WorldWideScience

Sample records for plants medicinal

  1. Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  2. Medicinal plants: conception / contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaing, H S; Merino-chavez, G; Yang, L L; Wang, F N; Hafez, E S

    1994-01-01

    Researchers have conducted considerable experiments on the effectiveness and therapeutic values of Chinese herbs and parts of plants. We should not ignore the significance of natural medicine. The Chinese have been perfecting medicinal therapy based on the raw ingredients of plants/herbs and their derivatives for thousands of years. Chinese practitioners of traditional medicine prescribe medicines based on yin and yang. Traditional medicine is communicated in a verb or written form. Natural resources used in traditional medicine to treat diseases are not limited to just medicinal plants but also include animals, shell fish, and minerals. Parts of plants used in traditional medicine are leaves, stems, flowers, bark, and root. Chinese medicine is the world's oldest continuous surviving tradition. The Chinese experimented with local plants, often resulting in mild to violent reactions. This process allowed them to become familiar with poisonous plants and those that could relieve pain or successfully treat illness. Current allopathic medicines are composed of synthetic compounds copied from natural chemical derivatives, which tend to be more potent than the original compound. Some medicinal plants used to effect conception/contraception include Striga astiatica (contraceptive); Eurycoma longifolia (male virility); and a mixture of lengkuas, mengkudu masak, black pepper seeds, ginger, salt, and 2 eggs (increase libido). Women in Malaysia take jamu to preserve their body shape and to provide nutrition during pregnancy. Praneem causes local cell-mediated immunity in the uterus. Clinical trials of Praneem with or without the hCG vaccine are planned. PMID:12287843

  3. Antifertility activity of medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of medicinal plants used as antifertility agents in females throughout the world by various tribes and ethnic groups. We undertook an extensive bibliographic review by analyzing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, and further consulting well accepted worldwide scientific databases. We performed CENTRAL, Embase, and PubMed searches using terms such as "antifertility", "anti-implantation", "antiovulation", and "antispermatogenic" activity of plants. Plants, including their parts and extracts, that have traditionally been used to facilitate antifertility have been considered as antifertility agents. In this paper, various medicinal plants have been reviewed for thorough studies such as Polygonum hydropiper Linn, Citrus limonum, Piper nigrum Linn, Juniperis communis, Achyanthes aspera, Azadirachta indica, Tinospora cordifolia, and Barleria prionitis. Many of these medicinal plants appear to act through an antizygotic mechanism. This review clearly demonstrates that it is time to expand upon experimental studies to source new potential chemical constituents from medicinal plants; plant extracts and their active constituents should be further investigated for their mechanisms. This review creates a solid foundation upon which to further study the efficacy of plants that are both currently used by women as traditional antifertility medicines, but also could be efficacious as an antifertility agent with additional research and study. PMID:25921562

  4. Resources of medicinal plants in China

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Guan-Fu, He.

    Full Text Available Four aspect dealts with in this paper are as follows: 1. environment of medicinal plants; 2. brief history on studies of medicinal plants; 3. species of medicinal plants; 4. studies on development and utilization of medicinal plant resources. [...

  5. Medicinal plants in therapy*

    OpenAIRE

    Farnsworth, Norman R.; Akerele, Olayiwola; Bingel, Audrey S.; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Guo, Zhengang

    1985-01-01

    One of the prerequisites for the success of primary health care is the availability and use of suitable drugs. Plants have always been a common source of medicaments, either in the form of traditional preparations or as pure active principles. It is thus reasonable for decision-makers to identify locally available plants or plant extracts that could usefully be added to the national list of drugs, or that could even replace some pharmaceutical preparations that need to be purchased and import...

  6. Phytochemical constituents of some Indian medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Dhandapani, R.; Sabna, B.

    2008-01-01

    Alkaloids, tannins, saponins, steroid, terpenoid, flavonoids, phlobatannin and cardie glycoside distribution in seven medicinal plants belonging to different families were assessed and compared. The medicinal plants investigated were Aegle marmelos, Cynodon dactylon, Eclipta prostrata, Moringa pterygosperma, Pongamia pinnata, Sida acuta and Tridax procumbens. The significance of the plants in traditional medicine and the importance of the distribution of these chemical constituents were discu...

  7. Radioactive properties of medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A complicated cycle of various compounds' synthesis is provided by plants in the process of their development. The synthesized compounds are necessary to maintain the life of all living organisms both in water and on the land. Together with the organic compounds all known natural radionuclides are accumulated by the plants. Many plants possess the ability to accumulate some elements, whose concentration in the plants may be much higher than that in the soils and water sources. It is well known that the plants are basic or initial raw materials for producing numerous food products, as well as medicinal preparations. The radionuclides, accumulated in the plants, may pass to the human organism through the products and drugs, and may become a source of internal radiation. Accumulation of the radionuclides in various human organs above the maximal acceptable concentration (MAC) may lead to various pathologic changes. That is why it is a necessary and urgent problem to carry out investigations of the radioactive properties of the plants (i.e. to determine their radioecological cleanliness) before using the medicinal plant for pharmacological purposes. In the present work we investigated the radioactive processes of kinds of medicinal plants by the method of semi-conductor gamma-spectrometry. Measurements of the gamma-spectra of the plants' leach were carried out with the help of a gamma-spectrometer with a Ge(Li) detector accompanied by a 4096-channel analyzer. R accompanied by a 4096-channel analyzer. Responsive volume of the detector was 40 cm3, energy resolution with respect to 1333 keV 60Co line was 3 keV. In the measured spectra we observed clearly photo-peaks belonging to uranium-238 family: 186 keV 226Ra; 295, 351 keV 214Pb; 609, 1120, 1764 keV 214Bi; and those belonging to thorium - 232 family: 339, 911, 968 keV 228Ac; 583, 2614 keV 208Te; as well as the photo-peak of the natural radionuclide 40K with the energy 1460 keV. From the proper gamma-lines, observed in the spectra, we calculated the concentration of the radionuclides. While choosing the analytical lines we took into account the degree of disturbance of the radioactive equilibrium between the maternal and filial radionuclides. The determined magnitudes for the natural radionuclides in the leaches of the investigated plants are presented. It is shown that the radioactivity of investigated plants is conditioned by decay of the natural radionuclides 238U, 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K. Maximal accumulation is observed for 40K and 232Th.Thorium minerals are dissolved in natural waters much weaker than those of uranium. However, the concentration of thorium in the investigated samples is (1.8-4.0) tunes higher than the concentration of uranium. This fact reveals that the plants absorb the isotopes of thorium in amounts, which are proportional to their concentration in soils. In the plants growing in the similar soil-climate conditions the concentration uranium is different. This fact testifies that the accumulation of uranium by the plants may depend on the specific features. Concentration of radium in the plants is comparable with its concentration in the soils that may be explained by ability of plants to accumulate radium in amounts, which exceed its concentration in a culture medium. In different kinds of the plants' leach we observe various concentrations of potassium - (24-7-51)·10-6 g/g - that reveals different needs of the plants with respect to potassium. The observed concentrations of the natural radionuclides are in the MAC limits. That testifies a relative radioecological well-being of the investigated plants

  8. Use of Medicinal Plants of District Bannu in Unani Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahzeb

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research work was carried out during 2012 in district Bannu to study the use of medicinal plants in Unani medicine. A total of 35 Unani medicines were reported and arranged systematically along with name of product, available form, company name, name of the plants/parts used in the drugs, family name and purpose of uses. During the research it was found that most of the members of Lamiaceae, Asteraceae and Rhamnaceae are used in these medicines. Plants which were used commonly in these medicines in one form or the other are Ziziphus jujuba, Foeniculum vulgare, Solanum nigrum, Ocimum cannum and Zingber officinale. It was noted that these products are mostly available in syrup form, rarely in tablets form (Hab –khoom Safa, Mensorine, Scony Tablets and one only one product in dry powder (Supari Pak. It is generally believed that these medicines have no side effect. Interestingly one medicine is suggested for many diseases as per the given instructions in the medicine pack. It was also noted that the manufacturers of these medicines are mostly not registered that’s why incomplete addresses along with the wrongly spellings plant name given on the medicine packs. The main purpose of the research was to identify and enlist the plants systematically used in these medicines.

  9. AN UPDATED REVIEW ON ANTHELMINTIC MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Raj Kumar; Elumalai, A.; Chinna Eswaraiah, M.

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal plants are part and parcel of human society to combat diseases, from the dawn of civilization. There exists a plethora of knowledge, information and benefits of herbal drugs in our ancient literature of Ayurvedic (Traditional Indian Medicine), Siddha, Unani and Chinese medicine. According to the World Health Organization, 2003 about 80 % of the population of developing countries being unable to afford pharmaceutical drugs rely on traditional medicines, mainly plant based, to sustain...

  10. Medicinal plants as immunosuppressive agents in traditional Iranian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirghofran, Zahra

    2010-06-01

    Immunomodulation using medicinal plants provides an alternative to conventional chemotherapy for several diseases, especially when suppression of inflammation is desired. The "Canon of Medicine", the epochal work of Avicenna, the great Persian scientist of the middle ages, provides comprehensive information about medicinal plants which used to cure inflammatory illnesses in traditional Iranian medicine. Taking into consideration that the mechanisms of damage in these illnesses are mediated by immune responses, it is reasonable to assume that the plants used for such diseases may suppress the immune responses and the resultant inflammation. In Iran, because of great diversity of climate and geographical conditions, numerous varieties of plants grow and at least 1000 species are recorded as medicinal plants. Many of these plants such as Punica granatum, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Foeniculum vulgare and Polygonum species prescribed by ancient Iranian physicians have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. In recent literature, different species of native medicinal plants such as Stachys obtusicrena, Salvia mirzayanii, Echium amoenum, Dracocephalum kotschyi and Linum persicum have been shown to have appreciable anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects including inhibitory effects on lymphocyte activation, suppression of cellular and humoral immunity and induction of apoptosis. This review focuses on plants that are used in Iranian traditional medicine and have been reported to act as immunoinhibitory agents. PMID:20574119

  11. From Curanderas to Gas Chromatography: Medicinal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Mary; Lara, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The Medicinal Plants of the Southwest summer workshop is an inquiry-based learning approach to increase interest and skills in biomedical research. Working in teams, Hispanic and Native American students discover the chemical and biological basis for the medicinal activity of regional plants used by healers. (Contains 4 tables and 1 figure.)

  12. MYCOPOPULATION OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN CROATIA

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    Karolina Vrande?i?

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There has not been a systematic research of medicinal plants mycoflora in Croatia. This paper aims to present the results of preliminary research of mycopopulation of 14 species of medicinal plants. Total of 393 plant parts has been examined and 10 genera of fungi were isolated: Penicillium, Aspergillus, Sordaria, Phoma, Cladosporium, Rhizopus, Stemphillium, Fusarium, Phomopsis and one unidentified genus. Penicillium sp. (from 11 of 14 plant species was isolated from the majority of samples. The plants fungi were isolated from did not show any macroscopically visible symptoms of infection, except plant parts of Lavandula x intermedia and Foeniculum vulgare, from which Phomopsis sp. and Fusarium sp. were isolated.

  13. Traditional Medicinal Plants of K. Maras (Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    Sengul Karaman; Yusuf Ziya Kocabas

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a list of some medicinal and aromatic plants in the K.Maras province of Turkey. During the ethnobotanical survey of 88 plants belonging to 47 families were obtained in the period of 1999. It has been found that these plants are mostly used for antiseptic, diuretic, stomach and wound.

  14. International congress on aromatic and medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text : In Morocco, medicinal and aromatic plants occupy an important place in the traditional care system of a large number of local people. They are also economically strong potential, but unfortunately they are not valued enough. Indeed, Morocco by its privileged geographical position in the Mediterranean basin and its floristic diversity (with a total of over 4,200 species and subspecies of which over 500 are recognized as medicinal and aromatic plants), is a leading provider of traditional global market. In this context and given the back label of the natural global, group research and studies on Aromatic and Medicinal Plants (GREPAM), the Faculty of Semlalia and University Cadi Ayyad, organize: the International Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants CIPAM 2009. The organization of this conference is part of scientific research developed by the GREPAM.

  15. Antibacterial activities of four Thai medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakulsomboon, Suwanna; Kummalue, Tanawan; Jiratchariyakul, Weena

    2006-09-01

    Medicinal plants have long been used and prescribed in Thailand for centuries. Some of them have been used for treating various diseases including infectious diseases. Pouzolzia pentandra Benn., Gelonium multiflorum A. Juss., Erycibe elliptilimba Merr. and Chun., Balanophora abbreviate Bl. are Thai medicinal plants from the Thai pharmacopoeia that have been prescribed for treating unknown fevers including some specific infectious diseases. This investigation demonstrated the effects of these Thai medicinal plants for their antibacterial activities by using the macrodilution assay. Based on the present study, the water methanol fraction (fraction 2) of Balanophora abbreviate Bl. showed the antibacterial activity at the MIC level of 250 microg/ml but the activity was bacteriostatic in its effects. Therefore, the use of these medicinal plants in controlling fever and infectious diseases appears to be justified and further investigations may be required to obtain more information. PMID:17100386

  16. Cytotoxic Effects of Bangladeshi Medicinal Plant Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Evelin Tiralongo; I. Darren Grice; Uddin, Shaikh J

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the cytotoxic effect of some Bangladeshi medicinal plant extracts, 16 Bangladeshi medicinal plants were successively extracted with n-hexane, dichloromethane, methanol and water. The methanolic and aqueous extracts were screened for cytotoxic activity against healthy mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) and three human cancer-cell lines (gastric: AGS; colon: HT-29; and breast: MDA-MB-435S) using the MTT assay. Two methanolic extracts (Hygrophila auriculata and Hibiscus tiliaceous) and on...

  17. Medicinal plant markets and trade in Maputo, Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Mogens Pedersen; Falcâo, Mario P.

    2006-01-01

    Medicinal plants and traditional medicine are important to urban and rural livelihoods in Mozambique. This study presents a preliminary investigation of the structure and conduct of medicinal plant markets in Maputo.

  18. Medicinal plants used in Kirklareli Province (Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kültür, Sükran

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, 126 traditional medicinal plants from Kirklareli Province in Turkey have been reported. One hundred and twenty six plant species belonging to 54 families and among them 100 species were wild and 26 species were cultivated plants. Most used families were Rosaceae, Labiatae, Compositae and the most used plants were Cotinus coggyria, Sambucus ebulus, Achillea millefolium subsp. pannonica, Hypericum perforatum, Matricaria chamomilla var. recutita, Melissa officinalis subsp. officinalis, Juglans regia, Thymus longicaulis subsp. longicaulis var. subisophyllus, Malva sylvestris, Urtica dioica, Plantago lanceolata, Rosa canina, Ecballium elaterium, Artemisia absinthium, Viscum album subsp. album, Papaver rhoeas, Helleborus orientalis, Cydonia oblonga, Prunus spinosa subsp. dasyphylla, Rubus discolor, Sorbus domestica. A total of 143 medicinal uses were obtained. The traditional medicinal plants have been mostly used for the treatment of wounds (25.3%), cold and influenza (24.6%), stomach (20%), cough (19%), kidney ailments (18.2%), diabetes (13.4%). PMID:17257791

  19. Cytotoxicity and Pharmacogenomics of Medicinal Plants from Traditional Korean Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Efferth; Ik-Soo Lee; Henry Johannes Greten; Sven Schröder; Mira Oswald; Benjamin Wiench; Ean-Jeong Seo; Benjamin Krusche; Victor Kuete

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The present study was designed to investigate the cytotoxicity of a panel of 280 Korean medicinal plants belonging to 73 families and 198 species against human CCRF-CEM leukemia cells. Selected phytochemicals were investigated in more detail for their mode of action. Methods. The resazurin assay was used to determine cytotoxicity of the plant extracts. Microarray-based mRNA expression profiling, COMPARE, and hierarchical cluster analyses were applied to identify which genes correlate wit...

  20. STANDARDIZATION OF MEDICINAL PLANT MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Kataria Sahil; Bhardwaj Sudeep; Middha Akanksha

    2011-01-01

    With the changing pattern of life style most of the diseases are now becoming lifestyle diseases. The world is witnessing an unprecedented growth in the usage of herbal product at national as well as international levels. These have necessitated development of modern and objective standards for evaluating the safety, quality and efficacy of these medicines. The current standards, parameters and protocols available to test the quality of herbal medicines were originally developed for allopathi...

  1. DIACAN: Integrated Database for Antidiabetic and Anticancer Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    James, Priyanka; Mathai, Vipin Anithottam; Shajikumar, Silpa; Pereppadan, Priya Antony; Sudha, Parvathi; Keshavachandran, Raghunath; Nazeem, Puthiyaveetil Abdulla

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants and plant derived molecules are widely used in traditional cultures all over the world and they are becoming large popular among biomedical researchers and pharmaceutical companies as a natural alternative to synthetic medicine. Information related to medicinal plants and herbal drugs accumulated over the ages are scattered and unstructured which make it prudent to develop a curated database for medicinal plants. The Antidiabetic and Anticancer Medicinal Plants Da...

  2. Evaluating Medicinal Plants for Anticancer Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Elisha Solowey; Michal Lichtenstein; Sarah Sallon; Helena Paavilainen; Elaine Solowey; Haya Lorberboum-Galski

    2014-01-01

    Plants have been used for medical purposes since the beginning of human history and are the basis of modern medicine. Most chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer treatment are molecules identified and isolated from plants or their synthetic derivatives. Our hypothesis was that whole plant extracts selected according to ethnobotanical sources of historical use might contain multiple molecules with antitumor activities that could be very effective in killing human cancer cells. This study examined t...

  3. Cytotoxicity and Pharmacogenomics of Medicinal Plants from Traditional Korean Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Seo, Ean-Jeong; Krusche, Benjamin; Oswald, Mira; Schröder, Sven; Greten, Henry Johannes; Lee, Ik-Soo; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The present study was designed to investigate the cytotoxicity of a panel of 280 Korean medicinal plants belonging to 73 families and 198 species against human CCRF-CEM leukemia cells. Selected phytochemicals were investigated in more detail for their mode of action. Methods. The resazurin assay was used to determine cytotoxicity of the plant extracts. Microarray-based mRNA expression profiling, COMPARE, and hierarchical cluster analyses were applied to identify which genes correlate with sensitivity or resistance to selected phytochemicals of the Korean plants. Results. The results of the resazurin assay showed that cytotoxicity extracts tested at 10??g/mL from 13 samples inhibited proliferation more than 50% (IC50 < 10??g/mL) and the most active plants are Sedum middendorffianum (15.33%) and Lycoris radiata (17.61%). Out of 13 selected phytochemicals from these plants, hopeaphenol and deoxynarciclasine were the most cytotoxic ones. Genes from various functional groups (transcriptional or translational regulation, signal transduction, cellular proliferation, intracellular trafficking, RNA metabolism, endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum function, etc.) were significantly correlated with response of tumor cell lines to these two compounds. Conclusion. The results provide evidence on the possible use of selected Korean medicinal plants and chemical constituents derived from them for the treatment of tumors. PMID:23935662

  4. Cinnamon: A Multifaceted Medicinal Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Pasupuleti Visweswara Rao; Siew Hua Gan

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum, and Cinnamon cassia), the eternal tree of tropical medicine, belongs to the Lauraceae family. Cinnamon is one of the most important spices used daily by people all over the world. Cinnamon primarily contains vital oils and other derivatives, such as cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, and cinnamate. In addition to being an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, anticancer, lipid-lowering, and cardiovascular-disease-lowering compound, cinnamon...

  5. Natural Radioactivity of some Medicinal Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural radioactivity of two medicinal plants was determined. It is found that the radioactivity level of ''2''3''8U, ''2''3''2Th and also 4''0K in investigated plants was 0.6* 10-''1''2 -3.2* 10-''9 Ci/kg. The balance of radioactivity between close daughter and mother isotopes is kept, whereas that between distant mother and daughter nuclides is broken

  6. AN UPDATED REVIEW ON HEPATOPROTECTIVE MEDICINAL PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areefa Areefa Shaik

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants may serve as a vital source of potentially useful new compounds for the development of effective therapy to combat a variety of liver problems. Many herbs have been proven to be effectual as hepatoprotective agents while many more are claimed to be hepatoprotective but lack any such scientific evidence to support such claims. Developing a satisfactory herbal therapy to treat severe liver diseases requires systematic investigation of properties like anti-hepatotoxicity (antioxidants, stimulation of liver regeneration and choleretic activity. Formulation of herbal medicines with standards of safety and efficacy can revitalize treatment of liver disorders. The aim of this review is to elucidate the list of hepatoprotective medicinal plants, which are scientifically proved during jan-dec 2011.

  7. The cultivation of of medicinal and aromatique plants in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Leon Sorin MUNTEAN

    1985-01-01

    Scientific research regarding medicinal plants started first in Cluj, where the Research Station for Medicinal Plants was first organized in Europe (1904). Research in this field was continued after 1930 by the staff of the Agronomy Researh Institute of Romania (ICAR). Beginning with 1975 the national research programme regarding the medicinal plants is coordinated by the Research Station for Medicinal and Aromatic Plants -SCPMA - Fundulea. Studies are performed in the experimental fields and...

  8. Flora medicinal de Chihuahua / Medicinal plants of Chihuahua State

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mario Humberto, Royo-Márquez; Alicia, Melgoza-Castillo; J. Santos, Sierra-Tristán.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available En México 10% de su vegetación está catalogada como medicinal. Al respecto, Chihuahua posee 20.2% de las plantas medicinales reconocidas en el país; sin embargo, no se ha publicado un listado a nivel estatal y se tienen pocos estudios etnobotánicos. Los objetivos del presente trabajo fueron revisar, [...] organizar y actualizar en una base de datos la información de las plantas medicinales de dicha entidad; las fuentes de información fueron literatura especializada y bases de datos botánicos con registros para el estado. Se documentaron 105 familias, 375 géneros, 605 especies y 44 infrataxa, de las cuales 14 se encuentran en riesgo de extinción según la NOM-059-SEMARNAT-2010. Las familias mejor representadas fueron: Asteraceae, Fabaceae y Euphorbiaceae, con 99, 51 y 27 especies, respectivamente. Las nativas correspondieron a 86% y las introducidas 14% (7.9% cultivadas). Las formas de crecimiento más abundantes resultaron ser las herbáceas latifoliadas, con 45.4%; los arbustos, con 18%; y los árboles, con 12.5%. Únicamente se presentan en un tipo de vegetación 32.1% de los taxa. En orden decreciente, la mayor riqueza correspondió al bosque de encino, con 56.5%, 51.2% al bosque de pino y 39.7% a los pastizales. En lo relativo al total de plantas medicinales se identificaron 1 090 usos, cuyos mayores porcentajes correspondieron a las utilizadas en los aparatos digestivo (37.8%) y genito-urinario (21.7%), así como en la piel y el tejido subcutáneo (32.3%). A fin de incrementar el conocimiento científico de las plantas medicinales, es necesario desarrollar más estudios etnobotánicos y análisis fitoquímicos. Abstract in english In Mexico, 10% of all the plants are classified as medicinal. Chihuahua possesses 20.2% of the species recognized as medicinal in the country; however, no state’s list of plants has been published, and ethnobotanical studies are scarce. The objectives of this paper were to review, organize and updat [...] e in a database the available information on the medicinal plants of the state. The sources of information were specialized literature and botanical data bases with registers for the entity. 105 families, 375 genera, 605 species, and 44 infrataxa were registered; 14 of the latter are endangered, according to NOM-059-SEMARNAT-2011. The most broadly represented families were Asteraceae, Fabaceae and Euphorbiaceae, with 99, 51 and 27 species, respectively. 86% of these are native, and 14% are introduced (7.9% are cultivated). The most abundant growths were broadleaf herbs (45.4%), shrubs (18%), and trees (12.5%). 32.1% of all the species belong to a single type of vegetation. The highest proportion (56.5%) corresponds to red oak forests, followed by 51.2% for pine forests, and 39.7% for grasslands. A total of 1 090 uses were found for the medicinal plants; the highest percentage, 37.8%, was for plants used for ailments of the digestive tract; 21.7% were used for the genitourinary tract, and 32.3%, for conditions of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue. In order to increase the scientific knowledge of the medicinal plants, further ethnobotanical studies and phytochemical analyses are required.

  9. MEDICINAL PLANTS ACTIVE AGAINST SNAKE ENVENOMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanojia Anita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite is an important cause of morbidity and mortality and is one of the major health problems in India. About 30000 to 40,000 persons die each year from venomous snake bite. Russell’s viper or daboia (Viper russelli appears to be the commonest cause of fatal snakebite in Southern India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Burma and Thailand. Intravenous administration of anti-snake venom neutralizes the systemic actions, however, antiserum does not provide enough protection against venom induced hemorrhage, necrosis, nephrotoxicity and often develops hypersensitivity reactions. India has a rich tradition of the usage of medicinal plants. Many Indian medicinal plants are mentioned in Ayurvedic literature to treat snakebite victims and are used by many ayurvedic practioners as well as in rural areas by traditioners. So much research work has been conducted for anti-snake venom activity of herbal medicine as alternative for Anti Snake Venom. This article presents a review of such herbal drugs which are effectively neutralize the snake venom like vitex nigundo, Emblica officinalis, Hemidesmus indicus etc which were assayed in research laboratories. It is considered as a valuable source of natural products for development of medicines against venomous snake bite.

  10. Evaluating medicinal plants for anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solowey, Elisha; Lichtenstein, Michal; Sallon, Sarah; Paavilainen, Helena; Solowey, Elaine; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya

    2014-01-01

    Plants have been used for medical purposes since the beginning of human history and are the basis of modern medicine. Most chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer treatment are molecules identified and isolated from plants or their synthetic derivatives. Our hypothesis was that whole plant extracts selected according to ethnobotanical sources of historical use might contain multiple molecules with antitumor activities that could be very effective in killing human cancer cells. This study examined the effects of three whole plant extracts (ethanol extraction) on human tumor cells. The extracts were from Urtica membranacea (Urticaceae), Artemesia monosperma (Asteraceae), and Origanum dayi post (Labiatae). All three plant extracts exhibited dose- and time-dependent killing capabilities in various human derived tumor cell lines and primary cultures established from patients' biopsies. The killing activity was specific toward tumor cells, as the plant extracts had no effect on primary cultures of healthy human cells. Cell death caused by the whole plant extracts is via apoptosis. Plant extract 5 (Urtica membranacea) showed particularly strong anticancer capabilities since it inhibited actual tumor progression in a breast adenocarcinoma mouse model. Our results suggest that whole plant extracts are promising anticancer reagents. PMID:25478599

  11. The Medicinal Plants of Salt Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Ahmad

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides preserving mines of salts, minerals, fossils, archeological and cultural heritage; the mountainous terrain of the Salt Range also has immense potential for its biodiversity in the broadly overlapping ? the subtropical dry evergreen and the thorny subtropical semi deciduous? types of forest ecologies. Olea ferruginea, Acacia modesta, Reptonia buxifolia and Salvadora oleoides represent the apparent arboreal landscape of the terrain. More than 92 medicinal plants are not only used for curing ailments ranging from mild infections to the chronic ulcers but are also contributing a lot to the rural economy of the area. Floral diversity in general, the species of Litsea, Neolitsea and Colchicum in particular, are exposed to severe collection and the habitat loss pressures. Commonly known medicinal plants of the Salt Range, Punjab and their therapeutic uses are presented in this paper.

  12. Insecticidal activity of certain medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavela, Roman

    2004-12-01

    The methanol extracts of eight species of medicinal plants were tested for insecticidal activity in third instar larvae of Egyptian cottonworm (Spodoptera littoralis). All extracts showed a certain degree of larval toxicity. The extracts of Ocimum basilicum, Origanum majorana and Salvia officinalis appeared to be highly toxic. The extracts significantly affected the growth indexes [relative growth rate (RGR), efficiency of conversion of ingested food (ECI), efficiency of conversion of digested food (ECD)]. PMID:15567255

  13. AN UPDATED REVIEW ON HEPATOPROTECTIVE MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Areefa Areefa Shaik; Elumalai, A. A.; Chinna Eswaraiah, M.; Swathi Swathi

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal plants may serve as a vital source of potentially useful new compounds for the development of effective therapy to combat a variety of liver problems. Many herbs have been proven to be effectual as hepatoprotective agents while many more are claimed to be hepatoprotective but lack any such scientific evidence to support such claims. Developing a satisfactory herbal therapy to treat severe liver diseases requires systematic investigation of properties like anti-hepatotoxicity (antiox...

  14. Neutron activation analysis of medicinal plant extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the determination of the elements Br, Ca, Cl, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb and Zn in medicinal extracts obtained from Centella asiatica, Citrus aurantium L., Achyrolcline satureoides DC, Casearia sylvestris, Solano lycocarpum, Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Solidago microglossa and Stryphnondedron barbatiman plants. The elements Hg and Se were determined using radiochemical separation by means of retention of Se in HMD inorganic exchanger and solvent extraction of Hg by bismuth diethyldithiocarbamate solution. Precision and accuracy of the results were evaluated by analyzing biological reference materials. The therapeutic action of some elements found in plant extracts analyzed is briefly discussed. (author). 15 refs., 5 tabs

  15. Antimicrobial activity of some Iranian medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemi Pirbalouti Abdollah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The major aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of the extracts of eight plant species which are endemic in Iran. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts of eight Iranian traditional plants, including Hypericum scabrum, Myrtus communis, Pistachia atlantica, Arnebia euchroma, Salvia hydrangea, Satureja bachtiarica, Thymus daenensis and Kelussia odoratissima, were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Candida albicans by agar disc diffusion and serial dilution assays. Most of the extracts showed a relatively high antimicrobial activity against all the tested bacteria and fungi. Of the plants studied, the most active extracts were those obtained from the essential oils of M. communis and T. daenensis. The MIC values for active extract and essential oil ranged between 0.039 and 10 mg/ml. It can be said that the extract and essential oil of some medicinal plants could be used as natural antimicrobial agents in food preservation. .

  16. A REVIEW ON ANTIULCER MEDICINAL PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamble Rahul Devidas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptic ulcer is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in clinical practice. Peptic ulcer is a conglomerate of heterogeneous disorders, which manifests itself as a break in the lining of the gastrointestinal mucosa bathed by acid and/or pepsin. A number of drugs including proton pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists are available for the treatment of peptic ulcer, but these drugs has shown incidence of relapses, side effects, and drug interactions. Thus the development of new antiulcer drugs and the search for novel molecules has been extended to herbal drugs that offer better protection and decreased relapse. Medicinal plants provide an effective and safer way in disease management. Many medicinal plants exhibit antiulcer activity and found useful in the treatment of peptic ulcer. In this review attempts have been made to know about some plants which may be used in treatment or prevention of peptic ulcer. Various plants like Nerium indicum, Ocimum sanctum, Argyreia speciosa, Bauhinia purpurea, Benincasa hispida and Croton zambesicus proved active in antiulcer therapy.

  17. Plant-antivenom: Database of anti-venom medicinal plants

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Saulo França, Amui; Renato David, Puga; Andreimar Martins, Soares; Silvana, Giuliatti.

    2011-01-15

    Full Text Available Plant-antivenom is a computational Websystem about medicinal plants with anti-venom properties. The system consists of a database of these plants, including scientific publications on this subject and amino acid sequences of active principles from venomous animals. The system relates these data allo [...] wing their integration through different search applications. For the development of the system, the first surveys were conducted in scientific literature, allowing the creation of a publication database in a library for reading and user interaction. Then, classes of categories were created, allowing the use of tags and the organization of content. This database on medicinal plants has information such as family, species, isolated compounds, activity, inhibited animal venoms, among others. Provision is made for submission of new information by registered users, by the use of wiki tools. Content submitted is released in accordance to permission rules defined by the system. The database on biological venom protein amino acid sequences was structured from the essential information from National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Plant-antivenom's interface is simple, contributing to a fast and functional access to the system and the integration of different data registered on it. Plant-antivenom system is available on the Internet at http://gbi.fmrp.usp.br/plantantivenom.

  18. SOME RARE HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICINAL PLANTS OF SOUTH INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, S.

    1993-01-01

    This present study describes 11 species under 11 generate and 10 families of rare Homoeopathic Medicinal Plants introduced and cultivated in the Nilgiri district, Tamil Nadu, South India. The original citation, description, distribution and their medicinal uses are given.

  19. Cytotoxic effects of bangladeshi medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Shaikh J; Grice, I Darren; Tiralongo, Evelin

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the cytotoxic effect of some Bangladeshi medicinal plant extracts, 16 Bangladeshi medicinal plants were successively extracted with n-hexane, dichloromethane, methanol and water. The methanolic and aqueous extracts were screened for cytotoxic activity against healthy mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) and three human cancer-cell lines (gastric: AGS; colon: HT-29; and breast: MDA-MB-435S) using the MTT assay. Two methanolic extracts (Hygrophila auriculata and Hibiscus tiliaceous) and one aqueous extract (Limnophila indica) showed no toxicity against healthy mouse fibroblasts, but selective cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells (IC(50) 1.1-1.6?mg?mL(-1)). Seven methanolic extracts from L. indica, Clerodendron inerme, Cynometra ramiflora, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Argemone mexicana, Ammannia baccifera and Acrostichum aureum and four aqueous extracts from Hygrophila auriculata, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, X. moluccensis and Aegiceras corniculatum showed low toxicity (IC(50) > 2.5?mg?mL(-1)) against mouse fibroblasts but selective cytotoxicity (IC(50) 0.2-2.3?mg?mL(-1)) against different cancer cell lines. The methanolic extract of Blumea lacera showed the highest cytotoxicity (IC(50) 0.01-0.08?mg?mL(-1)) against all tested cell lines among all extracts tested in this study. For some of the plants their traditional use as anticancer treatments correlates with the cytotoxic results, whereas for others so far unknown cytotoxic activities were identified. PMID:19706693

  20. Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Omogbadegun, Zacchaeus; Ayo, Charles; Mbarika, Victor; Omoregbe, Nicholas; Otofia, Efe; Chieze, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Medicinal plants are increasingly recognized worldwide as an alternative source of efficacious and inexpensive medications to synthetic chemo-therapeutic compound. Rapid declining wild stocks of medicinal plants accompanied by adulteration and species substitutions reduce their efficacy, quality and safety. Consequently, the low accessibility to and non-affordability of orthodox medicine costs by rural dwellers to be healthy and economically productive further threaten their life expectancy. Finding comprehensive information on medicinal plants of conservation concern at a global level has been difficult. This has created a gap between computing technologies' promises and expectations in the healing process under complementary and alternative medicine. This paper presents the design and implementation of a Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System addressing these concerns. Medicinal plants' details for designing the system were collected through semi-structured interviews and databas...

  1. The Antioxidant Activity of Some Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    JAIN, Prateek Kumar; Ravichandran, Veerasamy; Sharma, Simant; AGRAWAL, Ram K.

    2008-01-01

    The antioxidant properties of the methanol extracts of 10 medicinal plants were evaluated with the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl) test, hydroxyl scavenging test, and lipid peroxidation assay. The methanol extract of Emblica officinalis was the most active according to the DPPH test, with an IC50 value of 7.92 ± 0.1 mg/ml, followed by Asparagus racemosus, with an IC50 value of 9.28 ± 0.2 mg/ml. The minimum free radical scavenging activity was shown by Zingiber officinale, with an IC50...

  2. Preliminary phytochemical screening of some Indian Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, A.

    2009-01-01

    Alkaloids, tannins, saponins, steroid, terpenoid, flavonoids, phenolic compounds and cardie glycoside distribution in five medicinal plants belonging to different families were assessed and compared. The medicinal plants investigated were Asteracantha longifolia (L.) Nees, Psassiflora edulis Sims, Berberis tinctoria Lesch, Sphaeranthus indicus Linn, and Solanum trilobatum Linn. All the plants were found to contain Phenols, Cardiac glycosides, Steroids, Saponins and Tannin except for the absen...

  3. Search for Antimicrobial Efficacy of Certain Indian Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ekta Menghani; Mohit Soni

    2012-01-01

    Pet ether, benzene, chloroform, ethyl acetate, methanol and distilled water extracts of two Indian medicinal plants Alpinia galanga and Embelia ribes were examined for their antimicrobial potential against selected bacteria and fungi. The purpose of screening is to justify and authenticate the use of Indian medicinal plants in ethnomedicinal or folklore as traditional treasure to cure various ailments. In present investigations attempts were made to screen the Indian medicinal plants as an...

  4. Antioxidant Capacity of Macaronesian Traditional Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Tavares

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of many traditional medicinal plants is often hampered by the absence of a proper biochemical characterization, essential to identify the bioactive compounds present. The leaves from five species endemic to the Macaronesian islands with recognized ethnobotanical applications were analysed: Apollonias barbujana (Cav. Bornm., Ocotea foetens (Ainton Baill, Prunus azorica (Mouill. Rivas-Mart., Lousã, Fern. Prieto, E. Días, J.C. Costa & C. Aguiar, Rumex maderensis Lowe and Plantago arborescens Poir. subsp. maderensis (Dcne. A. Hans. et Kunk.. Since oxidative stress is a common feature of most diseases traditionally treated by these plants, it is important to assess their antioxidant capacity and determine the molecules responsible for this capacity. In this study, the antioxidant capacity of these plants against two of the most important reactive species in human body (hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals was determined. To trace the antioxidant origin total phenol and flavonoid contents as well as the polyphenolic profile and the amount of trace elements were determined. There was a wide variation among the species analysed in what concerns their total leaf phenol and flavonoid contents. From the High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC electrochemically detected peaks it was possible to attribute to flavonoids the antioxidant capacity detected in A. barbujana, O. foetens, R. maderensis and P. azorica extracts. These potential reactive flavonoids were identified for A. barbujana, R. maderensis and P. azorica. For R. maderensis a high content (7 mg g-1 dry weight of L-ascorbic acid, an already described antioxidant phytomolecule, was found. A high content in selenomethionine (414.35 ?g g-1 dry weight was obtained for P. arborescens subsp. maderensis extract. This selenocompound is already described as a hydroxyl radical scavenger is reported in this work as also possessing peroxyl radical scavenging capacity. This work is a good illustration of different phytomolecules (flavonoids, organic acids and selenocompounds, presents in leaves of the five traditional medicinal plants endemic to Macaronesia, all exhibiting antioxidant properties.

  5. Initial Studies on Alkaloids from Lombok Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Bremner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial investigation of medicinal plants from Lombok has resulted in the collection of 100 plant species predicted to have antimicrobial, including antimalarial, properties according to local medicinal uses. These plants represent 49 families and 80 genera; 23% of the plants tested positively for alkaloids. Among the plants testing positive, five have been selected for further investigation involving structure elucidation and antimicrobial testing on the extracted alkaloids. Initial work on structural elucidation of some of the alkaloids is reported briefly.

  6. Initial Studies on Alkaloids from Lombok Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Bremner, John. B.; Surya Hadi

    2001-01-01

    Initial investigation of medicinal plants from Lombok has resulted in the collection of 100 plant species predicted to have antimicrobial, including antimalarial, properties according to local medicinal uses. These plants represent 49 families and 80 genera; 23% of the plants tested positively for alkaloids. Among the plants testing positive, five have been selected for further investigation involving structure elucidation and antimicrobial testing on the extracted alkaloids. Initial work on ...

  7. Radio protective effects of some medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many plants are known to have beneficial therapeutic effects as noted in the traditional Indian system of medicine, Ayurveda and used since time immemorial for curing diseases. Even today, nearly 70% of the world's population is dependent on plants for handling their health related problems and plants have been utilized successfully for the treatment of free radical-mediated diseases in human such as Rheumatoid arthritis, Atherosclerosis, Cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, aging and several other conditions including inflammatory diseases. Plant extracts eliciting radio protective efficacy contain a plethora of compounds including antioxidants, immunostimulants, cell proliferation stimulators, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial agent, some of which may act in isolation as well as in combination with other constituents from the same plants. Glycyrrhiza glabra, Allium sepa, Allium sativum, Aloe arborescens, Amaranthus paniculatus, Curcuma longa, Moringa olefera and Syzygium cumini are some important radio protective plants. Alium sativum has been reported to possess antioxidant antimicrobial, antitumor, antimutagenic and anti-inflammatory properties. Aloe arborescens acts as a cell proliferate, healer and allergy reducer. Amaranthus paniculatus is used for purifying blood and treating scrofulous sores. Curcuma longa is widely used in antitumor and antibacterial activities. Leaf extract of Moringa oleifera is significantly used in nervous debility and heaificantly used in nervous debility and healing of wound. Chlorella is well known nutrient dense superfood that contains 60% protein, 18 amino acids (including all the essential amino acids), more than 20 vitamins and minerals. Chlorell has been used to treat cancer and also protect the body from the effects of cancer radiation treatment due to its chlorophyll in abundance level. However they have little attention for their radio protective as well as antioxidant. There is an urgent need to develop newer, more efficient and reliable bioassays for large scale rapid evaluation of radio protective efficacy of plant extracts. (author)

  8. MAPS Database: Medicinal plant Activities, Phytochemical and Structural Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfaq, Usman Ali; Mumtaz, Arooj; Qamar, Tahir ul; Fatima, Tabeer

    2013-01-01

    Drug development from natural sources is an important and fast developing area. Natural sources (plants) have been used to cure a range of diseases for Thousands of years. Different online medicinal plant databases provide information about classifications, activities, phytochemicals and structure of phytochemicals in different formats. These databases do not cover all aspects of medicinal plants. MAPS (Medicinal plant Activities, Phytochemicals & structural database) has been constructed with uniqueness that it combines all information in one web resource and additionally provides test targets on which particular plant found to be effective with reference to the original paper as well. MAPS database is user friendly information resource, including the data of > 500 medicinal plants. This database includes phytochemical constituents, their structure in mol format, different activities possessed by the medicinal plant with the targets reported in literature. Availability http://www.mapsdatabase.com PMID:24391364

  9. Color and Edge Histograms Based Medicinal Plants' Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj S. Anami

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a methodology for color and edge histogram based medicinal plants image retrieval. The medicinal plants are divided into herbs, shrubs and trees. The medicinal plants are used in ayurvedic medicines. Manual identification of medicinal plants requires a priori knowledge. Automatic recognition of medicinal plants is useful. We have considered medicinal plant species, such as Papaya, Neem, Tulasi and Aloevera are considered for identification and retrieval. The color histograms are obtained in RGB, HSV and YCbCr color spaces. The number of valleys and peaks in the color histograms are used as features. But, these features alone are not helpful in discriminating plant images, since majority plant images are green in color. We have used edge and edge direction histograms in the work to get edges in the stem and leafy parts. Finally, these features are used in retrieval of medicinal plant images. Absolute distance, Euclidean distance and mean square error, similarity distance measures are deployed in the work. The results show an average retrieval efficiency of 94% and 98% for edge and edge direction features respectively.

  10. COASTAL MEDICINAL PLANTS ALONG PALK STRAIT : A SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma pandi .M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available India has one of the richest plant medical cultures in the world. Millions of rural house holds use medicinal plants in a self-help mode. In the present study the survey is made on the coastal medicinal plants from S.P. Pattinam to Karangadu along Palk Strait. A total number of around thirty four plants such as Acacia arabica, Acorus calamus, Adhatoda vasica, Aloe vera, Alpinia galangal, Anisomeles malabarica, Cardiospermam halicacabam, Cassia juvanica, Cassia obtuse, Citrus limon, Coleus aromaticus, Cynodon dactylon, Daemia extensa, Datura metel, Eclipta alba, Enicostemma littorale, Evolvulus alsinoides etc from 24 families were recorded as a home based medicinal plants.

  11. Historical versus contemporary medicinal plant uses in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Jens; Asase, A

    2015-01-01

    ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Three extraordinary, historical documents stemming from observations made in 1697, 1803 and 1817 quote medicinal plant uses among the Fante, Ga and Ashanti people of present-day Ghana, and can be linked to original botanical specimens in European herbaria. This provides a unique opportunity to gain insight to the historical materia medica of Ghana and compare this to contemporary medicinal plant uses. By critical literary and taxonomic review, the present study (re-)establishes the earliest known history of many important Ghanaian medicinal plants, and assesses the scale of change and loss of medicinal plant knowledge in Ghana over time. The study provides the foundation to reconstruct lost or discontinued Ghanaian plant uses in local or ethnopharmacological contexts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Historical botanical specimens were located in the herbaria of University of Copenhagen Herbarium (C) and British Museum of Natural History (BM). The classification and synonymy of the specimens were updated for the study, and the historical vernacular names and medicinal uses of the plants compared with 20th/21st century literature. The plants of the historical Ga materia medica were (re-)collected to aid in semi-structured interviews. The interviews aimed to document the contemporary uses and names of the plants among the Ga, and to determine to what extent the historical medicinal uses and names are extant. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The study identified 100 species in historical medicinal use in Ghana, which could be linked to 134 unique uses and 105 vernacular names in Twi (Ashanti/Fante) and Ga. Most of the plants are common in Ghana. At least 52% of the historical vernacular names appear to still be in use today. Of the specific historical uses, 41 (31%) were traced among contemporary medicinal plant uses in Ghana and represent some of the most important Ghanaian medicinal plant species. However, 93 (69%) of the historical uses could not be traced and appears to be discontinued or forgotten. Among the Ga, two medicinal plants species have become rare or locally extinct, and thus the vast majority of the loss of knowledge appears to be due to cultural extinction. CONCLUSIONS: The scientifically strong voucher material allowed for identification of a high number of historical medicinal plants and their roots in traditional Ghanaian medicine systems 2-300 years ago. The materia medica of the Fante, Ga and Ashanti of Ghana has changed considerably over time. The "forgotten" historical uses warrant further studies to determine the pharmacological activity of these plants. This could provide the foundation for reconstruction of historical medicinal plant uses in evidence-based modern contexts.

  12. Antibacterial activity of East African medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabry, W; Okemo, P O; Ansorg, R

    1998-02-01

    In an ethnopharmacological survey, extracts of the six East African medicinal plants Entada abyssinica (stem bark), Terminalia spinosa (young branches), Harrisonia abyssinica (roots), Ximenia caffra (roots), Azadirachta indica (stem bark and leaves), and Spilanthes mauritiana (roots and flowers) were tested against 105 strains of bacteria from seven genera (Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Salmonella, Mycobacterium). The minimum inhibitory concentration reached by 50% (MIC50%) and 90% (MIC90) of the strains for the extracts of E. abyssinica, T. spinosa, X. caffra, and A. indica (stem bark) ranged from 0.13-8 mg/ml and from 0.5 to > 8 mg/ml, respectively. Their minimum bactericidal concentration by 50% (MBC50%) and MBC90% were all between 0.5 and > 8 mg/ml. H. abyssinica, A. indica (leaves), and S. mauritiana (roots and flowers) had MIC and MBC values > or = 8 mg/ml. Mycobacteria were not inhibited at extract concentrations of 0.5-2 mg/ml. It is concluded that plant extracts with low MIC and MBC values may serve as sources for compounds with therapeutic potency. PMID:9533435

  13. Systematic organization of medicinal plant information: a monograph template proposal

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ana C.B., Carvalho; Ligia A., Santos; Dâmaris, Silveira.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of medicinal plants in Brazil is widespread and is supported by public policies; it has the objective of providing the population with safe and effective herbal medicines of adequate quality. An action in these policies is to develop medicinal plant monographs to gather published information [...] and decide which medicinal plants should be financed by the Brazilian government and distributed by the public health system. Currently, the monographs published worldwide do not present unified information regarding medicinal plants, and generally, they do not cover enough requirements for herbal medicine registration. The aim of this study is to develop a monograph model with standardized information not only about botany, agronomy, quality control, safety, and efficacy but also about relating regulatory aspects that support herbal medicine regulation. The development of standardized monographs favors the fast authorization and distribution of herbal medicines in the public system. The model also points out the lacking studies that should be carried out to supplement the necessary regulatory information of medicinal plants.

  14. [Review on application of plant growth retardants in medicinal plants cultivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yu-Yao; Guo, Bao-Lin; Cheng, Ming

    2013-09-01

    Plant growth retardants are widely used in cultivation of medicinal plant, but there is still lack of scientific guidance. In order to guide the use of plant growth retardants in medicinal plant cultivation efficiently and reasonably, this paper reviewed the mechanism, function characteristic, plant and soil residue of plant growth retardants, such as chlorocholine chloride, mepiquat chloride, paclobutrazol, unicnazle and succinic acid, and summarized the application of plant growth retardants in medicinal plants cultivation in recent years, with focus on the effect of growth and yield of the officinal organs and secondary metabolites. PMID:24380290

  15. The microbiome of medicinal plants: diversity and importance for plant growth, quality and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MartinaKöberl

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Past medicinal plant research primarily focused on bioactive phytochemicals, however the focus is currently shifting due to the recognition that a significant number of phytotherapeutic compounds are actually produced by associated microbes or through interaction with their host. Medicinal plants provide an enormous bioresource of potential use in modern medicine and agriculture, yet their microbiome is largely unknown. The objective of this review is i to introduce novel insights into the plant microbiome with a focus on medicinal plants, ii to provide details about plant- and microbe-derived ingredients of medicinal plants, and iii to discuss possibilities for plant growth promotion and plant protection for commercial cultivation of medicinal plants. In addition, we also present a case study performed both to analyse the microbiome of three medicinal plants (Matricaria chamomilla L., Calendula officinalis L. and Solanum distichum Schumach. and Thonn. cultivated on organically managed Egyptian desert farm and to develop biological control strategies. The soil microbiome of the desert ecosystem was comprised of a high abundance of Gram-positive bacteria of prime importance for pathogen suppression under arid soil conditions. For all three plants, we observed a clearly plant-specific selection of the microbes as well as highly specific diazotrophic communities that overall identify plant species as important drivers in structural and functional diversity. Lastly, native Bacillus spec. div. strains were able to promote plant growth and elevate the plants’ flavonoid production. These results underline the numerous links between the plant-associated microbiome and the plant metabolome.

  16. Collection and conservation of medicinal and aromatic plants resources

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Z.

    2011-01-01

    (Abstract selected from presentation in National Conference on Biodiversity of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Collection, Characterization and Utilization, held at Anand, India during November 24-25, 2010)Plant genetic resources have made substantial contributions to the domestication, utilization and improvement of all kinds of crops including medicinal and aromatic plants. Collection, characterization and  their efficient utilization are keys to efficient management of any kind of genetic ...

  17. Effects of gamma irradiation on antioxidants of medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antioxidant effect of water extracts from irradiated medicinal plants on inhibition of lipid peroxidation in human plasma was examined. The results presented herein indicate that crude extracts from 29 kinds, 31 extracts, of medicinal plants, irradiated at 10 and 25 kilo gray. showed no significant change in inhibition of lipid peroxidation in plasma induced by gamma irradiation (p<0.05). It also found that extraction yields in some irradiated plants were increased

  18. Distribution of Phenolics in Various Malaysian Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Amid, A.; Barkat, A. A.; Jamal, P.

    2010-01-01

    Phenolics, which are widely distributed in plant kingdom, appear to have desirable medicinal properties and play a major role in both plant and animal health. Some have been reported to be antitumor agents and to exhibit antiviral and antimicrobial activities, hypotensive effects and antioxidant properties. These compounds, either as isolates or in conjunction with other compounds, may be used for various health benefits. In this study, forty types of Malaysian medicinal plants were examined ...

  19. MEDICINAL PLANTS OF RAJASTHAN (INDIA) WITH ANTIDIABETIC POTENTIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Batra Shikha; Nagori Badri Prakash; Batra Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    Rajasthan has a rich heritage of traditional system of medicine and many medicinally useful plants are found growing wildly because of vast area and variety of agro-climatic conditions. These plants are being used for the treatment of many human ailments including diabetes. Plants that are specifically employed for the treatment of diabetes are Acacia nilotica, Acacia senegal, Aegle marmelos, Calotropis procera, Capparis deciduas, Cassia auriculata, Cassia sophera, Cayratia trifolia, Cyamopsi...

  20. Phylogenetic exploration of commonly used medicinal plants in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yessoufou, Kowiyou; Daru, Barnabas H; Muasya, Abraham Muthama

    2015-03-01

    The rapid growth rate of human population, along with the public health crisis encountered in many regions, particularly in developing world, creates an urgent need for the discovery of alternative drugs. Because medicinal plants are not distributed randomly across lineages, it has been suggested that phylogeny along with traditional knowledge of plant uses can guide the identification of new medicinally useful plants. In this study, we combined different statistical approaches to test for phylogenetic signal in 33 categories of plant uses in South Africa. Depending on the null models considered, we found evidence for signal in up to 45% of plant use categories, indicating the need for multiple tests combination to maximize the chance of discovering new medicinal plants when applying a phylogenetic comparative approach. Furthermore, although there was no signal in the diversity of medicinal uses-that is, total number of medicinal uses recorded for each plant-our results indicate that taxa that are evolutionarily closely related have significantly more uses than those that are evolutionarily isolated. Our study therefore provides additional support to the body of the literature that advocates for the inclusion of phylogeny in bioscreening medicinal flora for the discovery of alternative medicines. PMID:25066923

  1. Ethnopharmacological survey of wild medicinal plants in Showbak, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qura'n, S

    2009-05-01

    Two main research questions are framing this investigation: (1) the main taxa of the medicinal importance value altered the Showbak forest stand and species composition? (2) The most safe species and what are the toxic ones (unsafe). These two research questions are the vital ones to draw a clear image about the wild medicinal plants of this investigated area of Showbak region in Jordan. 79 wild medicinal plant species were investigated in this study which are used in traditional medication for the treatment of various diseases. Most of the locals interviewed dealt with well-known safe medicinal plants such as Aaronsohnia factorovskyi Warb. et Eig., Achillea santolina L., Adiantum capillus-veneris L., Artemisia herba-alba L., Ceratonia siliqua L., Clematis recta L., Herniaria hirsuta L., Malva neglecta Wallr., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta chalepensis L., Salvia triloba L., Sarcopoterium spinosa (L.) Spach., Thymbra capitata (L.) Hof, and Urginea maritima Barker. Many of the wild medicinal plants investigated were toxic and needed to be practiced by practitioners and herbalists rather than the local healers. These plants include Calotropis procera Willd R.Br., Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Sch., Datura stramonium L., Digitalis purpurea L., Ecballium elaterium (L.) A.Rich., Euphorbia helioscopia L., Euphorbia tinctoria Boiss., Glaucium corniculatum (L.) Curt., Hyoscyamus aureus L., Mandragora officinarum L., Nerium oleander L., Ricinus communis L., Solanum nigrum L., Withania somnifera (L.) Dunel. The conservation of medicinal plants and natural resources is becoming increasingly important, so this research is trying to collect information from local population concerning the use of medicinal plants in Showbak; identify the most important specie; determine the relative importance value of the species and calculate the informant consensus factor (ICF) for the medicinal plants. Obtaining results is relied on the interviewee's personal information and the medicinal use of specific plants. PMID:19429338

  2. Medicinal plants of the Pilagá of central Chaco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipov, A

    1994-12-01

    Medicinal remedies of vegetal origin employed by the Pilagá in Central Chaco were studied through collections of plant specimens and interviews with local informants from several villages. Pilagá traditional medicine was mainly of a shamanic nature, yet plants were not completely excluded from the treatment of ailments; medicinal uses of 85 plants were recorded. Their local names, the parts employed, the manner of preparation and administration, and their uses for different illnesses are presented. Some of these remedies appear to be a part of the Pilagá traditional heritage. The employment of other remedies is due to contact with 'Criollo' settlers in the area. PMID:7898125

  3. Drying of medicinal plants with solar energy utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, G. [Inst. for Building, Mechanisation and Electrification of Agriculture, Warszawa (Poland)

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a potential of solar energy for drying of medicinal plants in Polish conditions is estimated and development of solar drying technologies is presented. The results of economic assessment of flat-plate solar collectors applied for drying of medicinal plants on a farm are promising. In some specific conditions, e.g. drying of wild grown medicinal plants in remote areas, even application of photovoltaic modules for driving of a fan of a solar dryer is a profitable option and enables easy control of the drying air temperature.

  4. Turkish folk medicinal plants, VIII: Lalapa?a (Edirne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertan Tuzlac?

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the folk medicinal plants of Lalapa?a (Edirne were researched. During the field works, the information were obtained from local healers, experienced adults and patients by personal interviews and the specimens of the plants were collected. According to the results of the identifications of the specimens, 55 plant taxa are used in therapy in Lalapa?a. These are presented in a table in the text. Among them 44 taxa are wild and 11 taxa are cultivated plants. The folk medicinal plants are mostly used for stomach ailments, hemorrhoids, diabetes, cold and warts.

  5. Antimycobacterial agents from selected Mexican medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Acevedo, Laura; Guerrero, José A; Martínez, Sergio; Bye, Robert; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio; Franzblau, Scott; Timmermann, Barbara N; Mata, Rachel

    2005-09-01

    As part of the ICBG program Bioactive Agents from Dryland Biodiversity of Latin America, the present investigation was undertaken to explore the possible antimycobacterial potential of compounds derived from selected Mexican medicinal plants. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the crude extracts of Rumex hymenosepalus (Polygonaceae), Larrea divaricata (Zygophyllaceae), Phoradendron robinsonii (Loranthaceae) and Amphipteryngium adstringens (Julianiaceae) led to the isolation of several antimycobacterial compounds. Four stilbenoids, two flavan-3-ols and three anthraquinones were isolated from R. hymenosepalus. Two flavonols and nordihydroguaiaretic acid were obtained from L. divaricata. Sakuranetin was the antimycobacterial agent isolated from P. robinsonii. Two known triterpenoids and the novel natural product 3-dodecyl-1,8-dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid were obtained from A. adstringens. In general, the isolates were identified by spectral means. The antimycobacterial activity of the secondary compounds isolated from the analysed species, as well as that of nine pure compounds previously isolated in our laboratories, was investigated; the MIC values ranged from 16 to 128 microg mL-1. Among the tested compounds, the glycolipids, sesquiterpenoids and triterpenoids showed the best antimycobacterial activity. The antimycobacterial property of the glycolipids is reported for the first time. Although the tested compounds showed moderate antimycobacterial activity, their presence in the analysed species provides the rationale for their traditional use in the treatment of tuberculosis. PMID:16105233

  6. Are Medicinal Plants Polluted with Phthalates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soodabeh Saeidnia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phthalic acid esters (PAEs have been employed in polymer materials as a plasticizer to form them more flexible, adhesive, and soluble. These compounds are mainly used in paints, varnishes, personal cares, cosmetics, paper coatings, and adhesives even in bottled waters, shampoo, body deodorant, hairspray, and gels. Phthalates are able to possess remarkable toxic variations depending on their structures. So far, Di-(2-EthylHexyl Phthalate DEHP and Di-n- Butyl Phthalate DBP have been found to cause reproductive and developmental toxicities. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA classified DEHP as probable human carcinogen. To the best of our knowledge, phthalates showed diverse toxicity profiles according to their structures in the liver, kidneys, thyroid, and testes, which are involved in general toxicity. Furthermore, they are introduced as hormonally-active agents, because they can interfere with the endocrine system in human. Incidence of developmental abnormalities (like skeletal malformations and cleft palate, and undescended testes, lowering testes weight and anogenital distance seems increasing via high exposure to phthalate metabolites. Although, increasing the capacity for phthalate free plasticizer productions is the first step to restrict the distribution of these toxic manmade compounds, finding the new ways for phthalate absorption from the soil in agricultural fields may have benefits. Also, evaluation and examination of diverse sources of medicinal and food plants to determine the level of phthalate accumulation in their organs are extremely recommended to avoid creating toxicity particularly in reproductive systems.

