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Sample records for out-of hospital cardiac

  1. Surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nick

    2016-05-01

    Emergency care nurses have been urged to play their part in Scotland's push to revolutionise care for cardiac arrest patients - by teaching others how to save a life. This article discusses the Scottish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest strategy, with particular focus on the drive to increase bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates, and on how emergency nurses are being enlisted to help promote the training of members of the public. PMID:27165393

  2. [Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Hoppu, Sanna; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrest as the first symptom of coronary artery disease is not uncommon. Some of previously healthy people with sudden cardiac arrest may be saved by effective resuscitation and post-resuscitative therapy. The majority of cardiac arrest patients experience the cardiac arrest outside of the hospital, in which case early recognition of lifelessness, commencement of basic life support and entry to professional care without delay are the prerequisites for recovery. After the heart has started beating again, the clinical picture of post-resuscitation syndrome must be recognized and appropriate treatment utilized. PMID:22204143

  3. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Optimal Management

    OpenAIRE

    Frhlich, Georg M.; Lyon, Richard M; Sasson, Comilla; Crake, Tom; Whitbread, Mark; Indermuehle, Andreas; Timmis, Adam; Meier, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has attracted increasing attention over the past years because outcomes have improved impressively lately. The changes for neurological intact outcomes has been poor but several areas have achieved improving survival rates after adjusting their cardiac arrest care. The pre-hospital management is certainly key and decides whether a cardiac arrest patient can be brought back into a spontaneous circulation. However, the whole chain of resuscitati...

  4. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarainen Antti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prehospital pediatric cardiac arrest is a rare event compared with adult cardiac arrest. Despite the recent advancements in postresuscitation care improving the outcome of adult patients, similar evidence is lacking in pediatric victims of cardiac arrest. In this brief article, the current data on pediatric cardiac arrest occurring in the prehospital setting are reviewed. The annual incidence of pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is approximately 8-10 cases per 100,000 persons. The outcome is generally poor, as only 2-9.6% of patients survive to hospital discharge. The neurologic outcome of survivors is good in 24-31% of patients. Current evidence is insufficient to strongly support or refute the use of mild therapeutic hypothermia during the postresuscitation phase in pediatric patients. The application of a goal-directed treatment protocol for pediatric cardiac arrest and postresuscitation syndrome needs to be evaluated.

  5. Pharmacotherapy and hospital admissions before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H; Lippert, Freddy K; Olesen, Jonas B; Andersson, Charlotte; Fosbøl, Emil L; Charlot, Mette G; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Poulsen, Henrik E; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) to be predicted and prevented, it is imperative the healthcare system has access to those vulnerable before the event occurs. We aimed to determine the extent of contact to the healthcare system before OHCA.......For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) to be predicted and prevented, it is imperative the healthcare system has access to those vulnerable before the event occurs. We aimed to determine the extent of contact to the healthcare system before OHCA....

  6. Demographic and temporal trends in out of hospital sudden cardiac death in belfast

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, M. J.; Glover, B.M.; McCann, C J; Cromie, Nicholas; Ferguson, Peter; Catney, Denise; Kee, Frank; Adgey, A A J

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the epidemiology of out of hospital sudden cardiac death (OHSCD) in Belfast from 1 August 2003 to 31 July 2004.Design: Prospective examination of out of hospital cardiac arrests by using the Utstein style and necropsy reports. World Health Organization criteria were applied to determine the number of sudden cardiac deaths.Results: Of 300 OHSCDs, 197 (66%) in men, mean age (SD) 68 (14) years, 234 (78%) occurred at home. The emergency medical services (EMS) attended 279 ...

  7. Hospital admissions and pharmacotherapy before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest according to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H; Lippert, Freddy K; Olesen, Jonas B; Andersson, Charlotte; Wissenberg, Mads; Poulsen, Henrik E; Nielsen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The underlying etiology of sudden cardiac death varies with age and is likely to be reflected in type and number of healthcare contacts. We aimed to determine the specific type of healthcare contact shortly before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) across ages. METHODS: OHCA patients...... were identified in the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Register and Copenhagen Medical Emergency Care Unit (2001-2006). We matched every OHCA patients with 10 controls on sex and age. Healthcare contacts were evaluated 30 days before event by individual-level-linkage of nationwide registers. RESULTS......: We identified 16,924 OHCA patients, median age 70.0 years (Q1-Q3: 59-80). OHCA patients had a higher number of hospitalizations and received more pharmacotherapy compared to the control population across all ages (p for difference 89) were...

  8. Antipsychotics and associated risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Jensen, Aksel; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Fosbøl, Emil L.; Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K.; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Holm, Ellen; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCA in Denmark (2001-2010). Risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug...

  9. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Lippert, Freddy K; Weeke, Peter; Karlsson, Lena; Søndergaard, Kathrine Bach; Kragholm, Kristian; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Nielsen, Søren L; Kober, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    population. METHODS: All OHCA patients in Denmark, ≤21 years of age, were identified from 2001 to 2010. The population was divided into infants (<1 year); pre-school children (1-5 years); school children (6-15 years); and high school adolescents/young adults (16-21 years). Multivariate logistic regression...... analyses were used to investigate associations between pre-hospital factors and study endpoints: return of spontaneous circulation and survival. RESULTS: A total of 459 individuals were included. Overall incidence of OHCA was 3.3 per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The incidence rates for infants, pre-school...... children, school children and high school adolescents were 11.5, 3.5, 1.3 and 5.3 per 100,000 inhabitants. Overall bystander CPR rate was 48.8%, and for age groups: 55.4%, 41.2%, 44.9% and 63.0%, respectively. Overall 30-day survival rate was 8.1%, and for age groups: 1.4%, 4.5%, 16.1% and 9...

  10. Establishing the Aus-ROC Australian and New Zealand out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Epistry

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Ben; Bray, Janet; Smith, Karen; Walker, Tony; Grantham, Hugh; Hein, Cindy; Thorrowgood, Melanie; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Tony; Dicker, Bridget; Swain, Andy; Bailey, Mark; Bosley, Emma; Pemberton, Katherine; Cameron, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a global health problem with low survival. Regional variation in survival has heightened interest in combining cardiac arrest registries to understand and improve OHCA outcomes. While individual OHCA registries exist in Australian and New Zealand ambulance services, until recently these registries have not been combined. The aim of this protocol paper is to describe the rationale and methods of the Australian Resuscitation Outcomes Consort...

  11. Barriers to recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency medical calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfsen, David; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Egerod, Ingrid; Lippert, Freddy K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The chance of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) depends on early and correct recognition of cardiac arrest by the emergency medical dispatcher during the emergency call. When cardiac arrest is identified, telephone guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and referral to...... an automated external defibrillator should be initiated. Previous studies have investigated barriers to recognition of OHCA, and found the caller's description of sign of life, the type of caller, caller's emotional state, an inadequate dialogue during the emergency call, and patient's agonal...... of not recognised cardiac arrest and 8 recordings of recognised cardiac arrests were analysed. Three main themes, six subthemes and an embedded theme emerged from the analysis: caller's physical distance (caller near patient, caller not near patient), caller's emotional distance (keeping calm, losing...

  12. Association of gender to outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - a report from the International Cardiac Arrest Registry.

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Viktor; Dankiewicz, Josef; Nielsen, Niklas; KARL B. KERN; Mooney, Michael R.; Riker, Richard R.; Rubertsson, Sten; Seder, David B; Stammet, Pascal; Sunde, Kjetil; Søreide, Eldar; Unger, Barbara T; Friberg, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies have suggested an effect of gender on outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), but the results are conflicting. We aimed to investigate the association of gender to outcome, coronary angiography (CAG) and adverse events in OHCA survivors treated with mild induced hypothermia (MIH). Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from the International Cardiac Arrest Registry. Adult patients with a non-traumatic OHCA and...

  13. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moler, Frank W.; Silverstein, Faye S.; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S.; Christensen, James R.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Clark, Amy E.; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S.; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Bennett, Kimberly S.; Berger, John T.; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A.; Koch, Joshua D.; Schleien, Charles L.; Dalton, Heidi J.; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M.; Fink, Ericka L.; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J.; Thomas, Neal J.; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Porter, Melissa B.; Meyer, Michael T.; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J.; Nowak, Jeffrey E.; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S.; Bhalala, Utpal S.; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A.; Sanders, Ronald C.; Dean, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. Methods We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 childrens hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. Results A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P = 0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P = 0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P = 0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. Conclusions In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a good functional outcome at 1 year. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and others; THAPCA-OH ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00878644.) PMID:25913022

  14. Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke Normark; Fonager, Kirsten; Jensen, Svend Eggert; Rajan, Shahzleen; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Hansen, Poul Anders; Lang-Jensen, Torsten; Hendriksen, Ole Mazur; Kober, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on long-term function of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors are sparse. We examined return to work as a proxy of preserved function without major neurologic deficits in survivors. METHODS AND RESULTS: In Denmark, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests have been systematically...... reported to the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register since 2001. During 2001-2011, we identified 4354 patients employed before arrest among 12 332 working-age patients (18-65 years), of whom 796 survived to day 30. Among 796 survivors (median age, 53 years [quartile 1-3, 46-59 years]; 81.5% men), 610 (76.......6%) returned to work in a median time of 4 months [quartile 1-3, 1-19 months], with a median time of 3 years spent back at work. A total of 74.6% (N=455) remained employed without using sick leave during the first 6 months after returning to work. This latter proportion of survivors returning to work increased...

  15. Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke Normark; Fonager, Kirsten; Jensen, Svend Eggert; Rajan, Shahzleen; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Hansen, Poul Anders; Lang-Jensen, Torsten; Hendriksen, Ole Mazur; Kber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Data on long-term function of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors are sparse. We examined return to work as proxy of preserved function without major neurological deficits in survivors. METHODS AND RESULTS: -In Denmark, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests are systematically reported...... to the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register since 2001. During 2001-2011, we identified 4,354 patients employed before arrest among 12,332 working age patients (18-65 years), of which 796 survived to day 30. Among 796 survivors (median age 53 years [Q1-Q3 46-59]; 81.5% men), 610 (76.6%) returned to work in...... a median time of 4 months [Q1-Q3 1-19] with a median time of 3 years spent back at work, of which 74.6% (N=455) remained employed without sick leaves during the first six months after return to work. This latter proportion of survivors returning to work increased over time (66.1% in 2001-2005 versus...

  16. Incidence and outcomes of rearrest following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcido, David D.; Sundermann, Matthew L.; Koller, Allison C.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rearrest occurs when a patient experiences cardiac arrest after successful resuscitation. The incidence and outcomes of rearrest following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have been estimated in limited local studies. We sought provide a large-scale estimate of rearrest incidence and its effect on survival. Methods We obtained case data from emergency medical services-treated, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, a multi-site clinical research network with clinical centers in 11 regions in the US and Canada. The cohort comprised all cases captured between 2006 and 2008 at 10 of 11 regions with prehospital return of spontaneous circulation. We used three methods to ascertain rearrest via direct signal analysis, indirect signal analysis, and emergency department arrival vital status. Rearrest incidence was estimated as the proportion of cases with return of spontaneous circulation that experience rearrest. Regional rearrest incidence estimates were compared with the χ2-squared test. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between rearrest and survival to hospital discharge. Results Out of 18,937 emergency medical services-assessed cases captured between 2006 and 2008, 11,456 (60.5%) cases were treated by emergency medical services and 4396 (38.4%) had prehospital return of spontaneous circulation. Of these, rearrest ascertainment data was available in 3253 cases, with 568 (17.5%) experiencing rearrest. Rearrest differed by region (10.2% to 21.2%, p<0.001). Rearrest was inversely associated with survival (OR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.14–0.26). Conclusions Rearrest was found to occur frequently after resuscitation and was inversely related to survival. PMID:25447433

  17. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival in rural Northwest Ireland: 17 years' experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Masterson, Siobhán

    2011-05-01

    SAVES, the name used to describe a register of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), was established in rural Northwest Ireland in 1992. From 1992 to 2008, 80 survivors were identified (population 239,000 (2006)). Most incidents were witnessed (69\\/70) and all were in shockable rhythm at the time of first rhythm analysis (66\\/66). Of 66 patients who could be traced, 46 were alive in December 2008. Average survival rates appeared to increase over the lifetime of the database. SAVES has also contributed to the development of a national OHCA register.

  18. No difference in mortality between men and women after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Michael; Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjærgaard, Jesper; Nielsen, N; Wetterslev, J.; Cronberg, Tobias; Erlinge, David; Friberg, H; Gasche, Yvan; Horn, J; Hovdenes, Jan; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Thomas; Stammet, Pascal; Wise, Matt P; Åneman, Anders; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Comparing the outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in men and women and to determine whether sex modifies the effect of targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33 or 36°C. METHODS: The TTM trial randomized 950 patients to TTM at 33 or 36°C for 24h. This predefined sub-study of...... the TTM trial assessed survival and neurological outcome defined as Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) using female sex as main predictor of outcome, in relation to level of TTM and other confounding factors. RESULTS: Compared to men, women more often had OHCA at home...

  19. Interposed Abdominal Compression CPR for an Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Victim Failing Traditional CPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D. McClung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Interposed abdominal compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR is an alternative technique to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR that can improve perfusion and lead to restoration of circulation in patients with chest wall deformity either acquired through vigorous CPR or co-morbidity such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where IAC-CPR allowed for restoration of spontaneous circulation and eventual full neurologic recovery when traditional CPR was failing to generate adequate pulses with chest compression alone.

  20. Antidepressant Use and Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, P; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Folke, F; Gislason, G H; Olesen, J B; Andersson, C; Fosbøl, E L; Larsen, J K; Lippert, Freddy; Nielsen, S L; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Andersen, Per Kragh; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Poulsen, H E; Pehrson, S; Køber, L; Torp-Pedersen, C

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with some types of antidepressants has been associated with sudden cardiac death. It is unknown whether the increased risk is due to a class effect or related to specific antidepressants within drug classes. All patients in Denmark with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) were...... identified (2001-2007). Association between treatment with specific antidepressants and OHCA was examined by conditional logistic regression in case-time-control models. We identified 19,110 patients with an OHCA; 2,913 (15.2%) were receiving antidepressant treatment at the time of OHCA, with citalopram...... being the most frequently used type of antidepressant (50.8%). Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs; odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.50) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; OR = 1.21, CI: 1.00-1.47) were both associated with comparable increases in risk of OHCA...

  1. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy K; Weeke, Peter; Karlsson, Lena; Rajan, Shahzleen; Søndergaard, Kathrine Bach; Sørensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Nielsen, Søren L; Kober, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    ); and in females (4.8% in 2001 to 6.7% in 2010), p<0.001. Multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusted for patient characteristics including comorbidities, showed no survival difference between sexes in patients with a non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.00; CI 0.72-1.40), while female sex was positively...... poorer prognostic characteristics in females with a lower proportion of shockable rhythm. In an adjusted model, female sex was positively associated with survival in patients with a shockable rhythm.......AIM: Crude survival has increased following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to study sex-related differences in patient characteristics and survival during a 10-year study period. METHODS: Patients≥12 years old with OHCA of a presumed cardiac cause, and in whom resuscitation was...

  2. Laryngeal tube use in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by paramedics in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunde Geir A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there are numerous supraglottic airway alternatives to endotracheal intubation, it remains unclear which airway technique is optimal for use in prehospital cardiac arrests. We evaluated the use of the laryngeal tube (LT as an airway management tool among adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA patients treated by our ambulance services in the Haukeland and Innlandet hospital districts. Methods Post-resuscitation forms and data concerning airway management in 347 adult OHCA victims were retrospectively assessed with regard to LT insertion success rates, ease and speed of insertion and insertion-related problems. Results A total of 402 insertions were performed on 347 OHCA patients. Overall, LT insertion was successful in 85.3% of the patients, with a 74.4% first-attempt success rate. In the minority of patients (n = 46, 13.3%, the LT insertion time exceeded 30 seconds. Insertion-related problems were recorded in 52.7% of the patients. Lack of respiratory sounds on auscultation (n = 100, 28.8%, problematic initial tube positioning (n = 85, 24.5%, air leakage (n = 61, 17.6%, vomitus/aspiration (n = 44, 12.7%, and tube dislocation (n = 17, 4.9% were the most common problems reported. Insertion difficulty was graded and documented for 95.4% of the patients, with the majority of insertions assessed as being “Easy” (62.5% or “Intermediate” (24.8%. Only 8.1% of the insertions were considered to be “Difficult”. Conclusions We found a high number of insertion related problems, indicating that supraglottic airway devices offering promising results in manikin studies may be less reliable in real-life resuscitations. Still, we consider the laryngeal tube to be an important alternative for airway management in prehospital cardiac arrest victims.

  3. Near-death experiences and electrocardiogram patterns in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors: a prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    ZALIKA KLEMENC-KETIS; STEFEK GRMEC; JANKO KERSNIK

    2011-01-01

    Aim. To determine the effect of several factors, that are a part of cardiac arrest and resuscitation, on the incidence of neardeath experiences (NDEs). Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study in the three largest hospitals in Slovenia in a consecutive sample of patients after out-of-hospital primary cardiac arrest. The presence of NDE was assessed with the self-administered Greyson’s near-death experiences scale. The electrocardiogram pattern at the beginning of resuscitatio...

  4. Factors Associated With Successful Resuscitation After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Temporal Trends in Survival and Comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Hassager, Christian; Lippert, Freddy; Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Friberg, Hans; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Køber, Lars; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    % (P trend <.001), whereas the percentage of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with successful resuscitation to hospital admission increased by 3% per year during the study period, from 37% in 2007 to 43% in 2011 (P trend <.001). CONCLUSION: Our observations confirm the importance of key features...

  5. Out-of-hospital extra-corporeal life support implantation during refractory cardiac arrest in a half-marathon runner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Guillaume; Pozzi, Matteo; Luyt, Charles-Edouard; Chastre, Jean; Carli, Pierre; Pavie, Alain; Leprince, Pascal; Vivien, Benot

    2011-09-01

    For patients who present with an out-of-hospital refractory cardiac arrest, in-hospital extracorporeal life-support (ECLS) initiation represents an alternative therapy which allows significant survival. We describe here the first case of out-of-hospital ECLS implantation in a patient presenting with a refractory cardiac arrest during a road race. ECLS was initiated within the MICU ambulance 60 min after cardiac arrest and enabled restoration of cardiac output to 4.5 l min?. Coronarography revealed a severe isolated stenosis of the right coronary artery, which was treated by angioplasty. The cardiogenic shock resolved progressively, enabling ECLS weaning within 48h, while renal, hepatic, and respiratory functions recovered simultaneously. PMID:21536365

  6. Establishing the Aus-ROC Australian and New Zealand out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Epistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Janet; Smith, Karen; Walker, Tony; Grantham, Hugh; Hein, Cindy; Thorrowgood, Melanie; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Tony; Dicker, Bridget; Swain, Andy; Bailey, Mark; Bosley, Emma; Pemberton, Katherine; Cameron, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Finn, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a global health problem with low survival. Regional variation in survival has heightened interest in combining cardiac arrest registries to understand and improve OHCA outcomes. While individual OHCA registries exist in Australian and New Zealand ambulance services, until recently these registries have not been combined. The aim of this protocol paper is to describe the rationale and methods of the Australian Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (Aus-ROC) OHCA epidemiological registry (Epistry). Methods and analysis The Aus-ROC Epistry is designed as a population-based cohort study. Data collection started in 2014. Six ambulance services in Australia (Ambulance Victoria, SA Ambulance Service, St John Ambulance Western Australia and Queensland Ambulance Service) and New Zealand (St John New Zealand and Wellington Free Ambulance) currently contribute data. All OHCA attended by ambulance, regardless of aetiology or patient age, are included in the Epistry. The catchment population is approximately 19.3 million persons, representing 63% of the Australian population and 100% of the New Zealand population. Data are collected using Utstein-style definitions. Information incorporated into the Epistry includes demographics, arrest features, ambulance response times, treatment and patient outcomes. The primary outcome is ‘survival to hospital discharge’, with ‘return of spontaneous circulation’ as a key secondary outcome. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was independently sought by each of the contributing registries. Overarching ethics for the Epistry was provided by Monash University HREC (Approval No. CF12/3938—2012001888). A population-based OHCA registry capturing the majority of Australia and New Zealand will allow risk-adjusted outcomes to be determined, to enable benchmarking across ambulance providers, facilitate the identification of system-wide strategies associated with survival from OHCA, and allow monitoring of temporal trends in process and outcomes to improve patient care. Findings will be shared with participating ambulance services and the academic community. PMID:27048638

  7. Spatial Variation and Resuscitation Process Affecting Survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests (OHCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chou; Chen, Chao-Wen; Ho, Chi-Kung; Liu, I-Chuan; Lin, Bo-Cheng; Chan, Ta-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Background Ambulance response times and resuscitation efforts are critical predictors of the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA). On the other hand, rural-urban differences in the OHCA survival rates are an important public health issue. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the January 2011December 2013 OHCA registry data of Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. With particular focus on geospatial variables, we aimed to unveil risk factors predicting the overall OHCA survival until hospital admission. Spatial analysis, network analysis, and the Kriging method by using geographic information systems were applied to analyze spatial variations and calculate the transport distance. Logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for OHCA survival. Results Among the 4,957 patients, the overall OHCA survival to hospital admission was 16.5%. In the multivariate analysis, female sex (adjusted odds ratio:, AOR, 1.24 [1.061.45]), events in public areas (AOR: 1.30 [1.051.61]), exposure to automated external defibrillator (AED) shock (AOR: 1.70 [1.302.23]), use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) (AOR: 1.35 [1.161.58]), non-trauma patients (AOR: 1.41 [1.041.90]), ambulance bypassed the closest hospital (AOR: 1.28 [1.071.53]), and OHCA within the high population density areas (AOR: 1.89 [1.552.32]) were positively associated with improved OHCA survival. By contrast, a prolonged total emergency medical services (EMS) time interval was negatively associated with OHCA survival (AOR: 0.98 [0.960.99]). Conclusions Resuscitative efforts, such as AED or LMA use, and a short total EMS time interval improved OHCA outcomes in emergency departments. The spatial heterogeneity of emergency medical resources between rural and urban areas might affect survival rate. PMID:26659851

  8. Early clinical prediction of neurological outcome following out of hospital cardiac arrest managed with therapeutic hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ishaq Ruknuddeen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH may improve neurological outcome in comatose patients following out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. The reliability of clinical prediction of neurological outcome following TH remains unclear. In particular, there is very limited data on survival and predictors of neurological outcome following TH for OHCA from resource-constrained settings in general and South Asia in specific. Objective: The objective was to identify factors predicting unfavorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge in comatose survivors of OHCA treated with hypothermia. Design: Retrospective chart review. Setting: Urban 200-bed hospital in Chennai, India. Methods: Predictors of unfavorable neurological outcome (cerebral performance category score [3-5] at hospital discharge were evaluated among patients admitted between January 2006 and December 2012 following OHCA treated with TH. Hypothermia was induced with cold intravenous saline bolus, ice packs and cold-water spray with bedside fan. Predictors of unfavorable neurological outcome were examined through multivariate exact logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 121 patients were included with 106/121 (87% experiencing the unfavorable neurological outcome. Independent predictors of unfavorable neurological outcome included: Status myoclonus <24 h (odds ratio [OR] 21.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.89-Infinite, absent brainstem reflexes (OR 50.09, 6.55-Infinite, and motor response worse than flexion on day 3 (OR 99.41, 12.21-Infinite. All 3 variables had 100% specificity and positive predictive value. Conclusion: Status myoclonus within 24 h, absence of brainstem reflexes and motor response worse than flexion on day 3 reliably predict unfavorable neurological outcome in comatose patients with OHCA treated with TH.

  9. Anxiety and depression among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, G; Nilsson, G; Nielsen, N; Friberg, H; Hassager, C; Koopmans, M; Kuiper, M; Martini, A; Mellinghoff, J; Pelosi, P; Wanscher, M; Wise, M P; Östman, I; Cronberg, T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) may experience psychological distress but the actual prevalence is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate anxiety and depression within a large cohort of OHCA-survivors. METHODS: OHCA-survivors randomized to targeted temperature of...... 33°C or 36°C within the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM-trial) attended a follow-up after 6 months that included the questionnaire Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). A control group with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) completed the same follow-up. Correlations to...... variables assumed to be associated with anxiety and depression in OHCA-survivors were tested. RESULTS: At follow-up 278 OHCA-survivors and 119 STEMI-controls completed the HADS where 24% of OHCA-survivors (28% in 33°C group/22% in 36°C group, p=0.83) and 19% of the STEMI-controls reported symptoms of...

  10. Epidemiology of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests Among Japanese Centenarians: 2005 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Izawa, Junichi; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Fujii, Tomoko; Nishiyama, Chika; Iwami, Taku

    2016-03-15

    Although the number of centenarians has been rapidly increasing in industrialized countries, no clinical studies evaluated their characteristics and outcomes from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). This nationwide, population-based, observation of the whole population of Japan enrolled consecutive OHCA centenarians with resuscitation attempts before emergency medical service arrival from 2005 to 2013. The primary outcome measure was 1-month survival from OHCAs. The multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess factors associated with 1-month survival in this population. Among a total of 4,937 OHCA centenarians before emergency medical service arrival, the numbers of those with OHCAs increased from 70 in 2005 to 136 in 2013 in men and from 227 in 2005 to 587 in 2013 in women. Women accounted for 80.3%. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) as first documented rhythm was 2.5%. The proportions of victims receiving bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation were 64.2%. The proportion of 1-month survival from OHCAs in centenarians was only 1.1%. In a multivariate analysis, age was not associated with 1-month survival from OHCAs (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for one increment of age 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87 to 1.18). Witness by a bystander (adjusted OR 3.45; 95% CI 1.88 to 6.31) and VF as first documented rhythm (adjusted OR 5.49; 95% CI 2.24 to 13.43) were significant positive predictors for 1-month survival. Cardiac origin was significantly poor in 1-month survival compared with noncardiac origin (adjusted OR 0.37; 95% CI 0.21 to 0.64). In conclusion, survival from OHCAs in centenarians was very poor, but witness by a bystander and VF as first documented rhythm were associated with improved survival. PMID:26810860

  11. Population density, call-response interval, and survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa Toshio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the effects of geographic variation on outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. The present study investigated the relationship between population density, time between emergency call and ambulance arrival, and survival of OHCA, using the All-Japan Utstein-style registry database, coupled with geographic information system (GIS data. Methods We examined data from 101,287 bystander-witnessed OHCA patients who received emergency medical services (EMS through 4,729 ambulatory centers in Japan between 2005 and 2007. Latitudes and longitudes of each center were determined with address-match geocoding, and linked with the Population Census data using GIS. The endpoints were 1-month survival and neurologically favorable 1-month survival defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance categories 1 or 2. Results Overall 1-month survival was 7.8%. Neurologically favorable 1-month survival was 3.6%. In very low-density (2 and very high-density (≥10,000/km2 areas, the mean call-response intervals were 9.3 and 6.2 minutes, 1-month survival rates were 5.4% and 9.1%, and neurologically favorable 1-month survival rates were 2.7% and 4.3%, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, cause of arrest, first aid by bystander and the proportion of neighborhood elderly people ≥65 yrs, patients in very high-density areas had a significantly higher survival rate (odds ratio (OR, 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.44 - 1.87; p Conclusion Living in a low-density area was associated with an independent risk of delay in ambulance response, and a low survival rate in cases of OHCA. Distribution of EMS centers according to population size may lead to inequality in health outcomes between urban and rural areas.

  12. Year in review 2013: Critical Care--out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, traumatic injury, and other emergency care conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Scott A; Kharbanda, Bryan; Pepe, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss articles published in 2013 contributing to the existing literature on the management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and the evaluation and management of several other emergency conditions, including traumatic injury. The utility of intravenous medications, including epinephrine and amiodarone, in the management of cardiac arrest is questioned, as are cardiac arrest termination-of-resuscitation rules. Articles discussing mode of transportation in trauma are evaluated, and novel strategies for outcome prediction in traumatic injury are proposed. Diagnostic strategies, including computerized tomography scan for the diagnosis of smoke inhalation injury and serum biomarkers for the diagnosis of post-cardiac arrest syndrome and acute aortic dissection, are also explored. Although many of the articles discussed raise more questions than they answer, they nevertheless provide ample opportunity for further investigation. PMID:25672494

  13. Development of a Web GIS Application for Visualizing and Analyzing Community Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Hugh; Qin, Han; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-01-01

    Improving survival rates at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as a priority for reducing overall rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the United States. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is important for public health officials and residents to be able to quickly locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and to target these areas for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes an OHCA web mapping application that was developed to provide users with interactive maps and data for them to quickly visualize and analyze the geographic pattern of cardiac arrest rates, bystander CPR rates, and survival rates at the neighborhood level in different U.S. cities. The data comes from the CARES Registry and is provided over a period spanning several years so users can visualize trends in neighborhood out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patterns. Users can also visualize areas that are statistical hot and cold spots for cardiac arrest and compare OHCA and bystander CPR rates in the hot and cold spots. Although not designed as a public participation GIS (PPGIS), this application seeks to provide a forum around which data and maps about local patterns of OHCA can be shared, analyzed and discussed with a view of empowering local communities to take action to address the high rates of OHCA in their vicinity. PMID:23923097

  14. Early pneumonia and timing of antibiotic therapy in patients after nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Hellenkamp, Kristian; Onimischewski, Sabrina; Kruppa, Jochen; Faßhauer, Martin; DE BECKER, Alexander; Eiffert, Helmut; Hünlich, Mark; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Wachter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background While early pneumonia is common in patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), little is known about the impact of pneumonia and the optimal timing of antibiotic therapy after OHCA. Methods We conducted a 5-year retrospective cohort study, including patients who suffered from OHCA and were treated with therapeutic hypothermia. ICU treatment was strictly standardized with defined treatment goals and procedures. Medical records, chest radiographic images and microb...

  15. Early Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest after Early Defibrillation: a 24 Months Retrospective Analysis

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    Paolo Terranova

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease remains the most common cause of death in the United States and most other Western nations. Among these deaths, sudden, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest claims approximately 1000 lives each day in the United States alone. Most of these cardiac arrests are due to ventricular fibrillation. Though highly reversible with the rapid application of a defibrillator, ventricular fibrillation is otherwise fatal within minutes, even when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is provided immediately. The overall survival rate in the United States is estimated to be less than 5 percent. Recent developments in automated-external-defibrillator technology have provided a means of increasing the rate of prompt defibrillation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. After minimal training, nonmedical personnel (e.g., flight attendants and casino workers are also able to use defibrillators in the workplace, with lifesaving effects. Nonetheless, such programs have involved designated personnel whose job description includes assisting persons who have had sudden cardiac arrest. Data are still lacking on the success of programs in which automated external defibrillators have been installed in public places to be used by persons who have no specific training or duty to act. Materials and Methods: All patients who had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 2003 and December 2004 and who received early defibrillation for ventricular fibrillation were included. We conducted a 24 months retrospective population-based analysis of the outcome in our population. Results: Over a 24 month period, 446 people had non–traumatic cardiac arrest, and in all of them it was observed to be ventricular fibrillation. In a very few cases, the defibrillator operators were good Samaritans, acting voluntarily. Eighty-nine patients (about 19% with ventricular fibrillation were successfully resuscitated, including eighteen who regained consciousness before hospital admission. Conclusion: Automated external defibrillators deployed in readily accessible, well-marked areas, are really very effective in assisting patients with cardiac arrest. However, it's quite true that, in the cases of survivors, most of our users had good prior training in the use of these devices.

  16. Near-death-experiences in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors. Meaningful phenomena or just fantasy of death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P R

    1994-03-01

    Frequent criticism concerning the investigation of near-death-experiences (NDEs) has been the lack of uniform nomenclature and the failure to control the studied population with an elimination of interfering factors such as administration of sedatives and nonspecific stress responses. Greyson's NDE Scale is a 16-item questionnaire developed to standardize further research into mechanisms and effects of NDEs. Using this scale, we interviewed good out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors, with documented time-intervals between call for help and restoration of spontaneous circulation, yet without obvious brain damage or known, psychiatric history. The incidence of such experiences appeared to be extremely low among survivors of genuine cardiac arrest events. Alteration of information processing under the influence of hypoxia and hypercarbia only occurs after several minutes of brain ischaemia. International multicentric data collection within the framework for standardized reporting of cardiac arrest events will be the only satisfying method to address this fascinating and intriguing issue. PMID:8029538

  17. Spontaneous defibrillation after cessation of resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a case of Lazarus phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Holopainen, Leevi; Erkkilä, Elja-Pekka; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Tenhunen, Jyrki

    2007-12-01

    This report describes a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with spontaneous defibrillation and subsequent return of circulation after cessation of resuscitative efforts. A 47-year-old man was found in cardiac arrest and resuscitation was initiated. As no response was achieved, the efforts were withdrawn and final registered cardiac rhythm was ventricular fibrillation. Fifteen minutes later the patient was found to be normotensive and breathing spontaneously. The patient made a poor neurological recovery and died 3 months after the arrest. The authors are unable to give an explanation to the event, but suspect the effect of adrenaline combined with mild hypothermia to have contributed to the self-defibrillation of the myocardium. PMID:17629389

  18. An outcome study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein template--a Japanese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiko, Kunihiro; Otsuka, Toshihumi; Shimazaki, Shuji; Kohama, Akitsugu; Kamishima, Gonbei; Katsurada, Kikushi; Sawada, Yusuke; Matsubara, Izumi; Yamaguchi, Kazunori

    2002-12-01

    Publication of the Utstein style template has made it possible to evaluate and compare national, regional, and hospital based Emergency Medical Services. This research was a national investigation to present outcome data for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients in Japan. 3029 OHCA patients who were transported to 10 Emergency and Critical Care Medical Center from November 1997 to April 1999 were recorded according to the Utstein style and the outcome evaluated by logistic regression analysis. Among 3029 OHCA patients, 109 were found dead. The remaining 2920 patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by emergency medical technicians (EMT) were included in this study. Among these patients, 1294 were considered of primary cardiac origin patients by the EMT and 722 of these patients suffered a witnessed cardiac arrest. Bystander CPR were performed in 28.4% of these witnessed patients and the discharge rate was 3.5% overall and 11.4% in witnessed VF/VT. Outcome analysis showed that a discharge rate in witnessed primary cardiac arrest was 30% in prehospital resuscitation which was 7.5 times higher than in-hospital emergency room resuscitation groups (4.0%). The longer the interval between an emergency telephone call and defibrillation, the lower the 1 month survival rate, which reached almost 0% at 30 min. Follow up evaluation after discharge revealed that the survival rate rapidly decreased from 24 h to 3 months, then became a plateau in primary cardiac patients was rapidly decreased from 24 h to 1 month, then became a near plateau in non-cardiac origin group. To improve the resuscitation rate in the prehospital phase, a prehospital medical control system should be developed with expansion of on scene techniques by Japanese paramedics such as tracheal intubation, administration of emergency drugs and early defibrillation with standing orders. Education and motivation of first responders will be needed and every effort should be concentrated on improving bystander CPR rate. PMID:12458060

  19. Does Pre-hospital Endotracheal Intubation Improve Survival in Adults with Non-traumatic Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest? A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tiah, Ling; Kajino, Kentaro; Alsakaf, Omer; Bautista, Dianne Carrol Tan; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Lie, Desiree; Naroo, Ghulam Yasin; Doctor, Nausheen Edwin; Chia, Michael YC; Gan, Han Nee

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Endotracheal intubation (ETI) is currently considered superior to supraglottic airway devices (SGA) for survival and other outcomes among adults with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to determine if the research supports this conclusion by conducting a systematic review. Methods We searched the MEDLINE, Scopus and CINAHL databases for studies published between January 1, 1980, and 30 April 30, 2013, which compared pre-hospital use of ETI with SGA for ...

  20. Mortality and neurological outcome in the elderly after target temperature management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael; Koopmans, Matty; Hassager, Christian; Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; Cronberg, Tobias; Erlinge, David; Friberg, Hans; Gasche, Yvan; Horn, Janneke; Hovdenes, Jan; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wise, Matthew P; Åneman, Anders; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess older age as a prognostic factor in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest (OHCA) and the interaction between age and level of target temperature management. METHODS AND RESULTS: 950 patients included in the target temperature management (TTM) trial were randomly...... allocated to TTM at 33 or 36 °C for 24h. We assessed survival and cerebral outcome (cerebral performance category, CPC and modified Rankin scale, mRS) using age as predictor, dividing patients into 5 age groups: ≤ 65 (median), 66-70, 71-75, 76-80 and >80 years of age. Shockable rhythm decreased with higher...

  1. Eccentric apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy unmasked by multimodality imaging: an uncommon but missed cause of out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towe, Eric; Sharma, Saurabh; Geske, Jeffrey; Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A woman in her late 50s experienced a witnessed, sudden out of hospital cardiac arrest. Initial workup included coronary angiography, transthoracic echocardiogram and a CT scan of the chest to rule out pulmonary embolus. She was subsequently discharged home without an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or a life vest. On follow-up at another facility, an ICD was placed and a Holter monitor showed no ventricular ectopy. Further transthoracic echocardiographic images were obtained, which were suggestive of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A limited transthoracic echocardiogram with contrast was performed, which did not elucidate the hypertrophy. However, eccentric left ventricular apical wall hypertrophy was visualised by a coronary CT scan. PMID:26153133

  2. Post resuscitation care of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in the Nordic countries: a questionnaire study

    OpenAIRE

    Saarinen, Sini; Castrén, Maaret; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Background Aim of this study was to compare post resuscitation care of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients in Nordic (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden) intensive care units (ICUs). Methods An online questionnaire was sent to Nordic ICUs in 2012 and was complemented by an additional one in 2014. Results The first questionnaire was sent to 188 and the second one to 184 ICUs. Response rates were 51 % and 46 %. In 2012, 37 % of the ICUs treated all patients resuscitated from O...

  3. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests and Outdoor Air Pollution Exposure in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmann, Janine; Folke, Fredrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias; Lippert, Freddy; Ketzel, Matthias; Ellermann, Thomas; Loft, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally and air pollution can be a contributing cause. Acute myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest are frequent manifestations of coronary heart disease. The objectives of the study were to investigate the association between 4 657 out...... of the hourly lags of any of the pollutants were significantly associated with OHCA events. The strongest association with OHCA events was observed for the daily lag4 of PM2.5, lag3 of PM10, lag3 of PM10-2.5, lag3 of NOx and lag4 of CO. An IQR increase of PM2.5 and PM10 was associated with a...... significant increase of 4% (95% CI: 0%; 9%) and 5% (95% CI: 1%; 9%) in OHCA events with 3 days lag, respectively. None of the other daily lags or other pollutants was significantly associated with OHCA events. Adjustment for O3 slightly increased the association between OHCA and PM2.5 and PM10. No susceptible...

  4. Advanced life support therapy and on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: Applying signal processing and pattern recognition methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve Eftestøl

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In the US alone, several hundred thousands die of sudden cardiac arrests each year. Basic life support defined as chest compressions and ventilations and early defibrillation are the only factors proven to increase the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and are key elements in the chain of survival defined by the American Heart Association. The current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines treat all patients the same, but studies show need for more individualiza- tion of treatment. This review will focus on ideas on how to strengthen the weak parts of the chain of survival including the ability to measure the effects of therapy, improve time efficiency, and optimize the sequence and quality of the various components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  5. Regional variation and outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (ohca in Finland the Finnresusci study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiltunen Pamela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the efforts of the modern Emergency Medical Service Systems (EMS, survival rates for sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA have been poor as approximately 10% of OHCA patients survive hospital discharge. Many aspects of OHCA have been studied, but few previous reports on OHCA have documented the variation between different sizes of study areas on a regional scale. The aim of this study was to report the incidence, outcomes and regional variation of OHCA in the Finnish population. Methods From March 1st to August 31st, 2010, data on all OHCA patients in the southern, central and eastern parts of Finland was collected. Data collection was initiated via dispatch centres whenever there was a suspected OHCA case or if a patient developed OHCA before arriving at the hospital. The study area includes 49% of the Finnish population; they are served by eight dispatch centres, two university hospitals and six central hospitals. Results The study period included 1042 cases of OHCA. Resuscitation was attempted on 671 patients (64.4%, an incidence of 51/100,000 inhabitants/year. The initial rhythm was shockable for 211 patients (31.4%. The survival rate at one-year post-OHCA was 13.4%. Of the witnessed OHCA events with a shockable rhythm of presumed cardiac origin (n=140, 64 patients (45.7% were alive at hospital discharge and 47 (33.6% were still living one year hence. Surviving until hospital admission was more likely if the OHCA occurred in an urban municipality (41.5%, p=0.001. Conclusions The results of this comprehensive regional study of OHCA in Finland seem comparable to those previously reported in other countries. The survival of witnessed OHCA events with shockable initial rhythms has improved in urban Finland in recent decades.

  6. Is the pre-hospital ECG after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest accurate for the diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salam, Idrees; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Langkjær, Sandra; Søholm, Helle; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Bang, Lia; Holmvang, Lene; Erlinge, David; Wanscher, Michael; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    -hospital ROSC-ECG in predicting ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). METHOD: ROSC-ECGs of 145 comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, randomly assigned in the Target Temperature Management trial, were classified according to the current STEMI ECG criteria (third universal definition of...... myocardial infarction). RESULTS: STEs were present in the pre-hospital ROSC-ECG of 78 (54%) patients. A final diagnosis revealed that 69 (48%) patients had STEMI, 31 (21%) patients had non-STEMI and 45 (31%) patients had no myocardial infarction. STE in ROSC-ECGs had a sensitivity of 74% (95% confidence...

  7. Peri-shock pause: an independent predictor of survival from out-of-hospital shockable cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheskes, Sheldon; Schmicker, Robert H.; Christenson, Jim; Salcido, David D.; Rea, Tom; Powell, Judy; Edelson, Dana P.; Sell, Rebecca; May, Susanne; Menegazzi, James J.; Van Ottingham, Lois; Olsufka, Michele; Pennington, Sarah; Simonini, Jacob; Berg, Robert A.; Stiell, Ian; Idris, Ahamed; Bigham, Blair; Morrison, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Peri-shock pauses are pauses in chest compressions prior to and following defibrillatory shock. We examined the relationship between peri-shock pauses and survival to hospital discharge. METHODS We included out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Epistry-Cardiac Arrest who suffered arrest between December 2005 and June 2007, presented with a shockable rhythm (ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia) and had CPR process data for at least one shock (n=815). We used multivariable logistic regression to determine the association between survival and peri-shock pauses. RESULTS In an analysis adjusted for Utstein predictors of survival, the odds of survival were significantly lower for patients with pre-shock pause ≥20 seconds (OR: 0.47, 95%CI: 0.27, 0.82) and peri-shock pause ≥40 seconds (OR: 0.54, 95%CI: 0.31, 0.97) when compared to patients with pre-shock pause <10 seconds and peri-shock pause <20 seconds. Post-shock pause was not independently associated with a significant change in the odds of survival. Log linear modeling depicted a decrease in survival to hospital discharge of 18% and 14% for every 5 second increase in both pre- and peri-shock pause interval (up to 40 and 50 seconds respectively) with no significant association noted with changes in the post-shock pause interval. CONCLUSIONS In patients with cardiac arrest presenting in a shockable rhythm longer peri-shock and pre-shock pauses were independently associated with a decrease in survival to hospital discharge. The impact of pre-shock pause on survival suggests refinement of automatic defibrillator software and paramedic education to minimize pre-shock pause delays may have significant impact on survival. PMID:21690495

  8. Systematic downloading and analysis of data from automated external defibrillators used in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Nielsen, Anne Møller

    2014-01-01

    be witnessed (92% vs. 34%, p<0.0001) and the bystander CPR rate was higher (98% vs. 85%, p=0.04). More patients with initial shockable rhythm achieved return of spontaneous circulation upon hospital arrival (88% vs. 7%, p<0.0001) and had higher 30-day survival rate (72% vs. 5%, p<0.0001). CONCLUSION......BACKGROUND: Valuable information can be retrieved from automated external defibrillators (AEDs) used in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We describe our experience with systematic downloading of data from deployed AEDs. The primary aim was to compare the proportion of shockable...... rhythm from AEDs used by laypersons with the corresponding proportion recorded by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) on arrival. METHODS: In a 20-month study, we collected data on OHCAs in the Capital Region of Denmark where an AED was deployed prior to arrival of EMS. The AEDs were brought to the...

  9. Resuscitation and post resuscitation care of the very old after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is worthwhile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Nielsen, Niklas; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Wanscher, Michael; Søholm, Helle

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. As comorbidity and frailty increase with age; ethical dilemmas may arise when OHCA occur in the very old. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate mortality, neurological outcome and post resuscitation care in...... octogenarians (≥80) to assess whether resuscitation and post resuscitation care should be avoided. METHODS: During 2007-2011 consecutive OHCA-patients were attended by the physician-based Emergency Medical Services-system in Copenhagen. Pre-hospital data based on Utstein-criteria, and data on post resuscitation...... care were collected. Primary outcome was successful resuscitation; secondary endpoints were 30-day mortality and neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category (CPC)). RESULTS: 2509 OHCA-patients with attempted resuscitation were recorded, 22% (n=558) were octogenarians/nonagenarians. 166 (30% of...

  10. Neurologic Recovery Following Prolonged Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest With Resuscitation Guided by Continuous Capnography

    OpenAIRE

    White, Roger D.; Goodman, Bruce W.; Svoboda, Mary A.

    2011-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with no known cardiac disease collapsed outdoors in a small rural community. The cardiac arrest was witnessed, and immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation was begun by a bystander and a trained first responder who was nearby. The patient was moved into a building across the street for continued resuscitation. First responders arrived with an automated external defibrillator, and ventricular fibrillation was documented. First responders delivered 6 defibrillation shocks, 4 of...

  11. Out-of hospital cardiac arrest in Okayama city (Japan: outcome report according to the "Utsutein Style".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi,Hoei

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in the city of Okayama, Japan, during a 1-year period after the reorganization of defibrillation by Emergency Life-Saving Technicians (ELSTs with standing orders of CPR. The data were collected prospectively according to an Utstein style between June 1, 2003 and May 31, 2004; OHCA was confirmed in 363 patients. Cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac etiology (179 was witnessed by a bystander in 62 (34.6% cases. Of this group, ventricular fibrillation (VF was documented in 20 cases (32.3%, and 1 patient (5% was discharged alive without severe neurological disability. This outcome is average in Japan, but it is quite low level compared with Western countries because there is less VF in Japan. The Utstein style revealed that we must try to detect VF before the rhythm changes and to provide defibrillation as soon as possible in order to improve outcomes. Further research will be required to accurately evaluate OHCA in Okayama city.

  12. Assessment of the Efficacy of Pulsed Biphasic Defibrillation Shocks for Treatment of Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Didon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the efficacy of a Pulsed Biphasic Waveform (PBW for treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA patients in ventricular fibrillation (VF. Large database (2001-2006, collected with automated external defibrillators (AED, (FRED®, Schiller Medical SAS, France, is processed.In Study1 we compared the defibrillation efficacy of two energy stacks (90-130-180 J vs. (130-130-180 J in 248 OHCA VF patients. The analysis of the first shock PBW efficacy proves that energies as low as 90 J are able to terminate VF in a large proportion of OHCA patients (77% at 5 s and 69% at 30 s. Although the results show a trend towards the benefit of higher energy PBW with 130 J (86% at 5 s, 73% at 30 s, the difference in shock efficacy does not reach statistical significance. Both PBW energy stacks (90-130-180 J and (130-130-180 J achieve equal success rates of defibrillation. Analysis of the post-shock rhythm after the first shock is also provided.For Study2 of 21 patients with PBW shocks (130-130-180 J, we assessed some attending OHCA circumstances: call-to-shock delay (median 16min, range 11-41 min, phone advices of CPR (67%. About 50% of the patients were admitted alive to hospital, and 19% were discharged from hospital. After the first shock, patients admitted to hospital are more often presenting organized rhythm (OR (27% to 55% than patients not admitted (0% to 10%, with significant difference at 15 s and 30 s. Post-shock VFs appear significantly rare until 15s for patients admitted to hospital (0% to 9% than for patients not admitted to hospital (40% to 50%. Return of OR (ROOR and efficacy to defibrillate VF at 5 s and 15 s with first shock are important markers to predict patient admission to hospital.

  13. Near-death experiences and electrocardiogram patterns in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZALIKA KLEMENC-KETIS

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the effect of several factors, that are a part of cardiac arrest and resuscitation, on the incidence of neardeath experiences (NDEs. Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study in the three largest hospitals in Slovenia in a consecutive sample of patients after out-of-hospital primary cardiac arrest. The presence of NDE was assessed with the self-administered Greyson’s near-death experiences scale. The electrocardiogram pattern at the beginning of resuscitation was recorded. Main outcome measure was the presence of near-death experiences. Univariate analysis was used. Results. The study included 52 patients. There were 42 (80.8% males in the sample; median age ± standard deviation of the patients was 53.1 ± 14.5 years. Near-death experiences were reported by 11 (21.2% patients. Patients with ventricular fibrillation had significantly less NDEs than other patients (12.2% vs. 54.5%, P = 0.006. Patients with pulseless electrical activity had significantly more NDEs than others (60.0% vs. 11.9%, P = 0.003. Patients with asystole and pulseless electrical fibrillation had significantly more NDEs than patients who had ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia (60.0% vs. 11.9%, P = 0.003. Patients with at least one defibrillation attempt had significantly less near-death experiences than others (62.5% vs. 13.6%, P = 0.007. Conclusion. Our study found a possible correlation between electrocardiogram pattern in cardiac arrest patients and the incidence of near-death experiences. Further studies should address this problem in larger samples.

  14. High resolution ECG-aided early prognostic model for comatose survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauber, Martin; Štajer, Dušan; Noč, Marko; Schlegel, Todd T; Starc, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a high mortality despite modern treatment. Reliable early prognosis in OHCA could significantly improve clinical decision making. We explored prognostic utility of advanced ECG parameters, obtained from high-resolution ECG, in combination with clinical and OHCA-related parameters during treatment with mild induced hypothermia (MIH) and after rewarming in unconscious survivors of OHCA. Ninety-two patients during MIH and 66 after rewarming were included. During MIH, a score based on initial rhythm, QRS-upslope and systolic pressure resulted in an area under curve (AUC) of 0.82 and accuracy of 80% for survival. After rewarming, a score based on admission rhythm, sum of 12 lead QRS voltages, and mean lateral ST segment level in leads I and V6 resulted in an AUC of 0.88 and accuracy of 85% for survival. ECG can assist with early prognostication in unconscious survivors of OHCA during MIH and after rewarming. PMID:25911585

  15. Trends in Outcomes for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest by Age in Japan: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Matsubara, Takehiro; Doi, Kent; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu; Yahagi, Naoki

    2015-12-01

    Population aging has rapidly advanced throughout the world and the elderly accounting for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has increased yearly.We identified all adults who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the All-Japan Utstein Registry of the Fire and Disaster Management Agency, a prospective, population-based clinical registry, between 2005 and 2010. Using multivariable regression, we examined temporal trends in outcomes for OHCA patients by age, as well as the influence of advanced age on outcomes. The primary outcome was a favorable neurological outcome at 1 month after OHCA.Among 605,505 patients, 454,755 (75.1%) were the elderly (?65 years), and 154,785 (25.6%) were the oldest old (?85 years). Although neurological outcomes were worse as the age group was older (P?

  16. Association of National Initiatives to Improve Cardiac Arrest Management With Rates of Bystander Intervention and Patient Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K; Folke, Fredrik; Weeke, Peter; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Jans, Henning; Hansen, Poul Anders; Lang-Jensen, Torsten; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Fosbol, Emil L; Nielsen, Søren L; Gislason, Gunnar H; Kober, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major health problem associated with poor outcomes. Early recognition and intervention are critical for patient survival. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is one factor among many associated with improved survival. OBJECTIVE To examine...... = 2253), leaving a study population of 19 468 patients. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Temporal trends in bystander CPR, bystander defibrillation, 30-day survival, and 1-year survival. RESULTS The median age of patients was 72 years; 67.4% were men. Bystander CPR increased significantly during the study...

