pollutant concentration fields using the differences between observations and predictions at grid cells where air quality monitors were locate...

  4. Health physics experience in commissioning and operation of radiation and air activity monitoring system at FBTR

    The Radiation and Air Activity Monitoring System (RAAMS) at Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is meant to monitor and record the radiation and air activity levels at various potentially active areas in FBTR complex. Health Physics Group, FBTR was associated during commissioning of RAAMS in fixing the alarm settings for the monitors, their relocation and in formulating the surveillance procedures. The areas were surveyed to check for any release of activity for confirming the observed readings during operation of the reactor. In such cases, augmentation of shielding was recommended and was promptly implemented by the station management. The details of the long and fruitful experience gained by the Health Physics Group, FBTR are described in this paper. (author)

  5. Modelling radiation fluxes in simple and complex environments—application of the RayMan model

    Matzarakis, Andreas; Rutz, Frank; Mayer, Helmut

    2007-03-01

    The most important meteorological parameter affecting the human energy balance during sunny weather conditions is the mean radiant temperature Tmrt. It considers the uniform temperature of a surrounding surface giving off blackbody radiation, which results in the same energy gain of a human body given the prevailing radiation fluxes. This energy gain usually varies considerably in open space conditions. In this paper, the model ‘RayMan’, used for the calculation of short- and long-wave radiation fluxes on the human body, is presented. The model, which takes complex urban structures into account, is suitable for several applications in urban areas such as urban planning and street design. The final output of the model is, however, the calculated Tmrt, which is required in the human energy balance model, and thus also for the assessment of the urban bioclimate, with the use of thermal indices such as predicted mean vote (PMV), physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) and standard effective temperature (SET*). The model has been developed based on the German VDI-Guidelines 3789, Part II (environmental meteorology, interactions between atmosphere and surfaces; calculation of short- and long-wave radiation) and VDI-3787 (environmental meteorology, methods for the human-biometeorological evaluation of climate and air quality for urban and regional planning. Part I: climate). The validation of the results of the RayMan model agrees with similar results obtained from experimental studies.

  6. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    Berkvens, Patrick; Botchev, M.A.; Verwer, Jan; M. C. Krol; Peters, W.

    2000-01-01

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species. This complicates the chemistry solution, easily causing large errors for such species. In the framework of an operational global air pollution model, we focus on the problem formed by chemistry and ve...

  7. An Analytical Air Pollution Model with Time Dependent Eddy Diffusivity

    Tiziano Tirabassi; Marco Túllio Vilhena; Daniela Buske; Gervásio Annes Degrazia

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution transport and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer are modeled by the advection-diffusion equation, that is, essentially, a statement of conservation of the suspended material in an incompressible flow. Many models simulating air pollution dispersion are based upon the solution (numerical or analytical) of the advection-diffusion equation assuming turbulence parameterization for realistic physical scenarios. We present the general time dependent three-dimensional soluti...

  8. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Botchev, M.A.; M. C. Krol; Peters, W.; Verwer, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species. This complicates the chemistry solution, easily causing large errors for such species. In the framework of an operational global air pollution model, we focus on the problem formed by chemistry and ve...

  9. Solving Vertical Transport and Chemistry in Air Pollution Models.

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Botchev, M.A.; Verwer, J.G.; M. C. Krol; Peters, W.

    2000-01-01

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species. This complicates the chemistry solution, easily causing large errors for such species. In the framework of an operational global air pollution model, we focus on the problem formed by chemistry and ve...

  10. Modelling of the Through-air Bonding Process

    Hossain, M.; M. Acar, Ph.D.; Malalasekera, W.

    2009-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling ofthe through-air bonding process of nonwoven fabricproduction is reported in this article. In the throughairprocess, hot air is passed through the fibrous webto heat and melt polymer fibers. Molten polymersubsequently flows to the point of contact betweenany two fibers to produce a bond. Two differentmodelling strategies are adapted to produce acomprehensive understanding of the through-airbonding process. In macroscale modelling, a CFDmodel is ...

  11. Control of asthma triggers in indoor air with air cleaners: a modeling analysis

    Allen Joseph G

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reducing exposure to environmental agents indoors shown to increase asthma symptoms or lead to asthma exacerbations is an important component of a strategy to manage asthma for individuals. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that portable air cleaning devices can reduce concentrations of asthma triggers in indoor air; however, their benefits for breathing problems have not always been reproducible. The potential exposure benefits of whole house high efficiency in-duct air cleaners for sensitive subpopulations have yet to be evaluated. Methods We used an indoor air quality modeling system (CONTAM developed by NIST to examine peak and time-integrated concentrations of common asthma triggers present in indoor air over a year as a function of natural ventilation, portable air cleaners, and forced air ventilation equipped with conventional and high efficiency filtration systems. Emission rates for asthma triggers were based on experimental studies published in the scientific literature. Results Forced air systems with high efficiency filtration were found to provide the best control of asthma triggers: 30–55% lower cat allergen levels, 90–99% lower risk of respiratory infection through the inhalation route of exposure, 90–98% lower environmental tobacco smoke (ETS levels, and 50–75% lower fungal spore levels than the other ventilation/filtration systems considered. These results indicate that the use of high efficiency in-duct air cleaners provide an effective means of controlling allergen levels not only in a single room, like a portable air cleaner, but the whole house. Conclusion These findings are useful for evaluating potential benefits of high efficiency in-duct filtration systems for controlling exposure to asthma triggers indoors and for the design of trials of environmental interventions intended to evaluate their utility in practice.

  12. Analytical modeling of the steady radiative shock

    Boireau, L.; Bouquet, S.; Michaut, C.; Clique, C.

    2006-06-01

    In a paper dated 2000 [1], a fully analytical theory of the radiative shock has been presented. This early model had been used to design [2] radiative shock experiments at the Laboratory for the Use of Intense Lasers (LULI) [3 5]. It became obvious from numerical simulations [6, 7] that this model had to be improved in order to accurately recover experiments. In this communication, we present a new theory in which the ionization rates in the unshocked (bar{Z_1}) and shocked (bar{Z_2} neq bar{Z_1}) material, respectively, are included. Associated changes in excitation energy are also taken into account. We study the influence of these effects on the compression and temperature in the shocked medium.

  13. Portable meter study of ionizing radiation Teletector in high rates of air kerma

    A set of portable meters of ionizing radiation high rates of air kerma (teletectors) commonly used in emergencies in Brazil and sent to the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN were under several tests and analyst is parameters for the detectors behavior were established. Applied tests were: energy dependence and primarily overload with the new irradiation system. Thus it was possible to determine the most common characteristic found in these equipment (quality control programs) and new calibration criteria were established following international recommendations. (author)

  14. Quantitative assessment of radiation force effect at the dielectric air-liquid interface

    Otávio Augusto Capeloto; Vitor Santaella Zanuto; Luis Carlos Malacarne; Mauro Luciano Baesso; Gustavo Vinicius Bassi Lukasievicz; Stephen Edward Bialkowski; Nelson Guilherme Castelli Astrath

    2016-01-01

    We induce nanometer-scale surface deformation by exploiting momentum conservation of the interaction between laser light and dielectric liquids. The effect of radiation force at the air-liquid interface is quantitatively assessed for fluids with different density, viscosity and surface tension. The imparted pressure on the liquids by continuous or pulsed laser light excitation is fully described by the Helmholtz electromagnetic force density.

  15. The air shower simulation program CORSIKA and hadronic interaction models

    CORSIKA is a program for detailed simulation of the evolution of extensive air showers initiated by high-energy cosmic ray particles. Protons, light nuclei up to iron, photons, and many other particles may be treated as primaries. The particles are tracked through the atmosphere until they undergo reactions with the air nuclei or - in the case of instable secondaries - decay. The hadronic interactions at high energies may be described by six reaction models alternatively. The influence of these models on simulation predictions of measurable air shower features is demonstrated with examples. (orig.)

  16. Spatial distribution of emissions to air – the SPREAD model

    Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Gyldenkærne, Steen

    -range transboundary air pollution, CLRTAP. NERI has developed a model to distribute emissions from the national emission inventories on a 1x1 km grid covering the Danish land and sea territory. The new spatial high resolution distribution model for emissions to air (SPREAD) has been developed according to the......The National Environmental Research Institute (NERI), Aarhus University, completes the annual national emission inventories for greenhouse gases and air pollutants according to Denmark’s obligations under international conventions, e.g. the climate convention, UNFCCC and the convention on long...

  17. Evaluation of Two New Models of Net Radiometers and Comparison to a Model to Predict Net Radiation

    Blonquist, J. M.; Tanner, B. D.; Bugbee, B.

    2007-12-01

    Net radiation is a key component to the surface energy balance, but it is difficult and expensive to measure accurately. Two new net radiometer models (Hukseflux NR01 and Kipp & Zonen CNR2) have been released in the past year. We evaluated and compared these models to two Kipp and Zonen model CNR1 net radiometers, and to two less expensive, older model net radiometers (Kipp & Zonen NR-Lite and REBS Q*7.1). Additionally, we predicted net radiation from solar radiation, air temperature, and absolute humidity measurements using a commonly used model that calculates net longwave radiation using a Brunt (1932; 1952) approach for predicting net emissivity. The model uses the ratio of measured solar radiation to predicted clear-sky solar radiation as a surrogate for cloud cover. Net shortwave radiation is determined by direct measurement of solar radiation and the albedo of the surface. Hourly averages and daily totals (over the course of the study; 33 days) from three replicate sensors of the two new net radiometers compared quite well to the CNR1 radiometers. The difference was generally less than +/- 5 %. Three replicates of the two older model net radiometers did not agree as well with the newer models, with differences generally less than +/- 15 %. Our data matched what others (Cobos and Baker, 2003; Brotzge and Duchon, 2000) have shown for these older radiometers. The net radiation model yielded hourly average and daily total values that were 10-15 % higher than the CNR1 radiometers. Our findings indicate that accuracy increases with increasing cost. Prediction of net radiation from the model yielded adequate results for some applications, such as evapotranspiration predictions and irrigation scheduling, but the model has considerable error at night due to some simplifying assumptions. Accurate net radiation measurements depend on proper placement of the sensor, proper leveling, and routine maintenance to keep the sensing surfaces clean.

  18. MODTRAN4: radiative transfer modeling for remote sensing

    Anderson, Gail P.; Berk, Alexander; Acharya, Prabhat K.; Matthew, Michael W.; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Chetwynd, James H., Jr.; Dothe, H.; Adler-Golden, Steven M.; Ratkowski, Anthony J.; Felde, Gerald W.; Gardner, James A.; Hoke, Michael L.; Richtsmeier, Steven C.; Pukall, Brian; Mello, Jason B.; Jeong, Laila S.

    1999-12-01

    MODTRAN4, the newly released version of the U.S. Air Force atmospheric transmission, radiance and flux model is being developed jointly by the Air Force Research Laboratory/Space Vehicles Directorate and Spectral Sciences, Inc. It is expected to provide the accuracy required for analyzing spectral data for both atmospheric and surface characterization. These two quantities are the subject of satellite and aircraft campaigns currently being developed and pursued by, for instance: NASA (Earth Observing System), NPOESS (National Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite System), and the European Space Agency (GOME--Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment). Accuracy improvements in MODTRAN relate primarily to two major developments: (1) the multiple scattering algorithms have been made compatible with the spectroscopy by adopting a corrected-k approach to describe the statistically expected transmittance properties for each spectral bin and atmospheric layer, and (2) radiative transfer calculations can be conducted with a Beer-Lambert formulation that improves the treatment of path inhomogeneities. Other code enhancements include the incorporation of solar azimuth dependence in the DISORT- based multiple scattering model, the introduction of surface BRDF (Bi-directional Radiance Distribution Functions) models and 15 cm-1 band model for improved computational speed.

  19. Air kerma national standard of Russian Federation for x-ray and gamma radiation. Activity SSDL/VNIIM in medical radiation dosimetry field

    Primary standard of unities air kerma and air kerma rate X-ray and gamma radiation, placed at VNIIM, consists of: plate-parallel free-air ionization chamber IK 10-60 for low-energy X-ray in the generating potential range from 10 to 50 kV; plate-parallel free-air ionization chamber IK 50-400 for medium-energy X-ray in the generating potential range from 50 to 300 kV; cavity cylindrical graphite chambers C1 and C30 with volumes 1 cm3 and 30 cm3 for reproduction and transmission the dimensions gamma radiation unities using Cs-137 and Co-60 sources. The next irradiation facilities are used at VNIIM: in low-energy X-ray range: a constant-potential high-voltage generator and a tungsten-anode Xray tube with inherent filtration of around 1 mm Be; in medium-energy X-ray range: set on the basis of an industrial X-ray apparatus Isovolt-400 and a tungsten-anode X-ray tube with inherent filtration of around 3,5 mm Al; in gamma radiations field: units with a radioactive sources Cs-137 with activity 140 and 1200 GBq and Co-60 with activity 120 GBq and irradiation set with a source from Co-60 (activity 3200 GBq). The last one belongs to Central Research Institute for Radiology and Roentgenology (CNIRRI). For measuring currents and charges of standard chambers we use electrometers such as Keithley of model 6517A and B7-45 manufactured by 'Belvar' (Republic Belarus). The reference radiation qualities L, N, H series according to ISO 4037 and the radiation qualities RQR, RQA and RQF according to IEC 61267 for calibration and verification of the therapeutic, diagnostic measurement means are realized in the low-energy and medium-energy X-ray standards. The VNIIM air kerma primary standard of has been participated in the international comparisons: key comparison BIPM.R1(I)-K1 for gamma radiation of Co-60 in 1997; supplementary comparisons BIPM.R1(I)-S10 for gamma radiation of Cs-137 in 1997; key comparison BIPM.R1(I)-K2 for low-energy X-ray range in 1998; key comparison BIPM.R1(I)-K3 for

  20. EnergyPlus Air Source Integrated Heat Pump Model

    Shen, Bo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Energy and Transportation Science Division; Adams, Mark B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Energy and Transportation Science Division; New, Joshua Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Energy and Transportation Science Division

    2016-03-30

    This report summarizes the development of the EnergyPlus air-source integrated heat pump model. It introduces its physics, sub-models, working modes, and control logic. In addition, inputs and outputs of the new model are described, and input data file (IDF) examples are given.

  1. On the valence model for radiative capture

    We give several parametrizations for the elastic scattering and radiative capture cross sections for low neutron bombarding energy and discuss the relationship between the corresponding resonance parameters. We then peform an extensive investigation of the valence radiative capture model of Lane and Lynn. This model is formulated here in the frame of the shell-model approach. We exhibit the similarities and differences between our results and those derived from the R-matrix approach by Lane and Lynn on the one hand and from the optical-model approach by Lane and Mughabghab on the other hand. Particular attention is paid to the choice of the average potential well in the shell model approach, in relation to the proper way to identify theoretical quantities and phenomenological parameters. We show that practically equivalent results can be obtained from a complex average potential well and from a suitably chosen real potential well. The following topics are investigated formally and numerically: dependence of the various theoretical expressions on the choice of the (real or complex) average potential well; relative importance of external and internal capture; dependence of photon widths and background cross section on mass number (for thermal energy and for E=100 keV); dependence of the resonance parameters and background cross sections on energy, for A=60; comparison between experimental data and theoretical values for radiative capture on 56Fe and 60Ni. We discuss the conditions of validity of the valence capture model The contribution of the low-lying excited target states is investigated formally and numerically

  2. Modelling heat and mass transfer in a membrane-based air-to-air enthalpy exchanger

    Dugaria, S.; Moro, L.; Del, D., Col

    2015-11-01

    The diffusion of total energy recovery systems could lead to a significant reduction in the energy demand for building air-conditioning. With these devices, sensible heat and humidity can be recovered in winter from the exhaust airstream, while, in summer, the incoming air stream can be cooled and dehumidified by transferring the excess heat and moisture to the exhaust air stream. Membrane based enthalpy exchangers are composed by different channels separated by semi-permeable membranes. The membrane allows moisture transfer under vapour pressure difference, or water concentration difference, between the two sides and, at the same time, it is ideally impermeable to air and other contaminants present in exhaust air. Heat transfer between the airstreams occurs through the membrane due to the temperature gradient. The aim of this work is to develop a detailed model of the coupled heat and mass transfer mechanisms through the membrane between the two airstreams. After a review of the most relevant models published in the scientific literature, the governing equations are presented and some simplifying assumptions are analysed and discussed. As a result, a steady-state, two-dimensional finite difference numerical model is setup. The developed model is able to predict temperature and humidity evolution inside the channels. Sensible and latent heat transfer rate, as well as moisture transfer rate, are determined. A sensitive analysis is conducted in order to determine the more influential parameters on the thermal and vapour transfer.

  3. A theoretical investigation to study the effect of air pollution on global solar radiation

    The ratio of measured solar radiation for normal and clear sky G and G0, known an ''clearness index'' is as an indicator for air pollutant mass loading. In the present work, estimated clear sky global solar radiation G0 for cairo city is compared graphically with measured actual solar radiation G for normal sky with atmospheric aerosols and pollution. The clearness index (G/G0) and its empirical coefficients which vary from place to place to place are examined in order to derive a suitable formula for cairo city relating these coefficients. In this study, the well known angstrom equation in its linear form together with measured monthly means of the daily global solar radiation data are used for function fitting procedure to derive a linear semi-empirical formula relating the clearness ined coefficients (the error is of value 5%). For daily values of measured global solar radiation, an extension of the angstrom equation in a non-linear form is assumed and a polynomial regression is used for curve fitting to obtain a corresponding semi-empirical relation between the clearness index coefficients (the error is 3%). The paper ends with the result that the nonlinear graph seems to be reasonably accurate and is recommended to estimate the global solar radiation G for Cairo city

  4. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana [Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, V Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Pop, Nicolina [Department of Physical Foundations of Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara, V Parvan 2, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Calinoiu, Delia [Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University of Timisoara, Mihai Viteazu 1, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  5. Modeling of Air Temperature for Heat Exchange due to Vertical Turbulence and Horizontal Air Flow

    ZHANG Lei; MENG Qing-lin

    2009-01-01

    In order to calculate the air temperature of the near surface layer in urban environment,the Sur-face layer air was divided into several layers in the vertical direction,and some energy bakmce equations were de-veloped for each air layer,in which the heat exchange due to vertical turbulence and horizontal air flow was tak-en into account.Then,the vertical temperature distribution of the surface layer air was obtained through the coupled calculation using the energy balance equations of underlying surfaces and building walls.Moreover,the measured air temperatures in a small area (with a horizontal scale of less than 500 m) and a large area (with ahorizontal scale of more than 1000 m) in Guangzhou in summer were used to validate the proposed model.The calculated results agree well with the measured ones,with a maximum relative error of 4.18%.It is thus con-cluded that the proposed model is a high-accuracy method to theoretically analyze the urban heat island and the thermal environment.

  6. Comparison of the performance of net radiation calculation models

    Kjærsgaard, Jeppe Hvelplund; Cuenca, R.H.; Martinez-Cob, A.;

    2009-01-01

    Daily values of net radiation are used in many applications of crop-growth modeling and agricultural water management. Measurements of net radiation are not part of the routine measurement program at many weather stations and are commonly estimated based on other meteorological parameters. Daily...... values of net radiation were calculated using three net outgoing long-wave radiation models and compared to measured values. Four meteorological datasets representing two climate regimes, a sub-humid, high-latitude environment and a semi-arid mid-latitude environment, were used to test the models. The...... long-wave radiation models included a physically based model, an empirical model from the literature, and a new empirical model. Both empirical models used only solar radiation as required for meteorological input. The long-wave radiation models were used with model calibration coefficients from the...

  7. Introductory Tools for Radiative Transfer Models

    Feldman, D.; Kuai, L.; Natraj, V.; Yung, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite data are currently so voluminous that, despite their unprecedented quality and potential for scientific application, only a small fraction is analyzed due to two factors: researchers' computational constraints and a relatively small number of researchers actively utilizing the data. Ultimately it is hoped that the terabytes of unanalyzed data being archived can receive scientific scrutiny but this will require a popularization of the methods associated with the analysis. Since a large portion of complexity is associated with the proper implementation of the radiative transfer model, it is reasonable and appropriate to make the model as accessible as possible to general audiences. Unfortunately, the algorithmic and conceptual details that are necessary for state-of-the-art analysis also tend to frustrate the accessibility for those new to remote sensing. Several efforts have been made to have web- based radiative transfer calculations, and these are useful for limited calculations, but analysis of more than a few spectra requires the utilization of home- or server-based computing resources. We present a system that is designed to allow for easier access to radiative transfer models with implementation on a home computing platform in the hopes that this system can be utilized in and expanded upon in advanced high school and introductory college settings. This learning-by-doing process is aided through the use of several powerful tools. The first is a wikipedia-style introduction to the salient features of radiative transfer that references the seminal works in the field and refers to more complicated calculations and algorithms sparingly5. The second feature is a technical forum, commonly referred to as a tiki-wiki, that addresses technical and conceptual questions through public postings, private messages, and a ranked searching routine. Together, these tools may be able to facilitate greater interest in the field of remote sensing.

  8. Epoxyesteracrylate materials hardened by radiation-chemical and photochemical methods in air medium

    Considered is the possibility of using compositions on the base of modifying products of unsaturated epoxy oligomers with dicarboxylic acids for getting coatings of radiation-chemical hardening on wood. Irradiation of coatings by electrons with energy of 1-300 MeV was carried out in open air. Current intensity in electron beam equaled 20 to 0.05 mA. Epoxysuccinacrylate was shown to be the most active oligomer in a process of radiation copolymerization. Acrylic acid, butylacrylate, vinylacetate are the most active monomers. Dozes, necessary for coating adhesiveness removal under the irradiation, are within 5.5-25.5 Mrad. Some physicochemical characteristics of coatings hardened by radiation chemical method on wood are given

  9. Radiation exposure of the aircrew and passengers on some Czechoslovak air lines

    According to the ICRP 60 recommendation, the aircrew should be included among workers whose exposure to cosmic radiation is considered to be occupational exposure. This brings about the need for a more precise determination and the mapping of the exposure level on different air routes. The results are presented of measurements performed by the staff of the Institute of Radiation Dosimetry on board of CSA aircraft (TU 154 M and A 310-300 Airbus) in 1991-1992. A number of passive and active devices were used to measure the ionizing and neutron component of cosmic radiation. The results obtained confirm the basic ideas about the influence of various factors on the exposure level. The interpretation of data is discussed in detail, particularly with respect to its possible modification based on new data on particle spectra on board of subsonic civil transport aircraft. (author) 2 tabs., 4 figs., 24 refs

  10. Sensitivity/uncertainty analysis for free-in-air tissue kerma due to initial radiation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Uncertainty estimates and cross correlations by range/survivor have been calculated for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki free-in-air (FIA) tissue kerma obtained from two-dimensional air/ground transport calculations. The uncertainties due to modeling parameter and basic nuclear transport data uncertainties were calculated for 700-, 1000-, and 1500-m ground ranges. Only the FIA tissue kerma due to initial radiation was treated in the analysis; the uncertainties associated with terrain and building shielding and phantom attenuation were not considered in this study. Uncertainties of --20% were obtained for the prompt neutron and secondary gamma kerma and 30% for the prompt gamma kerma at both cities. The uncertainties on the total prompt kerma at Hiroshima and Nagasaki are --18 and 15%, respectively. The estimated uncertainties vary only slightly by ground range and are fairly highly correlated. The total prompt kerma uncertainties are dominated by the secondary gamma uncertainties, which in turn are dominated by the modeling parameter uncertainties, particularly those associated with the weapon yield and radiation sources

  11. Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model Prediction

    Sherman, Max H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes. It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance. Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air leakage data from many sources and now has a database of more than 100,000 raw measurements. This paper uses a model developed from that database in conjunction with US Census Bureau data for estimating air leakage as a function of location throughout the US.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Food Freezing in Air-Blast Freezer

    Guiqiang Wang; Pinghua Zou

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical model for simulating the heat transfer during food freezing was presented. The model consists of three steps. First, the flow field inside the freezing chamber was modeled using the CFD method, based on which the freezing condition, including the temperature and velocity around the food, was calculated. Second, the heat transfer coefficient between food and air was calculated in the CFD model. Third, a finite-difference model was employed to simulate the heat transfer inside th...

  13. Spectral modeling of radiation in combustion systems

    Pal, Gopalendu

    Radiation calculations are important in combustion due to the high temperatures encountered but has not been studied in sufficient detail in the case of turbulent flames. Radiation calculations for such problems require accurate, robust, and computationally efficient models for the solution of radiative transfer equation (RTE), and spectral properties of radiation. One more layer of complexity is added in predicting the overall heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems due to nonlinear interactions between turbulent fluctuations and radiation. The present work is aimed at the development of finite volume-based high-accuracy thermal radiation modeling, including spectral radiation properties in order to accurately capture turbulence-radiation interactions (TRI) and predict heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems correctly and efficiently. The turbulent fluctuations of temperature and chemical species concentrations have strong effects on spectral radiative intensities, and TRI create a closure problem when the governing partial differential equations are averaged. Recently, several approaches have been proposed to take TRI into account. Among these attempts the most promising approaches are the probability density function (PDF) methods, which can treat nonlinear coupling between turbulence and radiative emission exactly, i.e., "emission TRI". The basic idea of the PDF method is to treat physical variables as random variables and to solve the PDF transport equation stochastically. The actual reacting flow field is represented by a large number of discrete stochastic particles each carrying their own random variable values and evolving with time. The mean value of any function of those random variables, such as the chemical source term, can be evaluated exactly by taking the ensemble average of particles. The local emission term belongs to this class and thus, can be evaluated directly and exactly from particle ensembles. However, the local absorption term

  14. The influence of gas radiation on the thermal behavior of a 2D axisymmetric turbulent non-premixed methane–air flame

    Highlights: • The study evaluates the importance of thermal radiation in a methane–air flame. • The radiative properties are treated with the WSGG based on HITEMP 2010. • The turbulence–radiation interaction (TRI) is based on a RANS approach. • Radiation strongly affected the temperature field but not the chemical composition. • Neglecting TRI led to a lower estimate of the radiation heat transfer. - Abstract: This paper presents a study of the effect of thermal radiation in the simulation of a turbulent, non-premixed methane–air flame. In such a problem, two aspects need to be considered for a precise evaluation of the thermal radiation: the turbulence–radiation interactions (TRI), and the local variation of the radiative properties of the participating species, which are treated here with the weighted-sum-of-gray-gases (WSGG) model based on newly obtained correlations from HITEMP2010 database. The chemical reactions rates were considered as the minimum values between the Arrhenius and Eddy Break-Up rates. A two-step global reaction mechanism was used, while the turbulence modeling was considered via standard k–ε model. The source terms of the energy equation consisted of the heat generated in the chemical reaction rates as well as in the radiation exchanges. The discrete ordinates method (DOM) was employed to solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE), including the TRI. Comparisons of simulations with/without radiation (which in turn was solved with/without TRI) demonstrated that the temperature, the radiative heat source, and the wall heat flux were importantly affected by thermal radiation, while the influence on species concentrations proved to be negligible. Inclusion of thermal radiation led to results that were closer to experimental data available in the literature for the same test case considered in this paper. Inclusion of TRI improved the agreement, although in a smaller degree. The main influence of TRI was mainly on global

  15. Inflation in a modified radiative seesaw model

    Budhi, Romy H S; Suematsu, Daijiro

    2014-01-01

    The existence of the inflationary era in the early Universe seems to be strongly supported by recent CMB observations. However, only a few realistic inflation scenarios which have close relation to particle physics seem to have been known unfortunately. The radiative neutrino mass model with inert doublet dark matter is a promising model for the present experimental issues which cannot be explained within the standard model. In order to make the model include inflation, we extend it by a complex scalar field with a specific potential. This scalar could be closely related to the neutrino mass generation at a TeV scale as well as inflation. We show that the inflation favored by the CMB observations could be realized even if inflaton takes sub-Planck values during inflation.

  16. Estimating individual exposure to 131I for radiation workers at radioisotope production using air sampling and smartphone techniques

    Indoor individual exposure at radioisotope production depends strongly on temporal concentration variation, contacting time and working location of radiation workers. To estimate personal exposure to indoor air polluted with 131I for the workers at radioisotope production, we had employed a low cost indoor model appropriate for their specific situation. In this model, time-microenvironment occupied by the workers was recorded by a smartphone sensitive motion software. Simultaneously, on the work days, indoor air in the three iodine production rooms was sampled by a portable air sampler coupled with activated carbon cartridges impregnated by TEDA. Then the low background gamma spectrometer was used to measure activity of the cartridges and the concentration of 131I in these rooms was calculated with the temporal resolution of one hour. By combining the hourly concentration with the high temporal resolution of activity patterns, we estimated the actual exposures for the group of workers producing radioisotopes in Nuclear Research Institute (Dalat) for the first four months of 2015. The highest daily average exposure was 410.2 Bq/m3 while the highest average exposure of the group was 147.2 Bq/m3. It showed an useful value for minimizing risks and estimating internal doses as well. This feasibility study may be applied for assessing personal exposure at radioisotope production, but also for many other indoor environments. (author)

  17. Simplified Modelling of the Infrared Heating Involving the Air Convection Effect before the Injection Stretch Blowing Moulding of PET Preform

    Luo, Y; Chevalier, Luc; Utheza, Françoise; Nicolas, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    International audience Initial heating conditions and temperature effects (heat transfer with air and mould, self-heating, conduction) have important influence during the ISBM process of PET preforms. The numerical simulation of infrared (IR) heating taking into account the air convection around a PET preform is very time-consuming even for 2D modelling. This work proposes a simplified approach of the coupled heat transfers (conduction, convection and radiation) in the ISBM process based o...

  18. Inflation Model Selection meets Dark Radiation

    Tram, Thomas; Vennin, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how inflation model selection is affected by the presence of additional free-streaming relativistic degrees of freedom, i.e. dark radiation. We perform a full Bayesian analysis of both inflation parameters and cosmological parameters taking reheating into account self-consistently. We compute the Bayesian evidence for a few representative inflation scenarios in both the standard $\\Lambda\\mathrm{CDM}$ model and an extension including dark radiation parametrised by its effective number of relativistic species $N_\\mathrm{eff}$. We find that the observational status of most inflationary models is unchanged, with the exception of potentials such as power-law inflation that predict a value for the scalar spectral index that is too large in $\\Lambda\\mathrm{CDM}$ but which can be accommodated when $N_\\mathrm{eff}$ is allowed to vary. In this case, cosmic microwave background data indicate that power-law inflation is one of the best models together with plateau potentials. However, contrary to plateau p...