  7. Trace elements in Malaysian medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental content of twenty medicinal plants used as tonic and for treatment of diabetes and sinusitis were determined by INAA and XRF. Elemental determination was carried out in the raw samples, residues after boiling and the water soluble fractions. Samples were irradiated in TRIGA MkII reactor and counted using HPGe detector coupled to Personal Computer Analyzer (PCA) system. Bowen's Kale, NBS Pine Needles, NBS citrus Leaves SRM were analysed to check the accuracy of the techniques used. Twenty elements were determined by both NAA and XRF. Arsenic was only detected in Labisia pothoina and Dracontomelon dao with a concentrations of 0.40 mg/kg and 0.60 mg/kg respectively. Antimony was found in eleven samples with a concentration of <0.20 mg/kg. Al, Br, Ca, Cl, K, Mn, Na and Rb were detected in all samples whereas Mg and Zn were present in all samples except Cinnamomum sp. Highest concentration of Br(190 mg/kg), Cl (11805 mg/kg), Co(0.50 mg/kg), Fe(1642 mg/kg), K(36788 mg/kg), Mn (325 mg/kg), Na(126 mg/kg), Rb(197 mg/kg), Sc(0.18 mg/kg) and Zn(3551 mg/kg) were observed in the tuber of Lasia aculeata. Less than 70% and 50% of the elements contained in Callicarpa longifolia and Eurycoma longifolia were obtained respectively from water by boiling. (author). 10 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Screening and antibacterial activity analysis of some important medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Senthilmurugan Viji, G.; Vasanthe, B.; Kuru Suresh

    2013-01-01

    The screening and study of five different plant specimens belonging to different families for phytochemical constituents was performed using generally accepted laboratory technique for qualitative determinations. The constituents screened were saponins, combined anthraquinones, terpenoids, flavonoids, carotenoids, steroids, xantho proteins, couramins, alkaloids, quinones, vitamin C. The distribution of these constituents in the plant specimens were assessed and compared. The medicinal plant s...

  9. Traditional home gardens: A preserve of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Bajpai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional home gardens have been described as man-managed ecosystems with high energy subsidy, complex structure, and multiple functions. These have been reported as treasure trove of a rich biodiversity of plant species including medicinal plants used for traditional home remedies of various ailments. A review of research work on the status of medicinal plants in traditional rural home gardens is presented with the objective to explore them as potential preservation site for medicinal plants. From the available literature it can be ascertained that these traditional rural home gardens can be a suitable site for conservation, propagation, and expansion of medicinal plants that form the backbone of the traditional medicine system and are fast dwindling due to over exploitation and development pattern. Widely reported presence in rural home gardens of medicinal plant species, such as, Adhatoda vasica, Nees., Aloe vera, Mill., Asparagus racemosus, Willd., Chlorophytum tuberosum, Baker., Curcuma angustifolia, Roxb., Dioscorea bulbifera, L., Dioscorea hispida, Dennst., Emblica officinalis, Gaertn., Gymnema sylvestre, Br., Rauwolfia serpentina, Benth., Terminalia arjuna, (Roxb. Wight. and Arn., Tinospora cordifolia, Miers., that are considered endangered is a further confirmation of this belief that traditional rural home gardens can be a good conservation site for domestication and conservation of these plant species.

  10. Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacchaeus Omogbadegun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are increasingly recognized worldwide as an alternative source of efficacious and inexpensive medications to synthetic chemo-therapeutic compound. Rapid declining wild stocks of medicinal plants accompanied by adulteration and species substitutions reduce their efficacy, quality and safety. Consequently, the low accessibility to and non-affordability of orthodox medicine costs by rural dwellers to be healthy and economically productive further threaten their life expectancy. Finding comprehensive information on medicinal plants of conservation concern at a global level has been difficult. This has created a gap between computing technologies' promises and expectations in the healing process under complementary and alternative medicine. This paper presents the design and implementation of a Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System addressing these concerns. Medicinal plants' details for designing the system were collected through semi-structured interviews and databases. Unified Modelling Language, Microsoft-Visual-Studio.Net, C#3.0, Microsoft-Jet-Engine4.0, MySQL, Loquendo Multilingual Text-to-Speech Software, YouTube, and VLC Media Player were used.

  11. Potent ?-amylase inhibitory activity of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava Shobha Y; Zinjarde Smita S; Sudha, P.; Kumar Ameeta R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Indian medicinal plants used in the Ayurvedic traditional system to treat diabetes are a valuable source of novel anti-diabetic agents. Pancreatic ?-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. In this study, seventeen Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for ?-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and eva...

  12. Potential of Traditional Medicinal Plants for Treating Obesity: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemipoor, Mahnaz; Radzi, Che Wan Jasimah Wan Mohamed; Cordell, Geoffrey A.; Yaze, Iman

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a global health concern associated with high morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic strategies include synthetic drugs and surgery, which may entail high costs and serious complications. Plant-based medicinal agents offer an alternative approach. A review of the studies on accessible botanical sources for the treatment of obesity is provided, which attempts to explain how these medicinal plants act to cause weight loss, and which approach is safer and more efficient...

  13. Review: Mycoendophytes in medicinal plants: Diversity and bioactivities

    OpenAIRE

    MUDASIR DAR; AJIT VARMA; DNYANESHWAR RATHOD; ANIKET GADE; MAHENDRA RAI

    2012-01-01

    Rai M, Gade A, Rathod D, Dar M, Varma A. 2012. Review: Mycoendophytes in medicinal plants: Diversity and bioactivities. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 86-96. Endophytes are microorganisms that reside in internal tissues of living plants without causing any negative effect. These offer tremendous potential for the exploitation of novel and eco-friendly secondary metabolites used in medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and agriculture. The present review is focused on diversity of endophytes, current...

  14. Medicinal plants used to treat malaria in Southern Benin

    OpenAIRE

    Maesen, L. J. G.

    2004-01-01

    People in Benin who cannot resort to allopathic medicines provided by the pharmaceutical industry use many species of plants to alleviate malaria symptoms. Complicated mixtures of different parts of several plant species are employed orally or as a bathing substance. The inventory of 85 species and 30 mixtures bought by us in southern Benin is by no means exhaustive, but the lists serve as examples of the widespread uses in medicine in a restricted area.

  15. Cultivation start of aromatic and medicinal plants in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Muntean, Leon Sorin; Muntean, Sorin

    1998-01-01

    The necessity of cultivating aromatic and medicinal plants in Romania stems from the fact that spontaneous flora cannot face the ever-rising demand for raw material. Then, some species take up at random vast areas within spontaneous flora, sometimes difficult get at; thus spotting picking and transport become cumbersome, the rhythmus hindered and production costs high. Certain medicinal plants do not grow spontaneously, others, though extant, are rarities; still others are highly poisonous, o...

  16. Medicinal Plants Traditionally Used in Mali for Dysmenorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Sanogo, Rokia

    2011-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is painful menstrual cramps, which negatively impacts the quality of life of a large percentage of the world's female population in reproductive age. The paper reviews the plants used in the Malian traditional medicine for the treatment of dysmenorrhea. Some medicinal plants were effective for treatments of dysmenorrhea with minimal side effects. Conventional therapy for dysmenorrhea, which usually includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), provides symptomatic reli...

  17. Cameroonian Medicinal Plants: Pharmacology and Derived Natural Products

    OpenAIRE

    ThomasEfferth; VictorKuete

    2010-01-01

    Many developing countries including Cameroon have mortality patterns that reflect high levels of infectious diseases and the risk of death during pregnancy and childbirth, in addition to cancers, cardiovascular diseases and chronic respiratory diseases that account for most deaths in the developed world. Several medicinal plants are used traditionally for their treatment. In this review, plants used in Cameroonian traditional medicine with evidence for the activities of their crude extracts a...

  18. ETHNOBOTANY OF SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS OF SRIKAKULAM DISTRICT, ANDHRA PRADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, K. Prakasa; Sreeramulu, S. Hara

    1985-01-01

    India has a rich heritage of herbal medicine of which the most important system namely Ayurveda needs even today a critical scientific scrutiny both in the correct identity of the proper drug plants and in the standard of the preparation of Ayurveda drugs. Authentic data on the medicinal plants growing in the Srikakulam district of Northern Andhra Pradesh is presented in the paper along with their etnobotainical data and their distribution in the district.

  19. Effects of medicinal plant extracts on gluconeogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Cetto A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Adolfo Andrade-CettoLaboratorio de Etnofarmacología, Departamento de Biología Celular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, MéxicoAbstract: On a global level, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is the most common endocrine disorder. T2DM is defined as an elevated blood glucose level associated with the absence of or inadequacy in pancreatic insulin secretion. The liver plays a key role in maintaining blood glucose levels during fasting by synthesizing glucose, mainly from lactate and amino acids through a process called gluconeogenesis. Because hepatic glucose production is increased at least twofold in patients with T2DM, targeting this pathway may lead to a blood glucose reduction in these patients. Botanical agents show promise for the development of new compounds to treat T2DM. Important mechanisms of action function via the inhibition of gluconeogenesis can occur in one of five ways: direct enzyme inhibition; through the downregulation of mRNA levels of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-P; through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, which leads to decreased levels of cAMP response element-binding protein, a key transcription factor for gluconeogenic enzyme phosphorylation; through the expression of the glucokinase gene, which stimulates glucokinase activity and inhibits G-6-P; and through the inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, which decreases gluconeogenesis and enzymatically inhibits G-6-P and fructose-1,6-diphosphatase.Keywords: type 2 diabetes mellitus, medicinal plants, gluconeogenesis, glucose 6-phosphatase, hepatic glucose production, endocrine disorder, fructose 1,6-diphosphatase

  20. Turkish folk medicinal plants, VIII: Lalapa?a (Edirne)

    OpenAIRE

    Ertan Tuzlac?; Duygu Fatma Alparslan ??bilen; Gizem Bulut

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: In this study, the folk medicinal plants of Lalapa?a (Edirne) were researched.During the field works, the information were obtained from local healers, experienced adultsand patients by personal interviews and the specimens of the plants were collected. Accordingto the results of the identifications of the specimens, 55 plant taxa are used in therapy inLalapa?a. These are presented in a table in the text. Among them 44 taxa are wild and 11 taxaare cultivated plants. The folk medicin...

  1. MEDICINAL PLANTS OF RAJASTHAN (INDIA WITH ANTIDIABETIC POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batra Shikha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rajasthan has a rich heritage of traditional system of medicine and many medicinally useful plants are found growing wildly because of vast area and variety of agro-climatic conditions. These plants are being used for the treatment of many human ailments including diabetes. Plants that are specifically employed for the treatment of diabetes are Acacia nilotica, Acacia senegal, Aegle marmelos, Calotropis procera, Capparis deciduas, Cassia auriculata, Cassia sophera, Cayratia trifolia, Cyamopsis tetragonoloba, Dalbergia sisso, Gymnema sylvestre, Momordica charantia, Syzygium cumini, Withania somnifera. This article aims to provide a comprehensive review on the some plants of Rajasthan having antidiabetic potential.

  2. Traditional uses of medicinal plants of uzumlu district, erzincan, turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A list of medicinal plants used by local people in uzumlu district and its villages is presented. This study included the first detailed ethnobotanical survey carried out in Erzincan. The study was conducted during spring and summer periods in 2010 and 2011 through face-to-face interview method to determine the local names, used parts, and medicinal usages of the determined plants. The plant samples collected from the study area were pressed, dried, and labeled according to the herbarium techniques, and identified. Totally 64 plant taxa belonging to 53 genera and 29 families were used by local people for different medicinal purposes in the area. The families including the highest number of taxa were Rosaceae (11 species), Asteraceae (6 species) and Lamiaceae (5 species). The species with the highest number of usage as herbal medicine were Urtica dioica, Anthemis cretica subsp. iberica, Petroselinum crispum,Allium cepa, Rheum ribes, Rosa dumalis subsp. boissieri var. boissieri and Vitis vinifera. Fruits and flowers were the most widely used parts of the plants. Decoction was the main method for using, and the primary therapeutic use of herbal remedies was for the respiratory system diseases such as cold, cough, asthma, and bronchitis.This study was the first carried out on 20 plant taxa used as traditional medicine, and the use of 28 taxa were recorded for the first time in Turkey. For maintaining the knowledge on traditional medicine, urgent studies should be carried out for recording before they have been completely lost. (author)

  3. Antioxidant Properties of Medicinal Plants from Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Iwona Wawer; Katarzyna Paradowska; Katarzyna Zawada; Adam Ber?owski

    2013-01-01

    There is a wide diversity of plants and seasonal crops in Peru, due to the presence of many climatic zones. Numerous plants are used to cure or prevent diseases. These plants are promising candidates for functional foods products. The most frequent form in which they are used is an aqueous infusion or decoction. In this study, we compared the antioxidant properties of ten Peruvian plants infusions and investigated their relation to the phenolic content. The studied plants were: Uncaria toment...

  4. Taxonomical Description and Ethnobotanical Survey for Indigenous Use of Some Medicinal Plants of Rawalpindi District

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Zafar; Syed Yassir Abbas Bokharie; Muhammad Akram Tariq; Kamran Shaukat; Abida Akram

    2003-01-01

    The survey of medicinal plants was conducted in different areas of Rawalpindi district. A total of fifteen plant species from thirteen different families were studied for their therapeutic potential. There were eight trees, two shrubs and five herbs in the selected medicinal plants. All the plants were dicotyledons. All were angiosperms. The selected plant species were described taxonomically, with parts of plants used and general medicinal property of each plant. Different medicinal flora we...

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Certain Plants used in Turkish Traditional Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Basaran Dulger; Ahmet Gonuz

    2004-01-01

    Ethanolic extracts of 16 Turkish plant species used in folk medicine were investigated for their antimicrobial activities against nine bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Listeria monocytogenes and Micrococcus luteus) and three yeasts (Candida albicans, Kluyveromyces fragilis and Rhodotorula rubra) using the disc diffusion method. Of the 16 plants tested, ten show...

  6. Plantas medicinais: cura segura? Medicinal plants: safe cure?

    OpenAIRE

    Veiga Junior, Valdir F.; Pinto, Angelo C.; Maciel, Maria Aparecida M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent literature on synergism, adulteration and risks of using medicinal plants. The use of copaiba and sacaca plants as well as their adulteration and side effects, are also described. In addition, the new regulations on phytotherapeutic registration in Brazil and Europe are discussed.

  7. Plantas medicinais: cura segura? / Medicinal plants: safe cure?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Valdir F., Veiga Junior; Angelo C., Pinto; Maria Aparecida M., Maciel.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available [...] Abstract in english This paper reviews the recent literature on synergism, adulteration and risks of using medicinal plants. The use of copaiba and sacaca plants as well as their adulteration and side effects, are also described. In addition, the new regulations on phytotherapeutic registration in Brazil and Europe are [...] discussed.

  8. Ontology Mapping of Indian Medicinal Plants with Standardized Medical Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Waheeta Hopper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: World Wide Web (WWW consisting large volume of information related with medicinal plants. However health care recommendation with Indian Medicinal Plants becomes complicated because valuable Information about medicinal resources as plants is scattered, in text form and unstructured. Search engines are not quite efficient and require excessive manual processing. Therefore search becomes difficult for the ordinary users to find the medicinal uses of herbal plants from the web. And another problem is that the domain experts could not able to map the medicinal uses of herbal plants with the existing standardized medical terms. Mapping the existing ontology introduces the problem of finding the similarity between the terms and relationships. Finding the solution to perform automatic mapping is another major challenge to be solved. Approach: To address these issues we developed a Knowledge framework for the Indian Medicinal Plants (KIMP. Knowledge framework includes the ontology creation, user interface for querying the system. Jena is used to build semantic web applications with the ontology representation of Resource Description Framework (RDF and Web Ontology Language (OWL. SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL is used to retrieve various query patterns. Automated mapping is achieved by considering lexical and edge based relatedness. Results: The user interface is demonstrated for five thousand concepts, which gives the related information from Wikipedia web page in three languages. Mapping recommendation by the lexical similarity Jaccard algorithm gives 27% and Jaro Winkler algorithm gives 60%. Edge based relationship using WuPalmer algorithm gives 93% mapping recommendation. These are analyzed and compared with our algorithm based on WuPalmer gives more specific mapping results than WuPalmer with 71%. Conclusion: Thus it possible to find the specific resultant web page based on the user requirement in three different languages. The mapping with standardized ontology gives more improvement in analyzing the performance of the medicinal plants and their uses.

  9. Traditional uses of medicinal plants for respiratory diseases in Transylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Nóra; Bartha, Sámuel; Boris, Gyöngyvér; Balogh, Lajos

    2011-10-01

    Inhabitants of some Transylvanian farms in Romania have a valuable archaic knowledge of medicinal plants because of their isolation and the insufficiency of official medical treatment. In this work we present ethnobotanical data about the use of medicinal plant taxa for various respiratory diseases in the villages Lövéte and Nagybacon. Altogether 34 plant taxa were documented in Lövéte and 26 species in Nagybacon with 15 concordant data of the villages. This information plays an important role in the documentation of the disappearing indigenous medical information of the villages. PMID:22164782

  10. Critical review on medicinally potent plant species: Gloriosa superba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Sonali; Shekhawat, G S

    2011-04-01

    Gloriosa superba L. is a perennial climber and is used as an ayurvedic medicinal herb to cure diseases in various parts of Africa and Southeast Asia. The plant was under threatened category due to its imprudent harvesting from wild as it is extensively used by medicinal industries for its colchicine content. It also faces a low seed set problem, but due to its industrial demand it is now under cultivation. The plant is used to cure arthritis, gout, rheumatism, inflammation, ulcers, bleeding piles, skin diseases, leprosy, impotency, snakebites, etc. Various compounds have been isolated from the plant parts mainly tubers and seeds, viz colchicine, colchicoside (its semi-synthetic derivative - thiocolchicoside), superbine, gloriosine, lumicolchicine, 3-demethyl-N-deformyl-N-deacetylcolchicine, 3-demethylcolchicine, N-formyl deacetylcolchicine. In the present review, we have summarized the information concerning the occurrence, botanical description, ethanopharmacology, medicinal uses, biological activities and toxicological studies on this plant. PMID:21059382

  11. MEDICINAL PLANTS USED AS ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmar Namita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are caused by pathogenic microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites or fungi. Diseases can spread, directly or indirectly, from one person to another. Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. About one-fourth of all the medicines we use, come from rainforest plants. However, scientific studies have been conducted only to a limited extent with few medicinal plants. The development of bacterial resistance to presently available antibiotics has necessitated the search of new antibacterial agents. In rural and backward area of India, several plants are commonly used as herbal medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases. Four such plants commonly used by the people of the area were screened for potential antibacterial activity.

  12. The microbiome of medicinal plants: diversity and importance for plant growth, quality and health

    OpenAIRE

    MartinaKöberl; ElshahatM.Ramadan; RudolfBauer

    2013-01-01

    Past medicinal plant research primarily focused on bioactive phytochemicals, however, the focus is currently shifting due to the recognition that a significant number of phytotherapeutic compounds are actually produced by associated microbes or through interaction with their host. Medicinal plants provide an enormous bioresource of potential use in modern medicine and agriculture, yet their microbiome is largely unknown. The objective of this review is (i) to introduce novel insights into the...

  13. Identification of Ornamental Plant Functioned as Medicinal Plant Based on Redundant Discrete Wavelet Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human has a duty to preserve the nature. One of the examples is preserving the ornamental plant. Huge economic value of plant trading, escalating esthetical value of one space and medicine efficacy that contained in a plant are some positive values from this plant. However, only few people know about its medicine efficacy. Considering the easiness to obtain and the medicine efficacy, this plant should be an initial treatment of a simple disease or option towards chemical based medicines. In order to let people get acquaint, we need a system that can proper identify this plant. Therefore, we propose to build a system based on Redundant Discrete Wavelet Transformation (RDWT through its leaf. Since its character is translation invariant that able to produce some robust features to identify ornamental plant. This system was successfully resulting 95.83% of correct classification rate.

  14. Medicinal plants in an urban environment: the medicinal flora of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussmann Rainer W

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Varanasi is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities of the world, and one of the most important Hindu pilgrimage sites. Despite this importance, very little information exits on the cities flora in general, and medicinal species found within its limit in particular. Traditional medicine plays a large role in Indian society. The presented study attempted to investigate if traditional plant use and availability of important common medicinal plants are maintained in urban environments. The paper presents information on the traditional uses of seventy-two plant species collected form the campus of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, and highlights the uses of these plants by the local inhabitants.

  15. Antioxidant Potential of Indigenous Medicinal Plants of District Gujrat Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Rafiq Khan; Syed Ali Raza; Mohammad Arshad; Ayoub Rashid Ch; Abdul Razzaq

    2014-01-01

    The work reported in this article was carried out to explore hidden antioxidant potential of some medicinal plants of District Gujrat, Pakistan. Crude methanolic extracts of Cichorium intybus L, Malva sylvestris L, and Euphorbia milii L were initially screened by DPPH on TLC assay for their antioxidant activity. Diphenylpicrylhydrayl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity was also determined for all plants. To assess the role of plants in lipid oxidation, PV of refined bleached and deodorize...

  16. Bioinformatics opportunities for identification and study of medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Vivekanand; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2012-01-01

    Plants have been used as a source of medicine since historic times and several commercially important drugs are of plant-based origin. The traditional approach towards discovery of plant-based drugs often times involves significant amount of time and expenditure. These labor-intensive approaches have struggled to keep pace with the rapid development of high-throughput technologies. In the era of high volume, high-throughput data generation across the biosciences, bioinformatics plays a crucia...

  17. The cultivation of of medicinal and aromatique plants in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Sorin MUNTEAN

    1985-08-01

    Full Text Available Scientific research regarding medicinal plants started first in Cluj, where the Research Station for Medicinal Plants was first organized in Europe (1904. Research in this field was continued after 1930 by the staff of the Agronomy Researh Institute of Romania (ICAR. Beginning with 1975 the national research programme regarding the medicinal plants is coordinated by the Research Station for Medicinal and Aromatic Plants -SCPMA - Fundulea. Studies are performed in the experimental fields and in the laboratories of this institute and different other research stations and universities in Romania. Beginning with 1979, a new specialized periodical - Herba Romanica - published the main results in the field. At present there are cultivated in Romania about 60 different medicinal and aromatic plant species. Recently a tendency emerged toward the concentration of the production to the most suitable regions and the specialization of different farms for the cultivation of a more restricted number of species. In the second part of the paper the species studied and/or cultivated in the experimental fields of the Agronomy Institute Cluj-Napoca are presented with a chronological list of papers published by the stuff in the period 1975-1984.

  18. Antiangiogenic Activity and Pharmacogenomics of Medicinal Plants from Traditional Korean Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Arend; Ik-Soo Lee; Henry Johannes Greten; Benjamin Krusche; Sven Schröder; Onat Kadioglu; Victor Kuete; Ean-Jeong Seo; Thomas Efferth

    2013-01-01

    Aim. In the present study, we investigated the antiangiogenic properties of 59 plants used in traditional Korean medicine. Selected phytochemicals were investigated in more detail for their modes of action. Methods. A modified chicken-chorioallantoic-membrane (CAM) assay using quail eggs was applied to test for antiangiogenic effects of plant extracts. A molecular docking in silico approached the binding of plant constituents to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (VEGFR1...

  19. ANTIMICROBIAL PROPERTIES OF ROOTS OF MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Sini, S.; Malathy, N. S.

    2005-01-01

    Antibacterial properties of hexane, chloroform and aqueous extracts of roots of Acorus calamus, Aristolochia indica, Cyperus rotundus, Desmodium gangeticum, Holostemma ada– kodien and Kaempferia galanga, used in the traditional medicine were studied on Bacillus pumilis and Eschericia coli by disc diffusion method.

  20. Pharmacological effects of medicinal plants on skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Bakhtiyari, MSc

    2013-06-01

    There are many herbs that have a role in the prevention and treatment of skin diseases, and are used in either traditional medicine or the preparation of cosmetics. The effects of a number of them have been scientifically proved and this information for the production of cosmetic and pharmaceutical products can be used.

  1. AN INDEX OF THE AVAILABLE MEDICINAL PLANTS, USED IN INDIAN SYSTEM OF MEDICINE FROM JAMMU AND KASHMIR STATE

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, T. N.; Rajasekharan, S.; Badola, D. P.; Shah, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    The medicinal plants used in Indian system of medicine and its distribution in Jammu and Kashmir has been categorized systematically here. The paper deals with 246 medicinal plants and has to off-set an index which is not there so far.

  2. Antifungal Activity of Some Saudi Plants Used in Traditional Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Saadabi, Abdulmoniem M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Methanolic, chloroform and aqueous extracts of 11 medicinal plants used in folklore medicine in Saudi Arabia, were investigated for in vitro activity against four pathogenic fungi. The extracts at concentration of 0.5 mL plate-1 showed varying degrees of total inhibition of fungal growth. Extracts from Salvadora persica and Vigna fragrans showed the highest activity, followed by Peganum harmala and Withania somnifera, while Polycarpaea corymbosa demonstrated the least activity, when compared ...

  3. Quantification of Gallic Acidin Fruits of Three Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Vazirian, Mahdi; Khanavi, Mahnaz; Amanzadeh, Yaghoub; Hajimehdipoor, Homa

    2011-01-01

    Triphala is a traditional herbal formulation consisting of dried fruits originating from three medicinal plants, namely Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica and Phyllanthus emblica. It is used in folk medicine for the treatment of headaches, dyspepsia and leucorrhoea. There are some reports regarding Triphala’s pharmacological effects including its anti-cancer, radioprotective, hypocholesterolaemic, hepatoprotective and anti-oxidant activities. The most important components of these pla...

  4. An Ethnopharmacological Study of Medicinal Plants in New South Wales

    OpenAIRE

    Randall, D.; M. Randall; J. Jamie; S. Vemulpad; J. Kohen; Harrington, D; Liu, Q.; Brouwer, N

    2005-01-01

    The Australian Aboriginal people have used plants as medicine and food for thousands of years, however, this traditional knowledge is documented only to a limited extent, and is in danger of being lost. The Indigenous Bioresources Research Group (IBRG) aims to help Australian Aboriginal communities to preserve their customary medicinal knowledge, and to provide information that can be used for their cultural or educational purposes, as well as for scientific advancement. This work is undertak...

  5. A pharmacological appraisal of medicinal plants with antidiabetic potential

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Vasim; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Akhtar, Mohd.; Aqil, Mohd.; Mujeeb, Mohd; Pillai, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complicated metabolic disorder that has gravely troubled the human health and quality of life. Conventional agents are being used to control diabetes along with lifestyle management. However, they are not entirely effective and no one has ever been reported to have fully recovered from diabetes. Numerous medicinal plants have been used for the management of diabetes mellitus in various traditional systems of medicine worldwide as they are a great source of biological co...

  6. Analysis of the Mercury in commonly used Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi N

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are used in various herbal products as food supplements and food additive. The requirement of medicinal plants is tremendously increasing in the global market. The presence of variousl heavy metals such as Arsenic, Mercury, Lead, Cadmium, Chromium, Nickle,silver, Atimony,Copper etc in herbal formulations result in several adverse effects. The present study was done to determine the presence of Mercury in some of the selected medicinal plants namely Hemidesmus indicus (L. R.Br. (Sariba, Cyperus rotundus L. (Musta, Glycyrrhiza glabra L. (Yashtimadhu, Rubia cordifolia L. (Manjishta, Eclipta alba Hassk (Bhringaraj, Hedychium spicatum Ham.ex Smith (Karchura, Emblica officinalis Gaertn. (Amalaki and Acacia concinna (Willd. DC. (Shikakai, which were procured from local market of Chennai, Tirupati and Hyderabad. The samples were digested by Wet digestion method and analysed by UV-Vis Spectrophotometer. The results were compared with permissible limits recommended by WHO. Mean levels were evaluated with respect to their procurement. It was found that the analyzed plant species contained safe levels of the heavy metals concentration excepting Sariba Tirupati sample, Yastimadhu Chennai sample and Manjishta Hyderabad sample. There was a considerable variation of heavy metal concentration for the examined medicinal plant species. This may be due to the difference in physiological properties of plant uptake.

  7. Cameroonian medicinal plants: Pharmacology and derived natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ThomasEfferth

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many developing countries including Cameroon have mortality patterns that reflect high levels of infectious diseases and the risk of death during pregnancy and childbirth, in addition to cancers, cardiovascular diseases and chronic respiratory diseases that account for most deaths in the developed world. Several medicinal plants are used traditionally for their treatment. In this review, plants used in Cameroonian traditional medicine with evidence for the activities of their crude extracts and/or derived products have been discussed. A considerable number of plant extracts and isolated compounds possess significant antimicrobial, antiparasitic including anti-malarial, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes, and antioxidant effects. Most of the biologically active compounds belong to terpenoids, phenolics and alkaloids. Terpenoids from Cameroonian plants showed best activities as anti-parasitic, but rather poor antimicrobial effects. The best antimicrobial, anti-proliferative and antioxidant compounds were phenolics. In conclusion, many medicinal plants traditionally used in Cameroon to treat various ailments displayed good activities in vitro. This explains the endeavor of Cameroonian research institutes in drug discovery from indigenous medicinal plants. However, much work is still to be done to standardize methodologies and to study the mechanisms of action of isolated natural products.

  8. Cameroonian Medicinal Plants: Pharmacology and Derived Natural Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Efferth, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Many developing countries including Cameroon have mortality patterns that reflect high levels of infectious diseases and the risk of death during pregnancy and childbirth, in addition to cancers, cardiovascular diseases and chronic respiratory diseases that account for most deaths in the developed world. Several medicinal plants are used traditionally for their treatment. In this review, plants used in Cameroonian traditional medicine with evidence for the activities of their crude extracts and/or derived products have been discussed. A considerable number of plant extracts and isolated compounds possess significant antimicrobial, anti-parasitic including antimalarial, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes, and antioxidant effects. Most of the biologically active compounds belong to terpenoids, phenolics, and alkaloids. Terpenoids from Cameroonian plants showed best activities as anti-parasitic, but rather poor antimicrobial effects. The best antimicrobial, anti-proliferative, and antioxidant compounds were phenolics. In conclusion, many medicinal plants traditionally used in Cameroon to treat various ailments displayed good activities in vitro. This explains the endeavor of Cameroonian research institutes in drug discovery from indigenous medicinal plants. However, much work is still to be done to standardize methodologies and to study the mechanisms of action of isolated natural products. PMID:21833168

  9. STUDY OF DRUG LIKENESS ACTIVITY OF PHYTOCHEMICALS IN MEDICINAL PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Sathya

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals in medicinal plants can deliver potential therapeutic drugs such as anticancer, antiviral, antioxidant etc. The plant kingdom is a treasure house of potential drugs and each phytochemical cannot be tested in the wetlab preparations. Hence the main aim of the study is the drug likeness activity of phytochemicals in medicinal plants such as Anethum graveolens, Apium graveolens against hepatocellular carcinoma. These plants have anticancer, antilivercancer, hepatoprotective, antiviral activities. Focusing on these activities, the phytochemicals from these plants were collected from Dr.Duke Phytochemical and ethnobotanical database. The drug likeness is evaluated by satisfying Lipinski’s rule of five, ADMET properties, Partition coefficient analyzed through Accelerys Discovery studio. The results screen the phytochemicals and these interpretations can be further preceded for the drug designing.

  10. Antibacterial activity of plants used in Indian herbal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Delonix elata , Enicostemma axillare, Merremia tridentata, Mollugo cerviana and Solanum incanum are medicinal plants used in traditional Indian medicine for the treatment of various ailments. These plants were selected to evaluate their potential antibacterial activity. To determine antibacterial activity and phytochemicals in the crude extracts of five medicinal plants used in traditional Indian medicine for the treatment of various ailments like rheumatism, piles fever, skin diseases and snake bite. The antibacterial activity of organic solvent extracts of these plants were determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution techniques against gram-positive bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results revealed that the chloroform and methanol extracts of D. elata and methanol extracts of M. cerviana exhibited significant antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative strains with minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC ranging from 1.5 to 100 mg/ml. Methanol extracts of M. tridentata exhibited activity only against gram-positive bacterial strains with MBC ranging from 12.5 to 100 mg/ml. Extracts of E. axillare and S. incanum showed activity only against B. subtilis and were not bactericidal at 100 mg/ml. The most susceptible organism to the organic extracts from all the studied plants was B. subtilis and the most resistant organism was P. aeruginosa. The presence of phytochemicals such as alkaloids, tannins, triterpenoids, steroids and glycosides in the extracts of these plants supports their traditional uses as medicinal plants for the treatment of various ailments. The present study reveals potential use of these plants for developing new antibacterial compounds against pathogenic microorganisms.

  11. Medicinal Plants used in Traditional Medicine in the Centre East Region of Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M.K. Ky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research focused on the inventory and the use of plants in traditional medicine for the treatment of diseases in this area. The method was based on ethnobotanical surveys with semi-directing interview, conducted from November 2006 to December 2007 among a sample of 50 people aged between 40 and 80 years and very experienced in traditional medicine in the municipalities of Bissiga, Lalgaye and Tenkodogo. We identify 73 phytogenetic species and 175 therapeutic indications used to treat 52 diseases and the principal ones are the gastrointestinal diseases, the malaria, the various fevers, the jaundice, the skin diseases, the respiratory affections, the reproduction diseases, the hemorrhoids and the infantile diseases. In traditional veterinary pharmacopoeia, 18 phytogenetic species are used with 33 therapeutic indications to treat diseases including trypanosomiasis, tuberculosis, diarrheas and wounds. The interest of people of this area for medicinal plants, command a special attention to organize the actors and preserve the plant genetic resources.

  12. A REVIEW ON SOME NEPHROPROTECTIVE MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Gaikwad Et Al, K.

    2012-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the most common kidney problems and occurs when body is exposed to a drug or toxin. A number of therapeutic agents can adversely affect the kidney resulting in acute renal failure, chronic interstitial nephritis and nephritic syndrome because increasing number of potent therapeutic drugs like aminoglycoside antibiotics, chemotherapeutic agents and NSAIDS. Nephroprotective agents are the substances which possess protective activity against nephrotoxicity. Medicinal pla...

  13. Anti-osteoporotic constituents from Indian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manmeet; Rawat, Preeti; Dixit, Preeti; Mishra, Devendra; Gautam, Abnish K; Pandey, Rashmi; Singh, Divya; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Maurya, Rakesh

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro osteogenic activities of selected medicinal plants used traditionally in India. The compounds isolated from three plants viz. Allophylus serratus, Cissus quadrangularis and Vitex negundo were evaluated for their in vitro osteogenic activities. Primary cultures of osteoblasts were used to determine the effects of these components on osteoblast functions. Five of the fourteen compounds isolated led to increase in osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. These findings lend support to the use of Allophylus serratus, Cissus quadrangularis and Vitex negundo in traditional medicine. PMID:20554183

  14. Antidiarrhoeal evaluation of some nigerian medicinal plants used bini traditional folk medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four medicinal plants namely; Vernonia amygdalina, Psidium guajava, Chromolaena odorata and Anarcadium occidentale, commonly used for the treatment of diarrhoea in Bini traditional folk medicine in Nigeria were tested against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella aerogenes. The leaf extracts of P guajava and A occidentale completely inhibited the growth of all the organisms tested, while V amygdalina inhibited the growth of K. aerogenes only. Metronidazole was used as the standard antidiarrhoeal drug. Glycosides were found in all the plant extracts. This study, Favours the use of the leaf extracts of A occidentale, P guajava and V amygdalina for the treatment of diarrhoea in Nigeria. (author)

  15. Medicinal plants: traditions of yesterday and drugs of tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurib-Fakim, Ameenah

    2006-02-01

    Plants have provided Man with all his needs in terms of shelter, clothing, food, flavours and fragrances as not the least, medicines. Plants have formed the basis of sophisticated traditional medicine systems among which are Ayurvedic, Unani, Chinese amongst others. These systems of medicine have given rise to some important drugs still in use today. Among the lesser-known systems of medicines are the African and Australian, Central and South American amongst others. The search for new molecules, nowadays, has taken a slightly different route where the science of ethnobotany and ethnopharmacognosy are being used as guide to lead the chemist towards different sources and classes of compounds. It is in this context that the flora of the tropics by virtue of its diversity has a significant role to play in being able to provide new leads. Nonetheless the issue of sovereignty and property rights should also be addressed in line with the Convention for Biological Diversity (CBD). This paper highlights the above, provides an overview of the classes of molecules present in plants and gives some examples of the types of molecules and secondary metabolites that have led to the development of these pharmacologically active extracts. The paper also presents some data on the use of plant products in the development of functional foods, addresses the needs for validation of plant extracts and always stressing on safety, efficacy and quality of phyto-medications. PMID:16105678

  16. Antioxidant Properties of Medicinal Plants from Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Wawer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a wide diversity of plants and seasonal crops in Peru, due to the presence of many climatic zones. Numerous plants are used to cure or prevent diseases. These plants are promising candidates for functional foods products. The most frequent form in which they are used is an aqueous infusion or decoction. In this study, we compared the antioxidant properties of ten Peruvian plants infusions and investigated their relation to the phenolic content. The studied plants were: Uncaria tomentosa (cat’s claw, Lepidium meyenii (maca, Berberis vulgaris L. (barberry, agracejo, Phyllantus niruri (chanca piedra, Annona muricata L. (graviola, soursop, Gentianella alborosea (hercampure, Geranium dielsianum (pasuchaca, Tabebuia ochracea (tahuari, Notholaena nivea (“cuti cuti” and Tiquilia paronychioides (“flor de arena”. Infusions of all studied plants have shown antioxidant activity, though there was a large diversity between the results. The antioxidant properties, determined with DPPH and ABTS scavenging assays as well as FRAP test, were strongly correlated with total phenolic content, while there was no correlation with the carotenoid content.

  17. Phytotoxic studies of medicinal plant species of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allelopathic screening of 81 medicinal plant species, collected from North West Frontier Province (NWFP) Pakistan, was carried out to identify significantly higher allelopathic species for future phyto chemical analyses. For this purpose, sandwich method was used to test allelopathic potentials of leaf leachates of these plant species against lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa L.). Two different concentrations of 10 mg and 50 mg of leaf leachates were used in the study. The radicle and hypocotyl growths were measured and compared with control treatments. It was observed that an endemic species Seriphidium kurramense, Andrachne cordifolia and Rhazya stricta were the stronger phyto toxic plants as compared to the other test species. Based on the current screening, three potential medicinal plants are recommended for future bioassay guided isolation of allelochemicals and for genetic diversity studies. It would also be interesting to see correlation between genetic markers and isolated allelochemicals. (author)

  18. Antiinflammatory activity of some medicinal plant extracts form Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, M J; Bermejo, P; Carretero, E; Martínez-Acitores, C; Noguera, B; Villar, A

    1996-12-01

    Six medicinal plant extracts from Venezuela, used in traditional medicine, were investigated for their anti-inflammatory potential against adjuvant-carrageenan-induced inflammation (ACII). All doses expressed here are equivalents of dried starting plant materials (1.50 g dry plant/kg body wt.). The most interesting plant extracts were Synedrella nodiflora, and the hexane leaf extract of Bursera simaruba. In ACII, orally administered extracts (at doses 40 and 80 mg/kg, respectively), inhibited both the acute and chronic phases of this experimental model of inflammation, mainly the chronic phase. These extracts exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activity daily throughout the experiment, and were as effective as reference drugs, phenylbutazone (80 mg/kg) and indomethacin (3 mg/kg). PMID:9121169

  19. Iranian Medicinal Plants for Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Taghizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Iranian traditional medicine a significant usage of herbs is promoted for their anti-diabetic activity. The aim of this review to assess the efficacy of glucose lowering effects of medicinal plants cultivated in Iran. An electronic literature search of MEDLINE, Science Direct, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane Library Database, Ebsco and Google Scholar from database inception conducted up to May 2012. A total of 85 studies (18 humans and 67 animals examining 62 plants were reviewed. The quality of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs assessed by using the Jadad scale. Among the RCTs studies, the best results in glycemic control was found in Aloe vera, Citrullus colocynthus, Plantago ovata, Silybum marianum, Rheum ribes and Urtica dioica. The majority of plants that have been studied for antidiabetic activity showed promising results. However, efficacy and safety of the most plants used in the treatment of diabetes are not sufficient.

  20. Varieties of aromatic and medicinal plants developed in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Sorin MUNTEAN

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of aromatic and medicinal plant breeding are complex: of these, the establishment of numerous traits: yield level, raw-material quality (content in active substances, uniformness of the material and reaching of technological maturity of harvesting, ability to adaptation and hardiness to diseases, pests, laying, frost, drought etc., behavior of plant raw-material during processing etc. In Romania, 20 species have been developed and authenticated, all productive and rich in active substances, weather-and pest resistant; of these, seven were authenticated between 1990 and 1997: Unirea (Cynara scolymus L., Record (Mentha crispa L., Silvia (Datura innoxia Mill., Smarald (Thymus vulgaris L., Safir (Papaver somniferum L., Tages (Tagetes patula L., Azur (Vinca minor L.. Seed and planting material with important numbers of species of aromatic and medicinal plants have been developed with years.

  1. [Medicinal plants in Senegal and oral diseases: use and interest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, M; Cisse, D; Toure, B; Lo, C M M; Faye, D

    2011-09-01

    The end of the last century and the present decade is characterized by an evolution of the concept of health and illness in the public domain. The World Health Organization defines traditional medicine as "comprising various practices, approaches, knowledge and beliefs incorporating medicinal herbal, animal and/or mineral, spiritual therapies, applied alone or in combination to maintain well-being and to treat, diagnose or prevent disease. In dentistry, the plants used are numerous. The objective of this work is to describe the herbal medicine used against oral diseases. To conduct this study, 10 articles and theses, a brief, 2 books, 4 reports and 2 clippings on traditional medicine/herbal medicine were consulted. Several African plants, in the form of use, can help relieve or treat dental pain and have positive effects against dental caries and periodontal diseases. The geographic and financial accessibility associated with the lack of qualified personnel are the plants could be an alternative in the management of certain oral diseases. PMID:25090741

  2. Rice-Traditional Medicinal Plant in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Umadevi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice is rich in genetic diversity, with thousands of varieties grown throughout the world. Rice cultivation is the principal activity and source of income for about 100 million households in Asia and Africa. Rice has potential in a wide range of food categories. Besides having nutritional and medicinal benefits, the by-products of rice are equally important and beneficial. By-products from growing rice create many valuable and worthwhile products. The unedible parts, that are discarded through the milling process, and the edible part could be transformed into some of the following suggested products. Rice can be used to treat skin conditions. The rice is boiled, drained and allowed to cool and mashed. The rice is made into a paste or moulded into balls and these can be applied to boils, sores, swellings and skin blemishes. Other herbs are sometimes added to the rice balls to increase their medicinal effects. Sticky glutinous rice is often taken to treat stomach upsets, heart-burn and indigestion. Extracts from brown rice have been used to treat breast and stomach cancer and warts. They have also been used to treat indigestion, nausea and diarrhoea.

  3. Antifungal Activity of Medicinal Plants from Jordan Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad B. Khalil

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants collected from different locations in Jordan were tested for their antifungal activities against 5 plant pathogenic fungi: Phytophthora infestans, Fuusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Stemphylium solani and Mucor sp. Data of this study showed that the highest growth inhibition of all fungi was observed with Salvia indica, which gave (66.3%, of inhibitions for Stemphylium, followed by Mucor (60.5%, R. solani (51.7%, F. oxysporum (48% and P. infestans (28.8%.

  4. Total Phenolics and Total Flavonoids in Selected Indian Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, C. T.; Balachandran, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Plant phenolics and flavonoids have a powerful biological activity, which outlines the necessity of their determination. The phenolics and flavonoids content of 20 medicinal plants were determined in the present investigation. The phenolic content was determined by using Folin-Ciocalteu assay. The total flavonoids were measured spectrophotometrically by using the aluminium chloride colorimetric assay. The results showed that the family Mimosaceae is the richest source of phenolics, (Acacia ni...

  5. Antifungal Activity of Medicinal Plants from Jordan Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Amjad B.; Dabaneh, Basem F.; Anfoka, Ghandi H.

    2005-01-01

    Medicinal plants collected from different locations in Jordan were tested for their antifungal activities against 5 plant pathogenic fungi: Phytophthora infestans, Fuusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Stemphylium solani and Mucor sp. Data of this study showed that the highest growth inhibition of all fungi was observed with Salvia indica, which gave (66.3%), of inhibitions for Stemphylium, followed by Mucor (60.5%), R. solani (51.7%), F. oxysporum (48%) and P. infestans (28.8%).

  6. Varieties of aromatic and medicinal plants developed in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Muntean, Leon Sorin; Muntean, Leon Jr

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of aromatic and medicinal plant breeding are complex: of these, the establishment of numerous traits: yield level, raw-material quality (content in active substances), uniformness of the material and reaching of technological maturity of harvesting, ability to adaptation and hardiness to diseases, pests, laying, frost, drought etc., behavior of plant raw-material during processing etc. In Romania, 20 species have been developed and authenticated, all productive and rich in acti...

  7. Medicinal plants in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Maliheh; Shams-Ardakani, Mohammadreza; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2014-11-28

    Abstract Context: Helicobacter pylori is a small, spiral, Gram-negative bacillus that plays a role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases ranging from asymptomatic gastritis to gastric cancer. Schedule compliance, antibiotic drug resistance, and side-effects of triple or quadruple therapy have led to research for novel candidates from plants. Objective: The purpose of this paper is to review the most potent medicinal plants of recently published literature with anti-H. pylori activity. For centuries, herbals have been used by traditional healers around the world to treat various gastrointestinal tract disorders such as dyspepsia, gastritis, and peptic ulcer disease. The mechanism of action by which these botanicals exert their therapeutic properties has not been completely and clearly elucidated. Anti-H. pylori properties may be one of the possible mechanisms by which gastroprotective herbs treat gastrointestinal tract disorders. Materials and methods: Electronic databases such as PubMed, Google scholar, EBSCO, and local databases were explored for medicinal plants with anti-H. pylori properties between 1984 and 2013 using key words "medicinal plants" and "Helicobacter pylori" or "anti-Helicobacter pylori". Results: A total of 43 medicinal plant species belonging to 27 families including Amaryllidaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Asclepiadoideae, Asteraceae, Bignoniaceae, Clusiaceae, Chancapiedra, Combretaceae, Cyperaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Geraniaceae, Lamiaceae, Lauraceae, Lythraceae, Menispermaceae, Myristicaceae, Myrtaceae, Oleaceae, Papaveraceae, Plumbaginaceae, Poaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, and Theaceae were studied as herbs with potent anti-H. pylori effects. Conclusion: Traditional folk medicinal use of some of these plants to treat gastric infections is substantiated by the antibacterial activity of their extracts against H. pylori. PMID:25430849

  8. Review: Mycoendophytes in medicinal plants: Diversity and bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUDASIR DAR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Rai M, Gade A, Rathod D, Dar M, Varma A. 2012. Review: Mycoendophytes in medicinal plants: Diversity and bioactivities. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 86-96. Endophytes are microorganisms that reside in internal tissues of living plants without causing any negative effect. These offer tremendous potential for the exploitation of novel and eco-friendly secondary metabolites used in medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and agriculture. The present review is focused on diversity of endophytes, current national and international bioactive secondary metabolite scenario and future prospects. Endophytic fungi as novel source of potentially useful medicinal compounds are discussed along with the need to search for new and more effective agents from endophytes to combat disease problems.

  9. Perilla frutescens: interesting new medicinal and melliferous plant in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Cinzia; Ferrazzi, Paola

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this study is to inform those potentially interested (researchers, farmers, industry and public bodies) in the medicinal and aromatic properties, and profitability of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton (Lamiaceae). Perilla, a medicinal and edible plant of Asian origin, was recently introduced to the Piedmont Region in the north-west of Italy. P. frutescens is commonly known for its anti-allergic, anti-tumor, and anti-oxidant properties. It is also widely used as human food. We collected a variety of data on Perilla crops in the Piedmont Region, including: agricultural practices, crop profitability, and its value as a bee plant. Our results suggest that ease of cultivation, approximate break-even economics, medicinal claims, and value for bees all contribute to make Perilla of economic interest in Italy. PMID:22164783

  10. Antibacterial activity of selected Myanmar medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirteen plants which are traditionally used for the treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea in Myanmar were selected and tested for antibacterial activity by using agar disc diffusion technique. Polar and nonpolar solvents were employed for extraction of plants. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extracts with the most significant predominant activity were evaluated by plate dilution method. The plants Eugenia jambolana, Quisqualis indica, Leucaena glauca and Euphorbia splendens var. 1 were found to show significant antibacterial activity. It was also observed that extracts using nonpolar solvents did not show any antibacterial activity and extracts using polar solvents showed antibacterial activity on tested bacteria, indicating that the active chemical compound responsible for the antibacterial action must be a polar soluble compound. (author)

  11. A pharmacological appraisal of medicinal plants with antidiabetic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Vasim; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Akhtar, Mohd.; Aqil, Mohd.; Mujeeb, Mohd.; Pillai, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complicated metabolic disorder that has gravely troubled the human health and quality of life. Conventional agents are being used to control diabetes along with lifestyle management. However, they are not entirely effective and no one has ever been reported to have fully recovered from diabetes. Numerous medicinal plants have been used for the management of diabetes mellitus in various traditional systems of medicine worldwide as they are a great source of biological constituents and many of them are known to be effective against diabetes. Medicinal plants with antihyperglycemic activities are being more desired, owing to lesser side-effects and low cost. This review focuses on the various plants that have been reported to be effective in diabetes. A record of various medicinal plants with their established antidiabetic and other health benefits has been reported. These include Allium sativa, Eugenia jambolana, Panax ginseng, Gymnema sylvestre, Momrodica charantia, Ocimum sanctum, Phyllanthus amarus, Pterocarpus marsupium, Trigonella foenum graecum and Tinospora cordifolia. All of them have shown a certain degree of antidiabetic activity by different mechanisms of action. PMID:22368396

  12. Identification, Characterization, and Palynology of High-Valued Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Hina Fazal; Nisar Ahmad; Bilal Haider Abbasi

    2013-01-01

    High-valued medicinal plants Achillea millefolium, Acorus calamus, Arnebia nobilis, Fumaria indica, Gymnema sylvestre, Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Peganum harmala, Psoralea corylifolia, Rauwolfia serpentina, and Vetiveria zizanioides were identified with the help of taxonomical markers and investigated for characterization and palynological studies. These parameters are used to analyze their quality, safety, and standardization for their safe use. Botanical description and crude drug des...

  13. Traditional uses of medicinal plants in gastrointestinal disorders in Nepal.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Uprety, Y.; Poudel, R. C.; Timsina, Binu; Munzbergová, Z.; Asselin, H.; Tiwari, A.; Shrestha, S. S.; Sidgel, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 158, Part A (2014), s. 221-229. ISSN 0378-8741 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : medicinal plant s * principal component analysis * randomization test * ethnomedicine * drug development Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.939, year: 2013

  14. Traditional uses of medicinal plants in gastrointestinal disorders in Nepal.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Uprety, Y.; Poudel, R. C.; Timsina, B.; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Asselin, H.; Tiwari, A.; Shrestha, S. S.; Sidgel, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 158, Part A (2014), s. 221-229. ISSN 0378-8741 R&D Projects: GA ?R GP13-10850P Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : principal component analysis * medicinal plants * randomization test * ethnomedicine * drug development Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.939, year: 2013

  15. A pharmacological appraisal of medicinal plants with antidiabetic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Vasim; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Akhtar, Mohd; Aqil, Mohd; Mujeeb, Mohd; Pillai, K K

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complicated metabolic disorder that has gravely troubled the human health and quality of life. Conventional agents are being used to control diabetes along with lifestyle management. However, they are not entirely effective and no one has ever been reported to have fully recovered from diabetes. Numerous medicinal plants have been used for the management of diabetes mellitus in various traditional systems of medicine worldwide as they are a great source of biological constituents and many of them are known to be effective against diabetes. Medicinal plants with antihyperglycemic activities are being more desired, owing to lesser side-effects and low cost. This review focuses on the various plants that have been reported to be effective in diabetes. A record of various medicinal plants with their established antidiabetic and other health benefits has been reported. These include Allium sativa, Eugenia jambolana, Panax ginseng, Gymnema sylvestre, Momrodica charantia, Ocimum sanctum, Phyllanthus amarus, Pterocarpus marsupium, Trigonella foenum graecum and Tinospora cordifolia. All of them have shown a certain degree of antidiabetic activity by different mechanisms of action. PMID:22368396

  16. Kenyan medicinal plants used as antivenin: a comparison of plant usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisangau Daniel P

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The success of snake bite healers is vaguely understood in Kenya, partly due to their unknown materia medica and occult-mystical nature of their practice. A comparison is made of plants used in snake bite treatments by two culturally distinct African groups (the Kamba and Luo. Thirty two plants used for snakebite treatment are documented. The majority of the antidotes are prepared from freshly collected plant material – frequently leaves. Though knowledge of snake bite conditions etiological perceptions of the ethnic groups is similar, field ethnobotanical data suggests that plant species used by the two ethnic groups are independently derived. Antivenin medicinal plants effectively illustrate the cultural context of medicine. Randomness or the use of a variety of species in different families appears to be a feature of traditional snake bite treatments. A high degree of informant consensus for the species was observed. The study indicates rural Kenya inhabitants rely on medicinal plants for healthcare.

  17. A database for medicinal and aromatic plants of JK (Jammu and Kashmir) in India

    OpenAIRE

    Masood, Akbar; Shafi, Mujtaba

    2005-01-01

    High throughput screening of small molecules for a given drug target is achieved using plant materials of medicinal value. Therefore, it is important to document the availability and location of such medicinal plants in the form of a database. Here, we describe a web database containing information (botanical name, common name, local name, botany, chemistry, folklore medicinal use and medicinal uses) about the medicinal and aromatic plants available i...

  18. A SHORT REVIEW ON UN-EXPLORED MEDICINAL PLANT: ECBOLIUM VIRIDIE

    OpenAIRE

    Elumalai, A.; Chinna Eswaraiah, M.; Lakshmi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Medicinal plants are the nature’s gift to human being to make disease free healthy life. It plays a vital role to preserve our health. In our country more than 2000 medicinal plants are recognized. Ecbolium viridie (Acanthaceae) is one of the important medicinal plant in India and Malaysia. Some of its medicinal uses have been mentioned in traditional system of medicine such as ayurveda, siddha and unani. This review attempts to encompass the available literature of Ecbolium viridie with re...

  19. In vitro mutation breeding in medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate radiosensitivity of in vitro cell, callus of Carthamus tincrorius L. was irradiated with gamma rays. Radiosensitivity of callus was intermediate between that of dormant seed and growing seedling. The effect of irradiation dose rate was observed. Irradiation effect varied due to preculture period in each culture. Depression of growth by irradiation was recoverd in the second subculture after irradiation. Berberine content was investigated in culture of Coptis japonica Makino. Embryoids derived from leaf blade shows higher concentration than those derived from leaf petiole and basal end of flower bud. Irradiation to enbryoid caused decrease of its content on the average, but some irradiated embryoids showed high content of berberine. In Datura alba Nees and C. Japonica Makino, regenerated plants were obtained. The number of regenerated plants depended on tissues from which callus was derived and on line of material plants. It is suggested from this experiment that choice of genotype which shows a high frequency of plant regeneration and of condition of mutagenic treatment which induce mutants at highest efficiency as possible were important for breeding efficacy. (author)

  20. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF FEW SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash G. K

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts of leaves of Ageratum conyzoides Linn (Fam: Asteraceae, Argemone mexicana Linn. (Fam: Papaveraceae, Heliotropium indicum Linn (Fam: Boraginaceae and stem barks of Alstonia scholaris (L. R. Brown (Fam: Apocynaceae were screened for their antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Stapphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger respectively. The results indicated that the chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts of all tested plant materials are active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria at the tested concentration. The spectrum of activity observed in the present study may be an indicative of the presence of broad spectrum antimicroial compounds in the extracts. Among the tested extracts, methanol extracts of all selected plant materials were found to be more effective than the other extracts under study. Preliminary phytochmical screening of the methanol extracts of selected plant materials primarily revealed presence of alkaloids, tannins and flavonoids. The present work justifies the use of these plant materials for antimicrobial activity as claimed in the folklore remedies.

  1. Cryopreservation of medicinal plants: role of melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many useful plant species found in Canada are of conservation concern. In vitro storage and cryopreservation techniques guarantees safety of these species and have potential applications which may result in sustainable agriculture. Shoot tips of in vitro-grown plantlets of American elm, St John’s Wo...

  2. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS AGAINST FISH PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Madhuri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present article elucidates on the antimicrobial (antibacterial and antifungal activity of some medicinal plants (herbs against different microbes (e.g., bacteria and fungi. Aquaculture has been a growing activity for more than 20 years worldwide. The bacterial infections are considered the major cause of mortality in aquaculture. Among the common fish pathogenic bacteria, Streptococcus agalactiae, Lactococcus garvieae, Enterococcus faecalis (all gram-positive, Aeromonas hydrophila and Yersinia ruckeri (both gram-negative cause infectious diseases. A. hydrophila, the most common bacterial pathogen in freshwater fish, has been recognized to be the aetiological agent of many pathological conditions, including tail rot, motile Aeromonas septicemia and epizootic ulcerative syndrome as a primary pathogen. The continuous use of antimicrobial agents in aquaculture has resulted into resistant bacterial strains in the aquatic environment. Treatment of bacterial diseases with different herbs has been safely used in organic agriculture, veterinary and human medicine. Treatment with medicinal plants having antibacterial activity is a potentially beneficial alternative in the aquaculture. These herbs mitigate many of the side effects which are associated with synthetic antimicrobials. Additionally, the plant-derived phytomedicines provide a cheaper source for treatment and greater accuracy than chemotherapeutic agents. Plants have been used as traditional medicine since time immemorial to control bacterial, viral and fungal diseases. In India, 500 medicinal plant species are used against pathogenic bacteria. Recently, research has been initiated to evaluate the feasibility of herbal drugs in fish diseases. Because of the growing bacterial resistance against commercial standard and reserve antibiotics, the search for new active substances with antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria is of increasing importance.

  3. PLANTS USED IN FOLK MEDICINE BY THE KOTAS OF NILGIRI DISTRICT, TAMIL NADU

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, S.; Sethuraman, M.

    1991-01-01

    The present report deals with 34 plants of ethno botanical significance used s food and medicine by the Kotas of Nilgiri District, Tamil Nadu. Dietary and medicinal applications of plants re briefly summarized and presented.

  4. Antiviral screening of British Columbian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, A R; Roberts, T E; Gibbons, E; Ellis, S M; Babiuk, L A; Hancock, R E; Towers, G H

    1995-12-01

    One hundred methanolic plant extracts were screened for antiviral activity against seven viruses. Twelve extracts were found to have antiviral activity at the non-cytotoxic concentrations tested. The extracts of Rosa nutkana and Amelanchier alnifolia, both members of the Rosaceae, were very active against an enteric coronavirus. A root extract of another member of the Rosaceae, Potentilla arguta, completely inhibited respiratory syncytial virus. A Sambucus racemosa branch tip extract was also very active against respiratory syncytial virus while the inner bark extract of Oplopanax horridus partially inhibited this virus. An extract of Ipomopsis aggregata demonstrated very good activity against parainfluenza virus type 3. A Lomatium dissectum root extract completely inhibited the cytopathic effects of rotavirus. In addition to these, extracts prepared from the following plants exhibited antiviral activity against herpesvirus type 1: Cardamine angulata, Conocephalum conicum, Lysichiton americanum, Polypodium glycyrrhiza and Verbascum thapsus. PMID:8847882

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Turkish Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    B. Dulger; A. Gonuz

    2004-01-01

    In this study, antimicrobial activity of Rhododendron ponticum L., Prunus laurocerasus L., Agrimonia eupatoria L., Cornus mas L., Vitis vinifera L., Punica granatum L., Anthemis cotula L., Cichorium intybus L., Viscum album L., Papaver hybridum L., Malva rotundifolia L. and Rhus coriaria L. were investigated. The ethanolic extracts of these plants were tested against Escherichia coli ATCC 11230, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P, Klebsiella pneumoniae UC57, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, P...