  17. Time-differentiated target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Hans; Rasmussen, Bodil S; de Haas, Inge; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk; Ilkjær, Susanne; Kaltoft, Anne; Jeppesen, Anni Nørregaard; Grejs, Anders; Duez, Christophe Henri Valdemar; Larsen, Alf Inge; Pettilä, Ville; Toome, Valdo; Arus, Urmet; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Storm, Christian; Skrifvars, Markus B; Søreide, Eldar

    2016-01-01

    treatment allocation and dichotomised to good (CPC 1-2) or poor (CPC 3-5) outcome. Secondary outcomes are: 6-month mortality, incidence of infection, bleeding and organ failure and CPC at hospital discharge, at day 28 and at day 90 following OHCA. Assuming that 50 % of the patients treated for 24 hours will...

  18. Predict Defibrillation Outcome Using Stepping Increment of Poincare Plot for Out-of-Hospital Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yushun; Lu, Yubao; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hehua; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation together with early defibrillation is a key point in the chain of survival for cardiac arrest. Optimizing the timing of defibrillation by predicting the possibility of successful electric shock can guide treatments between defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation and improve the rate of restoration of spontaneous circulation. Numerous methods have been proposed for predicting defibrillation success based on quantification of the ventricular fibrillation waveform during past decades. To date, however, no analytical technique has been widely accepted for clinical application. In the present study, we investigate whether median stepping increment that is calculated from the Euclidean distance of consecutive points in Poincare plot could be used to predict the likelihood of successful defibrillation. Electrocardiographic recordings of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients were obtained from the external defibrillators. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curve and compared with the results of other established features. The results indicated that median stepping increment has comparable performance to the established methods in predicting the likelihood of successful defibrillation. PMID:26413527

  19. Adverse events associated with poor neurological outcome during targeted temperature management and advanced critical care after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young-Min; Youn, Chun Song; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Byung Kook; Cho, In Soo; Cho, Gyu Chong; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Oh, Sang Hoon; Choi, Seung Pill; Shin, Jong Hwan; Cha, Kyoung-Chul; Oh, Joo Suk; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Park, Kyu Nam; ,

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the association of adverse events (AEs) during targeted temperature management (TTM) and other AEs and concomitant treatments during the advanced critical care period with poor neurological outcome at hospital discharge in adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Methods This was a retrospective study using Korean Hypothermia Network registry data of adult OHCA patients treated with TTM in 24 teaching hospitals throughout Sout...

  20. Incidence of Re-arrest after Return of Spontaneous Circulation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcido, David D.; Stephenson, Amanda M.; Condle, Joseph P.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) occurs in approximately 30% of EMS-treated out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA), however not all patients achieving ROSC survive to hospital arrival or discharge. The incidence of re-arrest (RA) before reaching the hospital is unknown, and the ECG waveform characteristics of prehospital RA rhythms have not been previously described. OBJECTIVES We sought to determine the incidence of RA in OHCA, to classify RA events by type, and to measure the time from ROSC to RA. We also conducted a preliminary analysis of the relationship between first EMS-detected rhythms and RA, as well as the effect of RA on survival. METHODS The Pittsburgh Regional Clinical Center of the NHLBI-sponsored Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) provided cases from a population-based cardiac arrest surveillance program, ROC Epistry. Only OHCA cases of non-traumatic etiology with available and adequate ECG files were included. We analyzed defibrillator-monitor ECG tracings (Philips MRX), patient care reports (PCR) and defibrillator audio recordings from EMS-treated cases of OHCA spanning the period 2006 – 2008. We identified ROSC and RA through interpretation of ECG traces and audio recordings. RA events were categorized as ventricular fibrillation (VF), pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT), asystole, and pulseless electrical activity (PEA) based on ECG waveform characteristics. Proportions of RA rhythms were stratified by first EMS rhythm and compared using Pearson’s Chi Square test. Logistic regression was used to test the predictive relationship between RA and survival to hospital discharge. RESULTS ROSC occurred in 329/1199 patients (27.4% {95% CI: 25.0–30.0}) treated for CA. Of these, 113 had ECG tracings that were available and adequate for analysis. RA occurred in 41 patients (36.0%, {95% CI: 26–46%}), with a total of 69 RA events. Survival to hospital discharge in RA cases was 23.1% (11.1–39.3) compared to 27.8% (17.9–39.6) in cases without RA. RA event counts by type were: 17 VF (24.6%, {95% CI: 15.2–36.5%}), 20 pulseless VT (29.0%, {95% CI: 18.7–41.2%}), 26 PEA (37%, {95% CI: 26.3–50.2%}), and 6 asystole (8.8%, {95% CI: 3.3–18.0%}). RA was not predictive of survival to hospital discharge, however initial EMS rhythm was predictive of RA shockability. The overall median time from ROSC to RA among all events was 3.1 (1.6–6.3) minutes. CONCLUSION In this sample, the incidence of RA was 38%. Of cases experiencing RA 54% survived to hospital arrival. A time window on the order of minutes may be available for intervention prior to RA. PMID:20809686

  1. Mild therapeutic hypothermia shortens intensive care unit stay of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest compared to historical controls

    OpenAIRE

    Storm, Christian; Steffen, Ingo; Schefold, Joerg C.; Krueger, Anne; Oppert, Michael; Jörres, Achim; Hasper, Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Persistent coma is a common finding after cardiac arrest and has profound ethical and economic implications. Evidence suggests that therapeutic hypothermia improves neurological outcome in these patients. In this analysis, we investigate whether therapeutic hypothermia influences the length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and ventilator time in patients surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods A prospective observational study with historical controls was conducted at ...

  2. The effect of carbon dioxide on near-death experiences in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors: a prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko; Grmec, Stefek

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Near-death experiences (NDEs) are reported by 11-23% of cardiac arrest survivors. Several theories concerning the mechanisms of NDEs exist - including physical, psychological, and transcendental reasons - but so far none of these has satisfactorily explained this phenomenon. In this study, we investigated the effect of partial pressures of O2 and CO2, and serum levels of Na and K on the occurrence of NDEs in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors. Methods A prospective observat...

  3. Survival and Neurologic Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients Who Were Transferred after Return of Spontaneous Circulation for Integrated Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome Care: The Another Feasibility of the Cardiac Arrest Center

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Mun Ju; Lee, Tae Rim; Shin, Tae Gun; Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Keun Jeong; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2014-01-01

    It has been proven that safety and efficiency of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients is transported to specialized hospitals that have the capability of performing therapeutic hypothermia (TH). However, the outcome of the patients who have been transferred after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) has not been well evaluated. We conducted a retrospective observational study between January 2010 to March 2012. There were primary outcomes as good neurofunctional status at 1 mont...

  4. Hospital costs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated in intensive care; a single centre evaluation using the national tariff-based system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, J; Easton, S; Naik, V; Lockie, C; Brett, S J; Stümpfle, R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is a scarcity of literature reporting hospital costs for treating out of hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) survivors, especially within the UK. This is essential for assessment of cost-effectiveness of interventions necessary to allow just allocation of resources within the National Health Service. We set out primarily to calculate costs stratified against hospital survival and neurological outcomes. Secondarily, we estimated cost effectiveness based on estimates of survival and utility from previous studies to calculate costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Setting We performed a single centre (London) retrospective review of in-hospital costs of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after OOHCA over 18 months from January 2011 (following widespread introduction of targeted temperature management and primary percutaneous intervention). Participants Of 69 successive patients admitted over an 18-month period, survival and cerebral performance category (CPC) outcomes were obtained from review of databases and clinical notes. The Trust finance department supplied ICU and hospital costs using the Payment by Results UK system. Results Of those patients with ROSC admitted to ICU, survival to hospital discharge (any CPC) was 33/69 (48%) with 26/33 survivors in CPC 1–2 at hospital discharge. Cost per survivor to hospital discharge (including total cost of survivors and non-survivors) was £50 000, cost per CPC 1–2 survivor was £65 000. Cost and length of stay of CPC 1–2 patients was considerably lower than CPC 3–4 patients. The majority of the costs (69%) related to intensive care. Estimated cost per CPC 1–2 survivor per QALY was £16 000. Conclusions The costs of in-hospital patient care for ICU admissions following ROSC after OOHCA are considerable but within a reasonable threshold when assessed from a QALY perspective. PMID:25838503

  5. Sinus bradycardia during hypothermia in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - a new early marker of favorable outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Sholm, Helle; Nielsen, Niklas; Wanscher, Michael; Kber, Lars; Pehrson, Steen; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bradycardia is a common finding in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), presumably as a normal physiological response to low body temperature. We hypothesized that a normal physiological response with sinus bradycardia (SB...

  6. Target Temperature Management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--a randomized, parallel-group, assessor-blinded clinical trial--rationale and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; al-Subaie, Nawaf; Andersson, Bertil; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Bishop, Gillian; Brunetti, Iole; Cranshaw, Julius; Cronberg, Tobias; Edqvist, Kristin; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Glover, Guy; Hassager, Christian; Horn, Janneke; Hovdenes, Jan; Johnsson, Jesper; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Langørgen, Jørund; Macken, Lewis; Martinell, Louise; Martner, Patrik; Pellis, Thomas; Pelosi, Paolo; Petersen, Per Erik; Persson, Stefan; Rundgren, Malin; Saxena, Manoj; Svensson, Robert; Stammet, Pascal; Thorén, Anders; Undén, Johan; Walden, Andrew; Wallskog, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael; Wise, Matthew P; Wyon, Nicholas; Aneman, Anders; Friberg, Hans

    2012-01-01

    from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A systematic review indicates that the evidence for recommending this intervention is inconclusive, and the GRADE level of evidence is low. Previous trials were small, with high risk of bias, evaluated select populations, and did not treat hyperthermia in the...

  7. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions--a nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Clemmensen, Peter; Olivecrona, Göran K; Hansen, Troels Martin; Trautner, Sven; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2011-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...

  8. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions-A nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Clemmensen, Peter; Olivecrona, Göran K; Hansen, Troels Martin; Trautner, Sven; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2010-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...

  9. The effect of targeted temperature management on coagulation parameters and bleeding events after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Marrit; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Wanscher, Michael; Johansson, Pär I; Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjærgaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Targeted temperature management (TTM) is part of the standard treatment of comatose patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) to attenuate neurological injury. In other clinical settings, hypothermia promotes coagulopathy leading to an increase in bleeding and thrombosis tendency......, thrombelastography (TEG), bleeding, and stent thrombosis events. Platelet counts were lower in the TTM33-group compared toTTM36 (p=0.009), but neither standard coagulation nor TEG-parameters showed any difference between the groups. TEG revealed a normocoagulable state in the majority of patients, while...... approximately 20% of the population presented as hypercoagulable. Adverse events included 38 bleeding events, one stent thrombosis, and one reinfarction, with no significant difference between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence supporting the assumption that TTM at 33°C was associated with impaired...

  10. Cognitive Function in Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest After Target Temperature Management at 33ºC Versus 36ºC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, Gisela; Nielsen, Niklas; Friberg, Hans; Horn, Janneke; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Nilsson, Lars Anders Fredrik; Pellis, Tommaso; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P; Bosch, Frank; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Brunetti, Iole; Forti Buratti, Azul; Hassager, Christian; Hofgren, Caisa; Insorsi, Angelo; Kuiper, Michael; Martini, Alice; Palmer, Nicki; Rundgren, Malin; Rylander, Christian; van der Veen, Annelou; Wanscher, Michael; Watkins, Helen; Cronberg, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    performed the same assessments. Half of the cardiac arrest survivors had cognitive impairment, which was mostly mild. Cognitive outcome did not differ (p >0.30) between the two temperature groups (33ºC/36ºC). Compared to STEMI-controls attention/mental speed was more affected among cardiac arrest patients......BACKGROUND: -Target temperature management is recommended as a neuro-protective strategy after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Potential effects of different target temperatures on cognitive impairment commonly described in survivors are not sufficiently investigated. The primary aim of this study...... was to evaluate whether a target temperature of 33ºC compared to 36ºC was favourable for cognitive function, and secondary to describe cognitive impairment in cardiac arrest survivors in general. METHODS AND RESULTS: -Study-sites included 652 cardiac arrest survivors originally randomized and...

  11. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Potential Prognostic Implications After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Substudy of the Target Temperature Management Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael; Nielsen, Niklas; Friberg, Hans; Bjerre, Mette; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    arrest treated with targeted temperature management. DESIGN: Post hoc analysis. SETTING: Single-center study of a prospective multicenter randomized study. PATIENTS: One hundred sixty-nine patients (99%) with available blood samples out of 171 patients included in the Target Temperature Management trial......, randomly assigning patients to targeted temperature management at 33°C or 36°C. INTERVENTION: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: At baseline and 24, 48, and 72 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, blood samples were obtained and screened for a battery of inflammatory markers. Level of interleukin...... interactions between targeted temperature management group and levels of interleukin-6 (p=0.25) or procalcitonin (p=0.85). None of the other inflammatory markers were independently associated with mortality. Area under the curve for procalcitonin and interleukin-6, 24 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest...

  12. Temporal trends in survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients with and without underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sidsel G; Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Hansen, Steen Møller; Kragholm, Kristian; Lippert, Freddy K; Karlsson, Lena; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar H; Wissenberg, Mads

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has tripled during the past decade in Denmark as a likely result of improvements in cardiac arrest management. This study analyzed whether these improvements were applicable for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD...... hospital arrival increased in both patient-groups (from 6.8% to 17.1% in COPD patients and from 8.2% to 25.6% in non-COPD patients, p<0.001). However, no significant change was observed in 30-day survival in COPD patients (from 3.7% to 2.1%, p=0.27), in contrast to non-COPD patients (from 3.5% to 13.0%, p...

  13. Sex and Age Aspects in Patients Suffering From Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Retrospective Analysis of 760 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegeler, Tobias; Thoeni, Nils; Kaserer, Alexander; Brueesch, Martin; Sulser, Simon; Mueller, Stefan M; Seifert, Burkhardt; Spahn, Donat R; Ruetzler, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is indicated in patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Several studies suggest a sex- and age-based bias in the treatment of these patients. This particular bias may have a significant impact on the patient's outcome. However, the reasons for these findings are still unclear and discussed controversially. Therefore, the aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze treatment and out-of-hospital survival rates for potential sex- and age-based differences in patients requiring out-of-hospital CPR provided by an emergency physician in the city of Zurich, Switzerland.A total of 3961 consecutive patients (2003-2009) were included in this retrospective analysis to determine the frequency of out-of-hospital CPR and prehospital survival rate, and to identify potential sex- and age-based differences regarding survival and treatment of the patients.Seven hundred fifty-seven patients required CPR during the study period. Seventeen patients had to be excluded because of incomplete or inconclusive documentation, resulting in 743 patients (511 males, 229 females) undergoing further statistical analysis. Female patients were significantly older, compared with male patients (68 ± 18 [mean ± SD] vs 64 ± 18 years, P = .012). Men were resuscitated slightly more often than women (86.4% vs 82.1%). Overall out-of-hospital mortality rate was found to be 81.2% (492/632 patients) with no differences between sexes (82.1% for males vs 79% for females, odds ratio 1.039, 95% confidence interval 0.961-1.123). No sex differences were detected in out-of-hospital treatment, as assessed by the different medications administered, initial prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale, and prehospital suspected leading diagnosis.The data of our study demonstrate that there was no sex-based bias in treating patients requiring CPR in the prehospital setting in our physician-led emergency ambulance service. PMID:27149475

  14. The impact of peri-shock pause on survival from out-of-hospital shockable cardiac arrest during the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium PRIMED trial☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheskes, Sheldon; Schmicker, Robert H.; Verbeek, P. Richard; Salcido, David D.; Brown, Siobhan P.; Brooks, Steven; Menegazzi, James J.; Vaillancourt, Christian; Powell, Judy; May, Susanne; Berg, Robert A.; Sell, Rebecca; Idris, Ahamed; Kampp, Mike; Schmidt, Terri; Christenson, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research has demonstrated significant relationships between peri-shock pause and survival to discharge from out-of-hospital shockable cardiac arrest (OHCA). Objective To determine the impact of peri-shock pause on survival from OHCA during the ROC PRIMED randomized controlled trial. Methods We included patients in the ROC PRIMED trial who suffered OHCA between June 2007 and November 2009, presented with a shockable rhythm and had CPR process data for at least one shock. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine the association between peri-shock pause duration and survival to hospital discharge. Results Among 2006 patients studied, the median (IQR) shock pause duration was: pre-shock pause 15 s (8, 22); post-shock pause 6 s (4, 9); and peri-shock pause 22.0 s (14, 31). After adjusting for Utstein predictors of survival as well as CPR quality measures, the odds of survival to hospital discharge were significantly higher for patients with pre-shock pause <10 s (OR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.09, 2.11) and peri-shock pause <20 s (OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.17, 2.85) when compared to patients with pre-shock pause ≥20 s and peri-shock pause ≥40 s. Post-shock pause was not significantly associated with survival to hospital discharge. Results for neurologically intact survival (Modified Rankin Score ≤ 3) were similar to our primary outcome. Conclusions In patients with cardiac arrest presenting in a shockable rhythm during the ROC PRIMED trial, shorter pre- and peri-shock pauses were significantly associated with higher odds of survival. Future cardiopulmonary education and technology should focus on minimizing all peri-shock pauses. PMID:24513129

  15. Detailed statistical analysis plan for the target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Winkel, Per; Cronberg, Tobias; Erlinge, David; Friberg, Hans; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Horn, Janneke; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wise, Matt P; Aneman, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn

    , and did not treat hyperthermia in the control groups. The optimal target temperature management (TTM) strategy is not known. To prevent outcome reporting bias, selective reporting and data-driven results, we present the a priori defined detailed statistical analysis plan as an update to the previously......Animal experimental studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurological function with temperature regulation to hypothermia after cardiac arrest. According to a systematic review, previous trials were small, had a risk of bias, evaluated select populations...

  16. Twenty-four-hour pattern in French firemen of lag time response to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and work-related injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touitou, Yvan; Reinberg, Alain; Smolensky, Michael H; Riedel, Marc; Mauvieux, Benoit; Brousse, Eric; Marlot, Michel; Berrez, Stephane

    2014-05-01

    Circadian cognitive and physical rhythms plus 24 h patterns of accidents and work-related injuries (WRI) have been verified in numerous studies. However, rarely, if ever, have 24 h temporal differences in both work performance and risk of WRI been assessed in the same group of workers. We explored in a homogenous group of French firemen (FM) 24 h patterns of both lag time (LT) response duration to emergency calls for medical help (ECFM) for life-threatening out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA), used as a non-specific index of work performance, and WRI. Our studies demonstrate rather high amplitude statistically significant 24 h patterns of the two variables. The LT response duration was twice as long -0500 h (slowest response) than -1600 h (fastest response). In the same group of FM, the actual number WRI/h was greatest -1600 h and lowest in the early morning hours. However, the 24 h pattern of the relative risk (RR) of WRIs, i.e., per clock hour number of WRI/(total number of responses to emergency calls x number of FM at risk per response), was very different, the RR being greatest -0200 h and lowest in the afternoon. The 24 h pattern in LT response duration to ECMH for OHCA and RR of WRI was strongly correlated (r = +0.85, P improve the nocturnal compromised work performance and elevated risk of WRI of shift-working FM. PMID:24851404

  17. Development of the probability of return of spontaneous circulation in intervals without chest compressions during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steen Petter

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the factors that limits survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is the interruption of chest compressions. During ventricular fibrillation and tachycardia the electrocardiogram reflects the probability of return of spontaneous circulation associated with defibrillation. We have used this in the current study to quantify in detail the effects of interrupting chest compressions. Methods From an electrocardiogram database we identified all intervals without chest compressions that followed an interval with compressions, and where the patients had ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia. By calculating the mean-slope (a predictor of the return of spontaneous circulation of the electrocardiogram for each 2-second window, and using a linear mixed-effects statistical model, we quantified the decline of mean-slope with time. Further, a mapping from mean-slope to probability of return of spontaneous circulation was obtained from a second dataset and using this we were able to estimate the expected development of the probability of return of spontaneous circulation for cases at different levels. Results From 911 intervals without chest compressions, 5138 analysis windows were identified. The results show that cases with the probability of return of spontaneous circulation values 0.35, 0.1 and 0.05, 3 seconds into an interval in the mean will have probability of return of spontaneous circulation values 0.26 (0.24–0.29, 0.077 (0.070–0.085 and 0.040(0.036–0.045, respectively, 27 seconds into the interval (95% confidence intervals in parenthesis. Conclusion During pre-shock pauses in chest compressions mean probability of return of spontaneous circulation decreases in a steady manner for cases at all initial levels. Regardless of initial level there is a relative decrease in the probability of return of spontaneous circulation of about 23% from 3 to 27 seconds into such a pause.

  18. Impact of time to return of spontaneous circulation on neuroprotective effect of targeted temperature management at 33 or 36 degrees in comatose survivors of out-of hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Nielsen, Niklas; Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Wanscher, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael; Hartvig Thomsen, Jakob; Wetterslev, Jørn; Cronberg, Tobias; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Erlinge, David; Friberg, Hans; Søholm, Helle; Gasche, Yvan; Horn, Janneke; Hovdenes, Jan; Stammet, Pascal; Wise, Matthew P; Åneman, Anders; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Time to Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC) has a plausible relation to severity of hypoxic injury before and during resuscitation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA), and has consistently been associated with adverse outcome. The effect of Targeted Temperature Management (TTM) may......, level of TTM and mortality and neurological outcome as assessed by the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scale and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) after 180 days. RESULTS: Prolonged time to ROSC was significantly associated with increased mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.02 per minute (95% CI 1...

  19. Target temperature management of 33°C and 36°C in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with initial non-shockable rhythm - A TTM sub-study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Erlinge, David; Wanscher, Michael; Nielsen, Niklas; Pellis, Tommaso; Åneman, Anders; Friberg, Hans; Hovdenes, Jan; Horn, Janneke; Wetterslev, Jørn; Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Wise, Matthew P; Kuiper, Michael; Stammet, Pascal; Cronberg, Tobias; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite a lack of randomized trials in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with an initial non-shockable rhythm (NSR), guidelines recommend induced hypothermia to be considered in these patients. We assessed the effect on outcome of two levels of induced hypothermia...... Performance Score (CPC) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS)), and organ dysfunction (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score). RESULTS: Patients with NSR were older, had longer time to ROSC, less frequently had bystander CPR and had higher lactate levels at admission compared to patients with shockable...

  20. Out-of-Hospital therapeutic hypothermia. A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Nélida Conejo Pérez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated therapeutic mild hypothermia improves neurological outcome of patients after suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.Other studies in animals suggest that the sooner hypothermia is started after return of spontaneous circulation, the lower neurological symptoms are suffered by patients.The aim of this work is to know the efficiency of the therapeutic moderated hipotermia after the cardiopulmonar resuscitation realized extra hospitable.Methods: We made a literature search in Medline (Pubmed, Cinahl, Cuiden, Cochrane Library and the Joanna Briggs Institute, combining mesh and free terms; and searched in the journals Circulation, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine Journal manually last year. We selected systematic reviews and randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials which had contrasted in-hospital and out-of-hospital TMH with over 18 years patients.Results: Only 5 articles met the inclusion criteria of the 35 selected: four randomized clinical trials and one nonrandomized. They were then subjected to a critical methodological evaluation (CASPe and statistic evaluation (IDIPaz.Conclusions: Pre hospital TMH is an effective and safe technique in comatose patients after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest, improving the neurological status at hospital discharge.

  1. [Accidental out-of-hospital deliveries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet, P-E; Chabernaud, J-L; Duc, F; Khouri, T; Leboucher, B; Riethmuller, D; Descamps, P; Sentilhes, L

    2014-03-01

    Unexpected out-of-hospital delivery accounts for 0.5% of the total number of delivery in France. The parturient is placed under constant multiparametric monitoring. Fetus heart rate is monitored thanks to fetal doppler. A high concentration mask containing a 50-to-50 percent mix of O(2) and NO performs analgesia. Assistance of mobile pediatric service can be required under certain circumstances such as premature birth, gemellary pregnancy, maternal illness or fetal heart rate impairment. Maternal efforts should start only when head reaches the pelvic floor, only if the rupture of the membranes is done and the dilation is completed. The expulsion should not exceed 30 min. Episiotomy should not be systematically performed. A systematic active management of third stage of labour is recommended. Routine care such as warming and soft drying can be performed when the following conditions are fulfilled: clear amniotic liquid, normal breathing, crying and a good tonus. Every 30 seconds assessment of heart rate, breathing quality and muscular tonus then guide the care. The redaction of birth certificate is a legal obligation and rests with the attending doctor. PMID:23773899

  2. Nurses’ attitude in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Kapadohos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of death in Europe. Bystanders’ early Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR may double or triple survival rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims. Aim: To investigate nurses’ attitude, in starting or not CPR and also the most frequent reasons that deter them from engaging in. Materials and Methods: The study had a sample of 177 nurses and assistant nurses that were working in nine hospitals of Athens. Nurses filled out the same, predetermined questionnaire, voluntarily and anonymously. The collected answers were analyzed with the help of the statistical program SPSS v.16, using x2 and Kendall’s Tau-B methods. Results: From 177 participants, 78% (137 were women and 22% (40 men with mean age 31 years (±7. According to their education, 16% (28 were Assistant Nurses, 79% (140 Registered Nurses (ATEI, AEI and 5% (9 Nurses had an MSc diploma. Nurses that had been recently trained in certified BLS courses felt more confident and were more willing to start CPR in a known victim (p=0.004 and in an unknown victim (p=0.02 comparing to nurses that had been trained a long time ago or never. Most frequent reasons nurses reported that deter them from starting CPR are the fear of a possible lawsuit (43%, the fear of harming instead of helping (30% and the fear of infectious transmission from victim to rescuer (15%. The fear of harming correlates considerably with lower ages (the younger the nurse the more is afraid, p=0.04 and also correlates substantially with the training in a certified CPR course (the more a nurse is trained, the less is afraid, p<0.001. Accordingly, the fear of infection diminishes as long as the CPR training is repeated (p=0.03. Conclusions: According to the results, there is a necessity of continuous education and re-education of nurses, in certified Basic Life Support programs. With frequent and specialized training, nurses will show more willingness to engage in an out-of-hospital arrest situation, in a familiar or unknown victim and, moreover, fears that deter them from starting CPR are remarkably reduced.

  3. Payment of hospital cardiac services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, W J

    1991-01-01

    This report describes how acute-care community hospitals in the United States get paid for services when their patients either are entitled to Medicare or Medicaid benefits or subscribe to a Blue Cross or Blue Shield plan, a commercial insurance plan, a health maintenance organization, a preferred provider organization, or some other third-party payment mechanism. The focus of this report is on cardiac services, which are the most common type of inpatient services provided by acute-care community hospitals. Over the past three decades, extraordinary advances in medical and surgical technologies as well as healthier life-styles have cut the annual death rate for coronary heart disease in half. Despite this progress, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of hospitalization. On average nationwide, diseases and disorders of the circulatory system are the primary reason for 17 percent of all patient admissions, and among the nation's 35 million Medicare beneficiaries they are the primary reason for 25 percent of all admissions. In the United States heart disease is the leading cause of death and a major cause of morbidity. Its diagnosis and treatment are often complex and costly, often requiring multiple hospitalizations and years of medical management. To focus management attention and resources on the immense cardiology marketplace, many hospitals have hired individuals with strong clinical backgrounds to manage their cardiology programs. These "front-line" managers play a key role in coordinating a hospital's services for patients with cardiovascular disease. Increasingly, these managers are being asked to become active participants in the reimbursement process. This report was designed to meet their needs. Because this report describes common reimbursement principles and practices applicable to all areas of hospital management and because it provides a "tool kit" of analytical, planning, and forecasting techniques, it could also be useful to hospital marketing, planning, finance, and accounting personnel. In addition, the rich reservoir of data contained in the appendixes to this report may be of interest to hospital chief executive officers, cardiologists, and cardiovascular surgeons. In addition to the introduction and summary sections, this report contains five main sections. Sequentially, these deal with: the ways hospitals get paid for what they do; ICD-9 coding DRGs, PPS, and Medicare claims administration; ways to analyze how well your hospital is doing; planning and forecasting; the new Resource-Based Relative Value Scale.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:10115896

  4. Out-of-hospital treatment in case of drowning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovi? Vladan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Drowning is a leading preventable cause of unintentional morbidity and mortality. The dominant pathophysiological mechanism of drowning includes the development of acute hypoxia. First aid. The rescue procedure of a drowning person includes careful pulling the victim out of the water, examination, maintenance of the airways passable and urgent transfer to hospital. Basic life support. The first and most important treatment option of a drowning victim is the provision of ventilation which increases the chances of survival. As soon as the unresponsive victim is removed from the water, the lay rescuer should immediately begin chest compressions and provide cycles of ventilations and compressions. Some recent investigations have revealed that exterior compression of the chest is a necessary measure even in a situation when bystanders cannot provide airway. It is recommended to train bystanders to provide basic life support and apply automated external defibrillator in a drowning person whenever indicated and as early as possible. Advanced life support. In drowning, the victim with cardiac arrest requires advanced life support, including an early intubation. Extended medical measures, which are primarily provided by medical professionals, include cervical spine immobilization in case a spinal injury is suspected, or, establishment of the ventilation with oxygen, emergency transport, application of reanimation and advanced vital support measures.

  5. Hospital Variation in Survival After In‐hospital Cardiac Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Raina M.; Berg, Robert A.; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B.; Groeneveld, Peter W.; Chan, Paul S.; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background In‐hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is common and often fatal. However, the extent to which hospitals vary in survival outcomes and the degree to which this variation is explained by patient and hospital factors is unknown. Methods and Results Within Get with the Guidelines‐Resuscitation, we identified 135 896 index IHCA events at 468 hospitals. Using hierarchical models, we adjusted for demographics comorbidities and arrest characteristics (eg, initial rhythm, etiology, arrest locat...

  6. Refibrillation during out-of-hospital arrest: A frequent event with clinical consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, Rudolph W.

    2010-01-01

    The refibrillation was a frequent event in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The number of recurrences of ventricular fibrillation (VF) is in inverse relationship with survival. In this article we discuss about causes and mechanism of refibrillation. The amiodarone and new technical solution (defibrillators that may allow continuous monitoring of the heart rhythm, while chest compressions continue and recommend defibrillation when refibrillation occurs) are promising new strategy to impr...

  7. Neurologic Function and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Following Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C vs 36°C After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronberg, Tobias; Lilja, Gisela; Horn, Janneke; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wise, Matt P; Pellis, Tommaso; Hovdenes, Jan; Gasche, Yvan; Åneman, Anders; Stammet, Pascal; Erlinge, David; Friberg, Hans; Hassager, Christian; Kuiper, Michael; Wanscher, Michael; Bosch, Frank; Cranshaw, Julius; Kleger, Gian-Reto; Persson, Stefan; Undén, Johan; Walden, Andrew; Winkel, Per; Wetterslev, Jørn; Nielsen, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Brain injury affects neurologic function and quality of life in survivors after cardiac arrest. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of 2 target temperature regimens on long-term cognitive function and quality of life after cardiac arrest. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this...... multicenter, international, parallel group, assessor-masked randomized clinical trial performed from November 11, 2010, through January 10, 2013, we enrolled 950 unconscious adults with cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause from 36 intensive care units in Europe and Australia. Eleven patients were excluded...... summary score was 46.8 (13.8) and 47.5 (13.8) (P = .45), comparable to the population norm. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Quality of life was good and similar in patients with cardiac arrest receiving targeted temperature management at 33°C or 36°C. Cognitive function was similar in both intervention groups...

  8. Neuron-Specific Enolase as a Predictor of Death or Poor Neurological Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C and 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stammet, Pascal; Collignon, Olivier; Hassager, Christian; Wise, Matthew P; Hovdenes, Jan; Åneman, Anders; Horn, Janneke; Devaux, Yvan; Erlinge, David; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Gasche, Yvan; Wanscher, Michael; Cronberg, Tobias; Friberg, Hans; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael; Gilson, Georges; Nielsen, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a widely-used biomarker for prognostication of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest, but the relevance of recommended cutoff values has been questioned due to the lack of a standardized methodology and uncertainties over the influence of temperatu...

  9. Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C Versus 36°C and Impact on Systemic Vascular Resistance and Myocardial Function After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Hassager, Christian; Wanscher, Michael; Østergaard, Morten; Nielsen, Niklas; Erlinge, David; Friberg, Hans; Køber, Lars; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    pressure ≥65 mm Hg and central venous pressure of 10 to 15 mm Hg were hemodynamic treatment goals. Hemodynamic evaluation was performed by serial right heart catheterization and transthoracic echocardiography. Primary end point was SVRI after 24 hours of cooling and secondary end points included mean SVRI......, cardiac index, systolic function, and lactate levels. The TTM33 group had a significant increase in SVRI compared with TTM36 (2595; 95% confidence interval, 2422-2767) versus 1960 (95% confidence interval, 1787-2134) dynes m(2)/s per cm(5); P<0.0001, respectively) after 24 hours of cooling with an overall...

  10. Hospital Variation in Survival After In‐hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M.; Berg, Robert A.; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B.; Groeneveld, Peter W.; Chan, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Background In‐hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is common and often fatal. However, the extent to which hospitals vary in survival outcomes and the degree to which this variation is explained by patient and hospital factors is unknown. Methods and Results Within Get with the Guidelines‐Resuscitation, we identified 135 896 index IHCA events at 468 hospitals. Using hierarchical models, we adjusted for demographics comorbidities and arrest characteristics (eg, initial rhythm, etiology, arrest location) to generate risk‐adjusted rates of in‐hospital survival. To quantify the extent of hospital‐level variation in risk‐adjusted rates, we calculated the median odds ratio (OR). Among study hospitals, there was significant variation in unadjusted survival rates. The median unadjusted rate for the bottom decile was 8.3% (range: 0% to 10.7%) and for the top decile was 31.4% (28.6% to 51.7%). After adjusting for 36 predictors of in‐hospital survival, there remained substantial variation in rates of in‐hospital survival across sites: bottom decile (median rate, 12.4% [0% to 15.6%]) versus top decile (median rate, 22.7% [21.0% to 36.2%]). The median OR for risk‐adjusted survival was 1.42 (95% CI: 1.37 to 1.46), which suggests a substantial 42% difference in the odds of survival for patients with similar case‐mix at similar hospitals. Further, significant variation persisted within hospital subgroups (eg, bed size, academic). Conclusion Significant variability in IHCA survival exists across hospitals, and this variation persists despite adjustment for measured patient factors and within hospital subgroups. These findings suggest that other hospital factors may account for the observed site‐level variations in IHCA survival. PMID:24487717

  11. Characteristiscs of fatal patient cases out of Riga hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smits A.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Health care system becomes less accessible to the people in Latvia. Health insurance is practically destroyed from April, 2010. The aim of our study is to analyze reasons of death of persons who died out of hospital in Riga. We have investigated 130 post mortem examination protocols from Pathology centre of Riga Eastern Clinical university hospital. We have evaluated the information from family doctor and ambulance care medical staff. In our analyzed group 58% of persons were found dead at home without any medical aid but 25% – died in the ambulance car after call to public institutions. Alarming is fact that 43,8% of patients died at 4–5th decade of age. There was also such vulnerably group as homeless people. The most common reasons of death were acute and chronic variations of cardio-vascular and lung curable pathologies. In Latvia there is urgent necessity of costless medical offices for poor and defenceless persons. Patient’s delay in seeking medical help is the decisive phase for late diagnosis of diseases and mortality. It is necessary to renew health insurance system in Latvia. All levels of medical staff and students of medical universities must be involved in providing information on early disease symptoms, diagnosis and treatment options in different media.

  12. Demographics, Bystander CPR, and AED Use in Out-of-Hospital Pediatric Arrests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. Austin; Grahan, Brian J. H.; Haukoos, Jason S.; McNally, Bryan; Campbell, Robert; Sasson, Comilla; Slattery, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2005 the American Heart Association released guidelines calling for routine use of automated external defibrillators during pediatric out-of-hospital arrest. The goal of this study was to determine if these guidelines are used during resuscitations. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from 29 U.S. cities that participate in the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES). Patients were included if they were older than 1 year of age and had a documented resuscitation attempt from October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2009 from an arrest presumed to be cardiac in nature. Hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the associations between age, demographic factors, and AED use. Results 129 patients were 1–8 years of age (younger children), 88 patients were 9–17 years of age (older children), and 19,338 patients were ≥18 years of age (adults). When compared to adults, younger children were less likely to be found in a shockable rhythm (young children 11.6%, adults 23.7%) and were less likely to have an AED used (young children 16.3%, adults 28.3%). Older children had a similar prevalence of shockable rhythms as adults (31.8%) and AED use (20.5%). A multivariable analysis demonstrated that, when compared to adults, younger children had decreased odds of having an AED used (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.26–0.69), but there was no difference in AED use among older children and adults. Conclusions Young children suffering from presumed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests are less likely to have a shockable rhythm when compared to adults, and are less likely to have an AED used during resuscitation. PMID:24681302

  13. What accounting leaves out of hospital financial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, K E; Glenn, J K

    1986-01-01

    As PPS and other fixed-price initiatives replace cost-based reimbursement in the hospital industry, the burden of assuming the risk for business success or failure shifts from the payor to the hospital. As a consequence, theories of risk to the business firm which have found application in other industries now deserve attention by hospital management. Incorporating such risk concepts into hospital strategies and actions requires a view of financial management that goes beyond the generally accepted accounting principles of managing and assigning costs for maximum revenue and profitability. This article examines the financial theory of risk in business firms, illustrates the various components of risk as they apply to a hospital business, and discusses how the hospital management strategies of cost-reduction, marketing, diversification, and multiorganizational affiliation can alter the risk characteristics of a hospital business. PMID:10275567

  14. Predictors of neurological outcome in the emergency department for elderly patients following out-of-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuhiro Nagata; Junya Tsurukiri; Keiko Ueno; Shiro Mishima

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Survival rates for cardiac arrest in acute medicine are higher following out-of-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation (OH-ROSC). However, data pertaining to OH-ROSC is limited in the elderly population. We aimed to assess the predictors of neurological outcome among elderly patients with OH-ROSC. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the data of patients 65 years and older who achieved OH-ROSC and who presented to the emergency department (ED) between 2009 and 2013. The fol...

  15. Electronic registration of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Dahl, Michael; Gade, John; Thorgaard, Per

    %) had ventricular fibrillation, 32 (10 %) had other arrhythmias, 21 (7 %) had sinus rhythm and a single patient (0.3 %) had ventricular tachycardia.   Conclusions: We have shown amPHI™ to be a valuable tool for accessing information about OHCA. By a stringent electronic registration we found a...

  16. Estimating the out-of-hospital mortality rate using patient discharge data

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Farsi; Geert Ridder

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the hospital quality measures based on routine administrative data such as patient discharge records. Most of the measures used in the literature are based on in-hospital mortality risks rather than post-discharge events. The in-hospital outcomes are sensitive to the hospital's discharge policy, thus could bias the quality estimates. This study aims at identifying out-of-hospital mortality risks and disentangling discharge and re-hospitalization rates from mortality rates ...

  17. Mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in in-hospital cardiac arrest: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameijer, Heleen; Immink, Rosa S; Broekema, Josien J; Ter Maaten, Jan C

    2015-12-01

    With increasing rates of in-hospital cardiac arrest, improving resuscitation outcomes is essential. Mechanical chest compressors seem to be related to improved outcome in out-of hospital cardiac arrest; however, the literature on its use in in-hospital cardiac arrest is scarce. We used the Medline public database to systematically review patient outcomes considering mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in in-hospital cardiac arrest. Fourteen studies were found, most cases (n=17), three cohort studies, a clinical pilot study and a registry study. The reported survival rate was high (35 out of 89 patients, 39%) and full neurological recovery was described in 91% of the survivors. Two studies did not report survival rates. Especially in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest because of treatable causes, early start of mechanical chest compressions could improve future patient outcomes because of better (coronary and brain) perfusion during mechanical chest compressions compared with manual chest compressions. However, the current literature is probably influenced by publication bias and more high-quality research is needed. PMID:26237664

  18. Cardiac Surgery and Percutaneous Coronary Interventions by Hospital: Beginning 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset contains the number of cases, number of in hospital/30 day deaths, observed, expected and risk- adjusted mortality rates for cardiac surgery and...

  19. Risky locations for out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest in a typical urban city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Moriwaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to clarify the circumstances including the locations where critical events resulting in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OHCPA occur. Materials and Methods: Subjects of this population-based observational case series study were the clinical records of patients with nontraumatic and nonneck-hanging OHCPA. Results: Of all 1546 cases, 10.3% occurred in a public place (shop, restaurant, workplace, stations, public house, sports venue, and bus, 8.3% on the street, 73.4% in a private location (victim′s home, the homes of the victims′ relatives or friends or cheap bedrooms, where poor homeless people live, and 4.1% in residential institutions. In OHCPA occurring in private locations, the frequency of asystole was higher and the outcome was poorer than in other locations. A total of 181 OHCPA cases (11.7% took place in the lavatory and 166 (10.7% in the bathroom; of these, only 7 (3.9% of OHCPA in the lavatory and none in the bath room achieved good outcomes. The frequencies of shockable initial rhythm occurring in the lavatory and in bath room were 3.7% and 1.1% (lower than in other locations, P = 0.011 and 0.002, and cardiac etiology in OHCPA occurring in these locations were 46.7% and 78.4% (the latter higher than in other locations, P < 0.001. Conclusions: An unignorable population suffered from OHCPA in private locations, particularly in the lavatory and bathroom; their initial rhythm was usually asystole and their outcomes were poor, despite the high frequency of cardiac etiology in the bathroom. We should try to treat OHCPA victims and to prevent occurrence of OHCPA in these risky spaces by considering their specific conditions.

  20. Análisis de la inclusión de la policía en la respuesta de emergencias al paro cardiorrespiratorio extrahospitalario Analysis of the inclussion of police personnel on the out of hospital cardiac arrest emergency response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Aguilera-Campos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: El presente estudio busca analizar una alternativa al pronóstico de paro cardiorrespiratorio extrahospitalario (PCE como problema de salud pública al involucrar a los cuerpos policiacos en la respuesta de emergencias. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se analizó retrospectivamente un registro de PCE iniciado en junio de 2009. Se contrastó un modelo basado en un número limitado de ambulancias con primera respuesta por la policía. RESULTADOS: La mortalidad fue de 100%, tiempos de respuesta elevados y 10.8% recibió reanimación cardiopulmonar (RCP por testigos presenciales. En 63.7% de los eventos la policía llegaba antes que la ambulancia y en 1.5% el policía dio RCP. El costo por vida salvada fue 5.8-60 millones de pesos en un modelo sólo con ambulancias vs. 0.5-5.5 millones de pesos en un modelo con primera respuesta policiaca. CONCLUSIONES: La intervención de la policía en la ciudad de Querétaro facilitaría la disminución de la mortalidad por PCE a un menor costo.OBJETIVE: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OCHA is a public health problem in which survival depends on community initial response among others. This study tries to analyze what's the proportional cost of enhancing such response by involving the police corps in it. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively an OCHA registry started on June 2009. We contrasted a model with limited number of ambulances and police based first response. RESULTS: Mortality was 100%, response times high and 10.8% of the victims were receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR by bystanders. In 63.7% of the events the police arrived before the ambulance, in 1.5% of these cases the police provided CPR. The cost for each saved life was of 5.8-60 million Mexican pesos per life with only ambulance model vs 0.5-5.5 million Mexican pesos on a police first response model with 12 ambulances. CONCLUSIONS: In Queretaro interventions can be performed taking advantage of the response capacity of the existing police focused on diminishing mortality from OCHA at a lesser cost than delegating this function only to ambulances.

  1. Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States, 1990-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be born preterm and at low birthweight ( 12 ). Definitions Out-of-hospital birth : Birth that occurs outside ... on a wide range of maternal and infant demographic and health characteristics ( 3 ). The birth data files ...

  2. Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From a Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D; Jacobs, Ian G; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L; Brett, Stephen J; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R; Deakin, Charles D; Finn, Judith C; Grsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; McNally, Bryan F; Morley, Peter T; Morrison, Laurie J; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Travers, Andrew H; Nolan, Jerry P

    2015-11-01

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and lessons learned from methodological research prompted this review and update of the 2004 Utstein guidelines. Representatives of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation developed an updated Utstein reporting framework iteratively by meeting face to face, by teleconference, and by Web survey during 2012 through 2014. Herein are recommendations for reporting out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Data elements were grouped by system factors, dispatch/recognition, patient variables, resuscitation/postresuscitation processes, and outcomes. Elements were classified as core or supplemental using a modified Delphi process primarily based on respondents' assessment of the evidence-based importance of capturing those elements, tempered by the challenges to collect them. New or modified elements reflected consensus on the need to account for emergency medical services system factors, increasing availability of automated external defibrillators, data collection processes, epidemiology trends, increasing use of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emerging field treatments, postresuscitation care, prognostication tools, and trends in organ recovery. A standard reporting template is recommended to promote standardized reporting. This template facilitates reporting of the bystander-witnessed, shockable rhythm as a measure of emergency medical services system efficacy and all emergency medical services system-treated arrests as a measure of system effectiveness. Several additional important subgroups are identified that enable an estimate of the specific contribution of rhythm and bystander actions that are key determinants of outcome. PMID:25438254

  3. Methylphenidate poisoning: an evidence-based consensus guideline for out-of-hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharman, Elizabeth J; Erdman, Andrew R; Cobaugh, Daniel J; Olson, Kent R; Woolf, Alan D; Caravati, E Martin; Chyka, Peter A; Booze, Lisa L; Manoguerra, Anthony S; Nelson, Lewis S; Christianson, Gwenn; Troutman, William G

    2007-01-01

    A review of US poison center data for 2004 showed over 8,000 ingestions of methylphenidate. A guideline that determines the conditions for emergency department referral and prehospital care could potentially optimize patient outcome, avoid unnecessary emergency department visits, reduce health care costs, and reduce life disruption for patients and caregivers. An evidence-based expert consensus process was used to create the guideline. Relevant articles were abstracted by a trained physician researcher. The first draft of the guideline was created by the lead author. The entire panel discussed and refined the guideline before distribution to secondary reviewers for comment. The panel then made changes based on the secondary review comments. The objective of this guideline is to assist poison center personnel in the appropriate out-of-hospital triage and initial out-of-hospital management of patients with suspected ingestions of methylphenidate by 1) describing the process by which a specialist in poison information should evaluate an exposure to methylphenidate, 2) identifying the key decision elements in managing cases of methylphenidate ingestion, 3) providing clear and practical recommendations that reflect the current state of knowledge, and 4) identifying needs for research. This review focuses on the ingestion of more than a single therapeutic dose of methylphenidate and the effects of an overdose and is based on an assessment of current scientific and clinical information. The expert consensus panel recognizes that specific patient care decisions may be at variance with this guideline and are the prerogative of the patient and the health professionals providing care, considering all of the circumstances involved. This guideline does not substitute for clinical judgment. Recommendations are in chronological order of likely clinical use. The grade of recommendation is in parentheses. 1) All patients with suicidal intent, intentional abuse, or in cases in which a malicious intent is suspected (e.g., child abuse or neglect) should be referred to an emergency department (Grade D). 2) In patients without evidence of self-harm, abuse, or malicious intent, poison center personnel should elicit additional information including the time of the ingestion, the precise dose ingested, and the presence of coingestants (Grade D). 3) Patients who are chronically taking a monoamine oxidase inhibitor and who have ingested any amount of methylphenidate require referral to an emergency department (Grade D). 4) Patients experiencing any changes in behavior other than mild stimulation or agitation should be referred to an emergency department. Examples of moderate to severe symptoms that warrant referral include moderate-to-severe agitation, hallucinations, abnormal muscle movements, headache, chest pain, loss of consciousness, or convulsions (Grade D). 5) For patients referred to an emergency department, transportation via ambulance should be considered based on several factors including the condition of the patient and the length of time it will take for the patient to arrive at the emergency department (Grade D). 6) If the patient has no symptoms, and more than 3 hours have elapsed between the time of ingestion and the call to the poison center, referral to an emergency department is not recommended (Grade D). 7) Patients with acute or acute-on-chronic ingestions of less than a toxic dose (see recommendations 8, 9, and 10) or chronic exposures to methylphenidate with no or mild symptoms can be observed at home with instructions to call the poison center back if symptoms develop or worsen. For acute-on-chronic ingestions, the caller should be instructed not to administer methylphenidate to the patient for the next 24 hours. The poison center should consider making a follow-up call at approximately 3 hours after ingestion (Grade D). 8) Patients who ingest more than 2 mg/kg or 60 mg, whichever is less, of an immediate-release formulation (or the equivalent amount of a modified-release formulation that has been chewed) should be referred to an emergency department (Grade C). 9) If a patch has been swallowed, consider the entire contents of the patch (not just the labeled dose of the patch) to have been ingested. Patients who ingest more than 2 mg/kg or 60 mg, whichever is less should be referred to an emergency department. If it is known that the patch has been chewed only briefly, and the patch remains intact, significant toxicity is unlikely and emergency department referral is not necessary (Grade D). 10) Patients who ingest more than 4 mg/kg or 120 mg, whichever is less, of an intact modified-release formulation should be referred to an emergency department (Grade D). 11) For oral exposures, do not induce emesis (Grade D). 12) Pre-hospital activated charcoal administration, if available, should only be carried out by health professionals and only if no contraindications are present. Do not delay transportation in order to administer activate charcoal (Grade D). 13) Benzodiazepines can be administered by EMS personnel if agitation, dystonia, or convulsions are present and if authorized by EMS medical direction expressed by written treatment protocol or policy or direct medical oversight (Grade C). 14) Standard advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) measures should be administered by EMS personnel if respiratory arrest, cardiac dysrhythmias, or cardiac arrest are present and if authorized by EMS medical direction expressed by written treatment protocol or policy or direct medical oversight (Grade C). PMID:18058301

  4. County hospitals and regional medical care in Texas: an analysis of out-of-county costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasingham, Ruben; Pickens, Sue; Anderson, Ron J

    2004-06-01

    The current system of regional medical service delivery in Texas places large demands on the state's urban public hospitals. To assess the nature and scope of such demands, we examined financial data from five of the state's largest public hospital districts. During fiscal year 2002, these hospitals reported 103,381 encounters with out-of-county patients, resulting in 66 million dollars in unreimbursed costs. Given the current economic outlook, Texas requires a more effective regional model that centralizes tertiary care, disperses primary and secondary care, and preserves key public health goods. PMID:15267028

  5. Pulseless electrical activity and successful out-of-hospital resuscitation – long-term survival and quality of life: an observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saarinen Sini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of patients successfully resuscitated from pre-hospital cardiac arrest with initial pulseless electrical activity (PEA, because the long-term outcome of these patients is unknown. Survival, neurological status one year after cardiac arrest and self-perceived quality of life after five years were assessed. Methods This retrospective study included adult patients resuscitated from PEA between August 2001 and March 2003 in three urban areas in southern Finland. A validated questionnaire was sent to patients while neurological status according to the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC -classification was assessed based on medical database notes recorded during follow-up evaluations. Results Out of 99 included patients in whom resuscitation was attempted, 41 (41% were successfully resuscitated and admitted to hospital. Ten (10% patients were discharged from hospital. Seven were alive after one year and six after five years following cardiac arrest. Five of the seven patients alive one year after resuscitation presented with the same functional level as prior to cardiac arrest. Conclusions Patients with initial PEA have been considered to have poor prognosis, but in our material, half of those who survived to hospital discharge were still alive after 5 years. Their self-assessed quality of life seems to be good with only mild to moderate impairments in activities of daily life.