  19. Evaluation of global solar radiation models for Shanghai, China

    Highlights: • 108 existing models are compared and analyzed by 42 years meteorological data. • Fitting models based on measured data are established according to 42 years data. • All models are compared by recently 10 years meteorological data. • The results show that polynomial models are the most accurate models. - Abstract: In this paper, 89 existing monthly average daily global solar radiation models and 19 existing daily global solar radiation models are compared and analyzed by 42 years meteorological data. The results show that for existing monthly average daily global solar radiation models, linear models and polynomial models have been able to estimate global solar radiation accurately, and complex equation types cannot obviously improve the precision. Considering direct parameters such as latitude, altitude, solar altitude and sunshine duration can help improve the accuracy of the models, but indirect parameters cannot. For existing daily global solar radiation models, multi-parameter models are more accurate than single-parameter models, polynomial models are more accurate than linear models. Then measured data fitting monthly average daily global solar radiation models (MADGSR models) and daily global solar radiation models (DGSR models) are established according to 42 years meteorological data. Finally, existing models and fitting models based on measured data are comparative analysis by recent 10 years meteorological data, and the results show that polynomial models (MADGSR model 2, DGSR model 2 and Maduekwe model 2) are the most accurate models

  20. Air pollution dispersion models as used in Poland in regional development planning

    Pruchnicki, J.

    1977-02-01

    This paper discusses air pollution models used in regional development planning in Poland. After outlining the institutional structure and legislature dealing with air pollution control, the paper describes the air quality standards currently in effect. Dispersion models used in predicting air pollution concentrations are then detailed. Finally the application of air pollution modelling to urban design is discussed.

  1. Modeling noise annoyance caused by air traffic using fuzzy logic

    Sanchez Franco, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of this project is the study and modeling of the noise annoyance caused by air traffic by using the fuzzy logic theory. Like many other environmental problems, air traffic noise, continues to grow and has become a serious problem in many countries. Millions of people living or working around airport areas can suffer from noise exposure effects as for instance hearing loss, interference with communication, stress, sleep disturbance, psychological effects as well...

  2. Integrated Modeling of Air Traffic, Aviation Weather, and Communication Systems

    Quan, Chuanwen

    2007-01-01

    Aviation suffers many delays due to the lack of timely air traffic flow management. These delays are also caused by the uncertainty weather information; and the lack of efficient dissemination of weather products to pilots. It is clear that better models are needed to quantify air traffic flow in three flight regions - en-route, in the terminal, and on the ground, to determine aviation weather information requirements at each region, and to quantify their bandwidth requirements. Furthermore,...

  3. Measurement and simulation of the in-flight radiation exposure on different air routes

    The exposure of air-crew personnel to cosmic radiation is considered to be occupational exposure and requirements for dose assessment are given in the European Council Directive 96/29/EURATOM. The High-Temperature Ratio (HTR) Method for LiF: Mg, Ti TLDs utilizes the well-investigated relative intensity of the combined high-temperature glow peaks 6 and 7 compared with the dominant peak 5 (left-hand side of Figure 1) as an indication of the dose-average LET of a mixed radiation field of unknown composition. The difference in the peak-5 readings of the neutron-sensitive TLD-600 (6LiF: Mg, Ti) and the neutron-insensitive TLD-700 (7LiF: Mg, Ti) can be utilized to assess the neutron dose equivalent accumulated in-flight. For this purpose, the dosemeter crystals were calibrated individually in the CERN-EU High Energy Reference Field (CERF) [8] which simulates the cosmic-ray induced neutron spectrum in good detail. The experiments conducted onboard passenger aircraft on different north-bound and trans-equatorial flight routes were aimed at the following: to measure the total dose equivalent accumulated during the flight, to assess the contribution of neutrons, and to compare the results with calculations by means of the well-known CARI computer code. Measurements were performed on a series of eight north-bound flights between Cologne and Washington as well as on the routes Vienna-Atlanta, Vienna-Sydney and Vienna-Tokyo during different solar activity conditions. Precise altitude and route profiles were recorded by the pilots. The experimental results were compared with model calculations using the latest release 6M of the CARI code. Precise altitude and route data on a ten-minute to one-hour scale were taken as input. The calculated dose values indicate that the algorithms employed for the computational assessment of route doses have been significantly improved during the last decade. The CARI results generally tend to be in reasonable agreement with the measured values

  4. Solar radiation practical modeling for renewable energy applications

    Myers, Daryl Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Written by a leading scientist with over 35 years of experience working at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Solar Radiation: Practical Modeling for Renewable Energy Applications brings together the most widely used, easily implemented concepts and models for estimating broadband and spectral solar radiation data. The author addresses various technical and practical questions about the accuracy of solar radiation measurements and modeling. While the focus is on engineering models and results, the book does review the fundamentals of solar radiation modeling and solar radiation m

  5. Modeling Paradigms Applied to the Analysis of European Air Quality

    Makowski, M.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of various modeling paradigms applicable to the analysis of complex decision-making that can be represented by large non-linear models. Such paradigms are illustrated by their application to the analysis of a model that helps to identify and analyze various cost-effective policy options aimed at improving European air quality. Also presented is the application of this model to support intergovernmental negotiations.

  6. RELMAP: A REGIONAL LAGRANGIAN MODEL OF AIR POLLUTION - USER'S GUIDE

    The regional Lagrangian Model of Air Pollution (RELMAP) is a mass conserving, Lagrangian model that simulates ambient concentrations and wet and dry depositions of SO2, SO4=, and fine and coarse particulate matter over the eastern United States and southeastern Canada (default do...

  7. FUNDAMENTAL MASS TRANSFER MODELS FOR INDOOR AIR POLLUTION SOURCES

    The paper discusses a simple, fundamental mass transfer model, based on Fick's Law of Diffusion, for indoor air pollution wet sorbent-based sources. (Note: Models are needed to predict emissions from indoor sources. hile empirical approaches based on dynamic chamber data are usef...

  8. Evaluation of temperature-based global solar radiation models in China

    Liu, Xiaoying; Mei, Xurong; Li, Yuzhong;

    2009-01-01

    Estimation of global solar radiation (Rs) from the daily range of air temperature (¿T) offers an important alternative in the absence of measured Rs or sunshine duration because of the wide availability of air temperature data. In this paper, we assessed 16 Rs models including modified versions of...... the Bristow and Campbell (B-C) and the Hargreaves (Harg) models across a wide range of agro-ecological conditions in China. Using long-term data from 15 sites in Northeast, North China Plain and Northwest China, we explored the main factors affecting model parameters and the predictive accuracy and...

  9. Current saturation in free-air ionization chambers with chopped synchrotron radiation

    An expression for ion recombination in free-air ionization chambers irradiated by chopped X-rays is presented. The expression is validated by comparison with experiments using synchrotron radiation. Saturation curves for free-air ionization chambers with electrode gap widths of 4.2, 8.4 and 18 mm were obtained for 10 and 15 keV undulator synchrotron radiation thinned with a 230 Hz rotating-disk chopper. Ion recombination in free-air ionization chambers was found to be inversely proportional to the applied electric field, and an expression that satisfactorily reproduced the ion-recombination rate is determined. A comparison of the expressions for continuous and pulsed X-rays revealed that chopped high-intensity X-rays require a higher voltage to attain saturation when the product of the pulse width and electric field exceeds a value that depends on the X-ray energy. This behaviour was observed explicitly for 10 keV X-rays in measurements with the ionization chamber placed before and after the chopper

  10. Multiple simultaneous event model for radiation carcinogenesis

    A mathematical model is proposed which postulates that cancer induction is a multi-event process, that these events occur naturally, usually one at a time in any cell, and that radiation frequently causes two of these events to occur simultaneously. Microdosimetric considerations dictate that for high LET radiations the simultaneous events are associated with a single particle or track. The model predicts: (a) linear dose-effect relations for early times after irradiation with small doses, (b) approximate power functions of dose (i.e. Dsup(x)) having exponent less than one for populations of mixed age examined at short times after irradiation with small doses, (c) saturation of effect at either long times after irradiation with small doses or for all times after irradiation with large doses, and (d) a net increase in incidence which is dependent on age of observation but independent of age at irradiation. Data of Vogel, for neutron induced mammary tumors in rats, are used to illustrate the validity of the formulation. This model provides a quantitative framework to explain several unexpected results obtained by Vogel. It also provides a logical framework to explain the dose-effect relations observed in the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombs. (author)

  11. Polar firn layering in radiative transfer models

    Linow, Stefanie; Hoerhold, Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many applications in the geosciences, remote sensing is the only feasible method of obtaining data from large areas with limited accessibility. This is especially true for the cryosphere, where light conditions and cloud coverage additionally limit the use of optical sensors. Here, instruments operating at microwave frequencies become important, for instance in polar snow parameters / SWE (snow water equivalent) mapping. However, the interaction between snow and microwave radiation is a complex process and still not fully understood. RT (radiative transfer) models to simulate snow-microwave interaction are available, but they require a number of input parameters such as microstructure and density, which are partly ill-constrained. The layering of snow and firn introduces an additional degree of complexity, as all snow parameters show a strong variability with depth. Many studies on RT modeling of polar firn deal with layer variability by using statistical properties derived from previous measurements, such as the standard deviations of density and microstructure, to configure model input. Here, the variability of microstructure parameters, such as density and particle size, are usually assumed to be independent of each other. However, in the case of the firn pack of the polar ice sheets, we observe that microstructure evolution depends on environmental parameters, such as temperature and snow deposition. Accordingly, density and microstructure evolve together within the snow and firn. Based on CT (computer tomography) microstructure measurements of antarctic firn, we can show that: first, the variability of density and effective grain size are linked and can thus be implemented in the RT models as a coupled set of parameters. Second, the magnitude of layering is captured by the measured standard deviation. Based on high-resolution density measurements of an Antarctic firn core, we study the effect of firn layering at different microwave wavelengths. By means of

  12. Modeling the ascent of sounding balloons: derivation of the vertical air motion

    A. Gallice

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A new model to describe the ascent of sounding balloons in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (up to ∼30–35 km altitude is presented. Contrary to previous models, detailed account is taken of both the variation of the drag coefficient with altitude and the heat imbalance between the balloon and the atmosphere. To compensate for the lack of data on the drag coefficient of sounding balloons, a reference curve for the relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number is derived from a dataset of flights launched during the Lindenberg Upper Air Methods Intercomparisons (LUAMI campaign. The transfer of heat from the surrounding air into the balloon is accounted for by solving the radial heat diffusion equation inside the balloon. In its present state, the model does not account for solar radiation, i.e. it is only able to describe the ascent of balloons during the night. It could however be adapted to also represent daytime soundings, with solar radiation modeled as a diffusive process. The potential applications of the model include the forecast of the trajectory of sounding balloons, which can be used to increase the accuracy of the match technique, and the derivation of the air vertical velocity. The latter is obtained by subtracting the ascent rate of the balloon in still air calculated by the model from the actual ascent rate. This technique is shown to provide an approximation for the vertical air motion with an uncertainty error of 0.5 m s−1 in the troposphere and 0.2 m s−1 in the stratosphere. An example of extraction of the air vertical velocity is provided in this paper. We show that the air vertical velocities derived from the balloon soundings in this paper are in general agreement with small-scale atmospheric velocity fluctuations related to gravity waves, mechanical turbulence, or other small-scale air motions measured during the SUCCESS campaign (Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects

  13. Generation of scalable terahertz radiation from cylindrically focused laser pulses in air

    Kuk, Donghoon; Yoo, Yungjun; Rosenthal, Eric; Jhajj, Nihal; Milchberg, Howard; Kim, Ki-Yong

    We have demonstrated scalable terahertz (THz) generation via cylindrical focusing of two-color laser pulses in air. In this experiment, we have used a terawatt (TW) laser system which can deliver >50 mJ, 800 nm, 50 fs pulses at a 10 Hz repetition rate. A 800 nm pulse passing through a nonlinear crystal (BBO) generates its second harmonic pulse (400 nm). Both pulses pass through a cylindrical lens and are focused together to generate a 2-dimensional plasma sheet in air. This yields two diverging THz lobes, characterized by an uncooled microbolometer. This observed radiation angle and pattern is explained by the optical-Cherenkov radiation theory. The diverging THz radiation is re-focused to yield strong THz field strengths (>20 MV/cm) at the focus. At laser energy of 40 mJ, cylindrical focusing provides THz energy of >30 microjoules, far exceeding the output produced by spherical focusing. This shows that cylindrical focusing can effectively minimize ionization-induced defocusing, previously observed in spherical focusing, and can allow scalable THz generation with relatively high laser energies (>20 mJ). Work supported by DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award No. 014216-001.

  14. Impact of transpacific aerosol on air quality over the United States: A perspective from aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions

    Tao, Zhining; Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian

    2016-01-01

    Observations have well established that aerosols from various sources in Asia, Europe, and Africa can travel across the Pacific and reach the contiguous United States (U.S.) at least on episodic bases throughout a year, with a maximum import in spring. The imported aerosol not only can serve as an additional source to regional air pollution (e.g., direct input), but also can influence regional air quality through the aerosol-cloud-radiation (ACR) interactions that change local and regional meteorology. This study assessed impacts of the transpacific aerosol on air quality, focusing on surface ozone and PM2.5, over the U.S. using the NASA Unified Weather Research Forecast model. Based on the results of 3-month (April to June of 2010) simulations, the impact of direct input (as an additional source) of transpacific aerosol caused an increase of surface PM2.5 concentration by approximately 1.5 μg m-3 over the west coast and about 0.5 μg m-3 over the east coast of the U.S. By influencing key meteorological processes through the ACR interactions, the transpacific aerosol exerted a significant effect on both surface PM2.5 (±6 μg m-3) and ozone (±12 ppbv) over the central and eastern U.S. This suggests that the transpacific transport of aerosol could either improve or deteriorate local air quality and complicate local effort toward the compliance with the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards.

  15. A comparison of model predictions and observations of the transfer of 137Cs through the air-pasture-cow-milk pathway

    Environmental measurements following the Chernobyl accident for selected locations in the United States and Europe were compared with model predictions of the transfer of 137Cs through the air-pasture-cow-milk pathway. The models include IAEA Safety Series No. 57, AIRDOS/EPA, NRC Regulatory Guides 1.109 and 1.111, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) screening model, and the PATHWAY dynamic food-chain model. Time integrals of the 137Cs concentrations in air, pasture, and milk were estimated, and the predicted and observed grass/air, milk/air, and milk/grass concentration ratios were compared. (author)

  16. Simplified model for a ventilated glass window under forced air flow conditions

    Ismail, K.A.R. [Depto. de Engenharia Termica e de Fluidos-FEM-UNICAMP CP: 6122 CEP 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Henriquez, J.R. [Depto. de Eng. Mecanica-DEMEC, UFPE Av. Academico Helio Ramos, S/N CEP 50740-530, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a study on a ventilated window composed of two glass sheets separated by a spacing through which air is forced to flow. The proposed model is one dimensional and unsteady based upon global energy balance over the glass sheets and the flowing fluid. The external glass sheet of the cavity is subjected to variable heat flow due to the solar radiation as well as variable external ambient temperature. The exchange of radiation energy (infrared radiation) between the glass sheets is also included in the formulation. Effects of the spacing between the glass sheets, variation of the forced mass flow rate on the total heat gain and the shading coefficients are investigated. The results show that the effect of the increase of the mass flow rate is found to reduce the mean solar heat gain and the shading coefficients while the increase of the fluid entry temperature is found to deteriorate the window thermal performance. (author)

  17. Simplified model for a ventilated glass window under forced air flow conditions

    This paper presents a study on a ventilated window composed of two glass sheets separated by a spacing through which air is forced to flow. The proposed model is one dimensional and unsteady based upon global energy balance over the glass sheets and the flowing fluid. The external glass sheet of the cavity is subjected to variable heat flow due to the solar radiation as well as variable external ambient temperature. The exchange of radiation energy (infrared radiation) between the glass sheets is also included in the formulation. Effects of the spacing between the glass sheets, variation of the forced mass flow rate on the total heat gain and the shading coefficients are investigated. The results show that the effect of the increase of the mass flow rate is found to reduce the mean solar heat gain and the shading coefficients while the increase of the fluid entry temperature is found to deteriorate the window thermal performance

  18. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  19. A new radiation model for Baltic Sea ecosystem modelling

    Neumann, Thomas; Siegel, Herbert; Gerth, Monika

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) is one of the key requirements for primary production in the ocean. The ambient PAR is determined by incoming solar radiation and optical properties of sea water and the optically active water constituents along the radiation pathway. Especially in coastal waters, the optical properties are affected by terrigenous constituents like yellow substances as well as high primary production. Numerical models for marine ecosystems account for the optical attenuation process in different ways and details. For the consideration of coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and shading effects of phytoplankton particles, we propose a dynamic parametrization for the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, products from biological turnover processes are implemented. Besides PAR and its attenuation coefficient, the model calculates the Secchi disk depth, a simple measurable parameter describing the transparency of the water column and a water quality parameter in the European Water Framework Directive. The components of the proposed optical model are partly implemented from other publications respectively derived from our own measurements for the area of investigation. The model allows a better representation of PAR with a more realistic spatial and temporal variability compared to former parametrizations. The effect is that regional changes of primary production, especially in the northern part of the Baltic Sea, show reduced productivity due to higher CDOM concentrations. The model estimates for Secchi disk depth are much more realistic now. In the northern Baltic Sea, simulated oxygen concentrations in deep water have improved considerably.

  20. Evaluation of the quality of hot air dehydrated onion coming from gamma radiated bulbs

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the quality of hot air dehydrated onion, as regards physical and chemical characteristics, coming from the regional product that was gamma irradiated for sprout inhibition. We worked with the onion variety Valenciana Sintetica 14. Radio inhibition was made 30 days post harvest with gamma radiation from a 60Co source at the Centro Atomico Ezeiza-CNEA, using a dose of 60 Gy. The skin of the bulbs was manually removed and the bulbs were cut in pieces 3 mm thick and between 1 and 3 cm long. The material was dehydrated in a rotating dryer with forced air circulation at 60 C degrees, between 0.8 and 1.7 m/s air speed and at ambient relative humidity. Dehydration was made 80 days after post-irradiation. The quality of the dehydrated onion was evaluated by the following physical- chemical analysis: total solids content, pungency (indirectly measured by pyruvic acid content assessment), color, pH, carbon hydrates and sensorial analysis. All analytical determinations were made in triplicate. The results obtained showed there are no significant changes between the averages of the physical-chemical properties of the control dehydrated samples and those coming from the radio-inhibited raw matter. According to the sensorial analysis, only the color of dehydrated onion was affected by the radio inhibition process. However, and according to the panel members comment, the greatest browning degree observed in ionizing radiation treated onion seemed to result more attractive to them. It may be concluded that radio inhibited regional onion can be useful as raw matter for hot air dehydrated product. It must be remarked that its use would extend the product use by dehydration plants, thus implying an increase of their processing capacity with the corresponding financial benefit. (author)

  1. Radiation exposure of workers assigned to the maintenance of air surveillance radar

    The French Defence Radiation Protection Service (SPRA) conducted a study to assess the radiation exposure of personnel assigned to the maintenance of the Palmier radar in an Air Force Base. The aim of the study was the assessment of the annual effective doses received by personnel assigned to these maintenance operations, and the measurement of equivalent dose rates in the area in order to realize radiological zoning. In two measurement campaigns, the annual individual effective doses, measured by passive whole-body OSL InlightR dosimeters, consolidated the results obtained by radiometric measurements. Moreover, the equivalent dose rate shows wide variations in relation to the position of the operator in the emitter's area. From these results, the authors propose recommendations for categorization of workers, radiological zoning and dose monitoring procedures. (authors)

  2. Study of filamentation dynamics of ultrashort laser radiation in air: beam diameter effect

    A single filamentation of femtosecond gigawatt laser radiation with a millimeter-size aperture upon collimated and sharply focused propagation in atmospheric air at 800 nm and 400 nm wavelengths is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The influence of beam initial radius on the parameters of the forming filament is analyzed. Three filament parameters, namely, start coordinate, filament length, and longitudinal continuity are considered. We report that unlike Marburger’s formula the single filamentation onset reveals marked nonquadratic dependence on the laser beam radius providing the same initial pulse power. Additionally, for sharply focused radiation the minor dependence of the filament length on the laser beam diameter at the constant initial pulse intensity was experimentally revealed. (paper)

  3. Stomatal resistance of rice leaves as influenced by radiation intensity and air humidity

    This paper describes results of field experiments of relationships between meteorological conditions and stomatal resistance of rice leaves. The magnitude of stomatal resistance of rice leaves was measured by a porometer at important three developmental stages of rice plants. Stomatal resistance (rs) changed very clearly throughout sunny days in relation to diurnal variation in solar radiation intensity (St) and leaf air vapor concentration deficit (HD). Stomatal resistance of the adaxial surface of rice leaves was found to be the same to that of the abaxial surface in the magnitude, indicating that the water vapor fluxes at the both surfaces of rice leaves are equal with each other. The dependence of non-dimensional stomatal resistance [rs/rm·k(HD)2] on solar radiation intensity (St) was well approximated by a hyperbolic function. The relationship between HD and [rs/rm(1+St, m/St)] was expressed by a quadratic function of HD

  4. REAS3: A revised implementation of the geosynchrotron model for radio emission from air showers

    Over the past years, the freely available Monte Carlo-code REAS which simulates radio emission from air showers based on the geosynchrotron model, was used regularly for comparisons with data. However, it emerged that in the previous version of the code, emission due to the variation of the number of charged particles within an air shower was not taken into account. In the following article, we show the implementation of these emission contributions in REAS3 by the inclusion of “end-point contributions” and discuss the changes on the predictions of REAS obtained by this revision. The basis for describing radiation processes is an universal description which is gained by the use of the end-point formulation. Hence, not only pure geomagnetic radiation is simulated with REAS3 but also radiation due to the variation of the net charge excess in the air shower, independent of the Earth's magnetic field. Furthermore, we present a comparison of lateral distributions of LOPES data with REAS3-simulated distributions. The comparison shows a good agreement between both, data and REAS3 simulations.

  5. A comparison between weighted sum of gray and spectral CK radiation models for heat transfer calculations in furnaces

    El Ammouri, F.; Plessier, R.; Till, M.; Marie, B.; Djavdan, E. [Air Liquide Centre de Recherche Claude Delorme, 78 - Jouy-en-Josas (France)

    1996-12-31

    Coupled reactive fluid dynamics and radiation calculations are performed in air and oxy-fuel furnaces using two gas radiative property models. The first one is the weighted sum of gray gases model (WSGG) and the second one is the correlated-k (CK) method which is a spectral model based on the cumulative distribution function of the absorption coefficient inside a narrow band. The WSGG model, generally used in industrial configurations, is less time consuming than the CK model. However it is found that it over-predicts radiative fluxes by about 12 % in industrial furnaces. (authors) 27 refs.

  6. Dynamic modeling of an air source heat pump water heater

    Fardoun, Farouk; Ibrahim, Oussama; Zoughaib, Assaad

    2011-01-01

    International audience This paper presents a dynamic simulation model to predict the performance of an air source heat pump water heater (ASHPWH). The mathematical model consists of submodels of the basic system components i.e. evaporator, condenser, compressor, and expansion valve. These submodels were built based on fundamental principles of heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, empirical relationships and manufacturer's data as necessary. The model simulation was carried out u...

  7. Correlation of growth with solar radiation and air temperature on potted miniature rose

    To establish systematic year-round production of potted miniature rose, rose growth and environmental factors such as solar radiation and air temperature were investigated for one year and the relationships of growth to these factors were analyzed. The period from the start to end of cultivation was longer in order of summer, spring and autumn cultivation. Leaf area, fresh weight of leaf and plant, leaf number and plant height as response variables were analyzed to explain the relation to environmental factors as explanatory variables using multiple linear regression analysis. The cumulative daily mean solar radiation, cumulative daytime and nighttime temperature within explanatory variables were significant main explanatory variables. Rose growth factors; leaf area, fresh weight of leaf and plant, leaf number and plant height showed close correlation with three environmental factors, respectively. Rose growth factors demonstrated significant multiple linear regressions using three environmental factors, and the parameters in multiple linear regression equations were also significant. Therefore, we demonstrated that the rose growth could be predicted using cumulative daily mean solar radiation, cumulative daytime and nighttime temperature and could be controlled by changing solar radiation and temperature

  8. Cosmic radiation in aviation: radiological protection of Air France aircraft crew.

    Desmaris, G

    2016-06-01

    Cosmic radiation in aviation has been a concern since the 1960s, and measurements have been taken for several decades by Air France. Results show that aircraft crew generally receive 3-4 mSv y(-1) for 750 boarding hours. Compliance with the trigger level of 6 mSv y(-1) is achieved by route selection. Work schedules can be developed for pregnant pilots to enable the dose to the fetus to be kept below 1 mSv. Crew members are informed of their exposition and the potential health impact. The upcoming International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report on cosmic radiation in aviation will provide an updated guidance. A graded approach proportionate with the time of exposure is recommended to implement the optimisation principle. The objective is to keep exposures of the most exposed aircraft members to reasonable levels. ICRP also recommends that information about cosmic radiation be disseminated, and that awareness about cosmic radiation be raised in order to favour informed decision-making by all concerned stakeholders. PMID:27044363

  9. Statistical issues in modelling radiation effects on disease incidence

    The author attempts to outline an overview of some models which have proven useful in recent work with radiation effects data. Topics addressed are mathematical models for radiation effects on disease incidence, modelling of background rates, relative versus excess risk models, dose-response effects, dose effect modification (sex and age at exposure), temporal variation in risks. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of indoor air quality in a department of radiation oncology located underground

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the radiation treatment center which is generally located underground is important to the health of hospital workers and patients treated over a long period of time. This study was conducted to measure and analyze the factors related to IAQ and subjective symptoms of sick building syndrome, and to establish the causes influencing IAQ and find a solution to the problems. Self administrated questionnaire was conducted to check the workers' symptoms and understanding of the work environment. Based on a preliminary investigation, the factors related to IAQ such as temperature, humidity, fine particulate, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), and radon gas were selected and measured for a certain period of time in specific sites where hospital workers stay long in a day. And we also evaluated the surrounding environment and the efficiency of the ventilating system simultaneously, and measured the same factors at the first floor (outdoor) to compare with outdoor air quality. All collected data were assessed by the recommended standard for IAQ of the domestic and international environmental organizations. Hospital workers were discontented with foul odors, humidity and particulate. They complained symptoms related to musculo-skeletal system, neurologic system, and mucosal-irritation. Most of the factors were not greater than the recommended standard, but the level of TVOC was third or fourth times as much as the measuring level of some offices in the United States. The frequency and the amount of the ventilating system were adequate, however, the problem arising in the position of outdoor-air inlets and indoor-air outlets involved a risk of the indraft of contaminated air. A careful attention was a requirement in handling and keeping chemical substances including a developing solution which has a risk of TVOC emissions, and repositioning the ventilating system was needed to solve the

  11. Economic damages of ozone air pollution to crops using combined air quality and GIS modelling

    Vlachokostas, Ch.; Nastis, S. A.; Achillas, Ch.; Kalogeropoulos, K.; Karmiris, I.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Chourdakis, E.; Banias, G.; Limperi, N.

    2010-09-01

    This study aims at presenting a combined air quality and GIS modelling methodological approach in order to estimate crop damages from photochemical air pollution, depict their spatial resolution and assess the order of magnitude regarding the corresponding economic damages. The analysis is conducted within the Greater Thessaloniki Area, Greece, a Mediterranean territory which is characterised by high levels of photochemical air pollution and considerable agricultural activity. Ozone concentration fields for 2002 and for specific emission reduction scenarios for the year 2010 were estimated with the Ozone Fine Structure model in the area under consideration. Total economic damage to crops turns out to be significant and estimated to be approximately 43 M€ for the reference year. Production of cotton presents the highest economic loss, which is over 16 M€, followed by table tomato (9 M€), rice (4.2 M€), wheat (4 M€) and oilseed rape (2.8 M€) cultivations. Losses are not spread uniformly among farmers and the major losses occur in areas with valuable ozone-sensitive crops. The results are very useful for highlighting the magnitude of the total economic impacts of photochemical air pollution to the area's agricultural sector and can potentially be used for comparison with studies worldwide. Furthermore, spatial analysis of the economic damage could be of importance for governmental authorities and decision makers since it provides an indicative insight, especially if the economic instruments such as financial incentives or state subsidies to farmers are considered.

  12. Adiabatic models of the cosmological radiative era

    Sussman, R A; Sussman, Roberto A.; Ishak, Mustapha

    2001-01-01

    We consider a generalization of the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) solutions by keeping the LTB metric but replacing its dust matter source by an imperfect fluid with anisotropic pressure $\\Pi_{ab} $. Assuming that total matter-energy density $\\rho$ is the sum of a rest mass term, $\\rhom$, plus a radiation $\\rhor=3p$ density where $p$ is the isotropic pressure, Einstein's equations are fully integrated without having to place any previous assumption on the form of $\\Pi_{ab} $. Three particular cases of interest are contained: the usual LTB dust solutions (the dust limit), a class of FLRW cosmologies (the homogeneous limit) and of the Vaydia solution (the vacuum limit). Initial conditions are provided in terms of suitable averages and contrast functions of the initial densities of $\\rhom, \\rhor$ and the 3-dimensional Ricci scalar along an arbitrary initial surface $t=t_i$. We consider the source of the models as an interactive radiation-matter mixture in local thermal equilibrium that must be consistent with caus...