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Turkish Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dulger

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, antimicrobial activity of Rhododendron ponticum L., Prunus laurocerasus L., Agrimonia eupatoria L., Cornus mas L., Vitis vinifera L., Punica granatum L., Anthemis cotula L., Cichorium intybus L., Viscum album L., Papaver hybridum L., Malva rotundifolia L. and Rhus coriaria L. were investigated. The ethanolic extracts of these plants were tested against Escherichia coli ATCC 11230, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P, Klebsiella pneumoniae UC57, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 8427, Bacillus cereus ATCC 7064, Mycobacterium smegmatis CCM 2067, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 15313, Micrococcus luteus CCM 169, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Rhodotorula rubra DSM 70403 and Kluyveromyces fragilis ATCC 8608 by disc diffusion method. Of the 12 plants tested, nine showed antimicrobial activity. Each plant species has unique against different microorganisms. The fruit extract of Rhus coriaria had the highest antimicrobial effect with an inhibition zone of 12-52 mm against all the bacteria, but not shown antiyeast effect. Except for the extracts of Rhus coriaria, Agrimonia eupatoria and Anthemis cotula, all additional extracts of generated inhibition zones smaller than those generated by several reference antibiotics.

  7. Anti-halitosis plants in Iranian Traditional Medicine

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    Sh. Fahimi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Halitosis is an oral health condition characterized by unpleasant odors emanating constantly from oral cavity. Almost 22-50% of the population experiences such a condition during lifespan and about half of them suffer from personal discomfort and social embarrassment. Based on the literature survey, it seems that the oral cavity is the most important origin of halitosis; therefore, this area could be considered as the best target for the treatment. Halitosis is a well-known disorder in Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM; Avicenna and some other famous Iranian traditional physicians have described this condition in their manuscripts precisely. Herbal therapy was the major treatment suggested by Iranian scholars in which mixtures of medicinal plants were used in the form of mouthwashes and other oral formulations. In the present study, six Iranian ancient medical texts were screened for the herbs with anti-halitosis effects. Subsequent to this study, the medicinal herbs were listed and scored based on the frequency of their repetition. Moreover, the effort has been taken to provide the best scientific name for each plant as well as searching modern studies about their biological effects. In our investigation fourteen plants were obtained as the most frequent herbs for treatment of halitosis in ITM. Previous studies revealed that some of these plants have shown biological activities relating to anti-halitosis effect. The present study introduces some more plants for future studies about anti-halitosis property.

  8. Artemisia herba alba: A Popular Plant with Potential Medicinal Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahmane Moufid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Artemisia herba alba (Asteraceae, commonly known as desert or white wormwood, is used in folk medicine for treatment of various diseases. Phytochemical studies of this plant revealed the existence of many beneficial compounds such as herbalbin, cis-chryanthenyl acetate, flavonoids (hispidulin and cirsilineol, monoterpenes, sesquiterpene. The aerial parts are characterized by a very low degree of toxicity. This study reviews the main reports of the pharmacological and toxicological properties of Artemisia herba alba in addition to the main constituents. It would appear that this plant exhibits many beneficial properties. Further studies are warranted to more integrate this popular plant in human health care system.

  9. Trace elements determination in ginseng and ginkgo biloba medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determinations of trace elements in medicinal plants or in their extracts are of great interest since some elements are components of active constituents or they can affect the plant metabolism and consequently the formation of active constituents. In this work, inorganic components in medicinal drugs, Ginseng e Ginkgo Biloba provided from different laboratories, were analyzed by neutron activation analysis. Elements As, Br, Ca, Cl, Co Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, and Zn, were determined in these samples. Comparisons carried out between the results obtained for samples from different laboratories indicated distinct concentrations for several elements. These results may be attributed to the effect of soil composition and environmental conditions where these plants were cultivated. The precision and accuracy of the results were evaluated by analyzing reference materials Bowen's Kale from IUAPC and Cabbage from IAEA. (author)

  10. Analysis of medicinal plant extracts by neutron activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation has presented the results from analysis of medicinal plant extracts using neutron activation method. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the determination of the elements Al, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc and Zn in medicinal extracts obtained from Achyrolcline satureoides DC, Casearia sylvestris, Centella asiatica, Citrus aurantium L., Solano lycocarpum, Solidago microglossa, Stryphnondedron barbatiman and Zingiber officinale R. plants. The elements Hg and Se were determined using radiochemical separation by means of retention of Se in HMD inorganic exchanger and solvent extraction of Hg by bismuth diethyl-dithiocarbamate solution. Precision and accuracy of the results have been evaluated by analysing reference materials. The therapeutic action of some elements found in plant extracts analyzed was briefly discussed

  11. The Role and Place of Medicinal Plants in the Strategies for Disease Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Sofowora, Abayomi; Ogunbodede, Eyitope; Onayade, Adedeji

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants have been used in healthcare since time immemorial. Studies have been carried out globally to verify their efficacy and some of the findings have led to the production of plant-based medicines. The global market value of medicinal plant products exceeds $100 billion per annum. This paper discusses the role, contributions and usefulness of medicinal plants in tackling the diseases of public health importance, with particular emphasis on the current strategic approaches to dise...

  12. Medicinal plants and Alzheimer's disease: from ethnobotany to phytotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, E K; Pickering, A T; Wang, W W; Houghton, P J; Perry, N S

    1999-05-01

    The use of complementary medicines, such as plant extracts, in dementia therapy varies according to the different cultural traditions. In orthodox Western medicine, contrasting with that in China and the Far East for example, pharmacological properties of traditional cognitive- or memory-enhancing plants have not been widely investigated in the context of current models of Alzheimer's disease. An exception is Gingko biloba in which the gingkolides have antioxidant, neuroprotective and cholinergic activities relevant to Alzheimer's disease mechanisms. The therapeutic efficacy of Ginkgo extracts in Alzheimer's disease in placebo controlled clinical trials is reportedly similar to currently prescribed drugs such as tacrine or donepezil and, importantly, undesirable side effects of Gingko are minimal. Old European reference books, such as those on medicinal herbs, document a variety of other plants such as Salvia officinalis (sage) and Melissa officinalis (balm) with memory-improving properties, and cholinergic activities have recently been identified in extracts of these plants. Precedents for modern discovery of clinically relevant pharmacological activity in plants with long-established medicinal use include, for example, the interaction of alkaloid opioids in Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) with endogenous opiate receptors in the brain. With recent major advances in understanding the neurobiology of Alzheimer's disease, and as yet limited efficacy of so-called rationally designed therapies, it may be timely to re-explore historical archives for new directions in drug development. This article considers not only the value of an integrative traditional and modern scientific approach to developing new treatments for dementia, but also in the understanding of disease mechanisms. Long before the current biologically-based hypothesis of cholinergic derangement in Alzheimer' s disease emerged, plants now known to contain cholinergic antagonists were recorded for their amnesia- and dementia-inducing properties. PMID:10411211

  13. Medicinal Plants: A Public Resource for Metabolomics and Hypothesis Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Syrkin Wurtele

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Specialized compounds from photosynthetic organisms serve as rich resources for drug development. From aspirin to atropine, plant-derived natural products have had a profound impact on human health. Technological advances provide new opportunities to access these natural products in a metabolic context. Here, we describe a database and platform for storing, visualizing and statistically analyzing metabolomics data from fourteen medicinal plant species. The metabolomes and associated transcriptomes (RNAseq for each plant species, gathered from up to twenty tissue/organ samples that have experienced varied growth conditions and developmental histories, were analyzed in parallel. Three case studies illustrate different ways that the data can be integrally used to generate testable hypotheses concerning the biochemistry, phylogeny and natural product diversity of medicinal plants. Deep metabolomics analysis of Camptotheca acuminata exemplifies how such data can be used to inform metabolic understanding of natural product chemical diversity and begin to formulate hypotheses about their biogenesis. Metabolomics data from Prunella vulgaris, a species that contains a wide range of antioxidant, antiviral, tumoricidal and anti-inflammatory constituents, provide a case study of obtaining biosystematic and developmental fingerprint information from metabolite accumulation data in a little studied species. Digitalis purpurea, well known as a source of cardiac glycosides, is used to illustrate how integrating metabolomics and transcriptomics data can lead to identification of candidate genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes in the cardiac glycoside pathway. Medicinal Plant Metabolomics Resource (MPM [1] provides a framework for generating experimentally testable hypotheses about the metabolic networks that lead to the generation of specialized compounds, identifying genes that control their biosynthesis and establishing a basis for modeling metabolism in less studied species. The database is publicly available and can be used by researchers in medicine and plant biology.

  14. Turkish folk medicinal plants, X: Ürgüp (Nev ? ehir

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    ?smail ?enkarde?

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was made to reveal the folk medicinal plants used traditionally inÜrgüp (Nev?ehir. During the research all the settlement centers (total 24, including 20 vil-lages visited and the field works have been done between June 2009 - June 2010, in may,june and july, lasting for 32 days in total. The specimens of the plants used as folk remedieshave been collected and the information such as local names, plant part(s used, therapeuticeffects, diseases and ailments treated, method of preparation and administration, dosage,duration of the treatment have been recorded. The collected plant specimens are kept in theHerbarium of the Faculty of Pharmacy, Marmara University (MARE. As a result of identifica-tion of 116 plant specimens, 67 species used as a traditional folk medicine, have been deter-mined. Among them 52 species are wild and 15 species are cultivated plants. These plantsand their local usages in treatment are presented in the text. The plants recorded in Ürgüpare mostly used for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cough, wound, asthma, stomachdiseases and high cholesterol.

  15. PHARMACOGNOSTIC AND PHARMACOLOGICAL PROFILE OF TRADITIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT: MYRICA NAGI

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    Ashok Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Myrica nagi belongs to myricaceae family. It is commonly known as Bay berry (English and Kathphal (Hindi. Myrica nagi has a long history of usage in traditional medicine against various ailments. In Ayurvedic and other traditional medicinal practices the plant has been used against diseases like, fever, Cardiac debility, typhoid, diarrhoea, dysentery. Phytochemicals like glycosides, saponins tannins, flavonoids, triterpenes and sterols have been isolated. Important pharmacological activities such as hepatoprotective, antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, antihelmintic, antiinflammatory and antiasthmatic properties were shown by researchers. This review presents a detailed survey of the literature on various traditional uses, phytochemical and pharmacological properties of Myrica nagi.

  16. Medicinal plants for the treatment of “nervios”, anxiety, and depression in Mexican Traditional Medicine

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    S. Laura, Guzmán Gutiérrez; Ricardo, Reyes Chilpa; Herlinda, Bonilla Jaime.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The term “nervios” is referred as a folk illness recognized by Mexican Traditional Medicine, and also widely reported across many countries in Latin America. “Nervios” are characterized by a “state of bodily and mental unrest”, which decreases the ability to achieve daily goals. The causes are varie [...] d; in fact, any situation that alters the emotional state or mood is interpreted as a possible triggering agent. Depression and anxiety are psychiatric disorders, which share symptoms, or can be included in the same group of disorders with “nervios”. The therapies are designed to reassure health, i.e. “calm the nerves”. For this propose, the oral administration of plants infusions is common. In this review we compile information regarding the plants used for the treatment of “nervios” in México, along with those for which reports of anxiolytic or/and antidepressive activity exist. We found 92 plant species used in folk medicine for the treatment of “nervios”, among these, sixteen have been studied experimentally. The most studied plant is Galphimia glauca Cav., Malpighiaceae, which current clinical studies have validated its efficacy in patients, and their active components, the triterpenes galphimine A, B, and C, identified. Interestingly only nine plants were found to be reported in folk medicine for the treatment of sadness or/and depression, but their antidepressant activity has not been investigated. However, among the plants used in folk medicine for treatment of “nervios”, several, as Litsea glaucescens Kunth, Lauraceae, have been proven to show antidepressant activity in experimental models, and some of their active compounds have been determined. These species could be a potential source of compounds with activity in the central nervous system.

  17. A review of medicinal plants that modulate nitric oxide activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Spelman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of nitric oxide (NO may offer novel approaches in the treatment of a variety of diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. A strategy in the modulation of NO expression may be through the use of herbal medicines. We surveyed medicinal plant research that utilized multicomponent extracts similar to what is used in clinical phytotherapy or in commerce, for demonstrated effects on NO activity. SciFinder Scholar, Pubmed, Web of Science, and BIOSIS were searched to identify human, animal, in vivo, ex vivo or in vitro research on botanical medicines, in whole or standardized form, that act on nitric oxide activity. iNOS was the most frequently investigated enzyme system and this system was up-regulated by many plant extracts, including, Chicorium intybus, Cocos nucifera, Echinacea purpurea, Euonymus alatus, Ixeris dentate, Oldenlandia diffusa, Rhinacanthus nasutus, and Sida cordifolia. Many plant extracts down-regulated iNOS, including Centella asiatica, Dichroa Febrifuga, Echinacea purpurea, Evolvulus alsinoides, Fagonia cretica, Ginkgo biloba, Mollugo verticillata, Lactuca indica, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Pueraria thunbergiana, and Taraxacum officinale. The eNOS system was stimulated by Eucommia ulmoides, Sida cordifolia, and Thymus pulegioides while Fagonia cretica, Rubia cordifolia and Tinospora cordifolia down-regulated nNOS. Given the activity demonstrated by many of these herbal medicines, the increasing awareness of the effects of nitric oxide on a wide variety of disease processes and the growing incidence of these conditions in the population, further study of medicinal plants on nitric oxide signaling may lead to novel therapies and further insight into human physiology.

  18. Oral hypoglycaemic activity of some medicinal plants of Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunanayake, E H; Welihinda, J; Sirimanne, S R; Sinnadorai, G

    1984-07-01

    Investigations were carried out to evaluate the oral hypoglycaemic activity of some Sri Lankan medicinal plants. Approximately 40 plants available locally are reputed to have oral hypoglycaemic activity. Of these, the mostly widely used are (a) Salacia reticulata (Celastraceae) (b) Aegle marmelos (Rutaceae) and (c) Momordica charantia (Cucurbitaceae). Aqueous decoctions of these plants were investigated for their ability to lower the fasting blood glucose level and improve the glucose tolerance in laboratory animals. The results indicate that the aqueous decoctions of all three plants possess significant hypoglycaemic effect. The magnitude of this effect showed time related variation with the three plants. The highest oral hypoglycaemic activity and the maximum improvement of the oral glucose tolerance were associated with the extract of Momordica charantia while the least but significant effects were shown by Salacia reticulata. PMID:6492834

  19. Antimicrobial activity of selected South African medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Trine R H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nearly 3,000 plant species are used as medicines in South Africa, with approximately 350 species forming the most commonly traded and used medicinal plants. In the present study, twelve South African medicinal plants were selected and tested for their antimicrobial activities against eight microbial species belonging to fungi, Mycobacteria, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods The radiometric respiratory technique using the BACTEC 460 system was used for susceptibility testing against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the liquid micro-broth dilution was used for other antimicrobial assays. Results The results of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC determinations indicated that the methanol extracts from Acacia karoo, Erythrophleum lasianthum and Salvia africana were able to prevent the growth of all the tested microorganisms. All other samples showed selective activities. MIC values below 100??g/ml were recorded with A. karoo, C. dentate, E. lasianthum, P. obligun and S. africana on at least one of the nine tested microorganisms. The best activity (MIC value of 39.06??g/ml was noted with S. africana against E. coli, S. aureus and M. audouinii, and Knowltonia vesitoria against M. tuberculosis. Conclusion The overall results of the present work provide baseline information for the possible use of the studied South African plant extracts in the treatment of microbial infections.

  20. Medicinal plants, human health and biodiversity: a broad review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Tuhinadri; Samanta, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity contributes significantly towards human livelihood and development and thus plays a predominant role in the well being of the global population. According to WHO reports, around 80 % of the global population still relies on botanical drugs; today several medicines owe their origin to medicinal plants. Natural substances have long served as sources of therapeutic drugs, where drugs including digitalis (from foxglove), ergotamine (from contaminated rye), quinine (from cinchona), and salicylates (willow bark) can be cited as some classical examples.Drug discovery from natural sources involve a multifaceted approach combining botanical, phytochemical, biological, and molecular techniques. Accordingly, medicinal-plant-based drug discovery still remains an important area, hitherto unexplored, where a systematic search may definitely provide important leads against various pharmacological targets.Ironically, the potential benefits of plant-based medicines have led to unscientific exploitation of the natural resources, a phenomenon that is being observed globally. This decline in biodiversity is largely the result of the rise in the global population, rapid and sometimes unplanned industrialization, indiscriminate deforestation, overexploitation of natural resources, pollution, and finally global climate change.Therefore, it is of utmost importance that plant biodiversity be preserved, to provide future structural diversity and lead compounds for the sustainable development of human civilization at large. This becomes even more important for developing nations, where well-planned bioprospecting coupled with nondestructive commercialization could help in the conservation of biodiversity, ultimately benefiting mankind in the long run.Based on these findings, the present review is an attempt to update our knowledge about the diverse therapeutic application of different plant products against various pharmacological targets including cancer, human brain, cardiovascular function, microbial infection, inflammation, pain, and many more. PMID:25001990

  1. Screening and antibacterial activity analysis of some important medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Senthilmurugan Viji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The screening and study of five different plant specimens belonging to different families for phytochemical constituents was performed using generally accepted laboratory technique for qualitative determinations. The constituents screened were saponins, combined anthraquinones, terpenoids, flavonoids, carotenoids, steroids, xantho proteins, couramins, alkaloids, quinones, vitamin C. The distribution of these constituents in the plant specimens were assessed and compared. The medicinal plant studied were Acalypha indica, Camellia sinensis, Plectranthus amboinicus, Curcuma longa, Rauvolfia tetraphylla. All the plant speciemens were found to contain terpenoids, xantho proteins, couramins and vitamin C. They also contain Saponins (except Curcuma longa, Combined anthroquinones (except Acalypha indica, Camellia sinensis, Curcuma longa flavonoids (except Acalypha indica, Camellia sinensis, Carotenoids (except Acalypha indica, Curcuma longa, and steroids (except Plectranthus amboinicus, Rauvolfia tetraphylla Quinones were found in one out of the five specimens. Some of the medicinal plant seemed to have potential as source of useful drugs. Though the one percent extracts of all the plants showed some degree of antimicrobial activity, it was significant in Acalypha indica, Camellia sinensis, Plectranthus amboinicus, Curcuma longa, and Rauvolfia tetraphylla. The extract of Camellia sinensis and Acalypha indica was most effective against Enterobacter faecalis (ZI = 3 cm and ZI = 1.7cm and Camellia sinensis and Acalypha indica was most effective against Staphylococcus aureus (ZI = 2.1 cm.

  2. Quantification of gallic acidin fruits of three medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazirian, Mahdi; Khanavi, Mahnaz; Amanzadeh, Yaghoub; Hajimehdipoor, Homa

    2011-01-01

    Triphala is a traditional herbal formulation consisting of dried fruits originating from three medicinal plants, namely Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica and Phyllanthus emblica. It is used in folk medicine for the treatment of headaches, dyspepsia and leucorrhoea. There are some reports regarding Triphala's pharmacological effects including its anti-cancer, radioprotective, hypocholesterolaemic, hepatoprotective and anti-oxidant activities. The most important components of these plants are the tannins and gallic acid which they contain. Gallic acid being a compound with tannin structure existing in the Triphala fruit. In this research, the gallic acid content contained in the three plants constituting Triphala was determined. Plant fruits were purchased from available Iranian markets. Milled and powdered fruits from each plant were extracted with 70% acetone and subjected to a reaction with rhodanine reagent in the process forming a colored complex. The complex's absorbance was measured at 520 nm and the amount of gallic acid was determined using its calibration curve. According to the results, the highest amount of gallic acid was observed in Phyllanthus embelica (1.79-2.18%) and the lowest amount was found in Terminalia chebula (0.28-0.80%). Moreover, differences between plant samples from different markets places were found to be statistically significant (p Triphala storage. In general, the rhodanine assay is a simple, rapid and reproducible method for the standardization of Triphala as gallic acid. PMID:24250348

  3. Plant Secondary Metabolites in some Medicinal Plants of Mongolia Used for Enhancing Animal Health and Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makkar, HPS.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels and activities of a number of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs are known to increase in response to increase in stress. The Mongolian plants considered to possess medicinal properties may contain novel compounds since they are exposed to severe conditions; such plants could become good candidates for modern drug discovery programmes. Information on distribution, palatability to livestock and opinion of local people on their nutritive and medicinal values was compiled for 15 plant materials from 14 plant species considered important for medicinal purposes. These plants were evaluated for nutritive value and PSMs: tannins, saponins, lectins, alkaloids and cyanogens. High levels of tannins were found in roots of Bergenia crassifolia and in leaves of B. crassifolia, Vaccinium vitisidaea and Rheum undulatum. High lectin activity (haemagglutination was present in B. crassifolia roots, and leaves of R. undulatum, Iris lacteal and Thymus gobicus contained weak lectin activity. Tanacetum vulgare, Serratula centauroids, Taraxacum officinale and Delphinum elatum leaves contained saponin activity (haemolysis. Alkaloids and cyanogens were not present in any of the samples. The paper discusses the known medicinal uses of these plants in light of the PSMs levels, and identifies plant samples for future applications in human and livestock health, welfare and safety.

  4. Antiangiogenic Activity and Pharmacogenomics of Medicinal Plants from Traditional Korean Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ean-Jeong; Kuete, Victor; Krusche, Benjamin; Schröder, Sven; Greten, Henry Johannes; Arend, Joachim; Lee, Ik-Soo; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Aim. In the present study, we investigated the antiangiogenic properties of 59 plants used in traditional Korean medicine. Selected phytochemicals were investigated in more detail for their modes of action. Methods. A modified chicken-chorioallantoic-membrane (CAM) assay using quail eggs was applied to test for antiangiogenic effects of plant extracts. A molecular docking in silico approached the binding of plant constituents to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (VEGFR1, VEGFR2). Microarray-based mRNA expression profiling was employed to correlate the 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) of a panel of 60 NCI cell lines to these phytochemicals. Results. Extracts from Acer mono leaves, Reynoutria sachalniensis fruits, Cinnamomum japonicum stems, Eurya japonica leaves, Adenophora racemosa whole plant, Caryopteris incana leaves-stems, and Schisandra chinensis stems inhibited angiogenesis more than 50% in quail eggs. Selected phytochemicals from Korean plants were analyzed in more detail using microarray-based mRNA expression profiles and molecular docking to VEGFR1 and VEGFR2. These results indicate multifactorial modes of action of these natural products. Conclusion. The antiangiogenic activity of plants used in traditional Korean medicine implicates their possible application for diseases where inhibition of blood vessel formation is desired, for example, cancer, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and others. PMID:23970927

  5. Antioxidant Potential Some Medicinal Plants of Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Dixit

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular damage or oxidative injury arising from free radicals or reactive oxygen species (ROS now appears the fun-damental mechanism underlying a number of human neurodegenerative disorder, diabetes, inflammation, viral infec-tions, autoimmune pathologies and digestive system disorders. Free radicals are generated through normal metabolism of drugs, environmental chemicals and other xenobiotics as well as endogenous chemicals, especially stress hormones (adrenalin and noradrenalin. Accumulated evidence suggests that ROS can be scavenged through chemoprevention utilizing natural antioxidant compounds present in foods and medicinal plants. In this review, research on the antioxi-dant potential of some medicinal plants of origin of Central India is considered.4CdBw3

  6. Medicinal and Aromatic Plants for Enhancing Farm Income: The Case of Bihar

    OpenAIRE

    K. M. Singh; KUMAR, Abhay; Singh, R.K.P.; Kumar, Ujjwal

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs) provide opportunities for developing a variety of safe and cost effective, prophylactic, and curative medicines for a number of maladies. It is estimated that the primary health care of over 80 per cent of the world’s population still depends on plant based traditional medicines (WHO, 2002). Growing consciousness about health and side effects of modern medicines has again set the stage for innovation and use of herbal medicines. Evidence shows that the t...

  7. MASS MULTIPLICATION OF THE INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANT Tylophora Indica (Burm.f.) Merr

    OpenAIRE

    Dhandapani, R.; Balu, S.

    2002-01-01

    Tylophora indica (Burm.f) Merr. (ASCLEPIDACEAE) is an important Indian medicinal plant. It is called “ASTHMA KODI” OR “NANJARUPPAN” IN Tamil in the Siddha system of medicine. Tamil medical literature reveal that it is an ideal plant medicine for respiratory problems and is also a cardiac tonic. For medicinal purposes it is collected only from the wild. It has not yet been brought under cultivation. Its taxonomy, morphology, ecology and medicinal uses were studied. Since, tissue-cultur...

  8. Evaluation of three medicinal plants for anti-microbial activity

    OpenAIRE

    Pratap, Gowd M. J. S; Manoj, Kumar M. G.; Sai, Shankar A. J.; B Sujatha; Sreedevi, E.

    2012-01-01

    Herbal remedies have a long history of use for gum and tooth problems such as dental caries. The present microbiological study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of three medicinal plants (Terminalia chebula Retz., Clitoria ternatea Linn., and Wedelia chinensis (Osbeck.) Merr.) on three pathogenic microorganisms in the oral cavity (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Staphylococcus aureus). Aqueous extract concentrations (5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%) were prepared fro...

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants from Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Koshy Philip; Malek, Sri N. A.; Wirakarnain Sani; Shin, Sim K.; Saravana Kumar; Lai, Hong S.; Serm, Lee G.; Rahman, Syarifah N. S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: About 32 extracts from eight selected medicinal plants, namely Pereskia bleo, Pereskia grandifolia, Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb., Curcuma zedoria, Curcuma mangga, Curcuma inodora aff. Blatter, Zingiber officinale var. officinale (jahe gajah) and Zingiber officinale var. rubrum (jahe emprit) used by Malaysia traditional health care systems were screened for their antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria using agar disc diffusion assay...

  10. solation and Identification of Fungi from Spices and Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Farid M. Toma; Nareen Q. Faqi Abdulla

    2013-01-01

    This investigation was designed to throw light on the microbial status of some crude herbal materials. A total of 16 samples, representing different types of spices and medicinal plants were collected from common market in the Erbil city. Ten different fungal genera and 16 species were isolated and identified as Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus spp., Gliocladium sp., Hyalodendron diddeus, Memmoniella sp., Penicillium spp., Rhizopus spp., Syncephalastrum sp., Cladosporium lignicolum and Ulocl...

  11. Micropropagation of an antidiabetic medicinal plant, Artemisia pallens

    OpenAIRE

    Nathar, Varsha Nitin; Yatoo, Ghulam Mohiuddin

    2014-01-01

    Artemisia pallens Wall. is an important aromatic medicinal plant used as a folk remedy for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The present study was initiated to explore in vitro propagation of Artemisia pallens using different explants on Murashige and Skoog (MS) media supplemented with varying concentrations and combinations of growth regulators. Highest callogenic response (100%) was shown by shoot tip explants with 2 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. The highest number of shoots (14.25...

  12. Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Some Nigerian Medicinal Plant Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Sofidiya, M. O.; Odukoya, O. A.; Familoni, O. B.; Inya-agha, S. I.

    2006-01-01

    The present research evaluates the DPPH radical scavenging, total antioxidant activities, reducing power and total contents of phenolic compounds in methanolic leaf extracts of five Nigerian medicinal plants (Dalbergia saxatilis Hook.f. (Papilionacae), Ekebergia senegalensis A.Juss.(Meliaceae), Hymenocardia acida Tul. (Hymenocardiaceae), Icacina tricantha Oliv. (Icacinaceae) and Salacia pallescens Oliv.(Celastraceae). Total phenols were analysed according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Each s...

  13. Antiviral Activity of Some Plants Used in Nepalese Traditional Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Hipper, M.; Karmacharya, N.; Gewali, M. B.; Bhattarai, S.; Chaudhary, R. P.; Jha, P. K.; Rajbhandari, M.; Mentel, R.; Lindequist, U.

    2007-01-01

    Methanolic extracts of 41 plant species belonging to 27 families used in the traditional medicine in Nepal have been investigated for in vitro antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza virus A by dye uptake assay in the systems HSV-1/Vero cells and influenza virus A/MDCK cells. The extracts of Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata, Cassiope fastigiata and Thymus linearis showed potent anti-herpes viral activity. The extracts of Allium oreoprasum, Androsace str...

  14. THE MEDICINAL PLANTS OF PANGI REGION OF WESTERN HIMALAYAS

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavi Sharma,

    2014-01-01

    Pangi valley probably the most remote area of Himachal Pradesh, lying in between Pir Panjal ranges of Himachal Pradesh and Zanskar ranges of J&K. This rugged, semiarid subdivision of Chamba district of Himachal Pradesh is a transition zone between Himalayas and Trans-Himalayas , thus a home to the most diverse flora of the western Himalayas. So a preliminary study was planned to document the medicinal plants and their local uses.

  15. THE MEDICINAL PLANTS OF PANGI REGION OF WESTERN HIMALAYAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Sharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pangi valley probably the most remote area of Himachal Pradesh, lying in between Pir Panjal ranges of Himachal Pradesh and Zanskar ranges of J&K. This rugged, semiarid subdivision of Chamba district of Himachal Pradesh is a transition zone between Himalayas and Trans-Himalayas , thus a home to the most diverse flora of the western Himalayas. So a preliminary study was planned to document the medicinal plants and their local uses.

  16. An Overview on Traditional Medicinal Plants as Aphrodisiac Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Ramandeep Singh; Sarabjeet Singh; G. Jeyabalan; Ashraf Ali

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a review of plants identified from various ethno botanical surveys and folklore medicinal survey with aphrodisiac activity. An aphrodisiac is defined as an agent that arouses sexual desire. Erectile dysfunction (ED) or male impotence is defined as the inability of a man to achieve and maintain an erection sufficient for mutually satisfactory intercourse with his partner. Sexual health and function are important determinants of quality of life. To overcome the problem of Ma...

  17. HISTOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATION OF TWO MEDICINAL PLANTS IN MAHARASHTRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V B Kadam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The histochemical studies of leaves and wood of Butea monosperma ­Lam and Madhuca indica Gmel. are medicinal important plants in Maharashtra. For histochemical studies the free hand sections of leaves and wood were taken and treated with the respective reagent in localize components, viz. starch, protein, tannin, saponin, fat, glucosides and alkaloids in the tissues. Key words: Histochemistry, starch, protein, tannin, saponin, fat, glucosides and alkaloids

  18. HISTOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATION OF TWO MEDICINAL PLANTS IN MAHARASHTRA

    OpenAIRE

    Kadam, V. B.; Tambe, S. S.; Fatima Sumia; Momin, R. K.

    2013-01-01

    The histochemical studies of leaves and wood of Butea monosperma ­Lam and Madhuca indica Gmel. are medicinal important plants in Maharashtra. For histochemical studies the free hand sections of leaves and wood were taken and treated with the respective reagent in localize components, viz. starch, protein, tannin, saponin, fat, glucosides and alkaloids in the tissues. Key words: Histochemistry, starch, protein, tannin, saponin, fat, glucosides and alkaloids

  19. Studies on bioactive components from Chinese medicinal plants

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ren-Sheng, Xu; Zong-Jian, Tang; Sheng-Chu, Feng; Yi-Ping, Yang; Wen-Han, Lin; Qiong-Xing, Zhong; Yi, Zhong.

    Full Text Available Several novel bioactive components isolated from Chinese medicinal plants will be presented. These include novel maytansinoid tumor, inhibitors, some new ent-kaurane and rosane diterpenoids from Mallotus anomalus Meer et Chun (Euphorbiaceae), as well asnovel insecticide, stemona alkaloids from Stemo [...] na parviflora C. H. Wright (Stemonaceae). Both are native plants of Hainan island, Chine. 2D NMR techniques such as mono and hetero-COSY, NOESY, COLOC as well as H-NMR line broadening effect were utilized for structure elucidation. The separation techniques, struture elucidations and bioassay results will be reported.

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants Against Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhia Hassawi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Four extract amounts (200, 150, 100 and 50 mg mL-1 from twelve medicinal plant species that belong to six genera (Achillea, Salvia, Convolvulus, Plantago, Anthemis and Artemisia were tested against Candida albicans. The antimicrobial activity was carried out by using the hole-plate diffusion method. The effect of plant species, extract amounts and their interaction were highly significant. Achillea santolina, Salvia dominica and Salvia officinalis inhibited the growth of Candida albicans at all tested extract amounts. The extracts of (Salvia spinosa, Convolvulus althaeoides and Plantago lanceolata showed no activity against Candida albicans.

  1. Medicinal Plants, Containing Cardiac Glycosides and Their Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Ahmetzhanova

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors consider bioecological peculiarities of some species of medicinal plants, containing cardiac glycosides and their distribution. The paper presents the tables, which contain data of the quantitative content of the amount of cardiac glycosides in the aerial and underground parts of some species of the Cruciferous, Buttercups, etc. in different ecological conditions. The article also introduces the specie of foxglove from the family of figwort, which defines the quantitative content of cardiac glycosides, as the leaves of these plants are a source of raw materials, producing cardiac glycosides.

  2. Medicinal plants with teratogenic potential: current considerations

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Kassiane Cristine da Silva, Costa; Suzana Barbosa, Bezerra; Clevanice Moreira, Norte; Luciana Macatrão Nogueira, Nunes; Tiago Moreira de, Olinda.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho busca as implicações atuais sobre o uso de plantas medicinais durante a gravidez, alertando sobre aquelas que devem ser evitadas nesse período por serem potencialmente abortivas e/ou teratogênicas. Para tanto, foram realizadas buscas nas bases de dados Sciencedirect, Scielo e Google sc [...] holar, adotando-se como critérios de inclusão capítulos de livros e/ou artigos completos (com abstract) e disponíveis, em português, inglês ou espanhol, publicados de 1996 a 2011. Após uma pré-seleção de 83 artigos, 49 bibliografias foram utilizadas na confecção final do artigo, sendo 25 provenientes da base de dados Scielo, 18 do Sciencedirect e 06 do Google scholar. A partir dos artigos estudados, identificaram-se as quatro plantas mais utilizadas como emenagogas/abortivas por pacientes do Serviço de Pré-Natal do SUS: senne, arruda, boldo e buchinha-do-norte ou cabacinha. Assim, é possível concluir que, muitas vezes, a população se utiliza da máxima "se é natural, não faz mal" para fazer uso irracional de produtos naturais, sem a correta orientação, acreditando que esses produtos sejam incapazes de provocar qualquer dano. Esse uso é ainda mais preocupante quando realizado por idosos, gestantes e crianças. Em relação à segurança do uso desses produtos, algumas informações e dados confiáveis ainda são escassos ou contraditórios. Abstract in english The aim of this study was to present the implications of the use of herbs during pregnancy, pointing out those that should be avoided during this condition because of their abortifacient and/or teratogenic potential. We carried out searches in the databases ScienceDirect, Scielo and Google Scholar, [...] adopting as criteria for inclusion: book chapters and/or complete articles (with abstract), available in English, Portuguese or Spanish, published from 1996 to in 2011. After a pre-selection of 83 articles, 49 bibliographies were used in the manufacturing end of the article, where 25 were from the Scielo database, 18 from ScienceDirect and 6 from Google Scholar. From the articles studied, we identified the four most commonly used plants as emmenagogue/abortifacient agents by patients of the Department of Prenatal SUS: senne, arruda, boldo and buchinha-do-norte or cabacinha. Thus, we conclude that people often adhere to the maxim "if it's natural, it does no harm" in their rational use of natural products, without the right guidance, believing that these products are safe to use. This usage is even more worrisome among the elderly, pregnant women and children. Regarding the safety of these products, some information and reliable data are scarce or contradictory.

  3. IN VITRO ANTIHELMINTIC ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish H. Bachani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Helminthiasis is infestation with one or more intestinal parasitic worms roundworms, whipworms , or hookworms in humans and animals. Presently, many synthetic drugs are available to treat Helminthiasis infection effectively, but suffer from number of side effects like abdominal pain, dizziness, headache, fever, nausea, vomiting, or temporary hair loss. Moreover, drug resistance is also another factor concerned with the use of these drugs. Thus, Herbal drugs need to be introduced as large number of medicinal plants are known for their antihelmintic activity with fewer or no side effects and are used by the ethnic groups across different parts of the world. But these medicinal plants need to be screened first for their in vitro and in vivo activity before putting them in use. Thus, many of these herbs have been scrutinized for their pharmacological and pre clinical studies. The present article describes review of promising in vitro efficacy of some medicinal plants having antihelmintic activity, which can be helpful in investigation and discovery of novel herbal drugs.

  4. A REVIEW ON THE MEDICINAL PLANT PSIDIUM GUAJAVA LINN. (MYRTACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi Shirur Dakappa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Psidium guajava is an important food crop and medicinal plant available in tropical and subtropical countries, widely used in food and folk medicines around the world. It contains important phytoconstituents such as tannins, triterpenes, flavonoid: quercetin, pentacyclic triterpenoid: guajanoic acid, saponins, carotenoids, lectins, leucocyanidin, ellagic acid, amritoside, beta-sitosterol, uvaol, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid. In view of the immense medicinal importance of the plant, this review is an effort to compile all the information reported on its ethanobotanical, phytochemical and pharmacological activities. The present work attempts to generate interest among the masses regarding its potential in preventing and treating several common diseases. Many pharmacological studies have demonstrated the ability of this plant to exhibit antioxidant, hepatoprotective, anti-allergy, antimicrobial, antigenotoxic, antiplasmodial, cytotoxic, antispasmodic, cardioactive, anticough, antidiabetic, antiinflamatory and antinociceptive activities, supporting its traditional uses. Suggesting a wide range of clinical applications for the treatment of infantile rotaviral enteritis, diarrhoea and diabetes. Key words: ethanobotany, myrtaceae, pharmacology, physicochemical, phytochemical, Psidium guajava

  5. Antimicrobial and toxicological activities of five medicinal plant species from Cameroon Traditional Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Njouendou Abdel J; Asongalem Emmanuel A; Nde Peter F; Njunda Anna L; Nsagha Dickson S; Kamga Henri LF; Assob Jules CN; Sandjon Bertrand; Penlap Veronique B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Infectious diseases caused by multiresistant microbial strains are on the increase. Fighting these diseases with natural products may be more efficacious. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanolic, ethylacetate (EtOAc) and hexanic fractions of five Cameroonian medicinal plants (Piptadeniastum africana, Cissus aralioides, Hileria latifolia, Phyllanthus muellerianus and Gladiolus gregasius) against 10 pathogenic microorganisms...

  6. Designing for development : principles and practices of as sustainable medicinal plant chain in north India

    OpenAIRE

    Kop, P.; Alam, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Indian state of Uttaranchal, located in the Himalayan region, is richly endowed with a large variety of medicinal plant species, many of which have medicinal properties. Due to continued collection and increasing demand by Indian and global pharmaceutical industries, numerous medicinal plant species are threatened with extinction. Recent action research by KIT Royal Tropical Institute and the Centre for Sustainable Development shows that the cultivation of medicinal plants could provide a...

  7. Antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase-inhibitory properties of long-term stored medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Amoo Stephen O; Aremu Adeyemi O; Moyo Mack; van Staden Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Medicinal plants are possible sources for future novel antioxidant compounds in food and pharmaceutical formulations. Recent attention on medicinal plants emanates from their long historical utilisation in folk medicine as well as their prophylactic properties. However, there is a dearth of scientific data on the efficacy and stability of the bioactive chemical constituents in medicinal plants after prolonged storage. This is a frequent problem in African Traditional Medic...

  8. A survey of traditional medicinal plants from the Callejón de Huaylas, Department of Ancash, Perú.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, G B; Fernández, I D; Villegas, L F; Vaisberg, A J

    1998-05-01

    The medicinal uses of local flora from the Callejón de Huaylas, Department of Ancash, northeastern Perú, are reported. This geographical area has an old tradition of herbal healing. A total of 33 species have been documented through interactions with village elders, traditional doctors and herbalists. Of the 33 medicinal plant species surveyed in the Callejón de Huaylas, six have not been previously reported, seven have received only minor phytochemical coverage in the literature, and the medicinal uses of seven other plants have not been corroborated with traditional medicinal reports from around the world. The traditional medicinal uses of six medicinal plants have been corroborated with previously published reports but their biological activities have yet to be confirmed in the laboratory. The medicinal uses of four other plants have been corroborated with previously published reports and their biological activities have been confirmed in the laboratory. The purported medicinal use of three plant species could not be confirmed in the laboratory. PMID:9687078

  9. Mutagenic screening of some commonly used medicinal plants in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintonwa, Alade; Awodele, Olufunsho; Afolayan, Gbenga; Coker, Herbert A B

    2009-09-25

    The uses of medicinal plants have always been part of human culture. The World Health Organization estimates that up to 80% of the world's population relies on traditional medicinal system for some aspect of primary health care. However, there are few reports on the toxicological properties of most medicinal plants especially, their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Therefore, this research is to determine the mutagenic potentials of Morinda lucida [Oruwo (Root)], Azadirachta indica [Dongoyaro (Leaf)], Terapluera tetraptera [Aridan (Fruit)], Plumbago zeylanica [Inabiri (Root)], Xylopia aethiopica [Erunje (Fruit)], Newbouldia laevis [Akoko (Leaf)], Alstonia boonei [Ahun (Bark)], Enantia chlorantha [Awopa (Bark)], and Rauvolfia vomitoria [Asofeyeje (Root)] using the Allium cepa Linn. model and the modified Ames assay. Allium cepa model was used to determine the mean root length, mitotic index and chromosomal aberrations effects of these plants on onion bulbs using 0.1, 1, 5 and 10mg/ml concentration of the plant extracts. The modified Ames test which is a modification of the standard Ames test as described by Ames et al. [Ames, B.N., McCann, J., Yamasaki, E., 1975. Methods for detecting carcinogens and mutagens with the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity test. Mutation Research 31, 347-364] was done using Escherichia coli (0157:H7) that has the phenotypic characteristics of glucose and lactose fermentation, motile, urease negative, indole positive and citrate negative. The results obtained from Allium cepa assay showed increasing root growth inhibition with increased concentration, decreasing mitotic index with increased concentration and chromosomal aberrations. The modified Ames test showed an alteration in the biochemical characteristics of Escherichia coli (0157:H7) for all plants except Rauvolfia vomitoria and Plumbago zeylanica. Three of the medicinal plants altered at least three of the normal biochemical characteristics thus demonstrating mutagenic potentials. The results of internationally accepted Allium cepa were comparable with the modified Ames test. However, a long term in vivo and dose dependent study should be carried out to validate these results and the findings should be communicated to drug and food regulatory body and also to the general public. PMID:19619631

  10. Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used in Arjan – Parishan protected area in Fars Province of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Dolatkhahi, Mehdi; Dolatkhahi, Ali; Nejad, Javad Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Objective : Today, medicinal plants are widely used in remedies for several ailments and improvement of human health because of their pharmaceutical properties. This study aimed to document important useful medicinal plants and their medicinal characteristics for treatment of human ailments in the Arjan _ Parishan protected area in Fars province of Iran during 2010-2012.

  11. Ethnobotanical survey in Canhane village, district of Massingir, Mozambique: medicinal plants and traditional knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares João; Romeiras Maria M; Ribeiro Ana; Faria Maria T

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Medicinal plants are used by 80% of people from developing countries to fulfill their primary health needs, occupying a key position on plant research and medicine. Taking into account that, besides their pharmaceutical importance, these plants contribute greatly to ecosystems' stability, a continuous documentation and preservation of traditional knowledge is a priority. The objective of this study was to organize a database of medicinal plants including their applications...

  12. Ethnopharmacological Survey of Medicinal Plants in Malaysia, the Kangkar Pulai Region

    OpenAIRE

    Aburjai, T.; Kadir, M. R. A.; Sultana, N.; Alsarhan, A.

    2012-01-01

    The medicinal plants play an important role in rural health care system throughout the world in remedying and preventing various kinds of diseases. This study documented the use of plants as traditional herbal medicine in the Kangkar Pulai region Johor, Malaysia. It also identified the homogeneity of informant knowledge on medicinal plants suitable for different ailments and types of plants most favored for the treatment of each ailment in the study. The information was gathered through semi-...

  13. A SURVEY OF IMPORTANT INDIGENOUS MEDICINAL PLANTS OF DISTRICT BHIMBER AZAD JAMMU & KASHMIR, PAKISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    Nazar Hussain; Majid, S. A.; Altaf Hussain, M.; Saleem Abbasi, M.

    2013-01-01

    A survey of medicinal plants was carried out about the traditional knowledge of rural people of District Bhimber and its allied areas. It was established that 96 plant species belonging to 49 families are currently used by common people and traditional plant medicines practitioner. Most medicinal plants grow in the wild (75%), while others are cultivated (25%) with predominant share of herbs (55%), trees (27%) and shrubs (17%). The frequently used species were Justicia adhatoda, Azadirachta i...

  14. Chemometric evaluation of trace elements in Brazilian medicinal plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Paulo S.C. da; Francisconi, Lucilaine S.; Goncalves, Rodolfo D.M.R., E-mail: pscsilva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro do Reator de Pesquisas

    2013-07-01

    The growing interest in herbal medicines has required standardization in order to ensure their safe use, therapeutic efficacy and quality of the products. Despite the vast flora and the extensive use of medicinal plants by the Brazilian population, scientific studies on the subject are still insufficiency In this study, 59 medicinal plans were analyzed for the determination of As, Ba, Br, Ca, Cl, Cs, Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Ta, Th, U, Zn and Zr by neutron activation analysis and Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd and Hg by atomic absorption. The results were analyzed by chemometric methods: correlation analysis, principal component analysis and cluster analysis, in order to verify whether or not there is similarity with respect to their mineral and trace metal contents. Results obtained permitted to classify distinct groups among the analyzed plants and extracts so that these data can be useful in future studies, concerning the therapeutic action the elements here determined may exert. (author)

  15. Chemometric evaluation of trace elements in Brazilian medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing interest in herbal medicines has required standardization in order to ensure their safe use, therapeutic efficacy and quality of the products. Despite the vast flora and the extensive use of medicinal plants by the Brazilian population, scientific studies on the subject are still insufficiency In this study, 59 medicinal plans were analyzed for the determination of As, Ba, Br, Ca, Cl, Cs, Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Ta, Th, U, Zn and Zr by neutron activation analysis and Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd and Hg by atomic absorption. The results were analyzed by chemometric methods: correlation analysis, principal component analysis and cluster analysis, in order to verify whether or not there is similarity with respect to their mineral and trace metal contents. Results obtained permitted to classify distinct groups among the analyzed plants and extracts so that these data can be useful in future studies, concerning the therapeutic action the elements here determined may exert. (author)

  16. Medicinal plants and dementia therapy: herbal hopes for brain aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Elaine; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R

    2011-12-01

    An escalating "epidemic" of diseases like Alzheimer's has not yet been met by effective symptomatic treatments or preventative strategies. Among a few current prescription drugs are cholinesterase inhibitors including galantamine, originating from the snowdrop. Research into ethnobotanicals for memory or cognition has burgeoned in recent years. Based on a multi-faceted review of medicinal plants or phytochemicals, including traditional uses, relevant bioactivities, psychological and clinical evidence on efficacy and safety, this overview focuses on those for which there is promising clinical trial evidence in people with dementia, together with at least one other of these lines of supporting evidence. With respect to cognitive function, such plants reviewed include sage, Ginkgo biloba, and complex mixtures of other traditional remedies. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) challenge carers and lead to institutionalization. Symptoms can be alleviated by some plant species (e.g., lemon balm and lavender alleviate agitation in people with dementia; St John's wort treats depression in the normal population). The ultimate goal of disease prevention is considered from the perspective of limited epidemiological and clinical trial evidence to date. The potential value of numerous plant extracts or chemicals (e.g., curcumin) with neuroprotective but as yet no clinical data are reviewed. Given intense clinical need and carer concerns, which lead to exploration of such alternatives as herbal medicines, the following research priorities are indicated: investigating botanical agents which enhance cognition in populations with mild memory impairment or at earliest disease stages, and those for BPSD in people with dementia at more advanced stages; establishing an ongoing authoritative database on herbal medicine for dementia; and further epidemiological and follow up studies of promising phytopharmaceuticals or related nutraceuticals for disease prevention. PMID:22070157

  17. An Overview on Traditional Medicinal Plants as Aphrodisiac Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramandeep Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of plants identified from various ethno botanical surveys and folklore medicinal survey with aphrodisiac activity. An aphrodisiac is defined as an agent that arouses sexual desire. Erectile dysfunction (ED or male impotence is defined as the inability of a man to achieve and maintain an erection sufficient for mutually satisfactory intercourse with his partner. Sexual health and function are important determinants of quality of life. To overcome the problem of Male sexual (or erectile dysfunction various natural aphrodisiac plants potentials are preferred. This review discuss about aphrodisiac potential of plants, its botanical name, Common name, family, part used and references, which are helpful for researcher to development new herbal aphrodisiac formulations.

  18. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of some Philippine medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichioco-Hernandez, Christine; Wudarski, Jakub; Gevaert, Lieven; Verschaeve, Luc

    2011-04-01

    The genotoxicity and toxicity of ethnomedicinal Philippine plants, which include Cassia fistula, Derris elliptica, Ficus elastica, Gliciridia sepium, Michelia alba, Morus alba, Pogostemon cablin and Ricinus communis, were tested using the Vitotox assay. The plants are used traditionally to treat several disorders like diabetes, weakness, menorrhagia, headache, toothache and rheumatism. The dried leaves were homogenized for overnight soaking in methanol at room temperature. The resulting alcoholic extracts were filtered and concentrated in vacuo and tested for their genotoxicity and cytotoxicity using Vitotox®. Results showed that the medicinal plants that were tested are not genotoxic nor cytotoxic, except for R. communis and P. cablin, which showed toxicity at high doses (low dilutions) in the absence of S9. PMID:21716927

  19. Screening of selected Indian medicinal plants for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinutha, B; Prashanth, D; Salma, K; Sreeja, S L; Pratiti, D; Padmaja, R; Radhika, S; Amit, A; Venkateshwarlu, K; Deepak, M

    2007-01-19

    Seventy-six plant extracts including methanolic and successive water extracts from 37 Indian medicinal plants were investigated for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity (in vitro). Results indicated that methanolic extracts to be more active than water extracts. The potent AChE inhibiting methanolic plant extracts included Withania somnifera (root), Semecarpus anacardium (stem bark), Embelia ribes (Root), Tinospora cordifolia (stem), Ficus religiosa (stem bark) and Nardostachys jatamansi (rhizome). The IC(50) values obtained for these extracts were 33.38, 16.74, 23.04, 38.36, 73.69 and 47.21mug/ml, respectively. These results partly substantiate the traditional use of these herbs for improvement of cognition. PMID:16950584

  20. Appraisal of medicinal plants used in alternative systems of medicines for microbial contamination, physiochemical parameters and heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of herbal products has become a foremost apprehension in public health with their recognition and worldwide market growth and due in part to the widespread assumption that natural implies harmless. The global market of medicinal plants has been growing at a rate of 7-10% annually; capitalizing on the growing awareness of herbal and aromatic plants globally. The present study was conducted to assess the physiochemical parameters, microbial contamination and presence of heavy metals. The 24 medicinal plants were collected from open market places of various cities of Pakistan and tested by employing WHO and AOAC guidelines. Medicinal plants were found polluted with wide variety of potentially pathogenic bacterias. Microbial count and levels of arsenic and mercury in some plants were found elevated. The percentage (%) of physiochemical parameters i.e., foreign organic matter, total ash, acid insoluble ash, alcohol soluble extract, water soluble extract and moisture count of these medicinal plants were found statistically noteworthy. The nonexistence of quality control values for medicinal plants has been one of the key lacunas. Quality assurance system and WHO's guidelines on good agricultural and collection practices be methodically enforced in the medicinal plants supply chain i.e., cultivation, collection and distribution, although it is tricky task. (author)

  1. The role and place of medicinal plants in the strategies for disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofowora, Abayomi; Ogunbodede, Eyitope; Onayade, Adedeji

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants have been used in healthcare since time immemorial. Studies have been carried out globally to verify their efficacy and some of the findings have led to the production of plant-based medicines. The global market value of medicinal plant products exceeds $100 billion per annum. This paper discusses the role, contributions and usefulness of medicinal plants in tackling the diseases of public health importance, with particular emphasis on the current strategic approaches to disease prevention. A comparison is drawn between the 'whole population' and 'high-risk' strategies. The usefulness of the common-factor approach as a method of engaging other health promoters in propagating the ideals of medicinal plants is highlighted. The place of medicinal plants in preventing common diseases is further examined under the five core principles of the Primary Health Care (PHC) approach. Medicinal plants play vital roles in disease prevention and their promotion and use fit into all existing prevention strategies. However, conscious efforts need to be made to properly identify, recognise and position medicinal plants in the design and implementation of these strategies. These approaches present interesting and emerging perspectives in the field of medicinal plants. Recommendations are proposed for strategising the future role and place for medicinal plants in disease prevention. PMID:24311829

  2. Standardization, biological activity and application of medicines from plants Limonium gmelinii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zhusupova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There are the data on the chemical study for plants of the genus Limonium gmelinii and of the creation on their basis the effective medicines of wide action range which introduced into practical medicine.

  3. Phytochemical and biological assessment of medicinally important plant ochradenus arabicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabal Al-Akhdar (Oman) is one of diverse floral region of Arabian Peninsula. Ochradenus arabicus, is an important medicinal plant to local people of the area. However, little is known about its potential role in biological activities against various emerging ailments. The collected plant samples were extracted with methanol and fractionated into n-hexane (JOAH), ethyl acetate (JOAE), chloroform (JOAC), n-butanol (JOAB) and water (JOAAQ). Various concentrations of these fractions were tested for their antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant, antidiabetic, phenolics, flavonoids, allopathic and nutrition quality properties. The results showed that fruits and leaves of O. arabicus have higher levels of carbohydrate, crude fats, fibres, proteins, moisture, ash and energy values. In phytotoxic activities, JOAAQ inhibited the lettuce seed germination and growth. The anticancer activities of fractions showed that JOAE, JOAB and JOAAQ are potent to reduce the cancer cell viability of HT29, HCT116, HepG2 and MCF-7 lines with a concentration of 1000 micro g/ml. JOAB showed a meagre activity of 12% in Glucosidase inhibition assay. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents were significantly higher in JOAE, which also resulted in higher DPPH radical scavenging activity as compared to other fractions and control. JOAE also exhibited higher antibacterial and antifungal activities. The results of current findings suggest that O. arabicus is a potential medicinal plants, which could be subjected to advance column chromatography for lead compounds using a bioassay guided approach. (author)

  4. Heavy metal levels in commonly used traditional medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study a survey of 24 commonly used medicinal plants of Indian subcontinent origin was carried out to evaluate their levels of heavy metals by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that the highest mean value for Cd (12.06 mu g.g/sup -1/), Cr (24.50 mu g.g/sup -1/), Cu (15.27 mu g.g/sup -1/), Pb (1.30 mu g.g/sup -1/), Fe (885.60 mu g.g/sup -1/), Mn (90.60 mu g.g/sup -1/), Ni (9.99 mu g.g/sup -1/) and Zn (77.15 mu g.g/sup -1/) were found in Lawsonia inermis, Murraya koenigii, Mentha spicata, Beta vulgaris Linn, Mentha spicata, Lagenaria sicerana standl, Lawsonia inermis, Emblica officinalis, respectively. The mean and maximum levels of Cd in plant samples were found higher than the recommended values of the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization and may constitute a health hazard for consumers. All other heavy metals in medicinal plants were found below the recommended tolerable limits. (author)

  5. Concentration of some radionuclides in some popular sudanese medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study was measured concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides 238U, 232Th and 40K in samples of sudanese medicinal plants. The radionuclide activity concentrations in samples analyzed ranged from 4.09 to 41.07 Bq kg-1 for 238Th and from 353.14 to 2270.21 Bq kg-1 for 40k. No trace of artificial radionuclide was determined in all the samples. The effective dose due to the presence of these radionuclides was estimated and found to be 0.524 mSv/year which is well below the permissible levels. (Author)

  6. SNAKE BITES: ROLE OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish E Bahekar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Snake bites possess significant amount of mortality as well as morbidity all over the world including India. Despite various species of snakes, only few of these can be potentially lethal to humans. Snake antivenom being only therapeutic option available in snake bite management, but has many drawbacks in actual clinical practice like species specificity, difficulty in availability, affordability and ideal storage conditions. The medicinal plants, available locally and used widely by traditional healers, therefore need attention in this aspects. Large number of plants and their active principles has been evaluated for pharmacological properties useful in the treatment of snake bites. However, numerous unexplored plants are claimed to have definite role in this issue need to be further studied. This review is an attempt to present a comprehensive account of various Indian herbal plants used in the treatment of snake bite in any forms like venom neutralization, topical application for local pain relief, oral formulation for pain relief etc. Keywords: Herbal plants, Snake bite, Anti-snake venom, Venom neutralisation

  7. In vitro antioxidant properties and characterization in nutrients and phytochemicals of six medicinal plants from the Portuguese folk medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Lillian; Oliveira, Sónia; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Ferreira, Isabel C .F. R.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional ethnomedical use of plants is recognized as an important potential source of compounds used in mainstream medicine. Herein, the in vitro antioxidant properties, nutrients and phytochemical composition of six medicinal plants widely used in the north-eastern Portuguese region were evaluated. The antioxidant activity was screened through: radical scavenging effects, reducing power, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation in brain homogenates. Nutrients and phytochemical characterizatio...

  8. IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON DIVERSITY OF HIMALAYAN MEDICINAL PLANT: A THREAT TO AYURVEDIC SYSTEM OF MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Ratha Kshirod Kumar; Mishra Sthiti Sruajani; Arya J.C.; Joshi G.C.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change and global warming are well acknowledged threats today, which affected the whole world biodiversity. Review of the literature revealed that regions with higher elevations are more vulnerable to the bad effect of climate change. The Indian Himalayan region, one among the mega hot spot of biodiversity is also the repository of valuable medicinal plants described in Ayurveda. Due to climate change the medicinal plant diversity of this region is on high stress or may be extinct in ...

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants from Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshy Philip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: About 32 extracts from eight selected medicinal plants, namely Pereskia bleo, Pereskia grandifolia, Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb., Curcuma zedoria, Curcuma mangga, Curcuma inodora aff. Blatter, Zingiber officinale var. officinale (jahe gajah and Zingiber officinale var. rubrum (jahe emprit used by Malaysia traditional health care systems were screened for their antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria using agar disc diffusion assay. Approach: The efficacy of the extracts was compared to the commercially prepared antibiotic diffusion discs. Results: No inhibition was observed with the water fractions. Conclusion/Recommendations: None of the plants tested showed inhibition against Escherichia coli. Curcuma mangga showed some remarked inhibition against the bacteria used in this study.