  6. Short-stay, out-of-hospital, radiologically guided liver biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the safety, the quality and adequacy of specimens obtained and the cost benefits associated with performing liver biopsy out of hospital, on a short-stay basis, using radiological guidance, a prospective study was undertaken over a three-year period, from March 1998 to March 2001, in a private radiology practice. 251 patients (159 men) with stable liver disease participated in this study. Coagulation studies were performed within a two-week period before biopsy, which was carried out under the guidance of ultrasound (143 patients) or computed tomography (108 patients). A disposable, spring-loaded gun with an 18-gauge biopsy needle was used in each case. A repeat ultrasound or CT scan was performed after the procedure to monitor for complications such as haemorrhage. Two hundred and twenty nine patients (91 2%) were discharged 60 minutes after the biopsy. The only post-biopsy complication was pain, either at the biopsy site or in the right shoulder. Pain was severe in three patients and, for one of these patients, a subcapsular hepatic haematoma was found on ultrasound eight days after the biopsy. Sufficient material for histopathological examination was obtained from all patients. The cost of out-of-hospital biopsies was substantially less than the cost of hospital-based, day-stay procedures. It was concluded that short-stay, out-of-hospital, radiologically guided liver biopsy is safe for patients who have stable chronic liver disease and acceptable coagulation profiles

  7. Ambient air pollution, temperature and out-of-hospital coronary deaths in Shanghai, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few studies have evaluated the effects of ambient air pollution and temperature in triggering out-of-hospital coronary deaths (OHCDs) in China. We evaluated the associations of air pollution and temperature with daily OHCDs in Shanghai, China from 2006 to 2011. We applied an over-dispersed generalized additive model and a distributed lag nonlinear model to analyze the effects of air pollution and temperature, respectively. A 10 μg/m3 increase in the present-day PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NO2 and CO were associated with increases in OHCD mortality of 0.49%, 0.68%, 0.88%, 1.60% and 0.08%, respectively. A 1 °C decrease below the minimum-mortality temperature corresponded to a 3.81% increase in OHCD mortality on lags days 0–21, and a 1 °C increase above minimum-mortality temperature corresponded to a 4.61% increase over lag days 0–3. No effects were found for in-hospital coronary deaths. This analysis suggests that air pollution, low temperature and high temperature may increase the risk of OHCDs. - Highlights: • Few studies have evaluated the effects of air pollution and temperature on OHCDs in China. • The present-day concentrations of air pollution were associated with OHCDs. • The effect of high temperatures on OHCDs was more immediate than low temperatures. • No significant effects were found for in-hospital coronary deaths. - Ambient air pollution and temperature may trigger out-of-hospital coronary deaths but not in-hospital coronary deaths

  8. End-of-life hospital referrals by out-of-hours general practitioners: a retrospective chart study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Korte-Verhoef Maria C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients are transferred from home to hospital during the final phase of life and the majority die in hospital. The aim of the study is to explore hospital referrals of palliative care patients for whom an out-of-hours general practitioner was called. Methods A retrospective descriptive chart study was conducted covering a one-year period (1/Nov/2005 to 1/Nov/2006 in all eight out-of-hours GP co-operatives in the Amsterdam region (Netherlands. All symptoms, sociodemographic and medical characteristics were recorded in 529 charts for palliative care patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the variables associated with hospital referrals at the end of life. Results In all, 13% of all palliative care patients for whom an out-of-hours general practitioner was called were referred to hospital. Palliative care patients with cancer (OR 5,1, cardiovascular problems (OR 8,3, digestive problems (OR 2,5 and endocrine, metabolic and nutritional (EMN problems (OR 2,5 had a significantly higher chance of being referred. Patients receiving professional nursing care (OR 0,2 and patients for whom their own general practitioner had transferred information to the out-of-hours cooperative (OR 0,4 had a significantly lower chance of hospital referral. The most frequent reasons for hospital referral, as noted by the out-of-hours general practitioner, were digestive (30%, EMN (19% and respiratory (17% problems. Conclusion Whilst acknowledging that an out-of-hours hospital referral can be the most desirable option in some situations, this study provides suggestions for avoiding undesirable hospital referrals by out-of-hours general practitioners at the end of life. These include anticipating digestive, EMN, respiratory and cardiovascular symptoms in palliative care patients.

  9. Associations of hospital characteristics with nosocomial pneumonia after cardiac surgery can impact on standardized infection rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanagou, M; Leder, K; Cheng, A C; Pilcher, D; Reid, C M; Wolfe, R

    2016-04-01

    To identify hospital-level factors associated with post-cardiac surgical pneumonia for assessing their impact on standardized infection rates (SIRs), we studied 43 691 patients in a cardiac surgery registry (2001-2011) in 16 hospitals. In a logistic regression model for pneumonia following cardiac surgery, associations with hospital characteristics were quantified with adjustment for patient characteristics while allowing for clustering of patients by hospital. Pneumonia rates varied from 0·7% to 12·4% across hospitals. Seventy percent of variability in the pneumonia rate was attributable to differences in hospitals in their long-term rates with the remainder attributable to within-hospital differences in rates over time. After adjusting for patient characteristics, the pneumonia rate was found to be higher in hospitals with more registered nurses (RNs)/100 intensive-care unit (ICU) admissions [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·2, P = 0·006] and more RNs/available ICU beds (aOR 1·4, P < 0·001). Other hospital characteristics had no significant association with pneumonia. SIRs calculated on the basis of patient characteristics alone differed substantially from the same rates calculated on the basis of patient characteristics and the hospital characteristic of RNs/100 ICU admissions. Since SIRs using patient case-mix information are important for comparing rates between hospitals, the additional allowance for hospital characteristics can impact significantly on how hospitals compare. PMID:26449769

  10. Analysis of steps adapted protocol in cardiac rehabilitation in the hospital phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Roseli Winkelmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze a cardiac rehabilitation adapted protocol in physical therapy during the postoperative hospital phase of cardiac surgery in a service of high complexity, in aspects regarded to complications and mortality prevalence and hospitalization days. Methods: This is an observational cross-sectional, retrospective and analytical study performed by investigating 99 patients who underwent cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass graft, heart valve replacement or a combination of both. Step program adapted for rehabilitation after cardiac surgery was analyzed under the command of the physiotherapy professional team. Results: In average, a patient stays for two days in the Intensive Care Unit and three to four days in the hospital room, totalizing six days of hospitalization. Fatalities occurred in a higher percentage during hospitalization (5.1% and up to two years period (8.6% when compared to 30 days after hospital discharge (1.1%. Among the postoperative complications, the hemodynamic (63.4% and respiratory (42.6% were the most prevalent. 36-42% of complications occurred between the immediate postoperative period and the second postoperative day. The hospital discharge started from the fifth postoperative day. We can observe that in each following day, the patients are evolving in achieving the Steps, where Step 3 was the most used during the rehabilitation phase I. Conclusion: This evolution program by steps can to guide the physical rehabilitation at the hospital in patients after cardiac surgery.

  11. Iron ingestion: an evidence-based consensus guideline for out-of-hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoguerra, Anthony S; Erdman, Andrew R; Booze, Lisa L; Christianson, Gwenn; Wax, Paul M; Scharman, Elizabeth J; Woolf, Alan D; Chyka, Peter A; Keyes, Daniel C; Olson, Kent R; Caravati, E Martin; Troutman, William G

    2005-01-01

    From 1983 to 1991, iron caused over 30% of the deaths from accidental ingestion of drug products by children. An evidence-based expert consensus process was used to create this guideline. Relevant articles were abstracted by a trained physician researcher. The first draft of the guideline was created by the primary author. The entire panel discussed and refined the guideline before its distribution to secondary reviewers for comment. The panel then made changes in response to comments received. The objective of this guideline is to assist poison center personnel in the appropriate out-of-hospital triage and initial management of patients with suspected ingestions of iron by 1) describing the manner in which an ingestion of iron might be managed, 2) identifying the key decision elements in managing cases of iron ingestion, 3) providing clear and practical recommendations that reflect the current state of knowledge, and 4) identifying needs for research. This guideline applies to ingestion of iron alone and is based on an assessment of current scientific and clinical information. The expert consensus panel recognizes that specific patient care decisions may be at variance with this guideline and are the prerogative of the patient and the health professionals providing care, considering all of the circumstances involved. The panel's recommendations follow; the grade of recommendation is in parentheses. 1) Patients with stated or suspected self-harm or who are victims of malicious administration of an iron product should be referred to an acute care medical facility immediately. This activity should be guided by local poison center procedures. In general, this should occur regardless of the amount ingested (Grade D). 2) Pediatric or adult patients with a known ingestion of 40 mg/kg or greater of elemental iron in the form of adult ferrous salt formulations or who have severe or persistent symptoms related to iron ingestion should be referred to a healthcare facility for medical evaluation. Patients who have ingested less than 40 mg/kg of elemental iron and who are having mild symptoms can be observed at home. Mild symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea occur frequently. These mild symptoms should not necessarily prompt referral to a healthcare facility. Patients with more serious symptoms, such as persistent vomiting and diarrhea, alterations in level of consciousness, hematemesis, and bloody diarrhea require referral. The same dose threshold should be used for pregnant women, however, when calculating the mg/kg dose ingested, the pre-pregnancy weight of the woman should be used (Grade C). 3) Patients with ingestions of children's chewable vitamins plus iron should be observed at home with appropriate follow-up. The presence of diarrhea should not be the sole indicator for referral as these products are often sweetened with sorbitol. Children may need referral for the management of dehydration if vomiting or diarrhea is severe or prolonged (Grade C). 4) Patients with unintentional ingestions of carbonyl iron or polysaccharide-iron complex formulations should be observed at home with appropriate follow-up (Grade C). 5) Ipecac syrup, activated charcoal, cathartics, or oral complexing agents, such as bicarbonate or phosphate solutions, should not be used in the out-of-hospital management of iron ingestions (Grade C). 6) Asymptomatic patients are unlikely to develop symptoms if the interval between ingestion and the call to the poison center is greater than 6 hours. These patients should not need referral or prolonged observation. Depending on the specific circumstances, follow-up calls might be indicated (Grade C). PMID:16255338

  12. Significance of the carboxyhemoglobin level for out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Yanagawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: At low concentrations, carbon monoxide (CO can confer cyto and tissue-protective effects, such as endogenous Heme oxygenase 1 expression, which has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antiapoptotic effects. The level of carboxyhemoglobin in the blood is an indicator of the endogenous production of CO and inhaled CO. Aim of study: To investigate the significance of the value of carboxyhemoglobin for out-of-hospital (OH cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA. Materials and Methods: This study involved a medical chart review of cases treated from January to December 2005. The inclusion criteria included a patient who was transported to this department due to an OH CPA. The exclusion criteria included a patient who did not undergo blood gas analysis on arrival and who experienced CPA due to acute carbon monoxide intoxication. The subjects were divided into two groups based on their final outcome of either survival or non-survival. Results: There was no significant difference associated with the sex, age, frequency of witness collapse, bystander cardiopulmonary arrest, electrocardiogram at scene, cause of CPA, value of PCO 2 , HCO3 - , and methemoglobin. The frequency of OH return of spontaneous circulation and the value of pH, PO 2 , base excess, and carboxyhemoglobin in the survival group were greater than those values in the non-survival group. There were no subjects whose carboxyhemoglobin level was 0% on arrival in the survival groups. Conclusion: There appeared to be an association between higher carboxyhemoglobin levels and survival in comparison with non-survival patients.

  13. Organisation of in-hospital cardiac arrest teams - A nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Kasper Glerup; Schmidt, Anders Sjrslev; Adelborg, Kasper; Lfgren, Bo

    2015-01-01

    in-hospital cardiac arrest teams and review pre-arrest allocation of tasks. METHODS: A nationwide cross-sectional study was performed. Data on cardiac arrest teams and pre-arrest allocation of tasks were collected from protocols on resuscitation required for hospital accreditation in Denmark...... was represented on 20% of teams and 20% of cardiac arrest teams had a different team composition during nights and weekends. In total, 41% of teams did not define a team leader pre-arrest, and the majority of the teams did not define the tasks of the remaining team members. CONCLUSION: In Denmark...

  14. Comparison of hospital episode statistics and central cardiac audit database in public reporting of congenital heart surgery mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Westaby, Stephen; Archer, Nicholas; Manning, Nicola; Adwani, Satish; Grebenik, Catherine; Ormerod, Oliver; Pillai, Ravi; Wilson, Neil

    2007-01-01

    Objective To verify or refute the value of hospital episode statistics (HES) in determining 30 day mortality after open congenital cardiac surgery in infants nationally in comparison with central cardiac audit database (CCAD) information.

  15. Is the public equipped to act in out of hospital cardiac emergencies?

    OpenAIRE

    K Smith; Cameron, P.; Meyer, A.; McNeil, J.

    2003-01-01

    Methods: A cross sectional telephone survey, which contained sections regarding participant demographics, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training, knowledge of CPR, and the emergency contact number and potential barriers to performing chest compressions and mouth to mouth.

  16. Debriefing bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is valuable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Fjordholt, Martin; Pedersen, Birgitte Dahl; Østergaard, Doris; Lippert, Freddy K

    2014-01-01

    , positively influencing the ability to cope with the emotional reactions and the cognitive perception of own performance and motivates improvement of CPR skills. Importantly, it increases confidence to provide CPR in the future. Implementation of telephone debriefing to bystanders at Emergency Medical...

  17. Variability in case-mix adjusted in-hospital cardiac arrest rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M.; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Nichol, Graham; Carr, Brendan G.; Mitra, Nandita; Bradley, Steven M.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Groeneveld, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unknown how in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) rates vary across hospitals and predictors of variability. Objectives Measure variability in IHCA across hospitals and determine if hospital-level factors predict differences in case-mix adjusted event rates. Research design Get with the Guidelines Resuscitation (GWTG-R) (n=433 hospitals) was used to identify IHCA events between 2003-2007. The American Hospital Association survey, Medicare, and US Census were used to obtain detailed information about GWTG-R hospitals. Subjects adult patients with IHCA Measures Case-mix adjusted predicted IHCA rates were calculated for each hospital and variability across hospitals was compared. A regression model was used to predict case-mix adjusted event rates using hospital measures of volume, nurse-to-bed ratio, percent ICU beds, palliative care services, urban designation, volume of black patients, income, trauma designation, academic designation, cardiac surgery capability and a patient risk score. Results We evaluated 103,117 adult IHCAs at 433 US hospitals. The case mix adjusted IHCA event rate was highly variable across hospitals, median 1/1000 bed days (interquartile range: 0.7-1.3 events/1000 bed-days). In a multivariable regression model, case-mix adjusted IHCA event rates were highest in urban hospitals (rate ratio [RR] 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-1.3, p=0.03) and hospitals with higher proportions of black patients (RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.3, p=0.01) and lower in larger hospitals (RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.45-0.66, p<.0001). Conclusion Case-mix adjusted IHCA event rates varied considerably across hospitals. Several hospital factors associated with higher IHCA event rates were consistent with factors often linked with lower hospital quality of care. PMID:22249921

  18. Cardiac myxoma: A surgical experience of 38 patients over 9 years, at SSKM hospital Kolkata, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shahbaaz Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac myxoma is the most common benign intracardiac tumor. We studied its clinical presentation, morbidity, mortality and recurrence following surgery over a period of 9 years. Materials and Methods: This study was performed at cardiothoracic and vascular surgery department of a tertiary level hospital of eastern India, Seth Sukhlal Karnani Memorial hospital, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research Kolkata. Near 6000 cardiac cases were operated at our center over this period. Preoperative diagnosis was made with clinical presentation and preoperative echocardiography. Complete tumor excision was done and all patients were followed up for recurrence and complications. Result: A total of 38 cases of cardiac myxoma were operated over a period from October 2002 to October 2011. Cardiac myxoma constituted about 0.6% of all cardiac cases operated at our institute. This most commonly presented at fifth decade of life. Of these, 35 cases were left atrial and 2 cases were right atrial, and 1 case was having both atrial involvements. The left atrial myxoma mostly presented as mitral stenosis and very few presented with embolic and constitutional symptoms. No death or recurrence was observed during the follow up period. Conclusion: Cardiac myxomas form a very small percentage of the cardiac cases. A high index of suspicion is essential for diagnosis. Echocardiography is the ideal diagnostic tool as also for follow-up. Immediate surgical treatment is indicated in all patients. Cardiac myxomas can be excised with a low rate of mortality and morbidity.

  19. Diphenhydramine and dimenhydrinate poisoning: an evidence-based consensus guideline for out-of-hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharman, Elizabeth J; Erdman, Andrew R; Wax, Paul M; Chyka, Peter A; Caravati, E Martin; Nelson, Lewis S; Manoguerra, Anthony S; Christianson, Gwenn; Olson, Kent R; Woolf, Alan D; Keyes, Daniel C; Booze, Lisa L; Troutman, William G

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, there were 28,092 human exposures to diphenhydramine reported to poison centers in the US. A related drug, dimenhydrinate, is a less frequent cause of poisonings. Between January 2000 and June 2004, there were 2,534 reported dimenhydrinate ingestions in children less than 6 years of age. An evidence-based expert consensus process was used to create this guideline. Relevant articles were abstracted by a trained physician researcher. The first draft was created by the primary author. The entire panel discussed and refined the guideline before distribution to secondary reviewers for comment. The panel then made changes based on the secondary review comments. The objective of this guideline is to assist poison center personnel in the appropriate out-of-hospital triage and initial management of patients with a suspected ingestion of diphenhydramine or dimenhydrinate, or a dermal exposure to diphenhydramine. This guideline is based on an assessment of current scientific and clinical information. The expert consensus panel recognizes that specific patient care decisions may be at variance with this guideline and are the prerogative of the patient and the health professionals providing care, considering all of the circumstances involved. This guideline does not substitute for clinical judgment. The panel's recommendations for dermal or oral exposures to diphenhydramine or oral exposures to dimenhydrinate follow. The grade of recommendation is in parentheses: 1) All patients with suicidal intent, intentional abuse, or in cases in which a malicious intent is suspected (e.g., child abuse or neglect) should be referred to an emergency department (Grade D). 2) In patients without evidence of self-harm, abuse, or malicious intent, poison center personnel should elicit additional information including the time of the ingestion or dermal exposure, determination of the precise dose ingested, and the presence of co-ingestants (Grade D). 3) Patients experiencing any changes in behavior other than mild drowsiness or mild stimulation should be referred to an emergency department. Examples of moderate to severe symptoms that warrant referral include agitation, staring spells, inconsolable crying, hallucinations, abnormal muscle movements, loss of consciousness, seizures, or respiratory depression (Grade D). 4) For patients referred to the emergency department, transportation via ambulance should be considered based on several factors including the condition of the patient and the length of time it will take the patient to arrive at the emergency department (Grade D). 5) If the patient has no symptoms, and more than 4 hours have elapsed between the time of diphenhydramine ingestion and the call to the poison center, referral to an emergency department is not recommended. For dermal exposures to diphenhydramine, if the patient has no symptoms and it has been more than 8 hours since the diphenhydramine was thoroughly removed from the skin, referral to an emergency department is not recommended (Grade D). 6) Patients with acute ingestions of less than a toxic dose of diphenhydramine, or chronic exposures to diphenhydramine and no or mild symptoms, can be observed at home with instructions to call the poison center back if symptoms develop or worsen. The poison center should consider making a follow-up call at approximately 4 hours after ingestion (Grade D). 7) Children less than 6 years of age who ingest at least 7.5 mg/kg of diphenhydramine should be referred to an emergency department (Grade D). 8) Patients 6 years of age and older who ingest at least 7.5 mg/kg or 300 mg of diphenhydramine (whichever is less), should be referred to an emergency department (Grade D). 9) If the patient has no symptoms, and more than 6 hours have elapsed between the time of dimenhydrinate ingestion and the call to the poison center, referral to an emergency department is not recommended (Grade D). 10) Patients with acute ingestions of less than a toxic dose of dimenhydrinate, or chronic exposures to dimenhydrinate and no or mild symptoms, can be observed at home with instructions to call the poison center back if symptoms develop or worsen. The poison center should consider making a follow-up call at approximately 6 hours after ingestion (Grade D). 11) Children less than 6 years of age ingesting at least 7.5 mg/kg of dimenhydrinate should be referred to an emergency department (Grade D). 12) Patients 6 years of age and older ingesting at least 7.5 mg/kg or 300 mg of dimenhydrinate (whichever is less), should be referred to an emergency department for evaluation (Grade D). 13) Following oral exposures of diphenhydramine or dimenhydrinate, do not induce emesis. Because of the potential for diphenhydramine or dimenhydrinate to cause loss of consciousness or seizures, activated charcoal should not be administered en route to an emergency department (Grade D). 14) For chronic dermal exposures of diphenhydramine, skin decontamination (with water or soap and water) should be attempted prior to transporting a patient to an emergency department unless moderate to severe symptoms are already present. In this circumstance, transportation should not be delayed, and EMS personnel should attempt skin decontamination en route to the emergency department (Grade D). 15) Intravenous sodium bicarbonate may be administered by EMS personnel if QRS widening (QRS >0.10 msec) is present and if authorized by EMS medical direction (Grade D). 16) Physostigmine should be reserved for administration in a hospital (Grade D). 17) Benzodiazepines may be administered by EMS personnel if agitation or seizures are present, and if authorized by EMS medical direction (Grade D). PMID:16749537

  20. Midwifery care and out-of-hospital birth settings: how do they reduce unnecessary cesarean section births?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakala, C

    1993-11-01

    In studies using matched or adjusted cohorts, U.S. women beginning labor with midwives and/or in out-of-hospital settings have attained cesarean section rates that are considerably lower than similar women using prevailing forms of care--physicians in hospitals. This cesarean reduction involved no compromise in mortality and morbidity outcome measures. Moreover, groups of women at elevated risk for adverse perinatal outcomes have attained excellent outcomes and cesarean rates well below the general population rate with these care arrangements. How do midwives and out-of-hospital birth settings so effectively help women to avoid unnecessary cesareans? This paper explores this question by presenting data from interviews with midwives who work in home settings. The midwives' understanding of and approaches to major medical indications for cesarean birth contrast strikingly with prevailing medical knowledge and practice. From the midwives' perspective, many women receive cesareans due to pseudo-problems, to problems that might easily be prevented, or to problems that might be addressed through less drastic measures. Policy reports addressing the problem of unnecessary cesarean births in the U.S. have failed to highlight the substantial reduction in such births that may be expected to accompany greatly expanded use of midwives and out-of-hospital birth settings. The present study--together with cohort studies documenting such a reduction, studies showing other benefits of such forms of care, and the increasing reluctance of physicians to provide obstetrical services--suggests that childbearing families would realize many benefits from greatly expanded use of midwives and out-of-hospital birth settings. PMID:8272902

  1. Implementing a working together model for Aboriginal patients with acute coronary syndrome: an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse working together to improve hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daws, Karen; Punch, Amanda; Winters, Michelle; Posenelli, Sonia; Willis, John; MacIsaac, Andrew; Rahman, Muhammad Aziz; Worrall-Carter, Linda

    2014-11-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) contributes to the disparity in life expectancy between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. Improving hospital care for Aboriginal patients has been identified as a means of addressing this disparity. This project developed and implemented a working together model of care, comprising an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse, providing care coordination specifically directed at improving attendance at cardiac rehabilitation services for Aboriginal Australians in a large metropolitan hospital in Melbourne. A quality improvement framework using a retrospective case notes audit evaluated Aboriginal patients' admissions to hospital and identified low attendance rates at cardiac rehabilitation services. A working together model of care coordination by an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse was implemented to improve cardiac rehabilitation attendance in Aboriginal patients admitted with ACS to the cardiac wards of the hospital. A retrospective medical records audit showed that there were 68 Aboriginal patients admitted to the cardiac wards with ACS from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2011. A referral to cardiac rehabilitation was recorded for 42% of these. During the implementation of the model of care, 13 of 15 patients (86%) received a referral to cardiac rehabilitation and eight of the 13 (62%) attended. Implementation of the working together model demonstrated improved referral to and attendance at cardiac rehabilitation services, thereby, has potential to prevent complications and mortality. PMID:25200319

  2. Study of Out-of-Pocket Expenditures for Outpatient Imaging Services in Imam-Khomeini Hospital in 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Marzban, Sima; Rajaee, Roya; Gholami, Soheyla; Keykale, Meysam Safi; Najafi, Marziye

    2015-01-01

    Background: Direct out-of-pocket (OOP) payment is the most inequitable way to pay for healthcare services, and this trend exposes patients and their families to backbreaking financial risks. The aim of this study was to estimate the out-of-pocket expenditures for outpatient imaging services in Imam-Khomeini Hospital in Tehran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 on 100 users of outpatient imaging services (radiology, ultrasonography, CT-scan, and MRI) in Imam-Khomeini Ho...

  3. Order-specific fertility estimates based on perinatal statistics and statistics on out-of-hospital births

    OpenAIRE

    Kreyenfeld, Michaela; Peters, Frederik; Scholz, Rembrandt; Wlosnewski, Ines

    2014-01-01

    Until 2008, German vital statistics has not provided information on biological birth order. We have tried to close part of this gap by providing order-specific fertility rates generated from Perinatal Statistics and statistics on out-of-hospital births for the period 2001-2008. This investigation has been published in Comparative Population Studies (CPoS) (see Kreyenfeld, Scholz, Peters and Wlosnewski 2010). The CPoS-paper describes how data from the Perinatal Statistics and statistics on out...

  4. Out of Pocket Expenditure for Hospitalization among Below Poverty Line Households in District Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupt, Anadi; Kaur, Prabhdeep; Kamraj, P.; Murthy, B. N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health insurance schemes, like Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY), should provide financial protection against catastrophic health costs by reducing out of pocket expenditure (OOPE) for hospitalizations. We estimated and compared the proportion and extent of OOPE among below poverty line (BPL) families beneficiaries and not beneficiaries by RSBY during hospitalizations in district Solan, H.P., India, 2013. Methods We conducted a cross sectional survey among hospitalized BPL families in the beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries groups. We compared proportion incurring OOPE and its extent during hospitalization, pre/post-hospitalization periods in different domains. Results Overall, proportion of non-beneficiaries who incurred OOPE was higher than the beneficiaries but it was not statistically significant (87.2% vs. 80.9%). The median overall OOPE was $39 (Rs 2567) in the non-beneficiaries group as compared to $ 11 (Rs 713) in the beneficiaries group (pconsumables was $ 23 (Rs 1500) in the non beneficiaries group as compared to nil in the beneficiaries group (pbehaviour in beneficiaries group has improved among comparatively older group with chronic conditions. RSBY has enabled beneficiaries to get more facilities such as drugs, consumables and diagnostics from the health facility. PMID:26895419

  5. Data integration in cardiac surgery health care institution: experience at G. Pasquinucci Heart Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Taddei, Alessandro; Dalmiani, Stefano; Vellani, Antonio; Piccini, Giacomo; Rocca, Emiliano; Carducci, T; Borghini, R; Marcheschi, Paolo; Macerata, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    During last ten years the Hospital Information System (HIS) was developed at Institut e of Clinical Physiology of National Research Council (IFC-CNR), recently reorganized on clinical s ide into the OG. Monasterio Foundationo (FGM) by joint efforts of CNR, Tuscany Region and Universi ties. G. Pasquinucci Heart Hospital (GPH) in Massa, currently one of the two FGMoes sections, i s specialised in Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery (adult and pediatric)

  6. Data Integration in Cardiac Surgery Health Care Institution: Experience at G. Pasquinucci Heart Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Taddei, Alessandro; Dalmiani, Stefano; Vellani, Antonio; Rocca, E.; Piccini, Giacomo; Carducci, T; Gori, A.; Borghini, R; Marcheschi, Paolo; Mazzarisi, Alessandro; Salvatori, Cristina; Macerata, Alberto; Varanini, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    During the last ten years the Hospital Information System (HIS) was developed at the Institute of Clinical Physiology of National Research Council (IFC-CNR), recently reorganized on clinical side into the "Gabriele Monasterio Foundation" (FGM) by joint efforts of CNR, Tuscany Region and Universities. At G.Pasquinucci Heart Hospital (GPH), currently FGM's section in Massa, the HIS was adapted and extended to Cardiac Surgery and Pediatric Cardiology. Data archiving and middleware integration th...

  7. Pulseless electrical activity and successful out-of-hospital resuscitation – long-term survival and quality of life: an observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Saarinen Sini; Kämäräinen Antti; Silfvast Tom; Yli-Hankala Arvi; Virkkunen Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of patients successfully resuscitated from pre-hospital cardiac arrest with initial pulseless electrical activity (PEA), because the long-term outcome of these patients is unknown. Survival, neurological status one year after cardiac arrest and self-perceived quality of life after five years were assessed. Methods This retrospective study included adult patients resuscitated from PEA between August 2001 and March 2...

  8. Incidence of treated cardiac arrest in hospitalized patients in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M.; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Nichol, Graham; Carr, Brendan G.; Mitra, Nandita; Bradley, Steven M.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Groeneveld, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The incidence and incidence over time of cardiac arrest in hospitalized patients (IHCA) is unknown. We sought to estimate the event rate and temporal trends of adult inhospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) treated with a resuscitation response. Design Three approaches were used to estimate the IHCA event rate. First approach: Calculate the IHCA event rate at hospitals (n=433) in the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GWTG-R) registry, years 2003–2007 and multiply this by US annual bed-days. Second approach: Use the GWTG-R, IHCA event rate to develop a regression model (including hospital demographic, geographic, organizational factors) and use the model coefficients to calculate predicted event rates for acute care hospitals (n=5,445) responding to the American Hospital Association survey. Third approach: Classify acute care hospitals into groups based on academic, urban, bed size-and determine the average event rate for GWTG-R hospitals in each group and then use weighted averages to calculate the national IHCA rate. Annual event rates were calculated to estimate temporal trends. Setting GWTG-R registry Patients Adult IHCA with a resuscitation response Measurements and main results The mean adult treated IHCA event rate at GWTG-R hospitals was 0.92/1000 bed-days (IQR 0.58 to 1.2/1000). In hospitals (n=150) contributing data for all years of the study period, the event rate increased from 2003–2007. With 2.09 million annual US bed-days, we estimated 192,000 IHCA throughout the US annually. Based on the regression model, extrapolating GWTG-R hospitals to hospitals participating in the American Hospital Association survey projected 211,000 annual IHCA. Using weighted averages projected 209,000 annual US IHCA. Conclusions There are approximately 200,000 treated cardiac arrests among US hospitalized patients annually and this rate may be increasing. This is important for understanding the burden of IHCA and developing strategies to improve care for hospitalized patients. PMID:21705896

  9. Emergencias extrahospitalarias: el paciente suicida Out-of-hospital emergencies: the suicidal patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pacheco Tabuenca

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La conducta suicida ha existido desde que la humanidad existe, sin embargo, la concepción positiva o negativa del mismo ha cambiado a través de las diferentes culturas. En la actualidad, supone un grave problema de salud pública, y se estudia desde diferentes perspectivas y áreas de conocimiento, tratando de dar una visión global para poder entender este fenómeno tan interesante, apasionante y, en ciertos momentos desconcertante. Objetivo: Por tanto, el objetivo del presente estudio es analizar el perfil de las personas que cometen un acto suicida en la ciudad de Madrid y que son atendidos en el área de la emergencia extrahospitalaria. Método: Estudio observacional, descriptivo y retrospectivo, encuadrado en SAMUR-Protección Civil durante el año 2008, analizando todos los casos atendidos de ideación, tentativa y suicidio consumado donde han intervenido un Soporte Vital Avanzado y la Unidad de Asistencia Psicológica. Se ha analizado una muestra de 96 pacientes suicidas, donde el 48,4% fueron tentativas de suicidio, seguidos de un 44,2% de suicidios consumados y un 7,4% de ideación autolítica, atendidos principalmente en los meses de marzo y mayo, turno de mañana - tarde, y en el distrito de Puente de Vallecas, intervenciones demandadas desde Madrid 112 en su mayor porcentaje. Resultados: Se establece un perfil de paciente suicida como varón, de 25-35 años, español, soltero, con patología psiquiátrica en tratamiento, sin tentativas previas, que había verbalizado sus intenciones autolíticas, teniendo como factor desencadenante la propia enfermedad física o psíquica, que elige como método autolítico la defenestración sin presencia de otras personas, al cuál se le traslada al Hospital y presenta como diagnóstico principal TCE, trauma o politraumatismo. Conclusiones: El conocimientog del perfil del paciente suicida atendidos en diversas áreas permite conocer en mayor medida, los factores de riesgo de la conducta suicida, así como puede favorecer actuaciones preventivas futuras.Background: Suicidal behavior has existed since mankind exists, however, positive or negative view of it has changed through different cultures. At present, poses a significant public health problem, and studied from different perspectives and areas of expertise, trying to give an overview to understand this phenomenon so interesting, exciting and at times bewildering. Therefore, the objective of this study is to analyze the profile of people who commit a suicide in the city of Madrid and are treated in the outpatient emergency area. Methods: Observational, descriptive and retrospective study, framed in SAMUR-Civil Protection in 2008, analyzing all cases seen ideation, suicide attempt, which have involved an Advanced Life Support and Counselling Unit. We analyzed a sample of 96 suicidal patients, where 48.4% were attempted suicide, followed by 44.2% of suicides and suicidal ideation 7.4%, seen mainly in the months of March and May, morning session-afternoon, and in the district of Puente de Vallecas, intervention from Madrid 112 defendants in the highest percentage. Results: Establishing a patient profile suicide as male, 25-35 years, Spanish, single, with psychiatric disorders in treatment, but previous attempts, he had verbalized his intentions autolytic, taking as a trigger for the physical or mental illness itself, which chooses defenestration as autolytic method without the presence of others, to which he was transferred to the Hospital and has a diagnosis of TBI, trauma or polytrauma. Conclusions: Knowledge of the profile of the suicidal patient treated in different areas allows better known, the risk factors of suicidal behavior and may facilitate future preventive actions.

  10. Risk of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Among Medicare Beneficiaries Undergoing Video Electroencephalographic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ahmed A.; Ullah, Naseeb; Adil, Malik M.; Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sudden cardiac death is the dominant reason of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Anecdotal reports have documented cardiac arrest during video electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring. We performed this study to determine the rate of cardiac arrest and need for cardiac resuscitation during video EEG monitoring. Methods We used inpatient data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)’s Linkable 2008–2010 Medicare Data Entrepreneur’s Synthetic Public Use File. Using the International Classification of Diseases 9th revision (ICD-9) primary diagnosis codes, we identified patients with epilepsy. We used the primary or secondary ICD-9 procedure codes to identify patients who underwent video EEG during admission. For primary endpoints, we identified patients who suffered cardiac arrest and those who underwent cardiorespiratory resuscitation (CPR). Results A total of 6,087 patients (mean age 76±12 years; 3,354 women) were included; 5,597 patients had a primary diagnosis of epilepsy and no video EEG, 240 patients had a primary diagnosis of epilepsy and underwent video EEG, and 250 patients underwent a video EEG without any diagnosis of epilepsy. A total of 12 patients (0.2%, 95% CI: 0.7–0.8) suffered a cardiac arrest during their admission. Three patients (0.1%) underwent CPR during their admission. There was no in-hospital mortality. None of the patients in those undergoing video EEG suffered cardiac arrest or underwent CPR. Conclusion While the risk of cardiac arrest during video EEG monitoring may exist, the rate of such events was negligible in our study comprising of elderly Medicare patients. PMID:26576214

  11. Prevalence of hospital malnutrition among cardiac patients: results from six nutrition screening tools

    OpenAIRE

    Pathirana, Anidu K; Lokunarangoda, Niroshan; Ranathunga, Ishara; Santharaj, Wijeyasingam Samuel; Ekanayake, Ruwan; Jayawardena, Ranil

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is highly prevalent among hospitalized patients, ranging from 30% to 50% depending on the patient population and the criteria used for diagnosis. Identifying early those who are malnourished and at risk of malnutrition and intervening at an early stage will improve patients overall prognosis and will reduce the costs to the state. Even though cardiac patients are at risk of malnutrition, data on the prevalence of malnutrition among cardiology inpatients is limited. The aim of the...

  12. The administration of dextrose during in-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with increased mortality and neurologic morbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Teng J; Andersen, Lars W.; Saindon, Brian Z.; Giberson, Tyler A; Kim, Won Young; Berg, Katherine; Novack, Victor; Donnino, Michael W; ,

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dextrose may be used during cardiac arrest resuscitation to prevent or reverse hypoglycemia. However, the incidence of dextrose administration during cardiac arrest and the association of dextrose administration with survival and other outcomes are unknown. Methods We used the Get With The Guidelines®-Resuscitation national registry to identify adult patients with an in-hospital cardiac arrest between the years 2000 and 2010. To assess the adjusted effects of dextrose administrat...

  13. Frequency of cardiac defects among children at echocardiography centre in a teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess frequency of cardiac defects among children from birth to 12 years of age on each Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted at echocardiography centre in coronary care unit at Bahawal Victoria Hby Paediatric Transthoracic echo probe; 2-D colour Doppler, Acuson CV-70 and Niemo-30 echocardiography machines. Mothers of children with cardiac defects were interviewed at the echocardiography centre. Variables included were A- Muscular plus Vascular defects; B- Valvular defects; C-Pericardial effusion; D- Dextrocardia and E- Congestive cardiac failure. History of children for sore throat followed by joint pains; history of mothers for drug intake (antihypertensive, antipyretic, anti-emetic, hypoglycaemic) as well as chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, anaemia) during pregnancy were surveyed. Parity of mothers, their cousin marriages, and family socio-economic status was also inquired. The results were tabulated, analyzed and finally subjected to suitable test of significant (SR of proportion) to find out statistical significant if any. Results: It was found that out of 150 patients, 76 (50.66%) were suffering from Cardiac muscular and Vascular defects, 61 (40.66%) Valvular defects, 7 (4.66%) Pericardial effusion, 2 (1.33%) Dextrocardia and 4 (2.66%) from Congestive Cardiac Failure. According to age, 54 (36%) were from birth to 3 years of age and 51 (34%) from 10 to 12 years. There was history of Rheumatic fever among 45 (30%) children. There were 106 (70.6%) children from lower socio-economic class and 79 (52.6%) parents had history of cousin marriages. Conclusion: Frequency of cardiac defects was more in children of male sex, lower socio-economic group, from birth to three years age and children from primipara mothers in our specified locality. Rheumatic fever, cousin's marriage, and prescribed drugs intake during pregnancy (for metabolic and hormonal disorders) were other contributors to cardiac defects. (author)

  14. Hospital employees' theoretical knowledge on what to do in an in-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlitz Johan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines recommend that all health care professionals should be able to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, including the use of an automated external defibrillator. Theoretical knowledge of CPR is then necessary. The aim of this study was to investigate how much theoretical knowledge in CPR would increase among all categories of health care professionals lacking training in CPR, in an intervention hospital, after a systematic standardised training. Their results were compared with the staff at a control hospital with an ongoing annual CPR training programme. Methods Health care professionals at two hospitals, with a total of 3144 employees, answered a multiple-choice questionnaire before and after training in CPR. Bootstrapped chi-square tests and Fisher's exact test were used for the statistical analyses. Results In the intervention hospital, physicians had the highest knowledge pre-test, but other health care professionals including nurses and assistant nurses reached a relatively high level post-test. Improvement was inversely related to the level of previous knowledge and was thus most marked among other health care professionals and least marked among physicians. The staff at the control hospital had a significantly higher level of knowledge pre-test than the intervention hospital, whereas the opposite was found post-test. Conclusions Overall theoretical knowledge increased after systematic standardised training in CPR. The increase was more pronounced for those without previous training and for those staff categories with the least medical education.

  15. Hospital ownership and performance: evidence from stroke and cardiac treatment in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Hsien-Ming; Chou, Shin-Yi; Liu, Jin-Tan

    2008-09-01

    This paper compares program expenditure and treatment quality of stroke and cardiac patients between 1997 and 2000 across hospitals of various ownership types in Taiwan. Because Taiwan implemented national health insurance in 1995, the analysis is immune from problems arising from the complex setting of the U.S. health care market, such as segmentation of insurance status or multiple payers. Because patients may select admitted hospitals based on their observed and unobserved characteristics, we employ instrument variable (IV) estimation to account for the endogeneity of ownership status. Results of IV estimation find that patients admitted to non-profit hospitals receive better quality care, either measured by 1- or 12-month mortality rates. In terms of treatment expenditure, our results indicate no difference between non-profits and for-profits index admission expenditures, and at most 10% higher long-term expenditure for patients admitted to non-profits than to for-profits. PMID:18486978

  16. The Role of Clinical and Geographic Factors in the Use of Hospital versus Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brual, Janette; Gravely, Shannon; Suskin, Neville; Stewart, Donna E.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is most often provided in a hospital setting. Home-based models of care have been developed to overcome geographic, among other, barriers in patients at a lower risk. This study assessed whether clinical and geographic factors were related to the use of either a hospital-based or a home-based program. Secondary analysis

  17. Impact of respiratory infection in the results of cardiac surgery in a tertiary hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Newton Guimarães Andrade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To assess the impact of respiratory tract infection in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery in relation to mortality and to identify patients at higher risk of developing this complication.Methods:Cross-sectional observational study conducted at the Recovery of Cardiothoracic Surgery, using information from a database consisting of a total of 900 patients operated on in this hospital during the period from 01/07/2008 to 1/07/2009. We included patients whose medical records contained all the information required and undergoing elective surgery, totaling 109 patients with two excluded. Patients were divided into two groups, WITH and WITHOUT respiratory tract infection, as the development or respiratory tract infection in hospital, with patients in the group without respiratory tract infection, the result of randomization, using for the pairing of the groups the type of surgery performed. The outcome variables assessed were mortality, length of hospital stay and length of stay in intensive care unit. The means of quantitative variables were compared using the Wilcoxon and student t-test.Results:The groups were similar (average age P=0.17; sex P=0.94; surgery performed P=0.85-1.00 Mortality in the WITH respiratory tract infection group was significantly higher (P<0.0001. The times of hospitalization and intensive care unit were significantly higher in respiratory tract infection (P<0.0001. The presence of respiratory tract infection was associated with the development of other complications such as renal failure dialysis and stroke P<0.00001 and P=0.002 respectively.Conclusion:The development of respiratory tract infection postoperative cardiac surgery is related to higher mortality, longer periods of hospitalization and intensive care unit stay.

  18. Efficacy of the EZ-IO® needle driver for out-of-hospital intraosseous access - a preliminary, observational, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latasch Leo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intraosseous (IO access represents a reliable alternative to intravenous vascular access and is explicitly recommended in the current guidelines of the European Resuscitation Council when intravenous access is difficult or impossible. We therefore aimed to study the efficacy of the intraosseous needle driver EZ-IO® in the prehospital setting. Methods During a 24-month period, all cases of prehospital IO access using the EZ-IO® needle driver within three operational areas of emergency medical services were prospectively recorded by a standardized questionnaire that needed to be filled out by the rescuer immediately after the mission and sent to the primary investigator. We determined the rate of successful insertion of the IO needle, the time required, immediate procedure-related complications, the level of previous experience with IO access, and operator's subjective satisfaction with the device. Results 77 IO needle insertions were performed in 69 adults and five infants and children by emergency physicians (n = 72 applications and paramedics (n = 5 applications. Needle placement was successful at the first attempt in all but 2 adults (one patient with unrecognized total knee arthroplasty, one case of needle obstruction after placement. The majority of users (92% were relative novices with less than five previous IO needle placements. Of 22 responsive patients, 18 reported pain upon fluid administration via the needle. The rescuers' subjective rating regarding handling of the device and ease of needle insertion, as described by means of an analogue scale (0 = entirely unsatisfied, 10 = most satisfied, provided a median score of 10 (range 1-10. Conclusions The EZ-IO® needle driver was an efficient alternative to establish immediate out-of-hospital vascular access. However, significant pain upon intramedullary infusion was observed in the majority of responsive patients.

  19. Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Adults With Previous Hospital-Based Psychiatric Inpatient and Outpatient Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Waagstein, Kristine; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Jabbari, Reza; Lynge, Thomas Hadberg; Glinge, Charlotte; Albert, Christine; Correll, Christoph U.; Haunso, Stig; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Psychiatric patients have premature mortality compared to the general population. The incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in psychiatric patients is unknown in a nationwide setting. The aim of this study was to compare nationwide SCD incidence rates in young individuals with and...... without previous psychiatric disease. METHOD: Nationwide, retrospective cohort study including all deaths in people aged 18-35 years in 2000-2006 in Denmark. The unique Danish death certificates and autopsy reports were used to identify SCD cases. Psychiatric disease was defined as a previous psychiatric...... hospital contact and was identified using The Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. All diagnoses in Danish registries are coded according to ICD-8 or ICD-10. All hospital records were retrieved manually. RESULTS: Among 5,178 deaths, 395 were due to SCD and autopsies were performed on 262 (66%). In...

  20. Desmosomal Molecules In and Out of Adhering Junctions: Normal and Diseased States of Epidermal, Cardiac and Mesenchymally Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pieperhoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current cell biology textbooks mention only two kinds of cell-to-cell adhering junctions coated with the cytoplasmic plaques: the desmosomes (maculae adhaerentes, anchoring intermediate-sized filaments (IFs, and the actin microfilament-anchoring adherens junctions (AJs, including both punctate (puncta adhaerentia and elongate (fasciae adhaerentes structures. In addition, however, a series of other junction types has been identified and characterized which contain desmosomal molecules but do not fit the definition of desmosomes. Of these special cell-cell junctions containing desmosomal glycoproteins or proteins we review the composite junctions (areae compositae connecting the cardiomyocytes of mature mammalian hearts and their importance in relation to human arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. We also emphasize the various plakophilin-2-positive plaques in AJs (coniunctiones adhaerentes connecting proliferatively active mesenchymally-derived cells, including interstitial cells of the heart and several soft tissue tumor cell types. Moreover, desmoplakin has also been recognized as a constituent of the plaques of the complexus adhaerentes connecting certain lymphatic endothelial cells. Finally, we emphasize the occurrence of the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein Dsg2, out of the context of any junction as dispersed cell surface molecules in certain types of melanoma cells and melanocytes. This broadening of our knowledge on the diversity of AJ structures indicates that it may still be too premature to close the textbook chapters on cell-cell junctions.

  1. Relationship between quantitative cardiac neuronal imaging with 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine and hospitalization in patients with heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hospitalization in patients with systolic heart failure is associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Myocardial sympathetic innervation, imaged by 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (123I-mIBG), has been associated with cardiac events in a recent multicenter study. The present analysis explored the relationship between 123I-mIBG imaging findings and hospitalization. Source documents from the ADMIRE-HF trial were reviewed to identify hospitalization events in patients with systolic heart failure following cardiac neuronal imaging using 123I-mIBG. Time to hospitalization was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to the mIBG heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio using multiple-failure Cox regression. During 1.4 years of median follow-up, 362 end-point hospitalizations occurred in 207 of 961 subjects, 79 % of whom had H/M ratio <1.6. Among subjects hospitalized for any cause, 88 % had H/M ratio <1.6 and subjects with H/M ratio <1.6 experienced hospitalization earlier than subjects with higher H/M ratios (log-rank p = 0.003). After adjusting for elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and time since heart failure diagnosis, a low mIBG H/M ratio was associated with cardiac-related hospitalization (HR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.05 - 2.0; p = 0.02). The mIBG H/M ratio may risk-stratify patients with heart failure for cardiac-related hospitalization, especially when used in conjunction with BNP. Further studies are warranted to examine these relationships. (orig.)

  2. Relationship between quantitative cardiac neuronal imaging with {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine and hospitalization in patients with heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Matthew W.; Sood, Nitesh [University of Connecticut, School of Medicine Department of Medicine, Farmington, CT (United States); Hartford Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Hartford, CT (United States); Ahlberg, Alan W. [Hartford Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Hartford, CT (United States); Jacobson, Arnold F. [GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ (United States); Heller, Gary V. [The Intersocietal Accreditation Commission, Ellicott City, MD (United States); Lundbye, Justin B. [University of Connecticut, School of Medicine Department of Medicine, Farmington, CT (United States); The Hospital of Central Connecticut, Division of Cardiology, New Britain, CT (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Hospitalization in patients with systolic heart failure is associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Myocardial sympathetic innervation, imaged by {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-mIBG), has been associated with cardiac events in a recent multicenter study. The present analysis explored the relationship between {sup 123}I-mIBG imaging findings and hospitalization. Source documents from the ADMIRE-HF trial were reviewed to identify hospitalization events in patients with systolic heart failure following cardiac neuronal imaging using {sup 123}I-mIBG. Time to hospitalization was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to the mIBG heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio using multiple-failure Cox regression. During 1.4 years of median follow-up, 362 end-point hospitalizations occurred in 207 of 961 subjects, 79 % of whom had H/M ratio <1.6. Among subjects hospitalized for any cause, 88 % had H/M ratio <1.6 and subjects with H/M ratio <1.6 experienced hospitalization earlier than subjects with higher H/M ratios (log-rank p = 0.003). After adjusting for elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and time since heart failure diagnosis, a low mIBG H/M ratio was associated with cardiac-related hospitalization (HR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.05 - 2.0; p = 0.02). The mIBG H/M ratio may risk-stratify patients with heart failure for cardiac-related hospitalization, especially when used in conjunction with BNP. Further studies are warranted to examine these relationships. (orig.)

  3. The Power of Advance Care Planning in Promoting Hospice and Out-of-Hospital Death in a Dialysis Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Rebecca J.; Weaner, Barbara B.; Long, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite mortality rates that exceed those of most cancers, hospice remains underutilized in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis and nearly half of all dialysis patients die in the hospital.

  4. Postoperative cardiac arrest due to cardiac surgery complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the role of anesthetists in the management of cardiac arrest occurring in association with cardiac anesthesia. In this retrospective study we studied the potential performances for each of the relevant incidents among 712 patients undergoing cardiac operations at Golestan and Naft Hospitals Ahwaz between November 2006 and July 2008. Out of total 712 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, cardiac arrest occurred in 28 cases (3.9%) due to different postoperative complications. This included massive bleeding (50% of cardiac arrest cases, 1.9% of patients); pulseless supra ventricular tachycardia (28.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 1.1% of patients); Heart Failure (7% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.2% of patients); Aorta Arc Rapture (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients); Tamponade due to pericardial effusion (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of total patients); Right Atrium Rupture (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients) were detected after cardiac surgery. Out of 28 cases 7 deaths occurred (25% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients). The most prevalent reason for cardiac arrest during post operative phase was massive bleeding (50%) followed by pulseless supra ventricular tachycardia (28.5%). Six patients had some morbidity and the remaining 15 patients recovered. There are often multiple contributing factors to a cardiac arrest under cardiac anesthesia, as much a complete systematic assessment of the patient, equipment, and drugs should be completed. We also found that the diagnosis and management of cardiac arrest in association with cardiac anesthesia differs considerably from that encountered elsewhere. (author)

  5. Cardiac arrhythmias 48 hours before, during, and 48 hours after discharge from hospital following acute myocardial infarction.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, G W; Kumar, E B; Portal, R. W.; Aber, C. P.

    1981-01-01

    The cardiac rate and rhythm were studied by 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic recording in 44 patients before, during, and after being discharged from hospital following an acute myocardial infarction. The first recordings were started 48 hours before discharge, the second on the morning of the day of discharge, and the third 48 hours after discharge (at home). While in hospital and after returning home the heart rate fell during sleep but there was no diurnal variation in the frequency...