  13. Lepton radiative decays in supersymmetric standard model

    Radiative decays of charged leptons li→ljγ(γ*) have been discussed in the framework of the supersymmetric generalization of the standard model. The most general form of the formfactors for the one-loop vertex function is written. Decay widths of the mentioned radiative decays are calculated. Scalar lepton masses are estimated at the maximal mixing angle in the scalar sector proceeding from the present upper limit for the branching of the decay μ→eγ. In case of the maximal mixing angle and the least mass degeneration of scalar leptons of various generations the following lower limit for the scalar electron mass me-tilde>1.5 TeV has been obtained. The mass of the scalar neutrino is 0(1) TeV, in case the charged calibrino is lighter than the scalar neutrino. The result obtained sensitive to the choice of the lepton mixing angle in the scalar sector, namely, in decreasing the value sin 2θ by an order of magnitude, the limitation on the scalar electron mass may decrease more than 3 times. In the latter case the direct observation of electrons at the e+e--collider (1x1 TeV) becomes available

  14. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  15. Effect mechanism of air deflectors on the cooling performance of dry cooling tower with vertical delta radiators under crosswind

    Highlights: • A 3D numerical model was set for NDDCTV to study the effect of air deflectors. • The air deflectors improve the tower performance by 1.375 °C at uc = 6 m/s for a case. • The air deflectors reduce the air inflow deviation angle θd at most delta entries. • The reduced θd can improve the cooling performance of former deteriorated columns. • Both the radial inflow air velocity and θd impact the cooling performance of delta. - Abstract: To study the effect mechanism of air deflectors on dry cooling tower, a three dimensional numerical model was established, with full consideration of the delta structure. The accuracy and credibility of dry cooling tower numerical model were validated. By numerical model, the average air static pressure and the average radial inflow air velocity were computed and analyzed at delta air entry, sector air entry and exit faces. By the air inflow deviation angle θd, the effect of air deflectors on the aerodynamic field around tower was analyzed. The water exit temperatures of θ−1 columns, θ+2 columns and cooling sectors were also presented to clarify the effect of air deflectors. It was found that the air deflectors improved the aerodynamic field around cooling columns. The reduced air inflow deviation degree at delta entry improved the cooling performance of deteriorated columns. Referring to the radial inflow air velocity ura and the air inflow deviation degree at delta entry, the effect mechanism of air deflectors are clarified under crosswind

  16. Aeolian processes across transverse dunes. I: Modelling the air flow

    J.H. van Boxel; S.M. Arens; P.M. van Dijk

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a two-dimensional second-order closure model simulating air flow and turbulence across transverse dunes. Input parameters are upwind wind speed, topography of the dune ridge and surface roughness distribution over the ridge. The most important output is the distribution of the f

  17. Numerical Modeling of Accuracy of Air Ion Field Measurement

    Bartušek, Karel; Fiala, P.; Bachorec, T.; Kadlecová, E.

    Cambridge : The Electromagnetic Academy, 2007, s. 578-581. ISBN 978-1-934142-00-4. [Progress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium - PIERS 2007. Beijing (CN), 26.03.2007-20.03.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : air ion * numerical modeling Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  18. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L. [National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  19. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber's continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis

  20. Modeling solar-driven ejector refrigeration system offering air conditioning for office buildings

    Guo, J.; Shen, H.G. [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2009-02-15

    A lumped method combined with dynamic model is proposed for use in investigating the performance and solar fraction of a solar-driven ejector refrigeration system (SERS) using R134a, for office air conditioning application for buildings in Shanghai, China. Classical hourly outdoor temperature and solar radiation model were used to provide basic data for accurate analysis of the system performance. Results indicate that during the office working-time, i.e., from 9:00 to 17:00, the average COP and the average solar fraction of the system were 0.48 and 0.82 respectively when the operating conditions were: generator temperature (85 C), evaporator temperature (8 C) and condenser temperature varying with ambient temperature. Compared with traditional compressor based air conditioner, the system can save upto 80% electric energy when providing the same cooling capacity for office buildings. Hence, the system offers a good energy conservation method for office buildings. (author)

  1. InMAP: a new model for air pollution interventions

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2015-10-01

    Mechanistic air pollution models are essential tools in air quality management. Widespread use of such models is hindered, however, by the extensive expertise or computational resources needed to run most models. Here, we present InMAP (Intervention Model for Air Pollution), which offers an alternative to comprehensive air quality models for estimating the air pollution health impacts of emission reductions and other potential interventions. InMAP estimates annual-average changes in primary and secondary fine particle (PM2.5) concentrations - the air pollution outcome generally causing the largest monetized health damages - attributable to annual changes in precursor emissions. InMAP leverages pre-processed physical and chemical information from the output of a state-of-the-science chemical transport model (WRF-Chem) within an Eulerian modeling framework, to perform simulations that are several orders of magnitude less computationally intensive than comprehensive model simulations. InMAP uses a variable resolution grid that focuses on human exposures by employing higher spatial resolution in urban areas and lower spatial resolution in rural and remote locations and in the upper atmosphere; and by directly calculating steady-state, annual average concentrations. In comparisons run here, InMAP recreates WRF-Chem predictions of changes in total PM2.5 concentrations with population-weighted mean fractional error (MFE) and bias (MFB) < 10 % and population-weighted R2 ~ 0.99. Among individual PM2.5 species, the best predictive performance is for primary PM2.5 (MFE: 16 %; MFB: 13 %) and the worst predictive performance is for particulate nitrate (MFE: 119 %; MFB: 106 %). Potential uses of InMAP include studying exposure, health, and environmental justice impacts of potential shifts in emissions for annual-average PM2.5. Features planned for future model releases include a larger spatial domain, more temporal information, and the ability to predict ground-level ozone (O3

  2. Mathematical modeling of heat transfer between the plant seedling and the environment during a radiation frost

    Finnikov K.A.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The power of the internal heat source sufficient to maintain a positive temperature of plants during one of the possible form of cold stress - radiation frost was determined with the help of numerical simulation.The simulation of unsteady heat transfer in the soil-plant-air system in the conditions of radiation frost showed that the the ground part of plants is cooling most rapidly, and this process is partially slowed down by the natural-convection heat transfer with warmer air. If the frost is not continuous, the radiative cooling is the main danger for plant. The necessary power of heat-production inside plant that allows it to avoid hypothermia depends both on natural conditions and the size of the plant. For plants with a typical diameter of the stem about 2 mm this heat-production should be from 50 to 100 W / kg. Within 2 hours a total amount of heat about 0.5 MJ / kg in the plant should be allocated. Larger plants will have a smaller surface to mass ratio, and the maintaining of it's temperature will require a lower cost of nutrients per unit, accordingly. Modeling of the influence of plant surface trichomes presence on the process of its cooling showed that the role of trichomes in the protection of plants from hypothermia during radiation frost usually is negative due to the fact that the presence of trichomes increases the radiative heat transfer from the plant and the impediment in air movement near the plant reduces heat flux entering the plant from a warmer air. But in cases where the intensity of heat generation within the plant is sufficient for the maintenance of the plant temperature higher than the air temperature, the presence of trichomes impairs heat transfer from plant to air, and therefore contributes to a better heating of plants.

  3. "Developing a multi hazard air quality forecasting model for Santiago, Chile"

    Mena, M. A.; Delgado, R.; Hernandez, R.; Saide, P. E.; Cienfuegos, R.; Pinochet, J. I.; Molina, L. T.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2013-05-01

    Santiago, Chile has reduced annual particulate matter from 69ug/m3 (in 1989) to 25ug/m3 (in 2012), mostly by forcing industry, the transport sector, and the residential heating sector to adopt stringent emission standards to be able to operate under bad air days. Statistical forecasting has been used to predict bad air days, and pollution control measures in Santiago, Chile, for almost two decades. Recently an operational PM2.5 deterministic model has been implemented using WRF-Chem. The model was developed by the University of Iowa and is run at the Chilean Meteorological Office. Model configuration includes high resolution emissions gridding (2km) and updated population distribution using 2008 data from LANDSCAN. The model is run using a 2 day spinup with a 5 day forecast. This model has allowed a preventive approach in pollution control measures, as episodes are the results of multiple days of bad dispersion. Decreeing air pollution control measures in advance of bad air days resulted in a reduction of 40% of alert days (80ug/m3 mean 24h PM2.5) and 66% of "preemergency days" (110ug/m3 mean 24h PM2.5) from 2011 to 2012, despite similar meteorological conditions. This model will be deployed under a recently funded Center for Natural Disaster Management, and include other meteorological hazards such as flooding, high temperature, storm waves, landslides, UV radiation, among other parameters. This paper will present the results of operational air quality forecasting, and the methodology that will be used to transform WRF-Chem into a multi hazard forecasting system.

  4. Air quality along motorways. Measuring and modelling calculations

    This report describes the air quality along Koege Bugt motorway, one of the most trafficked sections in Denmark. A number of measurements have been carried out along Koege Bugt motorway at Greve for a three-month period in the autumn of 2003. For the first time in Denmark, NOx were measured with high time dissolution from different distances of the motorway. Furthermore, a number of meteorological parameters were measured in order to map local meteorological conditions. An air quality model describing dispersal and conversion has been made on the basis of the OML model. The OML model is modified in order to take traffic-made turbulence into consideration. The model has been evaluated through comparisons between measurements and simulated calculations. Furthermore, simulated calculations for the year 2003 has been made for comparison with extreme values. (BA)

  5. Improved air ventilation rate estimation based on a statistical model

    A new approach to air ventilation rate estimation from CO measurement data is presented. The approach is based on a state-space dynamic statistical model, allowing for quick and efficient estimation. Underlying computations are based on Kalman filtering, whose practical software implementation is rather easy. The key property is the flexibility of the model, allowing various artificial regimens of CO level manipulation to be treated. The model is semi-parametric in nature and can efficiently handle time-varying ventilation rate. This is a major advantage, compared to some of the methods which are currently in practical use. After a formal introduction of the statistical model, its performance is demonstrated on real data from routine measurements. It is shown how the approach can be utilized in a more complex situation of major practical relevance, when time-varying air ventilation rate and radon entry rate are to be estimated simultaneously from concurrent radon and CO measurements

  6. CLOUDS, AEROSOLS, RADIATION AND THE AIR-SEA INTERFACE OF THE SOUTHERN OCEAN: ESTABLISHING DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

    Wood, Robert [University of Washington; Bretherton, Chris [University of Washington; McFarquhar, Greg [University of Illinois - Urbana; Protat, Alain [Bureau of Meteorology - Melbourne; Quinn, Patricia [NOAA PMEL; Siems, Steven [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jakob, Christian [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Alexander, Simon [Australian Antarctic Division; Weller, Bob [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

    2014-09-29

    A workshop sponsored by the Department of Energy was convened at the University of Washington to discuss the state of knowledge of clouds, aerosols and air-sea interaction over the Southern Ocean and to identify strategies for reducing uncertainties in their representation in global and regional models. The Southern Ocean plays a critical role in the global climate system and is a unique pristine environment, yet other than from satellite, there have been sparse observations of clouds, aerosols, radiation and the air-sea interface in this region. Consequently, much is unknown about atmospheric and oceanographic processes and their linkage in this region. Approximately 60 scientists, including graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and senior researchers working in atmospheric and oceanic sciences at U.S. and foreign universities and government laboratories, attended the Southern Ocean Workshop. It began with a day of scientific talks, partly in plenary and partly in two parallel sessions, discussing the current state of the science for clouds, aerosols and air-sea interaction in the Southern Ocean. After the talks, attendees broke into two working groups; one focused on clouds and meteorology, and one focused on aerosols and their interactions with clouds. This was followed by more plenary discussion to synthesize the two working group discussions and to consider possible plans for organized activities to study clouds, aerosols and the air-sea interface in the Southern Ocean. The agenda and talk slides, including short summaries of the highlights of the parallel session talks developed by the session chars, are available at http://www.atmos.washington.edu/socrates/presentations/SouthernOceanPresentations/.

  7. Radiation transport in earth for neutron and gamma ray point sources above an air-ground interface

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates methods were used to calculate the instantaneous dose rate in silicon and neutron and gamma ray fluences as a function of depth in earth from point sources at various heights (1.0, 61.3, and 731.5 meters) above an air--ground interface. The radiation incident on the earth's surface was transported through an earth-only and an earth--concrete model containing 0.9 meters of borated concrete beginning 0.5 meters below the earth's surface to obtain fluence distributions to a depth of 3.0 meters. The inclusion of borated concrete did not significantly reduce the total instantaneous dose rate in silicon and, in all cases, the secondary gamma ray fluence and corresponding dose are substantially larger than the primary neutron fluence and corresponding dose for depths greater than 0.6 meter. 4 figures, 4 tables

  8. Radiation transport in earth for neutron and gamma ray point sources above an air-ground interface

    Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.

    1979-03-01

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates methods were used to calculate the instantaneous dose rate in silicon and neutron and gamma ray fluences as a function of depth in earth from point sources at various heights (1.0, 61.3, and 731.5 meters) above an air--ground interface. The radiation incident on the earth's surface was transported through an earth-only and an earth--concrete model containing 0.9 meters of borated concrete beginning 0.5 meters below the earth's surface to obtain fluence distributions to a depth of 3.0 meters. The inclusion of borated concrete did not significantly reduce the total instantaneous dose rate in silicon and, in all cases, the secondary gamma ray fluence and corresponding dose are substantially larger than the primary neutron fluence and corresponding dose for depths greater than 0.6 meter. 4 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Radiation transport in earth for neutron and gamma-ray point sources above an air-ground interface

    Two-dimensional discrete-ordinates methods have been used to calculate the instantaneous dose rate in silicon and neutron and gamma-ray fluences as a function of depth in earth from point sources at various heights (1.0, 61.3, and 731.5 m) above an air-ground interface. The radiation incident on the earth's surface was transported through an earth-only and an earth-concrete model containing 0.9 m of borated concrete beginning 0.5 m below the earth's surface to obtain fluence distributions to a depth of 3.0 m. The inclusion of borated concrete did not significantly reduce the total instantaneous dose rate in silicon, and in all cases, the secondary gamma-ray fluence and corresponding dose are substantially larger than the primary neutron fluence and corresponding dose for depths > 0.6 m

  10. Radiation transport in earth for neutron and gamma-ray point sources above an air-ground interface

    Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    Two-dimensional discrete-ordinates methods have been used to calculate the instantaneous dose rate in silicon and neutron and gamma-ray fluences as a function of depth in earth from point sources at various heights (1.0, 61.3, and 731.5 m) above an air-ground interface. The radiation incident on the earth's surface was transported through an earth-only and an earth-concrete model containing 0.9 m of borated concrete beginning 0.5 m below the earth's surface to obtain fluence distributions to a depth of 3.0 m. The inclusion of borated concrete did not significantly reduce the total instantaneous dose rate in silicon, and in all cases, the secondary gamma-ray fluence and corresponding dose are substantially larger than the primary neutron fluence and corresponding dose for depths > 0.6 m.

  11. Long-term patterns in dissolved organic carbon in boreal lakes: the role of incident radiation, precipitation, air temperature, southern oscillation and acid deposition

    J. J. Hudson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Both lake-specific (e.g. pH and regional (e.g. precipitation factors affect DOC concentration and pattern. Using annual DOC concentration in nine boreal lakes in the ice-free season, the potential influences of five regional factors, air temperature, precipitation, SO4 deposition, solar radiation (photosynthetically active radiation, or PAR and the southern oscillation index (SOI have been explored through multiple regression. Mean solar radiation, winter precipitation and summer precipitation explained 59% of the variation in the mean DOC concentration (F3,17= 8.29, p= 0.0013. Solar radiation and winter precipitation were correlated, negatively, while summer precipitation was correlated, positively, with DOC concentration. Because these relationships were based on only 21 years of data (1978 to 1998, the significance of the parameters in the regression model was evaluated with a randomisation test. This re-analysis indicated that summer precipitation did not contribute significantly to the regression model ( prand= 0.183. The final multiple regression explained 50% of the variation in DOC (F2,18 = 9.33, prand= 0.002 based on solar radiation and winter precipitation. These results suggest that solar radiation and winter precipitation have a significant role in determining long-term DOC concentration in boreal lakes. Keywords: dissolved-organic-carbon, lakes, climate, solar-radiation, precipitation, acid-precipitation, Precambrian-Shield-Ontario

  12. Spatial distribution of emissions to air - the SPREAD model

    Plejdrup, M.S.; Gyldenkaerne, S.

    2011-04-15

    The National Environmental Research Institute (NERI), Aarhus University, completes the annual national emission inventories for greenhouse gases and air pollutants according to Denmark's obligations under international conventions, e.g. the climate convention, UNFCCC and the convention on long-range transboundary air pollution, CLRTAP. NERI has developed a model to distribute emissions from the national emission inventories on a 1x1 km grid covering the Danish land and sea territory. The new spatial high resolution distribution model for emissions to air (SPREAD) has been developed according to the requirements for reporting of gridded emissions to CLRTAP. Spatial emission data is e.g. used as input for air quality modelling, which again serves as input for assessment and evaluation of health effects. For these purposes distributions with higher spatial resolution have been requested. Previously, a distribution on the 17x17 km EMEP grid has been set up and used in research projects combined with detailed distributions for a few sectors or sub-sectors e.g. a distribution for emissions from road traffic on 1x1 km resolution. SPREAD is developed to generate improved spatial emission data for e.g. air quality modelling in exposure studies. SPREAD includes emission distributions for each sector in the Danish inventory system; stationary combustion, mobile sources, fugitive emissions from fuels, industrial processes, solvents and other product use, agriculture and waste. This model enables generation of distributions for single sectors and for a number of sub-sectors and single sources as well. This report documents the methodologies in this first version of SPREAD and presents selected results. Further, a number of potential improvements for later versions of SPREAD are addressed and discussed. (Author)

  13. Modeling of air pollution from the power plant ash dumps

    Aleksic, Nenad M.; Balać, Nedeljko

    A simple model of air pollution from power plant ash dumps is presented, with emission rates calculated from the Bagnold formula and transport simulated by the ATDL type model. Moisture effects are accounted for by assumption that there is no pollution on rain days. Annual mean daily sedimentation rates, calculated for the area around the 'Nikola Tesla' power plants near Belgrade for 1987, show reasonably good agreement with observations.

  14. Modelling Domestic Air Transport Demand and Evaluating under Scenarios

    Cenk OZAN; Özgür BAŞKAN; Haldenbilen, Soner; Ceylan, Halim

    2014-01-01

    The lack of balance and integration between transportation modes in Turkey is one of the main problems. In this study, domestic air transport demand is modeled and evaluated under scenarios. For this purpose, indexing method which is able to indicate observed monthly and seasonal variations in demand is used. Proposals are suggested in order to overcome the lack of balance between transportation modes. In modeling, purchasing power parity and jet fuel prices as independent variables are used....

  15. Performance of Air Pollution Models on Massively Parallel Computers

    Brown, John; Hansen, Per Christian; Wasniewski, Jerzy;

    1996-01-01

    To compare the performance and use of three massively parallel SIMD computers, we implemented a large air pollution model on the computers. Using a realistic large-scale model, we gain detailed insight about the performance of the three computers when used to solve large-scale scientific problems...... that involve several types of numerical computations. The computers considered in our study are the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5, and the MasPar MP-2216...

  16. Asian Dust particles impacts on air quality and radiative forcing over Korea

    Asian Dust particles originated from the deserts and loess areas of the Asian continent are often transported over Korea, Japan, and the North Pacific Ocean during spring season. Major air mass pathway of Asian dust storm to Korea is from either north-western Chinese desert regions or north-eastern Chinese sandy areas. The local atmospheric environment condition in Korea is greatly impacted by Asian dust particles transported by prevailing westerly wind. Since these Asian dust particles pass through heavily populated urban and industrial areas in China before it reach Korean peninsular, their physical, chemical and optical properties vary depending on the atmospheric conditions and air mass pathway characteristics. An integrated system approach has been adopted at the Advanced Environment Monitoring Research Center (ADEMRC), Gwangju Institute Science and Technology (GIST), Korea for effective monitoring of atmospheric aerosols utilizing various in-situ and optical remote sensing methods, which include a multi-channel Raman LIDAR system, sunphotometer, satellite, and in-situ instruments. Results from recent studies on impacts of Asian dust particles on local air quality and radiative forcing over Korea are summarized here.

  17. Surface air temperature variability in global climate models

    Davy, Richard

    2012-01-01

    New results from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) and multiple global reanalysis datasets are used to investigate the relationship between the mean and standard deviation in the surface air temperature. A combination of a land-sea mask and orographic filter were used to investigate the geographic region with the strongest correlation and in all cases this was found to be for low-lying over-land locations. This result is consistent with the expectation that differences in the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere are an important factor in determining the surface air temperature response to forcing.

  18. A mathematical model for radiation hydrodynamics

    Sebastiano Pennisi

    1990-11-01

    Full Text Available We adopt here the idea of describing a radiation field by means of the radiation energy density E and the radiative flux vector F which must satisfy a set of evolution equations; in these equations an unknown tensorial function P(E,F appears that is determined by the methods of extended thermodynamics.

  19. Seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air and resulting radiation dose to human respiratory tract

    A.M.A. Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of radiation hazard of indoor radon is largely due to the radon progenies, which are inhaled and deposited in the human respiratory tract. It is essential to evaluate aerodynamic characteristics of the radon progenies, which are either attached or unattached to aerosol particles, because the dose is strongly dependent on the location of deposition in respiratory tract and hence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the aerosol particles. This paper presents the seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air under domestic conditions at Nagoya University, Japan. A low pressure cascade impactor as an instrument for classifying aerosol sizes and imaging plate as a radiation detector have been employed to characterize the activity size distribution of short-lived radon decay products. In parallel, radon and its progenies concentrations were measured. Taking into account the progeny characteristics, the inhalation dose in the different seasons was also estimated based on a lung dose model with the structure that is related to the ICRP66 respiratory tract model. The result evident that, the highest dose 0.22 mSvy−1 was observed during the winter where the highest value of equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon (EEC and lowest value of the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD were found in this season; whereas, the dose in spring appeared to be lowest 0.02 mSvy−1.

  20. Modelling Domestic Air Transport Demand and Evaluating under Scenarios

    Cenk Ozan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The lack of balance and integration between transportation modes in Turkey is one of the main problems. In this study, domestic air transport demand is modeled and evaluated under scenarios. For this purpose, indexing method which is able to indicate observed monthly and seasonal variations in demand is used. Proposals are suggested in order to overcome the lack of balance between transportation modes. In modeling, purchasing power parity and jet fuel prices as independent variables are used. Results showed that the developed model using indexing method is substantially sensitive to observed monthly and seasonal variations in domestic air transport demand. Furthermore, in the event that there are optimistic an increase in the income level and a crawl in the jet fuel prices, domestic air transport can rival with railways for second place in the transportation modes behind highways. For this reason, it is considered regulation on wages policy and tax of jet fuel prices necessary to support development of domestic air transport demand.

  1. Radiolytic yield of ozone in air for low dose neutron and x-ray/gamma-ray radiation

    Radiation ionizes surrounding air and produces molecular species, and these localized effects may be used as a signature of, and for quantification of, radiation. Low-level ozone production measurements from radioactive sources have been performed in this work to understand radiation chemical yields at low doses. The University of New Mexico AGN-201 M reactor was used as a tunable radiation source. Ozone levels were compared between reactor-on and reactor-off conditions, and differences (0.61 to 0.73 ppb) well below background levels were measured. Simulations were performed to determine the dose rate distribution and average dose rate to the air sample within the reactor, giving 35 mGy of mixed photon and neutron dose. A radiation chemical yield for ozone of 6.5±0.8 molecules/100 eV was found by a variance weighted average of the data. The different contributions of photons and neutrons to radiolytic ozone production are discussed. - Highlights: • Localized ozone production in air may be an indicator of radioactive material. • Radiolytic ozone work is dominated by high radiation fields in the saturation regime. • For low level measurements we used a reactor as a mixed photon/neutron source. • Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the dose profile to air. • Different contributions to ozone production are discussed for neutrons and photons

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans: a model to monitor bacterial air quality

    Duclairoir Poc Cécile

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low environmental air quality is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity and this question is now emerging as a main concern of governmental authorities. Airborne pollution results from the combination of chemicals, fine particles, and micro-organisms quantitatively or qualitatively dangerous for health or for the environment. Increasing regulations and limitations for outdoor air quality have been decreed in regards to chemicals and particles contrary to micro-organisms. Indeed, pertinent and reliable tests to evaluate this biohazard are scarce. In this work, our purpose was to evaluate the Caenorhaditis elegans killing test, a model considered as an equivalent to the mouse acute toxicity test in pharmaceutical industry, in order to monitor air bacterial quality. Findings The present study investigates the bacterial population in dust clouds generated during crop ship loading in harbor installations (Rouen harbor, Normandy, France. With a biocollector, airborne bacteria were impacted onto the surface of agar medium. After incubation, a replicate of the colonies on a fresh agar medium was done using a velvet. All the replicated colonies were pooled creating the "Total Air Sample". Meanwhile, all the colonies on the original plate were isolated. Among which, five representative bacterial strains were chosen. The virulence of these representatives was compared to that of the "Total Air Sample" using the Caenorhaditis elegans killing test. The survival kinetic of nematodes fed with the "Total Air Sample" is consistent with the kinetics obtained using the five different representatives strains. Conclusions Bacterial air quality can now be monitored in a one shot test using the Caenorhaditis elegans killing test.

  3. Stochastic modeling of p53-regulated apoptosis upon radiation damage

    Bhatt, Divesh; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-01-01

    We develop and study the evolution of a model of radiation induced apoptosis in cells using stochastic simulations, and identified key protein targets for effective mitigation of radiation damage. We identified several key proteins associated with cellular apoptosis using an extensive literature survey. In particular, we focus on the p53 transcription dependent and p53 transcription independent pathways for mitochondrial apoptosis. Our model reproduces known p53 oscillations following radiation damage. The key, experimentally testable hypotheses that we generate are - inhibition of PUMA is an effective strategy for mitigation of radiation damage if the treatment is administered immediately, at later stages following radiation damage, inhibition of tBid is more effective.

  4. Effects of model resolution on entrainment (inversion heights), cloud-radiation interactions, and cloud radiative forcing

    H. Guo; Y. LIU; P. H. Daum; Zeng, X.; Li, X.; Tao, W.-K.

    2008-01-01

    We undertook three-dimensional numerical studies of a marine stratus deck under a strong inversion using an interactive shortwave- and longwave-radiation module. A suite of sensitivity tests were conducted to address the effects of model resolution on entrainment (inversion heights), cloud-radiation interactions, and cloud radiative-forcings by varying model horizontal resolution only, varying vertical resolution only, and varying horizontal- and vertical-resolution simultan...

  5. Development of a distributed air pollutant dry deposition modeling framework

    A distributed air pollutant dry deposition modeling system was developed with a geographic information system (GIS) to enhance the functionality of i-Tree Eco (i-Tree, 2011). With the developed system, temperature, leaf area index (LAI) and air pollutant concentration in a spatially distributed form can be estimated, and based on these and other input variables, dry deposition of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and particulate matter less than 10 microns (PM10) to trees can be spatially quantified. Employing nationally available road network, traffic volume, air pollutant emission/measurement and meteorological data, the developed system provides a framework for the U.S. city managers to identify spatial patterns of urban forest and locate potential areas for future urban forest planting and protection to improve air quality. To exhibit the usability of the framework, a case study was performed for July and August of 2005 in Baltimore, MD. - Highlights: ► A distributed air pollutant dry deposition modeling system was developed. ► The developed system enhances the functionality of i-Tree Eco. ► The developed system employs nationally available input datasets. ► The developed system is transferable to any U.S. city. ► Future planting and protection spots were visually identified in a case study. - Employing nationally available datasets and a GIS, this study will provide urban forest managers in U.S. cities a framework to quantify and visualize urban forest structure and its air pollution removal effect.

  6. Computational Modeling of Transport Limitations in Li-Air Batteries

    Ryan, Emily M.; Ferris, Kim F.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-02-22

    In this paper we investigate transport limitations in the electrodes of lithium-air batteries through computational modeling. We use meso-scale models to consider the effects of dendrites on the current and potential at the anode surface, and to investigate the effects of reaction and transport parameters on the formation of precipitates in the cathode. The formation of dendrites on the anode surface during cycling reduces the transport of ions and can lead to short circuits in the cell. Growth of precipitates in the cathode reduces the specific capacity of the cell due to surface passivation and pore clogging. Both of these degradation mechanisms depend on meso-scale phenomena, such as the pore-scale reactive transport in the cathode. To understand the effects of the meso-scale transport and precipitation on the performance and lifetime of Li-air batteries, meso-scale modeling is needed that is able to resolve the electrodes and their microstructures.

  7. Numerical analysis of radiation effects in a metallic foam by means of the radiative conductivity model

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the radiation contribution to the steady-state heat transfer in metallic foams by means of the radiative conductivity model. Because of the complexity of the structure, reference is made to a simplified physical radiative model, where the elementary cell of the foams is treated as a cubic cell. The contribution of the radiation heat transfer is investigated on a local basis. The local radiative conductivity has been used to evaluate the influence of radiative heat transfer in a two dimensional conductive-convective-radiative problem involving a forced fluid flow within a heated channel filled with a metallic foam. The effect of the solid emissivity and the foam porosity is pointed out for different foams.

  8. Radiation Transfer Model for Aerosol Events in the Earth Atmosphere

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Yokomae, Takuma; Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru

    Recently large scale-forest fire, which damages the Earth environment as biomass burning and emission of carbonaceous particles, frequently occurs due to the unstable climate and/or global warming tendency. It is also known that the heavy soil dust is transported from the China continent to Japan on westerly winds, especially in spring. Furthermore the increasing emis-sions of anthropogenic particles associated with continuing economic growth scatter serious air pollutants. Thus atmospheric aerosols, especially in Asia, are very complex and heavy loading, which is called aerosol event. In the case of aerosol events, it is rather difficult to do the sun/sky photometry from the ground, however satellite observation is an effective for aerosol monitoring. Here the detection algorithms from space for such aerosol events as dust storm or biomass burn-ing are dealt with multispectral satellite data as ADEOS-2/GLI, Terra/Aqua/MODIS and/or GOSAT/CAI first. And then aerosol retrieval algorithms are examined based on new radiation transfer code for semi-infinite atmosphere model. The derived space-based results are validated with ground-based measurements and/or model simulations. Namely the space-or surface-based measurements, multiple scattering calculations and model simulations are synthesized together for aerosol retrieval in this work.

  9. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    Sherman, Max H.; Hult, Erin L.

    2013-06-01

    A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the timescale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady-state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

  10. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    Sherman, Max H.; Hult, Erin L.

    2013-02-26

    A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

  11. Predictive Model of Radiative Neutrino Masses

    Babu, K S

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple and predictive model of radiative neutrino masses. It is a special case of the Zee model which introduces two Higgs doublets and a charged singlet. We impose a family-dependent Z_4 symmetry acting on the leptons, which reduces the number of parameters describing neutrino oscillations to four. A variety of predictions follow: The hierarchy of neutrino masses must be inverted; the lightest neutrino mass is extremely small and calculable; one of the neutrino mixing angles is determined in terms of the other two; the phase parameters take CP-conserving values with \\delta_{CP} = \\pi; and the effective mass in neutrinoless double beta decay lies in a narrow range, m_{\\beta \\beta} = (17.6 - 18.5) meV. The ratio of vacuum expectation values of the two Higgs doublets, tan\\beta, is determined to be either 1.9 or 0.19 from neutrino oscillation data. Flavor-conserving and flavor-changing couplings of the Higgs doublets are also determined from neutrino data. The non-standard neutral Higgs bosons, if t...