  10. As monografias sobre plantas medicinais / The medicinal plants monographs

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Valdir F., Veiga Junior; João Carlos P., Mello.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available As monografias sobre plantas medicinais ou drogas vegetais contêm informações para atender não somente aos órgãos de regulamentação, mas também às empresas industriais farmacêuticas e farmácias, e mesmo ao público consumidor. Este artigo revê as monografias da Comissão E, do American Botanical Counc [...] il, ESCOP, PDR e da Organização Mundial de Saúde em suas origens, objetivos e formatos. Duas publicações recentemente organizadas pela FIOCRUZ do Rio de Janeiro e as contribuições da Farmacopéia Brasileira também são avaliadas. Abstract in english The medicinal plants monographs are very important information collections about some of the most consumed plants all over the world that attend not only the regulatory agencies but also pharmaceutical industries and the general consumer. This manuscript reviews the origins, objectives and formats o [...] f the most important monographs, like Commission E, American Botanical Council, ESCOP, PDR and WHO. Two recently published Brazilian experiences organized by FIOCRUZ and the contributions from Brazilian Pharmacopoeia are also evaluated.

  11. Saponins: Anti-diabetic principles from medicinal plants - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elekofehinti, Olusola Olalekan

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents a global health problem. It is the most common of the endocrine disorders and is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia due to relative or absolute lack of insulin secretion or insulin actions. According to the World Health Organization projections, the diabetes population is likely to increase to 300 million or more by the year 2025. Current synthetic agents and insulin used effectively for the treatment of diabetes are scarce especially in rural areas, expensive and have prominent adverse effects. Complementary and alternative approaches to diabetes management such as isolation of phytochemicals with anti-hyperglycemic activities from medicinal plants is therefore imperative. Saponins are phytochemical with structural diversity and biological activities. This paper reviews saponins and various plants from which they were isolated as well as properties that make them ideal for antidiabetic remedy. PMID:25753168

  12. [Severe poisoning by plants used for traditional medicine in Mayotte].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durasnel, P; Vanhuffel, L; Blondé, R; Lion, F; Galas, T; Mousset-Hovaere, M; Balaÿ, I; Viscardi, G; Valyi, L

    2014-12-01

    The authors describe three cases of severe accidental poisoning by plants used as part of a traditional treatment in Mayotte. The established, or suspected, toxicity of Thevetia peruviana (Yellow oleander), Cinchona pubescens (Red quinine-tree), Melia azaderach (Persian lilac, also called china berry) and Azadirachta indica (Neem), is discussed. The clinical presentation is cardiac (atrioventricular block) and well known for Thevetia and Cinchona intoxications. Neurological signs and multi-organ failure are found for Azadirachta and Melia. The identification of the plants is never easy, nor is the evidence of their accountability. In the three cases reported, no other cause than the traditional treatment has been found to explain the clinical presentation. The outcome was favorable in all cases. The authors emphasize the difficulties to investigate these accidents, the poor medical knowledge of these practices in tropical areas, and in Mayotte particularly. The need for cooperation with local botanists, familiar with traditional medicine, is also underlined. PMID:25301110

  13. Ethnopharmacological survey: a selection strategy to identify medicinal plants for a local phytotherapy program

    OpenAIRE

    Flávia Liparini Pereira; José Martins Fernandes; João Paulo Viana Leite

    2012-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological studies are important for documenting and protecting cultural and traditional knowledge associated with the medical use of biodiversity. In this paper, we present a survey on medicinal plants used by locals in a community of Nova Viçosa, Viçosa, MG, Brazil, as a strategy to select medicinal plants for a phytotherapy-based local healthcare program. Eleven knowledgeable local informants were chosen by snowball sampling and interviewed about the use of medicinal plants. Plan...

  14. TRADITIONAL USES OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN TREATING SKIN DISEASES IN NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT OF TAMILNADU, INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    R. Sivaranjani; Ramakrishnan, K.

    2012-01-01

    The present documented the traditional knowledge of Medicinal Plants species used in various type of skin diseases in Nagapattinam district. We have documented the use of 50 species belonging to 26 families. The information on plants used as traditional medicine against skin diseases was gathered and ethnomedicinal survey based on interviews with local people involved in traditional herbal medicine practices. The particulars plants are used to cure variety of skin diseases, like swelling, wou...

  15. Cultivating a healthy enterprise : developing a sustainable medicinal plant chain in Uttaranchal - India

    OpenAIRE

    van de Belt, J.; Lengkeek, A.G.; Zant, J; Yadav, A. K.; Dimri, A.K.; Alam, G.

    2003-01-01

    Supply chain analysis provides a powerful tool in designing actions that enhance sustainable economic development. An approach was developed where stakeholders interact to construct a sustainable and equitable chain. A case study was conducted on medicinal plants in Uttaranchal, India. Medicinal plants are a fascinating global enterprise; they play a unique role in health care, culture, biodiversity and rural economies. Worldwide the demand for medicinal plants is growing. The mountains of Ut...

  16. Survey on medicinal plants and spices used in Beni-Sueif, Upper Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abdelhalim A; AbouZid Sameh F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study was conducted to identify medicinal plants and spices used for medicine by the community of Beni-Sueif, Upper Egypt. Methods Ethnobotanical data from local people was collected using direct interviews and a semi-structured questionnaire. Results Forty-eight plant species belonging to twenty-seven families and forty-seven genera were encountered during the study. Their botanical and vernacular names, plant parts used and medicinal uses are given. Results of the s...

  17. Threatened medicinal plants of Menwarsar Pahalgam, Kashmir Himalayas: Distribution pattern and current conservation status

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal Ahmad Baig; Duraisamy Ramamoorthy; Tariq Ahmad Bhat

    2013-01-01

    It is imperative to understand the distribution and conservation status of medicinal plants in their natural habitats, owing to their increased demand and value. We studied the distribution pattern and current conservation status of six threatened medicinal plants in Pahalgam valley, Kashmir Himalayas, by random quadrate sampling (n=216) in different habitat types. The different uses of medicinal plants were obtained by informal interviews and group discussions with family elders. Recent re-e...

  18. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group?I?carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-?B and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori eradication and H. pylori induced related gastric disease prevention. PMID:25132753

  19. Antimicrobial and toxicological activities of five medicinal plant species from Cameroon Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njouendou Abdel J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious diseases caused by multiresistant microbial strains are on the increase. Fighting these diseases with natural products may be more efficacious. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanolic, ethylacetate (EtOAc and hexanic fractions of five Cameroonian medicinal plants (Piptadeniastum africana, Cissus aralioides, Hileria latifolia, Phyllanthus muellerianus and Gladiolus gregasius against 10 pathogenic microorganisms of the urogenital and gastrointestinal tracts. Methods The fractions were screened for their chemical composition and in vivo acute toxicity was carried out on the most active extracts in order to assess their inhibitory selectivity. The agar well-diffusion and the micro dilution methods were used for the determination of the inhibition diameters (ID and Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC respectively on 8 bacterial species including two Gram positive species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, and six Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi and two fungal isolates (Candida albicans, Candida krusei. The chemical composition was done according to Harbone (1976, the acute toxicity evaluation according to WHO protocol and the hepatic as well as serum parameters measured to assess liver and kidney functions. Results The chemical components of each plant's extract varied according to the solvent used, and they were found to contain alkaloids, flavonoids, polyphenols, triterpens, sterols, tannins, coumarins, glycosides, cardiac glycosides and reducing sugars. The methanolic and ethylacetate extracts of Phyllanthus muellerianus and Piptadeniastum africana presented the highest antimicrobial activities against all tested microorganisms with ID varying from 8 to 26 mm and MIC from 2.5 to 0.31 mg/ml. The in vivo acute toxicity study carried out on the methanolic extracts of Phyllanthus muellerianus and Piptadeniastrum africana indicated that these two plants were not toxic. At the dose of 4 g/kg body weight, kidney and liver function tests indicated that these two medicinal plants induced no adverse effect on these organs. Conclusion These results showed that, all these plant's extracts can be used as antimicrobial phytomedicines which can be therapeutically used against infections caused by multiresistant agents. Phyllanthus muellerianus, Piptadeniastum africana, antimicrobial, acute toxicity, kidney and liver function tests, Cameroon Traditional Medicine

  20. solation and Identification of Fungi from Spices and Medicinal Plants

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    Farid M. Toma

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was designed to throw light on the microbial status of some crude herbal materials. A total of 16 samples, representing different types of spices and medicinal plants were collected from common market in the Erbil city. Ten different fungal genera and 16 species were isolated and identified as Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus spp., Gliocladium sp., Hyalodendron diddeus, Memmoniella sp., Penicillium spp., Rhizopus spp., Syncephalastrum sp., Cladosporium lignicolum and Ulocladium botrytis. The total number of isolated fungi from the all sixteen selected samples was serially diluted and plated on Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA medium was (203×103 cfu/g. samples. Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. were more frequently detected, while Stachybotrys sp., Syncephalastrum racemocum, Uocladium botrytis, Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium lignicolum and Gliocladium catenulatum ere less frequently detected. Detection of mycotoxin on Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphincol agar (DRBC for fungi isolated from spices and medicinal plant samples, A. flavus, A. Niger and A. ochraceous show positive results on the culture for mycotoxin production. Estimation of natural occurrence of Aflatoxin (AT and Ochratoxin (OT in some selected dried samples by using ELISA method, the high result of aflatoxin and ochratoxin show in Red tea (150.5, 387.3 ppb while the low result of aflatoxin and ochratoxin show in Garlic (1.4, 0 ppb respectively.

  1. Screening of estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities from medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kang, Se Chan; Kim, Kug Chan; Choung, Eui Su; Zee, Ok Pyo

    2008-01-01

    The medicinal plant extracts commercially used in Asia were screened for their estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities in a recombinant yeast system featuring both a human estrogen receptor (ER) expression plasmid and a reporter plasmid. Pueraria lobata (flower) had the highest estrogenic relative potency (RP, 7.75×10(-3); RP of 17?-estradiol=1), followed by Amomum xanthioides (1.25×10(-3)). Next potent were a group consisting of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Zingiber officinale, Rheum undulatum, Curcuma aromatica, Eriobotrya japonica, Sophora flavescens, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Polygonum multiflorum, and Pueraria lobata (root) (ranging from 9.5×10(-4) to 1.0×10(-4)). Least potent were Prunus persica, Lycoppus lucidus, and Adenophora stricta (ranging from 9.0×10(-5) to 8.0×10(-5)). The extracts exerting antiestrogenic effects, Cinnamomum cassia and Prunus persica, had relative potencies of 1.14×10(-3) and 7.4×10(-4), respectively (RP of tamoxifen=1). The solvent fractions from selected estrogenic or antiestrogenic herbs had higher estrogenic relative potencies, with their RP ranging from 9.3×10(-1) to 2.7×10(-4) and from 8.2×10(-1) to 9.1×10(-3), respectively. These results support previous reports on the efficacy of Oriental medicinal plants used or not used as phytoestrogens for hormone replacement therapy. PMID:21783839

  2. Protective Effect against Oxidative Stress in Medicinal Plant Extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protective effect of medicinal plant extracts against oxidative stress were screened in this study. Methanol extracts from 48 medicinal plants, which were reported to have antioxidative or anti-inflammatory effect were prepared and screened for their protective activity against chemically-induced and radiation-induced oxidative stress by using MTT assay. Thirty three samples showed protective activity against chemically-induced oxidative stress in various extent. Among those samples, extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis revealed the strongest activity (25.9% at 100 ?g/ml) with relatively lower cytotoxicity. Seven other samples showed higher than 20% protection at 100 ?g/ml. These samples were tested for protection activity against radiation-induced oxidative stress. Methanol extract of Alpina officinarum showed the highest activity (17.8% at 20 ?g/ml). Five fractions were prepared from the each 10 methanol extracts which showed high protective activity against oxidative stress. Among those fraction samples butanol fractions of Areca catechu var. dulcissima and Spirodela polyrrhiza showed the highest protective activities (78.8% and 77.2%, respectively, at 20 ?g/ml)

  3. Protective Effect against Oxidative Stress in Medicinal Plant Extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Shin, Dong O; Hong, Sung Eun [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    Protective effect of medicinal plant extracts against oxidative stress were screened in this study. Methanol extracts from 48 medicinal plants, which were reported to have antioxidative or anti-inflammatory effect were prepared and screened for their protective activity against chemically-induced and radiation-induced oxidative stress by using MTT assay. Thirty three samples showed protective activity against chemically-induced oxidative stress in various extent. Among those samples, extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis revealed the strongest activity (25.9% at 100 {mu}g/ml) with relatively lower cytotoxicity. Seven other samples showed higher than 20% protection at 100 {mu}g/ml. These samples were tested for protection activity against radiation-induced oxidative stress. Methanol extract of Alpina officinarum showed the highest activity (17.8% at 20 {mu}g/ml). Five fractions were prepared from the each 10 methanol extracts which showed high protective activity against oxidative stress. Among those fraction samples butanol fractions of Areca catechu var. dulcissima and Spirodela polyrrhiza showed the highest protective activities (78.8% and 77.2%, respectively, at 20 {mu}g/ml)

  4. PROFILE OF HEAVY METALS IN MEDICINAL PLANTS COLLECTED FROM KHYBER PAKHTUNKHWA, PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rehman, Hussain Ullah, Nisar Ahmad, Aziz Ur Rehman, Nimat Ullah, Shan Zeb, Imran and Ijaz Ahmad*

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Essential and non-essential heavy metals like Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co,  Cd, Cr and Pb were analyzed in nine selected medicinal plants namely Persea duthiei, Suaeda monoica, Oxalis corniculata, Hibiscus rosa, Erythrina variegates, Curcuma longa, Berberis lyceum, Zanthoxylum alatum and Quercus dilatata by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. These medicinal plants were selected for our investigation having in mind their extensive use in traditional medicine for various ailments by local physicians in the area from where these plants were collected. In general the concentration level of heavy metals in the selected plants was found to decrease in the order of Fe > Zn > Mn > Cu > Ni > Co > Cr > Cd > Pb. In most plants the concentration of Pb was found below the detection level. The results revealed that the medicinal plants accumulate the elements at different concentration. Monitoring such medicinal plants for heavy metals is a supreme importance in protecting the Public from the adverse effects of these heavy metals.

  5. Indigenous plant medicines for health care: treatment of Diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Nisha H; Parikh, Palak K; Kothari, Charmy

    2014-05-01

    Medicinal plants have played an important role in treating and preventing a variety of diseases throughout the world. Metabolic syndrome had become a global epidemic, defined as a cluster of three of five criteria: insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low high-density cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia. The current review focuses on Indian medicinal plant drugs and plants used in the treatment of diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Though there are various approaches to reduce the ill-effects of diabetes and hyperlipidemia and its secondary complications, plant-based drugs are preferred due to lesser side effects and low cost. The current review focuses on twenty-three medicinal plants used in the treatment of Diabetes mellitus and nine medicinal plants used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. The wealth of knowledge on medicinal plants points to a great potential for research and the discovery of new drugs to fight diseases, including diabetes and hyperlipidemia. PMID:24856756

  6. The carbon isotope ratios and contents of mineral elements in leaves of Chinese medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaf carbon isotope ratios and 13 kinds of mineral elements were measured on 36 species of common Chinese medicinal plants in a subtropical monsoon forest of Ding Hu Shan in Guangdong Province. The .delta.13C value were from -26.4 to -32.6%, indicating that all of the species belonged the photosynthetic C3 types. The relative lower value of ?13C was observed in the life form of shrubs. The contents of 7 elements (N, P, K, Ca, Na Mg, Si) were dependent upon the species, life form, medicinal function and medicinal part. Herb type medicine and the used medicinal part of leaves or whole plant showed higher levels of above elements than the others. Among the nine groups with different medicinal functions, it was found that more nitrogen was in the leaves of medicinal plants for hemophthisis, hypertension and stomachic troubles, more phosphorus and potassium were in the leaves for cancer and snake bite medicines, but more calcium and magnesium were in the leaves for curing rheumatics. Ferric, aluminium and manganese were the main composition of microelements in leaves. There were higher content of ferric in leaves for hemophthisis medicine, higher zinc in leaves for cold and hypertension medicine, and higher Cup in leaves of stomachic medicine. It was suggested that the pattern of mineral elements in leaves of Chinese medicinal plants reflected the different properties of absorption and accumulation. Some additional effect due to the high content of certain element might be associated with the main function of that medicine

  7. Evaluation of three medicinal plants for anti-microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Gowd M J S; Manoj, Kumar M G; Sai, Shankar A J; Sujatha, B; Sreedevi, E

    2012-07-01

    Herbal remedies have a long history of use for gum and tooth problems such as dental caries. The present microbiological study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of three medicinal plants (Terminalia chebula Retz., Clitoria ternatea Linn., and Wedelia chinensis (Osbeck.) Merr.) on three pathogenic microorganisms in the oral cavity (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Staphylococcus aureus). Aqueous extract concentrations (5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%) were prepared from the fruits of Terminalia chebula, flowers of Clitoria ternatea, and leaves of Wedelia chinensis. The antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extract concentrations of each plant was tested using agar well diffusion method and the size of the inhibition zone was measured in millimeters. The results obtained showed that the diameter of zone of inhibition increased with increase in concentration of extract and the antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extracts of the three plants was observed in the increasing order - Wedelia chinensis < Clitoria ternatea < Terminalia chebula. It can be concluded that the tested extracts of all the three plants were effective against dental caries causing bacteria. PMID:23723653

  8. Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Some Nigerian Medicinal Plant Extracts

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    M.O. Sofidiya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research evaluates the DPPH radical scavenging, total antioxidant activities, reducing power and total contents of phenolic compounds in methanolic leaf extracts of five Nigerian medicinal plants (Dalbergia saxatilis Hook.f. (Papilionacae, Ekebergia senegalensis A.Juss.(Meliaceae, Hymenocardia acida Tul. (Hymenocardiaceae, Icacina tricantha Oliv. (Icacinaceae and Salacia pallescens Oliv.(Celastraceae. Total phenols were analysed according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Each sample under assay condition, showed a dose-dependent effect both on free radical scavenging 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH and also on Fe3+ reducing power. The antioxidant activity of the plant extracts with the DPPH radical scavenging and reducing power method, were in the order Hymenocardia> Ekebergia> Salacia> Icacina> Dalbergia. H. acida and E. senegalensis possess very high radical scavenging activity in both assays. Potency of H. acida extract was of the same magnitude as that of reference ?-tocopherol. Total phenols in all the samples expressed as GAE (Gallic Acid Equivalent varied from 1.83 to 15.47mg g-1 of dry plant material. Total antioxidant activities correlated with total phenols (R2 = 0.6640 an indication that 66% of the antioxidant capacity of these extracts results from contribution of phenolic compounds. A linear positive relationship existed between the reducing power and total phenolics of the tested plant extracts (R2 = 0.9564.

  9. Antidiabetic medicinal plants as a source of alpha glucosidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benalla, Wafaa; Bellahcen, Saïd; Bnouham, Mohamed

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study is to collate all available data on antidiabetic plants that inhibit alpha glucosidase, reported mainly by Medline (PubMed) these last years. In the present study, interest is focused on experimental researches conducted on hypoglycemic plants particularly those which show alpha glucosidase inhibitor activity alongside bioactive components. This study describes 47 species that belong to 29 families. The plant families, which enclose the species, studied most as inhibitors of alphaglucosidase, are Fabaceae (6 species.), Crassulaceae (3 species), Hippocrateacaea (3 species), Lamiaceae (3 species), and Myrtaceae (3 species), with most studied species being Salacia reticulata (Hippocrateaceae) and Morus alba (Moraceae). The study also covers natural products (active natural components and crude extracts) isolated from the medicinal plants which inhibit alpha glucosidase as reported this last decade. Many kinds of these isolated natural products show strong activity such as, Alkaloids, stilbenoids (polyphenol), triterpene, acids (chlorogenic acid, betulinic acid, syringic acid, vanillic acid, bartogenic acid, oleanolic acid, dehydrotrametenolic acid, corosolic acid, ellagic acid, ursolic acid, gallic acid), phytosterol, myoinositol, flavonoids, Flavonolignans, anthraquinones, anthrones, and xanthones, Feruloylglucosides, flavanone glucosides, acetophenone glucosides, glucopyranoside derivatives, genine derivatives, flavonol, anthocyanin and others. PMID:20522017

  10. A Review on Medicinal Plants with Anti-Ulcer Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh A. M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A peptic ulcer is erosion in a segment of the gastro intestinal mucosa. It may typically in the stomach (gastric ulcer or first few centimeters of duodenum (duodenal ulcer that penetrates through the muscularis mucosae. Contrary to popular belief, ulcer is not only caused by spicy food but also most commonly due to an infection of Helicobacter Pylori and long term use of medications. Standard treatment is a combination of drugs including antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitors. Literature suggests that number of synthetic drugs are used in the management of peptic ulcers but elicit several adverse effects. Therefore Indian herbal plants stand out as being exceptional for its ethnic, ethobotanical and ethno-pharmaceutical use. In this review attempts have been made to know about some plants which may be used in treatment or prevention of peptic ulcers. Various plants like Excoecaria agallocha, Mentha arvensis, Utleria salicifolia, Emblica officinalis etc. proved active in antiulcer therapy. This combination of traditional and modern knowledge can produced better antiulcer drugs with fewer side effects. The medicinal plants are available in India and other countries, recent technologies advances have renewal interest in natural product in drug discovery.

  11. Chemical constituents of selected Sudanese medicinal and aromatic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudanese medicinal and aromatic plants (Alternanthra repens, Ambrosia maritima, Citrus paradisi, Croton zambesicus, Lepidium sativum, Morettia phillaena, Nauclea latifolia, Plectranthus barbatus, Pluchea dioscorides, and Sphaeranthus suaveolens) were analyzed for their chemical composition, mineral contents and secondary constituents. The concentration of manganese, copper, iron, nickel, lead, zinc and potassium in plant samples was performed using x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The trace elements found in the smallest amount of the investigated plant species are lead, nickel and copper, while high concentration was detected for potassium, iron and manganese. Mn was accumulated with high level in Alternanthra repens species. Potassium was abundant in S. suaveolens and Ambrosia maritima. The values of concentration obtained for all studied elements were compared with published values of reference material, trace elements in Hay (powder) by International Atomic Energy Agency. Phyto chemical analysis of investigated plants was performed for constituents: Flavonoids, saponins, tannins, alkaloids, amino acids and sugars. The methanolic extracts of P.barbatus, C.paradisi, A.repens, N.latifolia, L. sativum and C. zambesicus are found to contain alkaloids. Results of TLC analysis were shown as Rf values for saponins, bitter principles, essential oils, flavonoids and alkaloids. Quantification of flavonoids and tannins showed that flavonoid content was highest in case of Alternanthera repens and Sphaeranthus suavertens, whereas the highest tannin content was in case of Nauclea latifolia and Sphaearanthus suavertens. The results suggest that the user of traditional Sudanese crude drugs should be warned of potential danger of heavy metal poisoning because their concentrations seem to be higher than maximum values allowed by health agencies in several countries. This study has provided some biochemical basis for the ethno medical use of extracts from different candidate plant species in the treatment and prevention of diseases. As rich source of phytochemicals and minerals these plants can be a potential source of useful drugs, and also used as bio indicators to follow changes in an environmental pollution.(Author)

  12. Medicinal plants used for dogs in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, C; Harper, T; Georges, K; Bridgewater, E

    2000-06-12

    This paper documents ethnoveterinary medicines used to treat dogs in Trinidad and Tobago. In 1995, a 4-stage process was used to conduct the research and document the ethnoveterinary practices. Twenty-eight ethnoveterinary respondents were identified using the school-essay method, which is a modified rapid rural appraisal (RRA) technique. Semi-structured interviews were held with these respondents as well as with 30 veterinarians, 27 extension officers and 19 animal-health assistants and/or agricultural officers, and the seven key respondents that they identified. The final step involved hosting four participatory workshops with 55 of the respondents interviewed to discuss the ethnoveterinary data generated from the interviews and to determine dosages for some of the plants mentioned. Supplementary interviews were conducted in 1997 and 1998. Seeds of Carica papaya, and leaves of Cassia alata, Azadirachta indica, Gossypium spp., Cajanus cajan and Chenopodium ambrosiodes are used as anthelmintics. The anthelmintics Gossypium spp. and Chenopodium ambrosiodes are the most frequently used species. Crescentia cujete pulp, Musa spp. stem exudate, the inside of the pods of Bixa orellana, leaves of Cordia curassavica and Eclipta alba plant tops are used for skin diseases. Musa spp. stem exudate, seeds of Manilkara zapota, Pouteria sapota and Mammea americana and leaves of Cordia curassavica, Scoparia dulcis and Nicotiana tabacum are used to control ectoparasites. Dogs are groomed with the leaves of Cordia curassavica, Bambusa vulgaris and Scoparia dulcis. Psidium guajava buds and leaves and the bark of Anacardium occidentale are used for diarrhoea. Owners attempt to achieve milk let-down with a decoction of the leaves of Stachytarpheta jamaicensis. The plant uses parallel those practised in human folk medicine in other Caribbean countries and in other tropical countries. PMID:10821961

  13. Interacción entre fármacos y plantas medicinales / Interaction between medicines and medicinal plants

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    J.C., Tres.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años, el consumo de plantas medicinales ha experimentado un notable incremento en la sociedad española. Esto ha podido ser debido a que en algunos casos, se ha demostrado su eficacia en el tratamiento de determinadas patologías y a la percepción, errónea, de la inocuidad de estos prod [...] uctos. Las plantas medicinales se comportan como verdaderos fármacos ya que las sustancias químicas que las componen pueden tener una actividad biológica en humanos. Por esta razón, la administración conjunta con "fármacos convencionales" puede producir variaciones en la magnitud de su efecto. Este tipo de interacciones, al igual que las producidas entre dos o más fármacos pueden producirse por mecanismos farmacocinéticos, si afectan a procesos de absorción, distribución, metabolismo y excreción o farmacodinámicos, si afectan al resultado de su acción farmacológica. En la literatura médica son escasos los artículos y notificaciones de casos sobre los efectos adversos e interacciones que afectan a las plantas medicinales, lo que probablemente refleja una infranotificación de estos fenómenos. Si a esto añadimos la falta de datos experimentales y de estudios controlados, la percepción de su prevalencia es difícil o casi imposible. Este trabajo expone, ordenados según se explica más adelante, los hallazgos de una exhaustiva revisión de la literatura médica con el fin de que el lector conozca su existencia, sin entrar en otras consideraciones, como por ejemplo el grado de evidencia, que serán sujeto de próximos trabajos. Abstract in english In recent years there has been a notable increase in the consumption of medicinal plants in Spanish society. This might be due to the fact that in some cases they have shown themselves to be efficient in treating certain pathologies and to the erroneous perception that these products are innocuous. [...] Medicinal plants behave as authentic medicines since the chemical substances of which they are formed can have a biological activity in humans. For this reason, their joint administration with "conventional medicines" can produce variations in the magnitude of the effect. This type of interaction, just like those produced between two or more medicines, can produce pharmacokinetic mechanisms if they affect the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, or pharmacodynamic mechanisms if they affect the result of the pharmacological action. In the medical literature there are few articles and notifications of cases concerning the adverse effects and interactions that affect medicinal plants, which probably reflects an under-notification of these phenomena. If we add to this the lack of experimental data and controlled studies, perception of their prevalence is difficult or nearly impossible. This article sets out, in an order that will be explained later, the findings of an exhaustive review of the medical literature with the aim of making its existence known to the reader, without going into other considerations, such as the degree of evidence for example, which will be the subject of forthcoming articles.

  14. Interacción entre fármacos y plantas medicinales Interaction between medicines and medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Tres

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años, el consumo de plantas medicinales ha experimentado un notable incremento en la sociedad española. Esto ha podido ser debido a que en algunos casos, se ha demostrado su eficacia en el tratamiento de determinadas patologías y a la percepción, errónea, de la inocuidad de estos productos. Las plantas medicinales se comportan como verdaderos fármacos ya que las sustancias químicas que las componen pueden tener una actividad biológica en humanos. Por esta razón, la administración conjunta con "fármacos convencionales" puede producir variaciones en la magnitud de su efecto. Este tipo de interacciones, al igual que las producidas entre dos o más fármacos pueden producirse por mecanismos farmacocinéticos, si afectan a procesos de absorción, distribución, metabolismo y excreción o farmacodinámicos, si afectan al resultado de su acción farmacológica. En la literatura médica son escasos los artículos y notificaciones de casos sobre los efectos adversos e interacciones que afectan a las plantas medicinales, lo que probablemente refleja una infranotificación de estos fenómenos. Si a esto añadimos la falta de datos experimentales y de estudios controlados, la percepción de su prevalencia es difícil o casi imposible. Este trabajo expone, ordenados según se explica más adelante, los hallazgos de una exhaustiva revisión de la literatura médica con el fin de que el lector conozca su existencia, sin entrar en otras consideraciones, como por ejemplo el grado de evidencia, que serán sujeto de próximos trabajos.In recent years there has been a notable increase in the consumption of medicinal plants in Spanish society. This might be due to the fact that in some cases they have shown themselves to be efficient in treating certain pathologies and to the erroneous perception that these products are innocuous. Medicinal plants behave as authentic medicines since the chemical substances of which they are formed can have a biological activity in humans. For this reason, their joint administration with "conventional medicines" can produce variations in the magnitude of the effect. This type of interaction, just like those produced between two or more medicines, can produce pharmacokinetic mechanisms if they affect the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, or pharmacodynamic mechanisms if they affect the result of the pharmacological action. In the medical literature there are few articles and notifications of cases concerning the adverse effects and interactions that affect medicinal plants, which probably reflects an under-notification of these phenomena. If we add to this the lack of experimental data and controlled studies, perception of their prevalence is difficult or nearly impossible. This article sets out, in an order that will be explained later, the findings of an exhaustive review of the medical literature with the aim of making its existence known to the reader, without going into other considerations, such as the degree of evidence for example, which will be the subject of forthcoming articles.

  15. Medicinal plants from Peru: a review of plants as potential agents against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Valerio, Luis G

    2006-09-01

    Natural products have played a significant role in drug discovery and development especially for agents against cancer and infectious disease. An analysis of new and approved drugs for cancer by the United States Food and Drug Administration over the period of 1981-2002 showed that 62% of these cancer drugs were of natural origin. Natural compounds possess highly diverse and complex molecular structures compared to small molecule synthetic drugs and often provide highly specific biological activities likely derived from the rigidity and high number of chiral centers. Ethnotraditional use of plant-derived natural products has been a major source for discovery of potential medicinal agents. A number of native Andean and Amazonian medicines of plant origin are used as traditional medicine in Peru to treat different diseases. Of particular interest in this mini-review are three plant materials endemic to Peru with the common names of Cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa), Maca (Lepidium meyenii), and Dragon's blood (Croton lechleri) each having been scientifically investigated for a wide range of therapeutic uses including as specific anti-cancer agents as originally discovered from the long history of traditional usage and anecdotal information by local population groups in South America. Against this background, we present an evidence-based analysis of the chemistry, biological properties, and anti-tumor activities for these three plant materials. In addition, this review will discuss areas requiring future study and the inherent limitations in their experimental use as anti-cancer agents. PMID:17017852

  16. Review: Biotechnological strategies for conservation of rare and endangered medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHENDRA KUMAR RAI

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Rai MK (2010 Review: Biotechnological strategies for conservation of rare and endangered medicinal plants. Biodiversitas 11: 157-166. The use of medicinal plants is as old as human civilization. The biotechnological tools play a crucial role in conservation of rare and endangered medicinal plants. The rapid depletion of plant genetic diversity has made essential to develop new in situ and ex situ conservation methods. Advances in biotechnology offer new methods for conservation of rare and endangered medicinal plants. The present review is focused on biotechnological tools like in vitro culture, micropropagation, mycorrhization, genetic transformation and development of DNA banks. These are imperative and important alternatives for the conservation of rare and endangered medicinal plants.

  17. Potent ?-amylase inhibitory activity of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants

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    Bhargava Shobha Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indian medicinal plants used in the Ayurvedic traditional system to treat diabetes are a valuable source of novel anti-diabetic agents. Pancreatic ?-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. In this study, seventeen Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for ?-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on PPA (porcine pancreatic ?-amylase. Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the lead extracts was performed in order to determine the probable constituents. Methods Analysis of the 126 extracts, obtained from 17 plants (Aloe vera (L. Burm.f., Adansonia digitata L., Allium sativum L., Casia fistula L., Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don., Cinnamomum verum Persl., Coccinia grandis (L. Voigt., Linum usitatisumum L., Mangifera indica L., Morus alba L., Nerium oleander L., Ocimum tenuiflorum L., Piper nigrum L., Terminalia chebula Retz., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd. Miers., Trigonella foenum-graceum L., Zingiber officinale Rosc. for PPA inhibition was initially performed qualitatively by starch-iodine colour assay. The lead extracts were further quantified with respect to PPA inhibition using the chromogenic DNSA (3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid method. Phytochemical constituents of the extracts exhibiting? 50% inhibition were analysed qualitatively as well as by GC-MS (Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry. Results Of the 126 extracts obtained from 17 plants, 17 extracts exhibited PPA inhibitory potential to varying degrees (10%-60.5% while 4 extracts showed low inhibition ( 50% was obtained with 3 isopropanol extracts. All these 3 extracts exhibited concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, viz., seeds of Linum usitatisumum (540 ?gml-1, leaves of Morus alba (1440 ?gml-1 and Ocimum tenuiflorum (8.9 ?gml-1. Acarbose as the standard inhibitor exhibited an IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentrationvalue of 10.2 ?gml-1. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and steroids with the major phytoconstituents being identified by GC-MS. Conclusions This study endorses the use of these plants for further studies to determine their potential for type 2 diabetes management. Results suggests that extracts of Linum usitatisumum, Morus alba and Ocimum tenuiflorum act effectively as PPA inhibitors leading to a reduction in starch hydrolysis and hence eventually to lowered glucose levels.

  18. Indian medicinal plants as a reservoir of protective phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Saroj; Kaur, Kamaljit; Kaur, Swayamjot

    2003-01-01

    India is one of the 12 mega diversity countries in the world so it has a vital stake in conservation and sustainable utilization of its biodiversity resources. Plant secondary metabolites have been of interest to man for a long time due to their pharmacological relevance. With this in view, the bark powder of Acacia auriculiformis, A. nilotica, Juglans regia, and the fruit powder of Terminalia bellerica, T. chebula, Emblica officinalis, and a combination drug "Triphala," which are known to be rich in polyphenols, were tested for their antimutagenic activities. Antimutagenic activities of the extracts were estimated by employing the plate incorporation Ames Salmonella histidine reversion assay by using the frame shift mutagen tester strain TA98 and base pair substitution strain TA100 against direct acting mutagens (NPD, sodium azide), and the S9-dependent mutagen 2-aminofluorene(2AF). Acetone extracts of all the plants exhibited significant antimutagenic activities among the other extracts tested, but an acetone extract of Acacia nilotica showed a marked anti-mutagent effect. Furthermore, it was more effective against indirect acting mutagen, 2AF, in both TA98 and TA100 tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium than against the direct acting mutagens. The results indicate that an acetone extract of bark and fruit of the medicinal plants under study harbors constituents with promising antimutagenic/anticarcinogenic potential that could be investigated further. PMID:12616620

  19. INHIBITION OF TYPE I 5?-REDUCTASE BY MEDICINAL PLANT EXTRACTS

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    Patil Vijaya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Type I 5?-reductase has been implicated in skin disorders such as acne, hirsutism and male pattern baldness and its inhibition offers a potential treatment for these disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibition of type I 5?-reductase activity by extracts from Indian medicinal plants. Plant extracts were screened and selected based on their ability to inhibit Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Since type I 5?-reductase metabolises testosterone to ?4-androstene-3, 17-dione, the activity of enzyme was determined using RIA for testosterone and ?4-androstene-3, 17-dione. It was found that methanolic extract of Embelia ribes was a potent inhibitor of type I 5?-reductase (IC50:100?g/mL. Extracts of Vitex negundo, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia bellerica which also inhibited type I 5?-reductase (IC50: 200-390 ?g /mL. Therefore herbal formulation of these plant extracts may be used in the treatment of skin disorders involving type I 5?-reductase.

  20. Preliminary evaluation of the hypoglycemic effect of some Brazilian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, A P; Rossi, C; Poffo, C; Pretti Júnior, E; Oliveira, A E; Schlemper, V; Niero, R; Cechinel-Filho, V; Bürger, C

    2001-01-01

    The hypoglycemic effect of five Brazilian medicinal plants (Epidendrum monsenii, Marrubium vulgare, Rheedia gardneriana, Rubus imperialis and Wedelia paludosa) was studied on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The extract of these plants was intragastrically administered to diabetic rats. The results showed that all plants studied (except R. gardneriana) significantly lowered the blood glucose. These results suggest that these four medicinal plants could be an adjuvant agent in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:11677867

  1. Ecological status and traditional knowledge of medicinal plants in Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary of Garhwal Himalaya, India

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat Jahangeer A; Kumar Munesh; Bussmann Rainer W

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Himalayan forests are the most important source of medicinal plants and with useful species for the local people. Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary (KWLS) is situated in the interior part of the Garhwal Himalayan region. The presented study was carried out in Madhmeshwar area of KWLS for the ecological status of medicinal plants and further focused on the ethnomedicinal uses of these plants in the study area. Methods Ecological information about ethnomedicinal plants were colle...

  2. ANTIMICROBIAL PROPERTIES OF FEW PLANTS USED IN TRADITIONAL SYSTEM OF MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Bisht Satpal Singh; Ramani Priya, K.; Mishra Rojita; Panda Amrita; Praveen, B.

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal plants contribute a sizeable portion in human health care system both at commercial and production levels. The plants Azadirichta indica (neem), Mangifera indica (mango), Eucalyptus, Curcuma longa (turmeric), Cinnamomum verum, Musa, Capsicum annum (red chilly) were studied as these plants are popularly used in many folk medicines for last many centuries. Plant parts taken in the study were leaves, peels, rhizomes and fruit. The extracts were found to be very active against the tes...

  3. Fungal pathogens intercepted in imported germplasm of medicinal and aromatic plants and their quarantine significance

    OpenAIRE

    Usha Dev; P.C. Agarwal; Baleshwar Singh; Dinesh Chand; Jyoti Bhardwaj

    2011-01-01

    (Abstract selected from presentation in National Conference on Biodiversity of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Collection, Characterization and Utilization, held at Anand, India during November 24-25, 2010)   International exchange of planting material of medicinal plants germplasm has a significant role in crop improvement programmes as it provides a wide genetic diversity available world wide. However, exchange of the planting material carries an inherent risk of introducing new exotic path...

  4. Identification, characterization, and palynology of high-valued medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Hina; Ahmad, Nisar; Haider Abbasi, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    High-valued medicinal plants Achillea millefolium, Acorus calamus, Arnebia nobilis, Fumaria indica, Gymnema sylvestre, Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Peganum harmala, Psoralea corylifolia, Rauwolfia serpentina, and Vetiveria zizanioides were identified with the help of taxonomical markers and investigated for characterization and palynological studies. These parameters are used to analyze their quality, safety, and standardization for their safe use. Botanical description and crude drug description is intended for their quality assurance at the time of collection, commerce stages, manufacturing, and production. For this purpose the detailed morphology was studied and compared with the Flora of Pakistan and other available literatures. Here we reported the pollen grain morphology of Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Psoralea corylifolia, and Rauwolfia serpentina for the first time. Similarly the crude drug study of Gymnema sylvestre (leaf), Origanum vulgare (aerial parts), Paeonia emodi (tubers), and Peganum harmala (seeds) was also carried out for the first time. PMID:23844389

  5. Antibacterial and cytotoxic activity of Kenyan medicinal plants

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Wagate G, Cyrus; Gakuya W, Daniel; Mark O, Nanyingi; Francis K, Njonge; James M, Mbaria.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Seven medicinal plant extracts traditionally used in Kenya, mainly for management of infectious conditions, were chosen and screened for their antibacterial activity against Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus) bact [...] eria. Antibacterial activity was tested using the broth dilution method. Harrisonia abyssinica and Terminalia kilimandscharica extracts showed significant activity against Gram+ and Gram- bacteria. The methanolic extracts of T. kilimandscharica bark and H. abyssinica bark and leaves showed minimum inhibitory activity against all tested bacteria, with minimal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 25-150 mg/mL. Ajuga remota and Amaranthus hybridus, which are lethal to brine shrimp nauplii, showed significantly lower antibacterial activity than those that were relatively non-toxic.

  6. Antiviral activity of some plants used in Nepalese traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, M; Mentel, R; Jha, P K; Chaudhary, R P; Bhattarai, S; Gewali, M B; Karmacharya, N; Hipper, M; Lindequist, U

    2009-12-01

    Methanolic extracts of 41 plant species belonging to 27 families used in the traditional medicine in Nepal have been investigated for in vitro antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza virus A by dye uptake assay in the systems HSV-1/Vero cells and influenza virus A/MDCK cells. The extracts of Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata, Cassiope fastigiata and Thymus linearis showed potent anti-herpes viral activity. The extracts of Allium oreoprasum, Androsace strigilosa, Asparagus filicinus, Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata and Verbascum thapsus exhibited strong anti-influenza viral activity. Only the extracts of A. rivularis and B. ciliata demonstrated remarkable activity against both viruses. PMID:18955262

  7. Biological activity of common mullein, a medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Arzu Ucar; Camper, N D

    2002-10-01

    Common Mullein (Verbascum thapsus L., Scrophulariaceae) is a medicinal plant that has been used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, asthma, spasmodic coughs, diarrhea and other pulmonary problems. The objective of this study was to assess the biological activity of Common Mullein extracts and commercial Mullein products using selected bench top bioassays, including antibacterial, antitumor, and two toxicity assays--brine shrimp and radish seed. Extracts were prepared in water, ethanol and methanol. Antibacterial activity (especially the water extract) was observed with Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-induced tumors in potato disc tissue were inhibited by all extracts. Toxicity to Brine Shrimp and to radish seed germination and growth was observed at higher concentrations of the extracts. PMID:12241986

  8. Evaluation of medicinal plants from Central Kalimantan for antimelanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arung, Enos Tangke; Kusuma, Irawan Wijaya; Christy, Eva Oktoberiani; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2009-10-01

    In the course of searching for new materials to use as whitening agents, we screened 19 methanol extracts prepared from 14 medicinal plants from Central Kalimantan province, Indonesia. The screening methods used were the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging assay, a tyrosinase inhibition assay, and a melanin formation inhibition assay using B16 melanoma cells. The extracts of Willughbeia coriacea (bark part of aerial root), Phyllanthus urinaria (root), Eleutherine palmifolia (bulb), Eusideroxylon zwageri (seed), Dendrophthoe petandra (aerial root), Passiflora foetida (stem), and Vitex pinnata (root) showed DPPH radical-scavenging activity of more than 70% at 100 microg/ml. The extracts of W. coriacea (bark part of aerial root), P. urinaria (root), and D. petandra (aerial root) showed tyrosinase inhibitory activity of more than 40% using L-tyrosine as a substrate at 500 microg/ml. The extracts of W. coriacea (bark part of aerial root) and D. petandra (aerial root) showed tyrosinase inhibitory activity of more than 40% using L-DOPA as a substrate at 500 microg/ml. The extracts of W. coriacea (bark part of aerial root, 200 microg/ml), Glochidion philippcum (aerial root, 200 and 300 microg/ml), E. palmifolia (bulb, 50 microg/ml), E. zwageri (seed, 100 microg/ml), D. petandra (aerial root, 200 microg/ml), Lansium domesticum (bark, 25 microg/ml), P. foetida (stem, fruit, 300 microg/ml), and Solanum torvum (root, 300 microg/ml) strongly inhibited the melanin production of B16 melanoma cells without significant cytotoxicity. These findings indicate that some medicinal plants from Central Kalimantan are potential ingredients for skin-whitening cosmetics if their safety can be confirmed. PMID:19618251

  9. Use of medicinal plants and pharmaceuticals by indigenous communities in the Bolivian Andes and Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandebroek Ina

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate, by means of household surveys, the use of medicinal plants and pharmaceuticals in Apillapampa, a large Andean community of Quechua peasants, and in six small communities of Yuracaré-Trinitario "slash-and-burn" cultivators of the National Park Isiboro-Sécure (the NPIS in the Bolivian Amazon. METHODS: A total of 12% of households in Apillapampa and nearly all households in the NPIS were interviewed about their use of medicinal plants and pharmaceuticals for treating illnesses. Informants were also asked to name any medicinal plants they knew. FINDINGS: In spite of the presence of a primary health care service (PHC with medical doctor in Apillapampa, an equal number of informants used medicinal plants and pharmaceuticals. In the NPIS, the prevalent use of medicinal plants or pharmaceuticals in any community depended on the distance of the community from the nearest village and from a PHC with medical doctor (r = 0.85 and r = -0.96; both P = 0.05. The NPIS communities' knowledge of plants expressed as the average number of medicinal plants mentioned correlated positively and negatively with distance from the nearest village and use of pharmaceuticals, respectively (r = 0.95, P<0.005 and r = -0.90, P<0.05, respectively. CONCLUSION: The cultural importance of traditional medicine and the physical isolation of communities, both in general and from PHCs, are factors that influence the use of and knowledge about medicinal plants.

  10. Asháninka medicinal plants: a case study from the native community of Bajo Quimiriki, Junín, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luziatelli Gaia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Asháninka Native Community Bajo Quimiriki, District Pichanaki, Junín, Peru, is located only 4 km from a larger urban area and is dissected by a major road. Therefore the loss of traditional knowledge is a main concern of the local headman and inhabitants. The present study assesses the state of traditional medicinal plant knowledge in the community and compares the local pharmacopoeia with the one from a related ethnic group. Methods Fieldwork was conducted between July and September 2007. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews, collection of medicinal plants in the homegardens, forest walks, a walk along the river banks, participant observation, informal conversation, cross check through voucher specimens and a focus group interview with children. Results Four-hundred and two medicinal plants, mainly herbs, were indicated by the informants. The most important families in terms of taxa were Asteraceae, Araceae, Rubiaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Solanaceae and Piperaceae. Eighty-four percent of the medicinal plants were wild and 63% were collected from the forest. Exotics accounted to only 2% of the medicinal plants. Problems related to the dermal system, digestive system, and cultural belief system represented 57% of all the medicinal applications. Some traditional healers received non-indigenous customers, using their knowledge as a source of income. Age and gender were significantly correlated to medicinal plant knowledge. Children knew the medicinal plants almost exclusively by their Spanish names. Sixteen percent of the medicinal plants found in this community were also reported among the Yanesha of the Pasco Region. Conclusions Despite the vicinity to a city, knowledge on medicinal plants and cultural beliefs are still abundant in this Asháninka Native Community and the medicinal plants are still available in the surroundings. Nevertheless, the use of Spanish names for the medicinal plants and the shift of healing practices towards a source of income with mainly non-indigenous customers, are signs of acculturation. Future studies on quantification of the use of medicinal plants, dynamics of transmission of ethno-medicinal knowledge to the young generations and comparison with available pharmacological data on the most promising medicinal plants are suggested.

  11. Globalisation and sustainable exports of Indian medicinal and aromatic plants: A protection study

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Soumitra Kumar

    2010-01-01

    India has a rich heritage of traditional systems of medicine viz. Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha, Tibetan which are mostly based on botanical formulations. Although biologically, the region is extremely rich in medicinal plants, due to years of unwise use, the availability of raw materials in desired quality and quantity has become difficult to obtain raising serious doubt about the safety and efficacy of the medicines currently in use. There is unprecedented demand for natural medicines, green hea...

  12. Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Cultivation in Bihar, India: Economic Potential and Condition for Adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, K.M.; Jha, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    The MAPs provide opportunities for developing a variety of safe and cost effective, prophylactic, and curative medicines for a number of maladies. It is estimated that the primary health care of over 80 per cent of the world’s population still depends on plant based traditional medicines (WHO, 2002). Growing consciousness about health and side effects of modern medicines has again set the stage for innovation and use of herbal medicines. The global market for herbal products is continuously...

  13. A comparative study on medicinal plants used in Akha's traditional medicine in China and Thailand, cultural coherence or ecological divergence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inta, A.; Shengji, P.

    2008-01-01

    Aim of the study : The survey aims to study the effect of geographic separation of ethnic groups on local knowledge of medicinal plants used by Akha people in Thailand and China, who were separated 100-120 years ago, to see how different the two geographically distinct but culturally similar groups were in this respect. Materials and methods : Interviewing 10 villagers in each of five Akha villages, three in Thailand and two in China, about which plants they used and how they used them. Results : A total of 95 medicinal plants registered in the five villages only 16 were shared between China and Thailand. Otherwise the use patterns were quite similar with respect to which plant families and plant growth forms were used and also in terms of in which habitats the Akha found their medicinal plants. Conclusions : The moving to a different site has forced the Akha to find a new set of species, but that when using these new species they have maintained other traditions relating to medicinal plants.

  14. Bioactivity evaluation against Artemia salina Leach of medicinal plants used in Brazilian Northeastern folk medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcanjo, D D R; Albuquerque, A C M; Melo-Neto, B; Santana, L C L R; Medeiros, M G F; Citó, Amgl

    2012-08-01

    The brine shrimp (Artemia salina Leach) lethality bioassay offers an advantage in standardization and quality control of botanical products. This test is well correlated with antitumor activity (cytotoxicity) and can be used to monitor the activity of bioactive natural products. This paper reports the bioactivity of ethanol extracts from seven medicinal plants from the Northeast of Brazil (Acmella uliginosa, Ageratum conyzoides, Eugenia uniflora, Plectranthus neochilus, Moringa oleifera, Justicia pectoralis and Equisetum sp.) against Artemia salina. Biological activity was evaluated for extracts at 1, 10, 100, and 1000 µg/mL in triplicate, and the mean lethal concentration values (LC50) were obtained by probit analysis. The species Acmella uliginosa showed the highest bioactivity, and its flower extract was more active than its leaf extract. PMID:22990821

  15. Evidence-based Review of Medicinal Plants Used for the Treatment of Hemorrhoids

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Abdollahi,; Roja Rahimi

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhoidal disease is a common problem which is usually not managed properly with pharmacologic interventions and will eventually require surgery. However, there are many medicinal plants that were successfully used for the treatment of hemorrhoids in the traditional and folk medicine of different countries. In this study, these medicinal plants have been reviewed and their mechanism of action and their major chemical constituents responsible for their activities have been assessed individu...

  16. In vitro Multiplication of Aromatic and Medicinal Plants and Fungicide Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Leal, Fernanda; Matos, Manuela; Coelho, Ana Cláudia; Carnide, Olinda

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic and medicinal plants, widely used as folk medicine are, beyond fruits, vegetables grains and spices, the principal source of antioxidant compounds. Several studies demonstrated that antioxidants have also antifungal activity (Jayashree & Subramanyam, 2000; Rasooli & Abyaneh, 2004). More and more, humanity try to replace synthetic metabolites by natural metabolites. Therefore, studies in aromatic and medicinal plants with the capacity to produce a different range of sec...

  17. STUDY OF PLANT BIODIVERSITY OF HAZARIBAG DISTRICT JHARKHAND INDIA AND ITS MEDICINAL USES

    OpenAIRE

    Hari Shankar Lal; Sanjay Singh

    2012-01-01

    Jharkhand is rich in biodiversity of medicinal plants. The forest area is about 40% of the total area of Jharkhand. 32 tribal communities found in Jharkhand. They are used medicinal plants by traditional knowledge. Traditional medicinal practioners known as vaidays or kavirajas from the primary health care provider in rural Jharkhand.The objective of this present study was to conduct a value addition survey amongst tribal of Hazaribag and around the district of Jharkhand. Knowledge about to c...

  18. GERMPLASM EVALUATION OF MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC PLANTS IN HIGHLAND BALOCHISTAN, PAKISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    ASLAM GILL; AMINULLAH; SOHAIL ASLAM; KHALIL AHMAD; MUHAMMAD ISLAM; SHAISTA KOUKAB; SARFRAZ AHMAD

    2008-01-01

    Research studies are carried out for cultivation potential of medicinal and aromatic plants [Thyme, Oregano, Rosemary, Sage (belonging to the family Lamiaceae)] in Balochistan. The species studied showed good adaptability in cold and dry area and production potential in highland Balochistan. A medicinal herb garden was also established at Arid Zone Research Centre, Quetta with more than 60 potential medicinal and aromatic plants. This germplasm category includes culinary and herbal teas (Thym...

  19. PROFILE OF HEAVY METALS IN MEDICINAL PLANTS COLLECTED FROM KHYBER PAKHTUNKHWA, PAKISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Rehman, Hussain Ullah, Nisar Ahmad, Aziz Ur Rehman, Nimat Ullah, Shan Zeb, Imran and Ijaz Ahmad*

    2013-01-01

    Essential and non-essential heavy metals like Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co,  Cd, Cr and Pb were analyzed in nine selected medicinal plants namely Persea duthiei, Suaeda monoica, Oxalis corniculata, Hibiscus rosa, Erythrina variegates, Curcuma longa, Berberis lyceum, Zanthoxylum alatum and Quercus dilatata by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. These medicinal plants were selected for our investigation having in mind their extensive use in traditional medicine for various ailments by local physicia...

  20. The influence of extraction solvents on the anticancer activities of Palestinian medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Alzeer, J.; Vummidi, B. R.; Arafeh, R.; Rimawi, W.; Saleem, H.; Luedtke, Nathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Palestine has a rich and prestigious heritage of herbal medicines. To investigate the impact of variable extraction techniques on the cytotoxic effects of medicinal plant extracts, 5 well-known medicinal plants from Palestine were extracted with 90% ethanol, 80% methanol, acetone, coconut water, apple vinegar, grape vinegar or 5% acetic acid. The resulting 35 extracts were screened for cytotoxic activities against three different cancer cell lines (B16F10, MCF-7 and HeLa) using a standard res...

  1. The Anthelmintic Activity of Selected Indigenous Medicinal Plants Used by The anyankole of Western Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Olila Deogracious; Tuwangye Innocent

    2006-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the traditional cures of livestock diseases. This is because industrially produced drugs are too expensive for some sectors of the farming community especially in the developing world. Medicinal plants are often cheaper and more easily available than the commercially produced drugs. The self-help study in form of traditional medicines (especially from medicinal plants), offer a way out by making use of resources available within the communities the...

  2. Effects of a Chinese Medicinal Plant Radix Astragali on the Ovariectomized Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yan; Jin, Yue; Zhu, Hai-Bin; Xu, Shao-Ting; Xia, Ya-Xian; Huang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Perimenopausal syndrome occurs during the transition to menopause. Complementary and alternative medicine, especially Chinese medicinal plants, has manifested significant effects in alleviating perimenopausal symptoms. However, little research has been focused on the effects of Chinese medicinal plant on the immune function of the perimenopausal women. The present study aimed to explore the effects of Radix Astragali (RA) on the sex hormone levels and the interleukins of the ovariectomized fe...

  3. Polyphenols and antioxidant capacity of Bulgarian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, D; Gerova, D; Chervenkov, T; Yankova, T

    2005-01-01

    Extracts of 21 plants used in Bulgarian phytotherapy for the treatment of respiratory, gastrointestinal and other inflammatory disorders were screened in vitro for antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds content. Plant extracts were prepared as herbal teas following the ethnic use. The water-phase TEAC (Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity) of the teas were compared to that of the famous tea-like beverages mate, rooibos and honeybush, and to that of green and black tea, well known for their high antioxidant potential. The content of total phenolics in the teas was determined spectrometrically according to the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and calculated as quercetin equivalents (QE). Seven Bulgarian medicinal plants were with high phenolics content and antioxidant properties: Pulmonaria officinalis L. (Boraginaceae) (TEAC 2.02+/-0.14 mM/QE 673.39+/-9.92 microM), Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae) (TEAC 3.75+/-0.14 mM/QE 881.93+/-6.68 microM), Agrimonia eupatoria L. (Rosaceae) (TEAC 3.76+/-0.5mM/QE 702.29+/-6.82 microM), Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae) (TEAC 5.87+/-0.2mM/QE 1653.61+/-11.52 microM), Melissa officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) (TEAC 4.06+/-0.31 mM/QE 1370.09+/-41.38 microM), Rubus sp. diversa (Rosaceae) (TEAC 4.23+/-0,12 mM/QE 608.95+/-5.95 microM), Cotinus coggygria Scop. (Anacardiaceae) (TEAC 7.05+/-0.19 mM/QE 923.33+/-14.19 microM). Therefore, Bulgarian herbs can be considered to be a rich source of water-soluble antioxidants and/or phenolic compounds as compared to studied foreign plants. PMID:15588663

  4. PlantID – DNA-based identification of multiple medicinal plants in complex mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Caroline

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An efficient method for the identification of medicinal plant products is now a priority as the global demand increases. This study aims to develop a DNA-based method for the identification and authentication of plant species that can be implemented in the industry to aid compliance with regulations, based upon the economically important Hypericum perforatum L. (St John’s Wort or Guan ye Lian Qiao. Methods The ITS regions of several Hypericum species were analysed to identify the most divergent regions and PCR primers were designed to anneal specifically to these regions in the different Hypericum species. Candidate primers were selected such that the amplicon produced by each species-specific reaction differed in size. The use of fluorescently labelled primers enabled these products to be resolved by capillary electrophoresis. Results Four closely related Hypericum species were detected simultaneously and independently in one reaction. Each species could be identified individually and in any combination. The introduction of three more closely related species to the test had no effect on the results. Highly processed commercial plant material was identified, despite the potential complications of DNA degradation in such samples. Conclusion This technique can detect the presence of an expected plant material and adulterant materials in one reaction. The method could be simply applied to other medicinal plants and their problem adulterants.

  5. PlantID – DNA-based identification of multiple medicinal plants in complex mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background An efficient method for the identification of medicinal plant products is now a priority as the global demand increases. This study aims to develop a DNA-based method for the identification and authentication of plant species that can be implemented in the industry to aid compliance with regulations, based upon the economically important Hypericum perforatum L. (St John’s Wort or Guan ye Lian Qiao). Methods The ITS regions of several Hypericum species were analysed to identify the most divergent regions and PCR primers were designed to anneal specifically to these regions in the different Hypericum species. Candidate primers were selected such that the amplicon produced by each species-specific reaction differed in size. The use of fluorescently labelled primers enabled these products to be resolved by capillary electrophoresis. Results Four closely related Hypericum species were detected simultaneously and independently in one reaction. Each species could be identified individually and in any combination. The introduction of three more closely related species to the test had no effect on the results. Highly processed commercial plant material was identified, despite the potential complications of DNA degradation in such samples. Conclusion This technique can detect the presence of an expected plant material and adulterant materials in one reaction. The method could be simply applied to other medicinal plants and their problem adulterants. PMID:22838839

  6. HORTICULTURAL, MEDICINAL AND CEREMONIAL PLANTS IN PETIGA VILLAGE, TABANAN BALI PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyoman Adiputra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a must for Bali. It is due to the fact that one of the negative impact of development is the change of the land use from agriculture into other functions. As a result most of medicinal plants will be extinct. In another hand there is a trend of people to plant horticultures in their house yards. The main issue: is there any relationship between horticulture and sustainable development? In answering it, a field study was conducted in Petiga Village, Tabanan, Bali Province. Observation and  interview were carried out to respondents consisted of five Balinese farmers who nurse cultivate the horticultural plants for their daily activities. Results show that: 1 there are about 159kinds of plant totally used as horticultural plants; 2 amongst those plants, about 67 plants belong to the medicinal plants and 80 plants belong to ceremonial plants; 3 number of horticultural plants in every house sampled ranged from 63-94 kinds; 4 the popularity of any horticultural plant is affected by the market’s demand. The conclusion which could be drawn is that the medicinal plants as well as the ceremonial plants are used for horticultural plants. It is due to their wonderful colors, nice stems, flowers or leaves, special odors, economical values and magical values as well. Horticulture could be used as a strategy for preservation and conservation program of the medicinal plants in Bali. It is recommended that for the sustainability, all medicinal plants which exist in Bali should be invented and planted in a form of medicinal plant park.