  6. Simple Measures of Function and Symptoms in Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients Predict Short-Term Cardiac Event-Free Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Evanthia Zaharias; Janine Cataldo; Lynda Mackin; Jill Howie-Esquivel

    2014-01-01

    Background. Heart failure (HF) is a prevalent chronic condition where patients experience numerous uncomfortable symptoms, low functional status, and high mortality rates. Objective. To determine whether function and/or symptoms predict cardiac event-free survival in hospitalized HF patients within 90 days of hospital discharge. Methods. Inpatients (N = 32) had HF symptoms assessed with 4 yes/no questions. Function was determined with NYHA Classification, Katz Index of Activities of Daily Liv...

  7. Dimensionality of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) in cardiac patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emons, Wilco H M; Sijtsma, Klaas; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) measures anxiety and depressive symptoms and is widely used in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, there is some debate about the number of dimensions represented by the HADS. In a sample of 534 Dutch cardiac patients, this study examined...... (a) the dimensionality of the HADS using Mokken scale analysis and factor analysis and (b) the scale properties of the HADS. Mokken scale analysis and factor analysis suggested that three dimensions adequately capture the structure of the HADS. Of the three corresponding scales, two scales of five...... items each were found to be structurally sound and reliable. These scales covered the two key attributes of anxiety and (anhedonic) depression. The findings suggest that the HADS may be reduced to a 10-item questionnaire comprising two 5-item scales measuring anxiety and depressive symptoms....

  8. Dimensionality of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in Cardiac Patients: Comparison of Mokken Scale Analysis and Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emons, Wilco H. M.; Sijtsma, Klaas; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) measures anxiety and depressive symptoms and is widely used in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, there is some debate about the number of dimensions represented by the HADS. In a sample of 534 Dutch cardiac patients, this study examined (a) the dimensionality of the HADS using Mokken…

  9. Survival of male patients with spinal cord injury after cardiac arrest in Department of Veterans Affairs hospital: Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Caruso, MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Survivability characteristics after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the population with spinal cord injury (SCI are unclear but may be useful for advanced care planning discussions with patients. Retrospective evaluation from records of all SCI patients over 10 yr at a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest was performed. Demographic data and other common measurements were recorded. Thirty-six male subjects were identified, and only two patients survived to discharge (5.5% survival rate, both of whom were admitted for nonacute issues and were asymptomatic shortly before the cardiac arrest. The mean age at the time of cardiopulmonary arrest was 62.4 yr, with a mean time from cardiac arrest to death of 3.02 d. No significant demographic parameters were identified. Overall, SCI likely portends worse outcome for acutely ill patients in the situation of a cardiac arrest. Conclusions are limited by sample size.

  10. Prognostic implication of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients with cardiogenic shock and acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Sarah; Lindholm, Matias Greve; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Wanscher, Michael; Hassager, Christian

    to a tertiary centre with the diagnosis of CS and acute MI were enrolled, 118 (48%) presented with OHCA and 130 (52%) without (non-OHCA patients). Mean lactate level at admission was significantly higher in OHCA patients compared with non-OCHA patients (9mmol/l (SD 6) vs. 6mmol/l (SD 4) p<0.0001). Co......-morbidities were more prevalent in the non-OHCA group. By univariate analysis age (Hazard ratio (HR)=1.02 [CI 1.00-1.03], p=0.01) and lactate at admission (HR=1.06 [CI 1.03-1.09], p<0.001), but not OHCA (HR=1.1 [CI 0.8-1.4], p=NS) was associated with mortality. In multivariate analysis, only age (HR=1.02 [CI 1...

  11. Serum Potassium Changes During Therapeutic Hypothermia After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest-Should It Be Treated?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soeholm, Helle; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2012-01-01

    .5 mmol/L (quartiles 3.2-3.6 mmol/L) and stopped at 4.5 mmol/L (4.1-4.8 mmol/L). A total of 11% of patients experienced ventricular fibrillation (VF) or ventricular tachycardia (VT). Potassium levels in patients experiencing VF or VT were lower, though not significantly (p=0.119) compared to the rest of...

  12. A community collaborative to develop consensus guidelines to standardize out-of-hospital maintenance care of central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nailon, Regina; Rupp, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) maintenance is integral to preventing complications and improving outcomes. This process is made more challenging when patients transition from hospital to home care or to an outpatient infusion setting, because different CVC maintenance practices and care parameters confuse patients and care providers alike. Through collaboration and consensus building, a group of metropolitan home health and home infusion agencies developed a standardized approach to CVC maintenance care. This article discusses the multiagency collaborative and resulting guideline and other educational materials that better enable providers, patients, and families to maintain CVC integrity and achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:25723833

  13. High-velocity penetrating thoracic trauma with suspected cardiac involvement in a combat support hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most common cardiac injuries in the United States are blunt trauma from motor vehicle accidents or low-velocity trauma from stabbings. During military conflict, high-velocity injuries, including gunshot wounds (GSW) and fragment injury from improvised explosive devices (IED), are relatively more common. This is a retrospective review of cases with high-velocity penetrating injury and suspected myocardial involvement during a 6-month period in Baghdad, Iraq, at a United States Army hospital during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Eleven cases survived to admission (GSW in 5, IED in 6). The mean age of the all-male cohort was 27 years (range, 3-54 years). Eight of the 11 patients (73%) were victims of polytrauma. The entrance involved the right ventricle (n=3), right atrium (n=2), left ventricle (n=1), or mediastinum and pericardial reflections (n=5). Echocardiography was performed in all 11 patients. In 7 patients, no foreign body was identifiable, and in 2 patients the foreign body was identified within the pericardial fat pad. Three patients were identified as having a suspected ventricular septal defect, ranging in size from 2 to 8 mm. The most common electrocardiographic abnormality was atrioventricular block and right bundle branch block. In 4 patients, the management of the chest injury was nonsurgical, and in 1 patient the treatment was a chest tube only. Four of the patients underwent median sternotomy, 1 underwent emergent lateral thoracotomy, and 1 underwent an infradiaphragmatic approach. This case series is too small to draw definitive conclusions; however, a multidisciplinary approach to high-velocity injuries with potential for cardiac involvement augments preoperative assessment for myocardial injury and may allow selective nonoperative management. (author)

  14. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Epilepsy: Experience of Tertiary Referral Hospital in Sapporo City, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIYATA, Kei; OCHI, Satoko; ENATSU, Rei; WANIBUCHI, Masahiko; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro; INOUE, Hiroyuki; UEMURA, Shuji; TANNO, Katsuhiko; NARIMATSU, Eichi; MAEKAWA, Kunihiko; USUI, Keiko; MIZOBUCHI, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that epilepsy patients had higher risk of sudden death than that of the general population. However, in Japan, there is very little literature on the observational research conducted on sudden fatal events in epilepsy. We performed a single-center, retrospective study on all the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated in our emergency department between 2007 and 2013. Among the OHCA patients, we extracted those with a history of epilepsy and then analyzed the characteristics of the fatal events and the background of epilepsy. From 1,823 OHCA patients, a total of 10 cases were enrolled in our study. The median age was 34 years at the time of the incident [9–52 years; interquartile range (IQR), 24–45]. We determined that half of our cases resulted from external causes of death such as drowning and suffocation and the other half were classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In addition, asphyxia was implicated as the cause in eight cases. Only the two near-drowning patients were immediately resuscitated, but the remaining eight patients died. The median age of first onset of epilepsy was 12 years (0.5–30; IQR, 3–21), and the median disease duration was 25 years (4–38; IQR, 6–32). Patients with active epilepsy accounted for half of our series and they were undergoing poly anti-epileptic drug therapy. The fatal events related to epilepsy tended to occur in the younger adult by external causes. An appropriate therapeutic intervention and a thorough observation were needed for its prevention. PMID:26948699

  15. Major depression and first-time hospitalization with ischemic heart disease, cardiac procedures and mortality in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasse, Christiane; Laursen, Thomas M; Baune, Bernhard T

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the association between unipolar depression and incident hospital admissions due to ischemic heart disease, invasive cardiac procedures and mortality independent of other medical illnesses.Methods: A population-based cohort of 4.6 million persons aged 15 years or older ......-59 years of age and during the first weeks following psychiatric admission. Our findings support recent cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines on assessing depression among other psychosocial factors in patients at increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk....

  16. Impact of advanced cardiac life support training program on the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwalpreet Sodhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Guidelines on performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR have been published from time to time, and formal training programs are conducted based on these guidelines. Very few data are available in world literature highlighting the impact of these trainings on CPR outcome. Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the American Heart Association (AHA-certified basic life support (BLS and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS provider course on the outcomes of CPR in our hospital. Materials and Methods : An AHA-certified BLS and ACLS provider training programme was conducted in our hospital in the first week of October 2009, in which all doctors in the code blue team and intensive care units were given training. The retrospective study was performed over an 18-month period. All in-hospital adult cardiac arrest victims in the pre-BLS/ACLS training period (January 2009 to September 2009 and the post-BLS/ACLS training period (October 2009 to June 2010 were included in the study. We compared the outcomes of CPR between these two study periods. Results: There were a total of 627 in-hospital cardiac arrests, 284 during the pre-BLS/ACLS training period and 343 during the post-BLS/ACLS training period. In the pre-BLS/ACLS training period, 52 patients (18.3% had return of spontaneous circulation, compared with 97 patients (28.3% in the post-BLS/ACLS training period (P < 0.005. Survival to hospital discharge was also significantly higher in the post-BLS/ACLS training period (67 patients, 69.1% than in the pre-BLS/ACLS training period (12 patients, 23.1% (P < 0.0001. Conclusion : Formal certified BLS and ACLS training of healthcare professionals leads to definitive improvement in the outcome of CPR.

  17. Early administration of epinephrine (adrenaline) in patients with cardiac arrest with initial shockable rhythm in hospital: propensity score matched analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars W; Kurth, Tobias; Chase, Maureen; Berg, Katherine M; Cocchi, Michael N; Callaway, Clifton

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate whether patients who experience cardiac arrest in hospital receive epinephrine (adrenaline) within the two minutes after the first defibrillation (contrary to American Heart Association guidelines) and to evaluate the association between early administration of epinephrine and outcomes in this population. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting Analysis of data from the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, which includes data from more than 300 hospitals in the United States. Participants Adults in hospital who experienced cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, including patients who had a first defibrillation within two minutes of the cardiac arrest and who remained in a shockable rhythm after defibrillation. Intervention Epinephrine given within two minutes after the first defibrillation. Main outcome measures Survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge with a good functional outcome. A propensity score was calculated for the receipt of epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, based on multiple characteristics of patients, events, and hospitals. Patients who received epinephrine at either zero, one, or two minutes after the first defibrillation were then matched on the propensity score with patients who were “at risk” of receiving epinephrine within the same minute but who did not receive it. Results 2978patients were matched on the propensity score, and the groups were well balanced. 1510 (51%) patients received epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, which is contrary to current American Heart Association guidelines. Epinephrine given within the first two minutes after the first defibrillation was associated with decreased odds of survival in the propensity score matched analysis (odds ratio 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.82; P<0.001). Early epinephrine administration was also associated with a decreased odds of return of spontaneous circulation (0.71, 0.60 to 0.83; P<0.001) and good functional outcome (0.69, 0.58 to 0.83; P<0.001). Conclusion Half of patients with a persistent shockable rhythm received epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, contrary to current American Heart Association guidelines. The receipt of epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation was associated with decreased odds of survival to hospital discharge as well as decreased odds of return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge with a good functional outcome. PMID:27053638

  18. Fighting cardiac arrest: Automated external defibrillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar V

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular tachyarrhythmias - Ventricular fibrillation (VF and Ventricular tachycardia (VT account for most of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrests. Defibrillation is the specific therapy for VF/pulseless VT. Time to defibrillation is the most important determinant of survival from these cardiac arrests. Automated external defibrillator (AED has largely replaced the conventional defibrillator in Basic life support (BLS programmes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. AED use by trained laypersons in the community as part of Public Access Defibrillation (PAD programmes has significantly reduced time to defibrillation and increased survival. AED is now being stipulated for home use in people at high risk of sudden cardiac death. AED placement is also recommended in all areas of hospital. Physicians and Intesivists should strive to familiarize the medical fraternity in our country with AED use so that PAD programmes can be launched in the near future.

  19. Cardiac Complication Rate In Emergent Vascular Procedures Tehran Sina Hospital (2000-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Complications of Coronary artery disease remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality after vascular surgical procedures. Goldman risk factor analysis has been suggested as peri-operative noninvasive screening method to detect significant coronary artery disease in emergent vascular procedures."nMethods and Materials: In this study, the accuracy of the Goldman scale was assessed with regard to the development of cardiac complications such as asymptomatic ischemic change in ECG, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction and cardiac death. We studied 100 patients that were required emergent vascular procedures from 2000-2001. Data about perioperative complications were extracted and analyzed using SPSS computer program."nResults: Our study indicated there is not statistical correlation between cardiac death, infarction, arrythmia, ECG change, age, sex and cardiac class."nConclusion: We concluded that Goldman scale could not be regarded as a screening method to predict peri-operative cardiac complications in emergent vascular procedures.

  20. Cardiac tumors in a tertiary care cancer hospital: clinical features, echocardiographic findings, treatment and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Swafford

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are a rare entity, comprised of tumors with diverse histology and natural history. We report the clinical characteristics, echocardiograhic findings, therapy and outcome of 59 patients with primary and metastatic cardiac tumors. Our institutional echocardiogram data base from 1993 through 2005 was reviewed to identify patients diagnosed with intra-cardiac tumor. A total of 59 patients with cardiac tumors were identified and included in the study. The patient’s characteristics, presenting symptoms, diagnostic tests, location, histology of the tumor, treatment and one year survival rate of this population was collected from the medical records. Of the 59 cardiac tumor cases, 16 (27% were primary cardiac tumors and 43 (73% were secondary cardiac tumors. The most common primary tumor was sarcoma affecting 13 (81% of the 16 cases. Of these, 5 patients were angiosarcoma, 5 unclassified sarcoma, one myxoid sarcoma and 2 maignant fibrous histiocytoma. The mean age at presentation was 41.1 years, and the most common location was right atrium affecting 6 cases (37.5%. The most common symptom of dyspnea was present in 10 (62.5% cases. Eleven (25.6% of the 43 secondary cardiac tumors were metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. The mean age at presentation was 55.4 years. Right atrium was the most frequent location affecting 18 (42% of the 43 patients. The most common presenting symptom was dyspnea in 15 (35% cases. For both primary and secondary tumors, dyspnea was the most common symptom and right atrium was most frequently involved. Sarcoma was the most common primary cardiac tumor while metastasis from renal cell carcinoma was the most common secondary tumor.

  1. Can linked emergency department data help assess the out-of-hospital burden of acute lower respiratory infections? A population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Hannah C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a lack of data on the out-of-hospital burden of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI in developed countries. Administrative datasets from emergency departments (ED may assist in addressing this. Methods We undertook a retrospective population-based study of ED presentations for respiratory-related reasons linked to birth data from 245,249 singleton live births in Western Australia. ED presentation rates Results ED data from metropolitan WA, representing 178,810 births were available for analysis. From 35,136 presentations, 18,582 (52.9% had an International Classification of Diseases (ICD code for ALRI and 434 had a symptom code directly relating to an ALRI ICD code. A further 9600 presentations had a non-specific diagnosis. From the combined 19,016 ALRI presentations, the highest rates were in non-Aboriginal children aged 6–11 months (81.1/1000 child-years and Aboriginal children aged 1–5 months (314.8/1000. Croup and bronchiolitis accounted for the majority of ALRI ED presentations. Of Aboriginal births, 14.2% presented at least once to ED before age 5 years compared to 6.5% of non-Aboriginal births. Male sex and maternal age Conclusions ED data can give an insight into the out-of-hospital burden of ALRI. Presentation rates to ED for ALRI were high, but are minimum estimates due to current limitations of the ED datasets. Recommendations for improvement of these data are provided. Despite these limitations, ALRI, in particular bronchiolitis and croup are important causes of presentation to paediatric EDs.

  2. Hospital-based comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care among patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Rasmussen, Søren; Frederiksen, Marianne; Abadini, Sadollah; Appel, Jon; Rasmussen, Hanne; Gluud, Christian; Iversen, Lars; Sigurd, Bjarne; Madsen, Mette; Fischer-Hansen, Jørgen; Group, DANREHAB

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR), although evidence for this is still limited. We investigated the 12-month effect of hospital-based CCR versus usual care (UC) for a broadly defined group of cardiac patients within the modern therapeutic ...... Depression Scale did not differ significantly. CONCLUSION: At 12 months, the CCR and UC groups did not differ regarding the primary composite outcome. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation significantly reduced length of hospital stay and improved cardiac risk factors.......BACKGROUND: Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR), although evidence for this is still limited. We investigated the 12-month effect of hospital-based CCR versus usual care (UC) for a broadly defined group of cardiac patients within the modern therapeutic......, risk profile, and quality of life. The trial included 770 participants (20-94 years) with congestive heart failure (12%), ischemic heart disease (58%), or high risk of ischemic heart disease (30%). Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is composed of 6 weeks of intensive intervention and systematic...

  3. Cardiac surgery in patients on hemodialysis: Eight years experience of the Tunisian military hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Gharsallah Hedi; Trabelsi Walid; Hajjej Zied; Nasri Mourad; Lebbi Anis; Jebali Mohamed; Ferjani Mustapha

    2010-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is known to be an important risk factor for cardiac operations performed with cardiopulmonary bypass. We investigated the influence of preoperative status on perioperative mortality and morbidity. We retrospectively analyzed data from 26 patients with ESRD, who were on maintenance dialysis and underwent a cardiac surgical procedure bet-ween 2000 and 2007. Of them, 61.5% of the patients had isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and 38.5% h...

  4. Coronary Artery-Bypass-Graft Surgery Increases the Plasma Concentration of Exosomes Carrying a Cargo of Cardiac MicroRNAs: An Example of Exosome Trafficking Out of the Human Heart with Potential for Cardiac Biomarker Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanueli, Costanza; Fiorentino, Francesca; Reeves, Barnaby C.; Beltrami, Cristina; Mumford, Andrew; Clayton, Aled; Gurney, Mark; Shantikumar, Saran; Angelini, Gianni D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exosome nanoparticles carry a composite cargo, including microRNAs (miRs). Cultured cardiovascular cells release miR-containing exosomes. The exosomal trafficking of miRNAs from the heart is largely unexplored. Working on clinical samples from coronary-artery by-pass graft (CABG) surgery, we investigated if: 1) exosomes containing cardiac miRs and hence putatively released by cardiac cells increase in the circulation after surgery; 2) circulating exosomes and exosomal cardiac miRs correlate with cardiac troponin (cTn), the current “gold standard” surrogate biomarker of myocardial damage. Methods and Results The concentration of exosome-sized nanoparticles was determined in serial plasma samples. Cardiac-expressed (miR-1, miR-24, miR-133a/b, miR-208a/b, miR-210), non-cardiovascular (miR-122) and quality control miRs were measured in whole plasma and in plasma exosomes. Linear regression analyses were employed to establish the extent to which the circulating individual miRs, exosomes and exosomal cardiac miR correlated with cTn-I. Cardiac-expressed miRs and the nanoparticle number increased in the plasma on completion of surgery for up to 48 hours. The exosomal concentration of cardiac miRs also increased after CABG. Cardiac miRs in the whole plasma did not correlate significantly with cTn-I. By contrast cTn-I was positively correlated with the plasma exosome level and the exosomal cardiac miRs. Conclusions The plasma concentrations of exosomes and their cargo of cardiac miRs increased in patients undergoing CABG and were positively correlated with hs-cTnI. These data provide evidence that CABG induces the trafficking of exosomes from the heart to the peripheral circulation. Future studies are necessary to investigate the potential of circulating exosomes as clinical biomarkers in cardiac patients. PMID:27128471

  5. Hospital-level associations with 30-day patient mortality after cardiac surgery: a tutorial on the application and interpretation of marginal and multilevel logistic regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanagou Masoumeh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marginal and multilevel logistic regression methods can estimate associations between hospital-level factors and patient-level 30-day mortality outcomes after cardiac surgery. However, it is not widely understood how the interpretation of hospital-level effects differs between these methods. Methods The Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ASCTS registry provided data on 32,354 patients undergoing cardiac surgery in 18 hospitals from 2001 to 2009. The logistic regression methods related 30-day mortality after surgery to hospital characteristics with concurrent adjustment for patient characteristics. Results Hospital-level mortality rates varied from 1.0% to 4.1% of patients. Ordinary, marginal and multilevel regression methods differed with regard to point estimates and conclusions on statistical significance for hospital-level risk factors; ordinary logistic regression giving inappropriately narrow confidence intervals. The median odds ratio, MOR, from the multilevel model was 1.2 whereas ORs for most patient-level characteristics were of greater magnitude suggesting that unexplained between-hospital variation was not as relevant as patient-level characteristics for understanding mortality rates. For hospital-level characteristics in the multilevel model, 80% interval ORs, IOR-80%, supplemented the usual ORs from the logistic regression. The IOR-80% was (0.8 to 1.8 for academic affiliation and (0.6 to 1.3 for the median annual number of cardiac surgery procedures. The width of these intervals reflected the unexplained variation between hospitals in mortality rates; the inclusion of one in each interval suggested an inability to add meaningfully to explaining variation in mortality rates. Conclusions Marginal and multilevel models take different approaches to account for correlation between patients within hospitals and they lead to different interpretations for hospital-level odds ratios.

  6. Frequency and pattern of congenital heart defects in a tertiary care cardiac hospital of Karachi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Najma; Jawed, Shama; Nigar, Nagina; Junaid, Fariha; Wadood, Asia Abdul; Abdullah, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current frequency and pattern of distribution of congenital heart defects (CHD) at National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NICVD), with the age at which initial diagnosis of CHD was made and the age at which the participant first visited the study center. Methods: This is a descriptive and prospective hospital based study conducted in the pediatric cardiology unit outpatient department of NICVD. This study included all the patients, irrespective of age, having confirmed diagnosis of CHD on the basis of echocardiographic report. The collected data was entered and analyzed by using Statistical Package for Social Sciences v 20.0. Results: Out of 1100 cases of congenital heart defects 1003 could be analyzed. There are 565 males (56.3%) and 438 females (43.6%). Total 609 cases (60.6%) were of simple acyanotic lesions and 387 (38.6%) were complex cyanotic lesions. In simple lesions septal defects constitute 64.9% and obstructive lesions were 11.0%. Tetralogy of fallot(TOF) was the commonest CHD and cyanotic lesion accounted for 24.4% of the total 1003 cases followed by Ventricular septal defect (VSD) 21.5%, Atrial septal defect (ASD) 9.3% and Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) 8.6%. Pulmonary stenosis(PS) was the most common obstructive lesion making 3.1% of the CHD. In 147 (14.5%) cases combination of simple defects were encountered and the commonest combination was ASD with VSD in 34 cases. Conclusion: Congenital Heart Defects are very common in our setup and early detection of CHD is increasing. Overall burden of CHD is also increasing therefore a proper population based study on a large scale is needed to estimate the prevalence accurately. PMID:27022350

  7. Pharmacist counseling to cardiac patients in Israel prior to discharge from hospital contribute to increasing patient's medication adherence closing gaps and improving outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Bisharat Bishara; Hafi Lubna; Baron-Epel Orna; Armaly Zaher; Bowirrat Abdalla

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Medication non adherence is a global epidemic perplexing phenomenon that is eminent, but not insurmountable. Our first objective was to explore whether providing pharmacist's counseling to cardiac patients prior to discharge can increase patient's medication adherence, and our second objective was to assess whether better medication adherence leads to reduction of hospital readmissions. Methods Observational study was conducted among diagnosed cardiac patients using an int...

  8. A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE PREVALENCE OF CARDIAC DISEASE IN HIV POSITIVE PATIENTS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purushottam Rao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Acquired immune deficiency syndrome was recognized as an emerging disease only in the early 1980s. The disease has rapidly established itself throughout the world and may persist well into the 21 st century. Infectio n with human immunodeficiency virus is one of the leading causes of acquired heart disease and specifically of symptomatic heart failure. The cardiac complications of HIV infection tend to occur late in the disease and as patients with HIV infection are li ving longer , they are at risk of developing chronic diseases including coronary artery disease. Hence , clinicians should identify the risk factors for such disease and also be aware of the various cardiovascular manifestations of HIV infection. AIM AND OBJ ECTIVES : To find out prevalence of cardiac disease by correlating clinical findings and echocardiographic changes in HIV positive patients. MATERIALS AND METHOD : It is an observation type of study done in the Department of Medicine and anti retroviral ther apy centre , King George Hospital , Visakhapatnam , Andhra Pradesh. It is a Tertiary Care Hospital. Fifty patients who were detected to be HIV positive were included in the study after fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria. RESULTS : In this study , 1 5 patients constituting 30% of the total patients in the study had echocardiographic changes suggestive of cardiac disease with varied manifestations. CONCLUSION : Prevalence of heart disease increases with the duration of HIV illness. Patients with heart disease can be asymptomatic in early stages of the disease. So , periodic electrocardiographic and echocardiographic evaluation should be done at regular intervals from the time of diagnosis of HIV disease

  9. Post-cardiac arrest extracorporeal life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patroniti, Nicol; Sangalli, Fabio; Avalli, Leonello

    2015-12-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is a complex, life-threatening event involving a multidisciplinary approach. Despite the use of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation, survival rate continues to be low for both in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. In refractory cardiac arrest, defined by the absence of return of spontaneous circulation despite resuscitation manoeuvres, mortality approaches 100%. In the last years, an increasing number of case series, and few propensity-matched cohort studies have reported encouraging results on the use of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for refractory cardiac arrest. Extracorporeal circulation ensures an adequate blood flow, to perform diagnostic and therapeutic interventions even before a return of spontaneous circulation is achieved and to rest the heart by unloading the ventricle while ensuring myocardial perfusion after return of spontaneous circulation. This study reviews the rational, indications, evidence and management of extracorporeal support for cardiac arrest. PMID:26670820

  10. Adjuvant Hypofractionated Versus Conventional Whole Breast Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Long-Term Hospital-Related Morbidity From Cardiac Causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Elisa K. [Department of Oncology, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John (Canada); Woods, Ryan; McBride, Mary L. [Cancer Control Research Department, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Virani, Sean [Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Nichol, Alan [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Speers, Caroline [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Wai, Elaine S. [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott, E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The risk of cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (HF-WBI) compared with conventional whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (CF-WBI) in women with left-sided breast cancer remains a concern. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increase in hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women ≤80 years of age with early-stage breast cancer were treated with postoperative radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Hospital administrative records identified baseline cardiac risk factors and other comorbidities. Factors between radiation therapy groups were balanced using a propensity-score model. The first event of a hospital admission for cardiac causes after radiation therapy was determined from hospitalization records. Ten- and 15-year cumulative hospital-related cardiac morbidity after radiation therapy was estimated for left- and right-sided cases using a competing risk approach. Results: The median follow-up was 13.2 years. For left-sided cases, 485 women were treated with CF-WBI, and 2221 women were treated with HF-WBI. Mastectomy was more common in the HF-WBI group, whereas boost was more common in the CF-WBI group. The CF-WBI group had a higher prevalence of diabetes. The 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes (95% confidence interval) was not different between the 2 radiation therapy regimens after propensity-score adjustment: 21% (19-22) with HF-WBI and 21% (17-25) with CF-WBI (P=.93). For right-sided cases, the 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes was also similar between the radiation therapy groups (P=.76). Conclusions: There is no difference in morbidity leading to hospitalization from cardiac causes among women with left-sided early-stage breast cancer treated with HF-WBI or CF-WBI at 15-year follow-up.

  11. Adjuvant Hypofractionated Versus Conventional Whole Breast Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Long-Term Hospital-Related Morbidity From Cardiac Causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The risk of cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (HF-WBI) compared with conventional whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (CF-WBI) in women with left-sided breast cancer remains a concern. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increase in hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women ≤80 years of age with early-stage breast cancer were treated with postoperative radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Hospital administrative records identified baseline cardiac risk factors and other comorbidities. Factors between radiation therapy groups were balanced using a propensity-score model. The first event of a hospital admission for cardiac causes after radiation therapy was determined from hospitalization records. Ten- and 15-year cumulative hospital-related cardiac morbidity after radiation therapy was estimated for left- and right-sided cases using a competing risk approach. Results: The median follow-up was 13.2 years. For left-sided cases, 485 women were treated with CF-WBI, and 2221 women were treated with HF-WBI. Mastectomy was more common in the HF-WBI group, whereas boost was more common in the CF-WBI group. The CF-WBI group had a higher prevalence of diabetes. The 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes (95% confidence interval) was not different between the 2 radiation therapy regimens after propensity-score adjustment: 21% (19-22) with HF-WBI and 21% (17-25) with CF-WBI (P=.93). For right-sided cases, the 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes was also similar between the radiation therapy groups (P=.76). Conclusions: There is no difference in morbidity leading to hospitalization from cardiac causes among women with left-sided early-stage breast cancer treated with HF-WBI or CF-WBI at 15-year follow-up

  12. The association of willingness-to-pay and patient attributes: a cost-volume-profit analysis of cardiac catheter unit services in Ramallah Hospital, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabr, Samer F K; Younis, Mustafa Mike Z; Forgione, Dana A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association of willingness-to-pay and patient attributes in relation to the multi-service cost-volume-profit structure of a cardiac catheter unit in Ramallah Hospital. This article contributes to the literature by providing primary evidence on patient willingness-to-pay, by identifying the specific break-even parameters of three hospital cardiac catheter unit service types (diagnosis, balloon, and pacemaker), and by demonstrating the cross-subsidization of patient income groups that is inherent in the existing hospital rate structure. Our results provide information useful for (1) evidence-based policy making with respect to hospital rate setting and cross-subsidies of patient income groups; (2) the advancement of hospital management, by demonstrating the estimated variable and fixed cost parameters and the impact of patient revenue mix on the profitability of cardiac catheter unit services; and (3) the advancement of theory, by documenting the relationship of patient demand and the cost of supply in a multi-patient-group, multi-service hospital setting. PMID:19891208

  13. Forskelle mellem hospitaler i prognose efter hjertestop uden for hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy; Wanscher, Michael C; Hassager, Christian

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There are substantial differences in long-term survival of patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and the level of care during hospitalization may be a contributing factor. The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference in long-term prognosis between...... hospitals could be detected in patients surviving cardiac arrest in Copenhagen. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The mobile emergency care unit attempted resuscitation in 1,098 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the period 2002 to 2006, among whom return of spontaneous circulation occurred in 336 (30%) of....../pVT) as their initial rhythm, and they had more frequently received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Survival at 4.6 years was 41% in patients admitted to the tertiary hospital and 10% in patients admitted to other hospitals, p < 0.0001. After adjustment for other known risk factors, patients...

  14. Cardiac surgery in patients on hemodialysis: Eight years experience of the Tunisian military hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharsallah Hedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available End-stage renal disease (ESRD is known to be an important risk factor for cardiac operations performed with cardiopulmonary bypass. We investigated the influence of preoperative status on perioperative mortality and morbidity. We retrospectively analyzed data from 26 patients with ESRD, who were on maintenance dialysis and underwent a cardiac surgical procedure bet-ween 2000 and 2007. Of them, 61.5% of the patients had isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG and 38.5% had replacement or reconstruction of one or two valves. The perioperative mortality rate was 26% with five deaths occurring in patients undergoing CABG procedure. We found CABG procedure, being female and left ventricular (LV function < 30% to be associated with a higher relative risk for perioperative death. In conclusion, our data suggest that both indi-cations and referral for surgical intervention for coronary artery disease may be delayed in pa-tients who have ESRD, contributing to the relatively high perioperative mortality.

  15. Predictors of Healthcare System and Physician Distrust In Hospitalized Cardiac Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Charu; Bell, Susan P; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Fletcher, Sarah; Goggins, Kathryn M.; Kripalani, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    A trusting relationship between patients, physicians, and the healthcare system is important in encouraging self-care behaviors in cardiovascular patients. The study aimed to assess the prevalence of healthcare system and physician distrust in this population, compare the two forms of distrust, and describe the demographic, socioeconomic, and psycho-social predictors of high distrust. 1232 hospitalized adults with acute coronary syndrome or heart failure were enrolled in a prospective, observ...

  16. Insufficient medication documentation at hospital admission of cardiac patients: a challenge for medication reconciliation

    OpenAIRE

    Frei, P.; Huber, L. C.; Simon, R W; Bonani, M; Lüscher, T F

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication errors may occur when hospital doctors are not adequately informed about a patient's prescribed drugs. METHODS: The drug lists of 103 patients who were electively admitted for coronary angiography were assessed. Discrepancies between lists noted in admission letters, patient's personal medication lists, and medication histories were analyzed. RESULTS: Patients took a mean of 5 +/- 3 drugs. Nine percent of all drugs taken were only mentioned when a systematic medication ...

  17. Effects of epinephrine and vasopressin on end-tidal carbon dioxide tension and mean arterial blood pressure in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Mally, Stefan; Jelatancev, Alina; Grmec, Stefek

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Clinical data considering vasopressin as an equivalent option to epinephrine in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are limited. The aim of this prehospital study was to assess whether the use of vasopressin during CPR contributes to higher end-tidal carbon dioxide and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) levels and thus improves the survival rate and neurological outcome. Methods Two treatment groups of resuscitated patients in cardiac arrest were compared: in the epinephrine grou...

  18. Effectiveness of the clinical pharmacist in reducing mortality in hospitalized cardiac patients: a propensity score-matched analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhai XB

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-bo Zhai,1 Zhi-chun Gu,2 Xiao-yan Liu2 1Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai East Hospital, Affiliated to Tongji University School of Medicine, 2Department of Pharmacy, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Pharmacist-led medication review services have been assessed in the meta-analyses in hospital. Of the 135 relevant articles located, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria; however, there was no statistically significant difference found between pharmacists’ interventions and usual care for mortality (odds ratio 1.50, 95% confidence interval 0.65, 3.46, P=0.34. These analyses may not have found a statistically significant effect because they did not adequately control the wide variation in the delivery of care and patient selection parameters. Additionally, the investigators did not conduct research on the cases of death specifically and did not identify all possible drug-related problems (DRPs that could cause or contribute to mortality and then convince physicians to correct. So there will be a condition to use a more precise approach to evaluate the effect of clinical pharmacist interventions on the mortality rates of hospitalized cardiac patients. Objective: To evaluate the impact of the clinical pharmacist as a direct patient-care team member on the mortality of all patients admitted to the cardiology unit. Methods: A comparative study was conducted in a cardiology unit of a university-affiliated hospital. The clinical pharmacists did not perform any intervention associated with improper use of medications during Phase I (preintervention and consulted with the physicians to address the DRPs during Phase II (postintervention. The two phases were compared to evaluate the outcome, and propensity score (PS matching was applied to enhance the comparability. The primary endpoint of the study was the composite of all-cause mortality during Phase I and Phase II. Results: Pharmacists were consulted by the physicians to correct any drug-related issues that they suspected may cause or contribute to a fatal outcome in the cardiology ward. A total of 1,541 interventions were suggested by the clinical pharmacist in the study group; 1,416 (92.0% of them were accepted by the cardiology team, and violation of incompatibilities had the highest percentage of acceptance by the cardiology team. All-cause mortality was 1.5% during Phase I (preintervention and was reduced to 0.9% during Phase II (postintervention, and the difference was statistically significant (P=0.0005. After PS matching, all-cause mortality changed from 1.7% during Phase I down to 1.0% during Phase II, and the difference was also statistically significant (P=0.0074. Conclusion: DRPs that were suspected to cause or contribute to a possibly fatal outcome were determined by clinical pharmacist service in patients hospitalized in a cardiology ward. Correction of these DRPs by physicians after pharmacist’s advice caused a significant decrease in mortality as analyzed by PS matching. The significant reduction in the mortality rate in this patient population observed in this study is “hypothesis generating” for future randomized studies. Keywords: drug-related problems, cardiology ward, clinical pharmacists, intervention, propensity score matching

  19. Assessment Of Nurses Performance During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In Intensive Care Unit And Cardiac Care Unit At The Alexandria Main University Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nagla Hamdi Kamal Khalil El- Meanawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation one of the most emergency management the nurse has a pivotal role and should be highly qualified in performing these procedures. The aim of the study is to assess performance of nurses during Cardio pulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest In Intensive Care Unit and Cardiac Care Unit at the Alexandria main university hospital. To answer the question what are the most common area of satisfactory and area of neglection in nurses performance during Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation. The sample consists of 53 staff nurses working in Intensive care unit amp cardiac care unit at Alexandria main university hospital. The tools of data collection were structured of questionnaire sheet and observational cheek list. The results showed that unsatisfactory performance between nurses in both units. The study concluded that all nurses need to improve their performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest it is crucial for nursing staff to participate in CPR courses in order to refresh and update their theoretical knowledge and performance skills and consequently to improve the safety and effectiveness of care. The study recommended that continuous evaluation of nurses knowledge and performance is essential the optimal frequency with which CPR training should be implemented at least every 6 months in order to avoid deterioration in nurses CPR knowledge and skills.

  20. Feasibility and Acceptability of Utilizing a Smartphone Based Application to Monitor Outpatient Discharge Instruction Compliance in Cardiac Disease Patients around Discharge from Hospitalization

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, Aimee M.; James Whitworth; James Peacock; Bartels, Matthew N.; Jellen, Patricia A.; Thomashow, Byron M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of utilizing a smartphone based application to monitor compliance in patients with cardiac disease around discharge. For 60 days after discharge, patients' medication compliance, physical activity, follow-up care, symptoms, and reading of education material were monitored daily with the application. 16 patients were enrolled in the study (12 males, 4 females, age 55 ± 18 years) during their hospital stay. Five partic...

  1. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Costello BT; Nadel J.; Taylor AJ

    2016-01-01

    Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting syst...

  2. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support during targeted temperature management at 33°C Versus 36°C after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Annborn, Martin; Hassager, Christian; Wise, Matt P; Pelosi, Paolo; Nielsen, Niklas; Erlinge, David; Wanscher, Michael; Friberg, Hans; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    targeted temperature management at 33 °C or 36 °C. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and lactate were registered at prespecified time points. The population was stratified according to cardiovascular Sequential Organ Failure Assessment = 4 defining the...... high vasopressor group and cardiovascular Sequential Organ Failure Assessment less than or equal to 3 definingthe low vasopressor group. The targeted temperature management 33 (TTM33) group had a hemodynamic profile with lower heart rate (-7.0 min(-1) [95% confidence limit, -8.7, -5.1]; p(group) < 0...... decreased heart rate, elevated levels of lactate, and need for increased vasopressor support compared with targeted temperature management at 36 °C. Low mean arterial pressure and need for high doses of vasopressors were associated with increased mortality independent of allocated targeted temperature...

  3. Prognostic value of reduced discrimination and oedema on cerebral computed tomography in a daily clinical cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Sandra; Hassager, Christian; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Salam, Idrees; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Lippert, Freddy K; Wanscher, Michael; Køber, Lars; Nielsen, Niklas; Søholm, Helle

    2015-01-01

    (60%), 'cerebral bleeding' in 4(3%), 'new cerebral infarction' in 10(7%), and 'reduced discrimination between white and grey matter and/or oedema' in 45(30%) patients. 'Reduced discrimination and/or oedema' by late cCT was independently associated with higher 30-day mortality compared to patients with a normal...

  4. Challenges in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest-a study combining closed-circuit television (CCTV) and medical emergency calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Gitte; Hallas, Peter; Lippert, Freddy K; Wibrandt, Ida; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Østergaard, Doris

    2015-01-01

    awareness, communication and attitude/approach. Situation awareness among bystanders and the emergency medical dispatchers (dispatcher) differed. CCTV showed that bystanders other than the caller, were often physically closer to the victim and initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Hence...

  5. Use of computed tomography and mechanical CPR in cardiac arrest to confirm pulmonary embolism: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Elaine Catrin; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Bogner, Viktoria; Wirth, Stefan; Angstwurm, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Precise therapeutic decision-making is vital in managing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We present an interesting approach where suspected pulmonary embolism could be confirmed by early computed tomography in cardiac arrest. Chest compressions were performed automatically by mechanical devices also during the acquisition of computed tomography data and subsequent thrombolysis. PMID:25912517

  6. Pharmacist counseling to cardiac patients in Israel prior to discharge from hospital contribute to increasing patient's medication adherence closing gaps and improving outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisharat Bishara

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication non adherence is a global epidemic perplexing phenomenon that is eminent, but not insurmountable. Our first objective was to explore whether providing pharmacist's counseling to cardiac patients prior to discharge can increase patient's medication adherence, and our second objective was to assess whether better medication adherence leads to reduction of hospital readmissions. Methods Observational study was conducted among diagnosed cardiac patients using an intervention strategy at discharge from two hospitals in Israel; The Nazareth and the Haemek hospital. 74 patients were recruited between January 2010 and January 2011. Two separate groups were selected; intervention group: 33 patients who prior to discharge received nurse, pharmacist interventions, and control group: 41 patients who had received the nurse and hospital discharge counseling only. Results Regression analysis for examining the first objective reflected significant effect when having a pharmacist interventions, which explains the increasing 11.6% of the variance in medication adherence, [F change (1,73 = 9.43, p (1,73 = 9.43, n.s]. Conclusions While physicians and nurses can have an impact on improving adherence, pharmacists have demonstrated the ability to inform, problem-solve and provide performance support directly to patients.

  7. Knowledge, attitude and practices on needle-stick and sharps injuries in tertiary care cardiac hospital: A survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: One of the potential hazards for health care workers (HCWs is needle-stick and sharp injuries (NSSIs. The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge and attitude of health care workers about the NSSIs. Settings and Design: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in the tertiary care cardiac center. The participants were health care workers including doctors, nurses, technicians, and housekeeping staff from the different areas of the hospital. Methods and Materials: This cross-sectional survey was conducted in the institute using a self-administered validated questionnaire. The participants consisted of a total of 190 HCWs namely doctors, nurses, technicians, and housekeeping staff. Statistical Analysis Used: Nil. Results: Results showed maximum participant were in the age group of 20-30 years. 94.7% were aware about standard precautions. 91.5% knew about the procedure for reporting of NSSIs. Only 50.2% HCWs gave correct answers regarding disease transmission through needle stick and sharp injury. The prevalence of NSSIs was highest among nurses (38.4%, and needle on the disposable syringe (76.9% was the most common source of NSSIs. Conclusions: The survey revealed few gaps in the knowledge amongst HCWs about NSSIs like risks associated with needle-stick injuries and use of preventive measures, disassembling of needles prior to disposal. These gaps can be addressed by extensive education. As nurses were the most affected victim for the NSSIs, more emphasis should be given towards them for reducing the NSSIs.

  8. A Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (Clarkson Syndrome) in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Case Report in an Out-of-Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand Bechu, Manon; Rouget, Antoine; Recher, Christian; Azoulay, Elie; Bounes, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS) is a rare disease with poor prognosis, characterized by the occurrence of mucocutaneous and visceral edema with hypotension, hemoconcentration, and unexpected hypoalbuminemia. The disease can be idiopathic (Clarkson syndrome) or secondary to other diseases and treatments. We describe this syndrome in a prehospitalized, 63-year-old patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and an idiopathic form of SCLS manifesting as hypovolemic shock. Initial care is hospitalization in intensive care. In addition to etiological treatment if fluid replacement is necessary, treatment must be closely monitored for secondary overload complications. Catecholamine rather than arrhythmogenic support may be associated. PMID:27069700

  9. Response interval is important for survival until admission after prehospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Hien Quoc; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2010-01-01

    An increasing distance to the nearest hospital must be expected as a result of centralization of acute care at a small number of hospitals. This may have important consequences in emergency situations, such as prehospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) where the aim is to obtain return of...... spontaneous circulation (ROSC), i.e. successful resuscitation. The aim of this study was to describe the impact of response interval on sustained ROSC, i.e. ROSC at hospital admission, after OHCA with presumed cardiac aetiology....

  10. Cardiac Malpositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac Malposition refers to any position of the heart other than a left-sided heart in a situs solitus individual. Associated cardiac malformations are so complex that even angiocardiographic and autopsy studies may not afford an accurate information. Although the terms and classifications used to describe the internal cardiac anatomy and their arterial connections in cardiac malpositions differ and tend to be confusing, common agreement exists on the need for a segmental approach to diagnosis. Authors present 18 cases of cardiac malpositions in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between 1971 and 1979. Authors analyzed the clinical, radiographic, operative and autopsy findings with the emphasis on the angiocardiographic findings. The results are as follows: 1. Among 18 cases with cardiac malpositions, 6 cases had dextrocardia with situs inversus, 9 cases had dextrocardia with situs solitus and 3 cases had levocardia with situs inversus. 2. There was no genuine exception to visceroatrial concordance rule. 3. Associated cardiac malpositions were variable and complex with a tendency of high association of transposition and double outlet varieties with dextrocardia in situs solitus and levocardia in situs inversus. Only one in 6 cases of dextrocardia with situs inversus had pure transposition. 4. In two cases associated pulmonary atresia was found at surgery which was not predicted by angiocardiography. 5. Because many of the associated complex lesions can be corrected surgically provided the diagnosis is accurate, the selective biplane angiocardiography with or without cineradiography is essential.

  11. Cardiac Malpositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Shi Joon; Im, Chung Gie; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Hasn, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    Cardiac Malposition refers to any position of the heart other than a left-sided heart in a situs solitus individual. Associated cardiac malformations are so complex that even angiocardiographic and autopsy studies may not afford an accurate information. Although the terms and classifications used to describe the internal cardiac anatomy and their arterial connections in cardiac malpositions differ and tend to be confusing, common agreement exists on the need for a segmental approach to diagnosis. Authors present 18 cases of cardiac malpositions in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between 1971 and 1979. Authors analyzed the clinical, radiographic, operative and autopsy findings with the emphasis on the angiocardiographic findings. The results are as follows: 1. Among 18 cases with cardiac malpositions, 6 cases had dextrocardia with situs inversus, 9 cases had dextrocardia with situs solitus and 3 cases had levocardia with situs inversus. 2. There was no genuine exception to visceroatrial concordance rule. 3. Associated cardiac malpositions were variable and complex with a tendency of high association of transposition and double outlet varieties with dextrocardia in situs solitus and levocardia in situs inversus. Only one in 6 cases of dextrocardia with situs inversus had pure transposition. 4. In two cases associated pulmonary atresia was found at surgery which was not predicted by angiocardiography. 5. Because many of the associated complex lesions can be corrected surgically provided the diagnosis is accurate, the selective biplane angiocardiography with or without cineradiography is essential.

  12. A predictive model to identify patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes at high risk of cardiac arrest or in-hospital mortality: An IMMEDIATE Trial sub-study?,??,???,????

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Madhab; Ruthazer, Robin; Beshansky, Joni R.; Kent, David M.; Mukherjee, Jayanta T.; Alkofide, Hadeel; Selker, Harry P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The IMMEDIATE Trial of emergency medical service use of intravenous glucoseinsulinpotassium (GIK) very early in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) showed benefit for the composite outcome of cardiac arrest or in-hospital mortality. Objectives This analysis of IMMEDIATE Trial data sought to develop a predictive model to help clinicians identify patients at highest risk for this outcome and most likely to benefit from GIK. Methods Multivariable logistic regression was used to develop a predictive model for the composite endpoint cardiac arrest or in-hospital mortality using the 460 participants in the placebo arm of the IMMEDIATE Trial. Results The final model had four variables: advanced age, low systolic blood pressure, ST elevation in the presenting electrocardiogram, and duration of time since ischemic symptom onset. Predictive performance was good, with a C statistic of 0.75, as was its calibration. Stratifying patients into three risk categories based on the model's predictions, there was an absolute risk reduction of 8.6% with GIK in the high-risk tertile, corresponding to 12 patients needed to treat to prevent one bad outcome. The corresponding values for the low-risk tertile were 0.8% and 125, respectively. Conclusions The multivariable predictive model developed identified patients with very early ACS at high risk of cardiac arrest or death. Using this model could assist treating those with greatest potential benefit from GIK.

  13. Home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction or revascularisation: design and rationale of the Birmingham Rehabilitation Uptake Maximisation Study (BRUM: a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN72884263

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane Deirdre

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation following myocardial infarction reduces subsequent mortality, but uptake and adherence to rehabilitation programmes remains poor, particularly among women, the elderly and ethnic minority groups. Evidence of the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation remains limited. This trial evaluates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home-based compared to hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of home-based compared with hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation in four hospitals serving a multi-ethnic inner city population in the United Kingdom was designed. The home programme is nurse-facilitated, manual-based using the Heart Manual. The hospital programmes offer comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in an out-patient setting. Patients We will randomise 650 adult, English or Punjabi-speaking patients of low-medium risk following myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft who have been referred for cardiac rehabilitation. Main outcome measures Serum cholesterol, smoking cessation, blood pressure, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, distance walked on Shuttle walk-test measured at 6, 12 and 24 months. Adherence to the programmes will be estimated using patient self-reports of activity. In-depth interviews with non-attendees and non-adherers will ascertain patient views and the acceptability of the programmes and provide insights about non-attendance and aims to generate a theory of attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. The economic analysis will measure National Health Service costs using resource inputs. Patient costs will be established from the qualitative research, in particular how they affect adherence. Discussion More data are needed on the role of home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation for patients following myocardial infarction and revascularisation, which would be provided by the Birmingham Rehabilitation Uptake Maximisation Study (BRUM study and has implications for the clinical management of these patients. A novel feature of this study is the inclusion of non-English Punjabi speakers.

  14. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Søholm, Helle; Wanscher, Michael; Lippert, Freddy K; Møller, Jacob E; Køber, Lars; Hassager, Christian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level of vasopres...

  15. Induced Hypothermia as a Neuroprotectant in Post-Cardiac Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Alkadri, Mohi E.; McMullan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest frequently suffer devastating effects from anoxic brain injury. Therapeutic hypothermia is the first therapy to show benefit in improving survival as well as limiting neurologic injury. We review the data supporting the use of therapeutic hypothermia in this patient population, the pathophysiologic basis of its neuroprotectant effects, the methods of hypothermic induction, and the clinical application.

  16. Uso do desfibrilador automático externo no ambiente pré-hospitalar peruano: melhorando a resposta a emergências na América Latina Use of automated external defibrillator in Peruvian out-of-hospital environment: improving emergency response in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Lister

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Este relato de caso reporta o atendimento pré-hospitalar de um paciente com fatores de risco atendido pelo serviço pré-hospitalar ao ser acometido por uma parada cardíaca e apresentar fibrilação ventricular. O paciente foi atendido seguindo os padrões de suporte básico de vida e suporte cardiovascular avançado. Um desfibrilador automático externo (DAE foi aplicado com resultados favoráveis e o paciente se recuperou do quadro de perigo de vida com sucesso. Este é o primeiro relato documentado com resultados favoráveis no Peru, na área de atendimento pré-hospitalar e enfatiza a necessidade de serem adotadas políticas de acesso público à desfibrilação precoce.El presente reporte de caso, relata la atencion prehospitalaria de un paciente con factores de riesgo atendido en el area prehospitalaria al sufrir arresto cardiaco y presentar fibrilacion ventricular. El paciente fue atendido bajo estandares de Soporte Basico Vital y Soporte Cardiovascular Avanzado Vital, se aplico un Desfibrilador Automatizado Externo (DEA con resultado favorable y exito al recuperar al paciente de su condicion de compromiso de vida. Este es el primer reporte documentado con resultado favorable en el pais, en el area prehospitalaria y refuerza la conveniencia de adoptar politicas de Acceso Publico a la Desfibrilacion Temprana.This case report relates out-of-hospital care to a patient with risk factors treated in the out-of-hospital services after cardiac arrest and ventricular fibrillation. The patient was treated according to the standards of basic life support and advanced cardiovascular life support; by applying an automated external defibrillator (AED with favorable outcome and successful recovery of the patient from his risk of life condition. This is the first documented report with a favorable outcome in Peru, in out-of-hospital services and stresses the desirability of adopting policies for public access to early defibrillation.