  12. Review of Air Exchange Rate Models for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings, where people spend their time. The AER, which is rate the exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pol...

  13. Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Investment Model-Cargo

    Johnson, Jesse; Santmire, Tara

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Air Cargo Investment Model-Cargo (ACIMC), is to examine the economic effects of technology investment on the air cargo market, particularly the market for new cargo aircraft. To do so, we have built an econometrically based model designed to operate like the ACIM. Two main drivers account for virtually all of the demand: the growth rate of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and changes in the fare yield (which is a proxy of the price charged or fare). These differences arise from a combination of the nature of air cargo demand and the peculiarities of the air cargo market. The net effect of these two factors are that sales of new cargo aircraft are much less sensitive to either increases in GDP or changes in the costs of labor, capital, fuel, materials, and energy associated with the production of new cargo aircraft than the sales of new passenger aircraft. This in conjunction with the relatively small size of the cargo aircraft market means technology improvements to the cargo aircraft will do relatively very little to spur increased sales of new cargo aircraft.

  14. Development of a hydrodynamic model for air-lift reactors

    Carvalho E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a 1D hydrodynamic model has been developed for gas hold-up and liquid circulation velocity prediction in air-lift reactors. The model is based on momentum balance equations and has been adjusted to experimental data collected on a pilot plant reactor equipped with two types of gas distributors and using water and water/butanol as the liquid phase. Different techniques of signal analysis have also been applied to pressure fluctuations in order to extract information about flow regimes and regime transitions. A good knowledge of the flow pattern is essential to establish adequate correlations for the hydrodynamic model.

  15. Development of a forecast model for global air traffic emissions

    Schaefer, Martin

    2012-07-01

    The thesis describes the methodology and results of a simulation model that quantifies fuel consumption and emissions of civil air traffic. Besides covering historical emissions, the model aims at forecasting emissions in the medium-term future. For this purpose, simulation models of aircraft and engine types are used in combination with a database of global flight movements and assumptions about traffic growth, fleet rollover and operational aspects. Results from an application of the model include emissions of scheduled air traffic for the years 2000 to 2010 as well as forecasted emissions until the year 2030. In a baseline scenario of the forecast, input assumptions (e.g. traffic growth rates) are in line with predictions by the aircraft industry. Considering the effects of advanced technologies of the short-term and medium-term future, the forecast focusses on fuel consumption and emissions of nitric oxides. Calculations for historical air traffic additionally cover emissions of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons and soot. Results are validated against reference data including studies by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and simulation results from international research projects. (orig.)

  16. Solutions Network Formulation Report. NASA's Potential Contributions for Using Solar Ultraviolet Radiation in Conjunction with Photocatalysis for Urban Air Pollution Mitigation and Increasing Air Quality

    Underwood, Lauren; Ryan, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    This Candidate Solution is based on using NASA Earth science research on atmospheric ozone and aerosols data as a means to predict and evaluate the effectiveness of photocatalytically created surfaces (building materials like glass, tile and cement) for air pollution mitigation purposes. When these surfaces are exposed to near UV light, organic molecules, like air pollutants and smog precursors, will degrade into environmentally friendly compounds. U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) is responsible for forecasting daily air quality by using the Air Quality Index (AQI) that is provided by AIRNow. EPA is partnered with AIRNow and is responsible for calculating the AQI for five major air pollutants that are regulated by the Clean Air Act. In this Solution, UV irradiance data acquired from the satellite mission Aura and the OMI Surface UV algorithm will be used to help understand both the efficacy and efficiency of the photocatalytic decomposition process these surfaces facilitate, and their ability to reduce air pollutants. Prediction models that estimate photocatalytic function do not exist. NASA UV irradiance data will enable this capability, so that air quality agencies that are run by state and local officials can develop and implement programs that utilize photocatalysis for urban air pollution control and, enable them to make effective decisions about air pollution protection programs.

  17. Modeling and Fluid Flow Analysis of Wavy Fin Based Automotive Radiator

    Vishwa Deepak Dwivedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In continuous technological development, an automotive industry has increased the demand for high efficiency engines. A high efficiency engines in not only based on its performance but also for better fuel economy and less emission rate. Radiator is one of the important parts of the internal combustion engine cooling system. The manufacturing cost of the radiator is 20 percent of the whole cost of the engine. So improving the performance and reducing cost of radiators are necessary research. For higher cooling capacity of radiator, addition of fins is one of the approaches to increase the cooling rate of the radiator. In addition, heat transfer fluids at air and fluid side such as water and ethylene glycol exhibit very low thermal conductivity. As a result there is a need for new and innovative heat transfer fluids, known as “Nano fluid” for improving heat transfer rate in an automotive radiator. Recently there have been considerable research findings highlighting superior heat transfer performances of nanofluids about 15-25% of heat transfer enhancement can be achieved by using types of nanofluids. With these specific characteristics, the size and weight of an automotive car radiator can be reduced without affecting its heat transfer performance. An automotive radiator (Wavy fin type model is modeled on modeling software CATIA V5 and performance evaluation is done on pre-processing software ANSYS 14.0. The temperature and velocity distribution of coolant and air are analyzed by using Computational fluid dynamics environment software CFX. Results have shown that the rate of heat transfer is better when nano fluid (Si C + water is used as coolant, than the conventional coolant.

  18. The influence of the solar radiation model on the calcutated solar radiation from a horizontal surface to a tilted surface

    Andersen, Elsa; Lund, Hans; Furbo, Simon

    2004-01-01

    Measured solar radiation data are most commonly available as total solar radiation on a horizontal surface. When using solar radiation measured on horizontal to calculate the solar radiation on tilted surfaces and thereby the thermal performance of different applications such as buildings and solar...... yearly thermal performances of a solar collector using the different solar radiation processing models is investigated. The study shows that the isotropic diffuse radiation model is underestimating the diffuse radiation from south and overestimating the diffuse radiation from north, while the anisotropic...... heating systems, different solar radiation models can be used. The calculation of beam radiation from a horizontal surface to a tilted surface can be done exactly whereas different solar radiation models can calculate the sky diffuse radiation. The sky diffuse radiation can either be assumed evenly...

  19. New Methods for Air Quality Model Evaluation with Satellite Data

    Holloway, T.; Harkey, M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite major advances in the ability of satellites to detect gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, there remains significant, untapped potential to apply space-based data to air quality regulatory applications. Here, we showcase research findings geared toward increasing the relevance of satellite data to support operational air quality management, focused on model evaluation. Particular emphasis is given to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO) from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aboard the NASA Aura satellite, and evaluation of simulations from the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. This work is part of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST), and is motivated by ongoing dialog with state and federal air quality management agencies. We present the response of satellite-derived NO2 to meteorological conditions, satellite-derived HCHO:NO2 ratios as an indicator of ozone production regime, and the ability of models to capture these sensitivities over the continental U.S. In the case of NO2-weather sensitivities, we find boundary layer height, wind speed, temperature, and relative humidity to be the most important variables in determining near-surface NO2 variability. CMAQ agreed with relationships observed in satellite data, as well as in ground-based data, over most regions. However, we find that the southwest U.S. is a problem area for CMAQ, where modeled NO2 responses to insolation, boundary layer height, and other variables are at odds with the observations. Our analyses utilize a software developed by our team, the Wisconsin Horizontal Interpolation Program for Satellites (WHIPS): a free, open-source program designed to make satellite-derived air quality data more usable. WHIPS interpolates level 2 satellite retrievals onto a user-defined fixed grid, in effect creating custom-gridded level 3 satellite product. Currently, WHIPS can process the following data products: OMI NO2 (NASA retrieval); OMI NO2 (KNMI retrieval); OMI

  20. A rat model of radiation injury in the mandibular area

    Sønstevold, Tonje; Johannessen, Anne Christine; Stuhr, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation technology focuses on delivering the radiation as precisely as possible to the tumor, nonetheless both acute and long-term damage to surrounding normal tissue may develop. Injuries to the surrounding normal tissue after radiotherapy of head and neck cancer are difficult to manage. An animal model is needed to elucidate good treatment modalities. The aim of this study was to establish a rat model where a certain radiation dose gives reproducible tissue reactions in the ...

  1. A radiation-derived temperature-index snow routine for the GSSHA hydrologic model

    Follum, Michael L.; Downer, Charles W.; Niemann, Jeffrey D.; Roylance, Spencer M.; Vuyovich, Carrie M.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate estimation of snowpack is vital in many parts of the world for both water management and flood prediction. Temperature-index (TI) snowmelt models are commonly used for this purpose due to their simplicity and low data requirements. Although TI models work well within lumped watershed models, their reliance on air temperature (and potentially an assumed lapse rate) as the only external driver of snowmelt limits their ability to accurately simulate the spatial distribution of snowpack and thus the timing of snowmelt. This limitation significantly reduces the utility of the TI approach in distributed hydrologic models because spatial variability within the watershed, including snowpack and snowmelt, is usually the primary reason for selecting a distributed model. In this paper, a new radiation-derived temperature index (RTI) approach is presented that uses a spatially-varying proxy temperature in place of air temperature within the TI model of the fully-distributed Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) watershed model. The RTI is derived from a radiation balance and includes spatial heterogeneity in both shortwave and longwave radiation. Thus, the RTI accounts for more local variation in the available energy than air temperature alone. The RTI model in GSSHA is tested at the Senator Beck basin in southwestern Colorado where observations for snow water equivalent (SWE) and LandSat-derived images of snow cover area (SCA) are available. The TI and RTI approaches produce similar SWE estimates at two non-forested and relatively flat sites with SWE observations. However, the two models can produce very different SWE values at sites with forests or topographic slopes, which leads to significant differences in the basin-wide SWE values of the two models. Furthermore, the RTI model provides better basin-wide SCA estimates than the TI model in 75% of the LandSat images analyzed.

  2. Sunspot Modeling: From Simplified Models to Radiative MHD Simulations

    Rolf Schlichenmaier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We review our current understanding of sunspots from the scales of their fine structure to their large scale (global structure including the processes of their formation and decay. Recently, sunspot models have undergone a dramatic change. In the past, several aspects of sunspot structure have been addressed by static MHD models with parametrized energy transport. Models of sunspot fine structure have been relying heavily on strong assumptions about flow and field geometry (e.g., flux-tubes, "gaps", convective rolls, which were motivated in part by the observed filamentary structure of penumbrae or the necessity of explaining the substantial energy transport required to maintain the penumbral brightness. However, none of these models could self-consistently explain all aspects of penumbral structure (energy transport, filamentation, Evershed flow. In recent years, 3D radiative MHD simulations have been advanced dramatically to the point at which models of complete sunspots with sufficient resolution to capture sunspot fine structure are feasible. Here overturning convection is the central element responsible for energy transport, filamentation leading to fine-structure and the driving of strong outflows. On the larger scale these models are also in the progress of addressing the subsurface structure of sunspots as well as sunspot formation. With this shift in modeling capabilities and the recent advances in high resolution observations, the future research will be guided by comparing observation and theory.

  3. Experimental synergy combining lidar measurements so as to optically characterize aerosols: applications to air quality and radiative forcing

    The work carried out in this study is devoted to a better understanding of the evolution of aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties for urban pollution aerosols, dust and biomass burning particles. It mainly concerns the complex refractive index and the single-scattering albedo. Such a characterisation is indeed necessary so as to fulfil the requirements of scientific and societal air quality and global climate evolution questions. Our study is based on a synergy between different measurements platforms: ground-based or airborne measurements, together with active and passive remote sensing observations. Lidar in particular turns out to be an essential tool in order to assess horizontal and vertical variability of aerosol micro-physical and optical properties in the atmospheric boundary layer, but also in the residual layer, as well as in layers transported from the boundary layer to the free troposphere. The original methodology we developed highlights the importance of the geographical origin, the impact of aging and dynamical processes in the evolution of structural, optical and hygroscopic aerosol features. The related accurate determination of the properties in each aerosol layer is required for radiative fluxes and heating rates calculations in the atmospheric column. The radiative impact of both dust particles and biomass burning aerosols observed over the region of Niamey (Niger) was thus assessed during the dry season. These results reveal the need of a better characterisation of those significant aerosol properties for each layer in models. (author)

  4. Comparison of stationary and personal air sampling with an air dispersion model for children's ambient exposure to manganese.

    Fulk, Florence; Haynes, Erin N; Hilbert, Timothy J; Brown, David; Petersen, Dan; Reponen, Tiina

    2016-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) is ubiquitous in the environment and essential for normal growth and development, yet excessive exposure can lead to impairments in neurological function. This study modeled ambient Mn concentrations as an alternative to stationary and personal air sampling to assess exposure for children enrolled in the Communities Actively Researching Exposure Study in Marietta, OH. Ambient air Mn concentration values were modeled using US Environmental Protection Agency's Air Dispersion Model AERMOD based on emissions from the ferromanganese refinery located in Marietta. Modeled Mn concentrations were compared with Mn concentrations from a nearby stationary air monitor. The Index of Agreement for modeled versus monitored data was 0.34 (48 h levels) and 0.79 (monthly levels). Fractional bias was 0.026 for 48 h levels and -0.019 for monthly levels. The ratio of modeled ambient air Mn to measured ambient air Mn at the annual time scale was 0.94. Modeled values were also time matched to personal air samples for 19 children. The modeled values explained a greater degree of variability in personal exposures compared with time-weighted distance from the emission source. Based on these results modeled Mn concentrations provided a suitable approach for assessing airborne Mn exposure in this cohort. PMID:27168393

  5. Forest fire forecasting tool for air quality modelling systems

    Adverse effects of smoke on air quality are of great concern; however, even today the estimates of atmospheric fire emissions are a key issue. It is necessary to implement systems for predicting smoke into an air quality modelling system, and in this work a first attempt towards creating a system of this type is presented. Wild land fire spread and behavior are complex phenomena due to both the number of involved physic-chemical factors, and the nonlinear relationship between variables. WRF-Fire was employed to simulate spread and behavior of some real fires occurred in South-East of Spain and North of Portugal. The use of fire behavior models requires the availability of high resolution environmental and fuel data. A new custom fuel moisture content model has been developed. The new module allows each time step to calculate the fuel moisture content of the dead fuels and live fuels. The results confirm that the use of accurate meteorological data and a custom fuel moisture content model is crucial to obtain precise simulations of fire behavior. To simulate air pollution over Europe, we use the regional meteorological-chemistry transport model WRF-Chem. In this contribution, we show the impact of using two different fire emissions inventories (FINN and IS4FIRES) and how the coupled WRF-Fire- Chem model improves the results of the forest fire emissions and smoke concentrations. The impact of the forest fire emissions on concentrations is evident, and it is quite clear from these simulations that the choice of emission inventory is very important. We conclude that using the WRF-fire behavior model produces better results than using forest fire emission inventories although the requested computational power is much higher. (Author)

  6. Computer modelling of statistical properties of SASE FEL radiation

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1997-06-01

    The paper describes an approach to computer modelling of statistical properties of the radiation from self amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL). The present approach allows one to calculate the following statistical properties of the SASE FEL radiation: time and spectral field correlation functions, distribution of the fluctuations of the instantaneous radiation power, distribution of the energy in the electron bunch, distribution of the radiation energy after monochromator installed at the FEL amplifier exit and the radiation spectrum. All numerical results presented in the paper have been calculated for the 70 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility being under construction at DESY.

  7. A Generalized Layered Radiative Transfer Model in the Vegetation Canopy

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a generalized layered model for radiation transfer in canopy with high vertical resolution is developed. Differing from the two-stream approximate radiation transfer model commonly used in the land surface models, the generalized model takes into account the effect of complicated canopy morphology and inhomogeneous optical properties of leaves on radiation transfer within the canopy. In the model, the total leaf area index (LAI) of the canopy is divided into many layers. At a given layer, the influences of diffuse radiation angle distributions and leaf angle distributions on radiation transfer within the canopy are considered. The derivation of equations serving the model are described in detail, and these can deal with various diffuse radiation transfers in quite broad categories of canopy with quite inhomogeneous vertical structures and uneven leaves with substantially different optical properties of adaxial and abaxial faces of the leaves. The model is used to simulate the radiation transfer for canopies with horizontal leaves to validate the generalized model. Results from the model are compared with those from the two-stream scheme, and differences between these two models are discussed.

  8. Effect of clean indoor air laws on smokers: the clean air module of the SimSmoke computer simulation model

    Levy, D.; Friend, K; Polishchuk, E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To develop a simulation model to examine the effects of clean indoor air laws on prevalence rates and smoking attributable deaths.
METHODS—Based on empirical and theoretical research, the effects of clean air laws are modelled by type of law. The model considers clean air laws at the state levels between 1993 and 2000, and projects the number of smokers and smoking attributable deaths in the USA under different scenarios from 2000 onward.
RESULTS—The model predicts that comprehensi...

  9. Space-Time Fusion Under Error in Computer Model Output: An Application to Modeling Air Quality

    In the last two decades a considerable amount of research effort has been devoted to modeling air quality with public health objectives. These objectives include regulatory activities such as setting standards along with assessing the relationship between exposure to air pollutan...

  10. X-ray radiation from the volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    Bratchikov, V. B.; Gagarinov, K. A.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Tkachev, A. N.; Yakovlenko, S. I.

    2007-07-01

    X-ray radiation from the volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air is studied under the conditions when the voltage pulse rise time varies from 0.5 to 100 ns and the open-circuit voltage amplitude of the generator varies from 20 to 750 kV. It is shown that a volume discharge from a needle-like cathode forms at a relatively wide voltage pulse (to ≈60 ns in this work). The volume character of the discharge is due to preionization by fast electrons, which arise when the electric field concentrates at the cathode and in the discharge gap. As the voltage pulse rise time grows, X-ray radiation comes largely from the discharge gap in accordance with previous experiments. Propagation of fast avalanche electrons in nitrogen subjected to a nonuniform unsteady electric field is simulated. It is demonstrated that the amount of hard X-ray photons grows not only with increasing voltage amplitude but also with shortening pulse rise time.

  11. EMMA model: an advanced operational mesoscale air quality model for urban and regional environments

    Mesoscale air quality models are an important tool to forecast and analyse the air quality in regional and urban areas. In recent years an increased interest has been shown by decision makers in these types of software tools. The complexity of such a model has grown exponentially with the increase of computer power. Nowadays, medium workstations can run operational versions of these modelling systems successfully. Presents a complex mesoscale air quality model which has been installed in the Environmental Office of the Madrid community (Spain) in order to forecast accurately the ozone, nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide air concentrations in a 3D domain centred on Madrid city. Describes the challenging scientific matters to be solved in order to develop an operational version of the atmospheric mesoscale numerical pollution model for urban and regional areas (ANA). Some encouraging results have been achieved in the attempts to improve the accuracy of the predictions made by the version already installed. (Author)

  12. Air

    ... house) Industrial emissions (like smoke and chemicals from factories) Household cleaners (spray cleaners, air fresheners) Car emissions (like carbon monoxide) *All of these things make up “particle pollution.” They mostly come from cars, trucks, buses, and ...

  13. The role of air quality modelling in particulate matter management in cities. Results from the Air Implementation Pilot

    Castell N.; Guerreiro C; Denby B.R.; Ortiz González A.

    2015-01-01

    The European Commission and the EEA agreed to reinforce efforts to improve knowledge on implementation of air quality legislation through a joint pilot project. The Air Implementation Pilot run from March 2012 to June 2013 and aimed at better understanding the challenges cities faced in implementing air quality policy. Twelve European cities were selected and invited to join the project. One of the focus of the Pilot project was to assess the use of models ...

  14. A Model for Hourly Solar Radiation Data Generation from Daily Solar Radiation Data Using a Generalized Regression Artificial Neural Network

    Tamer Khatib; Wilfried Elmenreich

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model for predicting hourly solar radiation data using daily solar radiation averages. The proposed model is a generalized regression artificial neural network. This model has three inputs, namely, mean daily solar radiation, hour angle, and sunset hour angle. The output layer has one node which is mean hourly solar radiation. The training and development of the proposed model are done using MATLAB and 43800 records of hourly global solar radiation. The results show that...

  15. Development of a hydrodynamic model for air-lift reactors

    Carvalho E.; Camarasa E.; Meleiro L.A.C.; Maciel Filho R.; Domingues A.; Vial Ch.; Wild G.; Poncin S.; Midoux N.; Bouillard J.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a 1D hydrodynamic model has been developed for gas hold-up and liquid circulation velocity prediction in air-lift reactors. The model is based on momentum balance equations and has been adjusted to experimental data collected on a pilot plant reactor equipped with two types of gas distributors and using water and water/butanol as the liquid phase. Different techniques of signal analysis have also been applied to pressure fluctuations in order to extract information about flow r...

  16. Modelling internal air systems in gas turbine engines

    J Michael Owen

    2007-01-01

    Rotating-disc systems can be used to model,experimentally and computationally,the flow and heat transfer that occur inside the internal cooling-air systems of gas turbine engines.These rotating-disc systems have been used successfully to simplify and understand some of the complex flows that occur in internal-air systems,and designers have used this insight to improve the cooling effectiveness,thereby increasing the engine efficiency and reducing the emissions.In this review paper,three important cases are considered:hot-gas ingress;the pre-swirl system;and buoyancy-induced flow.Ingress,or ingestion,occurs when hot gas from the mainstream gas path is ingested into the wheel-space between the turbine disc and its adjacent casing.Rim seals are fitted at the periphery of the system,and sealing flow is used to reduce or prevent ingress.However,too much sealing air reduces the engine efficiency,and too little can cause serious overheating,resulting in damage to the turbine rim and blade roots.Although the flow is three-dimensional and unsteady,there are encouraging signs that simple 'orifice models' could be used to estimate the amount of ingress into the wheel-space.In a pre-swirl system,the cooling air for the gas-turbine blades is swirled by stationary nozzles,and the air is delivered to the blades via receiver holes in the rotating turbine disc.Swirling the air reduces its temperature relative to the rotating blades,and the designer needs to calculate the air temperature and pressure drop in the system.The designer also needs to calculate the effect of this swirling flow on the heat transfer from the turbine disc to the air,as this has a significant effect on the temperature distribution and stresses in the disc.Recent experimental and computational studies have given a better understanding of the flow and heat transfer in these systems.Buoyancy-induced flow occurs in the cavity between two co-rotating compressor discs when the temperature of the discs is higher

  17. Air temperature, radiation budget and area changes of Quisoquipina glacier in the Cordillera Vilcanota (Peru)

    Suarez, Wilson; Macedo, Nicolás; Montoya, Nilton; Arias, Sandro; Schauwecker, Simone; Huggel, Christian; Rohrer, Mario; Condom, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The Peruvian Andes host about 71% of all tropical glaciers. Although several studies have focused on glaciers of the largest glaciered mountain range (Cordillera Blanca), other regions have received little attention to date. In 2011, a new program has been initiated with the aim of monitoring glaciers in the centre and south of Peru. The monitoring program is managed by the Servicio Nacional de Meteorología e Hidrología del Perú (SENAMHI) and it is a joint project together with the Universidad San Antonio Abad de Cusco (UNSAAC) and the Autoridad Nacional del Agua (ANA). In Southern Peru, the Quisoquipina glacier has been selected due to its representativeness for glaciers in the Cordillera Vilcanota considering area, length and orientation. The Cordillera Vilcanota is the second largest mountain range in Peru with a glaciated area of approximately 279 km2 in 2009. Melt water from glaciers in this region is partly used for hydropower in the dry season and for animal breeding during the entire year. Using Landsat 5 images, we could estimate that the area of Quisoquipina glacier has decreased by approximately 11% from 3.66 km2 in 1990 to 3.26 km2 in 2010. This strong decrease is comparable to observations of other tropical glaciers. In 2011, a meteorological station has been installed on the glacier at 5180 m asl., measuring air temperature, wind speed, relative humidity, net short and longwave radiation and atmospheric pressure. Here, we present a first analysis of air temperature and the radiation budget at the Quisoquipina glacier for the first three years of measurements. Additionally, we compare the results from Quisoquipina glacier to results obtained by the Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD) for Zongo glacier (Bolivia) and Antizana glacier (Ecuador). For both, Quisoquipina and Zongo glacier, net shortwave radiation may be the most important energy source, thus indicating the important role of albedo in the energy balance of the glacier

  18. Subgrid-scale model for radiative transfer in turbulent participating media

    The simulation of turbulent flows of radiating gases, taking into account all turbulence length scales with an accurate radiation transport solver, is computationally prohibitive for high Reynolds or Rayleigh numbers. This is particularly the case when the small structures are not optically thin. We develop in this paper a radiative transfer subgrid model suitable for the coupling with direct numerical simulations of turbulent radiating fluid flows. Owing to the linearity of the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE), the emission source term is spatially filtered to define large-scale and subgrid-scale radiation intensities. The large-scale or filtered intensity is computed with a standard ray tracing method on a coarse grid, and the subgrid intensity is obtained analytically (in Fourier space) from the Fourier transform of the subgrid emission source term. A huge saving of computational time is obtained in comparison with direct ray tracing applied on the fine mesh. Model accuracy is checked for three 3D fluctuating temperature fields. The first field is stochastically generated and allows us to discuss the effects of the filtering level and of the optical thicknesses of the whole medium, of the integral length scale, and of the cutoff wave length. The second and third cases correspond respectively to turbulent natural convection of humid air in a cubical box, and to the flow of hot combustion products inside a channel. In all cases, the achieved accuracy on radiative powers and wall fluxes is about a few percents

  19. Evaluation of radiation scheme performance within chemistry climate models

    Forster, P. M.; Mayer, B.; et, al.

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates global mean radiatively important properties of chemistry climate models (CCMs). We evaluate stratospheric temperatures and their 1980�2000 trends, January clear sky irradiances, heating rates, and greenhouse gas radiative forcings from an offline comparison of CCM radiation codes with line�by�line models, and CCMs� representation of the solar cycle. CCM global mean temperatures and their change can give an indication of errors in radiative trans...

  20. Environmental Radiation Effects on Mammals A Dynamical Modeling Approach

    Smirnova, Olga A

    2010-01-01

    This text is devoted to the theoretical studies of radiation effects on mammals. It uses the framework of developed deterministic mathematical models to investigate the effects of both acute and chronic irradiation in a wide range of doses and dose rates on vital body systems including hematopoiesis, small intestine and humoral immunity, as well as on the development of autoimmune diseases. Thus, these models can contribute to the development of the system and quantitative approaches in radiation biology and ecology. This text is also of practical use. Its modeling studies of the dynamics of granulocytopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis in humans testify to the efficiency of employment of the developed models in the investigation and prediction of radiation effects on these hematopoietic lines. These models, as well as the properly identified models of other vital body systems, could provide a better understanding of the radiation risks to health. The modeling predictions will enable the implementation of more ef...

  1. Radiation exposure modeling and project schedule visualization

    This paper discusses two applications using IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) to assist environmental remediation efforts at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. In the first application, IGRIP is used to calculate the estimated radiation exposure to workers conducting tasks in radiation environments. In the second, IGRIP is used as a configuration management tool to detect interferences between equipment and personnel work areas for multiple projects occurring simultaneously in one area. Both of these applications have the capability to reduce environmental remediation costs by reducing personnel radiation exposure and by providing a method to effectively manage multiple projects in a single facility

  2. Radiation exposure modeling and project schedule visualization

    Jaquish, W.R.; Enderlin, V.R. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper discusses two applications using IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) to assist environmental remediation efforts at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. In the first application, IGRIP is used to calculate the estimated radiation exposure to workers conducting tasks in radiation environments. In the second, IGRIP is used as a configuration management tool to detect interferences between equipment and personnel work areas for multiple projects occurring simultaneously in one area. Both of these applications have the capability to reduce environmental remediation costs by reducing personnel radiation exposure and by providing a method to effectively manage multiple projects in a single facility.

  3. Spatial and energy distributions of skyshine neutron and gamma radiation from nuclear reactors on the ground-air boundary

    A set of measurements on skyshine radiation was conducted at two special research reactors. A broad range of detectors was used in the measurements to record neutron and gamma radiations. Dosimetric and radiometric field measurements of the neutrons and gamma quanta of the radiation scattered in the air were performed at distances of 50 to 1000 m from the reactor during different weather conditions. The neutron spectra in the energy range of 1 eV to 10 MeV and the gamma quanta spectra in the range of 0.1-10 MeV were measured. (author)

  4. Time-based collision risk modeling for air traffic management

    Bell, Alan E.

    Since the emergence of commercial aviation in the early part of last century, economic forces have driven a steadily increasing demand for air transportation. Increasing density of aircraft operating in a finite volume of airspace is accompanied by a corresponding increase in the risk of collision, and in response to a growing number of incidents and accidents involving collisions between aircraft, governments worldwide have developed air traffic control systems and procedures to mitigate this risk. The objective of any collision risk management system is to project conflicts and provide operators with sufficient opportunity to recognize potential collisions and take necessary actions to avoid them. It is therefore the assertion of this research that the currency of collision risk management is time. Future Air Traffic Management Systems are being designed around the foundational principle of four dimensional trajectory based operations, a method that replaces legacy first-come, first-served sequencing priorities with time-based reservations throughout the airspace system. This research will demonstrate that if aircraft are to be sequenced in four dimensions, they must also be separated in four dimensions. In order to separate aircraft in four dimensions, time must emerge as the primary tool by which air traffic is managed. A functional relationship exists between the time-based performance of aircraft, the interval between aircraft scheduled to cross some three dimensional point in space, and the risk of collision. This research models that relationship and presents two key findings. First, a method is developed by which the ability of an aircraft to meet a required time of arrival may be expressed as a robust standard for both industry and operations. Second, a method by which airspace system capacity may be increased while maintaining an acceptable level of collision risk is presented and demonstrated for the purpose of formulating recommendations for procedures

  5. Methodology for modeling the microbial contamination of air filters.

    Yun Haeng Joe

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a theoretical model to simulate microbial growth on contaminated air filters and entrainment of bioaerosols from the filters to an indoor environment. Air filter filtration and antimicrobial efficiencies, and effects of dust particles on these efficiencies, were evaluated. The number of bioaerosols downstream of the filter could be characterized according to three phases: initial, transitional, and stationary. In the initial phase, the number was determined by filtration efficiency, the concentration of dust particles entering the filter, and the flow rate. During the transitional phase, the number of bioaerosols gradually increased up to the stationary phase, at which point no further increase was observed. The antimicrobial efficiency and flow rate were the dominant parameters affecting the number of bioaerosols downstream of the filter in the transitional and stationary phase, respectively. It was found that the nutrient fraction of dust particles entering the filter caused a significant change in the number of bioaerosols in both the transitional and stationary phases. The proposed model would be a solution for predicting the air filter life cycle in terms of microbiological activity by simulating the microbial contamination of the filter.