  7. HORTICULTURAL, MEDICINAL AND CEREMONIAL PLANTS IN PETIGA VILLAGE, TABANAN BALI PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyoman Adiputra

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a must for Bali. It is due to the fact that one of the negative impacst of development is the change of the land use from agriculture into other functions. As a result, most of medicinal plants will be extinct. In another hand there is a trend of people to plant horticultures in their house yards. The main issue: is there any relationship between horticulture and sustainable development? In answering it, a field study was conducted in Petiga Village, Tabanan, Bali Province. Observation and interview were carried out to respondents consisted of five Balinese farmers who nurse cultivate the horticultural plants for their daily activities. Results show that: 1 there are about 159 kinds of plant totally used as horticultural plants; 2 amongst those plants, about 67 plants belong to the medicinal plants and 80 plants belong to ceremonial plants; 3 number of horticultural plants in every house sampled ranged from 63-94 kinds; 4 the popularity of any horticultural plant is affected by the market’s demand. The conclusion which could be drawn was that the medicinal plants as well as the ceremonial plants were used for horticultural plants. It was due to their wonderful colors, nice stems, flowers or leaves, special odors, economical values and magical values as well. Horticulture could be used as a strategy for preservation and conservation program of the medicinal plants in Bali. It was recommended that for the sustainability, all medicinal plants which exist in Bali should be invented and planted in a form of medicinal plant park.

  8. DOCUMENTATION OF MEDICINAL PLANTS KNOWLEDGE OF NAGAMALAI HILLS, MADURAI DISTRICT, TAMIL NADU, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ganesan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The traditional knowledge of people including reliable ethnomedicinal expertise in the native plants used for the preparation of drugs and administration were documented. The collected through questionnaire as well as informal personal interviews during field trips were carried out in the study area totaling 70 days during June 2014 - feb 2015. Rare medicinal plants survey was carried out to collect the information about the medicinal plants found in Nagamalai Hill and used by the native of around the hills people. 74 plants species belongs to 34 families, which are used in traditional health care system are described under this study. In this information obtained from the in and around the Nagamalai hills people, the documented medicinal plants used by the local people are arranged alphabetically, and followed by their botanical name, family name, vernacular names parts used and their corresponding diseases. The traditional system of health care has been systematically used for over two thousand years to treat illness. The local Nagamalai people depend on plants and their parts, to cure their health problems. To avoid biodiversity extinction some measures would taken, like cultivation of rare medicinal plants, establishment of herbal gardens in forest areas and creation of seed bank. People should be expectant to raise medicinal plants cultivate and sustainable utilization and medicinal gardens in their vicinity to ensure conservation of the biodiversity in medicinal plants.

  9. STUDY OF PLANT BIODIVERSITY OF HAZARIBAG DISTRICT JHARKHAND INDIA AND ITS MEDICINAL USES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Shankar Lal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Jharkhand is rich in biodiversity of medicinal plants. The forest area is about 40% of the total area of Jharkhand. 32 tribal communities found in Jharkhand. They are used medicinal plants by traditional knowledge. Traditional medicinal practioners known as vaidays or kavirajas from the primary health care provider in rural Jharkhand.The objective of this present study was to conduct a value addition survey amongst tribal of Hazaribag and around the district of Jharkhand. Knowledge about to conserve these natural resources is very important. If all the people know about our natural resources & its important in our life by training or another sources than save it for value addition. If one sps save per people by conserve it for value addition than disease free nature obtained. Information on 95 plants sps was obtained which were used by tribal vaidyas to treat various ailments given the table 1. These medicinal plants belong to 95 genera and 51 families. All plants were grown or cultivated in home steads or fields as ornamental plant, shade giving plants ,timber yielding plants, home construction plants ,medicinal plants ,vegetable ,fruits etc.The various plant part used included whole plants, leaves ,stems,roots,tuber,barks,flower,fruits,&seeds. Traditional and ethnic knowledge generated from such leads has played most significant role in the discovery of novel product as well as newer ideas about conservation of natural resources. This paper deals the biodiversity of plant which is used by tribals in Hazaribag Jharkhand.

  10. Total phenolics and antioxidant activity of five medicinal plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes total phenolics content and antioxidant activity in the ethanolic extract of leaves, bark and roots of five medicinal plants: Terminalia brasiliensis Camb., Terminalia fagifolia Mart. and Zucc., Copernicia cerifera (Miller) H.E. Moore, Cenostigma macrophyllum Tul. var. acuminata Teles Freire and Qualea grandiflora Mart. The total phenolics content of the plant extracts, determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, varied from 250.0 ±8,2 to 763,63 ±13.03 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g dry EtOH extract. The antioxidant activity of extracts was evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay system. Extract of bark from T. brasiliensis, the most active, with an EC50 value of 27.59 ± 0.82 ?g/mL, was comparable to rutin (EC50 = 27.80 ± 1.38) and gallic acid (EC50 = 24.27 ± 0.31), used as positive controls. The relationship between total phenolic content and antioxidant activity was positive and significant for T. brasiliensis, C. macrophyllum and C. cerifera. (author)

  11. Antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of five medicinal Libyan plants extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Al-Najjar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Five Libyan medicinal plants Thapsia garganica, Hammada scoparia, Euphorbia serrata, Hyoscyamus albus and Retama rateam were selected to evaluate their biological activities. Their total phenolic and flavanoid contents were assessed. The antioxidant activity was estimated using 2, 2-di- phenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH as free radical scavenger. Their crude extracts showed reducing potential proportional to their concentration. The correlation coefficient (R2 between antioxidant activity and their total phenolics and flavanoids content is 0.77 and 0.98 respectively. Crude aqueous, methanolic as well as alkaloids extracts of the five plants were tested against a number of G+ve and G-ve sensitive resistant (e.g MRSA bacteria beside some fungal species. The aqueous extracts displayed weak antibacterial activity whereas methanolic extracts were profoundly effective against both G+ve and G-ve bacteria. The extracts of E. serrata and H. scoparia were highly effective against E. coli in particular. The alkaloid-rich extracts of H. albus and H. scoparia induced remarkable bacteriostatic and fungistatic effects. The bioactive ingredients of H. scoparia, E. serrata and R. rateam extracts are shown to be potential sources of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial ingredients favoring their possible use in industrial pharmacology on large scale.

  12. Antimicrobial Activities Of Certain South Indian Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Subramani, R. Karnan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts of six medicinal plants viz. Gynodropsis Pentaphyllum (Capparidaceae family, Solanum nigrum (Solanaceae family, Merremia gangitica (Convolvulaceae family, Cicca acida (Euphorbiaceae family, Erythrina variegata ( Leguminaceae family and Asparagus fysoxii (Asparagaceae family were carried out against five pathogenic Bacteria. Out of which three Bacteria are Gram positive – ( Staphylococcus aureus NCIM 2079, Streptococcus mutans NCIM 2611, Bacillus cerus NCIM 2106 and two Gram negative bacteria – ( Escherichia coli NCIM 2005, Solmonella abony NCIM 2257 using disc diffusion method. The respective bacteria were inoculated in a nutrient broth for overnight incubation. In the comparative study of plant extracts with standard drugs, Sterile disc’s (HIMEDIA obtained and respective volume of each extract was dispensed over the disc to attain 10 mcg concentrations each of the disc’s were dried and impregnated over the pre-inoculated plates. Finally the zone of inhibition was observed and the inhibitory zone was measured using zone inhibitory scale (HIMEDIA and the values are noted in mm

  13. The molluscicidal activity of plants used in Brazilian folk medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, A F; Sant'Ana, A E

    2000-01-01

    In a continuing search for new compounds for the control of the vectors of schistosomiasis, we have tested the activity of some Brazilian medicinal plants as sources of molluscicidal natural compounds, using two molluscicidal bioassays. Twenty-seven crude extracts, from twenty-six species belonging to nineteen families, were tested. Seven extracts showed significant molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata adults with DL50 values of less than 50 ppm, and five of them were very active in the test using egg masses. The species most active against B. glabrata adults (LD50 value = 3.65 ppm) and their egg masses (LD50 value = 0.13 ppm) was Derris sp. Annona muricata [LD50 value (adult) = 11.86 ppm and LD50 value (egg) = 49.62 ppm], Jatropha elliptica (from Goiás state) [LD50 value (adult) = 24.80 ppm and LD50 value (egg) = 3.03 ppm] and Renealmia exaltata [LD50 value (adult) = 28.03 ppm and LD50 value (egg) = 21.67 ppm], were also considered promising molluscicidal plants. PMID:10715846

  14. Trace element content of medicinal plants from Algeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron activation analysis (INAA) has been applied to multielemental determination of eleven medicinal plants used to cure the urinary tract diseases observed in Algeria. These plants include Androgena Citratus, Ceratonia Siliquata, Punica Granatum, Glyryrrhiza Glabra, Lausaunia Alba, Fragaria Vesca, Arbutus Unedol, Hordeum Vulgaris, Papieteria Officinalis, Zea Mays L, and Davallia Seae. Concentrations of twenty elements Ba, Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, I, Mn, Na, Mg, Rb, Sb, Se, Sc, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn have been determined by short, and long irradiation times with a thermal and epithermal flux of 1.4 x 1012 n x cm-2 x s-1 and 1.4 x 1011 n x cm-2 x s-1, respectively. These analyses were performed in conjunction with Compton suppression. In almost herbs studied the Co, Cr, Cu, Rb, Sb , Sc, Se and V are found to be present at trace levels, Br, Mn, and Zn at the minor level, and Ca, Cl, Fe, Mg and Na are generally at the major level. The accuracy of the measurements has been evaluated by analyzing NISTbotanical references materials. (author)

  15. Hypolipidimic effect of some medicinal plants on diabetic rats

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    Eman G.E.Helal * and Mohamed M. A. Shahat

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to evaluate the hypolipidimic effect of aqueous extract of a famous mixture used in Saudi Arabia folk medicine that consists of Nigella sativa, Commiphora myrrha, Boswellia carterii Birdw, Ferule assa-foetida and Aloe vera and also the extract of each plant alone on alloxan induced diabetic rats. Material and Methods :-The present study was carried out on 80 adult male albino rats (120 ± 20 g.b.wt. , the rats were divided randomly into 8 groups, the first group served as control group, the second group as alloxan induced diabetic rats, the third group was diabetic rats treated with mixture of folk medicinal plant ( 0.01g /100 g b. wt. ,the fourth group: diabetic rats treated with Nigella sativa ( 0.01g /100 g b. wt. , the fifth group: diabetic rats treated with Aloe vera ( 0.005g /100 g b. wt. , the sixth group: diabetic rats treated with Ferule assa-foetida ( 0.01 g /100 g b. wt., the seventh: diabetic rats treated with Boswellia carterii Birdw ( 1ml/100 g b. wt. and the eighth group: diabetic rats treated with Commiphora myrrha ( 0.01 g ml/100 g b. wt. Results :- Serum total lipid, serum total cholesterol, LDL­cholesterol, and triglyceride recorded significant increases in diabetic, Nigella sativa, Commiphora myrrha, Boswellia carterii birdw and Aloe vera treated group. While the mixture and Ferule assa-foetida treated group, showed insignificant changes in serum total lipid, triglyceride, serum total cholesterol and LDL­cholesterol. On other hand, the mixture treated group and Ferule assa-foetida treated group showed significant decreased in the previous parameters. The serum HDL­cholesterol was significantly reduced in diabetic group throughout the experimental periods, otherwise, all treated group revealed insignificant changes till the end of experiment when compare with undiabetic rats. Conclusion: The aqueous extract of a mixture consists of Nigella sativa, Commiphora myrrha, Boswellia carterii Birdw, Ferule assa-foetida and Aloe vera are useful for improvement of the lipid profile of alloxan induced diabetic rats fram each plant alone.

  16. Ecological status and traditional knowledge of medicinal plants in Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary of Garhwal Himalaya, India

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    Bhat Jahangeer A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Himalayan forests are the most important source of medicinal plants and with useful species for the local people. Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary (KWLS is situated in the interior part of the Garhwal Himalayan region. The presented study was carried out in Madhmeshwar area of KWLS for the ecological status of medicinal plants and further focused on the ethnomedicinal uses of these plants in the study area. Methods Ecological information about ethnomedicinal plants were collected using random quadrats in a random sampling technique along an altitudinal gradient in the KWLS. Information on medicinal properties of plants encountered in the present study was generated by questionnaire survey and was also compared with relevant literature. Results A total of 152 medicinally important plant species were reported, in which 103 were found herbs, 32 shrubs and 17 were tree species which represented 123 genera of 61 families. A total of 18 plant species fell into the rare, endangered (critically endangered and vulnerable status categories. Conclusion The present study documented the traditional uses of medicinal plants, their ecological status and importance of these plants in the largest protected area of Garhwal Himalaya. This study can serve as baseline information on medicinal plants and could be helpful to further strengthen the conservation of this important resource.

  17. Unsustainable colletion and unfair trade? : uncovering and assessing assumptions regarding Central Himalayan medicinal plant conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Helle Overgaard; Olsen, Carsten Smith

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The trade in medicinal plants for herbal remedies is large and probably increasing. The trade has attracted the attention of scientists and development planners interested in the impact on plant populations and the potential to improve rural livelihoods through community based management and conservation. This has resulted in a large number of publications and development activities, ranging from small NGO projects to new government policies. Through a review of 119 references from Nepal, 4 common assumptions regarding the medicinal plant collection and trade have been identified: I. The commercial medicinal plant resource base is becoming ever more degraded as a consequence of collection; II. The medicinal plants are an open-access resource; III. Cultivation can contribute to conservation of commercially collected medicinal plant species; and IV. Medicinal plant harvesters are cheated by middlemen. The frequency of the assumptions is documented, their empirical support is evaluated, and the consequences of their presence for conservation and rural livelihoods are discussed. It is concluded that the empirical backing for the assumptions is weak, and that some reviewed references use logically flawed argumentation. It is argued that the assumptions are leading to misguided conservation efforts, and an inclusive approach to conservation of commercial central Himalayan medicinal plant species is briefly outlined. Electronic Supplementary Material Supplementary material is available in the online version of this article at http://www.dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-006-9039-4 and is accessible for authorized users.

  18. Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used in Arjan - Parishan protected area in Fars Province of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatkhahi, Mehdi; Dolatkhahi, Ali; Nejad, Javad Bagher

    2014-11-01

    Objective : Today, medicinal plants are widely used in remedies for several ailments and improvement of human health because of their pharmaceutical properties. This study aimed to document important useful medicinal plants and their medicinal characteristics for treatment of human ailments in the Arjan (_) Parishan protected area in Fars province of Iran during 2010-2012. Materials and Methods : Data were obtained using direct interviews with 80 informants particularly those who were more familiar with the herbs and their medicinal properties. Collected plants were recognized and families, genera, and species determined using indispensable references. In this paper, scientific name, local name, parts used, and ways of application and ailments treated using traditional medicinal plant species have been provided. Results : We documented 85 plant species belonging to 39 families and 78 genera used for treating ailments. Among which, Asteraceae with 13 species was the most frequently used family and fruits and leaves were the favored parts for local users. Our results indicated that in this area, the highest compliance in the use of plants in treating ailments were related to the intestinal digestive system (40.8%). Conclusion : The present study is the first contribution to the ethnobotany of this region. Our results showed that some plants are used for medicinal purposes in this region, either for the same or for different purposes. Generally, the results of the present investigation can be used as a basis for selecting useful medicinal plants and also help to preserve precious information that may otherwise be lost to future generations. PMID:25386404

  19. Medicinal plants - a potent antibacterial source against bacterial leaf blight (BLB) of rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antibacterial potential of indigenous medicinal plants as alternative chemical pesticides for controlling bacterial leaf blight (BLB) of rice was investigated. Twenty-five different species of medicinal plants were collected from various sites in Pakistan. Decoctions of all medicinal plant species were screened by the disc plate diffusion method for testing the susceptibility of an aggressive isolate of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo 105). Out of twenty five medicinal plants, Thuja orientalis (cone + leaves), Azadirachta indica (seeds + fruits), Amomum subulatum (fruits), Terminalia chebula (fruits), Terminalia bellirica (fruits), Anethum graveolens (fruits) and Ferula assa-foetida (fruits) decoctions showed significant activity. The efficacy of decoctions from six promising plants were further tested through detached leaf, glasshouse and field assays. A decoction of Terminalia chebula demonstrated the highest effectiveness in terms of regulating BLB in the plants both under laboratory and field conditions. Bioactive fractions of Terminalia chebula were purified, characterized and tentatively identified as allegic acid. (author)

  20. Inorganic constituents determination in medicinal plants and their extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types of therapies have been introduced as an alternative treatment to combat different types of human disorders. Among them, the use of herbal teas has been highlighted by the cost/benefit, easiness of acquisition and administration. The aim of this study was to determine the inorganic constituents, and evaluate the element concentrations of As, Ba, Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Hf, K, Mg. Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Ta, Th, Ti, U, V, Zn and Zr by neutron activation analysis; and Cd, Cu, Ni and Pb, by atomic emission spectrometry, with inductively coupled plasma source and Hg, by atomic absorption spectrometry, with cold vapor generation in medicinal plants and their extracts, whose marketing was recently regulated by National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA). The relevance of these analyses is justified by the need of contributing to the recommendation of such plants as sources of minerals in the diet and, also, to verify if their concentrations cam pose some harm to the organism. The techniques showed adequate sensitivity in determining the concentration for most of the elements. Toxic elements were found in concentration not harmful to the human body. The results, also, allowed possible to correlate the elemental concentration in the analyzed species, by the determination the correlation coefficients and applications of cluster analysis. From these results it was confirmers in the groups of elements, regarding the variation of the concentrations observed in some plants and their extracts. The elements that play important roles in the human metabolism were determined in concentrations that can help both, to avoid the lack of these elements in the organisms, from the diet, and in treatment of disease. (author)

  1. Cytotoxic activity of Thai medicinal plants for cancer treatment

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    Chawaboon Dechsukum

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Twelve Thai medicinal plants as the ingredients of a Southern Thai traditional formula for cancer treatment were selected to test cytotoxicity activity against two types of human cancer cell lines ; large cell lung carcinoma (CORL-23 and prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and one type of normal human cell line, fibroblast cells (10FS. SRB assay was used to test cytotoxic activity against all the cell types. Two of the extracts (water and ethanolic extracts procedures used were similar to those practised by Thai traditional doctors. One concentration (50 ?g/ml of two different extracts was tested first against cell lines and the active plant extracts were diluted and tested for calculating IC50. The ethanolic extracts of six plants (Bridelia ovata, Curcuma zedoaria, Derris scandens, Dioscorea membranacea, Nardostachys jatamansi and Rhinacanthus nasutus showed cytotoxic activity (IC50< 30 ?g/ml against lung and prostate cancer cell lines. Dioscorea membranacea roots showed the highest cytotoxic activity against lung cancer cell lines ( IC50= 4.6 ?g/ml but it exhibited low cytotoxic activity against prostate cancer cell lines (IC50= 17.55 ?g/ml and less cytotoxic activity against normal cell lines (IC50= 66.05 ?g/ml. Curcuma zedoaria showed cytotoxic activity against COR L-23 and PC3 but less cytotoxic activity against 10FS (IC50 = 6.05, 17.84 and 55.50 ?g/ml respectively Rhinacanthus nasutus root extract showed the highest cytotoxic activity against PC3 ( IC50 = 2.01 ?g/ml and this extract also showed high activity against COR L-23 and 10FS (IC50=5.05 and 10.95 ?g/ml respectively. The water extract of all plants exhibited no activity against all types of human cells. Two ethanolic plant extracts (Dioscorea membranacea and Curcuma zedoaria which showed specific activity against lung cancer cell lines and less cytotoxic activity against normal cells should be further investigated for active compounds against lung cancer cell.

  2. Ethnopharmacological survey of six medicinal plants from Mali, West-Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Bah Sekou; Ballo Ngolo; Skogsrud Mona; Glæserud Silje; Grønhaug Tom; Diallo Drissa; Paulsen Berit

    2008-01-01

    Abstract An ethnopharmacological survey was carried out to collect information about the use of six medicinal plants in the regions around Siby and Dioila, Mali. The plants investigated were Biopyhtum petersianum, Cola cordifolia, Combretum molle, Opilia celtidifolia, Parkia biglobosa and Ximenia americana. More than 60 medical indications were reported for the use of these plants in traditional medicine. The most frequently reported ailments were malaria (25.6%), different types of pain (14....

  3. Influence of Edaphic Factors on Distribution of Mycorrhiza Associated with Medicinal Plants in Indian Central Himalayas

    OpenAIRE

    Purshotam Kaushik; Supriya Gaur

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed the effect of various Edaphic factors on the Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (VAM) associated with medicinal plants. Based on the richness of medicinal plants in Himalayan region, this study considered three plants i.e., Catharanthus roseus Linn., Ocimum spp. and Asparagus racemosus Willd. The study was conducted at five districts of Uttarakhand state in India viz. Pauri Garhwal, Haridwar, Dehradun, Udham Singh Nagar and Almora. This study has evaluated and analyzed the ef...

  4. Identification of Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts with Novel Anti-Influenza Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekaran, Dhivya; Palombo, Enzo A.; Chia Yeo, Tiong; Lim Siok Ley, Diana; Lee Tu, Chu; Malherbe, Francois; Grollo, Lara

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistant variants of the influenza virus has led to a need to identify novel and effective antiviral agents. As an alternative to synthetic drugs, the consolidation of empirical knowledge with ethnopharmacological evidence of medicinal plants offers a novel platform for the development of antiviral drugs. The aim of this study was to identify plant extracts with proven activity against the influenza virus. Extracts of fifty medicinal plants, originating from the tropica...

  5. INHIBITION OF HSV-1 MULTIPLICATION BY FIVE SPECIES OF MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Maliheh Farahani

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants have been traditionally used for different kinds of ailments including infectious diseases. As viral resistance to available chemical drugs causes problems in the treatment of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection, there is an evolving need for new antiherpes drugs. Therefore in the present study 5 species of medicinal plants with ethno-medical background were screened for antiherpes effect against HSV-1in Hep-2(Human epithelial type 2) cells. Different parts of the plants we...

  6. Anti-pseudomona and Anti-bacilli Activity of Some Medicinal Plants of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Gholam Hosein Shahidi Bonjar; Ashraf Karimi Nik; Mohammad Reza Heydari; Mohammad Hassan Ghasemzadeh; Parvin Rashid Farrokhi; Mahmood Reza Moein; Shahla Mansouri; Alireza Foroumadi

    2003-01-01

    The use of plants in treatment of burns, dermatophytes, and infectious diseases is common in traditional medicine of Iran. Based on ethno pharmacological and taxonomic information, antibacterial activities of methanol extracts of some medicinal plants of Iran were determined by In Vitro bioassays using agar diffusion-method against standard strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus and B. pumilis at 20 mg/ml. From 180 plant species of 72 families, 78 spec...

  7. Common plants of medicinal values in kolams of Adilabad district, Andhra Pradesh

    OpenAIRE

    Vln, Rao; Bharathi K; Appalanaidu P; Jm, Naidu; Venkaiah M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Common plants of medicinal values in Kolams are used as ethnomedical practices for various ailments and diseases inhabiting the Utnoor division of Adilabad district, Andhra Pradesh, India. Aim: This paper provides data on 31 medicinal plants used by Kolams for curing various ailments along with their local names, method of preparation, mode of administration and use. Materials and Methods: Our collections of ethnomedicinal plant specimens from this area were deposited in the Andh...

  8. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in Terai forest of western Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Anant; Kumar Akhilesh; Tewari Divya

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Nepal Himalayas have been known as a rich source for valuable medicinal plants since Vedic periods. Present work is the documentation of indigenous knowledge on plant utilization as natural remedy by the inhabitants of terai forest in Western Nepal. Methods Study was conducted during 2010–2011 following standard ethnobotanical methods. Data about medicinal uses of plants were collected by questionnaire, personal interview and group discussion with pre identified informan...

  9. Evidence-based Review of Medicinal Plants Used for the Treatment of Hemorrhoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdollahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhoidal disease is a common problem which is usually not managed properly with pharmacologic interventions and will eventually require surgery. However, there are many medicinal plants that were successfully used for the treatment of hemorrhoids in the traditional and folk medicine of different countries. In this study, these medicinal plants have been reviewed and their mechanism of action and their major chemical constituents responsible for their activities have been assessed individually. Among various herbal medicines, Aesculus hippocastanum, Boswellia species, Cissus quadrangularis, Euphorbia prostrata, Juniperus species, Melastoma malabathricum, Myrtus communis and Verbascum species have got higher support from scientific evidence. These medicinal plants may exert their beneficial effects in hemorrhoids by their anti-inflammatory, analgesic and venotonic activities. Several chemical constituents were identified in these plants which may be responsible for their pharmacological activities, of which, flavonoids, terpenoids, triterpenes and tannins are the majors.

  10. Plant extracts from Cameroonian medicinal plants strongly inhibit hepatitis C virus infection in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galani, Borris R. T.; Sahuc, Marie-Emmanuelle; Njayou, Frederic N.; Deloison, Gaspard; Mkounga, Pierre; Feudjou, William F.; Brodin, Priscille; Rouillé, Yves; Nkengfack, Augustin E.; Moundipa, Paul Fewou; Séron, Karin

    2015-01-01

    According to some recent studies, Cameroon is one of the sub-Saharan African countries most affected by hepatitis C, with low access to the standard therapy based on the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. A first ethnobotanical survey, conducted in the Western region of Cameroon, reported the use of several medicinal plants in traditional medicine for the healing of liver-related disorders. Crude organic extracts of five plants surveyed were prepared and their effect against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection investigated. The HCV JFH1 strain cell culture system HCVcc was used. The antiviral activity was quantified by immunofluorescent labeling of HCV E1 envelope protein at 30 h post-infection in the presence of the plant extracts. Active compounds were then tested in time course infection experiments. Dose-response and cellular toxicity assays were also determined. Three extracts, methanol extracts from roots of Trichilia dregeana, stems of Detarium microcarpum and leaves of Phragmanthera capitata, showed anti-HCV activity, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 16.16, 1.42, and 13.17 ?g/mL, respectively. Huh-7 cells were incubated with the extracts for 72 h and it appears that T. dregeana extract is not toxic up to 200 ?g/mL, D. microcarpum up to 100 ?g/mL and P. capitata up to 800 ?g/mL. All the three extracts showed a strong inhibition of HCV entry and no effect on replication or secretion. Taken together, these results showed that extracts from Cameroonian medicinal plants are promising sources of anti-HCV agents. PMID:26029203

  11. Plant extracts from Cameroonian medicinal plants strongly inhibit hepatitis C virus infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galani, Borris R T; Sahuc, Marie-Emmanuelle; Njayou, Frederic N; Deloison, Gaspard; Mkounga, Pierre; Feudjou, William F; Brodin, Priscille; Rouillé, Yves; Nkengfack, Augustin E; Moundipa, Paul Fewou; Séron, Karin

    2015-01-01

    According to some recent studies, Cameroon is one of the sub-Saharan African countries most affected by hepatitis C, with low access to the standard therapy based on the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. A first ethnobotanical survey, conducted in the Western region of Cameroon, reported the use of several medicinal plants in traditional medicine for the healing of liver-related disorders. Crude organic extracts of five plants surveyed were prepared and their effect against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection investigated. The HCV JFH1 strain cell culture system HCVcc was used. The antiviral activity was quantified by immunofluorescent labeling of HCV E1 envelope protein at 30 h post-infection in the presence of the plant extracts. Active compounds were then tested in time course infection experiments. Dose-response and cellular toxicity assays were also determined. Three extracts, methanol extracts from roots of Trichilia dregeana, stems of Detarium microcarpum and leaves of Phragmanthera capitata, showed anti-HCV activity, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 16.16, 1.42, and 13.17 ?g/mL, respectively. Huh-7 cells were incubated with the extracts for 72 h and it appears that T. dregeana extract is not toxic up to 200 ?g/mL, D. microcarpum up to 100 ?g/mL and P. capitata up to 800 ?g/mL. All the three extracts showed a strong inhibition of HCV entry and no effect on replication or secretion. Taken together, these results showed that extracts from Cameroonian medicinal plants are promising sources of anti-HCV agents. PMID:26029203

  12. The Estrogenic-Like Activity of Four Chinese Medicinal Plants in Vitex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In most developing countries, 70-80% of the populations still resort to traditional medicine for their primary health care. This medicine utilizes medicinal plants which are traditionally taken as concoction and infusion. Ethanolic extracts of selected four Chinese medicinal plants in Vitex were tested for proliferative activity in ERa-positive MCF-7 human cell line using MTT assay. Vitex negundo showed the most estrogenic-like potent activity, which could be useful as a Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRP. In further investigation, the compounds with activities in Vitex negundo will be elucidated.

  13. Arnica montana L., planta medicinal europea con relevancia / Arnica montana L., relevant European medicinal plant

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    José, Waizel-Bucay; María de Lourdes, Cruz-Juárez.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Se exponen diferentes aspectos relativos a la especie Arnica montana (Asteraceae), importante planta medicinal de uso ancestral; a pesar de ser endémica de Europa central y meridional se ha logrado introducir y cultivar con éxito en Estados Unidos de América y Escocia. Respecto a la conservación de [...] la especie cabe mencionar que está bajo estricta protección y se incluye en diversos libros y listas rojas de algunos países europeos, así como en la Lista Roja de Especies Amenazadas de la IUCN. Se presenta un panorama general de A. montana desde el punto de vista científico (descripción botánica, distribución geográfica y sinonimia científica y nombres comunes en distintos idiomas). Debido a que se utiliza para aliviar muchos padecimientos y a que tiene una diversidad de aplicaciones, se mencionan sus usos medicinales, cosméticos, ornamentales y en perfumería. Su historia, las regiones que se dedican a su comercialización y su importancia económica justifican el interés de realizar estudios que aseguren las condiciones adecuadas para su introducción al cultivo en México; como contribución a este tema se presentan las formas de propagación y los requerimientos para su plantación. También se proporcionan datos sobre su fitoquímica, toxicología, contraindicaciones y efectos secundarios. Es de resaltar que A. montana produce numerosos metabolitos secundarios con actividad biológica, pertenecientes a los grupos de los aceites esenciales, ácidos fenólicos, cumarinas, flavonas, flavonoides, glucósidos, mucílagos, fitosteroles, lactonas sesquiterpénicas, taninos y triterpenos, entre otros. Abstract in english Different aspects of Arnica montana L. (Asteraceae) are presented in this work. It is an important perennial medicinal herb used since ancient times; it is endemic to central and southern Europe and has been successfully introduced and cultivated in several countries, such as the United States of Am [...] erica, Scotland, and others. It is under strict protection and is included in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, in the Red Data Books, and Red Data Lists of many European countries. Method: we applied the technique of direct, active reading of specialized documentary sources such as books, magazines and electronic databases. Results: A descriptive overview of the species: its botanical description, geographic distribution, scientific synonyms and common names in different languages; its history, its phytochemistry, its various uses: medicinal, cosmetic and ornamental; its toxicological aspects and its counter-indications or side effects. We also provide information regarding its economic importance, as well as data about its form of propagation. Furthermore, we include the requirements for its cultivation and the main countries that trade it. The plant produces numerous secondary metabolites with biological activity, including essential oils, phenolic acids, coumarins, flavones, flavonoids, glycosides, mucilages, phytosterols, sesquiterpene lactones, tannins and triterpenoids.

  14. Characterization of cysteine proteases in Malian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Sékou; Paulsen, Berit S; Diallo, Drissa; Johansen, Harald T

    2006-09-19

    Extracts form 10 different Malian medicinal plants with a traditional use against schistosomiasis were investigated for their possible content of proteolytic activity. The proteolytic activity was studied by measuring the hydrolysis of two synthetic peptide substrates Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec and Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec. Legumain- and papain-like activities were found in all tested crude extracts except those from Entada africana, with the papain-like activity being the strongest. Cissus quadrangularis, Securidaca longepedunculata and Stylosanthes erecta extracts showed high proteolytic activities towards both substrates. After gel filtration the proteolytic activity towards the substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec in root extract of Securidaca longepedunculata appeared to have Mr of 30 and 97kDa, while the activity in extracts from Cissus quadrangularis was at 39kDa. Enzymatic activity cleaving the substrate Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec showed apparent Mr of 97 and 26kDa in extracts from roots and leaves of Securidaca longepedunculata, while in Cissus quadrangularis extracts the activity eluted at 39 and 20kDa, with the highest activity in the latter. All Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec activities were inhibited by E-64 but unaffected by PMSF. The legumain activity was unaffected by E-64 and PMSF. The SDS-PAGE analysis exhibited five distinct gelatinolytic bands for Cissus quadrangularis extracts (115, 59, 31, 22 and 20kDa), while two bands (59 and 30kDa) were detected in Securidaca longepedunculata extracts. The inhibition profile of the gelatinolytic bands and that of the hydrolysis of the synthetic substrates indicate the cysteine protease class of the proteolytic activities. Several cysteine protease activities with different molecular weights along with a strong variability of these activities between species as well as between plant parts from the same species were observed. PMID:16621376

  15. Determination of metals in medicinal plants highly consumed in Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Alexandre Soares, Leal; Guilherme, Prado; Tatiana Cristina Bomfim, Gomes; Fernanda Peixoto, Sepe; Ilza, Dalmázio.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, amostras de Boldo (Peumus boldus), Castanha da Índia (Aesculus hippocastanum), Chá Verde (Camelia sinensis), Erva Cidreira (Melissa officinalis), Espinheira Santa (Maytenus ilicifolia), Guaraná (Paullinia cupana), Maracujá (Passiflora sp.), Mulungu (Erythrina velutina), Sene (Cassia [...] angustifolia) e Valeriana (Valeriana officinalis) foram investigadas utilizando a técnica Análise por Ativação Neutrônica (AAN-k0), a fim de se determinar os teores de metais e outros elementos químicos contaminantes. Os resultados revelaram a presença de elementos não essenciais ao organismo humano. A diversidade de impurezas químicas encontradas, mesmo em níveis de baixa concentração, considerando o potencial de toxicidade crônica desses elementos, reforça a necessidade de melhorias na aplicação de boas práticas pelos produtores e comerciantes e a hipótese de falta de controle de qualidade nos produtos vegetais. Abstract in english In this work, samples of the medicinal plants: Boldo (Peumus boldus), Castanha da Índia (Aesculus hippocastanum), Chá Verde (Camelia sinensis), Erva Cidreira (Melissa officinalis), Espinheira Santa (Maytenus ilicifolia), Guaraná (Paullinia cupana), Maracujá (Passiflora sp.), Mulungu (Erythrina velut [...] ina), Sene (Cassia angustifolia) and Valeriana (Valeriana officinalis) were evaluated BY using the Neutron Activation Analysis technique (NAA- k0) in order to determine the levels of metals and other chemical contaminants. The results showed the presence of non essential elements to the human body. The diversity of chemical impurities found even at low concentration levels, considering the potential for chronic toxicity of these elements, reinforces the need to improve the implementation of good practices by growers and traders, and the hypothesis of lack of quality control in plant products.

  16. In vitro biological effects of two anti-diabetic medicinal plants used in Benin as folk medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Bothon, Fifa; Debiton, Eric; Avlessi, Felicien; Forestier, Christiane; Teulade, Jean-claude; Sohounhloue, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracts from Polygonum senegalensis (Polygonaceae) and Pseudocedrela kotschyi (Meliaceae) are two important traditionally used medicinal plants in rural Benin to treat many diseases and notably type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study was to investigate the alpha-glucosidase inhibition, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of those plants extract: Polygonum senegalensis leaves, and Pseudocedrela kotschyi root. METHODS: Hydro-alcoholic (50%) extracts were analyzed for their phyto...

  17. Evaluation of the In Vitro Antiplasmodial, Antileishmanial, and Antitrypanosomal Activity of Medicinal Plants Used in Saudi and Yemeni Traditional Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Mothana, Ramzi A.; Nawal M. Al-Musayeib; Al-Ajmi, Mohamed F.; Paul Cos; Louis Maes

    2014-01-01

    The antiplasmodial, antileishmanial, and antitrypanosomal activity of twenty-five medicinal plants distributed in Saudi Arabia and Yemen was evaluated. The plants were extracted with methanol and screened in vitro against erythrocytic schizonts of Plasmodium falciparum, intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania infantum and Trypanosoma cruzi, and free trypomastigotes of T. brucei. To assess selectivity, cytotoxicity was determined on MRC-5 cells. Criteria for activity were an IC50 < 10??g/mL...

  18. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration in Wedelia calendulacea Less. an endangered medicinal plant

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Shamima Akhtar, Sharmin; Md. Jahangir, Alam; Md. Mominul Islam, Sheikh; Kanak Kanti, Sarker; Muhammad, Khalekuzzaman; Md. Anwarul, Haque; Mohammad Firoz, Alam; Iftekhar, Alam.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis was achieved from leaf and internode derived callus of Wedelia calendulacea, an endangered medicinal plant. Primary callus was induced by culturing leaf disc and internode explant on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 2.0 mg L-1 of [...] 2,4-D under light condition. Transfer of embryogenic callus on a reduced concentration of 2,4-D facilitated somatic embryo development while calluses remained unorganized at the same 2,4-D level. A histological analysis confirmed somatic embryo by revealing the presence of a closed vascular system in the developing embryos and lack of a vascularconnection with surrounding callus tissues. Somatic embryos germinated into plantlets upon transfer on MS medium containing 1.0 mg L-1 BAP plus 0.5 mg L-1 GA3. Plantlets were acclimatized successfully and survived under soil condition. This is the first on somatic embryogenesis of W.calendulacea. This result could facilitate genetic transformation of this important medicinal plant.

  19. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in the eastern highlands of Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorim Ronald Y

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Eastern Highlands area of Papua New Guinea (PNG has a rich tradition of medicinal plant use. However, rapid modernization is resulting in the loss of independent language traditions and consequently a loss of individuals knowledgeable in medicinal plant use. This report represents a program to document and preserve traditional knowledge concerning medicinal plant use in PNG. This report documents and compares traditional plant use in the Eastern Highlands districts of Unggai-Bena, Okapa, and Obura-Wonenara, and puts these new records in context of previously documented PNG medicinal plant use. Methods This manuscript is an annotated combination of Traditional Medicines survey reports generated by UPNG trainees using a survey questionnaire titled “Information sheet on traditional herbal reparations and medicinal plants of PNG”. The Traditional Medicines survey project is supported by WHO, US NIH and PNG governmental health care initiatives and funding. Results Overall, after “poisoning” (synonymous with “magic” the most commonly recorded ailments addressed by medicinal plant use were pain, gynecological disease, gastrointestinal maladies, anemia or malnutrition and malaria. However, the recorded indications for plant use varied widely amongst the different survey locations. Unlike many areas of PNG, mixing of ingredients was the most common mode of preparation recorded, except for two areas where the consumption of fresh plant material was more common. Throughout the Eastern Highlands oral administration was most common, with topical application second. Overall, leaves were most commonly used in the preparations of the healers interviewed, followed by bark and stems. Several new medicinal uses of plants were also documented. Conclusions Collaboration between the WHO, UPNG and the PNG Department of Health initiated Traditional Medicine survey program in order to preserve traditional knowledge concerning medicinal plant use in PNG. This effort promotes integration of effective and accessible traditional practices with Western protocols. The Traditional Medicine surveys are particularly important because, in the absence of the clinical validation, the documentation of the consistent use of a given plant for specific indication by a large number of herbalists, across a wide range of ethnic traditions, maybe considered as a positive criterion for the promulgation of said use amongst PNG’s recently formed traditional healer associations.

  20. ETHNOBOTANICAL STUDY OF MEDICINAL PLANTS USED BY MALAYALI TRIBALS IN KOLLIHILLS OF TAMILNADU, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuru Suresh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An ethnobotanical survey was carried out among the Malayali tribals in various villages of Kollihills, Nammakkal District, Tamilnadu, India during January 2007 to April 2009. A total of 108 species of ethnomedicinal plants belonging to 102 genera and 59 families were reported with the help of standardized questionnaires among 50 tribal informants between the ages of 20-85. The study shows a high degree of ethnobotanical novelty and the use of plants among the Malayali reflects the revival of interest in traditional folk medicine. The medicinal plants used by Malayali are arranged alphabetically followed by botanical name, family name, local name, parts used, mode of preparation and medicinal uses.

  1. Root endophyte Piriformospora indica DSM 11827 alters plant morphology, enhances biomass and antioxidant activity of medicinal plant Bacopa monniera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ram; Kamal, Shwet; Sharma, Pradeep K; Oelmüller, Ralf; Varma, Ajit

    2013-12-01

    Unorganized collections and over exploitation of naturally occurring medicinal plant Bacopa monniera is leading to rapid depletion of germplasm and is posing a great threat to its survival in natural habitats. The species has already been listed in the list of highly threatened plants of India. This calls for micropropagation based multiplication of potential accessions and understanding of their mycorrhizal associations for obtaining plants with enhanced secondary metabolite contents. The co-cultivation of B. monniera with axenically cultivated root endophyte Piriformospora indica resulted in growth promotion, increase in bacoside content, antioxidant activity and nuclear hypertrophy of this medicinal plant. PMID:23681554

  2. Commercial cultivation by farmers of medicinal plants in northern Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. M. Manzoor Rashid

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants (MPs are an important component of non-timber forest products (NTFPs, which are traditionally used in healthcare and source of livelihood all over the world. In an over-populated country like Bangladesh, the pressure on natural forests is immense; thus the cultivation of MPs can significantly contribute towards improving the livelihood of poor people, reducing the pressure on natural forests and enhancing biological diversity. Notwithstanding the growing recognition of its importance and economic and ecological potential, there has been little research on MPs, especially the cultivation, management and marketing aspects, in Bangladesh. Based on extensive fieldwork in a northern district of Bangladesh, this study explores various aspects of the cultivation, management and marketing of MPs. How collective efforts have brought economic and social benefits to communities was also examined in this study. It assesses the major processes and elements of management, identifies key problems and challenges and indicates ways of maximizing the potential of this important sector. The issues covered in this research include: farmers ’ perceptions and experiences; existing research and policy-making processes related to the MP sector; constraining factors (such as lack of processing technology, inadequate transportation, logistics, financial and storage infrastructure, lack of institutional capacity; markets, finance and networking; land use; pattern of livelihood and value chain issue.

  3. Molecular genetic studies on some irradiated medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    this thesis aimed to study the molecular characterization , the phylogenetic relationships among the four mentha and the three ocimum species and to get some species-specific markers. twenty-one RAPD and 10 ISSR primers were used which showed high polymorphism among the species and detected 150 molecular markers for these genotypes (100 using RAPD and 50 by ISSR-analyses). detection of the phylogenetic relationships based on the three studied systems (RAPD,ISSR and their combined analyses ) indicated that these techniques succeeded in separating the seven species into two main clusters of the two mentha and ocimum genera. SDS-protein patterns characterized the seven genotypes based on presence/ absence and staining intensities of 14 polypeptide bands into two main groups.the effect of four doses of gamma irradiation on eight active components of volatile oils and SDS-protein pattern of stems of mentha viridis indicated that low levels of gamma irradiation could improve the value of some active components of medicinal plants such as menthol in mentha viridis

  4. A study of trace elements in some medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty one medicinal plants (herbal) have been investigated for major, minor and trace elements using the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method. The samples were collected from the local market in Dhaka city and they were analysed by the thick-target external beam technique of the PIXE method. The samples were exposed to the proton beam as 1-mm thick pellet 0 f 7 mm dia. and irradiated with 2.0 MeV proton having 10 nA beam intensity. for 10-20 ?C irradiation, the concentration of 15 elements,K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb were measured by comparison with calibration factors obtained from a curve constructed on the basis of the NBS orchard leaf standard (SRM-1571) irradiated under identical experimental condition. The concentration of K and Ca observed in the samples were in the range of 0.34-5.96% and .11-3.98% respectively. For Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cr, As and Pb the concentration ranges were 4.1-1100, 60-7600, 1.1-276, 7-164, 1.2-48, 1.1-31, and 3.1-128 mg/kg respectively. Ti, Br, Rb, Sr and Zr were also determined with variable accuracy. The validity of the procedure was established by analysing a NIST standard (tomato leaf). The results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. 17 refs.,3 tables, 3 figs

  5. Ethnobotanical investigation of traditional medicinal plants commercialized in the markets of Mashhad, Iran

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    Mohammad Sadegh Amiri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: An ethnobotanical survey on the medicinal plant species marketed in Mashhad city, northeastern Iran, was conducted in order to document traditional medicinal knowledge and application of medicinal plants. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken between 2011 and 2012. The indigenous knowledge of traditional healers used for medicinal purposes were collected through questionnaire and personal interviews during field trips. Ethnobotanical data was arranged alphabetically by family name followed by botanical name, vernacular name, part used, folk use, and recipe. Correct identification was made with the help of the various Floras and different herbal literature at the Ferdowsi University of Mashhad Herbarium (FUMH. Results: The present investigation reported medicinal information for about 269 species, belonging to 87 vascular plant families and one fungus family. The most important family was Lamiaceae with 26 species, followed by Asteraceae with 23, Fabaceae with 20, and Apiaceae with 19. Herbal medicine uses reported by herbalists was classified into 132 different uses which show significant results to treat a wide spectrum of human ailments. Plants sold at the market were mostly used for digestive system disorders, respiratory problems, urological troubles, nervous system disorders, skin problems, and gynecological ailments. Conclusion: This survey showed that although people in study area have access to modern medical facilities,  a lot of them still continue to depend on medicinal plants for the treatment of healthcare problems. The present paper represents significant ethnobotanical information on medical plants which provides baseline data for future pharmacological and phytochemical studies.

  6. The use of medicinal plants in the trans-himalayan arid zone of Mustang district, Nepal

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    Chaudhary Ram P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study documents the use of medicinal plants from the Mustang district of the north-central part of Nepal. Traditional botanical medicine is the primary mode of healthcare for most of the population of this district and traditional Tibetan doctors (Amchi serve as the local medical experts. Methods Field research was conducted in 27 communities of the Mustang district in Nepal from 2005-2007. We sampled 202 interviewees, using random and snowball sampling techniques. After obtaining prior informed consent, we collected data through semi-structured interviews and participant-observation techniques. Voucher specimens of all cited botanic species were deposited at TUCH in Nepal. Results We recorded the traditional uses of 121 medicinal plant species, belonging to 49 vascular plant and 2 fungal families encompassing 92 genera. These 121 species are employed to treat a total of 116 ailments. We present data on 58 plant species previously unknown for their medicinal uses in the Mustang district. Of the medicinal plants reported, the most common growth form was herbs (73% followed by shrubs, trees, and climbers. We document that several parts of individual plant species are used as medicine. Plant parts were generally prepared using hot or cold water as the 'solvent', but occasionally remedies were prepared with milk, honey, jaggery, ghee and oil. Amchis recommended different types of medicine including paste, powder, decoction, tablet, pills, infusion, and others through oral, topical, nasal and others routes of administration. Conclusions The traditional pharmacopoeia of the Mustang district incorporates a myriad of diverse botanical flora. Traditional knowledge of the remedies is passed down through oral traditions and dedicated apprenticeships under the tutelage of senior Amchi. Although medicinal plants still play a pivotal role in the primary healthcare of the local people of Mustang, efforts to ensure the conservation and sustainable use of medicinal species are necessary.

  7. Rare earth elements determination in medicinal plants by Neutron Activation AnalisysRare earth elements determination in medicinal plants by Neutron Activation Analisys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare Earth Elements (REEs) have been considered nontoxic for human health and for the environment; however, the use of REEs in the development of recent technologies has increased the interest un their biological effects. Some studies related to their concentration in foodstuffs were published but REEs levels in medicinal plants are still unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the Rees concentration in the set of 59 medicinal herbs commonly used by Brazilian folk. Results showed that plants can concentrate REEs in their aerial parts, but the amount transferred to the extract of these plants is relatively low, resulting in little ingestion of these elements by the population during the extract consumption. (author)Rare Earth Elements (REEs) have been considered nontoxic for human health and for the environment; however, the use of REEs in the development of recent technologies has increased the interest un their biological effects. Some studies related to their concentration in foodstuffs were published but REEs levels in medicinal plants are still unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the Rees concentration in the set of 59 medicinal herbs commonly used by Brazilian folk. Results showed that plants can concentrate REEs in their aerial parts, but the amount transferred to the extract of these plants is relatively low, resulting in little ingestion of these elements by the population during the extract consumption. (author)

  8. Antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase-inhibitory properties of long-term stored medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoo Stephen O

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicinal plants are possible sources for future novel antioxidant compounds in food and pharmaceutical formulations. Recent attention on medicinal plants emanates from their long historical utilisation in folk medicine as well as their prophylactic properties. However, there is a dearth of scientific data on the efficacy and stability of the bioactive chemical constituents in medicinal plants after prolonged storage. This is a frequent problem in African Traditional Medicine. Methods The phytochemical, antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase-inhibitory properties of 21 medicinal plants were evaluated after long-term storage of 12 or 16 years using standard in vitro methods in comparison to freshly harvested materials. Results The total phenolic content of Artemisia afra, Clausena anisata, Cussonia spicata, Leonotis intermedia and Spirostachys africana were significantly higher in stored compared to fresh materials. The flavonoid content were also significantly higher in stored A. afra, C. anisata, C. spicata, L. intermedia, Olea europea and Tetradenia riparia materials. With the exception of Ekebergia capensis and L. intermedia, there were no significant differences between the antioxidant activities of stored and fresh plant materials as measured in the ?-carotene-linoleic acid model system. Similarly, the EC50 values based on the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging assay were generally lower for stored than fresh material. Percentage inhibition of acetylcholinesterase was generally similar for both stored and fresh plant material. Stored plant material of Tetradenia riparia and Trichilia dregeana exhibited significantly higher AChE inhibition than the fresh material. Conclusions The current study presents evidence that medicinal plants can retain their biological activity after prolonged storage under dark conditions at room temperature. The high antioxidant activities of stable bioactive compounds in these medicinal plants offer interesting prospects for the identification of novel principles for application in food and pharmaceutical formulations.

  9. Propagação vegetativa de liamba, planta medicinal / Vegetative propagation of liamba, a medicinal plant

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria de Fátima B, Coelho; Sandra Sely S, Maia; Andreya K, Oliveira; Francisco Ésio P, Diógenes; Silvio Roberto F, Soares.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A liamba (Vitex agnus castus L.) é utilizada no Brasil como medicinal e apresenta compostos com estrutura química semelhante à progesterona. Visando avaliar a propagação vegetativa de liamba foram conduzidos dois experimentos. O primeiro, com estacas da parte aérea com 20 cm de comprimento, sem folh [...] as e classificadas em dois grupos: apical e basal. As estacas tiveram a espessura padronizada em 3 a 5 mm de diâmetro e 40 unidades de cada tipo foram colocadas em sacolas de polietileno (10 x 30 cm) preenchidas com o substrato solo + esterco na proporção volumétrica de 2:1. O segundo, com miniestacas da parte aérea da planta com 3 a 5 cm de comprimento, sem folhas e no delineamento experimental em blocos casualizados com quatro repetições de 20 miniestacas, no esquema fatorial 2 x 3. Os tratamentos foram tipo da miniestaca (com talão e sem talão) e substrato (solo; solo + esterco bovino curtido e solo + composto). A propagação vegetativa de liamba pode ser feita por estacas basais ou mini-estacas com talão em substrato solo + composto. Abstract in english The liamba (Vitex agnus castus L.) is used as a medicinal species in Brazil and presents compounds with similar chemical structure to progesterone. To evaluate the propagation of liamba two experiments were carried out. The first, using shoot cuttings with 20 cm long, leafless and classified into tw [...] o groups, apical and basal. The cuttings were standardized in their thickness of 3 to 5 mm in diameter and 40 units of each type were placed in polyethylene bags (10 x 30 cm) filled with soil + manure in the volumetric ratio of 2:1. The second, with shoot minicuttings of the plant canopy with 3 to 5 cm long, without leaves and in a randomized block experimental design with four replications of 20 minicuttings, in a factorial 2 x 3. The treatments were kind of mini-cuttings (with and without hell) and substrate (soil, soil + cattle manure and soil + compost). The vegetative propagation of liamba can be made by basal cuttings or minicuttings with heel in soil + compost.

  10. Propagação vegetativa de liamba, planta medicinal Vegetative propagation of liamba, a medicinal plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima B Coelho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A liamba (Vitex agnus castus L. é utilizada no Brasil como medicinal e apresenta compostos com estrutura química semelhante à progesterona. Visando avaliar a propagação vegetativa de liamba foram conduzidos dois experimentos. O primeiro, com estacas da parte aérea com 20 cm de comprimento, sem folhas e classificadas em dois grupos: apical e basal. As estacas tiveram a espessura padronizada em 3 a 5 mm de diâmetro e 40 unidades de cada tipo foram colocadas em sacolas de polietileno (10 x 30 cm preenchidas com o substrato solo + esterco na proporção volumétrica de 2:1. O segundo, com miniestacas da parte aérea da planta com 3 a 5 cm de comprimento, sem folhas e no delineamento experimental em blocos casualizados com quatro repetições de 20 miniestacas, no esquema fatorial 2 x 3. Os tratamentos foram tipo da miniestaca (com talão e sem talão e substrato (solo; solo + esterco bovino curtido e solo + composto. A propagação vegetativa de liamba pode ser feita por estacas basais ou mini-estacas com talão em substrato solo + composto.The liamba (Vitex agnus castus L. is used as a medicinal species in Brazil and presents compounds with similar chemical structure to progesterone. To evaluate the propagation of liamba two experiments were carried out. The first, using shoot cuttings with 20 cm long, leafless and classified into two groups, apical and basal. The cuttings were standardized in their thickness of 3 to 5 mm in diameter and 40 units of each type were placed in polyethylene bags (10 x 30 cm filled with soil + manure in the volumetric ratio of 2:1. The second, with shoot minicuttings of the plant canopy with 3 to 5 cm long, without leaves and in a randomized block experimental design with four replications of 20 minicuttings, in a factorial 2 x 3. The treatments were kind of mini-cuttings (with and without hell and substrate (soil, soil + cattle manure and soil + compost. The vegetative propagation of liamba can be made by basal cuttings or minicuttings with heel in soil + compost.

  11. A SURVEY OF IMPORTANT INDIGENOUS MEDICINAL PLANTS OF DISTRICT BHIMBER AZAD JAMMU & KASHMIR, PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazar Hussain

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey of medicinal plants was carried out about the traditional knowledge of rural people of District Bhimber and its allied areas. It was established that 96 plant species belonging to 49 families are currently used by common people and traditional plant medicines practitioner. Most medicinal plants grow in the wild (75%, while others are cultivated (25% with predominant share of herbs (55%, trees (27% and shrubs (17%. The frequently used species were Justicia adhatoda, Azadirachta indica, Melia azedarach, Solanum nigrum, Allium cepa, Allium sativum, Tribulus terrestris and Solanum xanthocarpum while the most frequently cited families were Meliaceae and Euphorbiaceae. It was noted that plant species like Acacia modesta, Ficus carica, Melia azedarach and Butea monosperma recorded throughout the region uniformly however some plants like Azadirachta indica,Carica papaya, Ficus bengalensis and Glycyrrhiza glabra are less common.

  12. Conservation of Wild-harvested MedicinalPlant Species in Tanzania : Chain and consequence of commercial trade on medicinal plant species

    OpenAIRE

    Nahashon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tanzania is endowed with more than 10,000 plant species, of which 1,100 are endemic. The coastal regions host most endemic species, due to its wide range of productive ecological conditions. Over 25 % of all species are used as wild-harvested medicinal plants. About 60% of the Tanzanian population in both rural and urban areas depends on traditional medicine and herbs as their primary health care, and as a means of generating income. This is due to high costs and unavailability of the univers...

  13. TRADITIONAL USES OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN TREATING SKIN DISEASES IN NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT OF TAMILNADU, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Sivaranjani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present documented the traditional knowledge of Medicinal Plants species used in various type of skin diseases in Nagapattinam district. We have documented the use of 50 species belonging to 26 families. The information on plants used as traditional medicine against skin diseases was gathered and ethnomedicinal survey based on interviews with local people involved in traditional herbal medicine practices. The particulars plants are used to cure variety of skin diseases, like swelling, wound healing, psoriasis, scabies, eczema, dandruff, tinea versicularis, tinea cruris, impetigo, skin parasities, leucoderma, leucoderma, leprosy, rash, etc. the studies carried out for the time in this area, the medicinal plants used by traditional users of N agapattinam district were arranged by botanical name, family, local name, habit, mode of preparation and uses.

  14. Efficient plant regeneration of yellow loosestrife (Lysimachia vulgaris L.), a medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Arzu Ucar; Guner, Birgul

    2013-06-01

    Lysimachia vulgaris L. (yellow loosestrife) is a medicinal plant that has been used in the treatment of fever, ulcer, diarrhea and wounds in traditional medicine. A reliable in vitro culture protocol for yellow loosestrife was established. Explants (leaf lamina, stem internode and root segments) were cultured on Murashige and Skoog minimal organics (MSMO) medium supplemented with various plant growth regulator combinations. Of the tested combinations, those involving benzyladenine (BA) with either indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) were the most effective for all used explants in shoot production. Best shoot proliferation was obtained from leaf lamina explant cultured on media containing 0.5 mg/l BA and 0.1, 0.5 or 1 mg/l IBA, from stem internode explant cultured on media containing 1 mg/l BA and 0.5 mg/l IBA or 0.01 mg/l thidiazuron (TDZ) and 0.5 mg/l IAA, and from root explant cultured on media containing 0.5 mg/l BA and 0.5 mg/l IAA. Regenerated shoots were rooted on MSMO medium containing different concentrations of IAA, IBA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). IBA was determined as the most effective auxin for rooting. Most shoots developed roots on medium with 0.5 mg/l IBA. PMID:23739890

  15. Aloe Vera: The Miracle Plant Its Medicinal and Traditional Uses in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rajeswari, R.; Umadevi, M.; Sharmila Rahale, C.; Pushpa, R.; Selvavenkadesh, S.; Sampath Kumar, K. P.; Debjit Bhowmik

    2012-01-01

    Aloe vera is the oldest medicinal plant ever known and the most applied medicinal plant worldwide. Extracts of Aloe Vera is a proven skin healer. Aloe Vera help to soothe skin injuries affected by burning, skin irritations, cuts and insect bites, and its bactericidal properties relieve itching and skin swellings. It is known to help slow down the appearance of wrinkles and actively repair the damaged skin cells that cause the visible signs of aging. Aloe is a powerfuldetoxifier, antiseptic an...

  16. Antioxidant, Metal Chelating, Anti-glucosidase Activities and Phytochemical Analysis of Selected Tropical Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Fai-Chu; Yong, Ann-Li; Ting, Evon Peir-Shan; Khoo, Sim-Chyi; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the antioxidant potentials and anti-glucosidase activities of six tropical medicinal plants. The levels of phenolic constituents in these medicinal plants were also quantified and compared. Antioxidation potentials were determined colorimetrically for scavenging activities against DPPH and NO radicals. Metal chelating assay was based on the measurement of iron-ferrozine absorbance at 562 nm. Anti-diabetic potentials were measured by using ?-...