  17. A prospective study of drug utilization pattern in cardiac intensive care unit at a tertiary care teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Nagabushan, H.; H. S. Roopadevi; G. M. Prakash; R. Pankaja

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases remain the most common cause of sudden death. Appropriate drug therapy in cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) is crucial in managing cardiovascular emergencies and to decrease morbidity and mortality. The present study was conducted to observe the emergency cardiac diseases which are most frequently being treated and to study the prescribing prevalence among inpatients in CICU. Methods: A prospective, observational study was carried out among 102 patients...

  18. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Gran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety. PMID:24782478

  19. Weight-for-age standard score - distribution and effect on in-hospital mortality: A retrospective analysis in pediatric cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the distribution of weight for age standard score (Z score in pediatric cardiac surgery and its effect on in-hospital mortality. Introduction: WHO recommends Standard Score (Z score to quantify and describe anthropometric data. The distribution of weight for age Z score and its effect on mortality in congenital heart surgery has not been studied. Methods: All patients of younger than 5 years who underwent cardiac surgery from July 2007 to June 2013, under single surgical unit at our institute were enrolled. Z score for weight for age was calculated. Patients were classified according to Z score and mortality across the classes was compared. Discrimination and calibration of the for Z score model was assessed. Improvement in predictability of mortality after addition of Z score to Aristotle Comprehensive Complexity (ACC score was analyzed. Results: The median Z score was -3.2 (Interquartile range -4.24 to -1.91] with weight (mean±SD of 8.4 ± 3.38 kg. Overall mortality was 11.5%. 71% and 52.59% of patients had Z score < -2 and < -3 respectively. Lower Z score classes were associated with progressively increasing mortality. Z score as continuous variable was associated with O.R. of 0.622 (95% CI- 0.527 to 0.733, P < 0.0001 for in-hospital mortality and remained significant predictor even after adjusting for age, gender, bypass duration and ACC score. Addition of Z score to ACC score improved its predictability for in-hosptial mortality (δC - 0.0661 [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.0169], IDI- 3.83% [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.00042]. Conclusion: Z scores were lower in our cohort and were associated with in-hospital mortality. Addition of Z score to ACC score significantly improves predictive ability for in-hospital mortality.

  20. [Non-invasive and invasive out of hospital ventilation in chronic respiratory failure : Consensus report of the working group on ventilation and intensive care medicine of the Austrian Society of Pneumology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Peter; Eber, Ernst; Funk, Georg-Christian; Fritz, Wilfried; Hartl, Sylvia; Heininger, Peter; Kink, Eveline; Kühteubl, Gernot; Oberwaldner, Beatrice; Pachernigg, Ulrike; Pfleger, Andreas; Schandl, Petra; Schmidt, Ingrid; Stein, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The current consensus report was compiled under the patronage of the Austrian Society of Pneumology (Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Pneumologie, ÖGP) with the intention of providing practical guidelines for out-of-hospital ventilation that are in accordance with specific Austrian framework parameters and legal foundations. The guidelines are oriented toward a 2004 consensus ÖGP recommendation concerning the setup of long-term ventilated patients and the 2010 German Respiratory Society S2 guidelines on noninvasive and invasive ventilation of chronic respiratory insufficiency, adapted to national experiences and updated according to recent literature. In 11 chapters, the initiation, adjustment, and monitoring of out-of-hospital ventilation is described, as is the technical equipment and airway access. Additionally, the different indications-such as chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, thoracic restrictive and neuromuscular diseases, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and pediatric diseases-are discussed. Furthermore, the respiratory physiotherapy of adults and children on invasive and noninvasive long-term ventilation is addressed in detail. PMID:26837865

  1. Trauma penetrante cardíaco en la unidad de emergencia del Hospital Carlos Van Buren Penetrating cardiac trauma. Review of 36 operated patients

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    GONZALO GÓMEZ C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available El trauma penetrante cardíaco representa una de las mayores causas de muerte por motivo de violencia urbana y se clasifica en penetrante o contuso. La causa más común de trauma cardíaco penetrante es la herida por arma blanca o de fuego. La principal causa de trauma penetrante cardíaco en nuestra serie fue la lesión por arma blanca, siendo el ventrículo derecho la principal cámara cardíaca afectada. Los resultados quirúrgicos son comparables con otras series, con una mortalidad del 16,6% y una morbilidad de 22%. La mortalidad quirúrgica está relacionada con el retraso de la cirugía, o la lesión por arma de fuego, o la presencia de lesiones complejas. Aún sigue siendo fundamental el diagnóstico clínico y el manejo precoz.Background: The most common cause of cardiac penetrating trauma is wounds caused by knives or firearms. Aim: To review the operated cases of penetrating cardiac trauma in a public hospital emergency room. Material and Methods: Review of medical records of patients operated for penetrating cardiac trauma between 1986 and 2009. Results: We retrieved the records of 36 patients (33 males with a median age of 30 years. Ninety four percent of lesions were cause by knife wounds. In 24 patients, the right ventncle was injured. Immediate surgical mortality was 17% and 22% of patients had complications. Conclusions: Surgical mortality in penetrating cardiac trauma is related to the delay of surgical correction, injury by firearms or the presence of complex lesions.

  2. Temporal Influence of Heart Failure Hospitalizations Prior to Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator or Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy With Defibrillator on Subsequent Outcome in Mild Heart Failure Patients (from MADIT-CRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Andy Y; Moss, Arthur J; Ruwald, Martin H; Kutyifa, Valentina; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Zareba, Wojciech; Ruwald, Anne-Christine

    2015-01-01

    The temporal effect of heart failure (HF) hospitalization occurring at different time periods before implantation has not yet been studied in detail. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential association between time from last HF hospitalization to device implantation and...... effects on subsequent outcomes and benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D). Multivariate Cox models were used to determine the temporal influence of previous HF hospitalization on the end point of HF or death within all left bundle branch block implantable cardioverter......-defibrillator (ICD) and CRT-D patients enrolled in the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT) trial (n = 1,250) and to evaluate the clinical benefit of CRT-D implantation, comparing CRT-D patients with ICD patients within each previous HF hospitalization...

  3. A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE PREVALENCE OF CARDIAC DISEASE IN HIV POSITIVE PATIENTS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Purushottam Rao; Satyanarayana.; Praneeth

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : Acquired immune deficiency syndrome was recognized as an emerging disease only in the early 1980s. The disease has rapidly established itself throughout the world and may persist well into the 21 st century. Infectio n with human immunodeficiency virus is one of the leading causes of acquired heart disease and specifically of symptomatic heart failure. The cardiac complications of HIV infection tend to occur late ...

  4. Increasing the medium-term clinical benefits of hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation by telerehabilitation in coronary artery disease patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Frederix, Ines; Van Driessche, Niels; Hansen, Dominique; Berger, Jan; Bonne, Kim; Alders, Toon; Dendale, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a physical activity telemonitoring program on daily physical activity level, oxygen uptake capacity (VO2peak), and cardiovascular risk profile in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients who completed phase II cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Methods Eighty CAD patients who completed phase II CR were randomly assigned to an additional telemonitoring intervention or standard CR. The patients in the intervention group (n = 40) wore...

  5. Implementation of the guidelines for targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest: a longitudinal qualitative study of barriers and facilitators perceived by hospital resuscitation champions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Seung Joon; Jo, Sun Jin; Park, Kyu Nam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify the barriers to and facilitators of implementing guidelines for targeted temperature management (TTM) after cardiac arrest perceived by hospital resuscitation champions and to investigate the changes in their perceptions over the early implementation period. Design A longitudinal qualitative study (up to 2 serial semistructured interviews over 1?year and focus groups). The individual interviews and focus groups were transcribed and coded by 2 independent assessors. Contents were analysed thematically; group interaction was also examined. Setting 21 hospitals, including community and tertiary care centres in South Korea. Participants 21 hospital champions (14 acting champions and 7 managerial champions). Results The final data set included 40 interviews and 2 focus groups. The identified barriers and facilitators could be classified into 3 major themes: (1) healthcare professionals perceptions of the guidelines and protocols, (2) interdisciplinary and interprofessional collaboration and (3) organisational resources. Lack of resources was the most commonly agreed on barrier for the acting champions, whereas lack of interdisciplinary collaboration was the most common barrier for the managerial champions. Educational activities and sharing successfully treated cases were the most frequently identified facilitators. Most of the participants identified and agreed that cooling equipment was an important barrier as well as a facilitator of successful TTM implementation. Perception of the guidelines and protocols has improved with the accumulation of clinical experience over the study period. Conclusions Healthcare professionals internal barriers to TTM implementation may be influenced by new guidelines and can be changed with the accumulation of successful clinical experiences during the early implementation period. Promoting interprofessional and interdisciplinary collaboration through educational activities and the use of cooling equipment with an automated feedback function can improve adherence to guidelines in hospitals with limited human resources in critical care. PMID:26733568

  6. Propensity-matched analysis of association between preoperative anemia and in-hospital mortality in cardiac surgical patients undergoing valvular heart surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreedhar S Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anaemia is associated with increased post-operative morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively assess the relationship between preoperative anaemia and in-hospital mortality in valvular cardiac surgical population. Materials and Methods: Data from consecutive adult patients who underwent valvular repair/ replacement at our institute from January 2010 to April 2014 were collected from hospital records. Anaemia was defined according to WHO criteria (hemoglobin <13g/dl for males and <12g/dl for females. 1:1 matching was done for anemic and non-anemic patients based on propensity for potentially confounding variables. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between anaemia and in-hospital mortality. MatchIt package for R software was used for propensity matching and SPSS 16.0.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: 2449 patients undergoing valvular surgery with or without coronary artery grafting were included. Anaemia was present in 37.1% (33.91% among males & 40.88% among females. Unadjusted OR for mortality was 1.6 in anemic group (95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] - 1.041-2.570; p=0.033. 1:1 matching was done on the basis of propensity score for anaemia (866 pairs. Balancing was confirmed using standardized differences. Anaemia had an OR of 1.8 for mortality (95% CI- 1.042 to 3.094, P=0.035. Hematocrit of < 20 on bypass was associated with higher mortality. Conclusion: Preoperative anaemia is an independent risk factor associated with in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing valvular heart surgery.

  7. Fibrilacin auricular en el postoperatorio de ciruga cardaca: Prevalencia y tiempo de internacin Atrial fibrillation in postoperative cardiac surgery: Prevalence and hospitalized period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro E. Contreras

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available La fibrilacin auricular es el trastorno del ritmo ms frecuente luego de la ciruga cardaca. En estudios previos se ha asociado a prolongacin de la internacin, aumento en los costos e incremento en la mortalidad. El objetivo de este estudio fue conocer la prevalencia de fibrilacin auricular en el postoperatorio de ciruga cardaca y determinar el efecto en el tiempo de estada hospitalaria. Se analizaron retrospectivamente las historias clnicas de pacientes sometidos a ciruga cardaca consecutivamente (de revascularizacin miocrdica, valvulares o ambas entre enero 2006 y noviembre 2008. El punto final evaluado en el postoperatorio fue la presencia de fibrilacin auricular. Se dividi a la muestra en dos grupos segn tuvieran o no fibrilacin auricular, y se compararon las variables clnicas y el tiempo de estada hospitalaria. Ciento setenta y dos pacientes fueron operados en este perodo. Se excluyeron del anlisis siete pacientes por falta de datos. La edad media fue 64.2 9.5 aos, con predominio del sexo masculino. La fibrilacin auricular fue la complicacin ms frecuente (23.6%. El tiempo promedio de internacin fue 6.7 4.6 das. No hubo diferencias relevantes al comparar la estada hospitalaria entre los grupos con o sin fibrilacin auricular, 7.5 4.1 das vs. 6.5 4.7 das respectivamente, p = 0.21. La presencia de fibrilacin auricular no prolong la hospitalizacin. Probablemente una estrategia de prevencin indiscriminada no sera costo-efectiva.Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder after cardiac surgery. In previous studies it has been associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased costs and mortality. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in cardiac surgery and its impact on the hospitalization period. Medical records of consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, valvular, or both between January 2006 and November 2008 were included and retrospectively analyzed. Primary outcome was the presence of postoperative atrial fibrillation. The sample was divided into two groups, with and without atrial fibrillation in the postoperative. The clinical variables and length of hospital stay were compared between both groups. A total of 172 patients underwent surgery in this period. Seven patients were excluded from analysis due to lack of data. The mean age was 64.2 9.5 years, and they were predominantly male. Atrial fibrillation was the most common complication (23.6%. The average length hospital stay was 6.7 4.6 days. There were no significant differences between both groups, with atrial fibrillation (7.5 4.1 days, and without (6.5 4.7 days, p = 0.21. The presence of atrial fibrillation did not prolong hospitalization. Probably, such strategy of prevention would not be cost-effective.

  8. Acute Kidney Injury in ICU Patients Following Non-Cardiac Surgery at Masih Daneshvari Hospital: Joint Modeling Application

    OpenAIRE

    Khoundabi, Batoul; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Mansourian, Marjan; Kazempoor Dizaji, Mehdi; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) is often complicated by early acute kidney injury (AKI). AKI is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Risk factors and incidence of AKI have been notably high following non-cardiac surgery in the past decade. The aim of this study was to determine the hazard rate of AKI, the effect of risk factors of AKI and also to assess the changes in urine output (UO) as a predictor of AKI using joint modeling in patients undergoing n...

  9. Comparison of effective doses between computed tomography cardiac angiography and conventional angiography at Pantai Hospital, Kuala Lumpur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Faizal; Moin, F. H. A.

    2013-05-01

    This research studies two types of cardiac angiography procedures, namely Computed Tomography Cardiac Angiography (CTCA) and Conventional Angiography (CA). The following research was executed to estimate the difference of mean effective doses that the patients received through both procedures. The mean dose-length-product (DLP) from CTCA and mean dose-area-product (DAP) from CA were utilized in calculating the effective doses. The result shows that the mean effective dose for CTCA and CA are 1.71±0.59 mSv and 53.25±14.22 mSv respectively. This proves that the mean effective dose received by patients undergoing CA is higher than patients undergoing CTCA. According to t-test, both procedures differ significantly, with a difference amounting to p<0.0001. The increases of the effective dose that the patients received through CA procedure were influenced by exposure time, the coronary anatomical condition, the operator's experience, and the operation methods.

  10. [Cardiac rehabilitation: current status and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahmann, H W

    2012-02-01

    The goal of cardiac rehabilitation is to support heart patients using a multidisciplinary team in order to obtain the best possible physical and mental health and achieve long-term social reintegration. In addition to improving physical fitness, cardiac rehabilitation restores self-confidence, thus better equipping patients to deal with mental illness and improving their social reintegration ("participation"). Once the causes of disease have been identified and treated as effectively as possible, drug and lifestyle changes form the focus of cardiac rehabilitation measures. In particular diseases, rehabilitation offers the opportunity for targeted educational courses for diabetics or drug dose escalation, as well as special training for heart failure patients. A nationwide network of outpatient heart groups is available for targeted follow-up. Cardiac patients predominantly rehabilitated in follow-up rehabilitation are older and have greater morbidity than in the past; moreover, they generally come out of acute clinical care earlier and are discharged from hospital more quickly. The proportion of severely ill and multimorbid patients presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in cardiac rehabilitation, although cardiac rehabilitation was not initially conceived for this patient group. The benefit of cardiac rehabilitation has been a well documented reduction in morbidity and mortality. However, hurdles remain, partly due to the patients themselves, partly due to the health insurers. Some insurance providers still refuse rehabilitation for non-ST-segment elevation infarction. In principle rehabilitation can be carried out in an inpatient or an outpatient setting. Specific allocation criteria have not yet been established, but the structure and process quality of outpatient rehabilitation should correspond to that of the inpatient setting. The choice between the two settings should be based on pragmatic criteria. Both settings should be possible for an individual patient. Cardiac rehabilitation is already focusing on older, sicker and polymorbid patients; this will become ever more the case in the future. There is still a need for future clinical research for these patients. PMID:22190193

  11. Cardiac Arrest: the Changing Incidence of Ventricular Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Steven P.; Halperin, Henry R.

    2015-01-01

    There are more than 300,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in the USA annually, which can be grouped into those presenting with tachyarrhythmic (shockable) rhythms and those presenting with non-tachyarrhythmic rhythms. The incidence of tachyarrhythmic rhythms, which include ventricular fibrillation (VF) and pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT), has been noted to be progressively decreasing in multiple studies of OHCA. Improved medical and surgical therapies for ischemic heart diseas...

  12. Impact of hospital infections on patients outcomes undergoing cardiac surgery at Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Marília

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucieni Oliveira Conterno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study aimed to determine the incidence of nosocomial infections, the risk factors and the impact of these infections on mortality among patients undergoing to cardiac surgery. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of 2060 consecutive patients from 2006 to 2012 at the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Marília. Results: 351 nosocomial infections were diagnosed (17%, 227 non-surgical infections and 124 surgical wound infections. Major infections were mediastinitis (2.0%, urinary tract infection (2.8%, pneumonia (2.3%, and bloodstream infection (1.7%. The in-hospital mortality was 6.4%. Independent variables associated with non-surgical infections were age > 60 years (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.31, ICU stay > 2 days (OR 5, 49, 95% CI 2.98 to 10, 09, mechanical ventilation > 2 days (OR11, 93, 95% CI 6.1 to 23.08, use of urinary catheter > 3 days (OR 4.85 95% CI 2.95 -7.99. Non-surgical nosocomial infections were more frequent in patients with surgical wound infection (32.3% versus 7.2%, OR 6.1, 95% CI 4.03 to 9.24. Independent variables associated with mortality were age greater than 60 years (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.4 to3.0, use of vasoactive drugs (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.9 to 6, 0, insulin use (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.8, surgical reintervention (OR 4.4; 95% CI 2.1 to 9.0 pneumonia (OR 4.3; 95% CI 2.1 to 8.9 and bloodstream infection (OR = 4.7, 95% CI 2.0 to 11.2. Conclusion: Non-surgical hospital infections are common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery; they increase the chance of surgical wound infection and mortality.

  13. Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C versus 36°C after Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; Cronberg, Tobias; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Horn, Janneke; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wise, Matt P; Aneman, Anders; Al-Subaie, Nawaf; Boesgaard, Søren; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Brunetti, Iole; Bugge, Jan Frederik; Hingston, Christopher D; Juffermans, Nicole P; Koopmans, Matty; Køber, Lars; Langørgen, Jørund; Lilja, Gisela; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Rundgren, Malin; Rylander, Christian; Smid, Ondrej; Werer, Christophe; Winkel, Per; Friberg, Hans; Investigators, the TTM Trial

    2013-01-01

    Background Unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have a high risk of death or poor neurologic function. Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended by international guidelines, but the supporting evidence is limited, and the target temperature associated with the best outcome is...... unknown. Our objective was to compare two target temperatures, both intended to prevent fever. Methods In an international trial, we randomly assigned 950 unconscious adults after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause to targeted temperature management at either 33°C or 36°C. The...... primary outcome was all-cause mortality through the end of the trial. Secondary outcomes included a composite of poor neurologic function or death at 180 days, as evaluated with the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scale and the modified Rankin scale. Results In total, 939 patients were included in the...

  14. Gasto de hogares durante la hospitalización de menores derechohabientes, con diagnóstico de leucemia, en dos hospitales en México Out-of-pocket expenditures during hospitalization of young leukemia patients with state medical insurance in two Mexican hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo Rocha-García

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar el gasto de los hogares durante la primera hospitalización en 51 menores de 15 años de edad con leucemia, atendidos en dos hospitales del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, en México durante 1997. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal hecho en 1997 en el Distrito Federal y en León, Guanajuato. Se aplicó un cuestionario a los padres de 51 menores de 15 años de edad con diagnóstico de leucemia, hospitalizados por primera vez, en dos unidades del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Se capturó la información de los costos directos e indirectos enfrentados por los hogares durante esa primera hospitalización. Se aplicó el Indice de Precios al Consumidor (1997-2002 para expresar las estimaciones en precios de 2002. Se estimaron indicadores de gasto promedio y gastos catastróficos. Se establecieron los factores asociados, mediante un modelo de regresión lineal, utilizando el gasto total durante la hospitalización como variable dependiente. RESULTADOS: El costo promedio por paciente hospitalizado es de 7 318 pesos. El 86% corresponde a gastos asociados con la atención y 14% a costos indirectos. Para 14% de los hogares este gasto fue catastrófico. En 47% de los casos la erogación rebasó 100% de su ingreso disponible durante el periodo. Estos gastos se asociaron con lugar de residencia, nivel de ingreso y tipo de seguro. CONCLUSIONES: Ser derechohabiente de la seguridad social reduce los gastos de bolsillo por atención directa de los pacientes, pero no reduce los gastos complementarios, que pueden resultar onerosos para una elevada proporción de hogares. El costo de la primera hospitalización significó, en más de la mitad de los casos estudiados, el consumo de los ahorros, el endeudamiento o la venta de propiedades de los hogares, y dificultó la continuidad del tratamiento.OBJECTIVE: To estimate out-of-pocket expenditures for health care during the first hospitalization of children treated for leukemia in two hospitals of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social -IMSS-. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Mexico City and Leon, Guanajato, Mexico in 1997. The study population consisted of the parents of 51 children under 15 years of age diagnosed with leukemia, who were hospitalized for the first time in two IMSS hospitals. A questionnaire was applied to participants to obtain direct and indirect expenditures during that period. Consumer price indexes (1997-2002 were used to estimate expenditure prices for 2002. Average expenditures and catastrophic expenditures were estimated. Factors associated with expenditures were analyzed using a linear regression model in which the dependent variable was the total household expenditures during hospitalization. RESULTS: The average household cost per hospitalization was 7 318 pesos, 86% of which corresponded to medical care and 14% to indirect costs. Catastrophic expenditures occurred in 14% of households. In 47% of household expenditures exceeded 100% of the total household income during the hospitalization period. Expenditures during hospitalization were associated with place of residence, income level, and type of medical insurance. CONCLUSIONS: Being an IMSS policyholder decreased out-of-pocket expenditures, but not complementary expenditures, which may still be unaffordable for a large segment of the population. For more than a half of the households studied, continuity of care was compromised, as expenditures during the first hospitalization entailed using up savings, going into debt, and/or selling household property.

  15. [An epidemiological study of cardiac emergency cases in the province of Florence and the Southeast Florence Hospital area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marinis, A; Buoncristiano, U; Pagni, E; Piacentino, V; Pailli, F; Santoro, G; Vergassola, R

    1980-05-01

    The national data provided by ANMCO in 1978 show a total of 2.5 m heart cases in Italy, including 1.5 m instances of ischaemic cardiopathy, and an annual incidence of 105,000 new cases of myocardial infarct. An assessment was made of the 1976 and 1977 pattern of "cardiological emergency cases" (ISTAT codes 402, 410-14, 427-29, 441, 450, 519, 997) in the province of Florence and two of its social and health consortia: 39 (municipalities of Dicomano, Londa, Pelago, Pontassieve, Rufina, S. Godenzo), and 51 (municipalities of Borgata Ripoli, Greve, Impruneta, S. Casciano, Tavarnelle). The records of the S. Maria Nuova, Florence Hospital were used for in-patient data, since this is the only hospital in the province with automatic filing by discharge diagnosis according to the ISTAT code. Mortality in emergency cases in the two consortia m and the province fell from 14.68% and 17.17% to 11.20% and 18.11% respectively in the two years. In both populations, the highest incidence was between 70 and 74 yr of age in 1976, and between 65 and 69 yr in 1977. In the case of infarct, mortality moved from 18.75 to 7.58% (consortia) and from 22.40% to 20.93% (province), with maximum incidences in 1976 between 70 and 74 yr (consortia and province), and in 1977 between 65 and 69 yr (province) and between 55 and 59 yr (consortia). Admissions were greatest in number on Mondays (peak hours: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.) whereas no difference was noted between one month and another. The Hospital Resuscitation Centre, which serves the two consortia, received 45 emergency cases in 1977, including 25 infarct patients. Total mortality was 13.33% (infarct 20%). The slight numeric discrepancy between in the latter data and those held in the computer suggests that the ISTAT code may not be easy to use and not always employed by physicians in a rational manner. PMID:7219745

  16. [Pre-hospital medicine and medical control system in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Seizan

    2016-02-01

    It is necessary to treat the patient from the site of the emergency to raise a lifesaving rate of the patient. As a prime example would be out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Once you start the treatment after hospital arrival, cardiac arrest patient can't be life-saving. It is necessary to start the chest compression, etc. from the site of the emergency. Medical care to be carried out on the scene of emergency is the pre-hospital care. In recent years, improvement of the pre-hospital care is remarkable in Japan. It is because of that the quantity and quality of the emergency life-saving technician are being enhanced. And also doctor-helicopter system have been enhanced. Medical control is a critical component of the improvement. PMID:26915258

  17. Resultados de la revascularizacin coronaria en el cardiocentro del Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras, en un perodo de 20 aos Results of coronary revascularization in the Cardiac Center of the "Hermanos Ameijeiras" Clinical Surgical Hospital over 20 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Nafeh Abi-Rezk

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIN. En el cardiocentro del Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras, la ciruga cardiovascular se practica hace ms de 20 aos, a lo largo de los cuales se fueron introduciendo y desarrollando diversas tcnicas de revascularizacin miocrdica. El objetivo de esta investigacin fue describir los resultados de la ciruga de revascularizacin coronaria en ese perodo. MTODOS. Se realiz una investigacin descriptiva, longitudinal, retrospectiva, con cortes transversales quinquenales, comparando cada quinquenio con el siguiente. Del total de 763 pacientes sometidos a revascularizacin coronaria en el perodo comprendido entre enero de 1985 y diciembre del 2004, se excluyeron 17 por presentar historias clnicas extraviadas o con datos incompletos y 15 pacientes operados sin circulacin extracorprea, por lo que el universo de estudio qued conformado por 731 pacientes, operados todos con circulacin extracorprea. RESULTADOS. Predominaron los pacientes con edades entre 51 y 60 aos de edad y del sexo masculino; con el tabaquismo y la hipertensin arterial como factores de riesgo ms frecuentes. Los estados clnicos predominantes fueron la angina estable crnica y la angina inestable. Predomin la revascularizacin con tres puentes con tendencia al ascenso, as como el uso de la vena safena, pero con una evolucin ascendente en el empleo de la arteria mamaria interna y disminucin en la implantacin de la vena safena como nico conducto. El tiempo de circulacin extracorprea y de paro anxico mostr una tendencia a la disminucin. Las complicaciones ms frecuentes fueron las sepsis urinaria y respiratoria. Disminuyeron las muertes por causas cardacas, entre las cuales el fallo multiorgnico y el bajo gasto cardaco fueron las principales. Disminuy el bajo gasto transoperatorio pero hubo tendencia al aumento en el posoperatorio y del fallo multiorgnico. CONCLUSIONES. El uso de revascularizacin coronaria tuvo una tendencia ascendente en estos 20 aos, sobre todo en pacientes de la tercera edad y del sexo masculino, en los que el tabaquismo y la hipertensin arterial fueron los factores de riesgo mayormente asociados. Predomin la revascularizacin con tres puentes y el uso de la safena, pero con tendencia al uso ascendente de la arteria mamaria interna. La mortalidad tuvo un comportamiento decreciente.INTRODUCTION. In Cardiac Center of the "Hermanos Ameijeiras" Clinical Surgical Hospital cardiovascular surgery is done from more twenty years ago introducing and developing different techniques of myocardial revascularization. The objective of present research was to describe the results of coronary revascularization over that period. METHODS. A retrospective, longitudinal and descriptive research with five-year cross-sectional cuts was conducted comparing each five-year period with the following one. From the total of 763 patients underwent coronary revascularization from January,1985 to December, 2004, 17 patients were excluded due to missing medical records or with incomplete data and 15 patients operated on without extracorporeal circulation, thus, the universe included 731 patients operated on with this technique. RESULTS. There was predominance the patients aged between 51 and 60years and male sex where smoking and high blood pressure were the more frequent risk factors. The predominant clinical stages were the chronic stable angina and the unstable angina as well as revascularization with three bridges and a trend to rise, as well as the saphenous vein use but with an ascending evolution as the only duct. The time of extracorporeal circulation and anoxic arrest showed a trend to decrease. The more frequent complications were the urinary and respiratory sepsis. There was a decrease of deaths from cardiac causes among which the multiorgan failure and the low cardiac output were the major ones. The low transoperative output decreased but there was a trend to increase during the postoperative one and of the multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS. The use of c

  18. Platelet aggregation and clot formation in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest treated with induced hypothermia and dual platelet inhibition with aspirin and ticagrelor; a prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Kander, Thomas; Dankiewicz, Josef; Friberg, Hans; Schtt, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We conducted a prospective observational study in cardiac arrest survivors treated with mild induced hypothermia, evaluating different platelet function tests at hypo-and normothermia. We also investigated the relation between gastric emptying and vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). Methods: Comatose survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest were included and divided into two groups, depending on whether dual platelet inhibition with peroral ticagrelor and aspirin wa...

  19. Ways out of danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume divides into five sections: ways out of danger; pressure leading into danger; what might save us, and will it grow to become effective; tedious paths out of danger; companions out of danger. The author puts the question whether the true art of politics will be restored. He shows that by reducing politics to mere crisis management we shall not be enabled to overcome the serious problems of the eighties. He points out future possibilities by making clear the chances and misdevelopments of energy policy, of foreign, development and defence policy. The political experience of recent years, the new approach showing different needs and ways of life should be taken seriously as hopeful signs and ought to be reflected in politics again. (HSCH)

  20. Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due to Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellemo, Hugo; Hansen, Andreas E; Øines, Dennis A; Nilsen, Thor O; Wik, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Survival from pediatric cardiac arrest due to trauma has been reported to be 0.0%-8.8%. Some argue that resuscitation efforts in the case of trauma-related cardiac arrests are futile. We describe a successful outcome in the case of a child who suffered cardiac arrest caused by external traumatic airway obstruction. Our case illustrates how to deal with pediatric traumatic cardiac arrests in an out-of-hospital environment. It also illustrates how good clinical treatment in these situations may be supported by correct treatment after hospital admission when it is impossible to ventilate the patient to provide sufficient oxygen delivery to vital organs. This case relates to a lifeless child of 3-5 years, blue, and trapped by an electrically operated garage door. The first ambulance arrived to find several men trying to bend the frame and the door apart in order to extricate the child, who was hanging in the air with head and neck squeezed between the horizontally-moving garage door and the vertical door frame. One paramedic found a car jack and used it to push the door and the frame apart, allowing the lifeless child to be extricated. Basic life support was then initiated. Intubation was performed by the anesthesiologist without drugs. With FiO2 1.0 the first documented SaO2 was Spontaneous Circulation was achieved after thirty minutes, and she was transported to the hospital. After a few hours she was put on venous-arterial ECMO for 5.5 days and discharged home after two months. Outpatient examinations during the rest of 2013 were positive, and the child found not to be suffering from any injuries, either physical or mental. The last follow-up in October 2014 demonstrated she had made a 100% recovery and she started school in August 2014. PMID:26930137

  1. Hope out of Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Roy F.; Tolbert, Marsha; Myers-Oliver, Donna; Brissett, Julia M.; Roland, Annissa J.

    2007-01-01

    In "A Framework of Poverty," Ruby Payne (1998) itemizes the things that characterize poverty-stricken people. She talks about how hard it is for a person to move out of poverty. To not pass poverty on to another generation, one must have a vision. One must have a desire to achieve a better life or a strong support system. Schools must become the…

  2. [Assessment of the prognosis in patients who remain comatose after resuscitation from cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Emilie; Fedder, Anette Marianne; Dyrskog, Stig Eric; Degn, Niels Sanderhoff; Hassager, Christian; Jensen, Reinhold; Kirkegaard, Hans; Weber, Sven; Hoffmann-Petersen, Joachim Torp; Larsen, Niels Heden; Strange, Ditte Gry; Sonne, Morten; Lippert, Freddy K

    2014-06-30

    In Denmark there are around 3,500 unexpected cardiac arrests (CA) out of hospital each year. There is an unknown number of CA in hospitals. The survival rate after CA outside a hospital in Denmark is 10% after 30 days. There are varying data for the neurological outcome in this group of patients. The purpose of this work is to disseminate new knowledge and to help standardizing the treatment in the group of patients who remain comatose after being resuscitated from CA. Assessment of the prognosis for a patient in this group can be made after 72 hours and a multi-modal approach to the patient is required. PMID:25294674

  3. Learning Out of Leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Mougeot, Mathilde; Picard, Dominique; Tribouley, Karine

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the estimation problem in a regression-type model. To be able to deal with potential high dimensions, we provide a procedure called LOL, for Learning Out of Leaders with no optimization step. LOL is an auto-driven algorithm with two thresholding steps. A first adaptive thresholding helps to select leaders among the initial regressors in order to obtain a first reduction of dimensionality. Then a second thresholding is performed on the linear regression upon the leaders...

  4. Learning Out of Leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Kerkyacharian, Gerard; Mougeot, Mathilde; Picard, Dominique; Tribouley, Karine

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of selection and estimation in a high dimensional regression-type model. We propose a procedure with no optimization called LOL, for Learning Out of Leaders. LOL is an auto-driven algorithm with two thresholding steps. A first adaptive thresholding helps to select leaders among the initial regressors in such a way to reduce the dimensionality. Then a second thresholding follows the estimations and predictions performed by linear regression on the leaders. T...

  5. Ritmo circadiano y variaciones temporales en el paro cardiaco súbito extrahospitalario Circadian rhythm and time variations in out-hospital sudden cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. López-Messa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Analizar las características cronobiológicas y las variaciones temporales del paro cardiaco extrahospitalario (PCEH. Diseño: Estudio descriptivo retrospectivo. Pacientes: Todos los casos de PCEH de origen cardíaco registrados en la base de datos del servicio de emergencias médicas (SEM de la Comunidad Autónoma de Castilla y León (España durante 18 meses. Variables de interés principales: Edad, sexo, recuperación de la circulación espontánea, primer ritmo monitorizado (desfibrilable /no desfibrilable, lugar de alerta [(hogar, lugar público, centro atención primaria (AP], testigo (familiar, transeúnte, fuerzas de seguridad, personal AP, hora de alerta (0-8; 8-16; 16-24, hora de activación del equipo de emergencias, hora de atención y día de la semana. Análisis univariante mediante Chi², varianza y tests no paramétricos. Análisis cronobiológico mediante transformada rápida de Fourier y test Cosinor. Resultados: Se estudiaron 1.286 casos registrados entre enero 2007 y junio 2008. Se observaron diferencias estadísticas significativas en menor edad (pObjectives: To analyze the chronobiological and time variations of out- hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. Design: A retrospective descriptive study was made. Patients: All cases of OHCA of cardiac origin registered over 18 months in the database of the emergency medical service (EMS of the Autonomous Community of Castilla y León (Spain were evaluated. Variables analyzed: Age, sex, recovery of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, first monitored rhythm (amenable / not amenable to defibrillation, alert site [(home, public place, primary care (PC center], alerting person (family, witness, law enforcement member, PC center staff, alert time (0-8; 8-16; 16-24, emergency team activation time, care time and day of the week. Univariate analysis (chi-squared, variance, and nonparametric tests comparing the variables in three periods of 8hours. Chronobiological analysis by fast Fourier transform and Cosinor testing. Results: We studied 1286 cases reported between January 2007 and June 2008. Statistically significant differences were observed in terms of younger age, higher incidence in the victim's home, and greater frequency of family-cohabiting persons as witnesses in the period between 0 and 8hours. Chronobiological analysis found daily rhythm (circadian with acrophase at 11.16h (p<0.001 and weekly rhythm (circaseptan with acrophase on Wednesday (p<0.05. The median alert time-care time interval and emergency team activation time-care time were 11.7min and 8.0min, respectively, without differences between periods. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the presence of a daily rhythm of emergence of OHCA with a morning peak and a weekly rhythm with a peak on Wednesdays. These results can guide the planning of resources and improvements in response in certain time periods.

  6. Mediastinitis after cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Eklund, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Mediastinitis as a complication after cardiac surgery is rare but disastrous increasing the hospital stay, hospital costs, morbidity and mortality. It occurs in 1-3 % of patients after median sternotomy. The purpose of this study was to find out the risk factors and also to investigate new ways to prevent mediastinitis. First, we assessed operating room air contamination monitoring by comparing the bacteriological technique with continuous particle counting in low level contamination ach...

  7. Out of the woods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, J L

    1992-01-01

    Throughout Africa, Asia and Latin America women are pushed out of forests and from their maintenance by governments and private interests for cash crop development disregarding the role of women in conserving forests. In developing countries forests are a source of wood for fuel; 60-80% of women gather wood for family needs in America. Fruits, vegetables, and nuts gathered in woods enhance their diet. Indonesian women pick bananas, mangos, guavas, and avocados from trees around their homes; in Senegal shea-nut butter is made from a local tree fruit to be sold for cash. Women provide labor also in logging, wood processing, and tree nurseries. They make charcoal and grow seedlings for sale. In India 40% of forest income and 75% of forest products export earnings are derived from nonwood resources. Poor, rural women make items out of bamboo, rattan, and rope to sell: 48% of women in an Egyptian province make a living through such activities. In India 600,000 women harvest tendu leaves for use as wrappings for cigarettes. The expansion of commercial tree plantations replacing once communal natural forests has forced poor households to spend up to 4-% of their income on fuel that they used to find in forests. Tribal women in India know the medicinal uses of 300 forest species, and women in Sierra Leone could name 31 products they obtained or made from trees and bushes, while men named only 8 items. Only 1 forestry project appraised by the World Bank during 1984-97 named women as beneficiaries, and only 1 out of 33 rural development programs funded by the World Bank did. Women provide food, fuel, and water for their families in subsistence economies, they know sustainable methods of forestry, yet they are not included in development programs whose success or failure could hinge on more attention to women's contribution and on more equity. PMID:12285836

  8. Patient-reported health status prior to cardiac resynchronisation therapy identifies patients at risk for poor survival and prolonged hospital stays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, H.; Denollet, J.; Meine, M.; Pedersen, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient-reported factors have largely been neglected in search of predictors of response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT). The current study aimed to examine the independent value of pre-implantation patient-reported health status in predicting four-year survival and cardiac...... failure-specific health status. Data on patients' demographic, clinical and psychological characteristics at baseline, and on cardiac-related hospitalisations and all-cause deaths during a median follow-up of 3.9 years were obtained from purpose-designed questionnaires and patients' medical records....... RESULTS: Results of multivariable Cox regression analyses showed that poor patient-reported health status (KCCQ score < 50) prior to implantation was associated with a 2.5-fold increased risk of cardiac hospitalisation or all-cause death, independent of sociodemographic, clinical and psychological risk...

  9. IMPLEMENTATION AND FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ACORDING TO ISO 9001 STANDARD AT THE DEPARTMENT OF CARDIAC SURGERY, DUBRAVA UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DUBRAVA

    OpenAIRE

    Barić, Davor; Brkić, Kristina; Sutlić, Željko; NIKIĆ, NADA; Grubišić, Milka; Devčić-Jeres, Ana

    2007-01-01

    The need for quality management system (QMS) at cardiac surgery department has been recognized for some time. QMS should help in management of all processes prevent organizational mistakes and provide a tool for unbiased outcome analysis. Comprehensive process analysis of surgical treatment of cardiac patient has been carried out. Requirements of the ISO 9001:2000 standard: quality management system, management responsibility, resource management, product realization, measurement analysis and...

  10. Out of time?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Christian Dagnis; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2015-01-01

    implications of accelerated EU decision-making are expected to have repercussions beyond the EU system and in other institutions impinging on the role of national parliaments. This study examines the implications of an alteration of EU political time on national parliaments ability to scrutinize their...... agenda on EU timescapes is applied. This study finds that the clocks of most national parliaments are out of time with the EU decision-mode of early agreements, which severely hampers the national parliaments ability to scrutinize national governments.......Co-decisions between the Council of Ministers and the European Parliament are increasingly adopted as early agreements. Recent EU studies have pinpointed how this informal turn in EU governance has altered the existing balance of power between EU actors and within EU institutions. However, the...

  11. Learning Out of Leaders

    CERN Document Server

    Kerkyacharian, Gerard; Picard, Dominique; Tribouley, Karine

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of selection and estimation in a high dimensional regression-type model. We propose a procedure with no optimization called LOL, for Learning Out of Leaders. LOL is an auto-driven algorithm with two thresholding steps. A first adaptive thresholding helps to select leaders among the initial regressors in such a way to reduce the dimensionality. Then a second thresholding follows the estimations and predictions performed by linear regression on the leaders. Theoretical results are proved. As an estimation procedure, LOL is optimal since the upper exponential bounds are achieved. Rates of convergence are provided and show that LOL is also consistent as a selection procedure. An extensive computational experiment is conducted to emphasize the practical good performances of LOL.

  12. Creativity out of difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Gillespie, Alex

    Human creativity is ubiquitous, occurring in everyday actions and interactions. Accordingly, we suggest, it must be grounded in the most basic processes of human symbolic activity. This presentation seeks to identify the roots of human creativity in the most fundamental cultural psychological...... by symbolic meanings of anticipated outcomes, but the outcomes of action are often surprising. Second there is always a gap between the perspectives of self and other. Not only does the other ‘exceed’ self (Bakhtin, 1923), but the other also sees things about self which self is unaware of. Central to...... processes of semiotically mediated activity. Starting with the mediational pyramid of self-other-object-sign, we suggest that creativity arises out of two disjunctions, differences or ‘gaps.’ First there is always a gap between representation, the sign, and the world, or what is signified. Action is guided...

  13. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme after myocardial infarction (MI) improves quality of life and results in reduced cardiac mortality and recurrence of MI. Hospitals worldwide face problems with low participation rates in rehabilitation programmes. Inequality in...... cardiac rehabilitation programme. Methods: From 1 September 2002 to 31 December 2005, 388 first-incidence MI patients ?75 years were hospitalised. Register check for newly hospitalised MI patients, screening interview, and systematic referral were conducted by a project nurse. Patients were referred to a...... standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements...

  14. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme after myocardial infarction (MI) improves quality of life and results in reduced cardiac mortality and recurrence of MI. Hospitals worldwide face problems with low participation rates in rehabilitation programmes. Inequality in...... cardiac rehabilitation programme. Methods: From 1 September 2002 to 31 December 2005, 388 first-incidence MI patients ≤75 years were hospitalised. Register check for newly hospitalised MI patients, screening interview, and systematic referral were conducted by a project nurse. Patients were referred to a...... standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements...

  15. The effect of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Mavrogianni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurological impairment is common in survivors after cardiac arrest. Mild therapeutic hypothermia (32-34°C has been suggested to be useful in improving both survival rates and neurological outcome of these patients. Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore the relation between the method of mild therapeutic hypothermia, in ICU, with the traditional method (normothermia, for the treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivals, after restoring spontaneous circulation. Material and method: As for the design, it was a retrospective study. The studied population consisted of 25 patients who suffered cardiac arrest, with initial cardiac rhythm ventricular fibrillation (VF or ventricular tachycardia (VT,who were successfully resuscitated and hospitalized after restoration of spontaneous circulation. During a 2-year period (2009-2011 these patients were treated with hypothermia (32-34°C with ice packs or an endovascular cooling device. Results: he systematic cooling of survivals, between 32-34°C for a 24-hour period, increased the probability of survival (p=0.17 and improved neurological outcomes (p= 0.06, compared to normothermia. Complications, such as arrhythmias, bleeding and infections were treated by rewarming. Conclusions: Although there is a number of complications associated with hypothermia such as arrhythmias, bleeding disorders and infection, none seems to relate to adverse patient outcomes.

  16. Sympathoadrenal activation and endothelial damage are inter correlated and predict increased mortality in patients resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. a post Hoc sub-study of patients from the TTM-trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael; Hassager, Christian; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2015-01-01

    at a single site ICU. Blood was sampled a median 135 min (Inter Quartile Range (IQR) 103-169) after OHCA. Plasma catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline) and serum endothelial biomarkers (syndecan-1, thrombomodulin, sE-selectin, sVE-cadherin) were measured at admission (immediately after...... randomization). We had access to data on demography, medical history, characteristics of the OHCA, patients and 180-day outcome. RESULTS: Adrenaline and noradrenaline correlated positively with syndecan-1 and thrombomodulin i.e., biomarkers reflecting endothelial damage (both p<0.05). Overall 180-day mortality...... was 35%. By Cox analyses, plasma adrenaline, serum sE-selectin, reflecting endothelial cell activation, and thrombomodulin levels predicted mortality. However, thrombomodulin was the only biomarker independently associated with mortality after adjusting for gender, age, rhythm (shockable vs. non...

  17. The association of targeted temperature management at 33 and 36 °C with outcome in patients with moderate shock on admission after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annborn, Martin; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Nielsen, Niklas; Ullén, Susann; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian; Wanscher, Michael; Hovdenes, Jan; Pellis, Tommaso; Pelosi, Paolo; Wise, Matt P; Cronberg, Tobias; Erlinge, David; Friberg, Hans

    2014-01-01

    supportive measures to maintain a blood pressure ≥90 mmHg and/or clinical signs of end-organ hypoperfusion. In this post hoc analysis reported here, we further analyzed the 139 patients with shock at admission; all had been randomized to receive intervention at 33 °C (TTM33; n = 71) or 36 °C (TTM36; n = 68......). Primary outcome was 180-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were intensive care unit (ICU) and 30-day mortality, severity of circulatory shock assessed by mean arterial pressure, serum lactate, fluid balance and the extended Sequential Organ Failure assessment (SOFA) score. RESULTS: There was no...

  18. Extracorporeal Life Support during Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation in a Porcine Model of Ventricular Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Joshua C.; Salcido, David D.; Sundermann, Matthew L.; Koller, Allison C.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Implementation barriers for extracorporeal life support in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) include initiation delay and candidate selection. We explored ischemia duration, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration, and physiologic variables that discriminated animals with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). We instrumented eight female swine (31.9 ± 9.8 kg) with femoral artery and external jugular vein cannula. After 8 (n = 4) or 15 (n = 4) minutes ventricular fibrillation (VF)...

  19. Resuscitation of patients suffering from sudden cardiac arrests in nursing homes is not futile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sholm, Helle; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Lippert, Freddy K; Kber, Lars; Wanscher, Michael; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has increased in recent years, and new data are therefore needed to avoid unsubstantiated statements when debating futility of resuscitation attempts following OHCA in nursing home (NH)-residents. We aimed to investigate the outcome...... and prognosis after OHCA in NH. METHODS: Consecutive Emergency Medical Service (EMS) attended OHCA-patients in Copenhagen during 2007-2011 were included. Utstein-criteria for pre-hospital data and review of individual patient charts for in-hospital post-resuscitation care were collected. RESULTS: A...... total of 2541 consecutive OHCA-patients were recorded, 245 (10%) of who were current NH-residents. NH-patients were older, more frequently female, had more witnessed arrests, fewer shockable primary rhythm and assumed cardiac aetiology, but shorter time to the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC...

  20. Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in Cardiac Arrest: Current Guidelines and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Koniari, Ioanna; Apostolopoulou, Christina; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the review was to summarize the literature over the last 25 years regarding bicarbonate administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms "bicarbonates" and "cardiac arrest", limited to human studies and reviews published in English (or at least with a meaningful abstract in English) in the last 25 years. Clinical and experimental data raised questions regarding the safety and effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB) administration during cardiac arrest. Earlier advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines recommended routine bicarbonate administration as part of the ACLS algorithm, but recent guidelines no longer recommend its use. The debate in the literature is ongoing, but at the present time, SB administration is only recommended for cardiac arrest related to hypokalemia or overdose of tricyclic antidepressants. Several studies challenge the assumption that bicarbonate administration is beneficial for treatment of acidosis in cardiac arrest. At the present time, there is a trend against using bicarbonates in cardiac arrest, and this trend is supported by guidelines published by professional societies and organizations. PMID:26985247

  1. Cardiac pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention applies to improvements in cardiac pacemaker circuits and in the oscillators used therein, and in particular to improvements in cardiac pacemaker circuits with which stimulating pulses may also be generated in the absence of natural cardiac pulses. (orig./AK)

  2. Causes and indications for reoperation in valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG in 915 patients in cardiac surgery department in Imam Khomeini Hospital, 1374-77

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmehr H

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Valvular and coronary artery disease are among the most important causes of disability and death in the world and Iran as well. Every year, half a million death because of these diseases is reported in United State. The incidence of degenerative and valvular diseases of heart is increasing. Considering the industrialization of our country, the incidence of these kind of problems are increasing as well. In this study, there is an attempt to recognize the causes of cardiac surgery. We conducted a retrospective study in 915 cardiac surgery patients (630 CABG and 285 valve replacement from 1374 to 1377. In CABG patients, there were 46 cases of reoperation (78.3 percent male 21.7 percent female. The most reoperations for bleeding was less than 24 hours in 90.3 percent. In valvular patients the causes of reoperation were: A Valvular complications (female/male=3/1, B Non valvular complications (female/male=1/3. The most common nonvalvular complication was bleeding (66.6 percent. The most common valvular complication was bioprosthetic valve degeneration. The meantime between two operation in valvular complications was 11.8 years. In all cases (915 the incidence of bleeding was 3.8 percent, mediastinitis 0.8 percent, cardiac tamponade 0.8 percent and GI bleeding 0.5 percent.

  3. The Effects of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Changes in the Lipid Profile of Iranian Male and Female with Coronary Artery Disease Refered to Emam Khomeini Hospital Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalaei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: One of the most important part of management and modification of CAD risk factor is to control the level of plasma lipid profile. Application of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in patient with CAD could decrease the level of CHL, TG, LDL and increasing of HDL .There are a lot of studies that discuss the effect of rehabilitation on different people with different races and life style . Material and Methods: Thirty six patients with the age (40-75 who were referred by cardiologist participated in this study. Fast walking on treadmill, biking on stationary bicycle and cycling with upper body ergometer were chosen as aerobic exercises. For assessing the short term and long term effects of this protocol, blood sampling were taken at three stages; before exercise initiation, after 12 and 24 sessions of exercise. Results: Following the cardiac rehabilitation protocol, the level of CHL, LDL and the ratio of LDL/HDL and CHL/HDL decreased significantly. Conclusion: Cardiac rehabilitation could be used as means to improve lipid profile level in blood serum, prevention of cardiovascular disease and reducing mortality and morbidity rates.

  4. Frequency of Massive Cardiac Adiposity (Floating Heart) at Necropsy and Comparison of Clinical and Morphologic Variables With Cases With Nonmassive Cardiac Adiposity at a Single Texas Hospital, 2013 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William C; Won, Vera S; Vasudevan, Anupama; Ko, Jong Mi; Guileyardo, Joseph M

    2016-03-15

    Body weight continues to increase worldwide primarily because of the increase in body fat. This study analyzes the frequency of massive adiposity at autopsy determined by the ability of the heart to float in a container of 10% formaldehyde (because adipose tissue is lighter than myocardium) and compares certain findings in the patients with floating to those with nonfloating hearts. The hearts studied at necropsy during a 2-year period (2013 to 2014) at Baylor University Medical Center were carefully "cleaned" and weighed by the same person and tested as to their ability to float in a container of formaldehyde, an indication of severe cardiac adiposity. Of the 146 hearts studied, 76 (52%) floated in a container of formaldehyde and 70 (48%) did not. Comparison of the 76 patients with floating hearts with the 70 with nonfloating hearts showed significant differences in ages (62 ± 13 vs 58 ± 14 years). No significant differences between the 2 groups were found in gender, body mass index, frequency of systemic hypertension or diabetes mellitus, either acute or healed myocardial infarction, or whether death was due to a coronary or a noncoronary condition. A weak correlation was found between body mass index and heart weight in both men and women and in both floating and nonfloating hearts. The massive quantity of cardiac adipose tissue (floating heart) appears to have increased enormously in recent decades in the United States. PMID:26800773

  5. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest and targeted temperature management 33°C versus 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragancea, Irina; Horn, Janneke; Kuiper, Michael; Friberg, Hans; Ullén, Susann; Wetterslev, Jørn; Cranshaw, Jules; Hassager, Christian; Nielsen, Niklas; Cronberg, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    prospective data from the Target Temperature Management after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Trial which randomised 939 comatose survivors to treatment at either 33 °C or 36 °C. Poor outcome was defined as severe disability, vegetative state or death (Cerebral Performance Category scale 3-5) at six months......BACKGROUND: The reliability of some methods of neurological prognostication after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been questioned since the introduction of induced hypothermia. The aim of this study was to determine whether different treatment temperatures after resuscitation affected the...... prognostic accuracy of clinical neurological findings and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) in comatose patients. METHODS: We calculated sensitivity and false positive rate for Glasgow Coma Scale motor score (GCS M), pupillary and corneal reflexes and SSEP to predict poor neurological outcome using...