  6. Testing theoretical models of magnetic damping using an air track

    Magnetic braking is a long-established application of Lenz's law. A rigorous analysis of the laws governing this problem involves solving Maxwell's equations in a time-dependent situation. Approximate models have been developed to describe different experimental results related to this phenomenon. In this paper we present a new method for the analysis of magnetic braking using a magnet fixed to the glider of an air track. The forces acting on the glider, a result of the eddy currents, can be easily observed and measured. As a consequence of the air track inclination, the glider accelerates at the beginning, although it asymptotically tends towards a uniform rectilinear movement characterized by a terminal speed. This speed depends on the interaction between the magnetic field and the conductivity properties of the air track. Compared with previous related approaches, in our experimental setup the magnet fixed to the glider produces a magnetic braking force which acts continuously, rather than over a short period of time. The experimental results satisfactorily concur with the theoretical models adapted to this configuration

  7. Air pollutants and energy pathways; Extending models for abatement strategies

    This study presents the development and applications of regional and local scale models for use in integrated assessment of air pollution effects in conjunction with large-scale models. A regional deposition model called DAIQUIRI (Deposition, AIr QUality and Integrated Regional Information) for integrated assessment purposes in Finland was constructed, and regional matrices for nitrogen oxides and ammonia were developed from the results of the regional air quality model of the FMI. DAIQUIRI produced similar estimates of deposition from Finnish sources as the original model, and long-term trends and the average level of deposition estimated with DAIQUIRI were found comparable with the monitored deposition levels and trends. For the mid-nineties situation, the regional nitrogen modeling resulted in 9 % to 19 % (depending on the region compared) larger estimates of areas with acidity critical load exceedances than when using European scale nitrogen deposition modeling. In this work, also a method for estimating the impacts of local NOx emissions on urban and sub-urban ozone levels was developed and tested. The study concentrated on representing the destruction of ozone by fresh NO emissions in urban areas for future use in integrated assessment modeling of ozone control strategies. Correlation coefficients between measured daytime ozone values in the study area were found to improve from 0.64 (correlation between urban and surrounding rural measurements) to 0.85, on the average. The average correlation between daytime large-scale model estimates and urban site measurements was found to improve from 0.37 to 0.58. In the study, also integrated assessment model applications were carried out at European, national and local levels. The synergies between control strategies for CO2 and acidification and ozone formation in the case of the UN/FCCC Kyoto protocol and the air quality targets of the EU were assessed with the help of coupled models. With two alternative energy

  8. Radiative characteristics for atmospheric models from lidar sounding and AERONET

    Sapunov, Maxim; Kuznetsov, Anatoly; Efremenko, Dmitry; Bochalov, Valentin; Melnikova, Irina; Samulenkov, Dimity; Vasilyev, Alexander; Poberovsky, Anatoly; Frantsuzova, Inna

    2016-04-01

    Optical models of atmospheric aerosols above of St. Petersburg are constraint on the base of the results of lidar sounding. The lidar system of the Resource Center "Observatory of environmental safety" of the St. Petersburg University Research Park is situated the city center, Vasilievsky Island. The measurements of the vertical profile of velocity and wind direction in the center of St. Petersburg for 2014 -2015 are fulfilled in addition. Height of laser sounding of aerosols is up to 25 km and wind up to 12 km. Observations are accomplished in the daytime and at night and mapped to vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and pressure obtained from radiosounding in Voeikovo (St. Petersburg suburb). Results of wind observations are compared with those of upper-air measurements of meteorological service in Voeikovo. The distance between the points of observation is 25 km. Statistics of wind directions at different heights are identified. The comparison is based on the assumption of homogeneity of the wind field on such a scale. In most cases, good agreement between the observed vertical profiles of wind, obtained by both methods is appeared. However, there were several cases, when the results differ sharply or at high altitudes, or, on the contrary, in the surface layer. The analysis of the impact of wind, temperature, and humidity profiles in the atmosphere on the properties and dynamics of solid impurities is implemented. Comparison with AOT results from AERONET observations in St. Petersburg suburb Peterhof is done. It is shown that diurnal and seasonal variations of optical and morphological parameters of atmospheric aerosols in the pollution cap over the city to a large extent determined by the variability of meteorological parameters. The results of the comparison are presented and possible explanation of the differences is proposed. Optical models of the atmosphere in day and night time in different seasons are constructed from lidar and AERONET

  9. Modelling radiative heat transfer inside a basin type solar still

    Radiative heat transfer inside a basin type solar still has been investigated using two models with (model 1) and without (model 2) taking into account optical view factors. The coefficient of radiative heat exchange (hr,w-gc) between the water and cover surfaces of a practical solar still was computed using the two models. Simulation results show that model 1 yields lower values of hr,w-gc and the root mean square error than model 2. It is therefore concluded that the accuracy of modelling the performance of a basin-type solar still can be improved by incorporating view factors. - Highlights: • Radiative heat transfer in a basin type solar still has been investigated. • Two models with and without view factors were used. • The model with view factors exhibits a lower magnitude of root mean square error. • View factors affect the accuracy of modelling the performance of the solar still

  10. Extended equivalent dipole model for radiated emissions

    Obiekezie, Chijioke S.

    2016-01-01

    This work is on the characterisation of radiated fields from electronic devices. An equivalent dipole approach is used. Previous work showed that this was an effective approach for single layer printed circuit boards where an infinite ground plane can be assumed. In this work, this approach is extended for the characterisation of more complex circuit boards or electronic systems. For complex electronic radiators with finite ground planes, the main challenge is characterising field diffract...

  11. Determination of the mean energy necessary for the production of an ion pair in air by 60Co gamma radiation

    On the basis of an ionometric and a calorimetric method for determining the absorbed dose in graphite the following values of the mean energy for ion pair production by 60Co gamma radiation has been obtained in dry air: (33.87 +- 0.34) J/C. The errors of the method are discussed. The result is compared with recently published values. (author)

  12. Measurement and modeling of external radiation during 1984 from LAMPF atmospheric emissions

    An array of three portable, pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) measured short-term external radiation levels produced by air activation products from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The monitoring was at the closet offsite location, 700-900 m north and northeast of the source, and across a large, deep canyon. A Gaussian-type atmospheric dispersion model, using onsite meteorological and stack release data, was tested during their study. Monitoring results indicate that a persistent, local up-valley wind during the evening and early morning hours is largely responsible for causing the highest radiation levels to the northeast and north-northeast of LAMPF. Comparison of predicted and measured daily external radiation levels indicates a high degree of correlation. The model also gives accurate estimates of measured concentrations over longer periods of time

  13. Satellite Characterization of Fire Emissions of Aerosols and Gases Relevant to Air-Quality Modeling

    Ichoku, C. M.; Ellison, L.; Yue, Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Because of the transient and widespread nature of wildfires and other types of open biomass burning, satellite remote sensing has become an indispensable technique for characterizing their smoke emissions for modeling applications, especially at regional to global scales. Fire radiative energy (FRE), whose instantaneous rate of release or fire radiative power (FRP) is measurable from space, has been found to be proportional to both the biomass consumption and emission of aerosol particulate matter. We have leveraged this relationship to generate a global, gridded smoke-aerosol emission coefficients (Ce) dataset based on FRP and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements from the MODIS sensors aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. Ce is a simple coefficient to convert FRE to smoke aerosol emissions, in the same manner as traditional emission factors are used to convert burned biomass to emissions. The first version of this Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER.v1) global gridded Ce product at 1°x1° resolution is available at http://feer.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Based on published emission ratios, the FEER.v1 Ce product for total smoke aerosol has also been used to generate similar products for specific fire-emitted aerosols and gases, including those that are regulated as 'criteria pollutants' under the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), such as particulate matter (PM) and carbon monoxide (CO). These gridded Ce products were used in conjunction with satellite measurements of FRP to derive emissions of several smoke constituents, which were applied to WRF-Chem fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model simulations, with promising results. In this presentation, we analyze WRF-Chem simulations of surface-level concentrations of various pollutants based on FEER.v1 emission products to illustrate their value for air-quality modeling, particularly in parts of Africa and southeast Asia where ground-based air

  14. Modeling clinical radiation responses in the IMRT era

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the critical issues of radiobiological models, particularly as they apply to clinical radiation therapy. Developing models of radiation responses has a long history that continues to the present time. Many different models have been proposed, but in the field of radiation oncology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has had the most impact on the design of treatment protocols. Questions have been raised as to the value of the LQ model given that the biological assumption underlying it has been challenged by molecular analyses of cell and tissue responses to radiation. There are also questions as to use of the LQ model for hypofractionation, especially for high dose treatments using a single fraction. While the LQ model might over-estimate the effects of large radiation dose fractions, there is insufficient information to fully justify the adoption of alternative models. However, there is increasing evidence in the literature that non-targeted and other indirect effects of radiation sometimes produce substantial deviations from LQ-like dose-response curves. As preclinical and clinical hypofractionation studies accumulate, new or refined dose-response models that incorporate high-dose/fraction non-targeted and indirect effects may be required, but for now the LQ model remains a simple, useful tool to guide the design of treatment protocols.

  15. Air

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  16. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  17. Observations of surface radiation and stratospheric processes at Thule Air Base, Greenland, during the IPY

    Giovanni Muscari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based measurements of atmospheric parameters have been carried out for more than 20 years at the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC station at Thule Air Base (76.5°N, 68.8°W, on the north-western coast of Greenland. Various instruments dedicated to the study of the lower and middle polar atmosphere are installed at Thule in the framework of a long standing collaboration among Danish, Italian, and US research institutes and universities. This effort aims at monitoring the composition, structure and dynamics of the polar stratosphere, and at studying the Arctic energy budget and the role played by different factors, such as aerosols, water vapour, and surface albedo. During the International Polar Year (IPY, in winter 2008-2009, an intensive measurement campaign was conducted at Thule within the framework of the IPY project “Ozone layer and UV radiation in a changing climate evaluated during IPY” (ORACLE-O3 which sought to improve our understanding of the complex mechanisms that lead to the Arctic stratospheric O3 depletion. The campaign involved a lidar system, measuring aerosol backscatter and depolarization ratios up to 35 km and atmospheric temperature profiles from 25 to 70 km altitude, a ground-based millimeter-wave spectrometer (GBMS used to derive stratospheric mixing ratio profiles of different chemical species involved in the stratospheric ozone depletion cycle, and then ground-based radiometers and a Cimel sunphotometer to study the Arctic radiative budget at the surface. The observations show that the surface radiation budget is mainly regulated by the longwave component throughout most of the year. Clouds have a significant impact contributing to enhance the role of longwave radiation. Besides clouds, water vapour seasonal changes produce the largest modification in the shortwave component at the surface, followed by changes in surface albedo and in aerosol amounts. For what concerns the

  18. Some critical remarks about the radiative heat transfer in air frame cavities according to EN ISO 10077-2

    Cuccurullo, G.; Giordano, L.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal performances of windows frames are established, in Europe, by the international standard UNI EN ISO 10077-2:2012. The standard introduces an equivalent thermal conductivity for air frame cavities thus simplifying the original combined heat transfer problem to a merely two-dimensional conductive one. The equivalence is referred to a rectangular cavity and is not able to fully recover the same radiative heat flux involved in the original problem. In view of that, the paper is focused on the radiative heat transfer taking place in the air cavities and aims to check if different equivalence criteria could lead to improved results. Thus, numerical tests involving an accurate description of radiative heat transfer in air cavities are compared to the simplified fully-conductive one provided by the standard. Results show that different criteria lead to quite different results. The optimal criterion turns out to depend on both geometrical and surface radiative parameters. It is also shown that, in any case, a proper radiative resistance but not the one suggested by the ISO 10077 should be adopted.

  19. Urban scale air quality modelling using detailed traffic emissions estimates

    Borrego, C.; Amorim, J. H.; Tchepel, O.; Dias, D.; Rafael, S.; Sá, E.; Pimentel, C.; Fontes, T.; Fernandes, P.; Pereira, S. R.; Bandeira, J. M.; Coelho, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric dispersion of NOx and PM10 was simulated with a second generation Gaussian model over a medium-size south-European city. Microscopic traffic models calibrated with GPS data were used to derive typical driving cycles for each road link, while instantaneous emissions were estimated applying a combined Vehicle Specific Power/Co-operative Programme for Monitoring and Evaluation of the Long-range Transmission of Air Pollutants in Europe (VSP/EMEP) methodology. Site-specific background concentrations were estimated using time series analysis and a low-pass filter applied to local observations. Air quality modelling results are compared against measurements at two locations for a 1 week period. 78% of the results are within a factor of two of the observations for 1-h average concentrations, increasing to 94% for daily averages. Correlation significantly improves when background is added, with an average of 0.89 for the 24 h record. The results highlight the potential of detailed traffic and instantaneous exhaust emissions estimates, together with filtered urban background, to provide accurate input data to Gaussian models applied at the urban scale.

  20. Modelling of dynamic targeting in the Air Operations Centre

    Lo, Edward H. S.; Au, T. Andrew

    2007-12-01

    Air Operations Centres (AOCs) are high stress multitask environments for planning and executing of theatre-wide airpower. Operators have multiple responsibilities to ensure that the orchestration of air assets is coordinated to maximum effect. AOCs utilise a dynamic targeting process to immediately prosecute time-sensitive targets. For this process to work effectively, a timely decision must be made regarding the appropriate course of action before the action is enabled. A targeting solution is typically developed using a number of inter-related processes in the kill chain - the Find, Fix, Track, Target, Engage, and Assess (F2T2EA) model. The success of making a right decision about dynamic targeting is ultimately limited by the cognitive and cooperative skills of the team prosecuting the mission and their associated workload. This paper presents a model of human interaction and tasks within the dynamic targeting sequence. The complex network of tasks executed by the team can be analysed by undertaking simulation of the model to identify possible information-processing bottlenecks and overloads. The model was subjected to various tests to generate typical outcomes, operator utilisation, duration as well as rates of output in the dynamic targeting process. This capability will allow for future "what-if" evaluations of numerous concepts for team formation or task reallocation, complementing live exercises and experiments.

  1. Effect of surface radiation on the breakdown of steady natural convection flows in a square, air-filled cavity containing a centered inner body

    The physical model considered in the present numerical work is a square air-filled cavity cooled from below and above, with a heated square body located at the cavity center. The aim is to establish the effects of radiation interchanges amongst surfaces on the transition from steady, symmetric flows about the cavity centerline to complex periodic flows. Owing to the low temperature differences involved (1 K ≤ ΔT ≤ 5 K), the two-dimensional model is based on the Boussinesq approximation and constant thermophysical fluid properties at room temperature. The cavity walls are assumed gray and diffuse. The flow structure is investigated for various Rayleigh numbers, emissivities of the wall surfaces and sizes of the inner body. The results clearly establish the influence of surface radiation, both for steady and unsteady flows. For the geometry and thermal boundary conditions considered, the Rayleigh number for the transition to unsteady flows is considerably increased under the influence of radiation. This work underlines the difficulties in comparing experimental data and numerical solutions for gas-filled cavities partly subjected to wall heat flux boundary conditions. - Research highlights: → Heat transfer in cavities cooled from below and above with an inner heated body. → Effects of radiation on the transitions to unsteady flows are numerically studied. → The surfaces are gray and diffuse and the temperature differences are from 1 K to 5 K. → Critical Rayleigh numbers are considerably increased by radiation. → According to the thermal boundary conditions, combined analyses are required.

  2. Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality model version 5.1

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality model is a state-of-the-science air quality model that simulates the emission, transport and fate of numerous air pollutants, including ozone and particulate matter. The Atmospheric Modeling and Analysis Division (AMAD) of the U.S. Environment...

  3. Evaluation of observation-fused regional air quality model results for population air pollution exposure estimation.

    Chen, Gang; Li, Jingyi; Ying, Qi; Sherman, Seth; Perkins, Neil; Rajeshwari, Sundaram; Mendola, Pauline

    2014-07-01

    In this study, Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was applied to predict ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations during 2001 to 2010 in 15 hospital referral regions (HRRs) using a 36-km horizontal resolution domain. An inverse distance weighting based method was applied to produce exposure estimates based on observation-fused regional pollutant concentration fields using the differences between observations and predictions at grid cells where air quality monitors were located. Although the raw CMAQ model is capable of producing satisfying results for O3 and PM2.5 based on EPA guidelines, using the observation data fusing technique to correct CMAQ predictions leads to significant improvement of model performance for all gaseous and particulate pollutants. Regional average concentrations were calculated using five different methods: 1) inverse distance weighting of observation data alone, 2) raw CMAQ results, 3) observation-fused CMAQ results, 4) population-averaged raw CMAQ results and 5) population-averaged fused CMAQ results. It shows that while O3 (as well as NOx) monitoring networks in the HRRs are dense enough to provide consistent regional average exposure estimation based on monitoring data alone, PM2.5 observation sites (as well as monitors for CO, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 components) are usually sparse and the difference between the average concentrations estimated by the inverse distance interpolated observations, raw CMAQ and fused CMAQ results can be significantly different. Population-weighted average should be used to account for spatial variation in pollutant concentration and population density. Using raw CMAQ results or observations alone might lead to significant biases in health outcome analyses. PMID:24747248

  4. Modelling of air resistance during drying of wood-chips

    Karaj, S.; Barfuss, Isabel; Schalk, J.; Reisinger, G.; Pude, R.; Müller, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the parameters that affect the drying process of wood chips at low air flow conditions. This objective was determined by measuring the air pressure resistance being produced by wood chips by examining different variables such as: air flow rate, air velocity, wood chip size, bulk density, bulk height and porosity. The air flow resistance was measured inside a 3 meter high cylindrical air duct constructed at University of Hohenheim. Physical proper...

  5. Improving ammonia emissions in air quality modelling for France

    Hamaoui-Laguel, Lynda; Meleux, Frédérik; Beekmann, Matthias; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Génermont, Sophie; Cellier, Pierre; Létinois, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    We have implemented a new module to improve the representation of ammonia emissions from agricultural activities in France with the objective to evaluate the impact of such emissions on the formation of particulate matter modelled with the air quality model CHIMERE. A novel method has been set up for the part of ammonia emissions originating from mineral fertilizer spreading. They are calculated using the one dimensional 1D mechanistic model “VOLT'AIR” which has been coupled with data on agricultural practices, meteorology and soil properties obtained at high spatial resolution (cantonal level). These emissions display high spatiotemporal variations depending on soil pH, rates and dates of fertilization and meteorological variables, especially soil temperature. The emissions from other agricultural sources (animal housing, manure storage and organic manure spreading) are calculated using the national spatialised inventory (INS) recently developed in France. The comparison of the total ammonia emissions estimated with the new approach VOLT'AIR_INS with the standard emissions provided by EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) used currently in the CHIMERE model shows significant differences in the spatiotemporal distributions. The implementation of new ammonia emissions in the CHIMERE model has a limited impact on ammonium nitrate aerosol concentrations which only increase at most by 10% on the average for the considered spring period but this impact can be more significant for specific pollution episodes. The comparison of modelled PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm) and ammonium nitrate aerosol with observations shows that the use of the new ammonia emission method slightly improves the spatiotemporal correlation in certain regions and reduces the negative bias on average by 1 μg m-3. The formation of ammonium nitrate aerosol depends not only on ammonia concentrations but also on nitric acid availability, which

  6. Prediction of Indoor Air Exposure from Outdoor Air Quality Using an Artificial Neural Network Model for Inner City Commercial Buildings

    Avril Challoner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available NO2 and particulate matter are the air pollutants of most concern in Ireland, with possible links to the higher respiratory and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity rates found in the country compared to the rest of Europe. Currently, air quality limits in Europe only cover outdoor environments yet the quality of indoor air is an essential determinant of a person’s well-being, especially since the average person spends more than 90% of their time indoors. The modelling conducted in this research aims to provide a framework for epidemiological studies by the use of publically available data from fixed outdoor monitoring stations to predict indoor air quality more accurately. Predictions are made using two modelling techniques, the Personal-exposure Activity Location Model (PALM, to predict outdoor air quality at a particular building, and Artificial Neural Networks, to model the indoor/outdoor relationship of the building. This joint approach has been used to predict indoor air concentrations for three inner city commercial buildings in Dublin, where parallel indoor and outdoor diurnal monitoring had been carried out on site. This modelling methodology has been shown to provide reasonable predictions of average NO2 indoor air quality compared to the monitored data, but did not perform well in the prediction of indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Hence, this approach could be used to determine NO2 exposures more rigorously of those who work and/or live in the city centre, which can then be linked to potential health impacts.

  7. Improving UK Air Quality Modelling Through Exploitation of Satellite Observations

    Pope, R.; Chipperfield, M.; Savage, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Met Office's operational regional Air Quality Unified Model (AQUM) contains a description of atmospheric chemistry/aerosols which allows for the short-term forecast of chemical weather (e.g. high concentrations of ozone or nitrogen dioxide, which can trigger warnings of poor air quality). AQUM's performance has so far only been tested against a network of surface monitoring stations. Therefore, with recent improvements in the quality and quantity of satellite measurements, data products (e.g. tropospheric columns, vertical profiles) from several satellite instruments will be used to test the performance of the model. First comparisons between an AQUM simulation for the UK heatwave event of July 2006 and data from OMI, TES (both on AURA) and MODIS (on AQUA) have identified multiple model-satellite biases. The chemical/aerosol species investigated for this simulation include nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), formaldehyde (HCHO), carbon monoxide (CO) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 0.55 microns wavelength. NO2 spatial positive mean biases (AQUM-OMI July 2006 monthly mean tropospheric columns) over north- east England suggest model overestimation in the area's urban regions. Currently, sensitivity tests of the NOx emission datasets are investigating these biases and the model's represent of urban pollution. In the UK O3 monthly mean vertical profile comparisons (AQUM-TES), strong positive mean biases are detected in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. Since the AQUM does not use a stratospheric chemistry scheme, the satellite climatological vertical boundary conditions will be investigated (e.g. test the model with new boundary conditions using multiple satellite instruments or perturb existing climatologies). Comparisons of HCHO (AQUM-OMI monthly mean tropospheric columns) biases highlight strong negative biases over continental Europe and sporadic positive biases in the south-east lateral boundary conditions. Therefore, evaluation and development of

  8. Evaluation of air pollution modelling tools as environmental engineering courseware.

    Souto González, J A; Bello Bugallo, P M; Casares Long, J J

    2004-01-01

    The study of phenomena related to the dispersion of pollutants usually takes advantage of the use of mathematical models based on the description of the different processes involved. This educational approach is especially important in air pollution dispersion, when the processes follow a non-linear behaviour so it is difficult to understand the relationships between inputs and outputs, and in a 3D context where it becomes hard to analyze alphanumeric results. In this work, three different software tools, as computer solvers for typical air pollution dispersion phenomena, are presented. Each software tool developed to be implemented on PCs, follows approaches that represent three generations of programming languages (Fortran 77, VisualBasic and Java), applied over three different environments: MS-DOS, MS-Windows and the world wide web. The software tools were tested by students of environmental engineering (undergraduate) and chemical engineering (postgraduate), in order to evaluate the ability of these software tools to improve both theoretical and practical knowledge of the air pollution dispersion problem, and the impact of the different environment in the learning process in terms of content, ease of use and visualization of results. PMID:15193095

  9. Freezable Radiator Model Correlation Improvements and Fluids Study

    Lillibridge, Sean; Navarro, Moses

    2011-01-01

    Freezable radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the space craft s surroundings and because of different thermal rejection requirements during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recovering) a radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. To attempt to improve this, tests were conducted in 2009 to determine whether the behavior of a simple stagnating radiator could be predicted or emulated in a Thermal Desktop(trademark) numerical model. A 50-50 mixture of DowFrost HD and water was used as the working fluid. Efforts to scale this model to a full scale design, as well as efforts to characterize various thermal control fluids at low temperatures are also discussed. Previous testing and modeling efforts showed that freezable radiators could be operated as intended, and be fairly, if not perfectly predicted by numerical models. This paper documents the improvements made to the numerical model, and outcomes of fluid studies that were determined necessary to go forward with further radiator testing.

  10. An Analytic Radiative-Convective Model for Planetary Atmospheres

    Robinson, Tyler D; 10.1088/0004-637X/757/1/104

    2012-01-01

    We present an analytic 1-D radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries, (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunli...

  11. Influence of Wall Surface and Air Modelling in Finite-Element Analysis of Sound Transmission Between Rooms in Lightweight Buildings

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Dickow, Kristoffer Ahrens;

    2012-01-01

    Noise is a nuisance in the built environment, and to avoid undesirable transmission of sound and vibration within a building, its vibro-acoustic performance must be addressed in the design phase. For heavy structures, a reliable assessment of the sound pressure levels can be made by statistical...... be adopted. Five different cases are compared: A model that only includes the structure, a model with semi-infinite elements to account for radiation from the structure into the air, a model introducing finite elements for the acoustic field, a model with dissipation of sound inside the room, and finally...

  12. Modeling and analysis of ground target radiation cross section

    SHI Xiang; LOU GuoWei; LI XingGuo

    2008-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the passive millimeter wave (MMW) radiometer detection, the ground target radiation cross section is modeled as the new token for the target MMW radiant characteristics. Its ap-plication and actual testing are discussed and analyzed. The essence of passive MMW stealth is target radiation cross section reduction.

  13. Dispersion model computations of urban air pollution in Espoo, Finland

    Valkonen, E.; Haerkoenen, J.; Kukkonen, J.; Rantakrans, E.; Jalkanen, L.

    1997-12-31

    This report presents the numerical results of air quality studies of the city of Espoo in southern Finland. This city is one of the four cities in the Helsinki metropolitan area, having a total population of 850 000. A thorough emission inventory was made of both mobile and stationary sources in the Helsinki metropolitan area. The atmospheric dispersion was evaluated using an urban dispersion modelling system, including a Gaussian multiple-source plume model and a meteorological pre-processing model. The hourly time series of CO, NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} concentrations were predicted, using the emissions and meteorological data for the year 1990. The predicted results show a clear decrease in the yearly mean concentrations from southeast to northwest. This is due in part to the denser traffic in the southern parts of Espoo, and in part to pollution from the neighbouring cities of Helsinki and Vantaa, located east of Espoo. The statistical concentration parameters found for Espoo were lower than the old national air quality guidelines (1984); however, some occurrences of above-threshold values were found for NO{sub 2} in terms of the new guidelines (1996). The contribution of traffic to the total concentrations varies spatially from 30 to 90 % for NO{sub 2} from 1 to 65 % for SO{sub 2} while for CO it is nearly 100 %. The concentrations database will be further utilised to analyse the influence of urban air pollution on the health of children attending selected day nurseries in Espoo. The results of this study can also be applied in traffic and city planning. In future work the results will also be compared with data from the urban measurement network of the Helsinki Metropolitan Area Council. (orig.) 19 refs.

  14. Optical tomographic in-air scanner for external radiation beam 3D gel dosimetry

    Full text: Optical CT scanners are used to measure 3D radiation dose distributions in radiosensitive gels. For radiotherapy dose verification, 3D dose measurements are useful for verification of complex linear accelerator treatment planning and delivery techniques. Presently optical CTs require the use of a liquid bath to match the refractive index of the gel to minimise refraction of the light rays leading to distortion and artifacts. This work aims to develop a technique for scanning gel samples in free-air, without the requirement for a matching liquid bath. The scanner uses a He-Ne laser beam, fanned across the acrylic cylindrical gel container by a rotating mirror. The gel container was designed to produce parallel light ray paths through the gel. A pin phantom was used to quantify geometrical distortion of the reconstructed image, while uniform field exposures were used to consider noise, uniformity and artifacts. Small diameter wires provided an indication of the spatial resolution of the scanner. Pin phantom scans show geometrical distortion comparable to scanners using matching fluid baths. Noise, uniformity and artifacts were not found to be major limitations for this scanner approach. Spatial resolution was limited by laser beam spot size, typically 0.4 mm full width half maximum. A free-air optical CT scanner has been developed with the advantage of scanning without a matching fluid bath. Test results show it has potential to provide suitable quality 3D dosimetry measurements for external beam dose verification, while offering significant advantages in convenience and efficiency for routine use.

  15. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Executive summary

    The Association Contract covers a range of research domains that are important to the Radiation Protection Research Action, especially in the areas 'Evaluation of Radiation Risks' and 'Understanding Radiation Mechanisms and Epidemiology'. Three research projects concentrate on radiation dosimetry research and two projects on the modelling of radiation carcinogenesis. The following list gives an overview on the topics and responsible scientific project leaders of the Association Contract: Study of radiation fields and dosimetry at aviation altitudes. Biokinetics and dosimetry of incorporated radionuclides. Dose reconstruction. Biophysical models for the induction of cancer by radiation. Experimental data for the induction of cancer by radiation of different qualities. (orig.)

  16. Modeling The Dynamics Of Outer Radiation Belt Electrons

    Naehr, S M

    2000-01-01

    A computer model has been built to simulate the dynamic evolution of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt. The model calculates changes in electron flux due to three mechanisms: (1) fully-adiabatic response of electrons to variations in the magnetic field, (2) time-dependent radial diffusion, parameterized by overall magnetospheric activity, and (3) penetration of new particles into the model via a time-dependent outer boundary condition. Data from Los Alamos geosynchronous satellites, the CRRESELE statistical electron flux model, the Kp index, and the Toffoletto-Hill-Ding magnetic field model are all used to provide realistic, time-dependent inputs to the model. To evaluate the model, a simulation of the radiation belts during the November 3–12, 1993 magnetic storm was generated. Comparison of results to Global Positioning System (GPS) radiation dosimeter data indicates that the model can accurately predict storm-time flux variations for electrons with energies less than 600 keV. Mode...

  17. Modelling of the Through-air Bonding Process

    M. Hossain

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A computational fluid dynamics (CFD modelling ofthe through-air bonding process of nonwoven fabricproduction is reported in this article. In the throughairprocess, hot air is passed through the fibrous webto heat and melt polymer fibers. Molten polymersubsequently flows to the point of contact betweenany two fibers to produce a bond. Two differentmodelling strategies are adapted to produce acomprehensive understanding of the through-airbonding process. In macroscale modelling, a CFDmodel is developed treating the whole web as aporous media in order to investigate the effect ofprocess parameters. Results reveal that the timerequired to heat and melt the fibers decreases with theincreasing porosity of the web and the velocity of hotair. The CFD modelling technique is then used toanalyze the bonding process at a more fundamentallevel by considering the bonding of individual fibersat microscale. The effects of the fiber diameter,bonding temperature and contact angle between twofibers on the bonding time are investigated. Resultsshow that the time required to bond fibers is weaklyrelated to bonding temperature and fiber diameter.Fiber orientation angle, on the other hand, hassignificant effect on the progression of bondformation.