  17. Antibacterial effects of medicinal plant extracts against Lactococcus garvieae, the etiological agent of rainbow trout lactococcosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Saeid Fereidouni; Mostafa Akhlaghi; Aliasghar Khadem Alhosseini

    2013-01-01

    Eight medicinal plants were assessed for antimicrobial activity against Lactococcus garvieae isolate obtained from diseased Oncorhynchus mykiss collected from rainbow trout fish farms in Iran. Lactococcus garvieae is among the major pathogens of a large number of fish species cultured in fresh and marine recirculating and net pen production systems. The antibacterial activity of the medicinal plants against L. garvieae was evaluated using disc diffusion, well diffusion and minimum inhibitory ...

  18. Phytochemical and Biosynthetic Studies of Lignans, with a Focus on Indonesian Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Elfahmi,

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis phytochemical and biosynthetic studies of lignans are described. The focus is on the Indonesian medicinal plants Phyllanthus niruri and Piper cubeba and on two Linum species, Linum flavum and L. leonii, native to European countries. Both Indonesian plants are used in jamu. Jamu is the Indonesian traditional herbal medicine, practised for many centuries in the Indonesian community to maintain good health and to treat diseases. The manufacturing of jamu is shifting more and m...

  19. The antioxidant and DNA protection potential of Indian tribal medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    GUHA, Gunjan; RAJKUMAR, Venkatadri; Mathew, Lazar; Kumar, R. Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Prevention and treatment of various degenerative diseases using traditional medicines is increasingly generating interest, especially in geriatric clinical research. This study aimed to evaluate the free-radical scavenging properties and potential to prevent DNA damage (from oxidative stress) of 56 extracts (polar and non-polar) from 14 medicinal plants (from 12 families) used by diverse Indian tribes and ethnic groups. Although widely known for traditional uses, these plants have not been ex...

  20. Antiproliferative effects of some medicinal plants on HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ceni?-Miloševi? Desanka; Tambur Z.; Bokonji? D.; Ivan?aji? S.; Stanojkovi? Tatjana; Grozdani? Nadja; Jurani? Zorica

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants maintain the health and vitality of individuals, and also have potential curative effect on various diseases, including cancer. In this study were investigated the antiproliferative effects of water extracts of previously obtained ethanolic dry extracts of three different medicinal plants (Echinacea angustifolia, Salvia officinalis and Melissa officinalis) on cell lines derived from human cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa cells). The best cytotoxic activity (IC50 = 43.52 ?g/...

  1. ETHNO MEDICINAL STUDY OF THREATENED PLANTS OF SONITPUR DISTRICT IN ASSAM, NORTH EAST INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Das Amar Jyoti; Kumar Rajesh; Athar Mohammad; Rawat Devendra Singh; Kumar Manoj; Khan Mohd Aqueel; Prakash Jai

    2013-01-01

    Assam is endowed with a rich wealth of medicinal plants. It has the richest reservoir of plant diversity of India and is one of the hot diversity spots of the world supporting about 50% of India’s biodiversity. Traditional medical practice has been recognized by the World health Organization (WHO) as a building block of primary healthcare. Assam has a rich traditional knowledge of folk medicinal practices. But rapid fragmentation of natural habitats and unrestricted exploitation coupled wit...

  2. ANALYSIS OF VARIOUS METAL IONS IN SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS USING ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    OpenAIRE

    Y L Ramachandra, C. Ashajyothi And Padmalatha S. Rai

    2012-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron , lead, copper, nickel, cadmium , chromium and zinc were investigated in medicinally important plants Alstonia scholaris, Tabernaemontana coronariae, Asparagus racemosus, Mimosa pudica, Leucas aspera and Adhatoda vasica applying atomic absorption spectrophotometer techniques. The purpose of this study was to standardize various metal ion Contamination in indigenous medicinal plants. Maximum concentration of lead was present in Leucas aspera and Adhatoda vasica follo...

  3. Medicinal plants extracts affect virulence factors expression and biofilm formation by the uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    WOJNICZ, Dorota; Alicja Z. Kucharska; Sokó?-??towska, Anna; Kicia, Marta; TICHACZEK-GOSKA, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal plants are an important source for the therapeutic remedies of various diseases including urinary tract infections. This prompted us to perform research in this area. We decided to focus on medicinal plants species used in urinary tract infections prevention. The aim of our study was to determine the influence of Betulapendula, Equisetum arvense, Herniaria glabra, Galium odoratum, Urtica dioica, and Vaccinium vitis-idaea extracts on bacterial survival and virulence factors involved ...

  4. Ethnopharmacology of Medicinal Plants of the Pantanal Region (Mato Grosso, Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Isanete Geraldini Costa Bieski; Fabrício Rios Santos; Rafael Melo de Oliveira; Mariano Martinez Espinosa; Miramy Macedo; Ulysses Paulino de Albuquerque; Domingos Tabajara de Oliveira Martins

    2012-01-01

    Traditional knowledge is an important source of obtaining new phytotherapeutic agents. Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants was conducted in Nossa Senhora Aparecida do Chumbo District (NSACD), located in Poconé, Mato Grosso, Brazil using semi-structured questionnaires and interviews. 376 species of medicinal plants belonging to 285 genera and 102 families were cited. Fabaceae (10.2%), Asteraceae (7.82%) and Lamaceae (4.89%) families are of greater importance. Species with the greater re...

  5. Plants used traditionally to treat malaria in Brazil: the archives of Flora Medicinal

    OpenAIRE

    Botsaris Alexandros S

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The archives of Flora Medicinal, an ancient pharmaceutical laboratory that supported ethnomedical research in Brazil for more than 30 years, were searched for plants with antimalarial use. Forty plant species indicated to treat malaria were described by Dr. J. Monteiro da Silva (Flora Medicinal leader) and his co-workers. Eight species, Bathysa cuspidata, Cosmos sulphureus, Cecropia hololeuca, Erisma calcaratum, Gomphrena arborescens, Musa paradisiaca, Ocotea odorifera, and Pradosia ...

  6. Medicinal Uses of Plants with Particular Reference to the People of Dhirkot. Azad Jammu and Kashmir

    OpenAIRE

    Gorsi, M. S.; Rizwan Shahzad

    2002-01-01

    An ethnomedicinal exploration was carried out in Dhirkot and its allied areas district Bagh. The check list consists of 43 species of angiosperms belonging to 14 families. These medicinal plants are singly used or used with the mixture by the local inhabitants. The present report assists in coordinating and co-operation among various agencies such as forest, Pharmaceutical firms interested in the utilization of these medicinal plants and to initiate regeneration work in affected area.

  7. Human health sciences—From cultivation to utilization of medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Satoru Tsukagoshi; Megumi Sumino; Maya Kaneko; Yan Wang; Fumio Ikegami

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to recognize the ability of plants used as food and medicine for our health care. From this point of view, we have studied economical production techniques of medicinal plants and vegetables that have physiological functions such as disease prevention, health maintenance and improvement of physical function. We revealed the suitable cultivation techniques such as the long-term freezing seed storage, and systematic and efficient seedling production of Swertia...

  8. Traditional use of medicinal plants in the boreal forest of Canada: review and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Uprety Yadav; Asselin Hugo; Dhakal Archana; Julien Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The boreal forest of Canada is home to several hundred thousands Aboriginal people who have been using medicinal plants in traditional health care systems for thousands of years. This knowledge, transmitted by oral tradition from generation to generation, has been eroding in recent decades due to rapid cultural change. Until now, published reviews about traditional uses of medicinal plants in boreal Canada have focused either on particular Aboriginal groups or on restricte...

  9. Use of medicinal plants and pharmaceuticals by indigenous communities in the Bolivian Andes and Amazon.

    OpenAIRE

    Vandebroek Ina; Calewaert Jan-Bart; De jonckheere Stijn; Sanca Sabino; Semo Lucio; Van Damme Patrick; Van Puyvelde Luc; De Kimpe Norbert

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate, by means of household surveys, the use of medicinal plants and pharmaceuticals in Apillapampa, a large Andean community of Quechua peasants, and in six small communities of Yuracaré-Trinitario "slash-and-burn" cultivators of the National Park Isiboro-Secure (the NPIS) in the Bolivian Amazon. METHODS: A total of 12% of households in Apillapampa and nearly all households in the NPIS were interviewed about their use of medicinal plants and pharmaceuticals for treating ...

  10. Ethno Veterinary Medicinal Uses of Plants from Samahni Valley Dist. Bhimber, (Azad Kashmir) Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Ishtiaq Ch; Khan, M. A.; Wajahat Hanif

    2006-01-01

    This study comprises of an ethnoveterinary report of medicinal plants of Samahni valley. It provides folk medicinal uses of plants used for treatment of various diseases of domestic animals. Among these important traditional knowledge is as; Albizzia lebbeck is used to treat chronic diarrhoea, dysentery and snake bite, Abutilon theophrasti in ephemeral fever, Bauhania variegata in severe constipation, Butea monosperma, Linum usitatissimum and Taraxacum officinale as tonic to enhance milk and ...

  11. Antineoplastic Screening of Some Medicinal Plants Against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Masud Rana, A. Y. K. M.; Khanam, J. A.; Asad-ud-daula, M.

    2004-01-01

    Swiss Albino mice inoculated with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells were treated with the extract of some medicinal plants include Citrullus colocynthis, Withania somnifera, Bambusa arundinacea, Mesua ferrea, Acorus calamus, Myrica nagi, Calotropis procera, Catharanthus roseus, Ficus racemosa and also with clinically highly effective drug bleomycin. Among the medicinal plants Bambusa arundinacea showed highest cell growth inhibition 81.9%. The tumor cell growth inhibition were found to b...

  12. Ethnobotany of Medicinal Plants in Loma and Gena Bosa Districts (Woredas of Dawro Zone, Southern Ethiopia

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    Mathewos Agize

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional management, conservation and use of plant diversity with focus on medicinal plants found in and around home gardens in Loma and Gena Bosa Districts of Dawro Zone, Southern Ethiopia was studied. Data was collected between September 2006 and March 2007 to get relevant information and plant specimen of different seasons. The information was gathered through semi-structured interview conducted on 112 traditional healers whose ages ranged between 15 to 121 years. A total of 178 medicinal plants distributed in 64 families were documented in this study. The most frequently used plant part was leaf while the growth form with the highest number (43.82% of representatives among the plants encountered in this study were herbs. About 57.9% medicinal plants were collected from wild while 24.1% were cultivated and 18.5% were both cultivated and collected from wild. A total of 62 human and 27 veterinary diseases were documented in the study. However, only 58% of the traditional healers exercised their indigenous knowledge on treating both human and livestock diseases, while 41.96% practiced treatment of only human diseases. The medicinal plant resources and the associated knowledge of herbal medicine need to be used in a sustainable way and developed for more effective use in the future.

  13. Ethnobotanical study on medicinal plants in the community of Curral Velho, Luís Correia, Piauí, Brazil

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    Jairla Lima Araujo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of plants as medication in the state of Piauí, Brazil, has been a common practice passed from generation to generation. This study aimed to analyze the use of medicinal plants by residents of the community Curral Velho, in the municipality of Luís Correia, northern Piauí, Brazil, contributing to register and preserve the traditional botanical knowledge of the community under study and, as a consequence, the state’s. The survey of plant species used as a therapeutic resource was conducted through interviews with a semi-structured questionnaire applied to 38 informants. The plants were collected for scientific identification. Use value (UV, informant consensus factor (ICF, and relative importance (RI of species were determined. We registered 62 species, belonging to 38 families and 57 genera, and the Fabaceae family stood out. Aristolochia triangularis, Petiveria alliaceae, and Stachytarpheta cayennensis had the highest use values (UV = 3.0, and Turnera subulata was the most versatile. Out of the 10 bodily systems identified, those with higher concentration of medicinal species are related to the most ordinary illnesses as general signs (inflammation, fever, respiratory tract diseases, and genitourinary tract diseases. This survey enabled the identification of some relevant aspects concerning the use and knowledge of medicinal plants in the community under study. The diversity of medicinal plants known and the availability of plants in the very community suggest a correlation between use/knowledge of medicinal plants and their availability.

  14. DNA barcoding as a means for identifying medicinal plants of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA barcoding involves the generation of DNA sequencing data from particular genetic regions in an organism and the use of these sequence data to identify or 'barcode' that organism and distinguish it from other species. Here, DNA barcoding is being used to identify several medicinal plants found in Pakistan and distinguished them from other similar species. Several challenges to the successful implementation of plant DNA barcoding are presented and discussed. Despite these challenges, DNA barcoding has the potential to uniquely identify medicinal plants and provide quality control and standardization of the plant material supplied to the pharmaceutical industry. (author)

  15. World-wide every fifth vascular plant species is or was used as medicinal or aromatic plant

    OpenAIRE

    Wittig, Rüdiger; Dingermann, Theo; Sieglstetter, Robert; Xie, Yingzhong; Thiombiano, Adjima; Hahn, Karen

    2015-01-01

    It is common knowledge that plants have been the world-wide most important source of medicines and that they still play this role in developing countries. However, up to now, complete lists of medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP) exist for comparatively few countries. A review of all lists know to the authors reveals the following results: A total of 20.7 % of the plant species analyzed by either publications or own research are or were used as MAP. However, re¬garding single countries, the d...

  16. Antibacterial activity of traditional medicinal plants used by Haudenosaunee peoples of New York State

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    Meyers Ryan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance, as well as the evolution of new strains of disease causing agents, is of great concern to the global health community. Our ability to effectively treat disease is dependent on the development of new pharmaceuticals, and one potential source of novel drugs is traditional medicine. This study explores the antibacterial properties of plants used in Haudenosaunee traditional medicine. We tested the hypothesis that extracts from Haudenosaunee medicinal plants used to treat symptoms often caused by bacterial infection would show antibacterial properties in laboratory assays, and that these extracts would be more effective against moderately virulent bacteria than less virulent bacteria. Methods After identification and harvesting, a total of 57 different aqueous extractions were made from 15 plant species. Nine plant species were used in Haudenosaunee medicines and six plant species, of which three are native to the region and three are introduced, were not used in traditional medicine. Antibacterial activity against mostly avirulent (Escherichia coli, Streptococcus lactis and moderately virulent (Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus microbes was inferred through replicate disc diffusion assays; and observed and statistically predicted MIC values were determined through replicate serial dilution assays. Results Although there was not complete concordance between the traditional use of Haudenosaunee medicinal plants and antibacterial activity, our data support the hypothesis that the selection and use of these plants to treat disease was not random. In particular, four plant species exhibited antimicrobial properties as expected (Achillea millefolium, Ipomoea pandurata, Hieracium pilosella, and Solidago canadensis, with particularly strong effectiveness against S. typhimurium. In addition, extractions from two of the introduced species (Hesperis matronalis and Rosa multiflora were effective against this pathogen. Conclusions Our data suggest that further screening of plants used in traditional Haudenosaunee medicine is warranted, and we put forward several species for further investigation of activity against S. typhimurium (A. millefolium, H. matronalis, I. pandurata, H. pilosella, R. multiflora, S. canadensis.

  17. The Assessment of Pesticides Residues in Some Organic Cultivated and Wild-Collected Medicinal Plants in Albania

    OpenAIRE

    FERDI BRAHUSHI; ENDRIT KULLAJ

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide residues in environment are found in soil, water and plants due to the extensive use of pesticides for agricultural purposes. The residues of pesticides in medicinal plants are of high concern as they are toxic for human life since these plants are used for medicinal purposes. The objective of current study was to estimate the presence of pesticide residues in some organic cultivated and wild-collected medicinal plants in Albania during the years 2010–2013. The determination of pe...

  18. Magic and medicinal plants of the Ayoreos of the Chaco Boreal (Paraguay).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, G

    1993-06-01

    The Ayoreo is a hunter-gatherer tribe of Amerindians which occupy the central-northern part of the Paraguayan Chaco. The whole Ayoreo culture cannot be disassociated from religious beliefs. Disease is considered of supernatural origin and as the result of breaking or disobeying the tabu which regulates existence. A description of the shamanic practices is given to understand better the position of health practices in the Ayoreo culture, particularly the use of medicinal and hallucinogenic plants. Fragments of the Asojna ritual and the methods for becoming shaman; the initiation of the last living shaman, as well as references to the magic powers of the shaman are presented. Diagnosis and treatment included invocations to plant and animal spirits and the use of a few medicinal plants. The plants used as medicine or invoked for healing are presented for the first time. Of particular interest is the identification of two Euphorbiaceae as ritual plants by the Ayoreo. PMID:8412243

  19. Heavy Metal Analysis of Some Anti-Diabetic Medicinal Plants in Côte d'Ivoire

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    A.A.D. Djama

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Trace elements concentrations in four plants with anti-diabectic potency in Côte d’Ivoire were studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF Analysis technique. The aim of this study is to determine qualitatively and quantitatively trace elements in these plants and their medicinal roles in the human body. Leaves and roots were analyzed for their trace element contents. The plant samples were found to contain essential trace elements such as Cr, V, Zn and Mn which are well known for their important roles in anti-diabectic preparations (herbal drugs. All the medicinal plants were found to be rich more than one of the essential elements under study. The elemental concentrations in different part (root, stem and leaf of the medicinal plants and their biological effects are discussed.

  20. Inhibitory effects of essential oils of medicinal plants from growth of plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjehkeh, N; Jahani Hossein-Abadi, Z

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells produce a vast amount of secondary metabolites. Production of some compounds is restricted to a single species. Some compounds are nearly always found only in certain specific plant organs and during a specific developmental period of the plant. Some secondary metabolites of plants serve as defensive compounds against invading microorganisms. Nowadays, it is attempted to substitute the biological and natural agents with chemically synthesized fungicides. In the present research, the antifungal activities of essential oils of seven medicinal plants on mycelial growth of three soilborne plant pathogenic fungi were investigated. The plants consisted of Zataria multiflora, Thymus carmanicus, Mentha pieperata, Satureja hortensis, Lavandual officinolis, Cuminum cyminum and Azadirachta indica. The first five plants are from the family Labiatae. Examined fungi, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici, Fusarium solani and Rhizoctonia solani are the causal agents of tomato root rot. Essential oils of Z. multiflora, T. carmanicus, M. pieperata, S. hortensis and C. cyminum were extracted by hydro-distillation method. Essential oils of L. officinalis and A. indica were extracted by vapor-distillation method. A completely randomized design with five replicates was used to examine the inhibitory impact of each concentration (300, 600 and 900 ppm) of each essential oil. Poisoned food assay using potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium was employed. Results showed that essential oils of A. indica, Z. multiflora, T. carmanicus and S. hortensis in 900 ppm at 12 days post-inoculation, when the control fungi completely covered the plates, prevented about 90% from mycelial growth of each of the fungi. While, the essential oils of M. pieperata, C. cyminum and L. officinalis in the same concentration and time prevented 54.86, 52.77 and 48.84%, respectively, from F. solani growth. These substances did not prevent from F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and R. solani growth. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of essential oils of T. carmanicus, Z. multiflora and A. indica from R. solani and F. solani growth was 900 and 600 ppm, respectively. In addition, the MIC of essential oils of these plants and essential oil of S. hortensis from F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici growth was 900 ppm. The MIC of essential oils of M. pieperata, C. cyminum and L. officinalis from F. solani growth was 900 ppm. PMID:22702190

  1. Survey on medicinal plants and spices used in Beni-Sueif, Upper Egypt

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    Mohamed Abdelhalim A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was conducted to identify medicinal plants and spices used for medicine by the community of Beni-Sueif, Upper Egypt. Methods Ethnobotanical data from local people was collected using direct interviews and a semi-structured questionnaire. Results Forty-eight plant species belonging to twenty-seven families and forty-seven genera were encountered during the study. Their botanical and vernacular names, plant parts used and medicinal uses are given. Results of the study were analyzed using two quantitative tools. The factor informant consensus indicated the agreement in the use of plants and the fidelity level indicated the ratio between the number of informants who independently suggested the use of a species for the same major purpose and the total number of informants who mentioned the plant for any use. The results of the factor informant consensus showed that the cardiovascular category has the greatest agreement, followed by the immunological, gastrointestinal and respiratory categories. The most important species according to their fidelity are: Hibiscus sabdariffa L. for the cardiovascular category; Trigonella foenum-graecum L. for the immunological category; Mentha piperita L. for the gastrointestinal category and Pimpinella anisum L. for the respiratory category. Conclusions Medicinal plants are still used for treatment in Beni-Sueif community despite the availability of prescribed medications. Documentation of this ethnomedicinal knowledge is important. Evaluation of pharmacological activity for the promising medicinal plants is suggested.

  2. Ethnopharmacological Survey of Medicinal Plants in Malaysia, the Kangkar Pulai Region

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    T. Aburjai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal plants play an important role in rural health care system throughout the world in remedying and preventing various kinds of diseases. This study documented the use of plants as traditional herbal medicine in the Kangkar Pulai region Johor, Malaysia. It also identified the homogeneity of informant knowledge on medicinal plants suitable for different ailments and types of plants most favored for the treatment of each ailment in the study. The information was gathered through semi-structured interviews, discussions with key informants and informal conversations with local people and herbal practitioners. The data was calculated based on informant consensus factor (Fic and use value (UV. Information on 40 medicinal plants species from 29 taxonomic plant families used for traditional treatment of different diseases/ailments was documented. The informant consensus factor values (Fic showed that the local people tend to agree more with each other in terms of the plants used to treat sexual weakness (0.95, blood pressure (0.94, diabetes (0.93, delivery and female problems (0.90, hair problems and dandruff (0.87, respiratory disorder (0.86 and kidney problems (0.85. By contrast, digestive problems (0.76 and skin problems (0.71 and inflammation pain (0.70 were found to have low Fic values. Calculated values of the UV and Fic indicate that this community is knowledgeable on healing and treatment using traditional herbal medicines.

  3. Medicinal plant knowledge of the Bench ethnic group of Ethiopia: an ethnobotanical investigation

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    Woldu Zerihun

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants have traditionally been used as a source of medicine in Ethiopia since early times for the control of various ailments afflicting humans and their domestic animals. However, little work has been made in the past to properly document and promote the knowledge. Today medicinal plants and the associated knowledge in the country are threatened due to deforestation, environmental degradation and acculturation. Urgent ethnobotanical studies and subsequent conservation measures are, therefore, required to salvage these resources from further loss. The purpose of the present study was to record and analyse traditional medicinal plant knowledge of the Bench ethnic group in Southwest Ethiopia. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with Bench informants selected during transect walks made to houses as well as those identified as knowledgeable by local administrators and elders to gather data regarding local names of medicinal plants used, parts harvested, ailments treated, remedy preparation methods, administration routes, dosage and side effects. The same method was also employed to gather information on marketability, habitat and abundance of the reported medicinal plants. Purposive sampling method was used in the selection of study sites within the study district. Fidelity Level (FL value was calculated for each claimed medicinal plant to estimate its healing potential. Results The study revealed 35 Bench medicinal plants: 32 used against human ailments and three to treat both human and livestock ailments. The majority of Bench medicinal plants were herbs and leaf was the most frequently used part in the preparation of remedies. Significantly higher average number of medicinal plants was claimed by men, older people and illiterate ones as compared to women, younger people and literate ones, respectively. The majority of the medicinal plants used in the study area were uncultivated ones. Conclusion The study revealed acculturation as the major threat to the continuation of the traditional medical practice in the study area. Awareness should, therefore, be created among the Bench community, especially the young ones, by concerned organizations and individuals regarding the usefulness of the practice.

  4. Human health sciences—From cultivation to utilization of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Tsukagoshi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to recognize the ability of plants used as food and medicine for our health care. From this point of view, we have studied economical production techniques of medicinal plants and vegetables that have physiological functions such as disease prevention, health maintenance and improvement of physical function. We revealed the suitable cultivation techniques such as the long-term freezing seed storage, and systematic and efficient seedling production of Swertia japonica in the future domestication in Japan. We have also studied the development of a new and friendly product for preparing decoction of Kampo medicine (Japanese traditional medicine to utilize medicinal plants effectively. It was possible that the decoction of some Kampo medicines in a micro-wavable container could be carried out in substitution for a common method. This study revealed that the improvement of decoction method of Kampo medicine might contribute to conserve the energic or natural resources, especially medicinal plants of crude drugs in comparison with the conventional way. Moreover, the reevaluation of some vegetables such as Japanese radish and carrot in terms of the suitability as materials for “Yakuzen”, and creating and producing of newly low potassium tomatoes for improving the quality of life (QOL of dialysis patients and potassium restricted patients were also studied by focusing traditional and local vegetables. Some local cultivars containing stronger flavor and taste with higher amount of functional constituents are suitable for our health care than F1 (first filial generation cultivars. Our research will give feedback each other by cross cutting way, and human health science from the cultivation to utilization of medicinal plants and vegetables will be important and needed for our healthy and comfortable life in the future.

  5. Threatened medicinal plants of Menwarsar Pahalgam, Kashmir Himalayas: Distribution pattern and current conservation status

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    Bilal Ahmad Baig

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is imperative to understand the distribution and conservation status of medicinal plants in their natural habitats, owing to their increased demand and value. We studied the distribution pattern and current conservation status of six threatened medicinal plants in Pahalgam valley, Kashmir Himalayas, by random quadrate sampling (n=216 in different habitat types. The different uses of medicinal plants were obtained by informal interviews and group discussions with family elders. Recent re-emergence of herbal medicine applicability along with the ever escalating threats to biodiversity and the intensifying Biopyracy controversions have necessitated for an urgent documentation of the traditional use of bioresources. This survey, in addition to the precious ethno medicinal information, recorded the important natural history details. Our results indicate that Podophyllum hexandrum Royle is most common and has the highest density. While Arnebia benthamii (Wall ex Benth I.M. Johnston and Mecanopsis aculeata Royle are least frequent. Moist rocky slopes (MR were the most preferred habitat followed by flat tableland (FL situated above the tree line. While the shady slopes (SSs, flat meadow (FM and moist meadow (MM were least preferred. Our findings can help to formulate a conservation strategy for the unknown grass lands and the threatened vital medicinal plants of Pahalgam valley. While the low and localized distribution of all studied species deserves effective conservation strategies, the scope of such measures should be explored in a way to address the reliance of local communities on these plants.

  6. In vitro Antiplasmodial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants Used in Folk Medicine in Burkina Faso Against Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Cheikna Zongo; Lamoussa Paul Ouattara, Aly Savadogo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antiplasmodial activities of four plants used in traditional medicine. Hydroethanolic extract, hydroacetonic extract and aqueous extract of Mitragyna inermis (Willd.) O. Kuntze (Rubiaceae), Combretum sericeum G. Don (Combretaceae), Alternanthera pungens H.B. and K (Amaranthaceae) and Ampelocissus grantii (Baker) Planch (Vitaceae) have been tested in vitro against chloroquine-resistant strain (K1) and chloroquine-sensitve strain (3D7) of Plasm...

  7. Traditional use of medicinal plants in the boreal forest of Canada: review and perspectives

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    Uprety Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The boreal forest of Canada is home to several hundred thousands Aboriginal people who have been using medicinal plants in traditional health care systems for thousands of years. This knowledge, transmitted by oral tradition from generation to generation, has been eroding in recent decades due to rapid cultural change. Until now, published reviews about traditional uses of medicinal plants in boreal Canada have focused either on particular Aboriginal groups or on restricted regions. Here, we present a review of traditional uses of medicinal plants by the Aboriginal people of the entire Canadian boreal forest in order to provide comprehensive documentation, identify research gaps, and suggest perspectives for future research. Methods A review of the literature published in scientific journals, books, theses and reports. Results A total of 546 medicinal plant taxa used by the Aboriginal people of the Canadian boreal forest were reported in the reviewed literature. These plants were used to treat 28 disease and disorder categories, with the highest number of species being used for gastro-intestinal disorders, followed by musculoskeletal disorders. Herbs were the primary source of medicinal plants, followed by shrubs. The medicinal knowledge of Aboriginal peoples of the western Canadian boreal forest has been given considerably less attention by researchers. Canada is lacking comprehensive policy on harvesting, conservation and use of medicinal plants. This could be explained by the illusion of an infinite boreal forest, or by the fact that many boreal medicinal plant species are widely distributed. Conclusion To our knowledge, this review is the most comprehensive to date to reveal the rich traditional medicinal knowledge of Aboriginal peoples of the Canadian boreal forest. Future ethnobotanical research endeavours should focus on documenting the knowledge held by Aboriginal groups that have so far received less attention, particularly those of the western boreal forest. In addition, several critical issues need to be addressed regarding the legal, ethical and cultural aspects of the conservation of medicinal plant species and the protection of the associated traditional knowledge.

  8. Indigenous plants and schistosomiasis control in south africa:molluscicidal activity of some zulu medicinal plants

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    John A. O. Ojewole

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reviews plant molluscicides and presents preliminary findings of a molluscicidal screening programme carried out on some South African candidate molluscicidal plants. The overall objective of studies on plant molluscicides is to complement methods for controlling snails acting as intermediate hosts of schistosomes. In the last two decades, plant molluscicides have received considerable attention in the search for cheaper, effective, environmentally-friendly alternatives to expensive, imported chemotherapeutic agents and synthetic molluscicides used in schistosomiasis control. Although molluscicidal screening programmes have been conducted in many African countries, only relatively little efforts have been made to identify South African plants which could be suitable for use locally as plant molluascicides. The attraction of a locally grown molluscicidal plant is based on the development of a philosophy of selfreliance and community participation. This approach is dependent on community recognition of the infection as a public health menace, and their acceptance of the proposed control measures. Schistosomiasis has been recognized as a primary health problem in KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa, especially among the people in the rural communities that depend on river-water for all their water requirements. Concerns for schistosomiasis in the Province have indeed been matched by a 75% prevalence of Schistosoma haematobium infection among children aged 6 to 16 years. Forty-one medicinal plants commonly used by traditional healers for the treatment of schistosomiasis in KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa were evaluated for molluscicidal activity according to WHO?s method, using niclosamide (BayluscideÒ as reference molluscicide for comparison. Adult Bulinus africanus and Biomphalaria pfeifferi were exposed to sublethal and lethal doses of crude, aqueous extracts of the Zulu antischistosomal plants for a period of 24 hours. Results obtained indicate that 14 (34% of the 41 plants examined possess moderate to strong molluscicidal properties. Sublethal, toxic effects of the active plant extracts on the snails included retraction of the foot-sole and mobility, swelling of the cephalopedal mass, and haemorrhagic blistering in the subepithelium of the foot-sole, while administration of lethal doses resulted in cessation of mobility, severe swelling of the cephalopedal mass, increased mucous secretion, and haemorrhage. It is speculated that part of the molluscicidal actions of the active plant extracts could involve distruption of the snails? foot-sole epithelium osmoregulatory physiology and enzyme-mediated pathways. However, osmolality and electrolyte studies, as well as enzymatic, histochemical and biochemical studies are required to substantiate these possible modes of molluscicidal action of the South African candidate plant molluscicides. Treatment of schistosomiasis is based on chemotherapy with praziquantel, which is the currently-available drug of choice for all forms of the disease. However, since resistance to praziquantel has been demonstrated in many schistosomiasis endemic areas of the world; of necessity is a holistic approach which should include not only reducing the disease burden in schistosomiasis-infected persons, but also measures interfering with the life-cycle of the parasite by eliminating the intermediate host snail vectors. Inexpensive, non-toxic, effective and readily-available alternative drugs from natural sources are certainly warranted

  9. Preliminary assessment of medicinal plants used as antimalarials in the southeastern Venezuelan Amazon

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    Caraballo Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen species of medicinal plants used in the treatment of malaria in Bolívar State, Venezuela were recorded and they belonged to Compositae, Meliaceae, Anacardiaceae, Bixaceae, Boraginaceae, Caricaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Leguminosae, Myrtaceae, Phytolaccaceae, Plantaginaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Solanaceae and Verbenaceae families. Antimalarial plant activities have been linked to a range of compounds including anthroquinones, berberine, flavonoids, limonoids, naphthquinones, sesquiterpenes, quassinoids, indol and quinoline alkaloids.

  10. Medicinal plants of Otwal and Ngai Sub Counties in Oyam District, Northern Uganda

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    Acipa Annabel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ethnobotanical study was carried out in four parishes in the Ngai and Otwal Sub Counties in Oyam district, Northern Uganda, where insurgency has been prevalent for the past 20 years. Documenting medicinal plant species used in treating various health conditions among the local people. Methods Information was obtained from mainly the local population, the traditional healers and other experienced persons through interviews, formal and informal discussions and field excursions. Results Seventy one plant species were reported for use in the treatment of various diseases in the study area. These plant species belongs to 41 families, with Asteraceae being the most represented. Roots were ranked the commonest plant part used. Oral administration was the most frequently used route of administration. A total of 41 different health conditions were reported to be treated by use of medicinal plant species. Thirty nine percent of the recorded plant species were reported for treating stomach related ailments. Conclusion The use of medicinal plants in primary healthcare is still a common practice in Ngai and Otwal Sub Counties. The trust they have is built on the curative outcome properties claimed, poverty and armed conflict that lead to inadequate healthcare facilities. The generation gap caused by the over 20 years of insurgency in the area has brought about knowledge gap on the usage of medicinal plant species between the young and the older generation.

  11. Investigation of the effects of selected medicinal plants on experimental thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajide, O A

    1999-05-01

    Six medicinal plants indigenous to Africa were evaluated for their activity on experimental thrombosis in mice. Of the plants screened, the extract of Commiphora molmol exhibited the strongest antithrombotic activity, while the extract of Ageratum conyzoides showed no marked activity. This study established the antithrombotic effect of the extracts of Azadiractha indica, Bridelia ferruginea, Commiphora molmol, Garcinia kola and Curcuma longa. PMID:10353165

  12. Medicinal plants from swidden fallows and sacred forest of the Karen and the Lawa in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Many ecosystem services provided by forests are important for the livelihoods of indigenous people. Sacred forests are used for traditional practices by the ethnic minorities in northern Thailand and they protect these forests that are important for their culture and daily life. Swidden fallow fields are a dominant feature of the agricultural farming landscapes in the region. In this study we evaluate and compare the importance of swidden fallow fields and sacred forests as providers of medicinal plants among the Karen and Lawa ethnic minorities in northern Thailand. Methods We made plant inventories in swidden fallow fields of three different ages (1–2, 3–4, 5–6 years old) and in sacred forests around two villages using a replicated stratified design of vegetation plots. Subsequently we interviewed the villagers, using semi-structured questionnaires, to assess the medicinal use of the species encountered in the vegetation survey. Results We registered a total of 365 species in 244 genera and 82 families. Of these 72(19%) species in 60(24%) genera and 32(39%) families had medicinal uses. Although the sacred forest overall housed more species than the swidden fallow fields, about equal numbers of medicinal plants were derived from the forest and the fallows. This in turn means that a higher proportion (48% and 34%) of the species in the relatively species poor fallows were used for medicinal purposes than the proportion of medicinal plants from the sacred forest which accounted for 17–22%. Of the 32 medicinal plant families Euphorbiaceae and Lauraceae had most used species in the Karen and Lawa villages respectively. Conclusion Sacred forest are important for providing medicinal plant species to the Karen and Lawa communities in northern Thailand, but the swidden fallows around the villages are equally important in terms of absolute numbers of medicinal plant species, and more important if counted as proportion of the total number of species in a habitat. This points to the importance of secondary vegetation as provider of medicinal plants around rural villages as seen elsewhere in the tropics. PMID:23800255

  13. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in Terai forest of western Nepal

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    Singh Anant

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nepal Himalayas have been known as a rich source for valuable medicinal plants since Vedic periods. Present work is the documentation of indigenous knowledge on plant utilization as natural remedy by the inhabitants of terai forest in Western Nepal. Methods Study was conducted during 2010–2011 following standard ethnobotanical methods. Data about medicinal uses of plants were collected by questionnaire, personal interview and group discussion with pre identified informants. Voucher specimens were collected with the help of informants, processed into herbarium following standard methods, identified with the help of pertinent floras and taxonomic experts, and submitted in Department of Botany, Butwal Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal for future references. Results During the present study 66 medicinal plant species belonging to 37 families and 60 genera has been documented. These plants were used to treat various diseases and ailments grouped under 11 disease categories, with the highest number of species (41 being used for gastro-intestinal disorders, followed by dermatological disorders (34. In the study area the informants’ consensus about usages of medicinal plants ranges from 0.93 to 0.97 with an average value of 0.94. Herbs (53% were the primary source of medicine, followed by trees (23%. Curcuma longa (84% and Azadirachta indica (76% are the most frequently and popularly used medicinal plant species in the study area. Acacia catechu, Bacopa monnieri, Bombax ceiba, Drymaria diandra, Rauvolfia serpentina, and Tribulus terrestris are threatened species which needs to be conserved for future use. Conclusions The high degree of consensus among the informants suggests that current use and knowledge are still strong, and thus the preservation of today's knowledge shows good foresight in acting before much has been lost. The connections between plant use and conservation are also important ones, especially as the authors note that neither the local inhabitants nor the government is addressing the potential loss of valuable species in this region.

  14. Traditional Medicinal Plants Used by People in Libo-Kemkem District, South Gondar, Ethiopia

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    Yalew Addisie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted between June 2010 and September 2010, to document medicinal plant species traditionally used by peoples in Libo-kemekem district, South Gondar, Ethiopia. Ethnobotanical data were collected using semi structured interviews, focused group discussion and field observations. A total of 52 medically important plants belonging to 45 families and 47 genera were identified in the district. Majorities (47.37% were collected from wild. Most of the plants (94.23% were reportedly used to treat human diseases. The most frequently used plant parts were leaves (40.38%, followed by fruits (23.08% and roots (17.31%. Local people depend on both dry and fresh remedies. The administration routes were oral (57.69%, dermal (25.00%, nasal (11.54 % and anal (5.77%. The preference ranking showed that Lantana camara was the most important species in treating diarrhea followed by Vernonia amygdalin indicating high utility value of the species in the community. The results revealed existence of diverse medicinal plants and indigenous knowledge in the study area. Therefore, documenting medicinal plants and associated indigenous knowledge can be used as a basis for developing management plans for conservation and sustainable use of medicinal plants in the area.

  15. Assessment of Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity for Some Ornamental and Medicinal Plants Native to Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, Ahmed A; Shaaban, Mona I.; Hashish, Nadia E.; Amer, Mohamed A.; Lahloub, Mohamed-Farid

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of some plant extracts on the bacterial communication system, expressed as quorum sensing (QS) activity. Quorum sensing has a directly proportional effect on the amount of certain compounds, such as pigments, produced by the bacteria. Alcohol extracts of 23 ornamental and medicinal plants were tested for anti-QS activity by the Chromobacterium violaceum assay using the agar cup diffusion method. The screening revealed the anti-QS activity of six plants; nam...

  16. A SURVEY OF MEDICINALLY IMPORTANT PLANTS IN AROUND SRIVILLIPUTTUR TALUK, VIRUDHUNAGAR DISTRICT, TAMILNADU

    OpenAIRE

    Pandiarajan G

    2011-01-01

    The Survey was carried out in the remote villages in and around in the Western Ghats of Srivilliputtur Taluk, Virudhunagar District, Tamil Nadu. Most of the Plants are traditionally used by the people for their day to day life. There are 44 plant species belonging to from 22 families of medicinally important plants were identified and their uses are described. Among the species, Ennichostemma littorale, Achyranthus aspera,, Ficus bengalensis, Leucus aspera, Ocimum sanctum, Phyllantus amarus,...

  17. [Application of hyperspectral remote sensing in field of medicinal plants monitoring research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Guo, Lan-Ping; Huang, Lu-Qi; Zhu, Shou-Dong; Ma, Wei-Feng

    2013-05-01

    The paper introduces the basic concept and characteristics of hyperspectral remote sensing, and analyzed the application of hyperspectral remote sensing in the field of plants research. On the basis of the research advances of hyperspectral plant study, paper also analyzed the key facts that effects the application of hyperspectral remote sensing on the some researches which include distinguishing species,monitoring growth and quality etc. It proposed a new ideas and methods for people to research medicinal plants. PMID:23944052

  18. Effects of the medicinal plants Curcuma zedoaria and Camellia sinensis on halitosis control

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor Hugo Farina; Ana Paula de Lima; Ivan Balducci; Adriana Aigotti Haberbeck Brandão

    2012-01-01

    Volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) are the gases mainly responsible for halitosis (bad breath). The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of medicinal plants on halitosis control. Two commonly used plants were tested: Curcuma zedoaria and Camellia sinensis (green tea). These plants were prepared as an aqueous solution and used as mouthwashes, compared with a standard mouthwash of 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate and a placebo (water). The experiment was conducted with 30 volunteers from...

  19. Medicinal Potential of Poisonous Plants of Tehsil Kahuta from District Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Sohail Jamil Qureshi; Sofia Bano; Taj Mohammad; Mir Ajab Khan

    2001-01-01

    Medicinal potential of some poisonous plant was studied from Kahuta Rawalpindi district. Calotropis procera is a remedy for asthma, leprosy and skin diseases. Convolvulus arvensis is mild poisonous plant. It is an excellent remedy for skin diseases and is also used for washing hair to remove dandruff. Oil of Ricinus communis is useful in constipation in children and the plant is used as an antiseptic. Root of Euphorbia helioscopia is used as an anthelmintic. Tribulus terrestris is also a mild...

  20. Traditional Medicinal Plants Used by People in Libo-Kemkem District, South Gondar, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Yalew Addisie; Debebe Yared; Ashok Kumar, P.; Zewdneh Tomas; Assefa Awol

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted between June 2010 and September 2010, to document medicinal plant species traditionally used by peoples in Libo-kemekem district, South Gondar, Ethiopia. Ethnobotanical data were collected using semi structured interviews, focused group discussion and field observations. A total of 52 medically important plants belonging to 45 families and 47 genera were identified in the district. Majorities (47.37%) were collected from wild. Most of the plants (94.23%) were r...

  1. PHYTOCHEMICALS ANALYSIS AND TLC FINGERPRINTING OF METHANOLIC EXTRACTS OF THREE MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta Jayashree

    2013-01-01

    The present work is done on three medicinal plants (Enhydra fluctuans, Lecuas aspera and Dillinia indica) in order to investigate the presence of the various types of Phytoconstituents. The leaves of all three plants were extracted using methanol as solvents. For the purpose of phytochemical investigation, Preliminary qualitative chemical test and TLC were mainly used. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) has been carried out on all the three plants in two different solvent systems, which showed d...

  2. Ethnopharmacological Assessment of Medicinal Plants Used against Livestock Infections by the People Living around Indus River

    OpenAIRE

    Mussarat, Sakina; Amber, Rahila; Tariq, Akash; Adnan, Muhammad; Abdelsalam, Naser M.; Ullah, Riaz; Bibi, Roqaia

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to document detailed ethnopharmacological knowledge of medicinal plants against livestock infections of an unexplored remote region of Pakistan. Semistructured questionnaires were used for data collection. Total 43 plants belonging to 26 families were found to be used in ethnoveterinary practices. Seeds (29%) were found to be the most frequent plant part used followed by leaves (22%). Ethnoveterinary recipes were mostly prepared in the form of decoction and powderi...

  3. An Evidence-based Review on Medicinal Plants used for the Treatment of Peptic Ulcer in Traditional Iranian Medicine

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    Zahra Abbasabadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many medicinal plants have been identified in Traditional Iranian Medicine (TIM for the treatment of Peptic Ulcer (PU but they are still unknown to scientific community. In the present study anti PU activity of these remedies were systematically reviewed and identified. For this purpose, medicinal plants proposed for the management of PU in TIM were collected from TIM sources and they were searched in modern medical databases like PubMed, Scirus, Sciencedirect and Google Scholar to find studies confirmed their efficacy. Findings from modern investigations support the claims of TIM about the efficacy of many of these plants in PU. For example, the oleogum resin of Boswellia carterii and B. serrata as a beneficial remedy for PU in TIM were demonstrated to have wound healing, cytoprotective, antisecretory, antacid, prostaglandin production and inflammatory modulating properties. Fruit and leaves of Myrtus communis was found to be antioxidant, anti H. pylori, wound healing, antisecretory, antacid and cytoprotective. The aerial part from Melissa officinalis exerts its beneficial effects in PU by antioxidant, anti H. pylori, prostaglandin elevating, cytoprotective, antisecretory, antacid and leukotriene reducing properties. Furthermore, Polygonum species demonstrated its function on PU with prostaglandin enhancement, inflammatory modulation, wound healing, cytoprotection, antacid, antioxidant and anti-H. pylori activity. In contrast, for some of herbal remedies used in TIM such as Dolichos lablab flower, Symphytum species, Zizyphus spina-christi fruit, Alisma plantago-aquatica, Cupressus sempervirens fruit, Acacia Arabica gum, Cyperus species root, Althaea officinalis flower and Nymphaea alba flower there is no enough evidence in modern medicine to prove their effectiveness in the management of PU. Pharmacological and clinical studies for evaluation of efficacy of these herbs in PU and their possible mechanisms of action are recommended.

  4. GERMPLASM EVALUATION OF MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC PLANTS IN HIGHLAND BALOCHISTAN, PAKISTAN

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    ASLAM GILL

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Research studies are carried out for cultivation potential of medicinal and aromatic plants [Thyme, Oregano, Rosemary, Sage (belonging to the family Lamiaceae] in Balochistan. The species studied showed good adaptability in cold and dry area and production potential in highland Balochistan. A medicinal herb garden was also established at Arid Zone Research Centre, Quetta with more than 60 potential medicinal and aromatic plants. This germplasm category includes culinary and herbal teas (Thymus vulgaris, Matricaria recutita, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha piperita, Rosmarinus officinalis, Cymbopogon citrates, Artemisia drancunculus, Origanum majorana, Origanum vulgare. Aromatic plants (Lavandula angustifolia, Lavandula stoechas, Rosmarinus officinalis and medicinal plants (Tanacetum parthenium, Hyssopus officinalis, Pimpinella anisum, Achillea celifolium, Achillea millefolium, Borago officinalis, Salvia officinalis, Oenothera biennis, Crocus sativus. Available germplasm of annually sown crops like (Foeniculum vulgare, Carum copticum, Linum usitatissimum, Anethunm sowa and Nigella sativa, Cuminum cyminum were also evaluated and characterized for morphological description and registration with the Federal Seed Registration and Certification Department. These crops have also been introduced among the farming communities in different agro-ecological zones of Balochistan. The results indicate that medicinal and aromatic plants have great potential for commercial scale cultivation in Balochistan subject to provision of better and sustainable marketing avenues.

  5. 50 years of medicinal plant research - every progress in methodology is a progress in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, J David

    2003-06-01

    Many scientific methods of analysis have been developed for the investigation of the constituents and biological activities of medicinal plants during the 50 years since the inaugural meeting of the Gesellschaft für Arzneipflanzenforschung (GA). The chromatographic (e. g., TLC, GLC, HPLC), spectroscopic (e. g., UV, IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR, MS), and biological (e. g., anticancer, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant, antiprotozoal, CNS) techniques utilized for medicinal plant research are briefly reviewed. The contribution that advances in scientific methodology have made to our understanding of the actions of some herbal medicines (e. g., Echinacea, Ginkgo, St John's wort, Cannabis), as well as to ethnopharmacology and biotechnology, are briefly summarized. Plants have provided many medicinal drugs in the past and remain as a potential source of novel therapeutic agents. Despite all of the powerful analytical techniques available, the majority of plant species has not been investigated chemically or biologically in any great detail and even well known medicinal plants require further clinical study. PMID:12865964

  6. Pressurized hot water extraction of bioactive or marker compounds in botanicals and medicinal plant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Eng Shi; Cheong, Jane Si Han; Goh, David

    2006-04-21

    To reduce the use of organic solvent, pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) has been shown to be a feasible option for the extraction of bioactive and marker compounds in botanicals and medicinal plants. The parameters that may affect the extraction efficiencies in PHWE include temperature, extraction time and addition of small percentage of organic solvent or surfactants. Currently, applications of PHWE for the extraction of thermally labile compounds in botanicals are still rather limited. PHWE with and without the additional of a small percentage of organic solvent such as ethanol is highly suited for the chemical standardization and quality control of medicinal plants. At the same time, it can be applied at the pilot scale as a manufacturing process for medicinal plants. Surfactant assisted PHWE was found to enhance the extraction of thermally labile and more hydrophobic species in medicinal plants at a lower temperature. The addition of small amount of surfactants in PHWE is highly suited for the determination of bioactive or marker compounds in medicinal plants. With proper optimization, PHWE was observed to have good extraction efficiency and precision when compared to other reference methods of extraction. PMID:16388815

  7. Evaluation of fungal burden and aflatoxin presence in packed medicinal plants treated by gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Simone; Gonçalez, Edlayne; Rossi, Maria Helena; Nogueira, Juliana Hellmeister de Campos; Reis, Tatiana Alves Dos; Corrêa, Benedito

    2010-05-01

    This study was developed to evaluate the fungal burden, toxigenic molds, and mycotoxin contamination and to verify the effects of gamma radiation in four kinds of medicinal plants stored before and after 30 days of irradiation treatment. Eighty samples of medicinal plants (Peumus boldus, Camellia sinensis, Maytenus ilicifolia, and Cassia angustifolia) purchased from drugstores, wholesale, and open-air markets in São Paulo city, Brazil, were analyzed. The samples were treated using a (60)Co gamma ray source (Gammacell) with doses of 5 and 10 kGy. Nonirradiated samples were used as controls of fungal isolates. For enumeration of fungi on medicinal plants, serial dilutions of the samples were plated in duplicate onto dichloran 18% glycerol agar. The control samples revealed a high burden of molds, including toxigenic fungi. The process of gamma radiation was effective in reducing the number of CFU per gram in all irradiated samples of medicinal plants after 30 days of storage, using a dose of 10 kGy and maintaining samples in a protective package. No aflatoxins were detected. Gamma radiation treatment can be used as an effective method for preventing fungal deterioration of medicinal plants subject to long-term storage. PMID:20501045

  8. Medicinal plants potential and use by pastoral and agro-pastoral communities in Erer Valley of Babile Wereda, Eastern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Belayneh Anteneh; Asfaw Zemede; Demissew Sebsebe; Bussa Negussie F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Ethiopian plants have shown remarkably effective medicinal values for many human and livestock ailments. Some research results are found on medicinal plants of the south, south west, central, north and north western parts of Ethiopia. However, there is lack of data that quantitatively assesses the resource potential and the indigenous knowledge on use and management of medicinal plants in eastern Ethiopia. The main thrust of the present ethnobotanical study centres around ...

  9. The Assessment of Pesticides Residues in Some Organic Cultivated and Wild-Collected Medicinal Plants in Albania

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    FERDI BRAHUSHI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide residues in environment are found in soil, water and plants due to the extensive use of pesticides for agricultural purposes. The residues of pesticides in medicinal plants are of high concern as they are toxic for human life since these plants are used for medicinal purposes. The objective of current study was to estimate the presence of pesticide residues in some organic cultivated and wild-collected medicinal plants in Albania during the years 2010–2013. The determination of pesticides residues in medicinal plants was achieved by using extraction of plant material with organic solvent, clean up procedure and followed by detection with chromatography techniques. Among the detected pesticide residuesin the wild–collected plants as Malva sylvestris, Fragaria vesca, Bellis perennis were DDT, Dimethoat, Pirimiphos-methyl, Chlorpyriphos-ethyl, Carbendazim/Benomyl, Acetamiprid and Diphenylamine. Whereas in the cultivated medicinal plants as Calendula officinalis, Centaurea cyani, Salvia officinalis, Sideritis raeseri, the most common detected pesticide residues were Dimethoat, Chlorpyriphos, Pirimiphos-methyl, DDT and Carbendazim. The presence of pesticides in medicinal plant is related to the past use of pesticides as DDT and actual use of pesticides like Dimethoat, Pirimiphos-methyl, Chlorpyriphos, Acetamiprid, etc. Therefore, the quality of medicinal plants can be evaluated through estimation of pesticides residues in medicinal plants and comparison of the obtained values with acceptable limit values.

  10. Screening of Antibacterial Activities of Essential Oils from Selected Medicinal Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essential oils were extracted from the five medicinal plants (Syzygium aromaticum Linn, Cinnamoum tamala. Nees, Piper betle. Linn, Ocimum sanctum, Clausena exacavata Burn) by steam distillation method and percolation method with petroleum ether. These plants do not contain cyanogenic glycosides according to phytochemical tests. Essential oils from these plants were also tested on antimicrobial activity by agar well diffusion method. It was observed that essential oils extracted from these five plants have various effects on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungus. Among them, essential oils of Syzygium aromaticum possess the highest antimicrobial activity aganist all test organisms. B. pumalis and Calbican are the most susceptible to the five plants.

  11. Uranium and thorium nuclides series determined in medicinal plants commonly used in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, P.; Francisconi, L.; Damatto, S. [IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In recent years the study of medicinal plants has become the focus of ever more extensive research all over the world due to their diversity and potential as source of medicinal products. According to the World Health Organization approximately 80% of world population makes use of medicinal herbs due to their believed therapeutic action. Besides being used as medicine, medicinal plants are also largely used as dietary supplements. The presence of radionuclides in plants constitutes one of the main pathways for their transfer to man. The amount of radioactive nuclides from U and Th series in edible vegetables are relatively well known since they have been the main concern of research conducted worldwide. Medicinal plants, on the other hand, have been neglected in these studies, possibly because the ingestion of radioactive material through their consumption has not been recognized or was considered insignificant. The objective of the present study was to determine the content of natural radionuclides from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series in 25 species of medicinal plants used in Brazil, both as medicine and as dietary supplement. The medicinal plant samples were obtained in specialized pharmacies and drugstores. The raw plant and their extracts, produced as recommended by the National Agency for Sanitary Vigilance, were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analyses for the determination of U and Th and by Total Alpha and Beta Counting after Radiochemical Separation for determination of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb. In the raw plants the activity concentrations varied from 0,08 Bq kg{sup -1} to 8,0 Bq kg{sup -1} for thorium, from < LID to 22 Bq kg{sup -1} for uranium, from 1,8 Bq kg{sup -1} to 12 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, from 33 Bq kg{sup -1} to 74 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra and from 10 Bq kg{sup -1} to 120 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb. In the extracts, the activity concentrations varied from 9 mBq kg{sup -1} to 137 mBq kg{sup -1} for Th and 145 mBq kg{sup -1} to 580 mBq kg{sup -1} for U. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  12. Uranium and thorium nuclides series determined in medicinal plants commonly used in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years the study of medicinal plants has become the focus of ever more extensive research all over the world due to their diversity and potential as source of medicinal products. According to the World Health Organization approximately 80% of world population makes use of medicinal herbs due to their believed therapeutic action. Besides being used as medicine, medicinal plants are also largely used as dietary supplements. The presence of radionuclides in plants constitutes one of the main pathways for their transfer to man. The amount of radioactive nuclides from U and Th series in edible vegetables are relatively well known since they have been the main concern of research conducted worldwide. Medicinal plants, on the other hand, have been neglected in these studies, possibly because the ingestion of radioactive material through their consumption has not been recognized or was considered insignificant. The objective of the present study was to determine the content of natural radionuclides from 238U and 232Th series in 25 species of medicinal plants used in Brazil, both as medicine and as dietary supplement. The medicinal plant samples were obtained in specialized pharmacies and drugstores. The raw plant and their extracts, produced as recommended by the National Agency for Sanitary Vigilance, were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analyses for the determination of U and Th and by Total Alpha and Beta Counting after Radiochemical Separation for determination of 226Ra, 228Ra and 210Pb. In the raw plants the activity concentrations varied from 0,08 Bq kg-1 to 8,0 Bq kg-1 for thorium, from -1 for uranium, from 1,8 Bq kg-1 to 12 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, from 33 Bq kg-1 to 74 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra and from 10 Bq kg-1 to 120 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb. In the extracts, the activity concentrations varied from 9 mBq kg-1 to 137 mBq kg-1 for Th and 145 mBq kg-1 to 580 mBq kg-1 for U. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  13. Modulation of diabetes-mellitus-induced male reproductive dysfunctions in experimental animal models with medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Gyan Chand; Jangir, Ram Niwas

    2014-01-01

    Today diabetes mellitus has emerged as a major healthcare problem throughout the world. It has recently broken the age barrier and has been diagnosed in younger people also. Sustained hyperglycemia is associated with many complications including male reproductive dysfunctions and infertility. Numerous medicinal plants have been used for the management of the diabetes mellitus in various traditional system of medicine and in folklore worldwide as they are a rich source of bioactive phytoconsti...

  14. Diversity Loss Study of Medicinal Plants in Achanakmar Sanctuary, Chhattsgarh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Dhuria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Achanakmar Sanctuary (557.55 km2 of forest area was surveyed to study the loss of diversity of medicinal plants. Before a decade back this area was known as germplasm but after getting the knowledge, importance and economic value of a particular species of a medicine much exploitation has been done. Due to evere exploitation the number of species found endangered from four study sites viz. Shivtarai, Achanakmar, Chaparwa and Kewachi in Achanakmar Sanctuary.

  15. Antibacterial activity of traditional medicinal plants used by Haudenosaunee peoples of New York State

    OpenAIRE

    Meyers Ryan; Frey Frank M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance, as well as the evolution of new strains of disease causing agents, is of great concern to the global health community. Our ability to effectively treat disease is dependent on the development of new pharmaceuticals, and one potential source of novel drugs is traditional medicine. This study explores the antibacterial properties of plants used in Haudenosaunee traditional medicine. We tested the hypothesis that extracts fro...

  16. PHARMACOGNOSTIC AND PHYTOCHEMICAL EVALUATION OF CHLOROPHYTUM GLAUCUM DALZ. – A MEDICINALLY IMPORTANT PLANT

    OpenAIRE

    Patil V.N.; Abyari M.; Deokule S. S.

    2011-01-01

    Chlorophytum glaucum Dalz. belongs to family Liliaceae and is being used in the indigenous systems of medicine as a galactogogue and aphrodisiac. It is being sold in the market under the common name “safed musali”. The white tuberous roots of this plant are the medicinally useful parts. The tuberous roots of other species of Chlorophytum, Asparagus, Bombax and Orchids are also sometimes called safed musali leading to confusion. In order to ensure correct botanical standardization, the detaile...

  17. ECOLOGICAL FEATURES AND CONSERVATION OF ARNEBIA EUCHROMA. A CRITICALLY ENDANGERED MEDICINAL PLANT IN WESTERN HIMALAYA

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Koushalya Nandan; Lal, Brij; Chand, Gopi; Todaria, Nagendra P.

    2012-01-01

    Arnebia euchroma (Royle ex Benth.) Johnston, commonly known as ‘Ratanjot’ is an important medicinal plant species and is found distributed in the western Himalaya at elevations ranging between 3200 - 4500 m above sea level. Considering its potent medicinal properties, cultural significance, declining population density and critically endangered status of this taxon, the present investigation was carried out for the assessment of its availability in the natural alpine landscapes of the Spi...

  18. Steroidal Lactones from Withania somnifera, an Ancient Plant for Novel Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Palazón; Cusido, Rosa M.; Mercedes Bonfill; Elisabeth Moyano; Mohammad Hossein Mirjalili

    2010-01-01

    Withania somnifera, commonly known as Ashwagandha, is an important medicinal plant that has been used in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine for over 3,000 years. In view of its varied therapeutic potential, it has also been the subject of considerable modern scientific attention. The major chemical constituents of the Withania genus, the withanolides, are a group of naturally occurring C28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids built on an intact or rearranged ergostane framework, in which C-22 and C...