  6. An update on insertable cardiac monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming J; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krieger, Derk W

    2015-01-01

    Continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring has undergone compelling progress over the past decades. Cardiac monitoring has emerged from 12-lead electrocardiograms being performed at the discretion of the treating physician to in-hospital telemetry, Holter monitoring, prolonged external event monitoring...... and most recently toward insertable device monitoring for several years. Significant advantages and disadvantages pertaining to these monitoring options will be addressed in this review. Insertable cardiac monitors have several advantages over external monitoring techniques and may signify a clinical......-effectiveness for prolonged cardiac monitoring require further studies. Furthermore, insertable cardiac monitoring has not only the potential to augment diagnostic capabilities but also to improve the management of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  7. Patients with worsening chronic heart failure who present to a hospital emergency department require hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafazand Masoud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic heart failure (CHF is a major public health problem characterised by progressive deterioration with disabling symptoms and frequent hospital admissions. To influence hospitalisation rates it is crucial to identify precipitating factors. To characterise patients with CHF who seek an emergency department (ED because of worsening symptoms and signs and to explore the reasons why they are admitted to hospital. Method Patients (n = 2,648 seeking care for dyspnoea were identified at the ED, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra. Out of 2,648 patients, 1,127 had a previous diagnosis of CHF, and of these, 786 were included in the present study with at least one sign and one symptom of worsening CHF. Results Although several of the patients wanted to go home after acute treatment in the ED, only 2% could be sent home. These patients were enrolled in an interventional study, which evaluated the acute care at home compared to the conventional, in hospital care. The remaining patients were admitted to hospital because of serious condition, including pneumonia/respiratory disease, myocardial infarction, pulmonary oedema, anaemia, the need to monitor cardiac rhythm, pathological blood chemistry and difficulties to communicate. Conclusion The vast majority of patients with worsening CHF seeking the ED required hospital care, predominantly because of co-morbidities. Patients with CHF with symptomatic deterioration may be admitted to hospital without additional emergency room investigations.

  8. Age influences the predictive value of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre scoring models in patients admitted to Intensive Care Units after in-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. S. Senaratne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA are generally poor though different patient populations may benefit to different degrees from admission to Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Risk stratification algorithms may be useful in identifying patients who are most likely to benefit from ICU admission and so may aid allocation of this scarce resource. We aimed to compare the performance of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II and Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC scoring systems in predicting outcome following ICU admission after IHCA in younger (?69 years and older (?70 years patients. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective observational study in two adult ICUs from January 2006 to February 2010 inclusive. Patients were divided into younger (?69 years and older (?70 years patients. The primary outcome measures were acute hospital mortality and area under the curve (AUC calculation for receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results: Two hundred and sixty-one adult consecutive adult patients admitted following IHCA. Hospital mortality was 58.6%. ROC analysis demonstrated that ICNARC was more accurate than APACHE II in predicting acute hospital outcomes in the adult population (AUC 0.734 vs. 0.706. Both scoring systems performed weaker when predicting outcomes in younger patients compared to older patients (ICNARC AUC 0.655 vs. 0.810; APACHE II AUC 0.660 vs. 0.759. Discussion : Both APACHE II and ICNARC predict outcome well in older patients. In younger patients, their value is less clear, and so they must be used with caution.

  9. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in a Patient With Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Case Report and a Brief Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tanush; Paul, Neha; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Balasubramaniyam, Nivas; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Shah, Amar B; Gass, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a phenotypic variant of nonobstructive HCM, in which hypertrophy of the myocardium predominantly involves the left ventricular apex. It is common in Japanese and other Asian populations but is rare in the United States. Apical HCM has a relatively benign prognosis in terms of cardiovascular mortality; however, morbid events such as ventricular aneurysms, apical thrombi, diastolic dysfunction, atrial fibrillation, and myocardial infarction are not uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old white man who presented to our hospital after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The patient had a witnessed collapse while playing basketball in the field. He was found to be pulseless and unresponsive by his coach, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately started. Upon arrival of emergency medical services, an automated external defibrillator advised shock and he was defibrillated thrice. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 15 minutes. He was intubated for airway protection and was brought to the hospital. Therapeutic hypothermia was initiated. He demonstrated good neurological status after active rewarming. Subsequent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was suggestive of apical HCM with right ventricular involvement. The patient underwent an implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement for secondary prevention and was subsequently discharged. In conclusion, apical HCM can rarely be associated with adverse cardiovascular events. The diagnosis may be missed on transthoracic 2-dimensional cardiac echocardiogram, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging should be considered to exclude apical HCM in young patients who present after sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:25923227

  10. Successful use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to amitriptyline and venlafaxine intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Terhi; Salo, Ari; Kantola, Teemu; Toivonen, Lauri; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) due to intoxication is dismal. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are widely used in the treatment of depression, but possess significant cardiotoxicity, and are one of the most common medications used in suicide attempts worldwide. TCA poisoning can cause hypotension, seizures, and cardiac conduction disturbances, which can lead to life-threatening arrhythmia. Current guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for unconscious survivors of OHCA, but hypothermia treatment itself can cause disturbances in cardiac conduction, which could aggravate the effect of TCAs on cardiac conduction. We report the successful use of TH in a 19-year-old woman who was resuscitated from ventricular tachycardia after intentional ingestion of amitriptyline and venlafaxine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. The cardiac arrest was witnessed, but no bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed. The initial rhythm was ventricular tachycardia with no detectable pulse. Three defibrillations, magnesium sulfate, and sodium bicarbonate were given and her trachea was intubated, after which return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in 26 minutes. After ROSC, she had seizures and was sedated with propofol. Out-of-hospital TH was initiated with 1500 mL of cold Ringer's acetate. An infusion of norepinephrine was initiated for low blood pressure. On arrival at the university hospital, she was unconscious and had dilated pupils. She was tachycardic with a body temperature of 33.5°C. She was transferred to the intensive care unit and TH was maintained with invasive cooling. During the TH treatment, she did not experience any serious cardiac arrhythmia, transthoracic echocardiogram was normal, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) returned to normal. The patient was extubated 45 hours after the cardiac arrest. After the extubation, she was alert and cooperative, but slightly delusional. She was transferred to a ward on the third day and discharged from hospital on the sixth day of admission. Ambulatory psychiatric follow-up was organized. Neuropsychological examinations were later performed and she was estimated to be able to work at her previous job. This case report suggests that mild TH is safe even in case of intoxication with a drug known to cause serious cardiac conduction disturbances and arrhythmia. PMID:25867296

  11. American Heart Association Response to the 2015 Institute of Medicine Report on Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumar, Robert W; Eigel, Brian; Callaway, Clifton W; Estes, N A Mark; Jollis, James G; Kleinman, Monica E; Morrison, Laurie J; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Rea, Thomas D; Sendelbach, Sue

    2015-09-15

    The American Heart Association (AHA) commends the recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act (2015). The AHA recognizes the unique opportunity created by the report to meaningfully advance the objectives of improving outcomes for sudden cardiac arrest. For decades, the AHA has focused on the goal of reducing morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease though robust support of basic, translational, clinical, and population research. The AHA also has developed a rigorous process using the best available evidence to develop scientific, advisory, and guideline documents. These core activities of development and dissemination of scientific evidence have served as the foundation for a broad range of advocacy initiatives and programs that serve as a foundation for advancing the AHA and IOM goal of improving cardiac arrest outcomes. In response to the call to action in the IOM report, the AHA is announcing 4 new commitments to increase cardiac arrest survival: (1) The AHA will provide up to $5 million in funding over 5 years to incentivize resuscitation data interoperability; (2) the AHA will actively pursue philanthropic support for local and regional implementation opportunities to increase cardiac arrest survival by improving out-of-hospital and in-hospital systems of care; (3) the AHA will actively pursue philanthropic support to launch an AHA resuscitation research network; and (4) the AHA will cosponsor a National Cardiac Arrest Summit to facilitate the creation of a national cardiac arrest collaborative that will unify the field and identify common goals to improve survival. In addition to the AHA's historic and ongoing commitment to improving cardiac arrest care and outcomes, these new initiatives are responsive to each of the IOM recommendations and demonstrate the AHA's leadership in the field. However, successful implementation of the IOM recommendations will require a timely response by all stakeholders identified in the report and a coordinated approach to achieve our common goal of improved cardiac arrest outcomes. PMID:26130121

  12. Cardiac perioperative complications in noncardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Dragana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesiologists are confronted with an increasing population of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who are at risk for cardiac complications in the perioperative period. Perioperative cardiac complications are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of perioperative (operative and postoperative cardiac complications and correlations between the incidence of perioperative cardiac complications and type of surgical procedure, age, presence of concurrent diseases. A total of 100 patients with cardiac diseases undergoing noncardiac surgery were included in the prospective study (Group A 50 patients undergoing intraperitoneal surgery and Group B 50 patients undergoing breast and thyroid surgery. The patients were followed up during the perioperative period and after surgery until leaving hospital to assess the occurrence of cardiac events. Cardiac complications (systemic arterial hypertension, systemic arterial hypotension, abnormalities of cardiac conduction and cardiac rhythm, perioperative myocardial ischemia and acute myocardial infarction occurred in 64% of the patients. One of the 100 patients (1% had postoperative myocardial infarction which was fatal. Systemic arterial hypertension occurred in 57% of patients intraoperatively and 33% postoperatively, abnormalities of cardiac rhythm in 31% of patients intraoperatively and 17% postoperatively, perioperative myocardial ischemia in 23% of patients intraoperatively and 11% of postoperatively. The most often cardiac complications were systemic arterial hypertension, abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and perioperative myocardial ischemia. Factors independently associated with the incidence of cardiac complications included the type of surgical procedure, advanced age, duration of anaesthesia and surgery, abnormal preoperative electrocardiogram, abnormal preoperative chest radiography and diabetes.

  13. Surgical resection of a giant cardiac fibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Nikki L; Larbalestier, Robert I

    2016-05-01

    A 42-year-old woman presented to a regional hospital emergency room with palpitations and was found to be in ventricular tachycardia. Chest radiography demonstrated a massively enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass within the left ventricular free wall, consistent with a cardiac fibroma. The patient proceeded to have surgical resection of the mass. Left ventricular function was preserved postoperatively. PMID:25690433

  14. Clinical study of cardiac diseases during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Amitha Vijay Kamat; Swetha Dama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Objective of the study was to evaluate the burden of cardiac diseases in pregnancy in our hospital, their clinical presentation, type of cardiac lesion, complications, maternal and neonatal outcome. Methods: A prospective analysis conducted at Karnataka Institute of Medical Sciences, Hubli, a tertiary care center in Karnataka, between July 2014 to June 2015. All patients with cardiac diseases during pregnancy and developed during postpartum period were included in the study. Ag...

  15. Cardiac Surgery by Surgeon: Beginning 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset contains the number of cases, number of in hospital/30 day deaths, observed, expected and risk- adjusted mortality rates for cardiac surgery by...

  16. Impacto de la rehabilitación cardiaca intrahospitalaria en pacientes con I.M.A Impact of cardiac intra-hospital rehabilitation in patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liván Cruz Benítez

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo longitudinal y descriptivo sobre las ventajas de la aplicación de la fase 1 de la RC en el 100% de los pacientes con IMA de bajo riesgo atendidos en el periodo 2003-2004 en el Hospital General Docente ""Comandante Pinares"" en la provincia Pinar del Río. La investigación se basó en la toma de datos obtenidos en los expedientes clínicos de estos pacientes, que están archivados; donde las variables que se exploraron en las encuestas aplicadas incluyen anamnesis, examen físico, electrocardiograma, telecardiografía, aparición de complicaciones mayores y finalmente la clasificación funcional dada al alta hospitalaria. Todos los resultados demostraron las ventajas de la rehabilitación como parte esencial de la atención y terapéutica a la que deben tener acceso los pacientes con afecciones cardíacas de cualquier edad, para mejorar su calidad de vida.A retrospective, longitudinal and descriptive study was done on the advantages of applying the stage I of the RC in 100% of low-risk AMI patients assisted at Comandante Pinares General Teaching Hospital (HGCP during 2003-2004 in Pinar del Río province. The research was based on data collected from the clinical records of these patients, which are filed. The variables explored during the surveys include: anamnesis, physical examination, electrocardiogram, telecardiography, ocurrence of major complications and finally the functional classification done at hospital discharge. All results showed the rehabilitation advantages as essential part of the assistance and therapy which patients of any age and with cardiac disorders should have access to in order to improve their quality of life.

  17. Cardiac trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To maintain a high index of suspicion in all wounded pre cordial and the use of new diagnostic methods, it has solved many of the problems in the evaluation and in the treatment of the cardiac wounds. The following text revises the history, etiologies, classifications, pathophysiology and aspects related with the valuation and the current handling of the cardiac trauma

  18. The first human heart transplant and further advances in cardiac transplantation at Groote Schuur Hospital and the University of Cape Town

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, Johan G; Hassoulas, Joannis

    2009-01-01

    Summary Summary Christiaan (Chris) Barnard was born in 1922 and qualified in medicine at the University of Cape Town in 1946. Following surgical training in South Africa and the USA, Barnard established a successful open-heart surgery programme at Groote Schuur Hospital and the University of Cape Town in 1958. In 1967, he led the team that performed the world’s first human-to-human heart transplant. The article describing this remarkable achievement was published in the South African Medical ...

  19. Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest: An Advisory Statement by the Advanced Life Support Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Andersen, Lars W; Berg, Katherine M; Reynolds, Joshua C; Nolan, Jerry P; Morley, Peter T; Lang, Eddy; Cocchi, Michael N; Xanthos, Theodoros; Callaway, Clifton W; Soar, Jasmeet

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, mild induced hypothermia (32°C-34°C) has been standard of care for patients remaining comatose after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, and this has been extrapolated to survivors of cardiac arrest with initially nonshockable rhythms and to patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. Two randomized trials published in 2002 reported a survival and neurological benefit with mild induced hypothermia. One recent randomized trial reported similar outcomes in patients treated with targeted temperature management at either 33°C or 36°C. In response to these new data, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Advanced Life Support Task Force performed a systematic review to evaluate 3 key questions: (1) Should mild induced hypothermia (or some form of targeted temperature management) be used in comatose post-cardiac arrest patients? (2) If used, what is the ideal timing of the intervention? (3) If used, what is the ideal duration of the intervention? The task force used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology to assess and summarize the evidence and to provide a consensus on science statement and treatment recommendations. The task force recommends targeted temperature management for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm at a constant temperature between 32°C and 36°C for at least 24hours. Similar suggestions are made for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a nonshockable rhythm and in-hospital cardiac arrest. The task force recommends against prehospital cooling with rapid infusion of large volumes of cold intravenous fluid. Additional and specific recommendations are provided in the document. PMID:26449873

  20. The delay in transfer between the emergency department and the critical care unit for patients with an acute cardiac event--in hospital factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, C; Pannell, D; Smith-Sparrow, T

    2001-11-01

    The Lyell McEwin Health Service (LMHS) is a major public hospital located in the northern suburbs of Adelaide, a region where the death rate from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is higher than the expected death rate in the population. A retrospective case note study conducted at this hospital investigated the duration that patients with unstable angina pectoris (UA) or acute myocardial infarction (AMI) spent in the emergency department (ED) before admission to the critical care unit (CCU) and the factors that contributed to delays of greater than 70 minutes. All patients admitted to the LMHS over an 18 month period with a discharge diagnosis related group (DRG) for AMI and UA were included in the study. A total of 667 case notes were examined; 403 of these cases met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean duration between arrival in the ED and subsequent admission to the CCU was found to be 161 minutes. DRG was a major factor in the length of time spent in the ED. The mean duration for patients with AMI was 124 minutes, whilst for UA the duration was 190 minutes (difference = 66 minutes, p males, p=0.015), and mode of transport to the ED (arrival by ambulance mean duration 30 minutes private transport, Recommendations arising from this study included that a system be established to enable the rapid assessment of all patients suspected of suffering AMI and UA, inclusive of their expeditious transfer to the CCU. In addition, a staff development programme was proposed to ensure medical and nursing staff became aware of a bias in this hospital toward transferring male patients in a shorter timeframe than females with the same DRG. PMID:11806510

  1. Out of shadow / Peeter Linnap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Linnap, Peeter, 1960-

    2007-01-01

    "Out of shadow" oli näitus Baltimaade 1990. aastate kunstist Ameerika publikule - sõnumiks iseseisvumisjärgsete aastate materiaalse, sotsiaalse ning vaimuelu peegeldused/tõlgendused visuaalses kunstis

  2. Characterization of Out of Lesson and Out Of School Physical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof WARCHOŁ

    Full Text Available Principal purpose of the study is characteristics of out of lesson and out of school physical activities of children in selectedprimary schools in the Podkarpackie province. Inspiration for undertakings originate research was the opportunity to familiarizeoneself with the types of physical activity of students in their free time and the influence of formal and legal factors on theorganizational level of additional physical activities. The research was conducted in 60 primary schools in the Podkarpackieprovince. The basic condition in selecting the schools for the research owned a proper sport facility by the school. Research wasconducted in April and May, 2005. Empirical material was gathered by means of a diagnostic survey. Questionnaire of thesurvey included a set of closed questions. Students of physical education and headmasters of the schools were the respondents.The research indicates low level of physical activity of people of various ages. It should be assumed that this state of affairscorresponds to the state of physical education at schools. Therefore, in the search for optimal solutions, out of lesson and outof school activities should be included in the process of preparation of the young generation to physical activity in their adultlives. In conclusion, additional physical activity of children relies, to a large extent, on community service performed byteachers. Most of the times, out of lesson and out of school activities are occasional and incidental in nature and rarelyconstitute a part of an organized sequence of systematic events scheduled for specified points in time.

  3. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  4. Cardiac Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medication Used to lower blood pressure. Used with therapy for cardiac arrhythmias (abnormal heart rhythms) and in treating chest pain (angina). Used to prevent future heart attacks in patients who have had a heart attack. ...

  5. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss. Recreational drugs. Using certain drugs, such as cocaine or amphetamines, also increases your risk of cardiac ... also run other tests, depending on your health history and the results of these tests.

  6. Cardiac Calcification

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-01-01

    There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD)."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant v...

  7. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest following spinal anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Pranjali Madhav Kurhekar; VSG Yachendra; Simi P Babu; Raghavelu Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has been well researched. Myocardial stunning after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest is seen in up to 2/3 rd of in-hospital cardiac arrests. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has probably not been reported earlier. Our case, an ASA physical status I lady, posted for tubal reanastomosis surgery developed bradycardia followed by asystole, approximately 5 minutes after givin...

  8. August 2014 Tucson critical care journal club: bacteremia in cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hypes C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is an uncommon, but important, condition encountered in the emergency department (ED. While cardiac arrest represents the final common pathway of multiple conditions, early evaluation often focuses on cardiac abnormalities. However, observed associations between infection, particularly pneumonia, and in-hospital cardiac arrest led Coba et al. (1 to investigate the incidence of bacteremia among OHCA patients. The study prospectively investigated 250 adult patients who presented to an academic ED with OHCA between 2007 and 2009. Two blood culture samples were drawn during resuscitation or shortly after return of spontaneous circulation through vascular devices placed for clinical purposes. Children, pregnant women, victims of trauma were excluded. To minimize false positive results, patients were classified as bacteremic if one sample was positive for a typical pathogen or both samples were positive for the same skin colonizing organism. Patients in whom only 1 sample was positive for suspected skin contaminant ...

  9. Clinically Significant Contrast Induced Acute Kidney Injury after Non-Emergent Cardiac Catheterization - Risk Factors and Impact on Length of Hospital Stay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the frequency and risk factors associated with clinically significant contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients undergoing non-emergent coronary angiography. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2005 to December 2007. Methodology: Case records of patients who underwent coronary angiography with a serum creatinine of >= 1.5 mg/dl at the time of procedure were evaluated. Clinically significant contrast induced nephropathy (CSCIN) was defined as either doubling of serum creatinine from baseline value within a week following the procedure or need for emergency hemodialysis after the procedure. Results: One hundred and sixteen patients met the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 64.0 +- 11.5 years, 72% were males. Overall prevalence of CIN was 17% (rise of serum creatinine by A= 0.5 mg/dl) while that of clinically significant CIN (CSCIN) was 9.5% (11 patients). Patients with CSCIN had significantly lower left ventricular ejection fraction (p = 0.03, OR: 0.24; 95% CI = 0.06 A= 0.91) and higher prevalence of cerebrovascular disease (p < 0.001, OR: 14.66; 95% CI = 3.30 - 65.08). Mean baseline serum creatinine was significantly higher, 3.0 +- 1.5 vs. 2.0 +- 1.1 mg/dl (p = 0.03, OR: 1.47; 95% CI = 1.03 - 2.11) whereas mean GFR estimated by Cockcroft-Gault formula was significantly lower at 25 +- 7.4 vs. 41.0 +- 14.6 ml/minute (p = 0.001, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.84 A= 0.95) at the time of procedure in patients with CSCIN. Mean length of hospital stay was significantly higher in this group compared to those without CIN, 9.0 +- 5.1 vs. 3.0 +- 3.2 days (p = 0.001, OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.12 - 1.54). Multivariate analysis revealed low GFR (p = 0.001, OR = 0.88; 95% CI = 0.82 - 0.95) and low ejection fraction (p = 0.03, OR = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.04 - 0.91) to be independent factors associated with CSCIN. No significant differences were noted between the two groups in patients with hypertension, diabetes and heart failure. Conclusion: CSCIN is a significant concern in high risk groups despite prophylaxis. Patients with lower EF, cerebrovascular disease and low GFR at the time of procedure are more likely to have CIN. (author)

  10. All Things Out of Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Nuala

    2015-01-01

    This article brings together and compares my own artistic practice of drawing/painting and the eighteenth-century novel "Tristram Shandy." In both cases, there is a free play of lines, textual or graphic, which sets "all things out of rule". A whole typology of lines is woven throughout Sterne's text and reappears,…

  11. Something Out of a Nightmare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerkegaard, Stefan

    “Something out of a nightmare. Om Cho Seung-Hui og hans tekster” forsøger at belyse forholdet mellem de litterære tekster, som Virginia Tech morderen, Cho Seung-Hui, skrev, og dennes grusomme handlinger. Et par af teksterne blev, kort tid efter mordene, tilgængelige på nettet. Det gav anledning til...

  12. All Things Out of Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Nuala

    2015-01-01

    This article brings together and compares my own artistic practice of drawing/painting and the eighteenth-century novel "Tristram Shandy." In both cases, there is a free play of lines, textual or graphic, which sets "all things out of rule". A whole typology of lines is woven throughout Sterne's text and reappears,

  13. Single ventricle cardiac defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single ventricle heart is defined as a rare cardiac abnormality with a single ventricle chamber involving diverse functional and physiological defects. Our case is of a ten month-old baby boy who died shortly after admission to the hospital due to vomiting and diarrhoea. Autopsy findings revealed cyanosis of finger nails and ears. Internal examination revealed; large heart, weighing 60 grams, single ventricle, without a septum and upper membranous part. Single ventricle is a rare pathology, hence, this paper aims to discuss this case from a medico-legal point of view. (author)

  14. Main Complications of Mild Induced Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Soleimanpour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to assess the complications of mild induced hypothermia (MIH in patients with cardiac arrest. Presently, based on the guidelines of the American heart Association, MIH following successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in unconscious adult patients due to ventricular fibrillation (VF with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA is essential and required. However, MIH could be associated with complications in Patients with cardiac arrest. Studies conducted on the precautions and care following cardiac arrest and MIH were included. Valid scientific data bases were used for data collection. The obtained results from different studies revealed that mild MIH could be associated with numerous complications and the knowledge and awareness of the medical staff from the complications is required to guarantee successful therapeutic approaches in MIH following cardiac arrest which is a novel medical facility with different styles and complications. Overall, further future studies are required to improve the quality of MIH, to increase survival and to decrease complications rates.

  15. Fast tracking in adult cardiac surgery at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Early extubation after cardiac operation is an important aspect of fast-track cardiac anaesthesia. The length of stay in ICU limits utilisation of operation theatre in cardiac surgery. Increasing cost, limited resources, and newer surgical strategies have stimulated effectiveness of all routines in cardiac surgery, anaesthesia, and intensive care. Aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of fast-tracking in adult cardiac surgery and its effects on post operative recovery in our setup. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted over 14 months between Jul 16, 2007 to Sep 16, 2008. All the open heart cases were included unless absolute contraindications were there. We applied the rapid recovery protocol adopted from Oslo Hospital Norway in an attempt to achieve fast-tracking in our setup. Results: Two-hundred-seventy-four consecutive cases out of 400 operated cases were included in this study. Mean age was 47.69 +- 15.11 years, 27.7% were females, 5.8% were emergency cases, 5.1% were COPD, 11.1% were atrial fibrillation, and 6.9% were NYHA class-III cases. CABG was done in 66.1% cases and mean CPB-time was 75.92 +- 16.20 min. Mean Ventilation-time was 4.47+-4.48 hrs., 86% patients were fast-tracked to be extubated within 6 hours, and 85.4% patients remained free of post-op complications. Six (2.2%) re-intubatIions, 2.6% arrhythmias, 6.6% pleural effusions and 2.2% consolidation were observed post-operatively. Mean ICU stay was 2.49 +- 0.95 days and in-hospital mortality was 2.2%. Conclusion: Fast-tracking with extubation within 6 hours is feasible approach which minimises the post-operative complications significantly in adult cardiac surgical patients. (author)

  16. Personal and environmental dosimetric measurements using TLD method in Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory (CathLab) at the Rzeszow's Regional Hospital No 2, Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete test of publication follows. One of the basic problem in CathLab is the monitoring of ionizing radiation, calculations of doses for workers and finally to build a system to prevent workers from X-ray radiation. To measure doses from X-rays a passive method with thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were applied. Experimental part was based on creating 3D grid of Tl environmental dosemeters with 2 high sensitive TL detectors based on MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P). Dosemeters were placed evenly (as far as staff's work conditions allowed such positioning) in operating room and a control room. Grid of about 100 dosemeters was designed to measure X-ray dose distribution present during interventional cardiology procedures. That part of the project was especially important for hospital's employee, because it has brought an information about most radiative dangerous areas of each room. Patient dosimetry measurements have been also made using TLD method just during the interventional cardiology procedures. Every patient got a few dosemeters dor different parts of body. Experimental part consists of measurements of absorbed dose equivalent, mean dose rate of absorbed dose equivalent, and mean dose of effective dose per each body part. That last measurements were accomplished by placing TLD's near patient's head, chest and gonads. Personal dosimetry for employees, has been made using TLD's during hemodynamics procedures. Every employee (medical doctors, nurses, technicians and charwoman) has received few dosemeters also based on high sensitive MCP-N detectors. The main dosimetry was done for whole body covered by led gown and additionally for unprotected parts: (hands, arm, eyes and protected by gown: chest, gonads). For individual dosimetry Hp(10) in mSv was calculated, while using environmental dosemeters KERMA in air in mGy. This work will present results obtained from ca. 100 environmental placed in CathLab room. Additionally personal doses for whole body and for parts of workers and patients will be shown.

  17. A prospective study to determine the circumstances, incidence and outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a referral hospital in India, in relation to various factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Cardiac arrest has multifactorial aetiology and the outcome depends on timely and correct interventions. We decided to investigate the circumstances, incidence and outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR at a tertiary hospital in India, in relation to various factors, including extensive basic life support and advanced cardiac life support training programme for all nurses and doctors. Methods: It has been over a decade and a half with periodical updates and implementation of newer guidelines prepared by various societies across the world about CPR for both in-hospital and out-of hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA and OHCA. We conducted a prospective study wherein all cardiac arrests reported in the hospital consecutively for 12 months were registered for the study and followed their survival up to 1-year. Statistical analysis was performed by using Chi-square test for significant differences in proportions applied to various parameters of the study. Results: The main outcome measures were; (following CPR return of spontaneous circulation, survival for 24 h, survival from 24 h to 6 weeks or discharge, alive at 1-year. For survivors, an assessment was made about their cerebral performance and overall performance and accordingly graded. All these data were tabulated. Totally 419 arrests were reported in the hospital, out of which 413 were in-hospital arrests. Out of this 260 patients were considered for resuscitation, we had about 27 survivors at the end of 1-year follow-up (10.38%. Conclusion: We conclude by saying there are many factors involved in good clinical outcomes following IHCAs and these variable factors need to be researched further.

  18. SODIUM BICARBONATE INFUSION: TO PREVENT CARDIAC SURGERY - ASSOCIATED ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The incidence of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury is 50% of patients and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. This study aimed to determine if perioperative urinary and plasma alkalization with sodium bicarbonate infusion re duces the incidence of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury. SETTING AND DESIGN: This study is double blind randomized control trial conducted at U N Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Center , India. METHOD S AND RESULT: A total of 140 pat ients scheduled to undergo elective cardiac surgery , who were at increased risk of development of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury using recognized risk factors. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either sodium bicarbonate (n = 70 o r sodium chloride (n = 70 infusion , commencing at the start of anesthesia , in a dose of 4 mmol/kg over 24 hour. The primary outcome measure was the number of patients with development of CSA - AKI , defined as an increase in creatinine greater than 25% from baseline to peak value within the first three postoperative days. Significant differences among the groups in both plasma and urinary pH were achieved 6 hours after commencement of the infusion , and these changes persisted for more than 24 hours. A total o f 7 out of 70(10% patients in the sodium bicarbonate group and 16 out of 70(22.85% patients in the sodium chloride group developed acute kidney injury within the first three postoperative days with p value of 0.06 which is statistically not significant . There were also no significant differences in ventilation hours , ICU or hospital length of stay , or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Perioperative alkalization of blood and urine using an infusion of sodium bicarbonate did not result in a decrease in the incidence of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. KEYWORDS: Acute kidney injury; Cardiac surgery; Cardiopulmonary bypass; Creatinine; outcome; Urinary output

  19. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  20. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  1. Coming out of the woodwork

    OpenAIRE

    Selby, Mark

    2010-01-01

    ‘Coming Out of the Woodwork’ was a curatorial and installation art project, bringing together three artsits (Mark Selby, Richard Cramp and Joe Watling) who similarly identify with the exploration of architectural space in its formation and perception as a key component to their practice. The gallery space and its associated architecture, was entirely reformed through a series of installations and constructions. Each artist approaches new ways of engaging the viewer beyond a ‘static’ looking e...

  2. Time series analysis as input for clinical predictive modeling: Modeling cardiac arrest in a pediatric ICU

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy Curtis E; Turley James P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Thousands of children experience cardiac arrest events every year in pediatric intensive care units. Most of these children die. Cardiac arrest prediction tools are used as part of medical emergency team evaluations to identify patients in standard hospital beds that are at high risk for cardiac arrest. There are no models to predict cardiac arrest in pediatric intensive care units though, where the risk of an arrest is 10 times higher than for standard hospital beds. Curr...

  3. Cardiac radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac imaging is a relatively new and developing field. This article is aimed at radiology trainees, radiographers, and non-specialist radiologists who would like to learn more about this exciting subspecialty. What follows is a list of carefully selected web resources that may also be of interest to specialists for use in training. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article

  4. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  5. Radiation exposure during cardiac catheterization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For some time there has been an increased interest in more information about radiation exposure during cardiac catheterization because of: relatively high doses to workers and patient; rapid increase of numbers of examinations; introduction of new procedure-types (e.g. Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angiography, PTCA) and introduction of new techniques (e.g. Digital Subtraction Angiography, DSA). This paper reports about a study on the exposure to medical personnel and patient in two major hospitals in the Netherlands. The Total number of cardiac catheterization procedures in both hospitals amounts to circa 3000 per year (approximately 10% of all cardiac procedures c.q. 20% of all PTCA procedures in the Netherlands). This study is related to 1300 cardiac examinations

  6. Are hospitals also for relatives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Nina Konstantin; Madsen, Mette; Kjøller, Mette; Waldorff, Susanne B; Olsen Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Patients and their close relatives both feel the burden of cardiovascular disease. Relatives of heart patients experience lower quality of life and increased mortality than the general population and relatives of patients with other diseases. Nevertheless, knowledge on health services aimed at...... relatives of patients with cardiac diseases is sparse. This study aimed to survey the prevalence of health services for relatives of cardiac patients in Denmark. METHODS: We surveyed activities offered by Danish hospitals to the relatives of cardiac patients. Data were obtained from an Internet-based survey...... and 50 of 55 invited hospital departments participated. RESULTS: Almost all departments offer activities to relatives of cardiac patients, but only one-quarter have activities specifically aimed at supporting relatives. Large departments offer activities for relatives more often than smaller...

  7. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death: current approaches and predictive value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopera, Gustavo; Curtis, Anne B

    2009-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a serious public health problem; the annual incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in North America is approximately 166,200. Identifying patients at risk is a difficult proposition. At the present time, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) remains the single most important marker for risk stratification. According to current guidelines, most patients with LVEF strategies fail to identify patients at risk of SCD in larger population groups encompassing a greater number of potential SCD victims. However, the best approach to identifying patients and the value of various risk stratification tools is not entirely clear. The goal of this review is to discuss the problem of SCD and the value of the different risk stratification markers and their potential clinical use either alone or in combination with other risk stratification markers. PMID:20066150

  8. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    OpenAIRE

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstr...

  9. Modifying labor routines for the woman with cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcher, Patricia M; Harvey, Carol J

    2006-01-01

    The childbearing woman with cardiac disease presents a unique challenge to healthcare providers. The physiologic adaptations that accompany pregnancy and labor predispose the woman with cardiac disease to cardiac decompensation. Ideally, these women are identified to perinatal nursing staff prior to admission to the hospital in labor or for obstetrical procedures in order to provide adequate time for review of the specific cardiac lesion and development of an interdisciplinary plan of care. This article provides a comprehensive review of typical intrapartum routines that require modification and discusses strategies for adapting labor management for the woman with cardiac disease. PMID:17310671

  10. Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) – diagnostic difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalec, Karolina; Litwin, Linda; Drozdz, Katarzyna; Gac, Pawel; Jazwiec, Przemyslaw; Zymlinski, Robert; Molenda, Wlodzimierz; Szuba, Andrzej; Janczak, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) is the very rare disease that is associated with a high mortality rate. A prompt and proper diagnosis may affect the prognosis, and proper treatment may improve life expectancy. This report documents the case of a 74-year-old female with primary cardiac lymphoma. Unfortunately, the patient died from heart failure on her 23rd day in hospital. PMID:26702288

  11. Cardiac Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant valvular stenosis."nMyocardial calcification is a sign of prior infarction,"nwhile pericardial calcification is strongly associated"nwith constrictive pericarditis. A spectrum of different"ntypes of cardiac calcifications (linear, annular,"ncurvilinear,... could be seen in chest radiography and"nother imaging modalities. So a carful inspection for"ndetection and reorganization of these calcifications"nshould be necessary. Numerous modalities exist for"nidentifying coronary calcification, including plain"nradiography, fluoroscopy, intravascular ultrasound,"nMRI, echocardiography, and conventional, helical and"nelectron-beam CT (EBCT. Coronary calcifications"ndetected on EBCT or helical CT can be quantifie,"nand a total calcification score (Cardiac Calcification"nScoring may be calculated. In an asymptomatic"npopulation and/or patients with concomitant risk"nfactors like diabetes mellitus, determination of the"npresence of coronary calcifications identifies the"npatients at risk for future myocardial infarction and"ncoronary artery disease. In patients without coronary"ncalcifications, future cardiovascular events could"nbe excluded. Therefore, detecting and recognizing"ncalcification related to the heart on chest radiography"nand other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, CT"nand echocardiography may have important clinical"nimplications.

  12. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  13. Cardiac tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the demands placed on 201Tl cardiac imaging have become more complex. It is no longer sufficient to merely identify a myocardial scar or to diagnose myocardial ischemia by observing a defect at stress that fills in at equilibrium. Now there is a greater need to identify exactly the ischemic site, to determine how much peri-infarctional ischemic tissue remains, and to address how a specific site has responded after intervention of surgery or angioplasty. This information is difficult to obtain from a planar scan but is considered easier to acquire with transaxial cardiac tomography. Fortunately, these demands have occurred at a time when most of the previous problems with cardiac tomography had been resolved. The computer has become an integral part of the nuclear cardiology so that the only additional cost for tomography would be a rotating gantry. However, successful transaxial measurements are not easily achieved. With the limited dose of 21Tl there would be a minimum of counts available cost for tomography would be a rotation gantry. However, successful transaxial measurements are not easily achieved. With the limited dose of 201Tl there would be a minimum of counts available for tomographic reconstruction so that methods of acquisition, reconstruction, filtering, and display must all be optimized. This chapter discusses some of these technical factors and shows how they relate to clinical results

  14. FacilitiesHospitals_HOSPITAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This datalayer contains point locations of all major community, regional, comprehensive health, and healthcare provider hospitals in the state of Vermont. The...

  15. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  16. Psychometric validation of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugasegaram, Shamila; Gagliese, Lucia; Oh, Paul; Stewart, Donna E.; Brister, Stephanie J; Chan, Victoria; Sherry L. Grace

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale (CRBS). Design, setting, and participants: In total, 2636 cardiac inpatients from 11 hospitals completed a survey. One year later, participants completed a follow-up survey, which included the CRBS. A subsample of patients also completed a third survey which included the CRBS, the Cardiac Rehabilitation Enrolment Obstacles scale, and the Beliefs...

  17. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  18. Predictive value of EuroSCORE on long term outcome in cardiac surgery patients: a single institution study

    OpenAIRE

    R. De Maria; M. Mazzoni; Parolini, M.; Gregori, D; F. Bortone; Arena, V.; O. Parodi

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the value of the European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE), a validated model for prediction of in-hospital mortality after cardiac surgery, in predicting long term event-free survival.

  19. Intensive care in small hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, S S

    1984-01-01

    The scene: a small ICU in a 120-bed community hospital with no resident house staff. Emergency coverage is assigned to the emergency room physician. A patient in the ICU has cardiac arrest. His physician is called but cannot come to the hospital immediately, and the emergency room physician is attending a seriously injured patient. In the critical interim, paramedical professionals must shoulder the heavy responsibilities for decisions and interventions. PMID:10268823

  20. The CHARMS Study : cardiac patients' experiences of sexual problems following cardiac rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Molly; Doherty, Sally; Murphy, Andrew W.; McGee, Hannah M.; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2013-01-01

    Background:Sexual problems are common among cardiac patients. Further information is required on patients' experiences of sexuality and preferences for sexual counselling. Aim:To characterise sexual dysfunction and related factors among patients following cardiac rehabilitation and examine related treatment delivery. Methods:Telephone interviews with 382 patients (32% response rate) recruited from six hospital rehabilitation centres. Results:Seventy-nine per cent were male; average age was 64...

  1. Influence of cardiac insufficiency on acute renal impairment induced by contrast medium in patients with diabetes and renal dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing LI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the influence of cardiac insufficiency on contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM complicated with mild to moderate renal insufficiency (MMRI. Methods From Dec. 2008 to Oct. 2011, 2998 patients, with type 2 DM and concomitant chronic kidney diseases (CKD from 53 hospitals in China, were enrolled in the present study. Out of them, 2533 patients showed normal cardiac function (NYHA=1 and 465 patients suffered from cardiac insufficiency (NYHA>1. The demographic characteristics, preoperative renal function and postoperative incidence of CIAKI in the two groups were monitored. Results No significant difference was found between two groups (P>0.05 in preoperative baseline data (age, sex, high risk factors, etc.. The incidence of CIAKI was significantly higher in NYHA>1 group than in NYHA=1 group (4.7% vs2.8%, P=0.03. During a 30 day follow-up, the incidence of all-cause mortality was not significantly different between two groups (P>0.05. Multiple factors analysis found that rosuvastatin was the protective agent for CIAKI, and acute coronary syndrome, cardiac insufficiency, anemia and renal insufficiency were the risk factors for CIAKI. Conclusion For PCI, the risk of postoperative incidence of CIAKI is higher in patients with preoperative cardiac insufficiency than in those with normal cardiac function. The incidence of CIAKI may be reduced obviously by meticulous preoperative assessment of heart function in high-risk patients, giving effective treatment and performing PCI after cardiac function is improved. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.09.08

  2. Hospitals; hospitals13

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — Hospital Facilities information was compiled from several various sources. Main source was the RI Department of Health Facilities Regulation database, License 2000....

  3. FacilitiesHospitals_HOSPITAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This data layer contains point locations of all major community, regional, comprehensive health, and healthcare provider hospitals in the state of Vermont. The...

  4. Out-Of-Pocket X-Ray, CT Scan Costs Vary Widely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_158853.html Out-of-Pocket X-Ray, CT Scan Costs Vary Widely And trying to get hospitals ... pocket price for a standard chest X-ray, CT scan or ultrasound can vary by hundreds of dollars, ...

  5. A patient dose survey in a cardiac angiographic suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A very large set of patient dose survey data. containing 3,564 individual procedures, has been collected in the cardiac angiographic suite in a large teaching hospital. Every procedure for a period of three years has been logged by the radiographer assisting the cardiologist. A diamentor was permanently attached to the tube housing with a read out device located at the control panel. A removable hafnium (Hf) filter (50 ?m) was also available and was used when possible for 'thin' patients in order to reduce patient skin entrance dose. The survey included cardiac angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty procedures. Exposure-area product values were used to estimate effective dose and skin entrance doses for the various types of procedures for conditions where the Hf filter was in and out of the x-ray beam. The large data set has enabled us to illustrate statistical parameters of the data, including relationships between weight, height, sex, use of the Hf filter and dose-area product

  6. Patients’ anxiety before cardiac catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Loureiro Buzatto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify researches related to anxiety and strategies to reduce it in patients who are in the pre-cardiac catheterization period. Methods: A bibliographic research was carried out in the on line databases of PubMed, MedLine, CINAHL, LILACS and SciELO, from 1997 to 2009 in MedLine and from 1999 to 2009 in the others databases. The boolean expressions “and” and “or” has been used with the descriptors in Portuguese and in English. The inclusion of discerning was related about the presence, level and workable of the anxiety from the period of pre-cardiac catheterization. Results: Coping most of 17 researches selected were in American scientific publications, with experimental-descriptive studies. The possibilities of intercurrence and/or complications during and post-procedure, diagnostic, possibility of bad prognostic, being alone during the waiting, the first time submission the procedure, lost information and/or orientation and long time waiting could cause anxiety in pre-cardiac catheterization. Maintenance of escort and family alongside the patient, information adapted to the patient understanding level, overcoming traumas and difficulties with a multiprofessional approach, pharmacologic and non pharmacologic therapies were strategies to reduce the anxiety. Conclusions: The nurses are responsible to provide a humanized assistance to offer a fast recuperation, minimize traumas of the hospitalization and the procedure. The knowledge of the causes and the strategies are fundamental to reduce the level of anxiety in pre-catheterization cardiac.

  7. Critical appraisal of cardiac implantable electronic devices: complications and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padeletti L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Luigi Padeletti1, Giosuè Mascioli2, Alessandro Paoletti Perini1, Gino Grifoni1, Laura Perrotta1, Procolo Marchese3, Luca Bontempi3, Antonio Curnis31Istituto di Clinica Medica e Cardiologia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italia; 2Elettrofisiologia, Istituto Humanitas Gavazzeni, Bergamo, Italia; 3Elettrofisiologia, Spedali Civili, Brescia, ItaliaAbstract: Population aging and broader indications for the implant of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs are the main reasons for the continuous increase in the use of pacemakers (PMs, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs and devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-P, CRT-D. The growing burden of comorbidities in CIED patients, the greater complexity of the devices, and the increased duration of procedures have led to an augmented risk of infections, which is out of proportion to the increase in implantation rate. CIED infections are an ominous condition, which often implies the necessity of hospitalization and carries an augmented risk of in-hospital death. Their clinical presentation may be either at pocket or at endocardial level, but they can also manifest themselves with lone bacteremia. The management of these infections requires the complete removal of the device and subsequent, specific, antibiotic therapy. CIED failures are monitored by competent public authorities, that require physicians to alert them to any failures, and that suggest the opportune strategies for their management. Although the replacement of all potentially affected devices is often suggested, common practice indicates the replacement of only a minority of devices, as close follow-up of the patients involved may be a safer strategy. Implantation of a PM or an ICD may cause problems in the patients' psychosocial adaptation and quality of life, and may contribute to the development of affective disorders. Clinicians are usually unaware of the psychosocial impact of implanted PMs and ICDs. The main difference between PM and ICD patients is the latter's dramatic experience of receiving a shock. Technological improvements and new clinical evidences may help reduce the total burden of shocks. A specific supporting team, providing psychosocial help, may contribute to improving patient quality of life.Keywords: pacemaker, cardiac cardioverter-defibrillator, cardiac implantable electronic devices, infection, recall, quality of life 

  8. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial) - design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, A.D.O.; Schou, O.; Soja, A.M.B.; Bronnum-Hansen, H.; Gluud, C.; Iversen, L.; Sigurd, B.; Madsen, M.; Fischer-Hansen, J.; Danrehab, Grp

    Background Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. Study Design The DANish Cardiac REHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally...... large-scale, centrally randomized clinical trial on comprehensive CR can be conducted among a broadly defined patient group, but reaching the stipulated number of 1800 patients was difficult. Although the study included relatively many women and older people, elderly patients and patients with high...

  9. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial)--design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Gluud, Christian; Iversen, Lars; Sigurd, Bjarne; Madsen, Mette; Fischer-Hansen, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. STUDY DESIGN: The DANish Cardiac ReHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally...... large-scale, centrally randomized clinical trial on comprehensive CR can be conducted among a broadly defined patient group, but reaching the stipulated number of 1800 patients was difficult. Although the study included relatively many women and older people, elderly patients and patients with high...

  10. [Community-acquired pneumonia in patients in 2 hospital populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caberlotto, Oscar J; Cadario, Maria E; Garay, José E; Copacastro, Carlos A; Cabot, Asunción; Savy, Vilma L

    2003-01-01

    Patients hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia were studied prospectively in two hospitals located in the surroundings of Buenos Aires city. Fifty two patients from General Hospital Manuel Belgrano (HMB) were included from March 1998 to February 1999 and 23 patients from Hospital Dr A. Cetrangolo (HCET) for respiratory disease, were included from June 2000 to May 2001. Patients with lung tuberculosis, lung neoplasia and HIV infection were excluded. Clinical background, signs and symptoms were recorded. Microbiological examinations performed included bacteria, respiratory viruses and mycobacteria. Studies for "atypical" bacteria (Chlamydia spp., Coxiella burnetii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella spp.) were carried out by serological methods. No differences in age and gender were observed between both groups. Most frequently observed comorbidities in the HMB group included COPD, diabetes and cardiac failure while in the HCET group these were COPD, asthma and lung fibrosis. Etiology was established in 48% and 65.2% of the patients in the first and second group, respectively. Most frequent agents were Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, influenza A and Legionella spp.; the last one was detected in 12% of the patients. Most of these patients were from HMB and presented a good outcome. Mortality was similar in both groups (13.3%). In the HBM group it was related to the presence of comorbidities in 7 out of 8 cases, and in the HCET group it was a consequence of the worsening of their chronic respiratory failure. PMID:12673953

  11. Cardiac regeneration therapy: connections to cardiac physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Naofumi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2011-12-01

    Without heart transplantation, a large number of patients with failing hearts worldwide face poor outcomes. By means of cardiomyocyte regeneration, cardiac regeneration therapy is emerging with great promise as a means for restoring loss of cardiac function. However, the limited success of clinical trials using bone marrow-derived cells and myoblasts with heterogeneous constituents, transplanted at a wide range of cell doses, has led to disagreement on the efficacy of cell therapy. It is therefore essential to reevaluate the evidence for the efficacy of cell-based cardiac regeneration therapy, focusing on targets, materials, and methodologies. Meanwhile, the revolutionary innovation of cardiac regeneration therapy is sorely needed to help the millions of people who suffer heart failure from acquired loss of cardiomyocytes. Cardiac regeneration has been used only in limited species or as a developing process in the rodent heart; now, the possibility of cardiomyocyte turnover in the human heart is being revisited. In the pursuit of this concept, the use of cardiac stem/progenitor stem cells in the cardiac niche must be focused to usher in a second era of cardiac regeneration therapy for the severely injured heart. In addition, tissue engineering and cellular reprogramming will advance the next era of treatment that will enable current cell-based therapy to progress to "real" cardiac regeneration therapy. Although many barriers remain, the prevention of refractory heart failure through cardiac regeneration is now becoming a realistic possibility. PMID:21963835

  12. Hospital Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Hospital Compare has information about the quality of care at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country. You can use Hospital Compare to find...

  13. HCAHPS - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  14. Hospital Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Compare has information about the quality of care at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country. You can use Hospital Compare to find...

  15. Relocation of patients after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Laura Sommer; Hjortdal, V E; Jakobsen, C-J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast-track protocols may facilitate early patient discharge from the site of surgery through the implementation of more expedient pathways. However, costs may merely be shifted towards other parts of the health care system. We aimed to investigate the consequence of patient transfers on...... overall hospitalisation, follow-up and readmission rate after cardiac surgery. METHODS: A single-centre descriptive cohort study using prospectively entered registry data. The study included 4,515 patients who underwent cardiac surgery at Aarhus University Hospital during the period 1 April 2006 to 31...... December 2012. Patients were grouped and analysed based on type of discharge: Directly from site of surgery or after transfer to a regional hospital. The cohort was obtained from the Western Denmark Heart Registry and matched to the Danish National Hospital Register. RESULTS: Median overall length of stay...

  16. Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy for Cardiac Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Kyung U.; BOLLI, ROBERTO

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement The discovery of adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs) and their potential to restore functional cardiac tissue has fueled unprecedented interest in recent years. Indeed, stem-cell–based therapies have the potential to transform the treatment and prognosis of heart failure, for they have the potential to eliminate the underlying cause of the disease by reconstituting the damaged heart with functional cardiac cells. Over the last decade, several independent laboratories have demons...