  18. Using experimental designs for modelling of intermittent air filtration process

    2008-01-01

    Identification of the optimal operating conditions and evaluation of their robustness are critical issues for industrial processes.A standard procedure,for modelling a laboratory-scale wire-to-cylinder electrostatic precipitator and for guiding the research of the set point,is presented.The procedure consists of formulating a set of recommendations regarding the choice of parameter values for electrostatic precipitation.The experiments were carried out on a laboratory cylindrical precipitator,built by one of the authors,with samples of wood particles.The parameters considered are the applied high voltage U,the air flow F,and the quantity of dust in air m.Several"one-factor-at-a-time"followed by factorial composite design experiments were performed,based on the following three-step strategy:1)Identify the domain of variation of the variables;2)Determine the mathematical model of the process outcome:3)Validation of the mathematical model and optimisation of the process.

  19. Surface air temperature variability in global climate models

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2013-01-01

    New results from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) and multiple global reanalysis datasets are used to investigate the relationship between the mean and standard deviation in the surface air temperature. A combination of a land-sea mask and orographic filter were used to investigate the geographic region with the strongest correlation and in all cases this was found to be for low-lying over-land locations. This result is consistent with the expectation that difference...

  20. Numerical Simulation Model of Laminar Hydrogen/Air Diffusion Flame

    于溯源; 吕雪峰

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation model is developed for a laminar hydrogen/air diffusion flame. Nineteen species and twenty chemical reactions are considered. The chemical kinetics package (CHEMKIN) subroutines are employed to calculate species thermodynamic properties and chemical reaction rate constants. The flow field is calculated by simultaneously solving a continuity equation, an axial momentum equation and an energy equation in a cylindrical coordinate system. Thermal diffusion and Brownian diffusion are considered in the radial direction while they are neglected in the axial direction. The results suggest that the main flame is buoyancy-controlled.

  1. Modelling air pollution abatement in deep street canyons by means of air scrubbers

    De Giovanni, Marina; Curci, Gabriele; Avveduto, Alessandro; Pace, Lorenzo; Salisburgo, Cesare Dari; Giammaria, Franco; Monaco, Alessio; SPANTO, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Deep street canyons are characterized by weak ventilation and recirculation of air. In such environment, the exposure to particulate matter and other air pollutants is enhanced, with a consequent worsening of both safety and health. The main solution adopted by the international community is aimed at the reduction of the emissions. In this theoretical study, we test a new solution: the removal of air pollutants close to their sources by a network of Air Pollution Abatement (APA) devices. The ...

  2. Quality criteria for air pollution models, standardisation and model development in the Netherlands

    Based on standards of EPA and IEEE, quality criteria have been formulated which address the development of air pollution models, the transformation towards user-friendly software and ''after-sales'' service. A Dutch standard on the description of air pollution models is being finalized. The standard formulates minimal requirements on the theoretical and practical description of models. This paper provides a survey of the quality criteria and it summarizes the standard. Further, the current practice of model development at RIVM is discussed. (au) (24 refs.)

  3. Health risks maps. Modelling of air quality as a tool to map health risks

    Environmental departments consider geographical maps with information on air quality as the final product of a complicated process of measuring, modelling and presentation. Municipal health departments consider such maps a useful starting point to solve the problem whether air pollution causes health risks for citizens. The answer to this question cannot be reduced to checking if threshold limit values are exceeded. Based on the results of measurements and modelling of concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in air, the health significance of air pollution caused by nitrogen dioxide is illuminated. A proposal is presented to map health risks of air pollution by using the results of measurements and modelling of air pollution. 7 refs

  4. Application of zonal model on indoor air sensor network design

    Chen, Y. Lisa; Wen, Jin

    2007-04-01

    Growing concerns over the safety of the indoor environment have made the use of sensors ubiquitous. Sensors that detect chemical and biological warfare agents can offer early warning of dangerous contaminants. However, current sensor system design is more informed by intuition and experience rather by systematic design. To develop a sensor system design methodology, a proper indoor airflow modeling approach is needed. Various indoor airflow modeling techniques, from complicated computational fluid dynamics approaches to simplified multi-zone approaches, exist in the literature. In this study, the effects of two airflow modeling techniques, multi-zone modeling technique and zonal modeling technique, on indoor air protection sensor system design are discussed. Common building attack scenarios, using a typical CBW agent, are simulated. Both multi-zone and zonal models are used to predict airflows and contaminant dispersion. Genetic Algorithm is then applied to optimize the sensor location and quantity. Differences in the sensor system design resulting from the two airflow models are discussed for a typical office environment and a large hall environment.

  5. Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation (CAR ensemble modeling system

    X.-Z. Liang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation (CAR ensemble modeling system has been developed to incorporate the largest choices of alternative parameterizations for cloud properties (cover, water, radius, optics, geometry, aerosol properties (type, profile, optics, radiation transfers (solar, infrared, and their interactions. These schemes form the most comprehensive collection currently available in the literature, including those used by the world leading general circulation models (GCMs. The CAR provides a unique framework to determine (via intercomparison across all schemes, reduce (via optimized ensemble simulations, and attribute specific key factors for (via physical process sensitivity analyses the model discrepancies and uncertainties in representing greenhouse gas, aerosol and cloud radiative forcing effects. This study presents a general description of the CAR system and illustrates its capabilities for climate modeling applications, especially in the context of estimating climate sensitivity and uncertainty range caused by cloud-aerosol-radiation interactions. For demonstration purpose, the evaluation is based on several CAR standalone and coupled climate model experiments, each comparing a limited subset of the full system ensemble with up to 896 members. It is shown that the quantification of radiative forcings and climate impacts strongly depends on the choices of the cloud, aerosol and radiation schemes. The prevailing schemes used in current GCMs are likely insufficient in variety and physically biased in a significant way. There exists large room for improvement by optimally combining radiation transfer with cloud property schemes.

  6. Preliminary results of a three-dimensional radiative transfer model

    O`Hirok, W. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Clouds act as the primary modulator of the Earth`s radiation at the top of the atmosphere, within the atmospheric column, and at the Earth`s surface. They interact with both shortwave and longwave radiation, but it is primarily in the case of shortwave where most of the uncertainty lies because of the difficulties in treating scattered solar radiation. To understand cloud-radiative interactions, radiative transfer models portray clouds as plane-parallel homogeneous entities to ease the computational physics. Unfortunately, clouds are far from being homogeneous, and large differences between measurement and theory point to a stronger need to understand and model cloud macrophysical properties. In an attempt to better comprehend the role of cloud morphology on the 3-dimensional radiation field, a Monte Carlo model has been developed. This model can simulate broadband shortwave radiation fluxes while incorporating all of the major atmospheric constituents. The model is used to investigate the cloud absorption anomaly where cloud absorption measurements exceed theoretical estimates and to examine the efficacy of ERBE measurements and cloud field experiments. 3 figs.

  7. Further evidence of the role of air pollution on solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the ground

    The influence of photochemical pollution on the ultraviolet radiation reaching the ground is examined. For this purpose, a series of UV-A and UV-B measurements as well as the results of a simple parametric model are compared. It was found that the hypothesis of UV-B depletion is significant at an almost 95 per cent confidence level. It is also indicated that the effect of photochemical pollution on UV-B levels reaching the ground is roughly three times the same effect on UV-A levels. (author)

  8. A model of interband radiative transition

    Dittrich, Jaroslav; Exner, Pavel; Hirokawa, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2004), s. 753-786. ISSN 0025-5645 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 482 Keywords : radiative transition * crystal spectral band * decay law Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.366, year: 2004

  9. User's guide to the LIRAQ model: an air pollution model for the San Francisco Bay Area

    The Livermore Regional Air Quality (LIRAQ) model comprises a set of computer programs that have been integrated into an easily used tool for the air quality planner. To assemble and modify the necessary data files and to direct model execution, a problem formulation program has been developed that makes possible the setup of a wide variety of studies involving perturbation of the emission inventory, changes to the initial and boundary conditions, and different choices of grid size and problem domain. In addition to describing the types of air quality problems for which the LIRAQ model may be used, this User's Guide provides detailed information on how to set up and conduct model simulations. Also included are descriptions of the formats of input data files so that the LIRAQ model may be applied to regions other than the San Francisco Bay Area

  10. Analysis of Aerosol Radiative Forcing over Beijing under Different Air Quality Conditions Using Ground-Based Sun-Photometers between 2013 and 2015

    Wei Chen; Lei Yan; Nan Ding; Mengdie Xie; Ming Lu; Fan Zhang; Yongxu Duan; Shuo Zong

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol particles can strongly affect both air quality and the radiation budget of the atmosphere. Above Beijing, the capital city of China, large amounts of aerosols within the atmospheric column have caused the deterioration of local air quality and have influenced radiative forcings at both the top and the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA and TOA). Observations of aerosol radiative forcing and its efficiency have been made using two sun-photometers in urban Beijing between 2013 and 2015, and ...

  11. Modeling air temperature through a combination of remote sensing and GIS data

    Cristóbal Rosselló, Jordi; Ninyerola i Casals, Miquel; Pons, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    Air temperature is involved in many environmental processes such as actual and potential evapotranspiration, net radiation and species distribution. Ground meteorological stations provide important local data of air temperature, but a continuous surface for large and heterogeneous areas is also needed. In this paper we present a hybrid methodology between Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems to retrieve daily instantaneous, mean, maximum and minimum air temperatures (2002–2004)...

  12. A Physical Model of Electron Radiation Belts of Saturn

    Lorenzato, L.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Bourdarie, S.

    2012-09-01

    Enrolling on the Cassini age, a physical Salammbô model for the radiation belts of Saturn have been developed including several physical processes governing the kronian magnetosphere. Results have been compared with Cassini MIMI LEMMS data.

  13. Modeling of radiation effects in cells and tissues

    Friedland, W.; Kundrát, Pavel

    1. Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2014 - (Brahme, A.), s. 105-142 ISBN 978-0444536327. - (Reference Module in Biomedical Sciences) Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ionizing radiation * iological effects * athematical modeling * echanistic simulations * onte Carlo simulations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  14. New model to estimate and evaluate the solar radiation

    Y. El Mghouchi

    2014-12-01

    The results indicate that the proposed model can be successfully used to estimate the solar radiation during all the seasons of year for studied position and for considered day, using as input the altitude (degrees, longitude (degrees and latitude (m.

  15. Empirical investigation on modeling solar radiation series with ARMA–GARCH models

    Highlights: • Apply 6 ARMA–GARCH(-M) models to model and forecast solar radiation. • The ARMA–GARCH(-M) models produce more accurate radiation forecasting than conventional methods. • Show that ARMA–GARCH-M models are more effective for forecasting solar radiation mean and volatility. • The ARMA–EGARCH-M is robust and the ARMA–sGARCH-M is very competitive. - Abstract: Simulation of radiation is one of the most important issues in solar utilization. Time series models are useful tools in the estimation and forecasting of solar radiation series and their changes. In this paper, the effectiveness of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models with various generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) processes, namely ARMA–GARCH models are evaluated for their effectiveness in radiation series. Six different GARCH approaches, which contain three different ARMA–GARCH models and corresponded GARCH in mean (ARMA–GARCH-M) models, are applied in radiation data sets from two representative climate stations in China. Multiple evaluation metrics of modeling sufficiency are used for evaluating the performances of models. The results show that the ARMA–GARCH(-M) models are effective in radiation series estimation. Both in fitting and prediction of radiation series, the ARMA–GARCH(-M) models show better modeling sufficiency than traditional models, while ARMA–EGARCH-M models are robustness in two sites and the ARMA–sGARCH-M models appear very competitive. Comparisons of statistical diagnostics and model performance clearly show that the ARMA–GARCH-M models make the mean radiation equations become more sufficient. It is recommended the ARMA–GARCH(-M) models to be the preferred method to use in the modeling of solar radiation series

  16. Passive cooling for air-conditioning energy savings with new radiative low-cost coatings

    Muselli, Marc [University of Corsica - UMR CNRS 6134, Vignola, Route des Sanguinaires, F-20000 Ajaccio (France)

    2010-06-15

    Passive cooling is considered as an alternative technology to avoid unwanted heat gains, to reduce urban heat islands and to generate cooling potential for buildings (limiting air-conditioning energy). According to materials and surface treatments, the roof can represent to be a major heat gain source from opaque elements of the building fabric, heating up the outer surface and increasing heat flow by conduction. This paper presents low-cost new radiative materials (1 Euro /m{sup 2}) allowing to limit heat gains during diurnal cycle for hot seasons. To evaluate the relevance of these new substrates, their reflective UV-VIS-IR behavior are studied and compared to classical roofed materials available in industrial and developing countries. A 48 m{sup 2} experimental roof having different surfaces (plate steel sheets, fiber cement, terra cotta tiles and corrugated sheets) allows to determine the temperature ratio {delta} between uncoated and coated materials. Up to 34% surface temperature gains are obtained for white coated CS, 25% for FC and {approx}18% for TCT and PSS. According to uncoated materials for a surface temperature T{sub 0} = 60 C, simulations showed that the low-cost white opaque reflective roofs (50 m{sup 2}) presented in this study would reduce cooling energy consumption by 26-49%. (author)

  17. Air Temperature Error Correction Based on Solar Radiation in an Economical Meteorological Wireless Sensor Network

    Xingming Sun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Air temperature (AT is an extremely vital factor in meteorology, agriculture, military, etc., being used for the prediction of weather disasters, such as drought, flood, frost, etc. Many efforts have been made to monitor the temperature of the atmosphere, like automatic weather stations (AWS. Nevertheless, due to the high cost of specialized AT sensors, they cannot be deployed within a large spatial density. A novel method named the meteorology wireless sensor network relying on a sensing node has been proposed for the purpose of reducing the cost of AT monitoring. However, the temperature sensor on the sensing node can be easily influenced by environmental factors. Previous research has confirmed that there is a close relation between AT and solar radiation (SR. Therefore, this paper presents a method to decrease the error of sensed AT, taking SR into consideration. In this work, we analyzed all of the collected data of AT and SR in May 2014 and found the numerical correspondence between AT error (ATE and SR. This corresponding relation was used to calculate real-time ATE according to real-time SR and to correct the error of AT in other months.

  18. The Impact of a Laki-style Eruption on Cloud Drops, Indirect Radiative Forcing and Air Quality

    Carslaw, K.; Schmidt, A.; Mann, G.; Pringle, K. J.; Forster, P.; Wilson, M.; Thordarson, T.

    2010-12-01

    We assess the impact of 1783-1784 Laki eruption on changes in cloud drop number concentrations and the aerosol indirect (cloud) radiative forcing using an advanced global aerosol microphysics model. We further extend these simulations to quantify the impact of a modern-day Laki on air quality. Our results suggest that the first aerosol indirect effect is of similar magnitude as the direct forcing calculated in previous assessments of the Laki eruption, but has a different spatial pattern. We estimate that northern hemisphere mean cloud drop concentrations in low-level clouds increased by a factor 2.7 in the 3 months after the onset of the eruption, with peak changes exceeding a factor 10. The calculated northern hemisphere mean aerosol indirect effect peaks at -5.2 W/m2 in the month after the eruption and remains larger than -2 W/m2 for 6 months. From our understanding of anthropogenic aerosol effects on modern-day clouds, the calculated changes in cloud drop concentrations after Laki are likely to have caused substantial changes in pecipitation and cloud dynamics. Our results also show that a modern-day Laki-style volcanic air pollution event would be a severe health hazard, increasing excess mortality in Europe on a scale that is at least comparable with excess mortality due to seasonal flu. Investigating the potential impact of such an eruption is crucial in order to inform policy makers and society about the potential impact of such an event so that precautionary measures can be taken.

  19. Radiation

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  20. Parameterization of clouds and radiation in climate models

    Roeckner, E. [Max Planck Institute for Meterology, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    Clouds are a very important, yet poorly modeled element in the climate system. There are many potential cloud feedbacks, including those related to cloud cover, height, water content, phase change, and droplet concentration and size distribution. As a prerequisite to studying the cloud feedback issue, this research reports on the simulation and validation of cloud radiative forcing under present climate conditions using the ECHAM general circulation model and ERBE top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes.

  1. Numerical modelling of air movement in road tunnels

    The objective of the Mechanical Ventilation Systems (MVS) in highway tunnels is to provide tunnel patrons with a reasonable degree of comfort during normal operation and to assist in keeping tunnels safe during emergencies. Temperature, humidity, and air velocity are among the parameters that determine the tunnel environment and indicate the level of MVS performance. To investigate the performance of the current emergency ventilation strategies for an existing tunnel system in the event of a fire, a research project is being conducted at the National Research Council of Canada. The primary objectives of the study are: a) to assess and validate the ability of in-place emergency ventilation strategies to control smoke spread and minimize the impact of smoke on tunnel users; and b) to recommend guidelines for improving ventilation operation to maximize intervention effectiveness. This will allow future development of an intelligent ventilation system based on a pre-established scenario of ventilation activated using automatic fire detection. The research study includes two phases, numerical and experimental phases. The numerical phase will use a CFD model (Solvent) to study smoke ventilation in the tunnel. The experimental phase will be used to calibrate and validate the CFD model and to establish the boundary conditions for the numerical model. Solvent was used to model a ventilation scenario using existing data. The current paper presents the initial efforts to validate the CFD model against onsite flow measurements conducted in the tunnel. The CFD model included aerodynamically significant physical features of the tunnel. (author)

  2. Cloud and solar radiation biases over the Southern Ocean in climate models (Invited)

    Bodas-Salcedo, A.; Williams, K. D.; Hyder, P.; Edwards, J. M.; Copsey, D.

    2013-12-01

    Current climate models generally reflect too little solar radiation over the Southern Ocean, which may be the leading cause of the prevalent sea-surface temperature biases in climate models. We study the role of clouds on the solar radiation biases in atmosphere-only simulations of the Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project phase 2 (CFMIP2), which is part of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The CFMIP2 protocol requests additional diagnostics that are useful to investigate the causes of cloud and radiation biases in models, and their relation with cloud feedbacks. We composite AMIP daily data around cyclone centres in the latitude band between 40S and 70S during the summer. Most of the model biases occur in the cold air side of the cyclone composite, away from the cold front. We show that the cyclone composite accounts for most of the climatological error in that latitudinal band. We then use cloud property estimates from the International Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) to classify clouds into different regimes, following the clustering technique of Williams and Webb (2009). The cloud regime labelled as 'mid-level' is the main contributor to the Southern Ocean shortwave radiation biases. We use information from the CALIPSO lidar to investigate in more detail the properties of the 'mid-level' cloud regime. CALIPSO shows that the 'mid-level' cloud regime is dominated by two main cloud types; cloud with tops actually at mid-level, and low-level cloud. We will also present initial analyses of biases in air-sea fluxes over the Southern Ocean in the most recent configuration of the Met Office coupled model.

  3. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE)

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. On board the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20 500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset

  4. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE)

    Atwell, W.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. Onboard the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20-500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Select the most relevant input parameters using WEKA for models forecast Solar radiation based on Artificial Neural Networks

    Somaieh Ayalvary

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting solar radiation is important for many applications in research related to renewable energy. Solar radiation is forecasted by solar radiation forecast models including the traditional models and artificial neural network (ANN based model. There are geographical and meteorological variables that affect the solar radiation, thus identifying the appropriate variables to forecast solar radiation correctly is an important issue in the research area. Accordingly Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis (WEKA Software was used in 11 points in Guilan based on different weather conditions to find the most effective input parameters to forecast solar radiation in different ANN models. Input parameters include latitude, longitude, maximum wind speed, average temperatures in each month, the average maximum air temperature, average minimum air temperature, sunshine, monthly rainfall, maximum rainfall in a day  for different cities of Gilan. In order to check the reliability of the forecasts by known parameters, three ANN models have developed (ANN-1, ANN-2 and ANN-3. The maximum MAPE for ANN-1, ANN-2 and ANN-3 equals 22.15%, 20.29% and 22.14%, respectively indicating 1.86% improvement in the accuracy in the prediction of ANN-2. 

  6. Modelling low energy electron interactions for biomedical uses of radiation

    Current radiation based medical applications in the field of radiotherapy, radio-diagnostic and radiation protection require modelling single particle interactions at the molecular level. Due to their relevance in radiation damage to biological systems, special attention should be paid to include the effect of low energy secondary electrons. In this study we present a single track simulation procedure for photons and electrons which is based on reliable experimental and theoretical cross section data and the energy loss distribution functions derived from our experiments. The effect of including secondary electron interactions in this model will be discussed.

  7. Evaluation of air temperature distribution using thermal image under conditions of nocturnal radiative cooling in winter season over Shikoku area

    Using the thermal images offered by the infra-red thermometer and the LANDSAT, the air temperature distribution over mountainous regions were estimated under conditions of nocturnal radiative cooling in the winter season. The thermal image analyses by using an infra-red thermometer and the micrometeological observation were carried out around Zentsuji Kagawa prefecture. At the same time, the thermal image analyses were carried out by using the LANDSAT data. The LANDSAT data were taken on Dec. 7, 1984 and Dec. 5, 1989. The scenes covered the west part of Shikoku, southwest of Japan.The results were summarized as follows:Values of the surface temperature of trees, which were measured by an infra-red thermometer, were almost equal to the air temperature. On the other hand, DN values detected by LANDSAT over forest area were closely related with air temperature observed by AMeDAS. Therefore, it is possible to evaluate instantaneously a spatial distribution of the nocturnal air temperature from thermal image.The LANDSAT detect a surface temperature over Shikoku area only at 21:30. When radiative cooling was dominant, the thermal belt and the cold air lake were already formed on the mountain slopes at 21:30. Therfore, it is possible to estimate the characteristic of nocturnal temperature distribution by using LANDSAT data.It became clear that the temperature distribution estimated by thermal images offered by the infra-red thermometer and the LANDSAT was useful for the evaluation of rational land use for winter crops

  8. On an incompressible model in radiation hydrodynamics

    Ducomet, B.; Nečasová, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 4 (2015), s. 765-774. ISSN 0170-4214 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : radiation hydrodynamics * incompressible Navier-Stokes-Fourier system * weak solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2014 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mma.3107/abstract

  9. On a model in radiation hydrodynamics

    Ducomet, B.; Feireisl, Eduard; Nečasová, Šárka

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 6 (2011), s. 797-812. ISSN 0294-1449 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : radiation hydrodynamics * Navier-Stokes-Fourier system * weak solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.271, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0294144911000655

  10. Modeling radiative properties of nanoscale patterned wafers

    2010-01-01

    Temperature nonuniformity in rapid thermal processing of wafers is a critical problem facing the semiconductor industry. One cause of the problem is the nonuniform absorption of thermal radiation in patterned wafers where the optical properties vary across the wafer surface. This paper presents a parametric study of the radiative properties of patterned wafers, considering the effect of temperature, wavelength, and polarization. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is employed to examine the effect of various trench sizes on the radiative properties via numerically solving the Maxwell equations. The effective medium theory (EMT) is also used to help explain the absorptance prediction. The results show that in the cases with trench size variation, the resonance cavity effect may increase the absorptance as the trench width increases. And in the cases with trench size increasing at several different filling ratios, the absorptance does not change much at small filling ratio. The effects of the resonant cavity, diffraction, wave interferences on the spectral-directional absorptance were also discussed. This work is of great importance for optimization of advanced annealing techniques in semiconductor manufacturing.

  11. Search for molecular bremsstrahlung radiation signals in Ku band with coincidental operations of radio telescopes with air shower detectors

    Fukushima Masaki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwave radiation from extensive air showers is expected to provide a new technique to observe UHECR. We insatlled and operate radio telescopes in Osaka and at Telescope Array site in Utah, USA. In Osaka, we are coincidentally operating two Ku band radio telescopes with an air shower array which consists of nine plastic scintillators with about 10 m separation. In Utah, we installed two telescopes just beside the Black Rock Mesa fluorescence detector (FD station of the Telescope Array experiment, and we operated the radio telescopes coincidentally with FD event triggers. We report the experimental setups and the results of these measurements.

  12. A dynamic thermal model for design and control of an 800-element open-air radio telescope

    Bremer, Michael; Greve, Albert

    2011-09-01

    In earlier work we have described the thermal modelling for design and control of a fully insulated, and sometimes ventilated, high precision radio telescope. For such an insulated telescope the modelling of the time-variable dynamic influence of the thermal environment (air, sky and ground radiation, insolation) is relatively simple. The modelling becomes however quite complex for an open-air radio telescope where each individual member of the reflector backup structure (BUS) and the support structure (fork or yoke) is exposed under a different and time-dependent aspect angle to the thermal environment, which applies in particular to solar radiation. We present a time-dependent 800-element thermal model of an open-air telescope. Using the IRAM 30-m radio telescope as the basic mechanical structure, we explain how the temperature induced, real-time pointing and reflector surface deformations can be derived when using as input the day of the year, the thermal environment, and the geographic position of the telescope and its changing pointing direction. Thermal modelling and results similar to those reported here can be used for radio telescope design and real-time control of pointing and surface adjustment of a telescope with active panels.

  13. Application of SIM-air modeling tools to assess air quality in Indian cities

    Guttikunda, Sarath K.; Jawahar, Puja

    2012-12-01

    A prerequisite to an air quality management plan for a city is some idea of the main sources of pollution and their contributions for a city. This paper presents the results of an application of the SIM-air modeling tool in six Indian cities - Pune, Chennai, Indore, Ahmedabad, Surat, and Rajkot. Using existing and publicly available data, we put together a baseline of multi-pollutant emissions for each of the cities and then calculate concentrations, health impacts, and model alternative scenarios for 2020. The measured annual PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 micron meter) concentrations in μg m-3 averaged 94.7 ± 45.4 in Pune, 73.1 ± 33.7 in Chennai, 118.8 ± 44.3 in Indore, 94.0 ± 20.4 in Ahmedabad, 89.4 ± 12.1 in Surat, and 105.0 ± 25.6 in Rajkot, all exceeding the annual standard of 60 μg m-3. The PM10 inventory in tons/year for the year 2010 of 38,400 in Pune, 50,200 in Chennai, 18,600 in Indore, 31,900 in Ahmedabad, 20,000 in Surat, and 14,000 in Rajkot, is further spatially segregated into 1 km grids and includes all known sources such as transport, road dust, residential, power plants, industries (including the brick kilns), waste burning, and diesel generator sets. We use the ATMoS chemical transport model to validate the emissions inventory and estimate an annual premature mortality due to particulate pollution of 15,200 for the year 2010 for the six cities. Of the estimated 21,400 premature deaths in the six cities in 2020, we estimate that implementation of the six interventions in the transport and brick kiln sectors, can potentially save 5870 lives (27%) annually and result in an annual reduction of 16.8 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities.

  14. The effects of electron thermal radiation on laser ablative shock waves from aluminum plasma into ambient air

    Sai Shiva, S.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.; Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of electron thermal radiation on 7 ns laser ablative shock waves from aluminum (Al) plasma into an ambient atmospheric air has been numerically investigated using a one-dimensional, three-temperature (electron, ion, and radiation) radiation hydrodynamic code MULTI. The governing equations in Lagrangian form are solved using an implicit scheme for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. The shockwave velocities (Vsw) obtained numerically are compared with our experimental values obtained over the intensity range of 2.0 × 1010 to 1.4 × 1011 W/cm2. It is observed that the numerically obtained Vsw is significantly influenced by the thermal radiation effects which are found to be dominant in the initial stage up to 2 μs depending on the input laser energy. Also, the results are found to be sensitive to the co-ordinate geometry used in the simulation (planar, cylindrical, and spherical). Moreover, it is revealed that shock wave undergoes geometrical transitions from planar to cylindrical nature and from cylindrical to spherical nature with time during its propagation into an ambient atmospheric air. It is also observed that the spatio-temporal evolution of plasma electron and ion parameters such as temperature, specific energy, pressure, electron number density, and mass density were found to be modified significantly due to the effects of electron thermal radiation.

  15. Modeling Regional Air Quality Impacts from Indonesian Biomass Burning

    Jumbam, L.; Raffuse, S. M.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Larkin, N.

    2012-12-01

    Smoke from thousands of forest-clearing burns in Indonesia cause widespread air quality impacts in cities across southeastern Asia. These fires, which can produce significant smoke due to peat burning, are readily detected by polar orbiting satellites. Widespread smoke can be seen in satellite imagery, and high concentrations of particulate matter are detected by ground based sensors. Here we present results of a pilot modeling study focusing on the September 2011 Indonesian smoke episode. In the study, fire location information was collected from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The BlueSky modeling framework, which links information about fire locations with smoke emissions and meteorological models, was used to pass the fire location information from MODIS through the Fire INventories from NCAR (FINN) methodology to estimate emissions of aerosol and gaseous pollutants from the fires. These emissions were further directed by BlueSky through the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, which predicted the dispersion and transport of PM2.5 from the fires. The resulting regional PM2.5 concentration maps from BlueSky were compared with satellite imagery and urban ground stations, where available. This work demonstrates the extension of a system developed for producing daily smoke predictions in the United States outside of North America for the first time. We discuss the implications of regional smoke impacts and possibilities for predictive smoke modeling to protect public health in southeastern Asia.