  19. Effects of rare earth elements on growth and metabolism of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhong Zhang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The rare earth elements (REEs are a set of 17 chemical elements. They include the lanthanide series from lanthanum (La to lutetium (Lu, scandium (Sc, and yttrium (Y in the periodic table. Although REEs are used widely in industry and agriculture in China for a long time, there has been increasing interest in application of REEs to medicinal plants in recent years. In this paper, we summarize researches in the past few decades regarding the effects of REEs on the germination of seeds, the growth of roots, total biomass, and the production of its secondary metabolites, as well as their effects on the absorption of minerals and metals by medicinal plants. By compilation and analysis of these data, we found that REEs have promoting effects at low concentrations and negative effects at comparatively high concentrations. However, most studies focused only on a few REEs, i.e., La, cerium (Ce, neodymium (Nd and europium (Eu, and they made main emphasis on their effects on regulation of secondary metabolism in tissue-cultured plants, rather than cultivated medicinal plants. Advanced research should be invested regarding on the effects of REEs on yields of cultivated plants, specifically medicinal plants.

  20. Medicinal plants growing in the Judea region: network approach for searching potential therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Budovsky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants growing in the Judea region are widely used in traditional medicine of the Levant region. Nevertheless, they have not so far been sufficiently analyzed and their medicinal potential has not been evaluated. This study is the first attempt to fill the gap in the knowledge of the plants growing in the region. Comprehensive data mining of online botanical databases and peer-reviewed scientific literature including ethno-pharmacological surveys from the Levant region was applied to compile a full list of plants growing in the Judea region, with the focus on their medicinal applications. Around 1300 plants growing in the Judea region were identified. Of them, 25% have medicinal applications which were analyzed in this study. Screening for chemical-protein interactions, together with the network-based analysis of potential targets, will facilitate discovery and therapeutic applications of the Judea region plants. Such an approach could also be applied as an integrative platform for further searching the potential therapeutic targets of plants growing in other regions of the world.

  1. Common plants of medicinal values in kolams of Adilabad district, Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao VLN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common plants of medicinal values in Kolams are used as ethnomedical practices for various ailments and diseases inhabiting the Utnoor division of Adilabad district, Andhra Pradesh, India. Aim: This paper provides data on 31 medicinal plants used by Kolams for curing various ailments along with their local names, method of preparation, mode of administration and use. Materials and Methods: Our collections of ethnomedicinal plant specimens from this area were deposited in the Andhra University Herbarium (AUH, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India. Detailed interviews were conducted on four ethnomedical specialists drawn from the six study villages of the selected two Jainoor and Narnoor mandals of Utnoor division of Adilabad district, Andhra Pradesh. Results: The ethno-medical system among Kolam is quite diverse and the local knowledge is used mostly in primary health care. The vast traditional knowledge present among Kolam is mostly attributed to their cultural framework. Conclusion: The present study revealed the situation with regard to use common plants of medicinal values in the study area. 31 plant species from Utnoor division of Adilabad district in Andhra Pradesh were used to treat 57 different ailments and diseases. Among these plant species only few species are used to treat more than one disease. Medicinal pastes are prepared from stem, root, and leaves to treat diseases by the tribal people.

  2. ANTIOXIDANT, CYTOTOXIC PROPERTIES AND PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING OF TWO LEBANESE MEDICINAL PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rammal Hassan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays herbal medicine presents a significant adjuvant tool for hard treatment, especially in the case of cancer where modern medicine has access to traditional medicine to deprive the patient of the side effects of therapeutic approaches such as surgery and chemotherapy. Thus, Lebanese 10452 km2 are so rich in medicinal plants such as Eryngium creticum L. and Euphorbia macroclada Boiss that are traditionally used in the treatment of various diseases (leukemia, asthma, skin diseases, antidote to snake venom, tumors, etc.. To fully realize the importance of these two Lebanese plants, we tried at first to study the phytochemistry of three extracts (aqueous, methanolic and ethyl acetate from fresh leaves and stems of both plants. In a second step, the antioxidant capacity of these three extracts from the two parts of the fresh plants using spectrophotometric analysis has been evaluated and their cytotoxicity on the MCF7 breast cancer cell line by the XTT Cell viability technique has been studied. Our results showed that both leaves and stems of these two plants contain alkaloid, tannin, coumarin, saponin, flavonoid, polyphenol and reducing sugars in different concentrations. Moreover, both leaves and stems have exerted an antioxidant activity that may be due to their phenolic content and they have also inhibited the growth of cancer cell line from 68 % to 72 %. These results showed that both plants can be considered as a good source of natural products that can be used in the prevention of several diseases.

  3. NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase 1 inducer activity of some Saudi Arabian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahat, Abdelaaty A; Alsaid, Mansour S; Alyahya, Muhammad A; Higgins, Maureen; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T

    2013-04-01

    Medicinal plants are a rich source of biologically-active phytochemicals and have been used in traditional medicine for centuries. Specific phytochemicals and extracts of their plant sources have the ability to reduce the risk for chronic degenerative diseases by induction of enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, many of which also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. One such multifunctional cytoprotective enzyme is NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase. In this study, we prepared extracts of 27 Saudi Arabian medicinal plants which belong to 18 different plant families and tested their ability to induce NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase in murine hepatoma cells grown in microtiter plate wells. In addition to the Brassicaceae, a known source of NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase inducer activity, we found substantial inducer activity in extracts from the Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, and the Asteraceae families. Five out of a total of eight active extracts are from plants which belong to the Asteraceae family. We further show that artemisinin, an agent which is used clinically for the treatment of malaria, contributes but does not fully account for the inducer activity of the extract of Artemisia monosperma. In contrast to artemisinin, deoxyartemisinin is inactive in this assay, demonstrating the critical role of the endoperoxide moiety of artemisinin for inducer activity. Thus, the NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase inducer activity of extracts of some Saudi Arabian medicinal plants indicates the presence of specific phytochemicals which have the potential to protect against chronic degenerative diseases. PMID:23512501

  4. DETECTION AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS FROM MEDICINAL PLANT : TRIDAX PROCUMBENS

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    Prakash Solanki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines have been a part of human life through the past centuries. At present, there are many types of plants discovered which possess medicinal properties. Tridax Procumbens is one of the most common plants used by rural and tribal communities to cure various health ailments. This plant contains a large number of medicinal compounds which are useful for further studies. But some toxic compounds are also present in it which is harmful for human lives and their separation and identification from the leaves extract is very important. These compounds are Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids are a group of naturally occurring alkaloids based on the structure of Pyrrolizidine. Its identification from the Ethanol+ Deionized water extract can be done through TLC using Ehrlich reaction method of mattocks. Then after the identification of Pyrrolizidine alkaloids through TLC, we got its spectra by the help of IR Spectroscopy

  5. Study of some Indian medicinal plants by application of INAA and AAS techniques

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    Raghunath Acharya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS techniques were used to analyze 18 elements (K, Mn, Na, Fe, Zn, Cu, Co, Br, Sm, Cl, La, Al, Cr, Ca Cd, Ni, Pb and Hg in different medici-nal plants often used in Indian Ayurvedic system. The samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor and the induced activities were counted by ?-ray spectrometry using efficiency calibrated high resolution High Purity Germanium (HPGe detector. Most of the medicinal plants were found to be rich in one or more of the ele-ments under study. The elemental concentra-tion in different part of medicinal plants and their biological effects on human beings are discussed.

  6. Tapping an Amazônian plethora: four medicinal plants of Marajó Island, Pará (Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M L; Johns, E A

    1993-09-01

    This study focused its attention on four medicinal plants (Carapa guianensis, Elephantopus scaber, Piper umbellatum, Stachytarpheta cayenensis) used by Caboclo communities on Marajó, the main island of the Amazon delta. In the field, interviews were conducted with Caboclos and the medicinal usages and preparation procedures of the four plants were recorded. In the laboratory, the plant extracts were subjected to bioassays and their crude chemical composition was established. All four plants showed significant bioactivity and the chemical tests confirmed the presence of bioactive compounds. In addition, the results of both the field and laboratory studies corresponded well with those of a literature search. The ethnopharmacological significance of the four plants is discussed. PMID:8246531

  7. Medicinal plant use in the practice of midwifery in rural Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticktin, Tamara; Dalle, Sarah Paule

    2005-01-01

    Midwives in rural communities across the globe play an important role as primary health care providers, but few studies have documented the medicinal plants employed in this age-old practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 midwives in seven rural communities near La Ceiba, Honduras, regarding the plants they employ during the birthing process as well as their associated beliefs. Seventy-nine different plant species used to treat 15 conditions occurring during the pregnancy, birth and postpartum stages were recorded. Most plants and uses were reported by only one or two midwives, reflecting the fact that most midwives in this region had immigrated from different parts of the country. Almost all the midwives used or knew of plant remedies for treatment of miscarriages, postpartum abdominal pain and hemorrhages, retained placenta, and for speeding up contractions during labor. The most frequently cited plants as well as those for which there was greatest consensus tended to be widespread cultivated or weedy species. Although use of medicinal plants by midwives has decreased as a result of retraining programs by government health centers, midwives' knowledge of medicinal plants may provide an important resource for improving maternal-infant health in Honduras and elsewhere. Suggestions for future ethnobotanical and ethnopharmacological studies on this topic are provided. PMID:15588676

  8. MEDICINAL PLANTS USED AS AN ANTIDIABETIC DRUG IN PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY AND THEIR CONSERVATION: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Murthy K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to review the literature and the emerging policy issues on Antidiabetic plants for pharmaceutical usage. Also provides a brief review of different plants using in the traditional system for the treatment of diabetes since ancient times. Plants such as Allium cepa, Anacardium occidentale, Andrographic paniculata, Momordica charantia, Azadirachtha indica, Brassica oleraccia, Cinnamomum tamala and Withania sominifera are commonly using as remedy for diabetes. There is an increasing demand for the herbal medicines for diabetic ailments and many plant drugs from Ayurvedic system are being explored. The biological activities from various clinical and preclinical studies have been included. Some of the acclaimed valuation works done in the last few years have been considered for this purpose. Conservation of biodiversity based on the benefits of medicinal plants and the traditional knowledge can be considered as good starting point for effective conservation of Antidiabetic plants, which requires accurate and up-to date information on the status of medicinal plant populations, detailed area-specific study, landscape valuation, extent and nature of plant use by local communities.

  9. Trade potential and conservation issues of medicinal plants in district Swat, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of medicinal plants for various health disorders is a common practice especially in rural areas. Poor economic condition and lack of modern health care facilities in remote areas are the major reasons for adopting traditional medicine. Mingora is considered as the main center of trade of medicinal plants not only of Swat but of the entire Hindu Kush-Himalayan Region of Pakistan. The city was analyzed for the trade potential of local medicinal plants. The present study reported trade and marketing profile of 99 species collected locally and sold in the national and international markets. A total of 99 taxa were collected belonging to 55 families and 80 genera. Helvellaceae was at the top among the largest families with 9 taxa, followed by Asteraceae and Solanacea with 8 and 6 taxa respectively. Among the life form Chamaephyte was at the top with 27 taxa (27.27%), followed by Hemicryptophyte, Phanerophyte, Therophyte, Geophyte and Parasite with 25 (25.25%), 24 (24.24%), 17 (20.20%), 2 (2.02%) and 1 taxa (1.01%), respectively. Market analysis revealed that annual production and its share to the market was 8.056 and 6.644 million kg during the years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 whereas, it gave rise to the circulation of Rs. 4475.00 and Rs. 5084.70 millions, respectively. Thus quantity traded decreased due to the unsustainable collection in the wild, while amount circulated increased due to rise in price kg/sup -1/ as a result of increased demand from the national and intencreased demand from the national and international market. According to an estimate approximately 99,840 individuals (i.e. 8% of the total population of Swat) are associated with the collection or trade of these important medicinal plants in the valley. The study also revealed that availability of medicinal plants decreased day by day and this process is continued for the last two decades. According to local elders, most of the medicinal plants reported were abundant in the vicinities some 20 years back. However, their population was drastically decreased due to over exploitation, extension in agricultural lands, increased market pressure, lack of alternate earning opportunities in the area and unsustainable harvesting methods etc. All these threats have affected the population size of these medicinal plants in the wild. Therefore, early measures for the management of medicinal flora for sustaining its market supply and there by securing livelihood opportunities of rural communities are needed on urgent basis. (author)

  10. The evolution of traditional knowledge : environment shapes medicinal plant use in Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saslis-Lagoudakis, C Haris; Hawkins, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Traditional knowledge is influenced by ancestry, inter-cultural diffusion and interaction with the natural environment. It is problematic to assess the contributions of these influences independently because closely related ethnic groups may also be geographically close, exposed to similar environments and able to exchange knowledge readily. Medicinal plant use is one of the most important components of traditional knowledge, since plants provide healthcare for up to 80% of the world's population. Here, we assess the significance of ancestry, geographical proximity of cultures and the environment in determining medicinal plant use for 12 ethnic groups in Nepal. Incorporating phylogenetic information to account for plant evolutionary relatedness, we calculate pairwise distances that describe differences in the ethnic groups' medicinal floras and floristic environments. We also determine linguistic relatedness and geographical separation for all pairs of ethnic groups. We show that medicinal uses are most similar when cultures are found in similar floristic environments. The correlation between medicinal flora and floristic environment was positive and strongly significant, in contrast to the effects of shared ancestry and geographical proximity. These findings demonstrate the importance of adaptation to local environments, even at small spatial scale, in shaping traditional knowledge during human cultural evolution.

  11. Screening of Allelopathic Activity of Eleven Thai Medicinal Plants on Seedling Growth of Five Test Plant Species

    OpenAIRE

    H. Kato-Noguchi; P. Piyatida

    2010-01-01

    Eleven species of Thai medicinal plants, namely Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz, Clitoria ternatea L., Mammea siamensis Kosterm., Centella asiatica (L.) Urban, Thunbergia lauriflolia Linn., Piper sarmentosum Roxb., Hibiscus sabdariffa L., Moringa oleifera Lam., Tinospora tuberculata Beume, Tiliacora triandra (Colebr.) Diels. and Amomum krervanh Pierre ex. Gagnep. were evaluated their allelopathic potentials against cress (Lepidium sativum L.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), alfalfa (Medicago s...

  12. Medicinal Plants used for Dogs in Trinidad and Tobago

    OpenAIRE

    Lans, C.; Harper, T.; Georges, K.; Bridgewater, K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper documents ethnoveterinary medicines used to treat dogs in Trinidad and Tobago. In 1995, a 4-stage process was used to conduct the research and document the ethnoveterinary practices. Twenty-eight ethnoveterinary respondents were identified using the school-essay method, which is a modified rapid rural appraisal (RRA) technique. Semi-structured interviews were held with these respondents as well as with 30 veterinarians, 27 extension officers and 19 animal-health assistants and/or a...

  13. [Oral anticoagulants and medicinal plants. An emerging interaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argento, A; Tiraferri, E; Marzaloni, M

    2000-01-01

    The consumption of herbal medicines is increasing steadily throughout the world, although to our knowledge there are neither studies on their effectiveness nor controls over the quality and safety of these preparations. Considered "food integrators", these preparations are marketed without restriction. It is a common notion that natural therapy has neither side nor toxic effects: allergic reactions, direct toxic effects or those due to contamination, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and heavy metal toxicity have been reported as adverse events caused by herbs. Rather than replacing traditional therapy, most herbal medical treatment is used in conjunction with it. Also, the attending physician is generally not informed that the patient is using herbs. Because Passionflower, hydroalcoholic extracts, Juniper and Verbena officinalis supply variable quantities of vitamin K, they can lessen the effect of oral anticoagulant therapy. Ganoderma Japonicum, Papaw, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Ginseng, Devil's claw, Garlic, Quinine, Ginkgo, Ginger, Red Clover and Horse-Chestnut reinforce warfarin action by heterogeneous mechanisms. They should thus not be used in patients on oral anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet therapy. The scientific community must take into account the adverse events caused by interaction between herbal medicine and conventional therapy, and patients must be informed of the dangers of these preparations. If a bleeding event occurs or the quality of anticoagulant therapy is poor, the clinician should consider the possibility of interaction between conventional therapy and herbal medicine that the patient has neglected to mention he is taking. PMID:10920504

  14. Plantas medicinais: a necessidade de estudos multidisciplinares Medicinal plants: the need for multidisciplinary scientific studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida M. Maciel

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a program emphasizing ethnopharmacological approaches that could allow great success in the study of medicinal plants. The minimum ethnopharmacological research team should consist of a botanist, a chemist and a pharmacologist with each carrying the responsibility for answering in sequential fashion critical questions. The chemical composition and pharmacological properties of the very efficient medicinal plant Croton cajucara were investigated according to ethnopharmacological approaches. The study with this Croton proved to be both efficient and successful. This happy situation was only possible because a multidisciplinary team was involved getting the research done correctly. The ethnopharmacological study involving one other especies Copaifera will be cited.

  15. X-Rays Irradiation Produced Dual Effects on the Constituents of Medicinal Plants Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Zainab W. Abdul Lateef; Al-Nimer, Marwan S.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to show the effect of free radicals induced by fixed dose rate of X-rays radiation on the chemical constituents of some medicinal plants; barks of Cinnamomum verum (cinnamon), leaves of Salvia officinalis (sage) and Camellia sinensis (green tea). Four extracts (1%) were prepared for each medicinal plant; hydro-distilled, aqueous, ethanol and methanol. Each extract was subjected to X-rays radiation at rate of 1.9 Gy min-1. The UV-Visible spectra, physioche...

  16. SOME IMPORTANT MEDICINAL PLANTS USED IN THE TREATMENT OF ASTHMA - A REVIEW.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheela Kumar; Agnihotri, V. K.; Sunita Thakur; Anita Verma; Saxena, R. C.; Soni, Kapil K.

    2012-01-01

    Ayurveda, Siddha, Unani and Folk (Tribal) medicines are the major systems of indigenous medicines. Over three-quarters of the world population relies mainly on plants and plant extracts for health care. Unlike many diseases, which can be attributed to the life style of modern man, asthma is an ancient illness. Mast cells play an important role in some type of allergic reaction because the antibody that causes the allergic reaction that is Ig E have the mast cells which contains about a thousa...

  17. Achillea vermicularis a medicinal plant from Iranian Traditional Medicine induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells

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    M. Hamzeloo-Moghadam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Achillea is an ancient medicinal herb. The genus comprises about 100 species which are mostly distributed in northern hemisphere and some have been investigated for different biological activities. There are also several reports in Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM texts about its anti-tumor effect. The cytotoxic activity of the methanol extract of Achillea vermicularis Trin.  has been reported in previous studies against different tumor cell lines. Based on these reports, the species has been further investigated for apoptosis induction ability. Methods: The apoptosis induction ability has been evaluated through activated caspase 3 investigation in intact MCF-7 cells in vitro.  Results: The assay demonstrated signs of caspase 3 activation in MCF-7 cells. Conclusion: Achillea vermicularis is suggested for further mechanistic evaluations in apoptosis studies.

  18. Evaluation of the in vitro antiplasmodial, antileishmanial, and antitrypanosomal activity of medicinal plants used in saudi and yemeni traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothana, Ramzi A; Al-Musayeib, Nawal M; Al-Ajmi, Mohamed F; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis

    2014-01-01

    The antiplasmodial, antileishmanial, and antitrypanosomal activity of twenty-five medicinal plants distributed in Saudi Arabia and Yemen was evaluated. The plants were extracted with methanol and screened in vitro against erythrocytic schizonts of Plasmodium falciparum, intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania infantum and Trypanosoma cruzi, and free trypomastigotes of T. brucei. To assess selectivity, cytotoxicity was determined on MRC-5 cells. Criteria for activity were an IC50 ciliata showed fairly good activity against P. falciparum with IC50 of 6.7 and 10.8? ? g/mL and adequate selectivity (SI > 9.6 and >5.9). Interesting activity against L. infantum was obtained with Verbascum bottae (IC50 of 3.2? ? g/mL, SI 10.2) and Solanum glabratum (IC50 8.1? ? g/mL, SI 3.4). The extracts of C. penicillata, Leucas virgata, Loranthus regularis, and V. bottae exhibited moderate activity against T. brucei (IC50 8.5, 8.1, 8.3, and 2.3? ? g/mL; SI > 7.6, 7.7, 4.3, and >14.1). These results partly support the traditional use of some of the selected medicinal plants and warrant further investigations into the putative active constituents. PMID:24963330

  19. In vitro Antiplasmodial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants Used in Folk Medicine in Burkina Faso Against Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheikna Zongo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antiplasmodial activities of four plants used in traditional medicine. Hydroethanolic extract, hydroacetonic extract and aqueous extract of Mitragyna inermis (Willd. O. Kuntze (Rubiaceae, Combretum sericeum G. Don (Combretaceae, Alternanthera pungens H.B. and K (Amaranthaceae and Ampelocissus grantii (Baker Planch (Vitaceae have been tested in vitro against chloroquine-resistant strain (K1 and chloroquine-sensitve strain (3D7 of Plasmodium falciparum using pLDH assay. Aqueous extracts exhibited the best results against K1 with the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 0.54±0.18, 1.72±0.99, 1.54±0.04 ?g/mL for respectively, M. inermis leaves, C. sericeum leaves and whole plant of A. pungens. Hydroethanolic extract from the leaves of M. inermis gave also IC50 value of 0.87±0.10 ?g/mL with 3D7. Extracts showed antiplasmodial activity against both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum strains. Our study justifies the use of these plants in traditional medicine and leads to further investigations.

  20. Gems from traditional north-African medicine: medicinal and aromatic plants from Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Hassan; Abdalla, Wail Elsadig; Abdelgadir, Haider; Opatz, Till; Efferth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Sudanese folk medicine represents a unique blend of indigenous cultures with Islamic, Arabic and African traditions. In addition, Sudan encompasses different terrains and climatic zones, ranging from desert and semi-desert in the north to equatorial with a short rainy season (semi-aridand semi-humid) in the centre to equatorial with a long rainy season (arid-humid and equatorialhumid) in the south. This variation contributes to the immense diversity of vegetation in the region. The flora of S...

  1. Propagação vegetativa de liamba, planta medicinal Vegetative propagation of liamba, a medicinal plant

    OpenAIRE

    Maria de Fátima B Coelho; Sandra Sely S Maia; Andreya K Oliveira; Francisco Ésio P Diógenes; Silvio Roberto F Soares

    2011-01-01

    A liamba (Vitex agnus castus L.) é utilizada no Brasil como medicinal e apresenta compostos com estrutura química semelhante à progesterona. Visando avaliar a propagação vegetativa de liamba foram conduzidos dois experimentos. O primeiro, com estacas da parte aérea com 20 cm de comprimento, sem folhas e classificadas em dois grupos: apical e basal. As estacas tiveram a espessura padronizada em 3 a 5 mm de diâmetro e 40 unidades de cada tipo foram colocadas em sacolas de polietileno (10...

  2. Biological activities of commonly used medicinal plants from ghazi brotha, attock district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medicinal plants are important natural source of possibly secure drugs. They have been playing a significant role in mitigating human miseries by contributing herbal medicines in the primary health care systems of remote areas. About 70% population of rural and remote areas depends on folklore and traditional medicines to cure various ailments. The traditional medicines have gained much popularity due to the high cost and adverse effects of allopathic medicines which encouraged manufacturers of Greco-Arab and Ayurvedic systems of medicines to fuse their orthodox medicines with local traditional medicines in order to spread health coverage at a reasonable rate. Keeping in view the importance of ethnobotanical survey the current survey was carried out in Attock District, Punjab which comes under the Rawalpindi Division. The region has rural values of old civilizations and customs. The inhabitants of this area have their own trends for a village site, house, family, childbirth, death ceremonies, cultural functions, festivals and socio-religious belief. The ladies are more energetic and laborious as compared to gents. There is a lack of communication with current civilization which has kept them closer to nature from where they fulfill many of their daily needs. The inhabitants of the area are very close to natural flora, both in their habitat and livelihood. People of the area have speculative observations of nature and by communicating with other people of their culture, they discover the inherent knowledge of the local plants. As a result they gain indigenous knowledge, generation after generation. Plants and their derivatives available from the local area are utilized for many purposes such as food, fodder, medicine, veterinary medicines, timbers, households, oilseeds and also for socio-religious and various other purposes. In this way important medicinal plants are collected throughout the year for advertising, personal and entire community use. Due to random and excessive use of antimicrobial drugs in the treatment of contagious diseases, pathogenic bacteria have developed great resistance against prevailing antibiotics. Multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria generally spread in hospitals and are being isolated from population acquired infections. All this has resulted in severe consequences such as failure of treatment. Hence, it was imperative to explore natural products as an alternative to synthetic antimicrobial agents. (author)

  3. Uses of plants as medicine by Muna People, Sub District Wakarumba, District Muna, Province of Southeast Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLORENTINA INDAH WINDADRI

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available North Wakarumba is one of subdistrict lies in the north of Buton Island, close to North Buton Nature Reserve. More than one etnic live in this sub district such as Muna as the biggest ethnic. Muna people have unique behavior in the plant using and environment management including protecting forest and its surrounding area. Study on the plant usage as traditional medicinal plant has been done by interviewing local people. The result of the research was got 61 species of medicinal plants, where 6 species of them have never been published at the Index of Indonesian Medicinal Plants. Thirty-eight plants species could be found wildly and 16 of them occur in North Buton Nature Reserve areas. Bark of 10 species reported as after giving birth medicine. Grinding of Epipremnum pinnatum leaves could be used as wound medicine. Leaf of Terminalia catappa could be used as anti diarrhea.

  4. Identification of medicinal plants of Urmia for treatment of gastrointestinal disorders

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mahmoud, Bahmani; Arman, Zargaran; Mahmoud, Rafieian-Kopaei.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is one of the most important organs of the human body and is vulnerable to different diseases. Available drugs often have low efficacy or are associated with many adverse effects. Therefore, alternative drugs are necessary to treat gastrointestinal complications. This stud [...] y intended to identify medicinal plants in Urmia, Iran, that can affect common gastrointestinal disorders and diseases. Data was collected from public resources via interviews and questionnaires applied from April to June 2013. Herbarium specimens were collected from the region and authenticated by a botanist. A total of 41 indigenous medicinal plants from the Urmia region, belonging to twenty families, have a traditional medicinal role in the treatment of parasitic and infectious diseases, diarrhea, reflux, gastroenteritis, peptic ulcer, constipation, bloating, among other gastrointestinal tract disorders. Analysis showed that most plants affecting the gastrointestinal tract belonged in the Asteraceae family (24%). The most used part of the plants was the seed at 17%. Decoction at 65% was the most popular form of treatment used. Some of the medicinal plants discussed in this article have new implications presented for the first time. Pharmacological studies on the therapeutic effects of the indigenous plants mentioned in this study are necessary in order to investigate their claimed clinical effects and the use of their effective compounds to produce natural and useful drugs. Currently, there is no data on the herbal plants used to treat gastrointestinal disorders in northwestern Iran. Therefore, these findings are important for the management of gastrointestinal disorders and to conduct future studies on traditional medicine for drug development.

  5. Pollution Based Study of Heavy Metals in Some Selected Medicinal Plants by Dry Digestion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Niaz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Study of heavy metals including Iron (Fe, Nickel (Ni, Manganese( Mn, Zinc (Zn, Copper (Cu, Cadmium (Cd, Chromium (Cr and Lead (Pb in four selected medicinal plants Capparis spinosa, Peganum harmala , Rhazya stricta and Tamarix articulata collected from polluted and unpolluted areas of Karak, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Pakistan was performed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Dry Ashingmethod was adopted for sample preparation. In general the concentration level of heavy metals in the selected plants from polluted area was found to decrease in the order of Fe > Zn > Mn > Cu >Pb > Ni > Cr > Cd, and the same order was also found in unpolluted area. In polluted area Iron was found high 48.76 mg/kg in leaves ofCapparis spinosa while least level (Below detection level was that of Cadmium and in unpolluted area the level of iron was high 54.94 mg/kg in roots of Rhazya stricta while least concentration was that of Cd 0.02 mg/kg in leaves of Peganum harmala. These medicinal plants were selected for our investigation having in mind their extensive use in traditional medicine for various ailments by local physicians in the area from where these plants were collected. Monitoring such medicinal plants for heavy metals is a supreme importance in protecting the Public from the adverse and hazardous affects of these heavy metals.

  6. ETHNO MEDICINAL STUDY OF THREATENED PLANTS OF SONITPUR DISTRICT IN ASSAM, NORTH EAST INDIA

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    Das Amar Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Assam is endowed with a rich wealth of medicinal plants. It has the richest reservoir of plant diversity of India and is one of the hot diversity spots of the world supporting about 50% of India’s biodiversity. Traditional medical practice has been recognized by the World health Organization (WHO as a building block of primary healthcare. Assam has a rich traditional knowledge of folk medicinal practices. But rapid fragmentation of natural habitats and unrestricted exploitation coupled with limited cultivation and insufficient attempts for its replacement has decreased this knowledge day by day. As a result, this wild stock of the medicinal plant species has been markedly depleted with increasing the risk of loosing their genetic diversity and the medicinal quality of these plants remains unknown.Many species are extinct or on the verge of extinction before they are known for their scientific uses. In order to categorize and update the list of threatened species, the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN has recognized the categories on the basis of geographical range, populations and fragmentation of populations.The present study was carried out in Sonitpur district of Assam for the documentation of ethnomedicinal importance of such threatened plants species.

  7. Medicinal plants used as sedative by ecological farmers from southern rio grande do sul state, brazil

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    Teila Ceolin, Rita Maria Heck, Rosa Lía Barbieri, Andrieli Daiane Zdanski de Souza, Walter Fagundes Rodrigues, Marisa Vanini

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify the medicinal plants used as with sedative effects by families of ecological farmers from Southern Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Methods: this is a qualitative study, exploratory and descriptive approach, and the data were collected from January to May 2009. Eight families of farmers were participants which were residents in Pelotas, Morro Redondo, Canguçu and Arroio do Padre cities. This study was approved by the Committee of Ethics in Research of the Medicine Faculty of the Federal University of Pelotas (072/2007. Results: it was found citations of 196 medicinal plants, some native and other exotic, and seven elixirs. From these, twelve plants (Lactuca sativa L., Aloysia gratissima (Gillies & Hook. Tronc., Chamomilla recutita L., Cymbopogon citratus (DC., Aloysia triphylla Royle, Aristolochia cymbifera Mart. & Zucc., Ageratum conyzoides L., Eucalyptus sp., Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck, Passiflora caerulea L., Melissa officinalis L., Cunila microcephala Benth., and one elixir were mentioned as having soothing effect. Conclusion: the nurse can work in guidelines the use of medicinal plants aimed at health promotion, prevention and treatment of diseases. It is essential the enlargement of the pharmacological studies on plants used by popular knowledge in health care.

  8. SOME IMPORTANT MEDICINAL PLANTS USED IN THE TREATMENT OF ASTHMA - A REVIEW.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela Kumar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda, Siddha, Unani and Folk (Tribal medicines are the major systems of indigenous medicines. Over three-quarters of the world population relies mainly on plants and plant extracts for health care. Unlike many diseases, which can be attributed to the life style of modern man, asthma is an ancient illness. Mast cells play an important role in some type of allergic reaction because the antibody that causes the allergic reaction that is Ig E have the mast cells which contains about a thousand tiny granules. These granules are loaded with dozens of potent chemicals or mediators, the most powerful in which are histamine and a newly discovered group called leukotrienes. From the present laboratory, there are number of medicinal plants have been reported for antihistaminic/anti-asthmatic activities. Some of them are Achyranthes aspera, Tephrosia purpurea,Dolichos lablab, Eclipta alba, Jasminum sambac, Balanites aegyptiaca, Viscum album, Tridex procumbens, Glycyrrhiza glabra and Cassia fistula. Recently, Soni (2009-2011 has reported 100% inhibition ofLeukotrienes (which cause asthma from the EtoAC fraction of Bacopa monnieri extract. It is suggested that formulation and patent of the reported medicinal plants is mandatory for further use against asthma and if possible, clinical trials should be done of these plants for their appropriate use.

  9. Comparison of the total antioxidant content of 30 widely used medicinal plants of New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderJagt, T J; Ghattas, R; VanderJagt, D J; Crossey, M; Glew, R H

    2002-01-18

    Teas made from medicinal plants are commonly used by a majority of the inhabitants of New Mexico and Mexico to treat various ailments including infections, arthritis, heart disorders, headaches, fever, asthma and menstrual pain. However, little is known about the identity or chemical nature of the bioactive substances and compounds responsible for the therapeutic effects of the teas made from the leaves, seeds, flowers stems, and roots of these medicinal plants. Some of the beneficial effects of these teas may be attributable to antioxidants contained in the medicinal plants from which they are brewed. In the present study we collected 30 medicinal plants that are widely used in the Rio Grande Valley and, using a two-stage Trolox based assay, analyzed the total antioxidant capacity of aqueous extracts prepared from these plants. The antioxidant content of the aqueous extracts was substantial, ranging from 27 to 972 micromol Trolox equivalent per gram dry weight. An extract of the leaves of the plant Ilex paraguensis (Mate leaf) contained the highest amount of antioxidant, followed by the flowers of the Rosa sp. (Rosa de Castillo, 804 micromol/g), the bark of Chinchona sp. (Copalquin, 692 micromol/g), Rumex hymenosepalus stems (Cana Agria, 672 micromol/g) and the leaves of Marrubium vulgare (Mastranzo, 560 micromol/g). The plants that had the lowest antioxidant capacity were the seeds of Linum lewissii (Linasa, 29 micromol/g) and Yucca sp. plant root (Amole, 27 micromol/g). It will be useful to further analyze those plants that contain the most antioxidant activity in order to identify the active principles. PMID:11860152

  10. Indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants of Chagharzai valley, district Buner, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants was recorded during summer 2004, in 22 villages of Chagharzai valley, District Buner. The study revealed 141 plant species belonging to 120 genera and 26 families are being used as medicine. The local people know the prospect and nature of the plant utilization, through personal experiences and ancestral prescriptions. The study also revealed that old aged people particularly women posses strong folk love of medicinal plants in comparison to young people. It was concluded that some plants are used singly while many other are used in combination. Similarly few plant species are used for the treatment of a specific disease, while several other have multiple uses. The plants were mainly used as stomachic, anti-allergic, antineuralgia, vermifuge, narcotic, laxative, anti jaundice, emollient, hypnotic, diuretic, digestive, demulcent, carminative, astringent, aphrodisiac, anti-spasmodic, anti-emetic, anti-diabetic, anthelmentic, anodyne and alterative. The present investigation will help in the preservation of indigenous knowledge of the local people, which is depleting day by day. (author)

  11. Changes in the trade in native medicinal plants in Brazilian public markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Maria das Graças Lins; Cosenza, Gustavo Pereira; Pereira, Flávia Liparini; Vasconcelos, Ariela Silva; Fagg, Christopher William

    2013-08-01

    Plants continue to be an important source of new bioactive substances. Brazil is one of the world's mega-diverse countries, with 20 % of the world's flora. However, the accelerated destruction of botanically rich ecosystems has contributed to a gradual loss of native medicinal species. In previous study, we have observed a fast and intensive change in trade of medicinal plants in an area of Amazon, where human occupation took place. In this study, we surveyed 15 public markets in different parts of Brazil in search of samples of 40 plants used in traditional medicine and present in first edition of Brazilian Official Pharmacopoeia (FBRAS), published in 1926. Samples of plants commercialized as the same vernacular name as in Pharmacopoeia were acquired and submitted to analysis for authentication. A total of 252 plant samples were purchased, but the laboratory analyses showed that only one-half of the samples (126, 50.2 %) were confirmed as the same plant species so named in FBRAS. The high number of unauthenticated samples demonstrates a loss of knowledge of the original native species. The proximity of the market from areas in which the plant occurs does not guarantee that trade of false samples occurs. The impact of the commerce of the substitute species on their conservation and in public health is worrying. Strategies are necessary to promote the better use and conservation of this rich heritage offered by Brazilian biodiversity. PMID:23322507

  12. Efforts on conservation and sustainable use of medicinal plants of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the beginning of civilization, and perhaps as early as Neanderthal man, people have used plants as medicine. Evidence indicates that people used plants to cure themselves, e.g. Chinese Emperor (2800 BC); Babylon (1770 BC); Ancient Egypt (1550 BC). Islamic and Indian physicians also wrote many works prior to 1100 AD and the Seals from the Harappan site in Pakistan (2000 BC) also indicate use of plants. New aspects of medicinal plants need to be studied. For example, we should address the question why plant diversity declines, when plants with weedy traits become more abundant. This is consequently followed by, species that have traits permitting their persistence in degraded and species-poor cosystems which are likely to carry high pathogen and vector burdens. Indigenous communities of Pakistan play a vital role in conservation of medicinal plants. Intentionally or unintentionally, people have evolved strategies for doing so in the form of rituals, beliefs and taboos. Various traditional harvesting methods described in one of the study suggest that they were efficient to utilize the natural resources. Our efforts are towards not only providing food security, nutrition and health care to the tribal people, but also to recover, record and diffuse local botanical knowledge and wisdom. (author)

  13. Use of medicinal plant in the manufacturing of energetic cookies Uso de erva medicinal na fabricação de biscoito energético

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    Édira Castello Branco de Andrade Gonçalves

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Many nutrients provide energy and regulate physiological processes linked to exercise. This work aimed at using medicinal plant in the manufacturing of energetic cookie. An evaluation of microbiological and physicochemical stability was made within 180 days of the fabrication of the product. Sensorial analysis was performed in all stages with untrained tasters. The results were statistically tested. The evaluation of ergogenic effect of the product used the maximum volume of oxygen index as a parameter through the cooper track test (12 minutes with 7 voluntaries. The participants received the consent form. This study was approved by the local ethics committee (N° CAAE - 0009.0.313.000-08. It was observed good stability for physicochemical and microbiological parameters. As for sensorial analysis there was a predominance of scores 6 to 8, characterizing good acceptance. It was verified increase in VO2 max after the intake of the cookies with or without the medicinal plants. However, the product with the medicinal plants presented a bigger value, 35.47 VO2 max mL/(kg.min-1. The fraction of carbohydrate and the presence of medicinal plants can be considered as nutritional ergogenic substances. The lipid fraction favor the energetic aspect of the product. The proposed product presented energetic and ergogenic effect.Os vários nutrientes alimentares fornecem energia e regulam os processos fisiológicos relacionados ao exercício. O objetivo deste trabalho foi utilizar ervas medicinais na elaboração de biscoito energético. A avaliação da estabilidade físico-química e microbiológica periódica até 180 dias do produto elaborado foi feita, bem como a análise sensorial com provadores não treinados. Os resultados foram tratados estatisticamente. Para avaliação do efeito ergogênico utilizou-se o índice de volume de oxigênio máximo como parâmetro através do teste de pista de Cooper (12 minutos com 7 voluntários. Os voluntários receberam o termo de esclarecimento e consentimento, aprovado pelo comitê de ética com Nº CAAE - 0009.0.313.000-08. Observou-se boa estabilidade tanto nos parâmetros físico-químicos quanto no microbiológico. Na análise sensorial, as notas de 6 a 8 foram as mais mencionadas, caracterizando boa aceitação. Foi verificado aumento no VO2 máx tanto no consumo do biscoito energético preparado sem o uso das ervas medicinais quanto no consumo do produto com as ervas medicinais, o qual apresentou maior valor, 35,47 VO2 máx mL/ (kg.min-1. A fração de carboidratos e a presença das ervas medicinais podem ser consideradas substâncias ergogênicas nutricionais. A fração lipídica favorece o aspecto energético do produto. O produto elaborado apresentou efeito energético e ergogênico.

  14. Use of medicinal plant in the manufacturing of energetic cookies / Uso de erva medicinal na fabricação de biscoito energético

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Édira Castello Branco de Andrade, Gonçalves; Roberta Melquiades Silva de, Andrade.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Os vários nutrientes alimentares fornecem energia e regulam os processos fisiológicos relacionados ao exercício. O objetivo deste trabalho foi utilizar ervas medicinais na elaboração de biscoito energético. A avaliação da estabilidade físico-química e microbiológica periódica até 180 dias do produto [...] elaborado foi feita, bem como a análise sensorial com provadores não treinados. Os resultados foram tratados estatisticamente. Para avaliação do efeito ergogênico utilizou-se o índice de volume de oxigênio máximo como parâmetro através do teste de pista de Cooper (12 minutos) com 7 voluntários. Os voluntários receberam o termo de esclarecimento e consentimento, aprovado pelo comitê de ética com Nº CAAE - 0009.0.313.000-08. Observou-se boa estabilidade tanto nos parâmetros físico-químicos quanto no microbiológico. Na análise sensorial, as notas de 6 a 8 foram as mais mencionadas, caracterizando boa aceitação. Foi verificado aumento no VO2 máx tanto no consumo do biscoito energético preparado sem o uso das ervas medicinais quanto no consumo do produto com as ervas medicinais, o qual apresentou maior valor, 35,47 VO2 máx mL/ (kg.min)-1. A fração de carboidratos e a presença das ervas medicinais podem ser consideradas substâncias ergogênicas nutricionais. A fração lipídica favorece o aspecto energético do produto. O produto elaborado apresentou efeito energético e ergogênico. Abstract in english Many nutrients provide energy and regulate physiological processes linked to exercise. This work aimed at using medicinal plant in the manufacturing of energetic cookie. An evaluation of microbiological and physicochemical stability was made within 180 days of the fabrication of the product. Sensori [...] al analysis was performed in all stages with untrained tasters. The results were statistically tested. The evaluation of ergogenic effect of the product used the maximum volume of oxygen index as a parameter through the cooper track test (12 minutes) with 7 voluntaries. The participants received the consent form. This study was approved by the local ethics committee (N° CAAE - 0009.0.313.000-08). It was observed good stability for physicochemical and microbiological parameters. As for sensorial analysis there was a predominance of scores 6 to 8, characterizing good acceptance. It was verified increase in VO2 max after the intake of the cookies with or without the medicinal plants. However, the product with the medicinal plants presented a bigger value, 35.47 VO2 max mL/(kg.min)-1. The fraction of carbohydrate and the presence of medicinal plants can be considered as nutritional ergogenic substances. The lipid fraction favor the energetic aspect of the product. The proposed product presented energetic and ergogenic effect.

  15. Anti Yeast Activity of Some Plants Used in Traditional Herbal-medicine of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    G.H. Shahidi Bonjar

    2004-01-01

    This is the first report showing the anti-yeast activities of different Iranian plants. Plants used in herbal-medicine were collected from South-East regions of Iran. Methanolic extracts were prepared and evaluated in Agar well-diffusion test against three yeast species of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans and C. utilis. From 48 plant species in 34 families, 26 species in 20 families showed inhibitory effect at least against one yeast species at 20 mg ml ha-1 . Plants with high anti-...

  16. Study of transfer of trace elements from soil to medicinal plants in the environment of Mangalore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of five trace elements Cr, As, Pb, Rb and Sr in seven medicinal plants Garcinia indica, Ficus benghalensis, Flacartia Montana, Nyctanthes arbor-tristis, Morinda citrifolia, Ficus recemosa, Barringtonia acutangula and associated soils were analyzed using ICP-MS. In plant the elemental concentrations of Cr, Pb, Rb and Sr vary widely and in soil the elemental concentrations of Cr, As and Sr showed wide variation. Selective enrichment of elements Rb and Sr was observed in some plants. The soil to plant transfer ratio was significant for Sr. The results of these systematic investigations are presented and discussed in this paper. (author)

  17. Medicinal Potential of Poisonous Plants of Tehsil Kahuta from District Rawalpindi, Pakistan

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    Sohail Jamil Qureshi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal potential of some poisonous plant was studied from Kahuta Rawalpindi district. Calotropis procera is a remedy for asthma, leprosy and skin diseases. Convolvulus arvensis is mild poisonous plant. It is an excellent remedy for skin diseases and is also used for washing hair to remove dandruff. Oil of Ricinus communis is useful in constipation in children and the plant is used as an antiseptic. Root of Euphorbia helioscopia is used as an anthelmintic. Tribulus terrestris is also a mild poisonous plant for humans but poisonous for goats. The leaves of Cannabis sativa are antispasmodic, narcotic and sedative.

  18. Morpho-anatomical diagnostic of medical plants and medicinal crude

    OpenAIRE

    Seraya, Ludmila M.

    2012-01-01

    The main conclusions of the investigations of macro- and microscopically features of the plants and herbal drug crude of Ukraine are represented in the works of the author and the main publications are quoted.

  19. Medicinal plants in the southern region of the State of Nuevo León, México

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    Estrada-Castillón Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the flora of the State of Nuevo León is well known, there are few records of ethnobotancial information. An ethnobotanical study was undertaken in order to know the medicinal plants used by people living at the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas in the southern Nuevo León. Collection of plants specimens and interviews were carried out among the people of the municipalities of Aramberri, Galeana, and Zaragoza. Since former studies in the region are scarce, the aim of this work was to record the medicinal species and their uses in the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas, of southern Nuevo León, Mexico, and also to know if there are differences in the number of species and number of uses knowledge by people. Methods Field work was carried out over a 2 years period; useful plants were collected and a total of 105 people from 46 different villages were interviewed. A database was compiled using data collected by means of semi structured interviews. The data were analyzed by means of non-parametric statistics, using goodness-of-fit test (Chi-squared (number of species known by people of each municipality, number of uses known by people of each municipality, Chi-squared modified to incorporate the Yates Correction (number of species known by people living at scrublands and oak-pine forest; the Kruskall-Wallis test (number of species known by women and men of the three municipalities, and the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (age and number of species known, and age and number of uses. Results A total of 163 medicinal plant species were recorded in the study area, comprising 108 wild and 55 cultivated plants. A total of 117 species were recorded in the oak-pine forest, and 111 in the scrublands area, a total of 68 were recorded in both areas; 68 medicinal species are used in all three municipalities, 40 wild and 28 cultivated. We documented 235 different medicinal uses. The most common plant parts used for medicinal purposes were found to be leaves (123 species, stems (55, fruits (28, roots (17, and bark (14. No differences were noted in the number of medicinal plant species identified among people, but differences were significant in their knowledge with respect to the number of uses among people of the three municipalities studied; people from both, scrublands and oak-pine forest know similar number of species and number of uses. Men and women of the three different municipalities knew statistically the same number of species and number of uses. There was no correlation between resident’s age and number of species known and resident’s age and number of uses either in Galeana or in Aramberri, but, there was high correlation among these variables in Zaragoza. Conclusion In southern Nuevo León people use at least 5% of the total State flora as medicinal plants, and most of these species are included in few plant families. Most of medicinal species are wild and indigenous to the region. The two most important major plant communities, scrublands and oak-pine forest provide almost the same number of medicinal species. A third of the medicinal flora recorded are used in all three municipalities, most of them are wild. Leaves, stems and fruits are the plant parts most commonly used for healing, and boiling is the most common method used for this purpose. Men and women from the three municipalities are familiar with nearly the same number of species; however, their knowledge of the number of uses varies significantly. In Galeana and Aramberri there was no correlation between a person’s age and number of species recognized, however, in Zaragoza, there existed a high correlation between these two factors.

  20. Consensus of the 'Malasars' traditional aboriginal knowledge of medicinal plants in the Velliangiri holy hills, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragupathy, Subramanyam; Steven, Newmaster G; Maruthakkutti, Murugesan; Velusamy, Balasubramaniam; Ul-Huda, Muneer M

    2008-01-01

    There are many vanishing cultures that possess a wealth of knowledge on the medicinal utility of plants. The Malasars of Dravidian Tamils are an indigenous society occupying the forests of the Western Ghats, South India. They are known to be exceptional healers and keepers of traditional aboriginal knowledge (TAK) of the flora in the Velliangiri holy hills. In fact, their expertise is well known throughout India as evidenced by the thousands of pilgrims that go to the Velliangiri holy hills for healing every year. Our research is the first detailed study of medicinal plants in India that considers variation in TAK among informants using a quantitative consensus analysis. A total of 95 species belonging to 50 families were identified for medicinal and general health purposes. For each species the botanical name, family, local name, parts used, summary of mode of preparation, administration and curing are provided. The consensus analysis revealed a high level of agreement among the informants usage of a particular plant at a local scale. The average consensus index value of an informant was FIC > 0.71, and over 0.80 for some ailments such as respiratory and jaundice. Some of the more common problems faced by the Malasars were gastrointestinal disorders, respiratory illness, dermatological problems and simple illness such as fever, cough, cold, wounds and bites from poisonous animals. We also discovered several new ethnotaxa that have considerable medicinal utility. This study supports claims that the Malasars possess a rich TAK of medicinal plants and that many aboriginals and mainstream people (pilgrims) utilize medicinal plants of the Velliangiri holy hills. Unfortunately, the younger generation of Malasars are not embracing TAK as they tend to migrate towards lucrative jobs in more developed urban areas. Our research sheds some light on a traditional culture that believes that a healthy lifestyle is founded on a healthy environment and we suggest that TAK such as that of the Malasars may serve toward a global lifestyle of health and environmental sustainability. PMID:18371206

  1. Consensus of the 'Malasars' traditional aboriginal knowledge of medicinal plants in the Velliangiri holy hills, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragupathy, Subramanyam; Steven, Newmaster G; Maruthakkutti, Murugesan; Velusamy, Balasubramaniam; Ul-Huda, Muneer M

    2008-01-01

    There are many vanishing cultures that possess a wealth of knowledge on the medicinal utility of plants. The Malasars of Dravidian Tamils are an indigenous society occupying the forests of the Western Ghats, South India. They are known to be exceptional healers and keepers of traditional aboriginal knowledge (TAK) of the flora in the Velliangiri holy hills. In fact, their expertise is well known throughout India as evidenced by the thousands of pilgrims that go to the Velliangiri holy hills for healing every year. Our research is the first detailed study of medicinal plants in India that considers variation in TAK among informants using a quantitative consensus analysis. A total of 95 species belonging to 50 families were identified for medicinal and general health purposes. For each species the botanical name, family, local name, parts used, summary of mode of preparation, administration and curing are provided. The consensus analysis revealed a high level of agreement among the informants usage of a particular plant at a local scale. The average consensus index value of an informant was FIC > 0.71, and over 0.80 for some ailments such as respiratory and jaundice. Some of the more common problems faced by the Malasars were gastrointestinal disorders, respiratory illness, dermatological problems and simple illness such as fever, cough, cold, wounds and bites from poisonous animals. We also discovered several new ethnotaxa that have considerable medicinal utility. This study supports claims that the Malasars possess a rich TAK of medicinal plants and that many aboriginals and mainstream people (pilgrims) utilize medicinal plants of the Velliangiri holy hills. Unfortunately, the younger generation of Malasars are not embracing TAK as they tend to migrate towards lucrative jobs in more developed urban areas. Our research sheds some light on a traditional culture that believes that a healthy lifestyle is founded on a healthy environment and we suggest that TAK such as that of the Malasars may serve toward a global lifestyle of health and environmental sustainability. PMID:18371206

  2. Hairy root induction and plant regeneration of medicinal plant Dracocephalum kotschyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafi, Ali; Sohi, Haleh Hashemi; Azadi, Pejman; Sharafi, Ata Allah

    2014-04-01

    An efficient hairy root induction system for an important endangered medicinal plant, Dracocephalum kotschyi, was developed through Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation by modifying the co-cultivation medium using five bacterial strains, A4, ATCC15834, LBA9402, MSU440, and A13 (MAFF-02-10266). A drastic increase in transformation frequency was observed when a Murashige and Skoog medium lacking NH4NO3 KH2PO4, KNO3 and CaCl2 was used, resulting in hairy root induction frequencies of 52.3 %, 69.6 %, 48.6 %, 89.0 %, and 80.0 % by A4, A13, LBA9402, MSU440, and ATCC15834 strains, respectively. For shoot induction, hairy roots and unorganized tumors induced by strain ATCC15834 were placed on an MS media supplemented with 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/l BA plus 0.1 mg/l NAA. The high frequency of shoot regeneration and number of shoot were obtained in the medium containing 0.25 mg/l BA and 0.1 mg/l NAA. Root induction occurred from the base of regenerated shoots on the MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l IBA after 10 days. PMID:24757330

  3. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of some Philippine medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Chichioco-hernandez, Christine; Wudarski, Jakub; Gevaert, Lieven; Verschaeve, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The genotoxicity and toxicity of ethnomedicinal Philippine plants, which include Cassia fistula, Derris elliptica, Ficus elastica, Gliciridia sepium, Michelia alba, Morus alba, Pogostemon cablin and Ricinus communis, were tested using the Vitotox assay. The plants are used traditionally to treat several disorders like diabetes, weakness, menorrhagia, headache, toothache and rheumatism. The dried leaves were homogenized for overnight soaking in methanol at room temperature. The resulting alcoh...

  4. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF TOTAL PHENOLIC CONTENT IN SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C. E.; Oladeinde, F. O.; Kinyua, A. M.; Michelin, R.; Makinde, J. M.; Jaiyesimi, A. A.; Mbiti, W. N.; Kamau, G. N.; Kofi-tsekpo, W. M.; Pramanik, S.; Williams, A.; Kennedy, A.; Bronner, Y.; Clarke, K.; Fofonoff, P.

    2008-01-01

    This study was to compare the total phenolic (TP) content in extracts from eleven plant materials collected at different geographical locations in Kenya, Nigeria, and USA. These plants have been selected because the majority of them are highly pigmented, from yellow to purple, and would therefore have economic value in industries for producing antioxidants and surfactants. Two of them were collected from the industrial and domestic waste outlets. Each analysis was achieved using the Folin-Cio...

  5. Harnessing the potential clinical use of medicinal plants as anti-diabetic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell-Tofte JI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Joan IA Campbell-Tofte,1 Per Mølgaard,2 Kaj Winther11Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder arising from complex interactions between multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. The characteristic high blood sugar levels result from either lack of the hormone insulin (type 1 diabetes, T1D, or because body tissues do not respond to the hormone (type 2 diabetes, T2D. T1D patients currently need exogenous insulin for life, while for T2D patients who do not respond to diet and exercise regimes, oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs and sometimes insulin are administered to help keep their blood glucose as normal as possible. As neither the administration of insulin nor OADs is curative, many patients develop tissue degenerative processes that result in life-threatening diabetes comorbidities. Several surveys of medicinal plants used as anti-diabetic agents amongst different peoples have been published. Some of this interest is driven by the ongoing diabetes pandemic coupled with the inadequacies associated with the current state of-the-art care and management of the syndrome. However, there is a huge cleft between traditional medicine and modern (Western medicine, with the latter understandably demanding meaningful and scientific validation of anecdotal evidence for acceptance of the former. The main problems for clinical evaluation of medicinal plants with promising anti-diabetic properties reside both with the complexity of components of the plant materials and with the lack of full understanding of the diabetes disease etiology. This review is therefore focused on why research activities involving an integration of Systems Biology-based technologies of pharmacogenomics, metabolomics, and bioinformatics with standard clinical data, should be used for cost-effective validation of the safety and anti-diabetic efficacy of promising medicinal plants. The application of such approaches to studying entire mixtures of plant materials will ensure proper elucidation of novel therapies with improved mechanisms of action, as well as facilitate a personalized clinical use of medicinal plants as anti-diabetic agents.Keywords: medicinal plants, anti-diabetes therapy, natural products, systems biology, 'omics technologies, drug discovery

  6. Ecological Properties of the Medicinal Plant-Helleborus orientalis Lam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Kilinc

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nutrient concentrations (N, P and K in above and below ground parts of Helleborus orientalis Lam. which has several medicinal properties were examined during vegetative and generative growth periods. There were significant differences between two growth periods in different parts of H. orientalis in terms of N and K concentrations. We have only found statistically significant differences between the studied localities, in terms of K concentrations. There were no significant differences with respect to soil factors except K and organic matter concentrations of the studied localities. Our findings are supported the vernal dam hypothesis.

  7. [Study on medicinal plant resources and diversity in Rhinopithecus bieti national natural reserve of Markam in Tibet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qi; Quan, Hong; Zheng, Wei-lie; Liao, Zhi-hua; Lan, Xiao-zhong

    2015-02-01

    This research was a part of the investigation of traditional Chinese medicine resources survey in Markam. The medicinal plants in natural reserve were studied for the first in this paper. There were 300 species in 202 genera of 54 families, among them there were 7 species of ferns in 5 genera of 5 families, 6 species of gymnosperms in 4 genera of 3 families, and 287 species of angiosperms in 194 genera of 61 families. There were 166 species Tibetan medicinal plants in 102 genera of 47 families. Quantitative analysis was carried out in 6 aspects of family and genus composition, medicinal parts, drug properties, flavour of a drug, Tibetan medicine, toxicity and new plants. The concrete suggestions of protection and exploitation were put forward, which provided scientific basis for the sustainable utilization of medicinal plants in this area. PMID:26084154

  8. Biodiversity Status, Distribution and Use Pattern of Some Ethno-Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti KUMARI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The erosion of plant biodiversity is a matter of global concern. Due to unawareness the building blocks of entire ecosystems are disappearing. Some medicinal plants like Taxus baccata Linn., Thymus serpyllum Linn., Coleus forskohli Will., Oroxylum indicum Linn., Valeriana hardwickii Wall., Malaxis acuminata D.Don, Habenaria edgeworthii Hook. f.ex.Collett., Costus speciosus (Koen. Sm., Dioscorea deltodea Wall., Gloriosa superba Linn., Polygonatum cirrhifolium Wall. and Polygonatum verticillatum Linn., Thalictrum foliolosum DC., Berberis aristata DC., Baliospermum montanum Will., Bergenia ciliata (Haworth Sternb., Clerodendrum serratum Linn., Valeriana jatamansii Jones, Celastrus paniculatus Will., Habenaria intermedeia D. Don, and Curculigo orchioides Gaerth are reached on the border of extinction. The 2008 IUCN Red List shows that the number of threatened plant species is increasing gradually (IUCN 2008. Therefore, there is an immediate need for conservation steps to be taken up along with promotion of conservation of medicinal plants.

  9. Occurrence of taraxerol and taraxasterol in medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kiran; Zafar, Rasheeduz

    2015-01-01

    Indian soil germinates thousands of medicinal drugs that are cultivated with a purpose to obtain a novel drug. As it is a well-established fact that the structural analogs with greater pharmacological activity and fewer side-effects may be generated by the molecular modification of the functional groups of such lead compounds. This review throws light on two natural triterpenes - Taraxerol and Taraxasterol which have many important pharmacological actions including anti-cancer activity, their chemistry, biosynthesis aspects, and possible use of these compounds as drugs in treatment of cancer. A silent crisis persists in cancer treatment in developing countries, and it is intensifying every year. Although at least 50-60% of cancer victims can benefit from radiotherapy that destroys cancerous tumors, but search for the paramount therapy which will prove to be inexpensive with minimal side effects still persists. Various treatment modalities have been prescribed, along with conventional and non-conventional medicine but due to their adverse effects and dissatisfaction among users, these treatments are not satisfactory enough to give relief to patients. Hence, this review sparks the occurrence of Taraxerol (VI) and Taraxasterol (VII) in nature, so that the natural godowns may be harvested to obtain these potent compounds for novel drug development as well as discusses limitations of these lead compounds progressing clinical trials. PMID:26009688

  10. Diuretic Plant Ecology and Medicine in the Western Mediterranean Coastal Region of Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Salama M. El-darier; Sania A. Kamal; Randa S. youssef

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to document ethnoecological knowledge through a survey on diuretic plant species used by the inhabitants of the North Western Mediterranean region of Egypt (from Burg El-Arab to Salum) for use in treatment of urinary system problems. The study revealed that the number of plant species used by the bedouins was low (35 species) and some species such as Alhagi maurorum , Polygonum equisitiforme, Sylibum marianum etc. recorded in the ancient Arabic medicine ...