  17. Desigualdades entre pacientes hospitalizados por doenas cardacas e vasculares-cerebrais em localidade do Estado de So Paulo (Brasil, 1986 Inequalities among patients hospitalized for cardiac and cerebral-vascular diseases in the City of the State of S. Paulo, Brazil, 1986

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Stuardo Yazlle Rocha

    1989-10-01

    Full Text Available Valendo-se de um sistema de informaes sobre hospitalizaes no Municpio de Ribeiro Preto, SP (Brasil foram estudadas as caractersticas clnico-epidemiolgicas referidas dos pacientes internados, em 1986, por doenas cardacas e vasculares-cerebrais (DCVC. De 43.499 hospitalizaes ocorridas naquele ano, 4.673 foram ocasionadas por doenas cardacas e vasculares-cerebrais. Utilizando a fonte de financiamento da internao como indicador do estrato social ao qual pertence o paciente, foram compostos 4 grupos de estudo: particulares, "outros", previdencirios e "no pagantes"; estes grupos apresentaram diferenas significativas quanto a coeficiente de internaes por DCVC, mdia e mediana de idade na hospitalizao, perfil ocupacional, durao da internao, freqncia dos sub-grupos diagnsticos, coeficientes de mortalidade e a idade mdia e mediana nos casos de bitos. Estas diferenas foram atribudas s disparidades sociais no nvel de vida e condies de trabalho dos grupos estudados o que determina diferenas no adoecer, ser assistido e no morrer.The clinical and epidemiological characteristics of hospitalizations due to cardiac and cerebral-vascular diseases (CCVD - ICD 390 - 438, which occurred in 1986, were studied on the basis of data from an information system relating to medical care in the City of Ribeiro Preto, State of S. Paulo, Brazil. These causes accounted for 4,673 of the annual total of 43,449 hospital admissions. Using the sources of payment of the hospitalization as an indicator of the patients' social strata, the following four study groups were defined: private, social insurance, non-paying and "others". These groups showed significant differences in relation to the following variables: hospitalization rates due to CCVD, mean and median age at admission and time of death, occupation, average length of stay in the hospital, mortality rates and relative frequencies of specific sub-group diagnosis. These differences are attributed to inequalities in the standard of living and in the working conditions of the groups, which determine diverse patterns of disease, medical care and mortality.

  18. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest following spinal anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjali Madhav Kurhekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has been well researched. Myocardial stunning after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest is seen in up to 2/3 rd of in-hospital cardiac arrests. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has probably not been reported earlier. Our case, an ASA physical status I lady, posted for tubal reanastomosis surgery developed bradycardia followed by asystole, approximately 5 minutes after giving subarachnoid block. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC was achieved within 2 minutes with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and defibrillation for pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Patient developed delayed pulmonary oedema, which was probably due to myocardial stunning. In the present case, inadequate preloading could have precipitated bradycardia progressing to cardiac arrest which, after resuscitation led to reversible myocardial dysfunction. We conclude that early vasopressor infusion, titrated fluids and echocardiography should be considered in immediate post cardiac arrest phase following spinal anaesthesia.

  19. Características cardíacas e metabólicas de corredores de longa distância do ambulatório de cardiologia do esporte e exercício, de um hospital terciário Cardiac and metabolic characteristics in long distance runners of sport and exercise cardiology outpatient facility of a tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Ferreira Azevedo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar parâmetros cardíacos, eletrocardiográficos e funcionais, e respostas cardiopulmonares ao exercício em corredores de longa distância brasileiros, acompanhados no Ambulatório de Cardiologia do Esporte e Exercício de um hospital terciário. MÉTODOS: De uma população inicial de 443 atletas, de ambos os sexos, de diferentes modalidades esportivas, foram avaliados 162 (37% corredores de longa distância, do sexo masculino, com idade variando entre quatorze e 67 anos. Registros eletrocardiográficos (doze derivações e ecocardiográficos (modos mono e bidimensional foram realizados em repouso. Respostas cardiopulmonares foram avaliadas durante teste em esteira rolante, com protocolo em rampa. RESULTADOS: Alterações metabólicas e doenças cardiovasculares foram diagnosticadas em 17% e 9% dos corredores, respectivamente. Bradicardia sinusal e hipertrofia ventricular esquerda foram verificadas em 62% e 33% dos corredores, respectivamente. Alterações estruturais, como cavidade ventricular > 55mm, espessura relativa de parede > 0,44 e índice de massa ventricular > 134g/m2 foram encontradas em 15%, 11% e 7% dos corredores, respectivamente. Fração de ejeção OBJECTIVE: To characterize electrocardiographic and functional cardiac parameters and cardiopulmonary responses to exercise in long-distance Brazilian runners monitored at the Sport and Exercise Cardiology Outpatient Facility of a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: Of an initial population of 443 male and female athletes of different sport modalities, we assessed 162 (37% long-distance male runners, aged from 14 to 67. Electrocardiographic (12 leads and echocardiographic (M-mode and two-dimensional parameters were recorded at rest. Cardiopulmonary responses were evaluated on a treadmill with a ramp protocol. RESULTS: Metabolic alterations and cardiovascular diseases were diagnosed in 17% and 9% of the runners, respectively. Sinus bradycardia and left ventricular hypertrophy were observed in 62% and 33% of the runners, respectively. Structural alterations such as ventricular cavity > 55mm, relative wall thickness > 0.44, and ventricular mass index > 134g/m2 were found in 15%, 11% and 7% of the runners, respectively. Ejection fraction < 55% was observed in 4% of the runners. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak decreased as of the age of 41, although the anaerobic threshold relative to the VO2peak remained unchanged with age. CONCLUSION: Resting bradycardia and left ventricular hypertrophy are the most frequent cardiovascular adaptations in Brazilian long distance runners monitored by the Sport and Exercise Cardiology Outpatient Facility. Although VO2peak decreases after the age of 41, the relative oxygen uptake at the anaerobic threshold of these runners remained unchanged.

  20. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful? Formal name: Cardiac Risk Assessment Related tests: Lipid Profile , VLDL Cholesterol , hs-CRP , Lp(a) Overview | Common ... on Coronary artery disease: Tests and diagnosis .) The lipid profile is the most important blood test for cardiac ...

  1. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... implantation of an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator. The surgery will be performed by Dr. Hanscy Seide and ... use of a cardiac defibrillator in open heart surgery and what is the risk to the phrenic ...

  2. Provision of out-of-hours interventional radiology services in the London Strategic Health Authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illing, R.O., E-mail: rowland@doctors.org.u [University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Ingham Clark, C.L.; Allum, C. [Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Aim: To review the provision of out-of-hours interventional radiology (IR) services in the London Strategic Health Authority (SHA). Materials and methods: All 29 acute hospitals in the London SHA were contacted between November 2008 and January 2009. A questionnaire based on the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) guidelines assessed the provision of out-of-hours IR services. An 'ad-hoc' service was defined as on-call provision where not all the radiologists could perform intervention: If IR was required out of hours, an interventionalist came in when off-duty or the patient was transferred. Results: Seventeen out of the 29 (59%) hospitals provided ad-hoc out-of-hours services, eight (28%) provided a 24-hour rota, and four (14%) provide no out-of-hours cover. No ad-hoc service had formal transfer arrangements to a centre providing a 24 h service. Only two hospitals providing a 24 h service had six radiologists on the rota. Conclusion: Strategic planning for out-of-hours IR across London is recommended. This is likely to be welcomed by the hospitals involved, allowing informal arrangements to be formalized, and collaboration to provide comprehensive regional networks, provided appropriate funding is made available. A national audit is recommended; it is unlikely these findings are unique to London.

  3. Cardiac surgery in octogenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar, G; Raanani, E; Brauner, R; Vidne, B A

    1994-12-01

    Age as an important risk factor in surgery has always been debatable. Between January 1991 and December 1992, 35 consecutive octogenarian patients (23 males and 12 females; average age 82.3 years) were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-five patients had only coronary artery by-pass graft operations (CABG), five had aortic valve replacements (AVR) and five had combined AVR-CABG operations. Twenty-five of the 30 patients (83%) who underwent CABG alone or a combined procedure had suffered from unstable angina. The mean ejection fraction was 40% in this group. An average of 2.8 grafts per patient was performed. The left internal mammary artery (LIMA) was-used in nine patients (30%). The average hospitalization period was 11.5 days. Operative mortality (within 30 days) was zero. Patients who underwent AVR only were hospitalized for an average of 17.6 days and there were two cases (6%) of mortality in this group. All patients who underwent AVR and CABG were discharged within 14 days. Overall complications occurred in nine patients (25.7%); cardiac arrythmias, (4) neurological deficits (2), severe wound infections (2), and adult respiratory distress syndrome (1). The use of the LIMA was not associated with an increased incidence of bleeding or sternal infection. The low rates of mortality and major complications lead us to conclude that, when indicated, surgical treatment including the use of LIMA in selected cases, should be offered to this group of patients, even in the presence of moderate LV dysfunction. PMID:7775542

  4. Cardiac Biomarkers: a Focus on Cardiac Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Forough

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically, biomarkers have been used in two major ways to maintain and improve better health status: first, for diagnostic purposes, and second, as specific targets to treat various diseases.  A new era in treatment and even cure for the some diseases using reprograming of somatic cells is about to be born. In this approach, scientists are successfully taking human skin cells (previously considered terminally-differentiated cells and re-programming them into functional cardiac myocytes and other cell types in vitro.  A cell reprograming approach for treatment of cardiovascular diseases will revolutionize the field of medicine and significantly expand the human lifetime. Availability of a comprehensive catalogue for cardiac biomarkers is necessary for developing cell reprograming modalities to treat cardiac diseases, as well as for determining the progress of reprogrammed cells as they become cardiac cells.  In this review, we present a comprehensive survey of the cardiac biomarkers currently known.

  5. Data fra automatiske eksterne defibrillatorer giver vigtig information om kvaliteten af hjertestopbehandling på hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård, Lone Due; Løfgren, Bo; Krarup, Niels Henrik Vinther; Holm, Tina; Andersen, Lone Kærslund

    2014-01-01

    International guidelines recommend monitoring the outcome following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Using data from automatic external defibrillators (AED) prospectively collected during a three-year period in a regional hospital, we evaluated the treatment quality of resuscitation. Time to defibrill......International guidelines recommend monitoring the outcome following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Using data from automatic external defibrillators (AED) prospectively collected during a three-year period in a regional hospital, we evaluated the treatment quality of resuscitation. Time to...

  6. Usefulness of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy in the prediction of cardiac events in patients with cardiomyopathy showing stabilization of symptoms or preserved cardiac function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not rare for patients with cardiomyopathy to be asymptomatic for long periods or to show improved cardiac function following various medical interventions. Conversely, cardiac events sometimes occur in those patients, requiring close observation. We assessed the usefulness of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy (MIBG) to predict the occurrence of cardiac events in patients with stable cardiomyopathy. The subjects comprised 74 outpatients with stable cardiomyopathy. MIBG was performed calculate the extent score, severity score, washout rate (WR), and heart-to-mediastinum ratio. At about the same time, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by echocardiography and the plasma brain natriuretic peptide were measured. The mean observation period extended for 741±437 days with an end point of cardiac events (cardiac death, heart failure requiring hospitalization, and arrhythmias requiring hospitalization). During the mean follow-up period, 15 cardiac events occurred. Results of multivariate analysis revealed that LVEF was the most powerful predictor of cardiac events (0.006, p<0.01). However, WR was the only significant predictor of hard events such as cardiac death (1.171, p<0.001) and cardiac events in the group of patients who preserved cardiac function with LVEF 0.4 or higher (1.079, p<0.05). Combined use of LVEF and WR is useful to predict the occurrence of cardiac events in patients with stable cardiomyopathy. (author)

  7. Insuficiencia cardíaca en hospitales chilenos: resultados del Registro Nacional de Insuficiencia Cardíaca, Grupo ICARO Cardiac failure in Chilean hospitals: results of the National Registry of Heart Failure, ICARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Castro G

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure (HF is a major public health problem. In Chile hospitalized patients due to HF have not been characterized. Aim: To evaluate clinical profile and outcome of patients hospitalized for heart failure in Chilean hospitals. Patients and Methods: Prospective registry of 14 centers. Patients hospitalized for HF in functional class III and IV were included. Epidemiological and clinical data, functional class, type of presentation, decompensation cause, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, treatment and evolution were registered. Results: Three hundred seventy two patients aged 69±13 years old, 59% men, were assessed. The main etiologies of HF were ischemic in 31.6%, hypertensive in 35.2%, valvular in 14.9% and idiopathic in 7.4%. There was a history of hypertension 69%, diabetes in 35%, myocardial infarction in 22%, atrial fibrillation (AF in 28%. The presentation form of HF was chronic decompensated in 86%, acute in 12%, refractory in 2%. The causes of decompensation were non compliance with diet or medical prescriptions in 28%, infections in 22% and AF 17%. ECG showed AF in 36% and left bundle branch block in 16%. Echocardiography was performed in 52% of the patients, 69% had left ventricular ejection fraction <40%. On admission, 39% received angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, 15% beta-blocker, 25% digoxin, 16% spironolactone and 53% furosemide. The mean hospital stay was 11±10 days and mortality was 4.5%. Conclusions: The elderly is the age group most commonly admitted to hospital due to HF. The main etiologies were ischemic and hypertensive. The main causes for decompensations were noncompliance with diet or medical prescriptions and infections. A significant proportion had a relatively well preserved ventricular systolic function (Rev Méd Chile 2004; 132: 655-62

  8. Troponin T in patients with traumatic chest injuries with and without cardiac involvement: Insights from an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Serum troponin T (TnT is a common marker of myocardial injury. However, its implication in the absence of clinical evidence of cardiac reason is not well established. Aims: The aim of this study was to identify the implications of positive TnT in traumatic chest injury (TCI patients regardless of the cardiac involvement. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of all TCI patients admitted to level 1 trauma center between 2008 and 2011. Patients who underwent TnT testing were divided into two groups: Group 1 (positive TnT and Group 2 (negative TnT. The two groups were analyzed and compared, and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of TnT positivity and mortality. Results: Out of 993 blunt TCI patients, 19.3% had positive TnT (Group 1. On comparison to Group 2, patients in Group 1 were 5 years younger and more likely to have head, cardiac, hepatic, splenic, and pelvic injuries, in addition to lung contusion. Positive TnT was associated with higher Injury Severity Score (ISS (P = 0.001, higher chest Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS (P = 0.001, and longer hospital stay (P = 0.03. In addition, Group 1 patients were more likely to undergo chest tube insertion, exploratory laparotomy, mechanical ventilation, and tracheostomy. Twenty patients had cardiac involvement, and of them 14 had positive TnT. Among 973 patients who showed no evidence of cardiac involvement, 178 had positive TnT (18.3%. There were 104 deaths (60% in Group 1. On multivariate regression analysis, the predictors of hospital mortality were positive TnT, head injury, and high ISS, whereas, the predictors of TnT positivity were cardiac, hepatic, and pelvic injuries; higher ISS; and age. Conclusions: Positive TnT in blunt TCI patients is a common challenge, particularly in polytrauma cases. Patients with positive TnT tend to have the worst outcome even in the absence of clinical evidence of acute cardiac involvement. Positive TnT is also a reflection of the severity of chest or extrathoracic injuries; however, further prospective studies are warranted.

  9. Reoperation for bleeding in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Rauer, Line Juul; Mortensen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Bo Juel

    2012-01-01

    At Odense University Hospital (OUH), 5-9% of all unselected cardiac surgical patients undergo reoperation due to excessive bleeding. The reoperated patients have an approximately three times greater mortality than non-reoperated. To reduce the rate of reoperations and mortality due to postoperative...... bleeding, we aim to identify risk factors that predict reoperation. A total of 1452 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery using extracorporeal circulation (ECC) between November 2005 and December 2008 at OUH were analysed. Statistical tests were used to identify risk factors for reoperation. We...... after cardiac surgery was low ejection fraction, high EuroSCORE, procedures other than isolated CABG, elongated time on ECC, low body mass index, diabetes mellitus and preoperatively elevated s-creatinine. Reoperated patients significantly had a greater increase in postoperative s-creatinine and higher...

  10. Norovirus - hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ... to understand an outbreak, such as in a hospital setting. This test is done by collecting a ...

  11. Southern hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, H

    1992-03-01

    Self Memorial Hospital's hostesses are the embodiment of a patient-oriented service philosophy instituted by Bob Borland when he created the $5-million-a-year Hospitality Services department. PMID:10117979

  12. Survey of Staphylococcus isolates among hospital personnel, environment and their antibiogram with special emphasis on methicillin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to find the prevalence of Staphylococcus spp. carriage among hospital personnel and hospital environment and their antibiogram with special emphasis on methicillin resistance. A total of 205 samples from hospital personnel and environment were collected from casualty, oncology and multidisciplinary cardiac unit ward of Kasturba Medical College Hospital, Manipal. Samples were collected using sterile cotton wool swabs and inoculated into brain heart infusion broth. Subcultures were done onto blood agar and MacConkey′s agar. Isolates were identified by standard methods up to species level. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed according to standardized disc diffusion Kirby-Bauer method. Each of the isolates was screened for methicillin resistance using oxacillin disc on Mueller Hinton agar plate followed by MIC for methicillin and cefoxitin susceptibility test by disc diffusion method. Sixty five out of 205 strains (31.7% were Staphylococcus spp. and all of them were coagulase negative. Most of the strains belonged to S.epidermidis 49.23%(32/65 followed by S. saprophyticus 26.15%(17/65. Maximum isolates of S.epidermidis were from anterior nares 28.12%(9/32 strains of S.epidermidis . Highest number of methicillin resistant coagulase negative strains (3/9, 33.33% were isolated from stethoscope of multidisciplinary cardiac unit ward followed by carriers in the anterior nares (2/9, 22.22%. Methicillin resistant coagulase negative staphylococci are prevalent in anterior nares of hospital personnel and in the hospital environment thereby providing a definite source for hospital acquired infection. All isolates were sensitive to vancomycin, ciprofloxacin and amikacin.

  13. Preoperative statin therapy and infectious complications in cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hartholt, N. L.; Rettig, T C D; Schijffelen, M.; Morshuis, W J; van de Garde, E.M.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304841528; Noordzij, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether preoperative statin therapy is associated with the risk of postoperative infection in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: 520 patients undergoing cardiac surgery in 2010 were retrospectively examined. Data regarding statin and antibiotic use prior to and after surgery were available from the hospital pharmacy information system. Cultures and clinical data of patients on postoperative antibiotics other than standard prophylactic therapy were studied to identify...

  14. Incidence and Risk Factors of Early Delirium after Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ieva Norkienė; Donata Ringaitienė; Vilma Kuzminskaitė; Jūratė Šipylaitė

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of our study was to identify the incidence and risk factors of delirium after cardiac surgery implementing Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC). Material and Methods. 87 patients, undergoing cardiac surgery at Vilnius University hospital, were prospectively monitored for postoperative delirium development, during intensive care unit stay. Results. The incidence of postoperative delirium was 13.30%. No statistically relevant preoperative predictors of delir...

  15. Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise and Self Care for Chronic Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Ades, Philip A; Keteyian, Steven J; Balady, Gary J.; Houston-Miller, Nancy; Kitzman, Dalane W; MANCINI, DONNA M.; Michael W. Rich

    2013-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is highly prevalent in older individuals and a major cause of morbidity, mortality, hospitalizations and disability. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise training and CHF self-care counseling have each been shown to improve clinical status and clinical outcomes in CHF. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of CR exercise training alone (without counseling) have demonstrated consistent improvements in CHF symptoms in addition to reductions of cardiac mortality and ho...

  16. Historical perspectives of cardiac electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, Berndt

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of clinical electrophysiology has a long and fascinating history. From earliest times, no clinical symptom impressed the patient (and the physician) more than an irregular heart beat. Although ancient Chinese pulse theory laid the foundation for the study of arrhythmias and clinical electrophysiology in the 5th century BC, the most significant breakthrough in the identification and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias first occurred in this century. In the last decades, our knowledge of electrophysiology and pharmacology has increased exponentially. The enormous clinical significance of cardiac rhythm disturbances has favored these advances. On the one hand, patients live longer and thus are more likely to experience arrhythmias. On the other hand, circulatory problems of the cardiac vessels have increased enormously, and this has been identified as the primary cause of cardiac rhythm disorders. Coronary heart disease has become not just the most significant disease of all, based on the statistics for cause of death. Arrhythmias are the main complication of ischemic heart disease, and they have been directly linked to the frequently arrhythmogenic sudden death syndrome, which is now presumed to be an avoidable "electrical accident" of the heart. A retrospective look--often charming in its own right--may not only make it easier to sort through the copious details of this field and so become oriented in this universe of important and less important facts: it may also provide the observer with a chronological vantage point from which to view the subject. The study of clinical electrophysiology is no dry compendium of facts and figures, but rather a dynamic field of study evolving out of the competition between various ideas, intentions and theories. PMID:19196616

  17. Individualized cardiac resynchronization therapy: current status

    OpenAIRE

    Ruwald MH; Bruun NE

    2014-01-01

    Martin H Ruwald,1,2 Niels E Bruun1,3 1Department of Cardiology, Gentofte Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark; 2Heart Research Follow-up Program, Division of Cardiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA; 3Clinical Institute, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Abstract: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has shown a substantial reduction in heart failure patient morbidity and mortality, with improvement in quality of life as well as symptoms. The therapy is, however, l...

  18. A case of thyroid storm with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yutaka Nakashima,1 Tsuneaki Kenzaka,2 Masanobu Okayama,3 Eiji Kajii31Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, 2Division of General Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, Japan; 3Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, JapanAbstract: A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging. He immediately received basic life support from a bystander and was transported to our hospital. On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity. Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest. Although hyperthyroidism-induced cardiac arrest including ventricular fibrillation is rare, it should be considered when diagnosing the cause of treatable cardiac arrest.Keywords: hyperthyroidism, ventricular fibrillation, treatable cardiac arrest, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary arrest

  19. Understanding Out-of-Work and Out-of-School Youth in Europe and Central Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro, Joseph Anthony; Mitra, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to describe and analyze the out-of-work and out-of-school youth (ages 15-24) in the Europe and Central Asia2 (ECA) region. People who are out-of-work and out-of-school are referred to as NEET (Not in Employment, Education or Training). This study attempts to characterize the NEETs by age, gender, education and their activity status. The main findings of thi...

  20. Primary cardiac osteosarcoma in a 42-year-old woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Jianyong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We describe here a 42-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital with a pedunculated mass in her left atrium. She was diagnosed with a primary cardiac osteosarcoma with special immunohistochemical characteristics. Echocardiography and computed tomography can be used to differentiate cardiac osteosarcomas from routine intracardiac tumors. The patient was treated by surgical removal of the mass. Two years later, she has shown no evidence of disease recurrence. We discuss primary osteosarcomas in the cardiac cavity and their management.

  1. Autologous Transfusion in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmehr H

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Preoperative autologous blood donation is commonly used to reduce exposure to homologous blood transfusions among patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of autologous transfusion on patients' hematocryte value, intra and postoperative blood loss, hospitalization time, the development of infective complications and other factors. Materials and Methods: Between June 2001 to April 2002, 208 patients were underwent cardiac surgery in cardiac surgery ward in Imam Khomeini Medical Center. One or more blood units donate from 104 Patients before cardiopulmonary bypass and heparin injection, and transfused to them after CPB and Protamin injection (autologous Group, group 1. 104 patients underwent cardiac surgery routinely (control group, group 2."nResults: Mean of age was 55.9±8.6 in group 1 and 56.6±9.3 in group 2 (P=NS. 73 male and 31 females were in group 1 and 79 males and 25 females were in group 2 (P=NS. Smoking, familial history, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, hypertension, stroke, and history of myocardial infarction was similar in two groups."nSeverity of angina, urgency operation, number vessels disease, duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, duration of aortic cross clamp time, use of internal thoracic artery graft, and number of grafts was similar in both groups. Mean of bleeding post operation was 548 cc in group 1 and 803 cc in-group 2 (P=0.003. Bleeding that need to operation was 1.8% in group 1 and 8.6% in group 2 (P=0.002. Wound infection, mediastinitis, renal failure, ventilatory prolonged, stroke, need to Intra-aortic Balloon Pump (IABP, intraoperative bleeding, and hospital stay was similar in both groups. Mean of extubationt time was 10.2 hours in group 1 and 14.8 hours in group 2 (P=0.001."nConclusion: Preoperative and intra-operative donations are safe and continue to contribute uniquely to blood conservation, providing important options in comprehensive blood conservation programs in current pediatric open-heart surgery."n"n"n"n"n"n"n 

  2. Collaborative quality improvement in the cardiac intensive care unit: development of the Paediatric Cardiac Critical Care Consortium (PC4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaies, Michael; Cooper, David S; Tabbutt, Sarah; Schwartz, Steven M; Ghanayem, Nancy; Chanani, Nikhil K; Costello, John M; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Laussen, Peter C; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Donohue, Janet E; Willis, Gina M; Gaynor, J William; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Ohye, Richard G; Charpie, John R; Pasquali, Sara K; Scheurer, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    Despite many advances in recent years for patients with critical paediatric and congenital cardiac disease, significant variation in outcomes remains across hospitals. Collaborative quality improvement has enhanced the quality and value of health care across specialties, partly by determining the reasons for variation and targeting strategies to reduce it. Developing an infrastructure for collaborative quality improvement in paediatric cardiac critical care holds promise for developing benchmarks of quality, to reduce preventable mortality and morbidity, optimise the long-term health of patients with critical congenital cardiovascular disease, and reduce unnecessary resource utilisation in the cardiac intensive care unit environment. The Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care Consortium (PC4) has been modelled after successful collaborative quality improvement initiatives, and is positioned to provide the data platform necessary to realise these objectives. We describe the development of PC4 including the philosophical, organisational, and infrastructural components that will facilitate collaborative quality improvement in paediatric cardiac critical care. PMID:25167212

  3. Does organophosphate poisoning cause cardiac injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghabiklooei, Abbas; Mostafazadeh, Babak; Farzaneh, Esmaeil; Morteza, Afsaneh

    2013-11-01

    Organophosphates are insecticides which are widely used as a suicidal agent in Iran. They are associated with different types of cardiac complications including cardiac arrest and arrhythmia, however their role in cardiac injury is not known yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of myocardial damage in patients with cholinesterase poisoning.It was a prospective study conducted from January 2008 to March 2010. Cohorts of patients with cholinesterase poisoning due to suicidal attempt who have been referred to Loghman hospital were selected. Patients who have taken more than one poison or were used concomitant drugs were excluded. Physical examination was performed on admission to discover warning sign. Peripheral arterial blood gases, creatine kinase, creatine kinase-myocardial band, troponin-T measurements were performed in all cases. There were 24 patients, 7 of them women, with the mean age of 41.2±15.05 who were included in this study. Non-survivors had significantly higher levels of systolic blood pressure, partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, bicarbonate Glasgow Coma Scale scoring and longer duration of mechanical ventilation. Our findings showed that cardiac injury is an important cause of death in organophosphate poisoning. It could be hypothesized that cardiac injury is a strong predictor of death in patients with organophosphate poisoning. PMID:24191334

  4. Cardiac Stem Cell Niches

    OpenAIRE

    Annarosa Leri; Marcello Rota; Toru Hosoda; Polina Goichberg; Piero Anversa

    2014-01-01

    The critical role that stem cell niches have in cardiac homeostasis and myocardial repair following injury is the focus of this review. Cardiac niches represent specialized microdomains where the quiescent and activated state of resident stem cells is regulated. Alterations in niche function with aging and cardiac diseases result in abnormal sites of cardiomyogenesis and inadequate myocyte formation. The relevance of Notch 1 signaling, gap-junction formation, HIF-1α and metabolic state in the...

  5. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, the...

  6. Preoperative cardiac risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Vidaković Radosav; Poldermans Don; Nešković Aleksandar N.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 100 million people undergo noncardiac surgery annually worldwide. It is estimated that around 3% of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery experience a major adverse cardiac event. Although cardiac events, like myocardial infarction, are major cause of perioperative morbidity or mortality, its true incidence is difficult to assess. The risk of perioperative cardiac complications depends mainly on two conditions: 1) identified risk factors, and 2) the type of the surgical p...

  7. Cardiac output measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wilde, Robert Bernard Pieter de

    2009-01-01

    Accurate clinical assessment of the circulatory status is particular desirable in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) and patients undergoing cardiac, thoracic, or vascular interventions. As the patients haemodynamic status may change rapidly, continuous monitoring of cardiac output will provide information allowing rapid adjustment of therapy. Aim of this thesis is an overview and evaluation with respect to less invasive cardiac output measurement and monitoring sy...

  8. Indium extraction out of sulfate zinc solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience of operation of Chelyabinsk electrolyte zinc works in improvement of indium extraction technology out of sulfate zinc solutions of zinc production is generalized. Descriptions of tripolyphosphate, sorption and extraction technologies for indium extraction are presented. It is shown that indium extraction scheme using binary di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid extractant and trialkylamine that has been put into operation with usage of high-molecular synthetic C7-C9 acids as diluent, has several advantages comparing with precipitation and sorption technologies. This technology allowed rising indium extraction out of Waelz-oxide by 8-10 % to decrease substantially operation expenses and almost by two times cut required personnel

  9. [Sexuality and cardiac arrhythmias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztajzel, J

    2013-03-20

    For most patients, sexual activity represents a low risk of triggering cardiac arrhythmias. However, particularly in patients with an underlying heart disease, sexual activity may cause cardiac arrhythmias which may be sometimes serious. From a physiological point of view, sexual activity produces increased sympathetic activity and thereby probably reduced vagal tone which at different degrees may induce cardiac arrythmias. Several presently available autopsy-studies have shown that this happens very rarely and that it mostly affects men. Finally, recently published recommendations allow us to better advise patients with cardiac arrhytmias to engage in sexual activity or to defer it until the condition is stabilized and optimally controlled. PMID:23547362

  10. Cardiac ablation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheter ablation; Radiofrequency catheter ablation; Cryoablation ... There are two methods for performing cardiac ablation: Radiofrequency ... very cold temperatures. The type of procedure you have will ...

  11. UK pulls out of plans for ILC

    CERN Multimedia

    Durrani, Matin

    2007-01-01

    "A funding crisis at one of the UK's leading research councils has forced the country to pull out of plans for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) says in a report published today that it does not see "a practicable path towards the realization of this facility as currently conceived on a reasonable timescale". (1 page)

  12. France, Germany drop out of ITER race

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The list of countries willing to host a multi-billion dollar fusion facility got much shorter when France and Germany effectively took themselves out of the competition, making Japan the odd-on favorite as the site for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) if it is built. This article describes the history and the possible future for the ITER

  13. Out of the comfort zone (Part 1)

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, P.

    2013-01-01

    When we are normally asked to report strange masses in heads, some of us take it as an interesting challenge away from the hum drum day to day long running contest of stroke or no stroke, but when we get presented with conditions that extend out of our normal range of competencies how do we deal with this?

  14. Out of the comfort zone (Part 2)

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, P.

    2013-01-01

    When we are normally asked to report strange masses in heads, some of us take it as an interesting challenge away from the hum drum day to day long running contest of stroke or no stroke, but when we get presented with conditions that extend out of our normal range of competencies how do we deal with this.

  15. Cardiac Arrest from Postpartum Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection

    OpenAIRE

    Pillow, Malford T; Nguyen, Ngoc Anh; Kuo, Dick

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with a witnessed cardiac arrest. She was otherwise healthy with no cardiac risk factors and had undergone an uneventful repeated cesarean section 3 days priorly. The patient underwent defibrillation, out of ventricular fibrillation to a perfusing sinus rhythm, and was taken to the catheterization laboratory where coronary angiography findings showed spontaneous dissection of the left anterior descending arter...

  16. Frequency of Massive Cardiac Adiposity (Floating Heart) in the Native Hearts of Patients Having Heart Transplantation at a Single Texas Hospital (2013 to 2015) and Comparison of Various Clinical and Morphologic Variables in the Patients With Massive Versus Nonmassive Cardiac Adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William C; Won, Vera S; Vasudevan, Anupama; Ko, Jong Mi; Hall, Shelley A; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V

    2016-04-15

    Body weight continues to increase worldwide due primarily to the increase in body fat. This study analyzes the frequency of massive adiposity at hearts of patients who underwent heart transplantation (HT) determined by the ability of the heart to float in a container of 10% formaldehyde (because adipose tissue is lighter than myocardium) and compares certain characteristics of those patients with and without floating hearts. The hearts studied at HT during a 3-year period (2013 to 2015) at Baylor University Medical Center were carefully "cleaned" and weighed by the same individual and tested as to their ability to float in a container of formaldehyde, an indication of severe cardiac adiposity. Of the 220 hearts studied, 84 (38%) floated in a container of formaldehyde and 136 (62%) did not. Comparison of the 84 patients with floating hearts to the 136 with nonfloating hearts showed a significant difference in ages, but a nonsignificant difference in gender, body mass index, frequency of systemic hypertension, or diabetes mellitus. The odds of a heart being a floating one was increased in patients with a diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathy (unadjusted odds ratio 2.12, 95% CI 1.21 to 3.70). The frequency of massive cardiac adiposity in the native hearts of patients having HT (38%) is striking and appears to have increased in frequency in the recent decades. PMID:26912162

  17. Value of emergency cardiac enzymes: audit in a coronary care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, F.; Jishi, F; Sissons, C E; Baker, J. T.; Child, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    Medical audit in a district general hospital coronary care unit led to the introduction of an emergency cardiac enzyme service. 91.2% of patients eligible for thrombolysis therapy received treatment following this introduction compared to 73.7% before (P = .05). No patient was treated inappropriately on the basis of a raised cardiac enzyme.

  18. Diagnosis of traumatic cardiac contusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma remains a diagnostic problem because of a lack of sensitive diagnostic tests. This study evaluated thallous chloride Tl 201 single-photon-emission computed tomography in a series of 48 patients following blunt chest trauma. Of the 48 patients, 23 had normal scans. None of these patients proved to have serious arrhythmias during three days of continuous monitoring. Of 25 patients with abnormal or ambiguous studies, five (20%) developed serious arrhythmias requiring therapy. Single-photon-emission computed tomography scanning thus was sensitive in indicating that group of patients at risk of serious arrhythmias, and may therefore prove to be a useful screening test to determine the need for hospitalization and arrhythmia monitoring following blunt chest trauma

  19. Cardiac catheterization and complications: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Dubey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac catheterization for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes has been routinely used since last one year in College of Medical Sciences and Teaching Hospital, Bharatpur, Nepal. Because all cardiac catheterizations involve the insertion of cardiac catheters into the circulatory system, it should not be surprising that a variety of complications can ensue. These complications range from minor problems with no long-term sequelae to major problem even death. A total of 357 consecutive diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterization performed in College of Medical Sciences and Teaching Hospital, Bharatpur between April 2011 to April 2012 were evaluated for their complications. Among them 220 (61.6% were coronary angiogram, 65 (18.2 % percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA and stenting, 7 ( 1.9 % permanent pacemaker insertion, 65 (18.2% were others including temporary pacemaker insertion, peripheral angiography and carotid angiography. There were 3 deaths (0.84%. Two deaths occurred following coronary angiogram and 1 death following PTCA stenting. Vascular complications occurred in 5 (1.4% patients with groin haematoma in all. Contrast allergy occurred in 9 (2.5 %, vasovagal reaction in 2 (0.56%, pyrogen reaction in 6 (1.6%, and contrast induced nephropathy occurred in 3 (0.84% patients. Cardiac catheterization procedure in CMS-TH, Bharatpur has acceptable low complications including death. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-2, 1-6 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i2.6830

  20. In-hospital emergency: how to identify the patient in crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Marcello Difonzo; Antonio Bisceglie

    2015-01-01

    In-hospital emergency is a system designed to ensure an adequate response, in rapidity and appropriateness, to cardiac arrests and other medical emergencies, in general wards and in not-medical areas of the hospital. Early treatment of unstable patients, hospitalized in non-intensive care unit, reduces the incidence of serious adverse events such as unexpected cardiac arrest, unplanned intensive care admissions, and unexpected death.The Rapid Response System (RRS) describes the entire process...

  1. Time out of work and skill depreciation

    OpenAIRE

    Edin, Per-Anders; Gustavsson, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of skill depreciation in the relationship between work interruptions and subsequent wages. Using Swedish data from two waves (1994 and 1998) of the International Adult Literacy Survey, which included results of tests gauging respondents' ability to read and make practical use of printed information, the authors are able to analyze changes in individuals' skills as a function of time out of work. They find statistically strong evidence of a negative relationshi...

  2. Fungi causing dying out of heather seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kowalik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the fungi causing dying out of one-yearold heather seedlings. Observations were carried out on: 'Amethyst', 'Annemarie', 'Colette', 'Perestroika' and 'Reini'. The shoots revealing necrotic symptoms were plated on PDA medium. 25 species of fungi were isolated. Among them Pestalotia sydowiana, Alternaria alternata, Cylindrocarpon destructans, Leptosphaeria coniothyrium and Epicoccum purpurascens were dominant, while Mammaria echinobotryoides, Phoma leveillei, Kaissleriella subalpina, Botrytis cinerea and Phytophthora cinnamomi occurred less frequently.

  3. Out-of-Plane Cmos Compatible Magnetometers

    OpenAIRE

    El Ghorba, M.; André, N; Sobieski, S.; Raskin, J. -P.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional MEMS magnetometers with use of residual stresses in thin multilayers cantilevers are presented. Half-loop cantilevers based on Lorentz-force deflection convert magnetic flux in changes, thanks to piezoresistive transducers mounted in Wheatstone bridge. Magnetic field in the order of 10 Gauss was measured with a sensitivity of 0.015 mV/Gauss. A Finite Element Model of the device has been developed with Ansys for static and dynamic simulations. Novel out-of-plane ferromagnetic...

  4. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  5. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  6. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, D.R.; Friedman, I.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 ?? 1010 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park. ?? 1985.

  7. Information and communication technology-based cardiac rehabilitation homecare programs

    OpenAIRE

    Varnfield M; Karunanithi M

    2015-01-01

    Marlien Varnfield, Mohanraj KarunanithiAustralian eHealth Research Centre, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has, for many years, been a highly recommended approach to secondary prevention for patients recovering after a heart attack or heart surgery. These programs are traditionally delivered from a hospital outpatient center. Despite demonstrated benefits and guideli...

  8. The cardiac patient during Ramadan and Hajj.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Ahmed, Waqar H; Al-Shaibi, Khaled F

    2014-10-01

    The holy month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, fasting Muslims refrain from eating, drinking, smoking, and sex from dawn until sunset. Although the Quran exempts sick people from the duty of fasting, it is not uncommon for many heart disease patients to fast during Ramadan. Despite the fact that more than a billion Muslims worldwide fast during Ramadan, there is no clear consensus on its effects on cardiac disease. Some studies have shown that the effects of fasting on stable patients with cardiac disease are minimal and the majority of patients with stable cardiac illness can endure Ramadan fasting with no clinical deterioration. Fasting during Ramadan does not seem to increase hospitalizations for congestive heart failure. However, patients with decompensated heart failure or those requiring large doses of diuretics are strongly advised not to fast, particularly when Ramadan falls in summer. Patients with controlled hypertension can safely fast. However, patients with resistant hypertension should be advised not to fast until their blood pressure is reasonably controlled. Patients with recent myocardial infarction, unstable angina, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery should avoid fasting. Physician advice should be individualized and patients are encouraged to seek medical advice before fasting in order to adjust their medications, if required. The performance of the Hajj pilgrimage is another pillar of Islam and is obligatory once in the lifetime for all adult Muslims who are in good health and can afford to undertake the journey. Hajj is a physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually demanding experience. Medical checkups one or two months before leaving for Hajj is warranted, especially for those with chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease. Patients with heart failure, uncontrolled hypertension, serious arrhythmias, unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, or cardiac surgery should be considered unfit for undertaking the Hajj pilgrimage. PMID:25278723

  9. The future general practitioner: out of date and running out of time.

    OpenAIRE

    Lipman, T

    2000-01-01

    In the late 1960s a Royal College of General Practitioners' working party produced a job description for the 'Future General Practitioner', together with an educational programme for vocational training. Despite the perceived success of vocational training, general practice remains academically disadvantaged compared with hospital medicine. Most general practitioners (GPs) have no contact with research or academic general practice, few achieve higher degrees compared with hospital consultants...

  10. Do out-of-hours co-operatives improve general practitioners' health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, J; Pickard, D; Rose, J; Stewart-Brown, S; Wilkinson, E; Brogan, C; Lawrence, D

    2000-10-01

    General practitioners (GPs) have been found to have a higher level of anxiety and depression then hospital managers and consultants. In 1995 and 1998, we surveyed GPs in Buckinghamshire. We found that the development of out-of-hours co-operatives was an important factor in the improvement in GPs' health status. PMID:11127174

  11. Do out-of-hours co-operatives improve general practitioners' health?

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, J.; Pickard, D; Rose, J; Stewart-Brown, S; Wilkinson, E.; Brogan, C.; Lawrence, D.

    2000-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) have been found to have a higher level of anxiety and depression then hospital managers and consultants. In 1995 and 1998, we surveyed GPs in Buckinghamshire. We found that the development of out-of-hours co-operatives was an important factor in the improvement in GPs' health status.

  12. Out-of-body-induced hippocampal amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergouignan, Loretxu; Nyberg, Lars; Ehrsson, H Henrik

    2014-03-25

    Theoretical models have suggested an association between the ongoing experience of the world from the perspective of one's own body and hippocampus-based episodic memory. This link has been supported by clinical reports of long-term episodic memory impairments in psychiatric conditions with dissociative symptoms, in which individuals feel detached from themselves as if having an out-of-body experience. Here, we introduce an experimental approach to examine the necessary role of perceiving the world from the perspective of one's own body for the successful episodic encoding of real-life events. While participants were involved in a social interaction, an out-of-body illusion was elicited, in which the sense of bodily self was displaced from the real body to the other end of the testing room. This condition was compared with a well-matched in-body illusion condition, in which the sense of bodily self was colocalized with the real body. In separate recall sessions, performed ?1 wk later, we assessed the participants' episodic memory of these events. The results revealed an episodic recollection deficit for events encoded out-of-body compared with in-body. Functional magnetic resonance imaging indicated that this impairment was specifically associated with activity changes in the posterior hippocampus. Collectively, these findings show that efficient hippocampus-based episodic-memory encoding requires a first-person perspective of the natural spatial relationship between the body and the world. Our observations have important implications for theoretical models of episodic memory, neurocognitive models of self, embodied cognition, and clinical research into memory deficits in psychiatric disorders. PMID:24616529

  13. Naturally occurring cardiac glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D J; Gillies, A D; Hinds, J A; Duffy, P

    1986-05-12

    Cardiac glycoside poisoning from the ingestion of plants, particularly of oleanders, occurs with reasonable frequency in tropical and subtropical areas. We have assessed a variety of plant specimens for their cardiac glycoside content by means of radioimmunoassays with antibodies that differ in their specificity for cardiac glycosides. Significant amounts of immunoreactive cardiac glycoside were found to be present in the ornamental shrubs: yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana); oleander (Nerium oleander); wintersweet (Carissa spectabilis); bushman's poison (Carissa acokanthera); sea-mango (Cerbera manghas); and frangipani (Plumeria rubra); and in the milkweeds: redheaded cotton-bush (Asclepias curassavica); balloon cotton (Asclepias fruiticosa); king's crown (Calotropis procera); and rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandifolia). The venom gland of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) also contained large quantities of cardiac glycosides. The competitive immunoassay method permits the rapid screening of specimens that are suspected to contain cardiac glycosides. Awareness of the existence of these plant and animal toxins and their dangers allows them to be avoided and poisoning prevented. The method is also useful for the confirmation of the presence of cardiac glycosides in serum in cases of poisoning. PMID:3086679

  14. Genoplivning med automatisk ekstern defibrillator p hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lfgren, Bo; Wahlgreen, Claus; Hoffmann, Anne Mette; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Krarup, Niels Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Early defibrillation is a determinant of survival in cardiac arrest. We report a Danish case of successful in-hospital resuscitation using an automated external defibrillator (AED). This case illustrates important aspects of implementation of in-hospital use of an AED, i.e. location of the AED......, education of the staff, systematic registration and data collection and technical aspects of AED use. If in-hospital AED implementation is carefully executed, its use may provide a safe and effective way of obtaining early defibrillation. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jan-26...

  15. Conceptual lay-out of small launcher

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this diploma thesis is to perform a conceptual lay-out of a small launcher. Re- quirements have been defined in order to realize this first preliminary study and design of a small launcher. In that frame, a MATLAB code has been written in order to simulate the rocket tra- jectories. An optimization program on launcher staging has been written as well. To validate this code, the VEGA and Ariane 5 launchers have been used. Then from studies on existing launchers, simulations ha...

  16. Ways out of the environmental crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book documents the interdisciplinary papers held at a meeting on 'Ways out of the environmental crisis' in November 1985. Guided by the principle of concrete responsibilities emphasis was on the following subjects: Time presses - definition and consequences of the awareness of an imminent environmental catastrophe; air pollution and water pollution recapitulated; economic strategies for the benefit of pollution abatement; ethical and theological aspects; acceptable environmental policies - prospects and perspectives. The papers reflect the relation between the environment, the present generation, posterity, gross national producns and energy consumption, and present a number of scientifically founded alternative strategies. (HSCH) With 16 figs., 1 tab

  17. Out-of-Plane Cmos Compatible Magnetometers

    CERN Document Server

    Ghorba, M El; Sobieski, S; Raskin, J -P

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional MEMS magnetometers with use of residual stresses in thin multilayers cantilevers are presented. Half-loop cantilevers based on Lorentz-force deflection convert magnetic flux in changes, thanks to piezoresistive transducers mounted in Wheatstone bridge. Magnetic field in the order of 10 Gauss was measured with a sensitivity of 0.015 mV/Gauss. A Finite Element Model of the device has been developed with Ansys for static and dynamic simulations. Novel out-of-plane ferromagnetic nickel plate magnetometer is also presented.

  18. Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services In FY 2016, 758 out of 3,308 hospitals subject to the HAC Reduction Program are in the worst performing quartile and will have a one percent payment reduction...

  19. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed for...... uncertain and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  20. Economic and biological costs of cardiac imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picano Eugenio

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Medical imaging market consists of several billion tests per year worldwide. Out of these, at least one third are cardiovascular procedures. Keeping in mind that each test represents a cost, often a risk, and a diagnostic hypothesis, we can agree that every unnecessary and unjustifiable test is one test too many. Small individual costs, risks, and wastes multiplied by billions of examinations per year represent an important population, society and environmental burden. Unfortunately, the appropriateness of cardiac imaging is extra-ordinarily low and there is little awareness in patients and physicians of differential costs, radiological doses, and long term risks of different imaging modalities. For a resting cardiac imaging test, being the average cost (not charges of an echocardiogram equal to 1 (as a cost comparator, the cost of a CT is 3.1x, of a SPECT 3.27x, of a Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance imaging 5.51x, of a PET 14.03x, and of a right and left heart catheterization 19.96x. For stress cardiac imaging, compared with the treadmill exercise test equal to 1 (as a cost comparator, the cost of stress echocardiography is 2.1x and of a stress SPECT scintigraphy is 5.7x. Biohazards and downstream long-term costs linked to radiation-induced oncogenesis should also be considered. The radiation exposure is absent in echo and magnetic resonance, and corresponds to 500 chest x rays for a sestamibi cardiac stress scan and to 1150 chest x rays for a thallium scan. The corresponding extra-risk in a lifetime of fatal cancer is 1 in 2000 exposed patients for a sestamibi stress and 1 in 1000 for a thallium scan. Increased awareness of economic, biologic, and environmental costs of cardiac imaging will hopefully lead to greater appropriateness, wisdom and prudence from both the prescriber and the practitioner. In this way, the sustainability of cardiac imaging will eventually improve.

  1. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. PMID:23577977

  2. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with ICD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Blunk, Louise; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The COPE-ICD (Copenhagen Outpatient ProgrammE-implantable cardioverter defibrillator) trial studied comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation for patients with ICDs. The purpose of this paper was to explore: (1) gender differences in self-rated health and quality of life (QoL) at hospital...... discharge after ICD implantation, (2) gender differences in effect of cardiac rehabilitation, and (3) predictors of effect of cardiac rehabilitation. METHODS: Patients with first-time ICD implantation were randomized to comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care. Gender differences in self...... physical component scale, mental component scale, social functioning, physical functioning, bodily pain, vitality, mental health, and QoL with men having higher scores. Among men only, significant differences were found in VO2 (rehabilitation: 20.9 mL/min/kg [standard deviation (SD) 8.1] vs 23.4 m...

  3. Preventable Hospitalizations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Governor's strategic goal on preventable hospitalizations is to drive down the rate by 10 percent by the end of 2015. 2011 cost data are in 2011 dollars. 2010...

  4. Hospital Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Welcome to hospitalinspections.org, a website run by the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) that aims to make federal hospital inspection reports easier...

  5. Hospitals - Chicago

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospitals in Chicago. To view or use these files, compression software, like WinZip, and special GIS software, such as ESRI ArcGIS, is required. The .dbf file may...

  6. Lack of agreement between esophageal doppler cardiac output measurements and continuous pulse contour analysis during off-pump cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Groesdonk

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Transesophageal echo-Doppler cardiac output as well as arterial pulse contour analyses cardiac output are increasingly used for cardiac output monitoring. No data are available whether both techniques may be used interchangeably in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Design: Prospective, observational study Setting: Operating rooms of a university affiliated hospital. Patients: 30 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.Interventions: NoneMeasurements: 900 paired cardiac output measurements were obtained by pulse contour analysis following transpulmonary thermodilution equilibration by the PiCCO system (PiCCO, Pulsion, Munich, Germany and by the HemoSonic esophageal doppler monitor (HemoSonic 100; Arrow International, Reading, PA. Measurements were performed within the first hour after induction of anesthesia. Results: Bland-Altman analysis of the complete data set showed a mean difference (bias of - 0.12 l/min (95% CI -0.06 to -0.18 with limits of agreement + 1.8 l/min to -1.6 l/min (upper 95% CI 1.78 to 1.98; lower 95% CI -1.74 to -1.54, the percentage error was + 37% to -44.5%. Transesophageal echo-Doppler cardiac output closely correlated (r = 0.75, p < 0.0001 with pulse-contour analyses cardiac output. Conclusions: Several studies have shown the accuracy of calibrated pulse contour cardiac output measurements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Thus, the present data question the reliability of transesophageal echo-Doppler derived cardiac output measurements in this setting and may have implications for using transesophageal echo-Doppler during goal-directed hemodynamic optimization.

  7. Chest pain of cardiac and noncardiac origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenfant, Claude

    2010-10-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common symptoms driving patients to a physician's office or the hospital's emergency department. In approximately half of the cases, chest pain is of cardiac origin, either ischemic cardiac or nonischemic cardiac disease. The other half is due to noncardiac causes, primarily esophageal disorder. Pain from either origin may occur in the same patient. In addition, psychological and psychiatric factors play a significant role in the perception and severity of the chest pain, irrespective of its cause. Chest pain of ischemic cardiac disease is called angina pectoris. Stable angina may be the prelude of ischemic cardiac disease; and for this reason, it is essential to ensure a correct diagnosis. In most cases, further testing, such as exercise testing and angiography, should be considered. The more severe form of chest pain, unstable angina, also requires a firm diagnosis because it indicates severe coronary disease and is the earliest manifestation of acute myocardial infarction. Once a diagnosis of stable or unstable angina is established, and if a decision is made not to use invasive therapy, such as coronary bypass, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, or stent insertion, effective medical treatment of associated cardiac risk factors is a must. Acute myocardial infarction occurring after a diagnosis of angina greatly increases the risk of subsequent death. Chest pain in women warrants added attention because women underestimate their likelihood to have coronary heart disease. A factor that complicates the clinical assessment of patients with chest pain (both cardiac and noncardiac in origin) is the relatively common presence of psychological and psychiatric conditions such as depression or panic disorder. These factors have been found to cause or worsen chest pain; but unfortunately, they may not be easily detected. Noncardiac chest pain represents the remaining half of all cases of chest pain. Although there are a number of causes, gastroesophageal disorders are by far the most prevalent, especially gastroesophageal reflux disease. Fortunately, this disease can be diagnosed and treated effectively by proton-pump inhibitors. The other types of non-gastroesophageal reflux disease-related noncardiac chest pain are more difficult to diagnose and treat. In conclusion, the cause of chest pain must be accurately diagnosed; and treatment must be pursued according to the cause, especially if the cause is of cardiac origin. PMID:20837193

  8. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dr. Stoner about the current state of cardiac disease here in the United States. So where are we right now, Dr. Stoner, with heart disease? Well, Matt, we're going to see tonight ...