  16. Czech air quality monitoring and receptor modeling study

    An ongoing air quality monitoring program in the Czech Republic has provided nearly continuous data for the concentrations of aerosols and gas-phase pollutants since its inception in February 1992. In addition to PM-2.5 concentrations, the concentrations of sulfate, organic carbon, elemental carbon, trace elements (Al-Pb), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also measured. Fine particulate matter (PM-2.5) was composed mainly of organic carbon and sulfate with smaller amounts of trace metals. Coarse particle mass concentrations were typically between 10 and 30% of PM-2.5 concentrations. The chemical composition of emissions from power plants, residential space heating, local factories, and motor vehicles was also characterized. The ambient monitoring and source characterization data were then used in receptor modeling calculations, the results of which indicate that residential space heating and power plant emissions accounted for most of fine particle mass concentrations observed during winter air pollution episodes. Motor vehicles, incinerators, and windblown dust contributed to the balance of the fine particle mass. Peak 24-h average TSP and SO2 concentrations (1100 and 800μg/m3, respectively) obtained at the main monitoring site at Teplice in northern Bohemia during a severe air pollution episode in 1993 were within a factor of 2 of smoke and SO2 concentrations (1800 and 1600 μg/m3) measured in London during the smog episode of December 5-9, 1952. That pollution episode was thought to have contributed to a substantial increase in mortality. 24 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Resistance of o-ring seal compounds to heat and ionizing radiation in air and in water

    Results of tests involving exposure of o-ring compounds to various levels of temperature and ionizing radiation in air and in water are presented and discussed. The results indicate the levels of these variables, acting both singly, and in combination, at which functional properties such as sealing force or compression set and non-functional properties such as hardness or weight are significantly altered. Changes in sealing force were found to be well correlated with compression set. Hardness and weight changes were not well correlated with compression set. Significant temperature - media and temperature - radiation dose interaction effects were present for certain compounds. (author)

  18. Air kerma to Hp(3) conversion coefficients for a new cylinder phantom for photon reference radiation qualities

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has issued a standard series on photon reference radiation qualities (ISO 4037). In this series, no conversion coefficients are contained for the quantity personal dose equivalent at a 3 mm depth, Hp(3). In the past, for this quantity, a slab phantom was recommended as a calibration phantom; however, a cylinder phantom much better approximates the shape of a human head than a slab phantom. Therefore, in this work, the conversion coefficients from air kerma to Hp(3) for the cylinder phantom are supplied for X- and gamma radiation qualities defined in ISO 4037. (authors)

  19. Air kerma to Hp(3) conversion coefficients for a new cylinder phantom for photon reference radiation qualities.

    Behrens, R

    2012-09-01

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has issued a standard series on photon reference radiation qualities (ISO 4037). In this series, no conversion coefficients are contained for the quantity personal dose equivalent at a 3 mm depth, H(p)(3). In the past, for this quantity, a slab phantom was recommended as a calibration phantom; however, a cylinder phantom much better approximates the shape of a human head than a slab phantom. Therefore, in this work, the conversion coefficients from air kerma to H(p)(3) for the cylinder phantom are supplied for X- and gamma radiation qualities defined in ISO 4037. PMID:22434922

  20. Occultation Modeling for Radiation Obstruction Effects on Spacecraft Systems

    de Carufel, Guy; Li, Zu Qun; Harvey, Jason; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A geometric occultation model has been developed to determine line-of-sight obstruction of radiation sources expected for different NASA space exploration mission designs. Example applications includes fidelity improvements for surface lighting conditions, radiation pressure, thermal and power subsystem modeling. The model makes use of geometric two dimensional shape primitives to most effectively model space vehicles. A set of these primitives is used to represent three dimensional obstructing objects as a two dimensional outline from the perspective of an observing point of interest. Radiation sources, such as the Sun or a Moon's albedo is represented as a collection of points, each of which is assigned a flux value to represent a section of the radiation source. Planetary bodies, such as a Martian moon, is represented as a collection of triangular facets which are distributed in spherical height fields for optimization. These design aspects and the overall model architecture will be presented. Specific uses to be presented includes a study of the lighting condition on Phobos for a possible future surface mission, and computing the incident flux on a spacecraft's solar panels and radiators from direct and reflected solar radiation subject to self-shadowing or shadowing by third bodies.

  1. Dynamic stochastic optimization models for air traffic flow management

    Mukherjee, Avijit

    This dissertation presents dynamic stochastic optimization models for Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) that enables decisions to adapt to new information on evolving capacities of National Airspace System (NAS) resources. Uncertainty is represented by a set of capacity scenarios, each depicting a particular time-varying capacity profile of NAS resources. We use the concept of a scenario tree in which multiple scenarios are possible initially. Scenarios are eliminated as possibilities in a succession of branching points, until the specific scenario that will be realized on a particular day is known. Thus the scenario tree branching provides updated information on evolving scenarios, and allows ATFM decisions to be re-addressed and revised. First, we propose a dynamic stochastic model for a single airport ground holding problem (SAGHP) that can be used for planning Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) when there is uncertainty about future airport arrival capacities. Ground delays of non-departed flights can be revised based on updated information from scenario tree branching. The problem is formulated so that a wide range of objective functions, including non-linear delay cost functions and functions that reflect equity concerns can be optimized. Furthermore, the model improves on existing practice by ensuring efficient use of available capacity without necessarily exempting long-haul flights. Following this, we present a methodology and optimization models that can be used for decentralized decision making by individual airlines in the GDP planning process, using the solutions from the stochastic dynamic SAGHP. Airlines are allowed to perform cancellations, and re-allocate slots to remaining flights by substitutions. We also present an optimization model that can be used by the FAA, after the airlines perform cancellation and substitutions, to re-utilize vacant arrival slots that are created due to cancellations. Finally, we present three stochastic integer programming

  2. Modelling relationships between lichen bioindicators, air quality and climate on a national scale: Results from the UK OPAL air survey

    Air pollution has many negative effects on the natural environment, from changes in plant growth patterns to loss of ecosystem function. This study uses citizen science to investigate national-scale patterns in the distribution and abundance of selected lichen species on tree trunks and branches, and to relate these to air pollution and climate. Volunteers collected data for nine lichen indicators on 19,334 deciduous trees. Submitted data provided information on species-level patterns, and were used to derive composite lichen indices. Multiple linear regression and ANCOVA were used to model the relationships between lichen response variables on Quercus spp. and pollution, climate and location. The study demonstrated significant relationships between patterns in indicator lichens and levels of N- and S-containing pollutants on trunks and twigs. The derived lichen indices show great potential as a tool to provide information on local, site-specific levels of air quality. -- Highlights: •Data on presence and abundance of selected lichens were collected by members of the public. •Indicator species and indices were modelled against air pollution and climate data. •Lichens and indices show significant relationships with nitrogenous air pollution. •Lichen indices are useful tools for providing information on local air quality. -- Data on selected lichen taxa collected by members of the public in England is used to show the relationship of indicator taxa and pollution indices to air pollution and climate data

  3. A modeling analysis of a heavy air pollution episode occurred in Beijing

    An, X.; Zhu, T.; Wang, Z.; C. Li; Wang, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM) and ozone in Beijing often exceed healthful levels in recent years, therefore China is to taking steps to improve Beijing's air quality for the 2008 Olympic Games. In this paper, the Models-3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System was used to investigate a heavy air pollution episode in Beijing during 3–7 April 2005 to obtain the basic information of how heavy air pollution formed and the contributions of local...

  4. Prediction of Indoor Air Exposure from Outdoor Air Quality Using an Artificial Neural Network Model for Inner City Commercial Buildings

    Avril Challoner; Francesco Pilla; Laurence Gill

    2015-01-01

    NO2 and particulate matter are the air pollutants of most concern in Ireland, with possible links to the higher respiratory and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity rates found in the country compared to the rest of Europe. Currently, air quality limits in Europe only cover outdoor environments yet the quality of indoor air is an essential determinant of a person’s well-being, especially since the average person spends more than 90% of their time indoors. The modelling conducted in this res...

  5. Numerical models for afterburning of TNT detonation products in air

    Donahue, L.; Zhang, F.; Ripley, R. C.

    2013-11-01

    Afterburning occurs when fuel-rich explosive detonation products react with oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere. This energy release can further contribute to the air blast, resulting in a more severe explosion hazard particularly in confined scenarios. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the products equation of state (EOS) on the prediction of the efficiency of trinitrotoluene (TNT) afterburning and the times of arrival of reverberating shock waves in a closed chamber. A new EOS is proposed, denoted the Afterburning (AB) EOS. This EOS employs the JWL EOS in the high pressure regime, transitioning to a Variable-Gamma (VG) EOS at lower pressures. Simulations of three TNT charges suspended in a explosion chamber were performed. When compared to numerical results using existing methods, it was determined that the Afterburning EOS delays the shock arrival times giving better agreement with the experimental measurements in the early to mid time. In the late time, the Afterburning EOS roughly halved the error between the experimental measurements and results obtained using existing methods. Use of the Afterburning EOS for products with the Variable-Gamma EOS for the surrounding air further significantly improved results, both in the transient solution and the quasi-static pressure. This final combination of EOS and mixture model is recommended for future studies involving afterburning explosives, particularly those in partial and full confinement.

  6. A Simplified Scheme of the Generalized Layered Radiative Transfer Model

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, firstly, a simplified version (SGRTM) of the generalized layered radiative transfer model (GRTM) within the canopy, developed by us, is presented. It reduces the information requirement of inputted sky diffuse radiation, as well as of canopy morphology, and in turn saves computer resources. Results from the SGRTM agree perfectly with those of the GRTM. Secondly, by applying the linear superposition principle of the optics and by using the basic solutions of the GRTM for radiative transfer within the canopy under the condition of assumed zero soil reflectance, two sets of explicit analytical solutions of radiative transfer within the canopy with any soil reflectance magnitude are derived: one for incident diffuse, and the other for direct beam radiation. The explicit analytical solutions need two sets of basic solutions of canopy reflectance and transmittance under zero soil reflectance, run by the model for both diffuse and direct beam radiation. One set of basic solutions is the canopy reflectance αf (written as α1 for direct beam radiation) and transmittance βf (written as β1 for direction beam radiation) with zero soil reflectance for the downward radiation from above the canopy (i.e. sky), and the other set is the canopy reflectance (αb) and transmittanceβb for the upward radiation from below the canopy (i.e., ground). Under the condition of the same plant architecture in the vertical layers, and the same leaf adaxial and abaxial optical properties in the canopies for the uniform diffuse radiation, the explicit solutions need only one set of basic solutions, because under this condition the two basic solutions are equal, i.e., αf = αb and βf = βb. Using the explicit analytical solutions, the fractions of any kind of incident solar radiation reflected from (defined as surface albedo, or canopy reflectance),transmitted through (defined as canopy transmittance), and absorbed by (defined as canopy absorptance)the canopy and other properties

  7. The Influence of Tropical Air-Sea Interaction on the Climate Impact of Aerosols: A Hierarchical Modeling Approach

    Hsieh, W. C.; Saravanan, R.; Chang, P.; Mahajan, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we use a hierarchical modeling approach to investigate the influence of tropical air-sea feedbacks on climate impacts of aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We construct four different models by coupling the atmospheric component of CESM, the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), to four different ocean models: (i) the Data Ocean Model (DOM; prescribed SST), (i) Slab Ocean Model (SOM; thermodynamic coupling), (iii) Reduced Gravity Ocean Model (RGOM; dynamic coupling), and (iv) the Parallel Ocean Program (POP; full ocean model). These four models represent progressively increasing degree of coupling between the atmosphere and the ocean. The RGOM model, in particular, is tuned to produce a good simulation of ENSO and the associated tropical air-sea interaction, without being impacted by the climate drifts exhibited by fully-coupled GCMs. For each method of coupling, a pair of numerical experiments, including present day (year 2000) and preindustrial (year 1850) sulfate aerosol loading, were carried out. Our results indicate that the inclusion of air-sea interaction has large impacts on the spatial structure of the climate response induced by aerosols. In response to sulfate aerosol forcing, ITCZ shifts southwards as a result of the anomalous clockwise MMC change which transports moisture southwardly across the Equator. We present analyses of the regional response to sulfate aerosol forcing in the equatorial Pacific as well as the zonally-averaged response. The decomposition of the change in the net surface energy flux shows the most dominant terms are net shortwave radiative flux at the surface and latent heat flux. Further analyses show all ocean model simulations simulate a positive change of northward atmospheric energy transport across the Equator in response to the perturbed radiative sulfate forcing. This positive northward atmospheric energy transport change plays a role in compensating partially cooling caused by sulfate aerosols.

  8. Development of 3D Multicomponent Model for Cold Spray Process Using Nitrogen and Air

    Muhammad Faizan Ur Rab

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cold spray is a unique coating technology that allows for solid state deposition of particles under atmospheric pressure. In this paper, a three dimensional, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD multicomponent model is developed to estimate cold spray gas conditions involving both nitrogen and air. Calibration of the model followed by validation is accomplished by considering the thermal history of substrate exposed to cold spray supersonic jet. The developed holistic multicomponent model is effective in determining the state of gas and particles from injection point to the substrate surface with the advantage of optimizing very rapid cold spray deposition in nanoseconds. The validation of k-ε type CFD multicomponent model is done by using the temperature measured for a titanium substrate exposed to cold spray nitrogen at 800 °C and 3 MPa. Heat transfer and radiation are considered for the de Laval nozzle used in cold spray experiments. The calibrated multicomponent model has successfully estimated the state of propellant gas for the chosen high pressure and high temperature cold spray conditions. Moreover, the multicomponent model predictions are in good agreement with a previous holistic three dimensional cold spray model in which only nitrogen was used as the surrounding as well as the propellant gas.

  9. A radiative diffusion model for laser-compression simulations

    A radiation diffusion package is described which can handle the transport of continuum radiation arising from free-free and free-bound transitions in a laser-compressed plasma. This model has been incorporated into MEDUSA, a two temperature, 1-D Lagrangian computer code, and numerous computer runs have been carried out to study the effect of radiative preheat on target compression. The calculations show that in compression of a 10-μg solid carbon microsphere the radiation effects reduce the final target density by up to a factor of 6. In the case of a neon filled thin glass microballoon, the radiative preheat reduces maximum neon density by a factor of 3 while the maximum shell density drops from 105 Kg/m3 to 1.8 x 104 Kg/m3. (author)

  10. Modelling urban air quality using artificial neural network

    Nagendra, S.M. Shiva; Khare, Mukesh [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Department of Civil Engineering, New Delhi (India)

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the development of artificial neural network-based vehicular exhaust emission models for predicting 8-h average carbon monoxide concentrations at two air quality control regions (AQCRs) in the city of Delhi, India, viz. a typical traffic intersection (AQCR1) and a typical arterial road (AQCR2). Maximum of ten meteorological and six traffic characteristic variables have been used in the models' formulation. Three scenarios were considered - considering both meteorological and traffic characteristics input parameters; only meteorological inputs; and only traffic characteristics input data. The performance of all the developed models was evaluated on the basis of index of agreement (d) and other statistical parameters, viz. the mean and the deviations of the observed and predicted concentrations, mean bias error, mean square error, systematic and unsystematic root mean square error, coefficient of determination and linear best fit constant and gradient (Willmott in B Am Meteorol Soc 63:1309, 1982). The forecast performance of the developed models, with meteorological and traffic characteristics (d=0.78 for AQCR1 and d=0.69 for AQCR2) and with only meteorological inputs (d=0.77 for AQCR1 and d=0.67 for AQCR2), were comparable with the measured data. (orig.)

  11. Modeling Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over the Northern Hemisphere using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Wong, D.; Hogrefe, C.; Xing, J.; Wei, C.; Gan, M.

    2013-12-01

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challenging. A detailed investigation of the processes regulating aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects and verification of their simulated effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in order to build confidence in the estimates of the projected impacts arising from changes in both anthropogenic forcing and climate change. Anthropogenic emissions of primary aerosol and gaseous precursors have witnessed dramatic changes over the past two decades across the northern hemisphere. During the period 1990-2010, SO2 and NOx emissions across the US have reduced by about 66% and 50%, respectively, mainly due to Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAA). In contrast, anthropogenic emissions have increased dramatically in many developing regions during this period. We conduct a systematic investigation of changes in anthropogenic emissions of primary aerosols and gaseous precursors over the past two decades, their impacts on trends and spatial heterogeneity in anthropogenic aerosol loading across the northern hemisphere troposphere, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. The coupled WRF-CMAQ model is applied for selected time periods spanning the period 1990-2010 over a domain covering the northern hemisphere and a nested finer resolution continental U.S. domain. The model includes detailed treatment of direct effects of aerosols on photolysis rates as well as on shortwave radiation. Additionally, treatment of aerosol indirect effects on clouds has also recently been implemented. A methodology is developed to consistently estimate U.S. emission inventories for the 20-year period accounting for air quality regulations as well as

  12. Depicting the Dependency of Isoprene in Ambient Air and from Plants on Temperature and Solar Radiation by Using Regression Analysis

    Saxena, Pallavi; Ghosh, Chirashree

    2016-07-01

    Among all sources of volatile organic compounds, isoprene emission from plants is an important part of the atmospheric hydrocarbon budget. In the present study, isoprene emission capacity at the bottom of the canopies of plant species viz. Dalbergia sissoo and Nerium oleander and in ambient air at different sites selected on the basis of land use pattern viz. near to traffic intersection with dense vegetation, away from traffic intersection with dense vegetation under floodplain area (Site I) and away from traffic intersection with dense vegetation under hilly ridge area (Site II) during three different seasons (monsoon, winter and summer) in Delhi were measured. In order to find out the dependence of isoprene emission rate on temperature and solar radiation, regression analysis has been performed. In case of dependency of isoprene in ambient air on temperature and solar radiation in selected seasons it has been found that high isoprene was found during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon seasons. Thus, positive linear relationship gives the best fit between temperature, solar rdaiation and isoprene during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon season. On the other hand, in case of isoprene emission from selected plant species, it has been found that high temperature and solar radiation promotes high isoprene emission rates during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon seasons in D. sissoo. Thus, positive linear relationship gives the best fit between temperature, solar radiation and isoprene emission rate during summer season as compared to winter and monsoon season. In contrast, in case of Nerium oleander, no such appropriate relationship was obtained. The study concludes that in ambient air, isoprene concentration was found to be high during summer season as compared to other seasons and gives best fit between temperature, solar radiation and isoprene. In case of plants, Dalbergia sissoo comes under high isoprene emission category

  13. Atmospheric dispersion models help to improve air quality; Los modelos de dispersion atmosferica ayudan a mejorar la calidad del aire

    Martin, F.

    2013-07-01

    One of the main challenges of the atmospheric sciences is to reproduce as well as possible the phenomena and processes of pollutants in the atmosphere. To do it, mathematical models based in this case on fluid dynamics and mass and energy conservation equations, equations that govern the atmospheric chemistry, etc., adapted to the spatial scales to be simulated, are developed. The dispersion models simulate the processes of transport, dispersion, chemical transformation and elimination by deposition that air pollutants undergo once they are emitted. Atmospheric dispersion models with their multiple applications have become essential tools for the air quality management. (Author)

  14. Optimization models for reducing air emissions from ships

    Balland, Océane

    2013-01-01

    This research deals with the reduction of air emissions from ships. Ships are large contributors to air pollution with implications for climate change and human health. Regulations have entered into force or will in the near future, which will force shipowners to reduce the air emissions from their vessels. Multiple technologies or operational measures reducing these main pollutants are available and the term air emission control has here been defined as any effort made by ship-owners, operat...

  15. Computer Model to Estimate Reliability Engineering for Air Conditioning Systems

    Reliability engineering is used to predict the performance and optimize design and maintenance of air conditioning systems. Air conditioning systems are expose to a number of failures. The failures of an air conditioner such as turn on, loss of air conditioner cooling capacity, reduced air conditioning output temperatures, loss of cool air supply and loss of air flow entirely can be due to a variety of problems with one or more components of an air conditioner or air conditioning system. Forecasting for system failure rates are very important for maintenance. This paper focused on the reliability of the air conditioning systems. Statistical distributions that were commonly applied in reliability settings: the standard (2 parameter) Weibull and Gamma distributions. After distributions parameters had been estimated, reliability estimations and predictions were used for evaluations. To evaluate good operating condition in a building, the reliability of the air conditioning system that supplies conditioned air to the several The company's departments. This air conditioning system is divided into two, namely the main chilled water system and the ten air handling systems that serves the ten departments. In a chilled-water system the air conditioner cools water down to 40-45 degree F (4-7 degree C). The chilled water is distributed throughout the building in a piping system and connected to air condition cooling units wherever needed. Data analysis has been done with support a computer aided reliability software, this is due to the Weibull and Gamma distributions indicated that the reliability for the systems equal to 86.012% and 77.7% respectively. A comparison between the two important families of distribution functions, namely, the Weibull and Gamma families was studied. It was found that Weibull method performed for decision making.

  16. The impact of air pollutant and methane emission controls on tropospheric ozone and radiative forcing: CTM calculations for the period 1990–2030

    F. Raes

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available To explore the relationship between tropospheric ozone and radiative forcing with changing emissions, we compiled two sets of global scenarios for the emissions of the ozone precursors methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC and nitrogen oxides (NOx up to the year 2030 and implemented them in two global Chemistry Transport Models. The "Current Legislation" (CLE scenario reflects the current perspectives of individual countries on future economic development and takes the anticipated effects of presently decided emission control legislation in the individual countries into account. In addition, we developed a "Maximum technically Feasible Reduction" (MFR scenario that outlines the scope for emission reductions offered by full implementation of the presently available emission control technologies, while maintaining the projected levels of anthropogenic activities. Whereas the resulting projections of methane emissions lie within the range suggested by other greenhouse gas projections, the recent pollution control legislation of many Asian countries, requiring introduction of catalytic converters for vehicles, leads to significantly lower growth in emissions of the air pollutants NOx, NMVOC and CO than was suggested by the widely used IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios scenarios (Nakicenovic et al., 2000. With the TM3 and STOCHEM models we performed several long-term integrations (1990–2030 to assess global, hemispheric and regional changes in CH4, CO, hydroxyl radicals, ozone and the radiative climate forcings resulting from these two emission scenarios. Both models reproduce realistically the observed trends in background ozone, CO, and CH4 concentrations from 1990 to 2002. For the "current legislation" case, both models indicate an increase of the annual average ozone levels in the Northern hemisphere by 5 ppbv, and up to 15 ppbv over the Indian

  17. Modeling of the Martian environment for radiation analysis

    A model for the radiation environment to be found on the planet Mars due to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) has been developed. Solar modulated primary particles rescaled for conditions at Mars are transported through the Martian atmosphere down to the surface, with altitude and backscattering patterns taken into account. The altitude to compute the atmospheric thickness profile has been determined by using a model for the topography based on the data provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. The Mars surface composition has been modeled based on averages over the measurements obtained from orbiting spacecraft and at various landing sites, taking into account the possible volatile inventory (e.g. CO2 and H2O ices) along with its time variations throughout the Martian year. The Mars Radiation Environment Model has been made available worldwide through the Space Ionizing Radiation Effects and Shielding Tools (SIREST) website, a project of NASA Langley Research Center. This site has been developed to provide the scientific and engineering communities with an interactive site containing a variety of environmental models, shield evaluation codes, and radiation response models to allow a thorough assessment of ionizing radiation risk for current and future space missions

  18. Modeling of the Martian environment for radiation analysis

    De Angelis, G. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk VA (United States) and NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA (United States) and Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: giovanni.deangelis@iss.it; Wilson, J.W. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA (United States); Clowdsley, M.S. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA (United States); Qualls, G.D. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA (United States); Singleterry, R.C. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA (United States)

    2006-10-15

    A model for the radiation environment to be found on the planet Mars due to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) has been developed. Solar modulated primary particles rescaled for conditions at Mars are transported through the Martian atmosphere down to the surface, with altitude and backscattering patterns taken into account. The altitude to compute the atmospheric thickness profile has been determined by using a model for the topography based on the data provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. The Mars surface composition has been modeled based on averages over the measurements obtained from orbiting spacecraft and at various landing sites, taking into account the possible volatile inventory (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O ices) along with its time variations throughout the Martian year. The Mars Radiation Environment Model has been made available worldwide through the Space Ionizing Radiation Effects and Shielding Tools (SIREST) website, a project of NASA Langley Research Center. This site has been developed to provide the scientific and engineering communities with an interactive site containing a variety of environmental models, shield evaluation codes, and radiation response models to allow a thorough assessment of ionizing radiation risk for current and future space missions.

  19. SRADLIB: A C Library for Solar Radiation Modelling

    Balenzategui, J. L. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This document shows the result of an exhaustive study about the theoretical and numerical models available in the literature about solar radiation modelling. The purpose of this study is to develop or adapt mathematical models describing the solar radiation specifically for Spain locations as well as to create computer tools able to support the labour of researchers or engineers needing solar radiation data to solve or improve the technical or energetic performance of solar systems. As results of this study and revision, a C library (SRADLIB) is presented as a key for the compilation of the mathematical models from different authors, for the comparison among the different approaches and for its application in computer programs. Different topics related to solar radiation and its modelling are first discussed, including the assumptions and conventions adopted and describing the most accepted and used current state-of-the-art models. some typical problems in the numerical calculation of radiation values are also posed with the proposed solution. The document includes next a complete reference of the developed functions, with many examples of application and calculus. (Author) 24 refs.

  20. SRADLIB: A C Library for Solar Radiation Modelling

    This document shows the result of an exhaustive study about the theoretical and numerical models available in the literature about solar radiation modelling. The purpose of this study is to develop or adapt mathematical models describing the solar radiation specifically for Spain locations as well as to create computer tools able to support the labour of researchers or engineers needing solar radiation data to solve or improve the technical or energetic performance of solar systems. As result of this study and revision, a C library (SRADLIB) is presented as a key tool for the compilation of the mathematical models from different authors, for the comparison among the different approaches and for its application in computer programs. Different topics related to solar radiation and its modelling are first discussed, including the assumptions and conventions adopted and describing the most accepted and used current state-of-the-art models. Some typical problems in the numerical calculation of radiation values are also posed with the proposed solution. The document includes next a complete reference of the developed functions, with many examples of application and calculus. (Author) 24 refs

  1. Radiation Environment Variations at Mars - Model Calculations and Measurements

    Saganti, Premkumar; Cucinotta, Francis

    Variations in the space radiation environment due to changes in the GCR (Galactic Cosmic Ray) from the past (#23) solar cycle to the current one (#24) has been intriguing in many ways, with an unprecedented long duration of the recent solar minimum condition and a very low peak activity of the current solar maximum. Model calculated radiation data and assessment of variations in the particle flux - protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions of the GCR environment is essential for understanding radiation risk and for any future intended long-duration human exploration missions. During the past solar cycle, we have had most active and higher solar maximum (2001-2003) condition. In the beginning of the current solar cycle (#24), we experienced a very long duration of solar minimum (2009-2011) condition with a lower peak activity (2013-2014). At Mars, radiation measurements in orbit were obtained (onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft) during the past (#23) solar maximum condition. Radiation measurements on the surface of Mars are being currently measured (onboard the Mars Science Laboratory, 2012 - Curiosity) during the current (#24) solar peak activity (August 2012 - present). We present our model calculated radiation environment at Mars during solar maxima for solar cycles #23 and #24. We compare our earlier model calculations (Cucinotta et al., J. Radiat. Res., 43, S35-S39, 2002; Saganti et al., J. Radiat. Res., 43, S119-S124, 2002; and Saganti et al., Space Science Reviews, 110, 143-156, 2004) with the most recent radiation measurements on the surface of Mars (2012 - present).

  2. Potential solar radiation and land cover contributions to digital climate surface modeling

    Puig, Pol; Batalla, Meritxell; Pesquer, Lluís; Ninyerola, Miquel

    2016-04-01

    Overview: We have designed a series of ad-hoc experiments to study the role of factors that a priori have a strong weight in developing digital models of temperature and precipitation, such as solar radiation and land cover. Empirical test beds have been designed to improve climate (mean air temperature and total precipitation) digital models using statistical general techniques (multiple regression) with residual correction (interpolated with inverse weighting distance). Aim: Understand what roles these two factors (solar radiation and land cover) play to incorporate them into the process of generating mapping of temperature and rainfall. Study area: The Iberian Peninsula and supported in this, Catalonia and the Catalan Pyrenees. Data: The dependent variables used in all experiments relate to data from meteorological stations precipitation (PL), mean temperature (MT), average temperature minimum (MN) and maximum average temperature (MX). These data were obtained monthly from the AEMET (Agencia Estatal de Meteorología). Data series of stations covers the period between 1950 to 2010. Methodology: The idea is to design ad hoc, based on a sample of more equitable space statistician, to detect the role of radiation. Based on the influence of solar radiation on the temperature of the air from a quantitative point of view, the difficulty in answering this lies in the fact that there are lots of weather stations located in areas where solar radiation is similar. This suggests that the role of the radiation variable remains "off" when, instead, we intuitively think that would strongly influence the temperature. We have developed a multiple regression analysis between these meteorological variables as the dependent ones (Temperature and rainfall), and some geographical variables: altitude (ALT), latitude (LAT), continentality (CON) and solar radiation (RAD) as the independent ones. In case of the experiment with land covers, we have used the NDVI index as a proxy of land

  3. Modeling of Kinetics of Air Entrainment in Water Produced by Vertically Falling Water Flow

    Adelė VAIDELIENĖ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the process of air entrainment in water caused by vertically falling water flow in the free water surface. The new kinetic model of air entrainment in water was developed. This model includes the process of air entrapment, as well as air removal, water sputtering and resorption. For the experimental part of this study a new method based on digital image processing was developed. Theoretical and experimental methods were used for determining air concentration and its distribution in water below the air-water interface. A new presented mathematical model of air entrainment process allows determining of air bubbles and water droplets concentrations distribution. The obtained theoretical and experimental results were in good agreement. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4871

  4. Hybrid Air Quality Modeling Approach for use in the Hear-road Exposures to Urban air pollutant Study(NEXUS)

    The paper presents a hybrid air quality modeling approach and its application in NEXUS in order to provide spatial and temporally varying exposure estimates and identification of the mobile source contribution to the total pollutant exposure. Model-based exposure metrics, associa...

  5. Modelling air pollution abatement in deep street canyons by means of air scrubbers

    De Giovanni, Marina; Avveduto, Alessandro; Pace, Lorenzo; Salisburgo, Cesare Dari; Giammaria, Franco; Monaco, Alessio; Spanto, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Deep street canyons are characterized by weak ventilation and recirculation of air. In such environment, the exposure to particulate matter and other air pollutants is enhanced, with a consequent worsening of both safety and health. The main solution adopted by the international community is aimed at the reduction of the emissions. In this theoretical study, we test a new solution: the removal of air pollutants close to their sources by a network of Air Pollution Abatement (APA) devices. The APA technology depletes gaseous and particulate air pollutants by a portable and low-consuming scrubbing system, that mimics the processes of wet and dry deposition. We estimate the potential pollutant abatement efficacy of a single absorber by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The presence of the scrubber effectively creates an additional sink at the bottom of the canyon, accelerating its cleaning process by up to 70%, when an almost perfect scrubber (90% efficiency) is simulated. The efficacy of absorber is not...