  11. Optimization of total RNA isolation method from the aromatic medicinal plant Artemisia annua L.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan Lai Keng; Nad-Ali Babaeian Jelodar; Ahmad Sofiman Othman; Ning Shu Ping; Arvind Bhatt; Suganthi Appalasamy

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the first report on the development of a protocol that allows rapid and simplified extraction of total RNA from Artemisia annua L., an aromatic medicinal plant. This innovative protocol ensures a consistently high quantity and good quality of total RNA without any contamination of polyphenols, polysaccharides and proteins. The total RNA obtained is also free of fungal RNA even when extracted from fungal infested plants. The extraction buffer used in the proposed modified protoco...

  12. In vitro propagation of the medicinal plant Ziziphora tenuior L. and evaluation of its antioxidant activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dakah, Abdulkarim; Zaid, Salim; Suleiman, Mohamad; Abbas, Sami; Wink, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ziziphora tenuior L. (Lamiaceae) is an aromatic herb used for its medicinal values against fungi, bacteria. Micropropagation can be used for large-scale multiplication of essential oil producing plants thus avoiding an overexploitation of natural resources. This work aims to develop a reliable protocol for the in vitro propagation of Z. tenuior, and to compare the antioxidant activity between in vitro propagated and wild plants.

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants Against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Dhia Hassawi; Abeer Kharma

    2006-01-01

    Four extract amounts (200, 150, 100 and 50 mg mL-1) from twelve medicinal plant species that belong to six genera (Achillea, Salvia, Convolvulus, Plantago, Anthemis and Artemisia) were tested against Candida albicans. The antimicrobial activity was carried out by using the hole-plate diffusion method. The effect of plant species, extract amounts and their interaction were highly significant. Achillea santolina, Salvia dominica and Salvia officinalis inhibited the growth of Candida albicans at...

  14. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of some Libyan medicinal plants in experimental animals

    OpenAIRE

    Nahar Lutfun; El-Ashheb Mabrouka; Gbaj Abdul; Anwair Masoud; Ben-Hussein Ghazala; Elmezogi Jamal; Sarker Satyajit D.; Zetrini Abdulmottaleb

    2012-01-01

    Ballota pseudodictamnus (L.) Benth. (Lamiaceae), Salvia fruticosa Mill. (Lamiaceae) and Thapsia garganica L. (Apiaceae) are three well-known medicinal plants from the Libyan flora, which have long been used for the treatment of inflammations. The aim of the present study was to investigate, for the first time, the anti-inflammatory property of the methanol (MeOH) extracts of the aerial parts of these plants. Shade-dried and ground aerial parts of B. pseudodictamnus, S. fruticosa) and T....

  15. Biodiversity Status, Distribution and Use Pattern of Some Ethno-Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Priti KUMARI; Joshi, Girish Chandra; Lalit Mohan TEWARI

    2012-01-01

    The erosion of plant biodiversity is a matter of global concern. Due to unawareness the building blocks of entire ecosystems are disappearing. Some medicinal plants like Taxus baccata Linn., Thymus serpyllum Linn., Coleus forskohli Will., Oroxylum indicum Linn., Valeriana hardwickii Wall., Malaxis acuminata D.Don, Habenaria edgeworthii Hook. f.ex.Collett., Costus speciosus (Koen.) Sm., Dioscorea deltodea Wall., Gloriosa superba Linn., Polygonatum cirrhifolium Wall. and Polygonatum verticilla...

  16. COLLAGENASE INHIBITION ACTIVITY OF INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS: AN APPROACH TO MODERATE COLLAGEN TURNOVER

    OpenAIRE

    Iswarya S, Radhakrishnan N, Kavitha V, AB Mandal and Gnanamani A*

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of collagenase plays a vital role in protecting unbalanced turnover of collagen in human inflamed or UV-irradiated skin. In recent years, plants have been widely investigated and found to have anti-collagenase activity. Therefore, in the present study we have screened eleven Indian medicinal plants viz., Aegle marmelos, Acalypha indica, Calotropis gigantea, Nerium oleander, Adathoda vasica, Erythrina indica, Acalypha fruiticosa, Vitex negundo, Morinda citrifolia, Nyctanthes arbortr...

  17. Improvement of somatic embryogenesis and plantlet conversion in Oplopanax elatus, an endangered medicinal woody plant

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Heung-kyu; Kim, Yong-wook; Hong, Yong-pyo; Park, So-young

    2013-01-01

    Oplopanax elatus is a medicinal plant on the verge of extinction because of overexploitation. In the present study, the effects of various factors on enhancing somatic embryogenesis and plantlet conversion were studied. Mature seeds were collected from a total of 13 plants from 4 mountains in South Korea, and the genetic distances were calculated to analyze the effect of genotype on somatic embryogenesis. Results of cluster analysis and the unweighted-pair-group method with arithmetic mean of...

  18. Yeast alpha glucosidase inhibitory and antioxidant activities of six medicinal plants collected in Phalaborwa, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Shai, Leshweni Jeremia; Masoko, Peter; Mokgotho, Matlou Phineas; Magano, Solomon R.; Mogale, A. M.; Boaduo, N.; Eloff, Jacobus Nicolaas

    2010-01-01

    Recent decades have experienced a sharp increase in the incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus. One antidiabetic therapeutic approach is to reduce gastrointestinal glucose production and absorption through the inhibition of carbohydrate-digesting enzymes such as ?-amylase and ?-glucosidase and ?-amylase. The aim of the current study was to screen six medicinal plant species,with alleged antidiabetic properties for ?-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Powdered plant materia...

  19. Climatic Suitability of Growing Summer Squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) as a Medicinal Plant in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Bannayan, Mohammad; Amin ALIZADEH; Ehsan Eyshi REZAEI

    2011-01-01

    Diversification of production by including a broader range of plant species, can significantly contribute to improve health and nutrition, livelihoods, household food security and ecological sustainability. Exploring the climate impact on any given crop is one of the first priorities to find new suitable areas for production and management of new crops. Summer squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) is an economically valuable plant with various medicinal potentials. In order to investigate summer squash ...

  20. Total Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Capacities of Selected Chinese Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Feng-Lin Song; Ren-You Gan; Yuan Zhang; Qin Xiao; Lei Kuang; Hua-Bin Li

    2010-01-01

    Antioxidant capacities of 56 selected Chinese medicinal plants were evaluated using the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays, and their total phenolic content was measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The strong correlation between TEAC value and FRAP value suggested that the antioxidants in these plants possess free radical scavenging activity and oxidant reducing power, and the high positive correlation between antioxidant capac...

  1. Pharmacognostial Characterization Of Some Selected Medicinal Plants Of Semi Arid Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghendra Sharma

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacogonasy is mainly concerned with naturally occurring substances having a medicinal action. It also includes the study of other material used in pharmacy such as flavoring and suspending agents, disintegrants, filtering and support media and so on. It is closely related to both botany and plant chemistry. During present investigations studies were conducted on some selected plants of semi-arid regions.

  2. Spices, condiments and medicinal plants in Ethiopia, their taxonomy and agricultural significance

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, P. C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The book is the third in a series of publications on useful plants of Ethiopia. It describes 12 spices and condiments and 13 medicinal plants, both from a taxonomic and an agricultural viewpoint.The extensive botanical description of each taxon is accompanied by a full-page drawing, relevant photographs, lists of synonyms, literature and names, and details on taxonomic problems, geographic distribution, ecology, husbandry, uses and chemical composition.Numerous other spices, condiments and me...

  3. Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by people in Zegie Peninsula, Northwestern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giday Mirutse

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An ethnobotanical study was conducted from October 2005 to June 2006 to investigate the uses of medicinal plants by people in Zegie Peninsula, northwestern Ethiopia. Information was gathered from 200 people: 70 female and 130 males, using semistructured questionnaire. Of which, six were male local healers. The informants, except the healers, were selected randomly and no appointment was made prior to the visits. Informant consensus factor (ICF for category of aliments and the fidelity level (FL of the medicinal plants were determined. Sixty-seven medicinal plants used as a cure for 52 aliments were documented. They are distributed across 42 families and 64 genera. The most frequently utilized plant part was the underground part (root/rhizome/bulb (42%. The largest number of remedies was used to treat gastrointestinal disorder and parasites infections (22.8% followed by external injuries and parasites infections (22.1%. The administration routes are oral (51.4%, external (38.6%, nasal (7.9%, and ear (2.1%. The medicinal plants that were presumed to be effective in treating a certain category of disease, such as 'mich' and febrile diseases (0.80 had higher ICF values. This probably indicates a high incidence of these types of diseases in the region, possibly due to the poor socio-economic and sanitary conditions of this people. The medicinal plants that are widely used by the local people or used as a remedy for a specific aliment have higher FL values (Carissa spinarum, Clausena anisata, Acokanthera schimperi, Calpurnia aurea, Ficus thonningii, and Cyphostemma junceum than those that are less popular or used to treat more than one type of aliments (Plumbago zeylanicum, Dorstenia barnimiana.

  4. Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by people in Zegie Peninsula, Northwestern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklehaymanot, Tilahun; Giday, Mirutse

    2007-01-01

    An ethnobotanical study was conducted from October 2005 to June 2006 to investigate the uses of medicinal plants by people in Zegie Peninsula, northwestern Ethiopia. Information was gathered from 200 people: 70 female and 130 males, using semistructured questionnaire. Of which, six were male local healers. The informants, except the healers, were selected randomly and no appointment was made prior to the visits. Informant consensus factor (ICF) for category of ailments and the fidelity level (FL) of the medicinal plants were determined. Sixty-seven medicinal plants used as a cure for 52 ailments were documented. They are distributed across 42 families and 64 genera. The most frequently utilized plant part was the underground part (root/rhizome/bulb) (42%). The largest number of remedies was used to treat gastrointestinal disorder and parasites infections (22.8%) followed by external injuries and parasites infections (22.1%). The administration routes are oral (51.4%), external (38.6%), nasal (7.9%), and ear (2.1%). The medicinal plants that were presumed to be effective in treating a certain category of disease, such as 'mich' and febrile diseases (0.80) had higher ICF values. This probably indicates a high incidence of these types of diseases in the region, possibly due to the poor socio-economic and sanitary conditions of this people. The medicinal plants that are widely used by the local people or used as a remedy for a specific ailment have higher FL values (Carissa spinarum, Clausena anisata, Acokanthera schimperi, Calpurnia aurea, Ficus thonningii, and Cyphostemma junceum) than those that are less popular or used to treat more than one type of ailments (Plumbago zeylanicum, Dorstenia barnimiana). PMID:17355645

  5. Use of medicinal plants in different composts for yield improvement of various strains of oyster mushroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different of concentration of four medicinal plants viz., Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Azadirachta indica, Citrus lemon, Cymbopogon marginatus were investigated for the effect of certain active components in their parts, capable of increasing mushroom yield and controlling mushrooms pathogenic microbes which cause great loss in mushroom yield. Four strains of Oyster mushroom were selected on the basis of their well mycelial growth on MEA. For selection of best compost simple composts were also prepared without any medicinal plant products i.e., cotton, wheat, paddy straw. Corn stover composts and cotton compost gave the maximum yield. The dried leaves of the Citrus lemons, lemon grass and Neem cake (dried) were crushed, and the sawdust of the logs of Eucalyptus were incorporated with different doses of 2%, 3%, 4%, 5% w/w of substrates with cotton substrate before compost fermentation. Each of the compost bag having specific medicinal plant product with specific concentration were spawned with selected four strains of Oyster mushroom i.e., two local strain Pleurotus florida (P-17), Pleurotus ostreatus (P- 19) and two exotic strains Pleurotus (florida) ostreatus (WC536), Pleurotus ostreatus (WC-522). Spawn running and mushroom fruitification were allowed to develop under optimum environmental condition. The mushroom yield data of compost bags with different concentration of medicinal plant products plants were calculated. The results showed that presence of Neem cake and Cts showed that presence of Neem cake and Citrus lemon in the substrate increased the yield of Oyster mushroom strains i.e. Pleurotus florida) ostreatus (WC-536) followed by P. ostreatus (WC-522) strain. Neem cake and Citrus lemon were more promising in improving yield of mushroom. These results led to the conclusion that addition of specific medicinal plants concentration to compost increases the yield of Oyster mushroom by reducing the incidence of microbes and is more preferable than chemicals due to their lethal effects during human consumption of mushroom. (author)

  6. In vitro cytotoxic screening of selected Saudi medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almehdar, Hussein; Abdallah, Hossam M; Osman, Abdel-Moneim M; Abdel-Sattar, Essam A

    2012-04-01

    Many natural products from plants have been identified to exert anticancer activity. It might be expected to be a challenge to look at the Saudi plants in order to discover new sources for new molecules which may have anticancer activity. The methanolic extracts of forty species of plants traditionally used in Saudi Arabia for the treatment of a variety of diseases were tested in vitro for their potential anticancer activity on different human cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic activity of the methanolic extracts of the tested plants were determined using three human cancer cell lines, namely, breast cancer (MCF7), hepatocellular carcinoma (HEPG2), and cervix cancer (HELA) cells. In addition, human normal melanocyte (HFB4) was used as normal nonmalignant cells. Sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay was used to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic activity of the different extracts. The growth inhibition of 50% (IC(50)) for each extract was calculated from the optical density of treated and untreated cells. Doxorubicin, a broad-spectrum anticancer drug, was used as the positive control. Nine plant extracts were chosen for further fractionation based on their activity and availability. Interesting cytotoxic activity was observed for Hypoestes forskaolii, Withania somnifera, Solanum glabratum, Adenium obesum, Pistacia vera oleoresin, Caralluma quadrangula, Eulophia petersii, Phragmanthera austroarabica, and Asparagus officinalis. Other extracts showed poor activity. PMID:21953271

  7. THERAPEUTIC MANAGEMENT OF PEDIATRIC ALLERGIC DISORDERS BY INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS WITH MAST CELL STABILIZING POTENTIAL: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Mahapatra Arun Kumar; Nisha Kumari Ojha; Abhimanyu Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Every fifth child develops an allergic disorder sometime during childhood and these conditions gravely trouble the health status and quality of life of children. Conventional agents are being used to control allergic disorders. However, these are not entirely affordable and effective. Numerous medicinal plants have been used successfully for the prevention and management of pediatric allergic disorders in Indian traditional systems of medicine, Ayurveda. Medicinal plants with mast-cell stabi...

  8. CRATAEVA TAPIA LINN. - AN IMPORTANT MEDICINAL PLANT: A REVIEW OF ITS TRADITIONAL USES, PHYTOCHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka Sharma, Darshana Patil And Avinash Patil

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants, since times immemorial, have been used in virtually all cultures as a source of medicine. Interest in herbal drugs is growing due to their efficiency, low toxicity and absence/minimal side effects. Crataeva tapia L. (Family-Capparaceae) is a branched tree, commonly called as ‘Varuna’. The plant has been reported to possess several medicinal uses which include anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-arthritic, anti-fertility, anti-mycotic, anti-diabetic, anti-microbial, ant...

  9. Phytochemical Constituents of Some Medicinal Plant Species Used in Recipe During ‘Bohag Bihu’ in Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnali Gogoi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An ethno botanical study has been carried out to focus on medicinal utility of 101 plant species eaten during Bohag Bihu in Assamese society. Amongst 101 species, 25 species are found to have effect on gastrointestinal problem, 18 species effect on skin diseases, 16 species effect on respiratory ailments, 14 species effect as anti diabetic, 7 species effect on gynaecological problems, 6 species effect as blood purifier, 4 species effect on rheumatism, 3 species effect on eye-sight improvement and 2 species effect on jaundice. These plants contain various phytochemicals likesaponins, alkaloids, sterols, flavanoids, glycosides, terpenoids which have certain medicinal values. The paper reflects the rich ethno medicinal value of the herbs along with their phytochemical constituents The further scrutiny and evaluation of the safety parameters of each component of the herb used in the recipe may be investigate to develop a pharmacologically potent lead molecule.

  10. Screening of medicinal plants from Iranian traditional medicine for acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhami, Hamid-Reza; Farsam, Hassan; Krenn, Liselotte

    2011-08-01

    To find new herbal compounds with an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory effect, this study focused on herbal drugs and resins which have been used in Iranian traditional medicine for the treatment of cognitive disorders. Forty drugs were selected from authoritative written documents of Iranian traditional medicine. Each drug was extracted by accelerated solvent extraction using dichloromethane followed by methanol. The 80 extracts were screened for AChE inhibitory activity by a TLC bioautography method. The inhibiting effect of the 32 most active extracts was measured by a microplate colorimetric assay. Due to the best activity, the seeds of Peganum harmala L. were investigated in detail. From the TLC bioautography assay the alkaloids harmaline and harmine were identified as active compounds. This result was confirmed by means of HPLC-DAD. The IC(50) values were 41.2??g/mL for the methanol extract, 95.5??g/mL for the dichloromethane extract, 8.4??g/mL for harmaline and 10.9??g/mL for harmine. The concentrations of active compounds in the extracts were determined by a fast and precise HPLC method. As the amounts of harmaline and harmine in the extracts were correlated with the IC(50) values of the extracts, it can be concluded that these two alkaloids are responsible for the AChE inhibitory activity of P. harmala. PMID:21287652

  11. Medicinal use of plants by the peasant community of San Jacinto, northern Colombia Medicinal use of plants by the peasant community of San Jacinto, northern Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonzani Renée M.

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available I studied the medicinal use of plants by the peasant community of the town of San Jacinto, located in the savanna of Bolívar, northern Colombia. Fifty-five families, 138 genera, and 118 species were scientifically identified from 249 specimens collected of the modern-day vegetation of San Jacinto. From these, 198 uses were recorded for 190 (76% of the specimens. The 54 uses recorded for human medicine (27% and the five uses recorded for animal medicine (2% are discussed. Vernacular names, parts used, method of preparation, and medicinal uses are listed.Se presenta un estudio etnobotánico de la comunidad campesina del pueblo de San Jacinto, localizado en las sabanas de Bolívar, norte de Colombia. Se identificaron científicamente 55 familias, 138 géneros, y 118 especies con base en 249 especímenes recolectados de la vegetación de San Jacinto. De esos, se establecieron 198 usos para 190 (76% especímenes. Se presentan 54 usos para medicina humana (27% y cinco usos para medicina animal (2%. Se listan nombres vernáculos, partes usadas, método de preparación, y usos medicinales.

  12. Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants from the Humla district of western Nepal.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Münzbergová, Z.; Timsina, B.

    2010-01-01

    Ro?. 130, ?. 3 (2010), s. 485-504. ISSN 0378-8741 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA526/09/0549 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Nepal * medicinal plants * ethnobotany Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.466, year: 2010

  13. Antimicrobial and Free Radical Scavenging Activities of Five Palestinian Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Qabaha, Khaled Ibraheem

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from five indigenous Palestinian medicinal plants including Rosmarinus officinalis, Pisidium guajava, Punica granatum peel, grape seeds and Teucrium polium were investigated for antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activities against eight microorganisms, using well diffusion method. The microorganisms included six bacterial isolates (i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginos, Klebsiella pneumonia, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus) and two funga...

  14. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plants against pathogens causing complicated urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma Anjana; Chandraker S; Patel V; Ramteke Padmini

    2009-01-01

    Seventeen Indian folklore medicinal plants were investigated to evaluate antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanol and acetone extracts against 66 multidrug resistant isolates of major urinary tract pathogens ( Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis ) by disc diffusion method. Ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale and Punica granatum showed strong antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli. Ethanol extracts of Terminalia chebu...

  15. Cytogenetic characterization and genome size of the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Guilherme; Cardoso, Luísa; Oliveira, Helena; SANTOS, CONCEIÇÃO; Duarte, Patrícia; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    The genome size and organization of the important medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus is shown to correspond to 1C = 0.76 pg (~738 Mbps) and 2n = 16 chromosomes. The data provide a sound basis for future studies including cytogenetic mapping, genomics and breeding.

  16. Antibacterial Activities of Some Medicinal Plants of the Western Region of India

    OpenAIRE

    NAIR, Rathish; CHANDA, Sumitra V.

    2007-01-01

    Ten medicinal plants, namely Commiphora wightii, Hibiscus cannabinus, Anethum gravelons, Emblica officinalis, Ficus religiosa, Ficus racemosa, Ficus benghalensis, Ficus tisela, Mentha arvensis and Mimusops elengi, were screened for potential antibacterial activity against medically important bacterial strains, namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Alcaligenes faecalis and Salmonella typhimurium. The antibacterial activity was determined in a...

  17. Content of selected biologically active compounds in tea infusions of widely used European medicinal plants.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dadáková, E.; Vrchotová, Nad?žda; T?íska, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Ro?. 27, ?. 1 (2010), s. 27-34. ISSN 1803-4403 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA525/05/2546 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : medicinal plant * Filipendula ulmaria * phenolic comupounds * rutin * quercetin Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing http://joa.zf.jcu.cz; http://versita.com/science/agriculture/joa

  18. Ethnopharmacology of medicinal plants of the pantanal region (mato grosso, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieski, Isanete Geraldini Costa; Rios Santos, Fabrício; de Oliveira, Rafael Melo; Espinosa, Mariano Martinez; Macedo, Miramy; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos Tabajara

    2012-01-01

    Traditional knowledge is an important source of obtaining new phytotherapeutic agents. Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants was conducted in Nossa Senhora Aparecida do Chumbo District (NSACD), located in Poconé, Mato Grosso, Brazil using semi-structured questionnaires and interviews. 376 species of medicinal plants belonging to 285 genera and 102 families were cited. Fabaceae (10.2%), Asteraceae (7.82%) and Lamaceae (4.89%) families are of greater importance. Species with the greater relative importance were Himatanthus obovatus (1.87), Hibiscus sabdariffa (1.87), Solidago microglossa (1.80), Strychnos pseudoquina (1.73) and Dorstenia brasiliensis, Scoparia dulcis L., and Luehea divaricata (1.50). The informant consensus factor (ICF) ranged from 0.13 to 0.78 encompassing 18 disease categories,of which 15 had ICF greater than 0.50, with a predominance of disease categories related to injuries, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (ICF??=??0.78) having 65 species cited while 20 species were cited for mental and behavioral disorders (ICF??=??0.77). The results show that knowledge about medicinal plants is evenly distributed among the population of NSACD. This population possesses medicinal plants for most disease categories, with the highest concordance for prenatal, mental/behavioral and respiratory problems. PMID:22474496

  19. Diversity and biological activities of endophytic fungi associated with micropropagated medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echinacea is one of the top ten selling medicinal herbs in Europe and United States. Commercially available formulations may contain different plant parts of three species (Echinacea purpurea, E. pallida, and E. angustifolia). Our study evaluates the diversity of microbial community associated with ...

  20. Aphids and their parasitoids (Hym., Braconidae: Aphidiinae) asociated with medicinal plants in Iran.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Talebi, A. A.; Rakhshani, E.; Fathipour, Y.; Starý, Petr; Tomanovi?, Ž.; Rajabi-Mazhar, N.

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 3, ?. 2 (2009), s. 205-219. ISSN 1995-0748 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IBS5007102 Grant ostatní: University of Zabol(IR) No. 86-19; The Serbian Ministry of Science(CS) 143006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : medicinal plants * aphid parasitoids * Aphid iinae Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  1. ANTIFUNGAL AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITIES OF FIVE TRADITIONALLY USED INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikarimayum Haripyaree; Kshetrimayum Guneshwor; Maibam Damayanti

    2013-01-01

    Hexane, Methanol and Distilled water extracts of five Indian Medicinal plants viz., Mimosa pudica L, Vitex trifolia Linn, Leucas aspera Spreng, Centella asiatica (L) Urban and Plantago major Linn belonging to different families were subjected to preliminary antimicrobial screening against six standard organisms viz., Ceratocystis paradoxa, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium citrinum, Macrophomina phaseoli, Trichoderma viride and Rhizopus nigricans. To evaluate antifungal activity agar well diffus...

  2. X-Rays Irradiation Produced Dual Effects on the Constituents of Medicinal Plants Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab W. Abdul Lateef

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to show the effect of free radicals induced by fixed dose rate of X-rays radiation on the chemical constituents of some medicinal plants; barks of Cinnamomum verum (cinnamon, leaves of Salvia officinalis (sage and Camellia sinensis (green tea. Four extracts (1% were prepared for each medicinal plant; hydro-distilled, aqueous, ethanol and methanol. Each extract was subjected to X-rays radiation at rate of 1.9 Gy min-1. The UV-Visible spectra, physiochemical properties and biochemical constituents of each non irradiated and irradiated extracts were determined. The results showed that the effect of irradiation on the hydro-distilled and aqueous extract differed from alcohol extract. Favorable effect of irradiation was observed on the green tea extract. Considerable loses of total polyphenols and flavonoids quantities were observed in aqueous extracts. X-rays radiation remarkably induced degradation of allantoin and a slight changes in release nitrogen species. In conclusion X-ray radiation of medicinal plants in solutions produced dual effect in terms of improving and degrading the active ingredients depending on the extracted solution as well as the native constituents of each medicinal plant.

  3. MOLECULAR MARKER STUDIES OF SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS FOR ASSESSMENT OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. RAJALAKSHMI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to examine the total antioxidant activity and Genetic relationships between six different medicinal plants were analysed. Method: The total antioxidant were analysed by using DPPH Photometric assay. The genomic DNA and RAPD Work were analyzed in selected medicinal plan using standard method. Mathwork software was used to draw the dendogram. Result: The results observed in the present study are Out of the 5 selected plants showed high antioxidant activity followed by Clitoria ternatea blue leaves, Solanum nigrum blue Berries, Syzygium cumini, Clitoria ternatea white leaves, Solanum nigrum Red berries, Phyllanthus emblica. The Syzygium cumini has the maximum antioxidant property this was confirmed by using DPPH photometric assay Figue 1. Isolation of genomic DNA from six different selected medicinal plants by using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers and analyse its genetic diversity. A dendrogram was constructed using Euclidean distance methods. Based on the number of bands the medicinal plants were grouped to form1-4 clusters. Conclusion: To analyse it evolutionary process.

  4. Evaluation for antidiabetic activity in selected medicinal plants used in Malaysian traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous extracts of three medicinal plants used in Malaysian traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes were investigated. The nuts of Areca cathecu, leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa and Ficus deltoidea were each extracted by boiling in distilled water. The aqueous extracts were filtered and the filtrates were then spray dried. Their biological evaluation was conducted to determine their blood glucose lowering effect in normoglycaemic and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Commercially available antidiabetic drug, glybenclamide was used as positive control. Toxicity of the extracts was carried out using the brine shrimp lethality assay and in vivo acute toxicity test in rats. Aqueous extracts of all the plants studied showed significant reduction in blood glucose level up to 50% in rats over a period of 3 to 4 weeks. The largest reduction in blood glucose levels was exhibited by the aqueous extracts of the Lagestroemia speciosa, followed by the Ficus deltoidea and Areca cathecu. There was no evidence of toxicity of the extracts against the brine shrimp (up to 4,000 ?g/ml) and in rats (up to 0.2% body weight). (Author)

  5. Knowledge of medicinal plants and their uses among secondary and grammar school students: A case study from Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strgar Jelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of medicinal plants has been decreasing gradually. Our main objective was to determine whether young people today are still familiar with medicinal plants, and whether traditional knowledge, which forms part of the cultural heritage, has been lost or is still being passed on to new generations. In our study, we found that the majority of 19-year-olds used medicinal plants occasionally. They mostly buy dried plants or products based on medicinal plants; they rarely grew plants themselves. Their general knowledge concerning the use and effects of using these plants was not satisfactory. Students were only able to identify correctly a few medicinal plants, and most were not able to recognize poisonous plants. It was proposed that more time in school should be devoted to this topic because pupils did show interest in medicinal plants. This could be in the form of an elective module in the frame of an open curriculum that would also include growing plants in a school garden.

  6. Ethnopharmacological survey: a selection strategy to identify medicinal plants for a local phytotherapy program

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Flávia Liparini, Pereira; José Martins, Fernandes; João Paulo Viana, Leite.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudos etnofarmacológicos são importantes no registro e na preservação de conhecimentos de uma cultura tradicional associada ao uso medicinal da biodiversidade. No presente trabalho, foi realizado o levantamento das plantas medicinais utilizadas por conhecedores populares na comunidade de Nova Viço [...] sa, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brasil, como ferramenta para auxiliar na seleção de espécies vegetais visando à implantação de um programa de fitoterapia local na comunidade estudada. Participaram 11 conhecedores escolhidos por amostragem Bola de Neve e submetidos a entrevistas semiestruturadas. Amostras dos espécimes foram coletadas, herborizadas e identificadas conforme metodologias usuais e literatura especializada. Foram amostradas 107 espécies medicinais pertencentes a 86 gêneros e 39 famílias botânicas, destacando-se Asteraceae com 16 espécies. Costus spicatus (Jacq.) Sw., Mentha pulegium L., Rosmarinus officinalis L. e Ruta graveolens L. apresentaram Consenso de Uso Principal corrigido (CUPc) superior a 50%, evidenciando consensos de uso popular entre os entrevistados. Espécies com CUPc igual ou superior a 20%, juntamente com o levantamento de informações em bases científicas, foram utilizadas para selecionar as espécies para o programa de fitoterapia local. A seleção de plantas medicinais, levando-se em consideração o índice de CUPc obtido de uma determinada comunidade aliado ao levantamento científico, mostra-se como estratégia a ser considerada na implantação de programas fitoterápicos. Abstract in english Ethnopharmacological studies are important for documenting and protecting cultural and traditional knowledge associated with the medical use of biodiversity. In this paper, we present a survey on medicinal plants used by locals in a community of Nova Viçosa, Viçosa, MG, Brazil, as a strategy to sele [...] ct medicinal plants for a phytotherapy-based local healthcare program. Eleven knowledgeable local informants were chosen by snowball sampling and interviewed about the use of medicinal plants. Plant samples were collected, herborised and then identified using traditional techniques and specialised literature. We sampled 107 medicinal plant species belonging to 86 genera and 39 families, predominantly Asteraceae with 16 species. Costus spicatus (Jacq.) Sw, M. pulegium L., Rosmarinus officinalis L. and Ruta graveolens L. were found to have Consensus of Main Use corrected (CMUc) values above 50%, which were in agreement with the traditional uses described by the informants. However, species with CMUc values equal to or above 20%, combined with the scientific information survey, were also used to select medicinal plants for the phytotherapy-based local healthcare program. The selection of medicinal plants based on the CMUc index from this particular community, in combination with the scientific survey, appears to be an effective strategy for the implementation of phytotherapy programs.

  7. The Anthelmintic Activity of Selected Indigenous Medicinal Plants Used by The anyankole of Western Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olila Deogracious

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been growing interest in the traditional cures of livestock diseases. This is because industrially produced drugs are too expensive for some sectors of the farming community especially in the developing world. Medicinal plants are often cheaper and more easily available than the commercially produced drugs. The self-help study in form of traditional medicines (especially from medicinal plants, offer a way out by making use of resources available within the communities themselves. Despite the steady increase in demand for herbal medicines over the past decade worldwide, a great majority of herbal products are not pharmacologically assessed for their quality, safety and efficacy, nor are they licensed as medicine. In this study some of the medicinal plants used by the Banyankole (an ethnic group with a long history of cattle-keeping and the use of medicinal plants have been tested in vitro using the Ascaris model. Seven plants were studied (Vernonia amygdalina, Cassia didymobotrya, Rhoicissus tridentata, Phytolacca dodecandra, Euphorbia hirta, Aspilla africana and Cymbopogon nardus. Aspillia africana and Cymbopogon nardus did not show anthelmintic activity in this test system. The other five showed anthelmintic activity (Vernonia amygdalina, Cassia didymobotrya, Rhoicissus tridentata, Phytolacca dodecandra and Euphorbia hirta. Extracts of Vernonia amygdalina, Rhoicissus tridentata and Cassia didymobotrya showed higher activity than Euphorbia hirta and Phytolacca dodecandra (Vernonia amygdalina (ED50 of 3.533 mg mL 1, Rhoicissus tridentata (ED50 of 4.355 mg mL 1 and Cassia didymobotrya (ED50 of 4.880 mg mL 1; Euphorbia hirta (ED50 of 5.866 mg mL 1 and Phytolacca dodecandra (ED50 of 7.151 mg mL 1. Further studies on the five plants are needed. Phytochemical analysis to determine the active principles that are responsible for anthelmintic activity are urgently called for. This would help in identifying the spectrum of activity of the extracts as well as determining their mechanism of action. Studies should also be carried out on these plants to determine their toxicity and also their effect on other helminthes apart from Ascaris.

  8. ABORTIFACIENT ACTIVITY OF A MEDICINAL PLANT “MORINGA OLEIFERA” IN RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi, N.; Nath, D; Shukla, S.C.; Dyal, R

    1988-01-01

    Dried powder of leaf extract of common Indian plant Moringa Oleifera of Moringaceae family was tested experimentally in albino rats in our laboratory for its antifertility activity. Cant per cent abortifacient activity was found when administered orally in aqueous solution at dose of 175 mg/kg body weight daily to Charles foster strain albino rats from days 5-10 post mated.

  9. CO2 Extraction of Medicinal Components from Plants.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sajfrtová, Marie; Sovová, Helena

    Institute of Chemical Engineering BAS , 2004. s. 315. [International Summer School of Chemical Engineering /10./. 24.05.2004-31.05.2004, Varna] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA203/01/0550; GA ?R GD203/03/H140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : plants * CO2 extraction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  10. DNA barcoding of medicinal plant material for identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because of the increasing demand for herbal remedies and for authentication of the source material, it is vital to provide a single database containing information about authentic plant materials and their potential adulterants. The database should provide DNA barcodes for data retrieval and similar...

  11. PIXE analysis of some Nigerian anti-diabetic medicinal plants (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease characterized by high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to defects in insulin secretion, or action, or both, is a debilitating disease leading to other complications and death of many people in the world. Some of the medicinal plants implicated in the herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria have been reported. Additional medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria are presented in this work. These medicinal plants are becoming increasingly important and relevant as herbal drugs due to their use as antioxidants, nutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in combating diabetes. Elemental compositions of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants were determined using PIXE technique. The 1.8 MV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) Legnaro (Padova) Italy was employed for the work. The results show the detection of twenty-one elements which include Mg, P, Ca, K, Mn, Cu, Zn, S, Cr, Co, Ni and V that are implicated in the regulation of insulin and the control of the blood-sugar levels in the human body. The entire plant of Boerhavia diffusa, Securidaca longipedunculata stem, leaves of Peperomia pellucida, Macrosphyra longistyla, Olax subscorpioidea, Phyllanthus muerillanus, Jatropha gossypifolia, Cassia occidentalis, Phyllanthus amarus, and leaf and stem of Murraya koenigii, which have high concentrations of these elements could be recommended as vegetables, nutraceuticals, food additives, supplements and drugs in the control and management of diabetes, if toxicity profiles indicate that they are safe. However, significantly high contents of Al and Si in the entire plant of Bryophyllum pinnatum, and As, Cr, and Cu in Ocimum gratissimum leaf suggest that these plants should be avoided by diabetic patients to prevent complications

  12. PIXE analysis of some Nigerian anti-diabetic medicinal plants (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olabanji, S.O., E-mail: skayode2002@yahoo.co.uk [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Padova (Italy); ICTP Fellow on Sabbatical Leave from Centre for Energy Research and Development, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Adebajo, A.C. [Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Omobuwajo, O.R. [Department of Pharmacognosy and Herbal Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island (Nigeria); Ceccato, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Padova (Italy); Dipartmento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Buoso, M.C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Padova (Italy); Moschini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Padova (Italy); Dipartmento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease characterized by high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to defects in insulin secretion, or action, or both, is a debilitating disease leading to other complications and death of many people in the world. Some of the medicinal plants implicated in the herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria have been reported. Additional medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria are presented in this work. These medicinal plants are becoming increasingly important and relevant as herbal drugs due to their use as antioxidants, nutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in combating diabetes. Elemental compositions of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants were determined using PIXE technique. The 1.8 MV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) Legnaro (Padova) Italy was employed for the work. The results show the detection of twenty-one elements which include Mg, P, Ca, K, Mn, Cu, Zn, S, Cr, Co, Ni and V that are implicated in the regulation of insulin and the control of the blood-sugar levels in the human body. The entire plant of Boerhavia diffusa, Securidaca longipedunculata stem, leaves of Peperomia pellucida, Macrosphyra longistyla, Olax subscorpioidea, Phyllanthus muerillanus, Jatropha gossypifolia, Cassia occidentalis, Phyllanthus amarus, and leaf and stem of Murraya koenigii, which have high concentrations of these elements could be recommended as vegetables, nutraceuticals, food additives, supplements and drugs in the control and management of diabetes, if toxicity profiles indicate that they are safe. However, significantly high contents of Al and Si in the entire plant of Bryophyllum pinnatum, and As, Cr, and Cu in Ocimum gratissimum leaf suggest that these plants should be avoided by diabetic patients to prevent complications.

  13. Ethnopharmacological survey of six medicinal plants from Mali, West-Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bah Sekou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An ethnopharmacological survey was carried out to collect information about the use of six medicinal plants in the regions around Siby and Dioila, Mali. The plants investigated were Biopyhtum petersianum, Cola cordifolia, Combretum molle, Opilia celtidifolia, Parkia biglobosa and Ximenia americana. More than 60 medical indications were reported for the use of these plants in traditional medicine. The most frequently reported ailments were malaria (25.6%, different types of pain (14.0% and dermatitis (7.4%. The main forms for preparation were decoction (58.1% and powdered plant material (28.4%. The most frequent used plant parts were leaves (37.7% and stem bark (18.6%. The healers' consensus for the main indications is fairly high for the four plants B. petersianum, C. cordifolia, C. molle and O. celtidifolia, and this supports the traditional use of these plants. However for P. biglobosa and X. americana the healers' consensus is less consistent and it is more difficult to draw conclusions about the most important traditional use of these two plants.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of four medicinal plants widely used in Persian folk medicine

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    A. Hamedi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Commiphora habessinica (O.Berg Engl. (Burseraceae, Boswellia sacra Flueck (Burseraceae, Phoenix dactylifera L. (Arecaceae, and Doronicum glaciale (Wulfen Nyman (Asteraceae are of ethnomedicinal importance in Persian folk medicine and are widely used to treat infectious diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial properties of these herbal medicines to prevent misadministration. Methods: Antifungal and antibacterial (Gram-positive and Gram-negative activities of the petroleum ether, dichloromethane and ethanol fractions obtained from oleo-gum-resin of C. habessinica and B. sacra, spathe of P. dactylifera and roots of D. glaciale were evaluated against standard species and clinical antibiotic resistant isolates using broth microdilution method. The fractions were tested at concentrations of 0.5 to 256 µg/mL.Results: The petroleum ether fraction of C. habessinica oleo-gum-resin exhibited the most anti-Candida activity with MIC50 of 0.5-16 µg/mL. The growth of C. glabrata and C. tropicalis was inhibited by the ethanol fraction of C. habessinica oleo-gum-resin with MIC50 of 1-16 ?g/mL. C. glabrata was the most susceptible species. Among the tested fractions, only the petroleum ether fraction of C. habessinica oleo-gum-resin had an inhibitory effect on Aspergillus spp. with a MIC50 of 8-32 µg/mL. None of the fractions exhibited antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria at concentrations of 0.5 to 256 µg/mL. Conclusions: The sensitivity of fungi and bacteria to natural antimicrobials varies widely within species and it is essential to consider the sensitivity of the strains to prevent resistance.

  15. Effect of Fertilizer Application on Indigenous Medicinal Plant Andrographis paniculata Nees (Sega-gyi)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments were carried out to assess the effect of fertilizer application on indigenous medicinal plant Andrographis paniculata Nees (Sega-gyi) on yield components such as plant heigh (cm), fresh weight of whole plant (g), dry weigth of whole plant (g), dry weigth of leave per plant (g), mineral elemental contents of the leaves (N, P, K, Ca and Mg) and medically active compound andrographolide of the leaves from the green-house experiment. Various methods applied in the growth of medicinal plant A. paniculata Nees (Sega-gyi), comprised the dripping (Dropwise) and the spraying methods of the prepared blue green algae (BGA) Spirulina, the composite mixture of prepared BGA+ soil, mineral fertilizer + soil and soil itself as control. In all the fertilizer treatments, the dripping (Dropwise) method using the BGA biofertilizer gave rise to the highest growth of 100 cm when the average fresh weigth of the whole plant was 440g. Andrographolide crystals were isolated, identified and confirmed by chromatographic techniques. A single standard HPLC peak by UV detection (225 nm) indication a retention time of 4.36 min and its melting point (232 C) were found to correspond to the literature values. Analytical results of the leaves of Sega-gyi by the dripping (Dropwise) method indicated the presence of 2.12% andrographolide and also the mineral elements with the composition of N (22.78), P (1.93), K (16.15), Ca (23.70) and Mg (4.85) mg/g. Although the mechanism of micro-algal plant growth regulatory action has not yet been studied, from this research work it was observed that the BGA biofertilizer promotes plant growth, improves the soil physical conditions, and also enhance the yield of medicinally active compound andrographolide.

  16. Antimicrobial evaluation of Huilliche plant medicine used to treat wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Mølgaard, Per; Holler, Jes Gitz; Asar, Betül; Liberna, Iwona; Rosenbæk, Lise Bakkestrøm; Jebjerg, Christina Ploug; Jørgensen, Lene; Lauritzen, Jeanette; Guzman, Alfonso; Adsersen, Anne; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2011-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevanceThe traditional use of 40 plant species used for treatment of wounds and associated infections by the Huilliche people of Chile was evaluated against bacterial and fungal human pathogens, especially including wound pathogens. Materials and methodsThe extracts were tested against the fungi Penicillium expansum, Candida albicans and the bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four different strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (four differe...

  17. NUTRITIONAL VALUES OF LESSER UTILIZED AROMATIC MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Yeasmin Tanzima; Kader Golam; Hossain Shakawat; Peervin Rasida; Nikkon Farjana

    2011-01-01

    Lesser utilised rhizomes of Kaempferia galangal , Curmuma gedoria and Zingiber zerumbet were analyzed to determined its proximate chemical composition .The rhizomes have high level of moisture, appreciable amount of carbohydrate, protein, crude fibre, and negligible amount of lipid. The micro and macronutrients analysis raveled that the rhizomes to be potential source of potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium and vitamin-C. Overall, these plants represented a potential food sources with g...

  18. Medicinal plants used in treatment of inflammatory skin diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Dawid-Pa?, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Skin is an organ providing contact with the environment and protecting the human body from unfavourable external factors. Skin inflammation, reflected adversely in its functioning and appearance, also unfavourably affects the psyche, the condition of which is important during treatment of chronic skin diseases. The use of plants in treatment of inflammatory skin diseases results from their influence on different stages of inflammation. The paper presents results of the study regarding the ant...

  19. Antibacterial activities of total alkaloids extracted from some medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Garba S; Andrew K; Gayus J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore secondary metabolites, total alkaloids extraction and antibacterial activities of crude alkaloids extracted from Detarium microcarpum, Ximenia americana and Guiera senegalensis according to standard protocol. The results of phytochemical analysis showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, steroids and terpenoids while the results of total alkaloids extraction showed that all the plants contained similar alkaloids content. The crude alkaloids extra...

  20. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY PHYTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SOME MEDICINALLY POTENT PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar Pradeep; Verma Ravindra Kumar

    2011-01-01

    This present study reports 24 methanolic extracts prepared from the 6 Indian plants belonging to six families collected from the forest located in Jaipur and near by area. Qualitative preliminary phytochemical screening was performed on aforesaid extracts for the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, steroids and terpenoids. Each analysis was carried out in triplicate. Which shows positive results for alkaloids (30.43%), flavonoids (47.82%), steroids (65.21%) and terpenoids (43.47%), respectively.

  1. Antitumor and Antiviral Activity of Colombian Medicinal Plant Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    LA Betancur-Galvis; Saez J; Granados H; Salazar A; Ossa JE.

    1999-01-01

    Extracts of nine species of plants traditionally used in Colombia for the treatment of a variety of diseases were tested in vitro for their potential antitumor (cytotoxicity) and antiherpetic activity. MTT (Tetrazolium blue) and Neutral Red colorimetric assays were used to evaluate the reduction of viability of cell cultures in presence and absence of the extracts. MTT was also used to evaluate the effects of the extracts on the lytic activity of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). The 50% c...

  2. PROFILE OF MEDICINAL PLANTS WITH ANTI-OPHIDIAN PROPERTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep V. Binorkar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The morbidity and mortality associated with snake bite is a serious health concerned especially in developing countries. The rural communities are the worst affected and where it is considered as one of the occupational health hazards especially related to agriculture industry. About 50,000 deaths are recorded per year as a result of snakebite. The scenario may sometimes deteriorate further because of Ineffectiveness and or complications of the anti snake venom as well as untimely interventions or lack of appropriate medications in venomous snakebite cases. The common poisonous snakes found in India are Cobra (Naja naja, Krait (Bangarus Caeruleus, Russell’s viper (Daboia russelli and saw scaled viper (Echis Carinatus. Over the years many attempts have been made for the development of snake venom antagonists from plants sources. Ethnobotanical data suggests that certain plant species are used traditionally all over the world to treat snakebite cases successfully. Randomness or the use of a variety of species in different families appears to be a feature of traditional snake bite treatments. Present article deals with the Traditional, ethno botanical and pharmacological review of certain plants utilized in the cases of snakebite.

  3. The correlation of metal content in medicinal plants and their water extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran?elovi? Saša S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of some medicinal plants and their water extracts from South East Serbia is determined on the basis of metal content using atomic absorption spectrometry. The two methods were used for the preparation of water extracts, to examine the impact of the preparation on the content of metals in them. Content of investigated metals in both water extracts is markedly lower then in medicinal plants, but were higher in water extract prepared by method (I, with exception of lead content. The coefficients of extraction for the observed metal can be represented in the following order: Zn > Mn > Pb > Cu > Fe. Correlation coefficients between the metal concentration in the extract and total metal content in plant material vary in the range from 0.6369 to 0.9956. This indicates need the plants to be collected and grown in the unpolluted area and to examine the metal content. The content of heavy metals in the investigated medicinal plants and their water extracts is below the maximum allowable values, so they are safe to use.

  4. Determination of elements by atomic absorption spectrometry in medicinal plants employed to alleviate common cold symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Kuyumcu, Ebru

    2014-09-01

    Eleven important medicinal plants generally used by the people of Turkey for the treatment of common cold have been studied for their mineral contents. Eleven minor and major elements (essential, non-essential and toxic) were identified in the Asplenium adiantum-nigrum L. , Althaea officinalis L. , Verbascum phlomoides L., Euphorbia chamaesyce L., Zizyphus jujube Miller, Peganum harmala L., Arum dioscoridis Sm., Sambucus nigra L., Piperlongum L., Tussilago farfara L. and Elettaria cardamomum Maton by employing flame atomic absorption and emission spectrometry and electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Microwave digestion procedure for total concentration was applied under optimized conditions for dissolution of medicinal plants. Plant based biological certified reference materials (CRMs) served as standards for quantification. These elements are found to be present in varying concentrations in the studied plants. The baseline data presented in this work can be used in understanding the role of essential, non-essential and toxic elements in nutritive, preventive and therapeutic properties of medicinal plants. PMID:25532362

  5. Correlation between heavy metal contents and antioxidant activities in medicinal plants grown in copper mining areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three commonly used medicinal plants, e.g., Adhatoda vasica, Cassia fistula, and Withania somnifera grown in two contrasting environmental conditions, namely from copper mining site and from control site corresponding to soil not contaminated with Cu, to understand correlations between high Cu bioaccumulation in medicinal plants on their antioxidant activities. Concentrations of some essential metals, e.g., Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Se in the leaves of these plants were measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The Cu levels in the samples from mining site were in the range of 32.6 to 57.2 mg/kg, which were 5-7 folds higher than the control samples, while Cr levels were about 2-folds higher in the mining site. Speciation studies of Cr revealed negligible content of toxic hexavalent Cr. Antioxidant assay of these plants from both the sampling sites, measured as total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, free radical scavenging ability, and chelating ability with ferrous ions exhibited maximum activity for A. vasica, while that of W. somnifera was minimum. However, the variations in the antioxidant activities for each medicinal plant species from mining site and control site did not reveal significant differences. (author)

  6. Determination of trace elements in a medicinal plant by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of inorganic elements in medicinal plants may be related to the concentration of active constituents. Instrumental neutron activation analysis has been employed to determine the elements antimony, cesium, chlorine, cobalt, iron, manganese, nickel, potassium, rubidium, selenium, sodium and zinc in different parts of Helleborus cyclophyllus BOISS, and in the soil in which the plant was grown. It has been found that antimony has a selective accumulation in the rhizome of this plant where the active constituents are located, as well as chlorine in petioles and leaves. (author)

  7. Evaluation of the bioactivities of some Myanmar medicinal plants using brine shrimp (Artemia salina) toxicity test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a variety of toxic substances, brine shrimp larvae (Artemia salina) are usually used as a simple bioassay method and it is also applied for natural product research. The brine shrimp larvae (nauplii) are obtained by natural hatching method from Artemia cysts. By using the larvae, the results from these experiments lead to the lethal dose, LD50 values of extracts of selected medicinal plants. Activities of a broad range of plant extracts are manifested as toxicity to the brine shrimp. Screening results with six plant extracts are compared with pure caffeine. This method is rapid, reliable, inexpensive and convenient. (author)

  8. Antimicrobial activity and phyto constituents of Some medicinal plants from Kordofan province in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty four extracts from different morphological parts of eleven medicinal plants belonging to ten families growing in the study area Wad Albaga, Kordofan province, have been screened photochemically and assessed for their antimicrobial activity. Selection of plants was based primarily on their ethnobotanical and ethno pharmacological uses as antimicrobial plants for treatment of infections and wounds. Flavonoids, tannins, and terpenoids were detected in all screened extracts, about 66% of the extract contained alkaloids and 66% contained saponins with different concentrations. The extracts exhibited variable antimicrobial activity against two Gram-positive and three Gram-negative standard bacteria and two fungi. (Author)

  9. Total Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Capacities of Selected Chinese Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Lin Song

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant capacities of 56 selected Chinese medicinal plants were evaluated using the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays, and their total phenolic content was measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The strong correlation between TEAC value and FRAP value suggested that the antioxidants in these plants possess free radical scavenging activity and oxidant reducing power, and the high positive correlation between antioxidant capacities and total phenolic content implied that phenolic compounds are a major contributor to the antioxidant activity of these plants. The results showed that Dioscorea bulbifera, Eriobotrya japonica, Tussilago farfara and Ephedra sinica could be potential rich sources of natural antioxidants.

  10. Total phenolic contents and antioxidant capacities of selected chinese medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Feng-Lin; Gan, Ren-You; Zhang, Yuan; Xiao, Qin; Kuang, Lei; Li, Hua-Bin

    2010-01-01

    Antioxidant capacities of 56 selected Chinese medicinal plants were evaluated using the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays, and their total phenolic content was measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The strong correlation between TEAC value and FRAP value suggested that the antioxidants in these plants possess free radical scavenging activity and oxidant reducing power, and the high positive correlation between antioxidant capacities and total phenolic content implied that phenolic compounds are a major contributor to the antioxidant activity of these plants. The results showed that Dioscorea bulbifera, Eriobotrya japonica, Tussilago farfara and Ephedra sinica could be potential rich sources of natural antioxidants. PMID:20640157

  11. Essential Trace Metal (Zinc, Manganese, Copper and Iron) Levels in Plants of Medicinal Importance

    OpenAIRE

    T.M. Ansari; N. Ikram; M. Najam-ul-Haq; I. Fayyaz; Q. Fayyaz; I. Ghafoor; Khalid, N

    2004-01-01

    In this study, concentrations of four essential trace metals, i.e., zinc, manganese, copper and iron have been estimated in thirty five different spices and plants having folk medicinal uses. A wet digestion procedure involving the use of aqua regia (HNO3: HCl 1:3) has been used to solubilize metals from the plant samples. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been used to quantify metal levels. Results indicate the presence of variable amounts of metals in these plant samples. Order of co...

  12. Trace elements in indigenous medicinal plants (rhyzya stricta, vinca rosea and fagonia cretica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three indigenous medicinal plants reported to be anticancer have been selected for study of trace elements and their possible role in human health. Twelve trace elements (Al, Ag, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Ti, and Zn) have been detected and estimated in ash of various parts (leaves, shoots, flowers, seeds and roots) of the Rhazya stricta, Vinca rosea and Fagonia cretica plants. It is imperative to analyse the plants for their trace elements content, which have healing power for mankind in numerous ailments and disorders. The data of present work will be useful in this regard. (orig./A.B.)

  13. Phytochemical Study of Morinda pubescens J.E. Smith: A Medicinal Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Wangmo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Though Morinda pubescens J.E. Smith (= tinctoria= tomentosa (Roxb. Heyne (Rubiaceae is a medicinally important plant being used in dierent indigenous systems of medicine such as Ayurveda, Siddha, Unani, Tibbi and Amchi. Extract of its leaves, stems and fruits are used in the treatment of gastropathy, dyspepsia, diarrhoea, stomach ulcer, wounds, gout, inflammation, hernia, sarcocele and fever. Unfortunately, its pharmacognostic study has not been explored fully so far. Therefore, a detailed pharmcognostic investigation of the crude extracts of the leaf and stem drugs was executed using standard methods. Presence of active metabolites such as tannins, saponins, phenols and alkaloids was exhibited in the plant. As those active metabolites are associated to have anti viral, anti bacterial and anti inflammatory properties, they are widely used in treatment of various diseases. Thus, the potential of the plant as a source of the active metabolites is self explanatory.

  14. Rare earth elements determination in medicinal plants by Neutron Activation Analisys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Rodolfo D.M.R.; Francisconi, Lucilaine S.; Silva, Paulo S.C. da, E-mail: rdmrg89@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REEs) have been considered nontoxic for human health and for the environment; however, the use of REEs in the development of recent technologies has increased the interest un their biological effects. Some studies related to their concentration in foodstuffs were published but REEs levels in medicinal plants are still unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the Rees concentration in the set of 59 medicinal herbs commonly used by Brazilian folk. Results showed that plants can concentrate REEs in their aerial parts, but the amount transferred to the extract of these plants is relatively low, resulting in little ingestion of these elements by the population during the extract consumption. (author)

  15. Rare earth elements determination in medicinal plants by Neutron Activation Analisys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare Earth Elements (REEs) have been considered nontoxic for human health and for the environment; however, the use of REEs in the development of recent technologies has increased the interest un their biological effects. Some studies related to their concentration in foodstuffs were published but REEs levels in medicinal plants are still unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the Rees concentration in the set of 59 medicinal herbs commonly used by Brazilian folk. Results showed that plants can concentrate REEs in their aerial parts, but the amount transferred to the extract of these plants is relatively low, resulting in little ingestion of these elements by the population during the extract consumption. (author)

  16. Studies of the in vitro cytotoxic, antioxidant, lipase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities of selected Thai medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Kaewpiboon Chutima; Lirdprapamongkol Kriengsak; Srisomsap Chantragan; Winayanuwattikun Pakorn; Yongvanich Tikamporn; Puwaprisirisan Preecha; Svasti Jisnuson; Assavalapsakul Wanchai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Traditional folk medicinal plants have recently become popular and are widely used for primary health care. Since Thailand has a great diversity of indigenous (medicinal) plant species, this research investigated 52 traditionally used species of Thai medicinal plants for their in vitro cytotoxic, antioxidant, lipase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities. Methods The 55 dried samples, derived from the medicinally used parts of the 52 plant species were sequentially extrac...

  17. Screening of Indian medicinal plants for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Kumar, Venkatesan; Houghton, Peter J

    2007-12-01

    The cholinergic hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has provided the rationale for the current pharmaco-therapy of this disease, in an attempt to reduce the cognitive decline caused by cholinergic deficits. Nevertheless, the search for potent and long-acting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors that exert minimal side effects in AD patients is still ongoing. AChE inhibitors are currently the only approved therapy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease; only a limited number of drugs are commercially available. Hydroalcohol extracts of six herbs, Andrographis paniculata, Centella asiatica, Evalvulus alsinoides, Nardostachys jatamansi, Nelumbo nucifera, Myristica fragrans used in Indian systems of medicine, were tested for in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity based on Ellman's method in 96-well microplates using AChE obtained from bovine erythrocytes. The results showed that the hydroalcohol extract from Centella asiatica, Nardostachys jatamansi, Myristica fragrans, Evalvulus alsinoides inhibited 50% of AChE activity at concentrations of 100-150 microg/mL. Andrographis paniculata and Nelumbo nucifera extracts showed a weak inhibition of acetylcholinesterase with IC(50) values of 222.41 +/- 19.87 microg/mL and 185.55 +/- 21.24 microg/mL, respectively. Physostigmine was used as a standard and showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase with an IC(50) value of 0.076 +/- 0.0042 microg/mL. PMID:17639556

  18. Ethnobotanical Study of Some Medicinal Plants of Rawal Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Arshad

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethnobotanical survey was carried out in Rawal Town. The winter medicinal flora of town consisted of twenty-five species, which belong to twenty families. Out of them seventeen were dicot and three were monocot. Family Euphorbiaceae had three species, which was followed by Amaranthaceae, Astraceae and Papilionaceae with two species each. The remaining families had one species each. According to survey carried out in the specified area four species that is Achyranthus, Capsella, Cynodon and Cyprus are used as diuretic and for the treatment of gall blabber diseases. The leaves and fruits of Acacia are used for curing cough. Amaranthus is highly effective against snakebite and rheumatism. Calotrpis is used for treatment of cholera and malaria, where as Cannabis is notorious for its narcotic effects and also used for curing diarrhoea. Carthamus is supposed to be effective in ulcer and itching. Cassia and Convolvulus are used as purgative. The vegetative part of Chenopodium is anthelmintic and those of Aloe are effective in eradicating piles. The stem, leaves and roots of Dalbergia are used in curing leprosy.

  19. NeMedPlant: a database of therapeutic applications and chemical constituents of medicinal plants from north-east region of India

    OpenAIRE

    Meetei, Potshangbam Angamba; Singh, Pankaj; Nongdam, Potshangbam; Prabhu, N. Prakash; Rathore, Rs; Vindal, Vaibhav

    2012-01-01

    The North-East region of India is one of the twelve mega biodiversity region, containing many rare and endangered species. A curated database of medicinal and aromatic plants from the regions called NeMedPlant is developed. The database contains traditional, scientific and medicinal information about plants and their active constituents, obtained from scholarly literature and local sources. The database is cross-linked with major biochemical databases and analytical tools. The integr...

  20. Ethnopharmacological survey of different uses of seven medicinal plants from Mali, (West Africa) in the regions Doila, Kolokani and Siby

    OpenAIRE

    Barsett Hilde; Diallo Drissa; Dembélé Seydou; Togola Adiaratou; Paulsen Berit

    2005-01-01

    Abstract An ethnopharmacological survey was carried out to collect information on the use of seven medicinal plants in rural areas in the nearby regions of Bamako, Mali. The plants were Opilia celtidifolia, Anthocleista djalonensis, Erythrina senegalensis, Heliotropium indicum, Trichilia emetica, Piliostigma thonningii and Cochlospermum tinctorium About 50 medical indications were reported for the use of these plants in traditional medicine. The most frequent ailments reported were malaria, a...