  6. Numerical modeling of radiation physics in kinetic plasmas [II

    Paraschiv, Ioana; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Mancini, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    X-ray radiation is an important feature of ultra-intense laser interactions with high Z materials. In order to take into account the radiation effects in the high energy density plasmas created by such interactions, we have modified the collisional particle-in-cell code PICLS to self-consistently model the x-ray radiation transport (RT). Solving the equation of radiation transport requires the creation of a non-LTE database of emissivities and opacities as functions of photon frequency for given densities, bulk electron temperatures, hot electron temperatures, and hot electron fractions. The database was generated using results computed by a non-equilibrium, collisional-radiative atomic kinetics code. Using the two-dimensional RT-PICLS code we have studied the X-ray transport in an ultrafast heated target and the dependence of the emitted K- α radiation on the fast electron dynamics in the solid target. The details of these results obtained from the implementation of the radiation transport model into the PICLS calculations will be reported in this presentation. Work supported by the DOE Office of Science Grant No. DE-SC0008827 and by the NNSA/DOE Grants No. DE-FC52-06NA27616 and DE-NA0002075.

  7. Radiation dose modeling using IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO

    The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans in radiation environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO (Ergonomics) simulation software products. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide the radiation exposure information to and collect the radiation dose information from the workcell simulations. The emphasis of this paper is on the IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO parts of REMS, since that represents the extension to existing capabilities developed by the authors. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these database files to compute and accumulate dose to human devices (Deneb's ERGO human) during simulated operations around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. REMS was developed because the proposed reduction in the yearly radiation exposure limit will preclude or require changes in many of the manual operations currently being utilized in the Weapons Complex. This is particularly relevant in the area of dismantlement activities at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX. Therefore, a capability was needed to be able to quantify the dose associated with certain manual processes so that the benefits of automation could be identified and understood

  8. The problem of multicollinearity in horizontal solar radiation estimation models and a new model for Turkey

    Highlights: • Impacts of multicollinearity on solar radiation estimation models are discussed. • Accuracy of existing empirical models for Turkey is evaluated. • A new non-linear model for the estimation of average daily horizontal global solar radiation is proposed. • Estimation and prediction performance of the proposed and existing models are compared. - Abstract: Due to the considerable decrease in energy resources and increasing energy demand, solar energy is an appealing field of investment and research. There are various modelling strategies and particular models for the estimation of the amount of solar radiation reaching at a particular point over the Earth. In this article, global solar radiation estimation models are taken into account. To emphasize severity of multicollinearity problem in solar radiation estimation models, some of the models developed for Turkey are revisited. It is observed that these models have been identified as accurate under certain multicollinearity structures, and when the multicollinearity is eliminated, the accuracy of these models is controversial. Thus, a reliable model that does not suffer from multicollinearity and gives precise estimates of global solar radiation for the whole region of Turkey is necessary. A new nonlinear model for the estimation of average daily horizontal solar radiation is proposed making use of the genetic programming technique. There is no multicollinearity problem in the new model, and its estimation accuracy is better than the revisited models in terms of numerous statistical performance measures. According to the proposed model, temperature, precipitation, altitude, longitude, and monthly average daily extraterrestrial horizontal solar radiation have significant effect on the average daily global horizontal solar radiation. Relative humidity and soil temperature are not included in the model due to their high correlation with precipitation and temperature, respectively. While altitude has

  9. A new approach to modelling radiation noise in CCD's

    The energy depositions reported by Monte Carlo electron-photon irradiation transport codes are subject to a random error due to the finite number of particle histories used to generate the results. These statistical variations, normally a nuisance, may also be identified with the real radiation noise effects experienced by CCD pixels in persistent radiation environments. This paper explores the practicability of such radiation noise modelling by applying the ACCEPT code from the ITS suite to the case of a shielded CCD exposed to an electron flux. The results are compared with those obtained in a subsequent electron irradiation of the CCD by a Van de Graaff accelerator

  10. A Prediction Model of MF Radiation in Environmental Assessment

    HE-SHAN GE; YAN-FENG HONG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To predict the impact of MF radiation on human health.Methods The vertical distribution of field intensity was estimated by analogism on the basis of measured values from simulation measurement. Results A kind of analogism on the basis of geometric proportion decay pattern is put forward in the essay. It showed that with increasing of height the field intensity increased according to geometric proportion law. Conclusion This geometric proportion prediction model can be used to estimate the impact of MF radiation on inhabited environment, and can act as a reference pattern in predicting the environmental impact level of MF radiation.

  11. Modeling the air-soil transport pathway of perfluorooctanoic acid in the mid-Ohio Valley using linked air dispersion and vadose zone models

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Ryan, P. Barry; Vieira, Verónica M.; Bartell, Scott M.

    2012-05-01

    As part of an extensive modeling effort on the air-soil-groundwater transport pathway of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), this study was designed to compare the performance of different air dispersion modeling systems (AERMOD vs. ISCST3), and different approaches to handling incomplete meteorological data using a data set with substantial soil measurements and a well characterized point source for air emissions. Two of the most commonly used EPA air dispersion models, AERMOD and ISCST3, were linked with the EPA vadose zone model PRZM-3. Predicted deposition rates from the air dispersion model were used as input values for the vadose zone model to estimate soil concentrations of PFOA at different depths. We applied 34 years of meteorological data including hourly surface measurements from Parkersburg Airport and 5 years of onsite wind direction and speed to the air dispersion models. We compared offsite measured soil concentrations to predictions made for the corresponding sampling depths, focusing on soil rather than air measurements because the offsite soil samples were less likely to be influenced by short-term variability in emission rates and meteorological conditions. PFOA concentrations in surface soil (0-30 cm depth) were under-predicted and those in subsurface soil (>30 cm depth) were over-predicted compared to observed concentrations by both linked air and vadose zone model. Overall, the simulated values from the linked modeling system were positively correlated with those observed in surface soil (Spearman's rho, Rsp = 0.59-0.70) and subsurface soil (Rsp = 0.46-0.48). This approach provides a useful modeling scheme for similar exposure and risk analyses where the air-soil-groundwater transport is a primary contamination pathway.

  12. Meteorological and Wave Measurements for Improving Meteorological and Air Quality Modeling

    Hare, J.; MacDonald, C.; Ray, A.; Fairall, C. W.; Pezoa, S.; Gibson, B.; Huang, C. H.

    2010-12-01

    A unique collaboration between corporate, government, and university researchers have teamed up to develop a marine environmental observations program on an offshore platform in the Gulf of Mexico. The meteorological and oceanographic sensors have been deployed for an extended period (12-24 months) on a Chevron service platform (90.5W, 29N) to collect boundary layer and sea surface data sufficient to improve dispersion modeling in and around the Gulf of Mexico. This task has recently been provided significant import, given the large industrial presence in the Gulf, the large regional population, and the recognized need for precise and accurate dispersion forecasts. Observations include marine boundary layer winds, height, and temperature, sea surface temperature and current, wave height, downwelling solar and infrared radiation, air-sea momentum and heat fluxes, and mean meteorological parameters. We will present a summary of the instrument deployment, show the initial time series of the observations, and provide context for the experimental outcomes.

  13. MCNP model for the many KE-Basin radiation sources

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1997-05-21

    This document presents a model for the location and strength of radiation sources in the accessible areas of KE-Basin which agrees well with data taken on a regular grid in September of 1996. This modelling work was requested to support dose rate reduction efforts in KE-Basin. Anticipated fuel removal activities require lower dose rates to minimize annual dose to workers. With this model, the effects of component cleanup or removal can be estimated in advance to evaluate their effectiveness. In addition, the sources contributing most to the radiation fields in a given location can be identified and dealt with.

  14. MCNP model for the many KE-Basin radiation sources

    This document presents a model for the location and strength of radiation sources in the accessible areas of KE-Basin which agrees well with data taken on a regular grid in September of 1996. This modelling work was requested to support dose rate reduction efforts in KE-Basin. Anticipated fuel removal activities require lower dose rates to minimize annual dose to workers. With this model, the effects of component cleanup or removal can be estimated in advance to evaluate their effectiveness. In addition, the sources contributing most to the radiation fields in a given location can be identified and dealt with

  15. Linear No-Threshold Model VS. Radiation Hormesis

    Doss, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivor cancer mortality data have been used in the past to justify the use of the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for estimating the carcinogenic effects of low dose radiation. An analysis of the recently updated atomic bomb survivor cancer mortality dose-response data shows that the data no longer support the LNT model but are consistent with a radiation hormesis model when a correction is applied for a likely bias in the baseline cancer mortality rate. If the validity of t...

  16. Modelling of radiation exposure at high altitudes during solar storms

    A transport code analysis using Monte Carlo N-Particle extended code, MCNPX, has been used to propagate an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere to estimate radiation exposure during solar storms at high altitudes. Neutron monitor count rate data from stations around the world were used to benchmark the model calculations during a ground-level event (GLE). A comparison was made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during GLE 60. A computer code has been developed to implement the model for routine analysis. (authors)

  17. Assessing Air-Sea Interaction in the Evolving NASA GEOS Model

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how the climate responds to variations in forcing, one necessary component is to understand the full distribution of variability of exchanges of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and ocean. Surface heat and moisture fluxes are critical to the generation and decay of many coupled air-sea phenomena. These mechanisms operate across a number of scales and contain contributions from interactions between the anomalous (i.e. non-mean), often extreme-valued, flux components. Satellite-derived estimates of the surface turbulent and radiative heat fluxes provide an opportunity to assess results from modeling systems. Evaluation of only time mean and variability statistics, however only provides limited traceability to processes controlling what are often regime-dependent errors. This work will present an approach to evaluate the representation of the turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface in the current and evolving Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model. A temperature and moisture vertical profile-based clustering technique is used to identify robust weather regimes, and subsequently intercompare the turbulent fluxes and near-surface parameters within these regimes in both satellite estimates and GEOS-driven data sets. Both model reanalysis (MERRA) and seasonal-to-interannual coupled GEOS model simulations will be evaluated. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the distribution of the fluxes including extremes, and the representation of near-surface forcing variables directly related to their estimation. Results from these analyses will help identify the existence and source of regime-dependent biases in the GEOS model ocean surface turbulent fluxes. The use of the temperature and moisture profiles for weather-state clustering will be highlighted for its potential broad application to 3-D output typical of model simulations.

  18. Diffusion approximation for modeling of 3-D radiation distributions

    A three-dimensional transport code DIF3D, based on the diffusion approximation, is used to model the spatial distribution of radiation energy arising from volumetric isotropic sources. Future work will be concerned with the determination of irradiances and modeling of realistic scenarios, relevant to the battlefield conditions. 8 refs., 4 figs

  19. Dose loading mathematical modelling of moving through heterogeneous radiation fields

    Software component for management of data on gamma exposition dose spatial distribution was created in the frameworks of the Ukryttya information model creation. Availability of state-of-the-art programming technologies (NET., ObjectARX) for integration of different models of radiation-hazardous condition to digital engineer documentation system (AutoCAD) was shown on the basis of the component example

  20. Radiation risk estimation based on measurement error models

    Masiuk, Sergii; Shklyar, Sergiy; Chepurny, Mykola; Likhtarov, Illya

    2016-01-01

    This monograph discusses statistics and risk estimates applied to radiation damage under the presence of measurement errors. The first part covers nonlinear measurement error models, with a particular emphasis on efficiency of regression parameter estimators. In the second part, risk estimation in models with measurement errors is considered. Efficiency of the methods presented is verified using data from radio-epidemiological studies.

  1. Highly physical penumbra solar radiation pressure modeling with atmospheric effects

    Robertson, Robert; Flury, Jakob; Bandikova, Tamara; Schilling, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for highly physical solar radiation pressure (SRP) modeling in Earth's penumbra. The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. However, we aim to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. We present new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the high spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. Modeled penumbra SRP accelerations for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are compared to the sub-nm/s2 precision GRACE accelerometer data. Comparisons to accelerometer data and a traditional penumbra SRP model illustrate the improved accuracy which our methods provide. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the significance of various atmospheric parameters and modeled effects on penumbra SRP. While this model is more complex than a traditional penumbra SRP model, we demonstrate its utility and propose that a highly physical model which considers atmospheric effects should be the basis for any simplified approach to penumbra SRP modeling.

  2. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Meier, Matthias M.; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B.; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis suggests

  3. Analytical approach to the modeling of radiation effects in tissue

    This paper reports the application of reactor physics calculational methods to the analysis of the interaction of radiation with tissue with the objective of developing a radiation effects model that is equivalent to the reactor point kinetics equations in mathematical rigor and utility. A primary motivation for this effort is that concerns about exposure to low levels of radiation have caused enormous expense to the nuclear industry in terms of both lack of public acceptance and regulation of activities involving minor amounts of radioactivity. These concerns might be alleviated if there were a rigorous yet mathematically tractable model of the effects of radiation on tissue. Our understanding of such effects is derived by extrapolation from high-level exposures. These extrapolations involve statistical considerations that are not readily understood by the public. Regulators also have difficulty in that existing mathematical models of the biological effects of radiation do little to promote understanding by the nonspecialist. There are two approaches. At one extreme are simple calculational methods that combine the definition of dose with information on the range of the radiation. For example, for charged particles, all of the energy is deposited locally

  4. Six-Tube Freezable Radiator Testing and Model Correlation

    Lilibridge, Sean T.; Navarro, Moses

    2012-01-01

    Freezable Radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the spacecraft?s surroundings and because of different thermal loads rejected during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recov ering) a freezable radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. These predictions are a critical step in gaining the capability to quickly design and produce optimized freezable radiators for a range of mission requirements. This paper builds upon previous efforts made to correlate a Thermal Desktop(TM) model with empirical testing data from two test articles, with additional model modifications and empirical data from a sub-component radiator for a full scale design. Two working fluids were tested: MultiTherm WB-58 and a 50-50 mixture of DI water and Amsoil ANT.

  5. Evaluation of global solar radiation models for Konya, Turkey

    Solar radiation data are required by solar engineers, architects, agriculturists and hydrologists for many applications such as solar heating, cooking, drying and interior illumination of buildings. In order to achieve this, several empirical models have been developed to predicted the solar radiation all over the world. The main objective of this study is to review the global solar radiation models available in the literature. In order to evaluate the applicability of 50 models for computing the monthly average daily global radiation on a horizontal surface, the geographical and meteorological data of Konya, Turkey (37 deg. 52'N latitude, 32 deg. 29'E longitude) was used. The models were compared on the basis of statistical error tests such as the percentage error (e), mean percentage error (MPE), root mean square error (RMSE), mean bias error (MBE), regression coefficient (R) and Nash-Sutcliffe equation (NSE). According to the results, the Ertekin and Yaldiz model showed the best estimation of the global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for Konya, Turkey, by means of the MPE (0.004266%), RMSE (0.022576MJ/m2), MBE (0.000000MJ/m2), R (0.999993) and NSE (0.999985) statistical tests:H=20.296019-0.096134H0+0.317593δ-0.146422RH+10.705159SS0-0.288332T +0.021331TS+0.359791C+0.207588P-0.076444E

  6. Modern methods in collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a compact yet comprehensive overview of recent developments in collisional-radiative (CR) modeling of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. It describes advances across the entire field, from basic considerations of model completeness to validation and verification of CR models to calculation of plasma kinetic characteristics and spectra in diverse plasmas. Various approaches to CR modeling are presented, together with numerous examples of applications. A number of important topics, such as atomic models for CR modeling, atomic data and its availability and quality, radiation transport, non-Maxwellian effects on plasma emission, ionization potential lowering, and verification and validation of CR models, are thoroughly addressed. Strong emphasis is placed on the most recent developments in the field, such as XFEL spectroscopy. Written by leading international research scientists from a number of key laboratories, the book offers a timely summary of the most recent progress in this area. It ...

  7. Computerized Simulation of Automotive Air-Conditioning System: Development of Mathematical Model and Its Validation

    Haslinda Mohamed Kamar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical model for simulating thermal and energy performance of an automotive air-conditioning (AAC system in passenger vehicles has been developed. The model consists of two sections, namely empirical evaporator correlations and dynamic load simulation. The correlations used consider sensible and latent heat transfer performance of the evaporator coil. The correlations were obtained from the experimental data of actual air conditioning system for a compact size passenger car. The sensible heat transfer correlation relates the evaporator air off dry-bulb temperature to inlet air dry-bulb temperature, humidity ratio, evaporator air velocity, condenser inlet air dry-bulb temperature, condenser air velocity and compressor speed. The latent heat transfer correlation relates the coil air-off humidity ratio to the same six independent variables. The dynamic load simulation model was developed based on the z-transfer function method with a one-minute time step. The cooling load calculations were performed using heat gain weighting factors. Heat extraction rate and cabin air dry-bulb temperature calculations were carried out using air temperature weighting factors. The empirical evaporator sensible and latent heat transfer correlations were embedded in the loads calculation program to enable the determination of evaporator inlet and outlet air conditions, the cabin air temperature and relative humidity. Comparisons with road test data indicated that the program was capable of predicting the performance of the automotive air-conditioning system with reasonable accuracy.

  8. Atlantic air-sea interaction and model validation

    C. K. Folland

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of observations from 1948-1998 suggests that the atmosphere in the North Atlantic region does respond to North Atlantic Sea-Surface Temperatures (SSTs throughout the annual cycle. In the subtropics, high geopotential heights are seen to be a local response to warm SSTs. In winter, the North Atlantic Oscillation responds to a «tripole» pattern in North Atlantic SSTs. In summer, anticyclonicity over the U.K. is seen downstream of warm SST anomalies off Newfoundland and is possibly also related to warm subtropical SSTs. Such responses imply a degree of seasonal predictability and help quantify the strength of natural ocean-atmosphere coupled modes of variability. The average of an ensemble of 10 simulations of the HadAM3 atmospheric model forced with observed SSTs for the same period produces robust ocean-forced responses which agree well with those identifi ed in the observations and with a previous model. The agreement is encouraging as it confi rms the physical signifi cance of the observational results and suggests that the model responds with the correct patterns to SST forcing. In the subtropics, the magnitude of the ensemble mean response is comparable with the observational response. In the extratropics, the magnitude of the model response is about half that of the observations. Although atmospheric internal variability may have affected the observed atmospheric patterns and there are considerations regarding the lack of two-way air-sea interaction with an atmospheric model, it is suggested that the model?s extratropical response may be too weak. The 10 individual simulations of HadAM3 and 28 50-year periods of the ocean-atmosphere model, HadCM3, display similar results to each other with generally weaker ocean-forced links than observed. Seasonal predictability may, therefore, be too low in HadCM3 and low-frequency coupled modes under-represented. A moderate increase in the extratropics in the sensitivity of

  9. Predicting Chandra CCD Degradation with the Chandra Radiation Model

    Minow, Joseph I.; Blackwell, William C.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Grant, Catherine E.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Wolk, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Not long after launch of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, it was discovered that the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detector was rapidly degrading due to radiation. Analysis by Chandra personnel showed that this degradation was due to 10w energy protons (100 - 200 keV) that scattered down the optical path onto the focal plane. In response to this unexpected problem, the Chandra Team developed a radiation-protection program that has been used to manage the radiation damage to the CCDs. This program consists of multiple approaches - scheduled sating of the ACIS detector from the radiation environment during passage through radiation belts, real-time monitoring of space weather conditions, on-board monitoring of radiation environment levels, and the creation of a radiation environment model for use in computing proton flux and fluence at energies that damage the ACIS detector. This radiation mitigation program has been very successful. The initial precipitous increase in the CCDs' charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) resulting from proton damage has been slowed dramatically, with the front-illuminated CCDS having an increase in CTI of only 2.3% per year, allowing the ASIS detector's expected lifetime to exceed requirements. This paper concentrates on one aspect of the Chandra radiation mitigation program, the creation of the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM). Because of Chandra's highly elliptical orbit, the spacecraft spends most of its time outside of the trapped radiation belts that present the severest risks to the ACIS detector. However, there is still a proton flux environment that must be accounted for in all parts of Chandra's orbit. At the time of Chandra's launch there was no engineering model of the radiation environment that could be used in the outer regions of the spacecraft's orbit, so the CRM was developed to provide the flux environment of 100 - 200 keV protons in the outer magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and solar wind regions of geospace. This

  10. Statistical Modeling for Radiation Hardness Assurance

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2014-01-01

    We cover the models and statistics associated with single event effects (and total ionizing dose), why we need them, and how to use them: What models are used, what errors exist in real test data, and what the model allows us to say about the DUT will be discussed. In addition, how to use other sources of data such as historical, heritage, and similar part and how to apply experience, physics, and expert opinion to the analysis will be covered. Also included will be concepts of Bayesian statistics, data fitting, and bounding rates.

  11. Using multistage models to describe radiation-induced leukaemia

    The Armitage-Doll model of carcinogenesis is fitted to data on leukaemia mortality among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors with the DS86 dosimetry and on leukaemia incidence in the International Radiation Study of Cervical Cancer patients. Two different forms of model are fitted: the first postulates up to two radiation-affected stages and the second additionally allows for the presence at birth of a non-trivial population of cells which have already accumulated the first of the mutations leading to malignancy. Among models of the first form, a model with two adjacent radiation-affected stages appears to fit the data better than other models of the first form, including both models with two affected stages in any order and models with only one affected stage. The best fitting model predicts a linear-quadratic dose-response and reductions of relative risk with increasing time after exposure and age at exposure, in agreement with what has previously been observed in the Japanese and cervical cancer data. However, on the whole it does not provide an adequate fit to either dataset. The second form of model appears to provide a rather better fit, but the optimal models have biologically implausible parameters (the number of initiated cells at birth is negative) so that this model must also be regarded as providing an unsatisfactory description of the data. (author)

  12. Development of a new Global RAdiation Belt model: GRAB

    Sicard-Piet, Angelica; Lazaro, Didier; Maget, Vincent; Rolland, Guy; Ecoffet, Robert; Bourdarie, Sébastien; Boscher, Daniel; Standarovski, Denis

    2016-07-01

    The well known AP8 and AE8 NASA models are commonly used in the industry to specify the radiation belt environment. Unfortunately, there are some limitations in the use of these models, first due to the covered energy range, but also because in some regions of space, there are discrepancies between the predicted average values and the measurements. Therefore, our aim is to develop a radiation belt model, covering a large region of space and energy, from LEO altitudes to GEO and above, and from plasma to relativistic particles. The aim for the first version is to correct the AP8 and AE8 models where they are deficient or not defined. At geostationary, we developed ten years ago for electrons the IGE-2006 model which was proven to be more accurate than AE8, and used commonly in the industry, covering a broad energy range, from 1keV to 5MeV. From then, a proton model for geostationary orbit was also developed for material applications, followed by the OZONE model covering a narrower energy range but the whole outer electron belt, a SLOT model to asses average electron values for 2international partnership. This model will be called the GRAB model, as Global Radiation Belt model. We will present first beta version during this conference.

  13. Modelling pesticide volatilization after soil application using the mechanistic model Volt'Air

    Bedos, Carole; Génermont, Sophie; Le Cadre, Edith; Garcia, Lucas; Barriuso, Enrique; Cellier, Pierre

    Volatilization of pesticides participates in atmospheric contamination and affects environmental ecosystems including human welfare. Modelling at relevant time and spatial scales is needed to better understand the complex processes involved in pesticide volatilization. Volt'Air-Pesticides has been developed following a two-step procedure to study pesticide volatilization at the field scale and at a quarter time step. Firstly, Volt'Air-NH 3 was adapted by extending the initial transfer of solutes to pesticides and by adding specific calculations for physico-chemical equilibriums as well as for the degradation of pesticides in soil. Secondly, the model was evaluated in terms of 3 pesticides applied on bare soil (atrazine, alachlor, and trifluralin) which display a wide range of volatilization rates. A sensitivity analysis confirmed the relevance of tuning to K h. Then, using Volt'Air-Pesticides, environmental conditions and emission fluxes of the pesticides were compared to fluxes measured under 2 environmental conditions. The model fairly well described water temporal dynamics, soil surface temperature, and energy budget. Overall, Volt'Air-Pesticides estimates of the order of magnitude of the volatilization flux of all three compounds were in good agreement with the field measurements. The model also satisfactorily simulated the decrease in the volatilization rate of the three pesticides during night-time as well as the decrease in the soil surface residue of trifluralin before and after incorporation. However, the timing of the maximum flux rate during the day was not correctly described, thought to be linked to an increased adsorption under dry soil conditions. Thanks to Volt'Air's capacity to deal with pedo-climatic conditions, several existing parameterizations describing adsorption as a function of soil water content could be tested. However, this point requires further investigation. Practically speaking, Volt'Air-Pesticides can be a useful tool to make

  14. Research on Dependable Ionizing Radiation Protection based on Model i*

    Tan Hai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The software’s unreliability mostly attributes to an erroneous analysis on the requirements done at the beginning. In this paper, we apply the tool of i* frame requirement modeling and build early requirement model against ionizing radiation. After finding out possible risks and corresponding solutions during the process of modeling analysis, we propose reasoning models against ionizing radiation. The radiation protection system  with  the  above models  can  figure out  the  purpose  of agents  related  to radiant source and provide normal service even when the environment software system is being interfered. It can serve the ecological and economical society with stability and development.  The model is divided into several sections. Section 1 gives the outline of the dependant software. Section 2 illustrates the  i* frame  technology. Section 3, 4 and 5 cover the topic of dependant security requirement analysis, SD&SR model on ionizing radiation respectively. Section 6 gives the conclusion.

  15. A clinical intranet model for radiation oncology

    Purpose: A new paradigm in computing is being formulated from advances in client-server technology. This new way of accessing data in a network is referred to variously as Web-based computing, Internet computing, or Intranet computing. The difference between an internet and intranet being that the former is for global access and the later is only for intra-departmental access. Our purpose with this work is to develop a clinically useful radiation oncology intranet for accessing physically disparate data sources. Materials and Methods: We have developed an intranet client-server system using Windows-NT Server 4.0 running Internet Information Server (IIS) on the back-end and client PCs using a typical World Wide Web (WWW) browser. The clients also take advantage of the Microsoft Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) standard for accessing commercial database systems. The various data sources used include: a traditional Radiation Oncology Information (ROIS) System (VARiS 1.3tm); a 3-D treatment planning system (CAD Plantm); a beam scanning system (Wellhoffertm); as well as an electronic portal imaging device (PortalVisiontm) and a CT-Simulator providing digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) (Picker AcQsimtm). We were able to leverage previously developed Microsoft Visual C++ applications without major re-writing of source code for this. Results: With the data sources and development materials used, we were able to develop a series of WWW-based clinical tool kits. The tool kits were designed to provide profession-specific clinical information. The physician's tool kit provides a treatment schedule for daily patients along with a dose summary from VARiS and the ability to review portal images and prescription images from the EPID and Picker. The physicists tool kit compares dose summaries from VARiS with an independent check against RTP beam data and serves as a quick 'chart-checker'. Finally, an administrator tool kit provides a summary of periodic charging

  16. Radiative transfer model for contaminated rough slabs

    Andrieu, François; Schmidt, Frédéric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical model to simulate bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) spectra of a rough slab layer containing impurities. This model has been optimized for fast computation in order to analyze hyperspectral data. We designed it for planetary surfaces ices studies but it could be used for other purposes. It estimates the bidirectional reflectance of a rough slab of material containing inclusions, overlaying an optically thick media (semi-infinite media or stratified media, for instance granular material). The inclusions are supposed to be close to spherical, and of any type of other material than the ice matrix. It can be any type of other ice, mineral or even bubbles, defined by their optical constants. We suppose a low roughness and we consider the geometrical optics conditions. This model is thus applicable for inclusions larger than the considered wavelength. The scattering on the inclusions is assumed to be isotropic. This model has a fast computation implementation and th...

  17. Dynamic model of counter flow air to air heat exchanger for comfort ventilation with condensation and frost formation

    Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Rose, Jørgen; Kragh, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    In cold climates heat recovery in the ventilation system is essential to reduce heating energy demand. Condensation and freezing occur often in efficient heat exchangers used in cold climates. To develop efficient heat exchangers and defrosting strategies for cold climates, heat and mass transfer...... on a prototype heat exchanger for cold climates....... must be calculated under conditions with condensation and freezing. This article presents a dynamic model of a counter flow air to air heat exchanger taking into account condensation and freezing and melting of ice. The model is implemented in Simulink and results are compared to measurements...

  18. Quasi-steady-state model of a counter flow air-to-air heat exchanger with phase change

    Rose, Jørgen; Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Kragh, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    -exchanger. Developing highly efficient heat-exchangers and strategies to avoid/remove frost formation implies the use of detailed models to predict and evaluate different heat-exchanger designs and strategies. This paper presents a quasi-steady-state model of a counter-flow air-to-air heat-exchanger that takes......Using mechanical ventilation with highly efficient heat-recovery in northern European or arctic climates is a very efficient way of reducing the energy use for heating in buildings. However, it also presents a series of problems concerning condensation and frost formation in the heat...

  19. A simplified physically-based model to calculate surface water temperature of lakes from air temperature in climate change scenarios

    Piccolroaz, S.; Toffolon, M.

    2012-12-01

    Modifications of water temperature are crucial for the ecology of lakes, but long-term analyses are not usually able to provide reliable estimations. This is particularly true for climate change studies based on Global Circulation Models, whose mesh size is normally too coarse for explicitly including even some of the biggest lakes on Earth. On the other hand, modeled predictions of air temperature changes are more reliable, and long-term, high-resolution air temperature observational datasets are more available than water temperature measurements. For these reasons, air temperature series are often used to obtain some information about the surface temperature of water bodies. In order to do that, it is common to exploit regression models, but they are questionable especially when it is necessary to extrapolate current trends beyond maximum (or minimum) measured temperatures. Moreover, water temperature is influenced by a variety of processes of heat exchange across the lake surface and by the thermal inertia of the water mass, which also causes an annual hysteresis cycle between air and water temperatures that is hard to consider in regressions. In this work we propose a simplified, physically-based model for the estimation of the epilimnetic temperature in lakes. Starting from the zero-dimensional heat budget, we derive a simplified first-order differential equation for water temperature, primarily forced by a seasonally varying external term (mainly related to solar radiation) and an exchange term explicitly depending on the difference between air and water temperatures. Assuming annual sinusoidal cycles of the main heat flux components at the atmosphere-lake interface, eight parameters (some of them can be disregarded, though) are identified, which can be calibrated if two temporal series of air and water temperature are available. We note that such a calibration is supported by the physical interpretation of the parameters, which provide good initial

  20. Control of asthma triggers in indoor air with air cleaners: a modeling analysis

    Allen Joseph G; Minegishi Taeko; Myatt Theodore A; MacIntosh David L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Reducing exposure to environmental agents indoors shown to increase asthma symptoms or lead to asthma exacerbations is an important component of a strategy to manage asthma for individuals. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that portable air cleaning devices can reduce concentrations of asthma triggers in indoor air; however, their benefits for breathing problems have not always been reproducible. The potential exposure benefits of whole house high efficiency in-du...