  9. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranđelović Aleksandra Č.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death in an athlete is rare and tragic event. An athlete's death draws high public attention given that athletes are considered the healthiest category of society. The vast majority of sudden cardiac death in young athletes is due to congenital cardiac malformations such as hypertrophie cardiomyopathy and various coronary artery anomalies. In athletes over age 35, the usual cause of sudden cardiac death is coronary artery disease. With each tragic death of a young athlete, there is a question why this tragedy has not been prevented. The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association recommend that a pre-participation exam should include a complete cardiovascular history and physical examination.

  10. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator February 19, 2009 Halifax Health Medical Center, Daytona Beach, FL Welcome to Halifax Health Daytona Beach, Florida. Over the next hour you' ...

  11. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Beach, Florida. Over the next hour you'll see the implantation of an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator. ... Dr. Donald Stoner. In just moments, you'll see how the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator significantly improves the ...

  12. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a great deal of cardiovascular disease in the community. If we look at the next slide we'll also appreciate the volume of cardiac disease compared to other diseases. If you look at the top bar, ...

  13. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current state of cardiac disease here in the United States. So where are we right now, Dr. Stoner, ... disease. We got over 360,000 people in United State with going to die with heart disease in ...

  14. A radioisotopic cardiac pacemaker using plutonium 238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the 27th of April 1970, at the Broussais Hospital in Paris, was realized the first implantation in the world of a cardiac pacemaker, fed by an isotopic battery using plutonium 238. For the time being, a little more than one thousand implantations have been carried out in the world using essentially the pacemaker developed by the Company Medronic in cooperation with Dr. Laurens, the Company Alcatel and C.E.A. The design and the operation of this apparatus are described. A clinical appraisal of the implantations carried out is made and the main problems raised in connection with this type of stimulation on both technical and administrative level are called forth. In conclusion the unnumerable advantages resulting for patients are stated. The results attained by the technique of isotopic cardiac pacemaker are underlined

  15. Economic networks in and out of equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Squartini, Tiziano

    2013-01-01

    Economic and financial networks play a crucial role in various important processes, including economic integration, globalization, and financial crises. Of particular interest is understanding whether the temporal evolution of a real economic network is in a (quasi-)stationary equilibrium, i.e. characterized by smooth structural changes rather than abrupt transitions. Smooth changes in quasi-equilibrium networks can be generally controlled for, and largely predicted, via an appropriate rescaling of structural quantities, while this is generally not possible for abrupt transitions in non-stationary networks. Here we study whether real economic networks are in or out of equilibrium by checking their consistency with quasi-equilibrium maximum-entropy ensembles of graphs. As illustrative examples, we consider the International Trade Network (ITN) and the Dutch Interbank Network (DIN). We show that, despite the globalization process, the ITN is an almost perfect example of quasi-equilibrium network, while the DIN ...

  16. Getting a charge out of dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the possibility that dark matter is in the form of charged massive particles. Several constraints are discussed: (a) the absence of heavy-hydrogen-like atoms in water; (b) the agreement between the observed cosmic abundance of the elements and standard big-bang nucleosynthesis predictions; (c) the observed properties of galaxies, stars, and planets; (d) their nonobservation in ?-ray and cosmic-ray detectors, and the lack of radiation damage to space-borne electronic components. We find that integer-charged particles less massive than 103 TeV are probably ruled out as dark matter; but note briefly that there is a slim chance they could be blown out of the halo by supernovae. Above this mass the freeze-out abundance of these particles would overclose the Universe; thus their discovery would be evidence for inflation (or other late-time entropy dumping) below mch. We indicate where one should consider looking for charged massive dark matter

  17. Politics out of the History of Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Sartori

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Wendy Browns approach in Politics out of History is characterized by an attempt to analyze the presence of the past which can be read not only under the light of Nietzsches legacy, but also through a comparison with Hannah Arendts conception of the gap between the past and the future. Like Arendt, Brown aims to look at the present as the site of politics and freedom, even though the former conceives the break with tradition as the unavoidable starting point, while the latter assumes that that break is not fully accomplished because it was not recognized. Rather, it produces Wounded Attachments whose effect is that of limiting the possibility of left criticism. Moving from this parallel, Browns analysis is compared to the Italian philosophy of sexual difference, stressing their common interest in thinking freedom beyond a female identity built on a presumed common oppression.

  18. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  19. Engineered cardiac tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Rohin K; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Reis, Lewis A.; Radisic, Milica

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers the promise of creating functional tissue replacements for use in the failing heart or for in vitro drug screening. The last decade has seen a great deal of progress in this field with new advances in interdisciplinary areas such as developmental biology, genetic engineering, biomaterials, polymer science, bioreactor engineering, and stem cell biology. We review here a selection of the most recent advances in cardiac tissue engineering, including the classica...

  20. Functional cardiac tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Liau, Brian; Zhang, Donghui; Bursac, Nenad

    2012-01-01

    Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in both men and women worldwide. Stem cell-based therapies, including the use of engineered cardiac tissues, have the potential to treat the massive cell loss and pathological remodeling resulting from heart attack. Specifically, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are a promising source for generation of therapeutically relevant numbers of functional cardiomyocytes and engineering of cardiac tissues in vitro. This review will describe ...

  1. Human cardiac stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bearzi, Claudia; Rota, Marcello; Hosoda, Toru; Tillmanns, Jochen; Nascimbene, Angelo; De Angelis, Antonella; Yasuzawa-Amano, Saori; Trofimova, Irina; Siggins, Robert W.; LeCapitaine, Nicole; Cascapera, Stefano; Beltrami, Antonio P.; D'Alessandro, David A.; Zias, Elias; Quaini, Federico

    2007-01-01

    The identification of cardiac progenitor cells in mammals raises the possibility that the human heart contains a population of stem cells capable of generating cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. The characterization of human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) would have important clinical implications for the management of the failing heart. We have established the conditions for the isolation and expansion of c-kit-positive hCSCs from small samples of myocardium. Additionally, we have tested wheth...

  2. Cardiac Image Registration

    OpenAIRE

    Jasbir Sra

    2008-01-01

    Long procedure time and somewhat suboptimal results hinder the widespread use of catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF). Due to lack of contrast differentiation between the area of interest and surrounding structures in a moving organ like heart, there is a lack of proper intraprocedural guidance using current imaging techniques for ablation. Cardiac image registration is currently under investigation and is in clinical use for AF ablation. Cardiac image reg...

  3. Cardiac tumours in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yadava, O.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tumours in infancy are rare and are mostly benign with rhabdomyomas, fibromas and teratomas accounting for the majority. The presentation depends on size and location of the mass as they tend to cause cavity obstruction or arrhythmias. Most rhabdomyomas tend to regress spontaneously but fibromas and teratomas generally require surgical intervention for severe haemodynamic or arrhythmic complications. Other relatively rare cardiac tumours too are discussed along with an Indian perspect...

  4. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... slide, you're looking at discharges from the hospital for cardiovascular disease, you'll see that although ... at the top bar, represents admissions to the hospital for cardiovascular disease compared to many other causes ...

  5. Noninvasive ambulatory measurement system of cardiac activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Esteban J; Chavez, Javier A P; Aqueveque, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    This work implements a noninvasive system that measures the movements caused by cardiac activity. It uses unobtrusive Electro-Mechanical Films (EMFi) on the seat and on the backrest of a regular chair. The system detects ballistocardiogram (BCG) and respiration movements. Real data was obtained from 54 volunteers. 19 of them were measured in the laboratory and 35 in a hospital waiting room. Using a BIOPAC acquisition system, the ECG was measured simultaneously to the BCG for comparison. Wavelet Transform (WT) is a better option than Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) for signal extraction and produces higher effective measurement time. In the laboratory, the best results are obtained on the seat. The correlation index was 0.9800 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were 0.7136 ± 4.3673 [BPM]. In the hospital waiting room, the best results are also from the seat sensor. The correlation index was 0.9840, and the limits of agreement were 0.4386 ± 3.5884 [BPM]. The system is able to measure BCG in an unobtrusive way and determine the cardiac frequency with high precision. It is simple to use, which means the system can easily be used in non-standard settings: resting in a chair or couch, at the gym, schools or in a hospital waiting room, as shown. PMID:26738057

  6. Increasing cardiac interventions among the aged.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J D

    2010-11-01

    Ireland\\'s over 65 year population is growing. As incidence of coronary events rises with age, there is a growing population of elderly patients with cardiac disease. The changing age profile of patients treated by a tertiary hospital\\'s Cardiology service was quantified using Hospital Inpatient Enquiry data. 53% of CCU admissions were aged > or = 65 years, with admissions aged > or = 85 years in 2008 four times greater than in 2002. Percentages of patients undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions in 1997 aged > or = 70 years were 19% and 18% respectively. By 2007, these percentages had risen to 31% and 34% respectively--greatest increases were in the very elderly age categories. The proportion of ICD recipients aged > 70 years increased from 8% in 2003 to 25% by 2008. The proportion of elderly patients receiving advanced cardiac care is increasing. This trend will continue and has clear resource implications. Outcomes of interventions in the very old need further investigation, since the \\'old old\\' are under-represented in clinical trials.

  7. Cardiac Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Long procedure time and somewhat suboptimal results hinder the widespread use of catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF. Due to lack of contrast differentiation between the area of interest and surrounding structures in a moving organ like heart, there is a lack of proper intraprocedural guidance using current imaging techniques for ablation. Cardiac image registration is currently under investigation and is in clinical use for AF ablation. Cardiac image registration, which involves integration of two images in the context of left atrium (LA, is intermodal, with the acquired image and the real-time reference image residing in different image spaces, and involves optimization, where one image space is transformed into the other. Unlike rigid body registration, cardiac image registration is unique and challenging due to cardiac motion during the cardiac cycle and due to respiration. This review addresses the basic principles of the emerging technique of registration and the inherent limitations as they relate to cardiac imaging and registration.

  8. Cardiac Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasbir Sra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Long procedure time and somewhat suboptimal results hinder the widespread use of catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF. Due to lack of contrast differentiation between the area of interest and surrounding structures in a moving organ like heart, there is a lack of proper intraprocedural guidance using current imaging techniques for ablation. Cardiac image registration is currently under investigation and is in clinical use for AF ablation. Cardiac image registration, which involves integration of two images in the context of the left atrium (LA, is intermodal, with the acquired image and the real-time reference image residing in different image spaces, and involves optimization, where one image space is transformed into the other. Unlike rigid body registration, cardiac image registration is unique and challenging due to cardiac motion during the cardiac cycle and due to respiration. This review addresses the basic principles of the emerging technique of registration and the inherent limitations as they relate to cardiac imaging and registration.

  9. Cardiac myxomas - clinical spectrum and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the characteristics and outcome of patients with cardiac myxomas. All patients diagnosed and managed as having cardiac myxomas at AKUH, during a period of six years (1999-2004) were included. Data was collected by reviewing clinical records. Follow-up data was collected from the clinical records and by a telephone interview where required. Out of 15 patients who were diagnosed to have cardiac myxomas, complete information was available in 14 patients. There was a female predominance (64%) with a mean age of 47 years. About two-thirds (71%) had symptom of dyspnoea. Half of the patients (50%) had neurological symptoms at presentation. Constitutional symptoms were present in 36% of patients. About two-third of patients (71%) had positive findings on cardiac auscultation. None of the patients had any rhythm abnormalities on the ECG. Diagnosis was made by transthoracic echocardiography in all patients. All of the tumors were located in the left atrium, and majority (64%) were attached to the interatrial septum. All patients were advised surgical treatment, however, only 8 (57%) were operated upon. Outcome was good in those who were operated upon, with no peri and postoperative mortality. (author)

  10. Cardiac rehabilitation services in Denmark: still room for expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O; Traeden, Ulla I; Videbaek, Jørgen; Madsen, Mette

    2005-01-01

    training (77%; 77%), psychosocial support (89%; 79%), dietary counselling (85%; 89%), smoking cessation (94%; 68%), and clinical control by a physician (100%; 93%). The content varied greatly. Full phase I CR was offered at 57% (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 44-70%) of the hospitals and 47% (95% CI: 34...... study was conducted among all hospitals receiving acute cardiac patients (n = 67). The response rate was 79%, with no differences according to catchment area, number of beds, or geographical location. The hospitals were classified as having full CR if all core components (physical training, psychosocial...

  11. Cardiac catheterisation in nonagenarians: Single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Alexander Ohlow

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the treatment, procedure related risks, and outcomes of patients older than 90 years of age undergoing cardiac catheterization. Methods We retrospectively studied 32 patients ? 90 years (93.0 1.2 years who underwent cardiac catheterisation in a tertiary specialist hospital (0.2% of 14,892 procedures during three years. The results were compared to a patient cohort younger than 90 years of age. Results Baseline characteristics revealed a higher prevalence of diabetes (P < 0.001, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P < 0.04, previous myocardial infarction (P < 0.02, and complex coronary anatomy (SYNTAX score 33 vs. 19 in nonagenarians. Patients < 90 years of age showed more hyperlipidemia (P < 0.01 and previous percutaneous coronary interventions (P < 0.015. Nonagenarians underwent coronary angiography more often for acute coronary syndrome (ACS (P < 0.003, were presented more often in cardiogenic shock (P < 0.003, and were transferred faster to coronary angiography in cases of ACS (P < 0.0001. The observed in-hospital mortality rate (13% study group vs. 1% control group; P < 0.003 in nonagenarians was lower than the calculated rate of thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI and global registry of acute cardiac events (GRACE mortality and strongly influenced by the severity of clinical presentation and the presence of co-morbidities. Conclusion Despite the common scepticism that cardiac catheterisation exposes patients ? 90 years to an unwarranted risk, our data demonstrate an acceptable incidence of complications and mortality in this group of patients.

  12. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease among children presenting to two referral hospitals in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    P, Gapu; M, Bwakura-Dangarembizi; G, Kandawasvika; D, Kao; C, Bannerman; J, Hakim; J A, Matenga.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remain significant causes of morbidity and mortality in resource-limited settings. In Zimbabwe ARF/RHD characteristics have not been systematically documented OBJECTIVES: To document cases of ARF/RHD among children presenting [...] at referral hospitals in Harare, Zimbabwe, determine their clinical and echocardiographic characteristics, and identify opportunities for improving care METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was carried out in which consecutive children aged 1 - 12 years presenting with ARF/RHD according to the 2002/3 World Health Organization modified Jones criteria were enrolled RESULTS: Out of 2 601 admissions and 1 026 outpatient visits over 10 months, 50 children were recruited, including 31 inpatients with ARF/RHD and 19 outpatients with chronic RHD. Among inpatients, 9 had ARF only, 7 recurrent ARF with RHD, and 15 RHD only. The commonest valve lesions were mitral regurgitation (26/31) and aortic regurgitation (11/31). The commonest reason for admission was cardiac failure (22/31). The proportion of ARF/RHD cases among inpatients aged 1 - 12 years was 11.9/1 000. Of the 22 with RHD, 14 (63.6%) presented de novo and 1 had bacterial endocarditis. Among the outpatients, 15 had cardiac failure while echocardiographic findings included mitral regurgitation (18/19) and aortic regurgitation (5/19). At presentation, 18/26 known cases were on oral penicillin prophylaxis and 7 on injectable penicillin. Of those on secondary prophylaxis, 68.0% reported taking it regularly CONCLUSION: ARF/RHD remains a major problem and cause of hospital admissions in Harare, Zimbabwe. Children often present late with established RHD and cardiac failure. With the majority on oral penicillin, secondary prophylaxis was suboptimal in a resource-limited setting unable to offer valve replacement surgery

  13. Pattern of cardiovascular diseases in pilgrims admitted in Al-Noor hospital Makkah during hajj 1429 H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of Hajj pilgrims is increasing every year, and has crossed the huge figure of 2 million. During Hajj period of 1428H (2007G), cardiac problems have been reported as one of the commonest causes of admissions in hospitals. However, the data regarding their Nationalities, age and gender is not available in the literature. This study was carried out to identify the cardiovascular diseases in Hajj pilgrims for the year 1429 H (2008G) classified on geographical, age and gender basis, and to suggest pre-Hajj measures for their home countries and their handling by concerned Ministry during Hajj. Methods: On retrospective basis, data of all patients belonging to different Nationalities of various regions of the world, their age and gender, was analysed, who were admitted in the Coronary Care Unit (CCU) and cardiology wards at Al- Noor Specialist Hospital Makkah, over a period of 15 days in Hajj season 1429H (2008G). Results: Out of 203 patients hospitalised, the majority (94%) were older, i.e., >45 years. The patients suffering from various cardiac diseases were in the following order: heart failure cases 67%; ischemic heart disease 21.7%; and valvular heart disease 11.3%. As an outcome of total admissions (hospitalisation), 84% patients were discharged in stable condition, 9% were discharged against medical advice, 4.5% were unable to perform Hajj and 2.5% patients died. Most common cardiac diseases were found in hospitalized patients for Hajj 1429 H, which belongs to different countries over the globe. It indicate loop holes in the health services of their home countries not verifying the physical fitness of their pilgrims before allowing them to proceed for Hajj. This study will also serve as a helping tool for the Ministry of Hajj in Saudi Arabia to take appropriate measures for demanding strictness for the physical fitness of Hajj pilgrims and anticipated health services for them. (author)

  14. Establishing a clinical cardiac MRI service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Regan, D.P. [Imaging Sciences Department, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: declan.oregan@imperial.ac.uk; Schmitz, S.A. [Imaging Sciences Department, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-15

    After several years of research development cardiovascular MRI has evolved into a widely accepted clinical tool. It offers important diagnostic and prognostic information for a variety of clinical indications, which include ischaemic heart disease, cardiomyopathies, valvular dysfunction and congenital heart disorders. It is a safe non-invasive technique that employs a variety of imaging sequences optimized for temporal or spatial resolution, tissue-specific contrast, flow quantification or angiography. Cardiac MRI offers specific advantages over conventional imaging techniques for a significant number of patients. The demand for cardiac MRI studies from cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiologists and other referrers is likely to continue to rise with pressure for more widespread local service provision. Setting up a cardiac MRI service requires careful consideration regarding funding issues and how it will be integrated with existing service provision. The purchase of cardiac phased array coils, monitoring equipment and software upgrades must also be considered, as well as the training needs of those involved. The choice of appropriate imaging protocols will be guided by operator experience, clinical indication and equipment capability, and is likely to evolve as the service develops. Post-processing and offline analysis form a significant part of the time taken to report studies and an efficient method of providing quantitative reports is an important requirement. Collaboration between radiologists and cardiologists is needed to develop a successful service and multi-disciplinary meetings are key component of this. This review will explore these issues from our perspective of a new clinical cardiac MRI service operating over its first year in a teaching hospital imaging department.

  15. Establishing a clinical cardiac MRI service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After several years of research development cardiovascular MRI has evolved into a widely accepted clinical tool. It offers important diagnostic and prognostic information for a variety of clinical indications, which include ischaemic heart disease, cardiomyopathies, valvular dysfunction and congenital heart disorders. It is a safe non-invasive technique that employs a variety of imaging sequences optimized for temporal or spatial resolution, tissue-specific contrast, flow quantification or angiography. Cardiac MRI offers specific advantages over conventional imaging techniques for a significant number of patients. The demand for cardiac MRI studies from cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiologists and other referrers is likely to continue to rise with pressure for more widespread local service provision. Setting up a cardiac MRI service requires careful consideration regarding funding issues and how it will be integrated with existing service provision. The purchase of cardiac phased array coils, monitoring equipment and software upgrades must also be considered, as well as the training needs of those involved. The choice of appropriate imaging protocols will be guided by operator experience, clinical indication and equipment capability, and is likely to evolve as the service develops. Post-processing and offline analysis form a significant part of the time taken to report studies and an efficient method of providing quantitative reports is an important requirement. Collaboration between radiologists and cardiologists is needed to develop a successful service and multi-disciplinary meetings are key component of this. This review will explore these issues from our perspective of a new clinical cardiac MRI service operating over its first year in a teaching hospital imaging department

  16. Temperature of systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, J-L; Richard, J; Guillou, H

    2008-07-28

    Two phenomenological approaches are currently used in the study of the vitreous state. One is based on the concept of fictive temperature introduced by Tool [J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. 34, 199 (1945)] and recently revisited by Nieuwenhuizen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 5580 (1998)]. The other is based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes initiated by De Donder at the beginning of the last century [L'Affinite (Gauthier-Villars, Paris, 1927)] and recently used by Moller et al. for a thorough study of the glass transition [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 094505 (2006)]. This latter approach leads to the possibility of describing the glass transition by means of the freezing-in of one or more order parameters connected to the internal structural degrees of freedom involved in the vitrification process. In this paper, the equivalence of the two preceding approaches is demonstrated, not only for glasses but in a very general way for any system undergoing an irreversible transformation. This equivalence allows the definition of an effective temperature for all systems departed from equilibrium generating a positive amount of entropy. In fact, the initial fictive temperature concept of Tool leads to the generalization of the notion of temperature for systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium, for which glasses are just particular cases. PMID:18681661

  17. Predictors for outcome among cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrandt, Ida; Norsted, Kristine; Schmidt, Henrik; Schierbeck, Jens

    for outcome among CA patients, we can improve the management of CA, in order to strengthen the leads in the chain of survival.MethodsA retrospective cohort study including 172 CA patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in Odense University Hospital (OUH) in a three-year period was conducted...... spontaneous circulation (ROSC).ResultsThe overall mortality was 44% and a favorable neurological outcome was seen among 52%. Strong predictors for survival and favorable neurological outcome were ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) as initial rhythm, cardiac etiology and time to ROSC¿<¿20...

  18. Pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery after cardiac catheterisation: diagnosis and treatment by manual compression guided by Doppler colour flow imaging.

    OpenAIRE

    Currie, P; Turnbull, C M; Shaw, T R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the value of Doppler colour flow imaging for diagnosing and guiding non-surgical treatment of pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery complicating cardiac catheterisation. DESIGN--A prospective study. SETTING--Cardiac department in a teaching hospital. PATIENTS--9 patients (8 female, 1 male) who presented with pseudoaneurysm 1-15 days after cardiac catheterisation. INTERVENTIONS--The femoral arterial communication to the false aneurysm was localised by Doppler colour flow im...

  19. Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Risk of Adverse Cardiac Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juurlink, David N.; Dormuth, Colin R.; Huang, Anjie; Hellings, Chelsea; Paterson, J. Michael; Raymond, Colette; Kozyrskyj, Anita; Moride, Yola; Macdonald, Erin M.; Mamdani, Muhammad M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) might be linked with adverse cardiac events, but a causal relationship is unproven. Methods We applied the self-matched case series method to two studies using population-based health care data from Ontario, Canada between 1996 and 2008. The first included subjects aged 66 years or older hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction within 12 weeks following initiation of PPI, while the second included subjects hospitalized for heart failure. In both studies we designated the primary risk interval as the initial 4 weeks of therapy and the control interval as the final 4 weeks. To test the specificity of our findings we examined use of histamine H2 receptor antagonists and benzodiazepines, drugs with no plausible causal link to adverse cardiac events. Results During the 13-year study period, we identified 5550 hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction and 6003 admissions for heart failure within 12 weeks of commencing PPI therapy. In the main analyses, we found that initiation of a PPI was associated with a higher risk of acute myocardial infarction (odds ratio 1.8; 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 1.9) and heart failure (odds ratio 1.8; 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 1.9). However, secondary analyses revealed similar risk estimates histamine H2 receptor antagonists and benzodiazepines, drugs with no known or suspected association with adverse cardiac events. Conclusion PPIs are associated with a short-term risk of adverse cardiac events, but similar associations are seen with other drugs exhibiting no known cardiac toxicity. Collectively these observationssuggest that the association between PPIs and adverse cardiac events does not represent reflect cause-and-effect. PMID:24386430

  20. Safety of Intranasal Fentanyl in the Out-of-Hospital Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anders P H; Pedersen, Danny M B; Trautner, Sven; Dahl, Jørgen B; Hansen, Morten S

    2014-01-01

    effects and no use of naloxone. Thirty-six patients (4%) experienced mild adverse effects: mild hypotension, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, abdominal pain, rash, or decrease of Glasgow Coma Scale score to 14. The median reduction in pain score was 3 (interquartile range 2 to 5) after fentanyl administration...

  1. Licking as an out-of-hospital burns treatment-An isolated cultural phenomenon?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seoighe, Deirdre M

    2012-02-01

    Wound management in burns is a potentially complex issue. Salivary constituents have been shown experimentally to be of benefit in the treatment of thermal injuries. In our clinical experience we have encountered patients who have saliva directly applied to the burn wound prior to presenting to the national burns service. The practice is known as "Licking". We report two cases to illustrate the presentations we have encountered. We believe that these illustrate an isolated phenomenon unique to the Republic of Ireland.

  2. FENO and AHR mannitol in patients referred to an out-of-hospital asthma clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke; Sverrild, Asger; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2014-01-01

    unselected patients with symptoms suggestive of asthma, FENO and response to mannitol were tested. Of the 141 who underwent both tests, 32 (23%) had FENO > 25 ppb, and 58 (41%) had AHR to mannitol. A significant association between high FENO and AHR was found (p < 0.001); 26% responded to mannitol despite a...... normal NO, and 8% had a high FENO but no AHR. Additionally, a weak association was found between log FENO and log response to mannitol (r = 0.32, p < 0.01). The area under the ROC curve for FENO as a predictor of AHR was 0.66 (95% CI 0.6-0.8) and for mannitol for having high FENO was 0.73 (95%CI 0...

  3. Hospitality Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  4. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  5. Cardiac diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging includes determination of the size and structure of the cardiac chambers, valves, great vessels and the coronary arteries, chamber and valvular function, myocardial perfusion, viability and metabolism. Material and methods: Chest roentgenography, angiography, echocardiography and nuclear imaging are commonly used but computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging also offer a promising potential. Results: Coronary angiography is the gold standard in assessing coronary anatomy. Fast CT technologies such as electron-beam and multi-row-CT are promising non-invasive imaging modalities in the assessment of coronary artery disease. With intravascular ultrasound early stages of coronary atherosclerosis can be detected. For the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability as well as cardiac function, scintigraphic methods are widely accepted. However, MRI methods have also reached a high degree of accuracy. Evaluation of chamber and valvular function is, due to its wide availability, the field of echocardiography. (orig.)

  6. Epidemiologic and Etiologic Evaluation of Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Cardiac Surgery ICU Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Moussa Mirinazhad; Mohammad Chavoshinazhad; Nasser Ghorbanian

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common acquired infections in hospitalized patients. The most common nosocomial infections in hospitals occur in intensive care units. Occurrence of UTI in severely compromised patients significantly increases the hospitalization period and treatment costs. The aim of the present study was the epidemiologic and etiologic evaluation of acquired UTI in cardiac surgery ICU patients. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 500 patients...

  7. Preoperative Anxiety as a Predictor of Mortality and Major Morbidity in Patients >70 Years of Age Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Judson B.; Alexander, Karen P; Morin, Jean-François; Langlois, Yves; Noiseux, Nicolas; Perrault, Louis P.; Smolderen, Kim; Arnold, Suzanne V; Eisenberg, Mark J.; Pilote, Louise; Monette, Johanne; Bergman, Howard; Smith, Peter K.; Afilalo, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the association between patient-reported anxiety and post-cardiac surgery mortality and major morbidity. Frailty ABC'S was a prospective multicenter cohort study of elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery (coronary artery bypass surgery and/or valve repair or replacement) at 4 tertiary care hospitals between 2008 and 2009. Patients were evaluated a mean of 2 days preoperatively with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), a validated questionnaire assessing d...

  8. Serum neuron-specific enolase as predictor of outcome in comatose cardiac-arrest survivors: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Prevost Fabrice; Parienti Jean-Jacques; Valette Xavier; Seguin Amélie; Gaillard Cathy; Etard Olivier; Allouche Stéphane; Quentin Charlotte; Daubin Cédric; Ramakers Michel; Terzi Nicolas; Charbonneau Pierre; du Cheyron Damien

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The prediction of neurological outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest has major ethical and socioeconomic implications. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability of serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a biomarker of hypoxic brain damage, to predict death or vegetative state in comatose cardiac-arrest survivors. Methods We conducted a prospective observational cohort study in one university hospital and one general hospital Intensive Care Unit (ICU)...

  9. Pneumothorax in cardiac pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Moller, Mogens; Arnsbo, Per; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors for pneumothorax treated with a chest tube after cardiac pacing device implantation in a population-based cohort.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nationwide cohort study was performed based on data on 28 860 patients from the Danish Pacemaker Register, which included all Danish...... patients who received their first pacemaker (PM) or cardiac resynchronization device from 1997 to 2008. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals for the association between risk factors and pneumothorax treated with a chest tube. The median...

  10. Sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Valenzuela, Antonio Jesus Sanchez; Lachica, E; Villanueva, E

    1992-01-01

    The study deals with the comparison of morphological, histochemical and biochemical methods applied to the detection of myocardial infarction in 150 medico-legal autopsies performed at the Institute of Forensic Pathology in Copenhagen. The study also included an NBT (formazan) test of cardiac cross......-sections, and light microscopy and fluorescence microscopy of acridine orange-stained specimens from four different sites of the cardiac musculature. Specimens of myocardium from the same four sites and pericardial fluid were analysed biochemically at the Institute of Legal Medicine in Granada. The K+/Na+ ratio...

  11. Cardiac asthma in elderly patients: incidence, clinical presentation and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Patrick

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac asthma is common, but has been poorly investigated. The objective was to compare the characteristics and outcome of cardiac asthma with that of classical congestive heart failure (CHF in elderly patients. Methods Prospective study in an 1,800-bed teaching hospital. Results Two hundred and twelve consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years presenting with dyspnea due to CHF (mean age of 82 ± 8 years were included. Findings of cardiac echocardiography and natriuretic peptides levels were used to confirm CHF. Cardiac asthma patients were defined as a patient with CHF and wheezing reported by attending physician upon admission to the emergency department. The CHF group (n = 137 and the cardiac asthma group (n = 75, differed for tobacco use (34% vs. 59%, p 2 (47 ± 15 vs. 41 ± 11 mmHg, p Conclusion Patients with cardiac asthma represented one third of CHF in elderly patients. They were more hypercapnic and experienced more distal airway obstruction. However, outcomes were similar.

  12. Cardiac arrest due to lymphocytic colitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groth Kristian A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of cardiac arrest due to hypokalemia caused by lymphocytic colitis. Case presentation A 69-year-old Caucasian man presented four months prior to a cardiac arrest with watery diarrhea and was diagnosed with lymphocytic colitis. Our patient experienced a witnessed cardiac arrest at his general practitioner's surgery. Two physicians and the emergency medical services resuscitated our patient for one hour and four minutes before arriving at our university hospital. Our patient was defibrillated 16 times due to the recurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. An arterial blood sample revealed a potassium level of 2.0 mmol/L (reference range: 3.5 to 4.6 mmol/L and pH 6.86 (reference range: pH 7.37 to 7.45. As the potassium level was corrected, the propensity for ventricular tachyarrhythmias ceased. Our patient recovered from his cardiac arrest without any neurological deficit. Further tests and examinations revealed no other reason for the cardiac arrest. Conclusion Diarrhea can cause life-threatening situations due to the excretion of potassium, ultimately causing cardiac arrest due to hypokalemia. Physicians treating patients with severe diarrhea should consider monitoring their electrolyte levels.

  13. Hydrogels for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Jianjun Guan; Zhenqing Li

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tissue regeneration is an integrated process involving both cells and supporting matrix. Cardiomyocytes and stem cells are utilized to regenerate cardiac tissue. Hydrogels, because of their tissue-like properties, have been used as supporting matrices to deliver cells into infarcted cardiac muscle. Bioactive and biocompatible hydrogels mimicking biochemical and biomechanical microenvironments in native tissue are needed for successful cardiac tissue regeneration. These hydrogels not o...

  14. Radiography in cardiology [cardiac disorders, cardiac insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic procedure in cardiology nearly always requires an X-ray examination of the thorax. This examination is very informative when it is correctly performed and interpreted. The radiographs need to be read precisely and comprehensively: this includes the evaluation of the silhouette of the heart (size, form and position) as well as the examination of extra-cardiac thoracic structures allowing among other things to search for signs of cardiac insufficiency. The conclusion of the X-ray examination can be drawn after having brought together information concerning the case history, the clinical examination and the study of the radiographs. The radiologist finds himself in one of three situations: (1) the information provided by the X-ray pictures is characteristic of a disease and permits a diagnosis, (2) the X-ray pictures indicate a group of hypotheses; further complementary tests could be useful and (3) the X-ray pictures provide ambiguous even contradictory information; it is necessary to complete the radiological examination by other techniques such as an ultrasonographic study of the heart

  15. Where do out-of-hours calls to a consultant microbiologist come from?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2009-08-01

    There is little in the literature about out-of-hours calls to medical microbiologists. The calls taken by a consultant medical microbiologist over a five-year period in an Irish tertiary referral hospital were reviewed. Excluding calls on weekend mornings and significant evening positive blood cultures, the mean annual number of calls on a one-in-four rota was 89 (range 70-111). Over 90% of calls were received before midnight and 51% were from specialist registrars. Medical specialties, neurosurgery and intensive care were the most common departments seeking advice. Two-thirds of calls related to the management of an individual patient, but advice on infection prevention and control is increasingly requested. Calls out-of-hours are not insignificant but little is known about how these vary between hospitals and what contribution they make to patient care.

  16. Cardiac risk assessment before carotid endarterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoperative cardiac assessment is an essential step to identify the patients at risk, optimize any dysfunction, anticipate perioperative and postoperative problems and plan special management. Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has become one of the most commonly performed vascular procedures in Western countries. The awareness of the potential beneficial role and hazards of CEA is not proportionate to the magnitude of this problem in our countries, not only among patients, but also among the medical disciplines. This report is a retrospective analysis of the prevalence of coronary artery diseases among 442 patients who were referred to the Division of Vascular Surgery at the King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia with suspicion of carotid artery disease. Eighty-two patients proved to have significant carotid artery stenosis and had thorough preoperative cardiac assessment by senior cardiologist. All cases had clinical assessment and ECG, 66 cases had echocardiogram examination, 44 had Dipyridamole Thallium-scan and 12 had coronary angiogram. Sixty-eight patients underwent 76 carotid endarterectomy. Four of them had MI and only one case died during preoperative period. This study shows that cardiac screening studies have a potential role in the candidates for carotid surgery in influencing the decision to operate and intensify of perioperative monitoring and care. We believe that the teamwork should involve vascular surgeons, cardiologist and anesthetist to manage such critical patients properly. (author)

  17. Understanding the Quality of Out-of-Class English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun; Zhu, Weimin; Gong, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-class learning constitutes an important context for human development, and active engagement in out-of-class activities is associated with successful language development. However, not all out-of-class experiences are equally beneficial to learning, and it is of paramount importance to understand what quality out-of-class English language

  18. Prevención primaria y secundaria de muerte súbita en un hospital de la Seguridad Social de Costa Rica: reporte del registro de pacientes con desfibrilador automático implantable, 2007-2011 Primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death in a hospital of the social security system in Costa Rica: report from the registry of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, 2007-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Arguedas-Jiménez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Justificación y objetivo: diversos estudios han demostrado la eficacia de los desfibriladores automáticos implantables en la prevención de la muerte súbita cardiaca. La aplicación de dicha evidencia debe ser evaluada mediante registros. El objetivo de este estudio fue describir las principales características epidemiológicas y clínicas y las complicaciones de los pacientes a quienes se les implanta un desfibrilador automático implantable en un hospital de tercer nivel en Costa Rica. Métodos: estudio observacional de cohorte, retrospectivo, que incluyó la totalidad de pacientes a quienes se les implantó un desfibrilador automático implantable en el hospital “Dr. Rafael Ángel Calderón Guardia” entre 2007 y 2011. Resultados: se incluyó 23 pacientes. La edad media fue de 55 ± 18 años. La cardiopatía isquémica fue la etiología más frecuente (10 pacientes. Veinte pacientes estaban en clase funcional I o II; la fracción de eyección media fue 0,38 ± 0,17. En los 18 pacientes el desfibrilador automático se implantó por prevención secundaria. Cinco pacientes presentaron una complicación temprana, todos ellos con dispositivos bicamerales: 2 hematomas menores, una disección del seno coronario, un desplazamiento del electrodo atrial derecho y un ictus cardioembólico. Hubo un total de 101 terapias (en 8 pacientes, de las cuales 94 fueron apropiadas (en 5 pacientes y 7 inapropiadas (en 3 pacientes; dos de estos últimos habían tenido episodios previos de fibrilación atrial. Conclusión: este registro muestra que la mayoría de los implantes de desfibriladores automáticos se realizan por prevención secundaria, con una alta tasa de terapias adecuadas y una baja tasa de terapias inadecuadas y de complicaciones; además, permite evaluar las indicaciones y las complicaciones asociadas con esta terapia.Aim: Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in the prevention of sudden cardiac death. The validation of this evidence has to be assessed through various registries. The objective of this study was to describe the main epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients who were referred to a tertiary hospital in Costa Rica to be treated with a cardioverter-defibrillators implantable; as well as the associated problems and complications. Methods: A retrospective observational cohort study, which included all patients who were treated with a cardioverter-defibrillator implantable in the “Dr. Rafael A. Calderón Guardia” hospital between 2007 and 2011. Results: Twenty three patients were included. The mean age was 55 ± 18 years. Ischemic heart disease was the most frequent etiology (10 patients. Twenty patients had functional class I or II and the mean ejection fraction was 0.38 ± 0.17. In 18 patients, the cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted for secondary prevention. Five patients had an early complication; all of them had dual-chamber devices: 2 minor hematomas, 1 coronary sinus dissection, 1 right atrial lead displacement, and 1 cardio embolic stroke. From a total of 101 therapies (in 8 patients, 94 were appropriate (in 5 patients and 7 were inappropriate (in 3 patients; 2 of the latter 3 patients had a history of atrial fibrillation episodes. Conclusion: This registry shows that the majority of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators implantations are performed as a secondary prevention, with a high rate of adequate therapies and a low rate of inadequate ones. The registry allowed an assessment of the indications and complications of this device therapy.

  19. Modern Management Practices and Hospital Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, K John; Lindrooth, Richard C; Wholey, Douglas R; Maddox, Thomas M; Bloom, Nick

    2016-04-01

    We investigate whether the modern management practices and publicly reported performance measures are associated with choice of hospital for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We define and measure management practices at approximately half of US cardiac care units using a novel survey approach. A patient's choice of a hospital is modeled as a function of the hospital's performance on publicly reported quality measures and the quality of its management. The estimates, based on a grouped conditional logit specification, reveal that higher management scores and better performance on publicly reported quality measures are positively associated with hospital choice. Management practices appear to have a direct correlation with admissions for AMI-potentially through reputational effects-and indirect association, through better performance on publicly reported measures. Overall, a one standard deviation change in management practice scores is associated with an 8% increase in AMI admissions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25712429

  20. Pattern of sudden death at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, South West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinwusi PO

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Patience Olayinka Akinwusi,1,2 Akinwumi Oluwole Komolafe,3 Olanrewaju Olayinka Olayemi,2 Adeleye Abiodun Adeomi41Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Osun State University, 2Department of Medicine, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, 3Department of Morbid Anatomy, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching, Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, 4Department of Community Medicine, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, NigeriaBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine the etiology and epidemiologic characteristics of sudden death at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, South West Nigeria.Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study of all cases of natural unexpected death, either occurring out of hospital or less than 24 hours after admission to LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, over a nine-year period from January 2003 to December 2011. Data were generated from information in the case notes and autopsy reports for these cases.Results: Sudden death accounted for 29 (4.0% of 718 adult medical deaths and 1.0% of all adult medical admissions. Out-of-hospital deaths occurred in 72.4% of cases. The mean age of the patients was 46.8 ± 11.5 (range 25–74 years. The male to female ratio was 6.25:1. Cardiovascular disease were the most common cause of death (51.7%, followed by respiratory disease (20.7%, pulmonary thromboembolism (10.4%, central nervous system disease (13.8%, gastrointestinal disorders (13.8%, severe chemical/drug poisoning (13.8%, and combined cardiovascular and central nervous system disease (13.8%. Hypertension-related causes were responsible for 14/29 (48.3% of the sudden deaths. Hypertensive heart disease accounted for 86.7% of the cardiovascular deaths, hypertensive heart failure accounted for 73.3%, whilst all heart failure cases accounted for 80.0%. Left ventricular hypertrophy was present in 69.2% of the patients with hypertensive heart disease. Moderate to severe atheromatous changes occurred in the aorta in 38.5% of patients aged ≥50 years. No case of myocardial infarction was found.Conclusion: Hypertensive heart disease and hypertension-related disorders are the most common causes of sudden death in South West Nigeria, so effective public health strategies should be channeled towards prevention, detection, and treatment of hypertension.Keywords: sudden cardiac death, hypertensive heart disease, hypertensive heart failure, left ventricular hypertrophy, atheromatous changes

  1. Cardiac output during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P; Sørensen, H; Zaar, M; Hvidtfeldt, M; Pichon, A; Secher, N H; Lundby, C

    2015-01-01

    Several techniques assessing cardiac output (Q) during exercise are available. The extent to which the measurements obtained from each respective technique compares to one another, however, is unclear. We quantified Q simultaneously using four methods: the Fick method with blood obtained from the...

  2. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...

  3. Primary cardiac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac tumors happen to be among the less known pathologies without clear treatment standards. Even one decade ago most of the cardiac tumor diagnosis were made post mortem, and only reports of isolated cases could be found in the literature, showing the lack of interest in the investigation of these pathologies by cardiology and cardiovascular surgery specialists. With the development of echocardiography and of cardiovascular surgery, more cases of primary and metastatic cardiac tumors have been diagnosed. Many cases have been treated by palliative or curative surgical interventions, thus increasing the reports in the world literature and the experience in this field, and pointing out the real incidence of these pathologies, not being as bizarre as it had been considered. a revision of the literature will be made, in which the frequency and the suggested interventions will be reported, as well as the cases of cardiac pathology in two cardiovascular centers of the country known by the author. The echocardiographic, pathologic and histological characteristics of the representative cases will be presented, without a greater evidence level, due to the problem's incidence and the few cases reported by these centers

  4. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do we need this, what's the purpose, what role does this serve in the community of health. If we look at the slides ... a great deal of cardiovascular disease in the community. If we look at ... cardiac disease compared to other diseases. If you look at the top bar, ...

  5. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Over the next hour you'll see the implantation of an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator. The surgery ... evening we're going to be discussing the implantation of a defibrillator. It’s a battery-powered implantable ...

  6. Understanding the quality of out-of-class English learning

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, C; Zhu, WH; Gong, G

    2014-01-01

    Out-of-class learning constitutes an important context for human development, and active engagement in out-of-class activities is associated with successful language development. However, not all out-of-class experiences are equally beneficial to learning, and it is of paramount importance to understand what quality out-of-class English language learning entails. This study surveyed 82 middle school EFL students on their out-of-class English language learning in order to identify the characte...

  7. Impact of obesity on hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoff, Brian; Amsterdam, Alison

    2008-10-01

    Obesity is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide and is a risk factor for cardiac disease, diabetes, and stroke. This provides a challenge for the physicians caring for this patient population in the hospital. Skin integrity, medication dosing, testing, and nutrition are all altered by obesity. We summarize some of the current data on caring for the obese inpatient. Unfortunately, few data on this unique inpatient population exist. PMID:18828168

  8. Maternal cardiac metabolism in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Laura X; Arany, Zolt

    2014-03-15

    Pregnancy causes dramatic physiological changes in the expectant mother. The placenta, mostly foetal in origin, invades maternal uterine tissue early in pregnancy and unleashes a barrage of hormones and other factors. This foetal 'invasion' profoundly reprogrammes maternal physiology, affecting nearly every organ, including the heart and its metabolism. We briefly review here maternal systemic metabolic changes during pregnancy and cardiac metabolism in general. We then discuss changes in cardiac haemodynamic during pregnancy and review what is known about maternal cardiac metabolism during pregnancy. Lastly, we discuss cardiac diseases during pregnancy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy, and the potential contribution of aberrant cardiac metabolism to disease aetiology. PMID:24448314

  9. [Cardiac amyloidosis. General review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraki, R

    1994-04-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis, most often of AL type, is a non-exceptional disease as it represents 5 to 10% of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. It realizes typically a restrictive cardiomyopathy. Nevertheless the wide diversity of possible presentation makes it a "big shammer" which must be evoked in front of every unexplained cardiopathy after the age of forty. If some associated manifestations can rapidly suggest the diagnosis, as a peripheric neuropathy especially a carpal tunnel syndrome or palpebral ecchymosis, cardiac involvement can also evolve in an apparently isolated way. The most suggestive paraclinic elements for the diagnosis are, in one hand, the increased myocardial echogenicity with a "granular sparkling" appearance seen throughout all walls of the left ventricle and, in the other hand, the association of a thickened left ventricle and a low voltage (electrocardiogram could also show pseudo-infarct Q waves). In front of such aspects, the proof of amyloidosis is brought by an extra-cardiac biopsy or by scintigraphy with labelled serum amyloid P component, so that the indications of endomyocardial biopsy are very limited today. The identification of the amyloid nature of a cardiopathy has an direct therapeutic implication: it contra-indicates the use of digitalis, calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers. The treatment of AL amyloidosis (chemotherapy with alkylant agents) remains very unsatisfactory especially in the cardiac involvement which is the most frequent cause of death (in AL amyloidosis). Last, cardiac amyloidosis is a bad indication for transplantation which results are burden by rapid progression of deposits especially in the gastro-intestinal tract and the nervous system. PMID:8059146

  10. A survey of attitudes and factors associated with successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge transfer in an older population most likely to witness cardiac arrest: design and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brehaut Jamie C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overall survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest rarely exceed 5%. While bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR can increase survival for cardiac arrest victims by up to four times, bystander CPR rates remain low in Canada (15%. Most cardiac arrest victims are men in their sixties, they usually collapse in their own home (85% and the event is witnessed 50% of the time. These statistics would appear to support a strategy of targeted CPR training for an older population that is most likely to witness a cardiac arrest event. However, interest in CPR training appears to decrease with advancing age. Behaviour surrounding CPR training and performance has never been studied using well validated behavioural theories. Methods/Design The overall goal of this study is to conduct a survey to better understand the behavioural factors influencing CPR training and performance in men and women 55 years of age and older. The study will proceed in three phases. In phase one, semi-structured qualitative interviews will be conducted and recorded to identify common categories and themes regarding seeking CPR training and providing CPR to a cardiac arrest victim. The themes identified in the first phase will be used in phase two to develop, pilot-test, and refine a survey instrument based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour. In the third phase of the project, the final survey will be administered to a sample of the study population over the telephone. Analyses will include measures of sampling bias, reliability of the measures, construct validity, as well as multiple regression analyses to identify constructs and beliefs most salient to seniors' decisions about whether to attend CPR classes or perform CPR on a cardiac arrest victim. Discussion The results of this survey will provide valuable insight into factors influencing the interest in CPR training and performance among a targeted group of individuals most susceptible to witnessing a victim in cardiac arrest. The findings can then be applied to the design of trials of various interventions designed to promote attendance at CPR classes and improve CPR performance. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00665288

  11. Comparison of Benefits from Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy between Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy and Patients with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talia Alenabi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT is an effective treatment for patients with moderate to severe heart failure. However, 20-30% of patients remain non-responders to CRT. We sought to identify which patients benefit the most from CRT in regard to the etiology of heart failure. Methods: Eighty-three consecutive patients (62 men who had a biventricular pacemaker inserted at Tehran Heart Center between May 2004 and March 2007 were evaluated retrospectively. The inclusion criteria were comprised of New York Heart Association (NYHA class III or IV, left ventricular ejection fraction120ms. After 6 months, response was defined as being alive, no hospitalization for cardiac decompensation, and an improvement in NYHA class>1 grade. Results: After 6 months, 60 patients out of the 83 patients were responders. Amongst the 83 patients, 48 had ischemic cardiomyopathy and 35 had non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. A cross-tabulation of response versus etiology showed no significant difference between ischemic versus non-ischemic cardiomyopathy with regard to response to CRT (P=0.322. Conclusion: According to our study, there was no difference in response to CRT between ischemic versus non-ischemic cardiomyopathy at six months’ follow-up.

  12. Foetal heart rate deceleration with combined spinal-epidural analgesia during labour: a maternal haemodynamic cardiac study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valensise, Herbert; Lo Presti, Damiano; Tiralongo, Grazia Maria; Pisani, Ilaria; Gagliardi, Giulia; Vasapollo, Barbara; Frigo, Maria Grazia

    2016-06-01

    To understand the mechanisms those are involved in the appearance of foetal heart rate decelerations (FHR) after the combined epidural analgesia in labour. Observational study done at University Hospital for 86-term singleton pregnant women with spontaneous labour. Serial bedside measurement of the main cardiac maternal parameters with USCOM technique; stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO) and total vascular resistances (TVR) inputting systolic and diastolic blood pressure before combined epidural analgesia and after 5', 10', 15' and 20 min. FHR was continuously recorded though cardiotocography before and after the procedure. Correlation between the appearance of foetal heart rate decelerations and the modification of maternal haemodynamic parameters. Fourteen out of 86 foetuses showed decelerations after the combined spino epidural procedure. No decelerations occurred in the women with low TVR (1200 dyne/s/cm(-5)). Soon after the epidural procedure, the absence of increase in SV and CO was observed in these women. No variations in systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were found. The level of TVR before combined epidural analgesia in labour may indicate the risk of FHR abnormalities after the procedure. Low TVR (<1000 dyne/s/cm(-5)) showed a reduced risk of FHR abnormalities. FHR decelerations seem to occur in women without the ability to upregulate SV and CO in response to the initial effects of analgesia. PMID:26333691

  13. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Petri, Helle; Duno, Morten; Juncker, Inger; Eiberg, Hans; Vissing, John; Bundgaard, Henning; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To quantify the association between myotonic dystrophy (DM) and cardiac disease in a nationwide cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified a nationwide cohort of 1146 DM patients (period 1977-2011) using the National Patient Registry (NPR) and a subcohort of 485 patients who had undergone...... genetic testing for DM1. Information on incident cardiac diseases was obtained from the NPR. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cardiac disease compared with the background population, overall and according to selected diagnostic subgroups (cardiomyopathy, heart failure, conduction...... disorders, arrhythmias, and device implantation). In the DM cohort, SIR for any cardiac disease was 3.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01-3.86]; for a cardiac disease belonging to the selected subgroups 6.91 (95% CI: 5.93-8.01) and for other cardiac disease 2.59 (95% CI: 2.03-3.25). For a cardiac disease...

  14. Hydrogels for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Guan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tissue regeneration is an integrated process involving both cells and supporting matrix. Cardiomyocytes and stem cells are utilized to regenerate cardiac tissue. Hydrogels, because of their tissue-like properties, have been used as supporting matrices to deliver cells into infarcted cardiac muscle. Bioactive and biocompatible hydrogels mimicking biochemical and biomechanical microenvironments in native tissue are needed for successful cardiac tissue regeneration. These hydrogels not only retain cells in the infarcted area, but also provide support for restoring myocardial wall stress and cell survival and functioning. Many hydrogels, including natural polymer hydrogels, synthetic polymer hydrogels, and natural/synthetic hybrid hydrogels are employed for cardiac tissue engineering. In this review, types of hydrogels used for cardiac tissue engineering are briefly introduced. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Furthermore, strategies for cardiac regeneration using hydrogels are reviewed.

  15. Out of Sight, Out of Mind—On Guy Schofield’s “Sleepers”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Allen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Video. Computational “3D models” don’t actually model any thing. They are assumed imitative, but in contemporary production, these are vectorized thought- objects, prototypes of notions and design ideals. The photographic image on the other hand, as a pipeline of indexical pixels, is the apogee of our attempts to describe and represent the world outside. 65,536 levels of red, green and blue, rendered into and out of the real world of electrons, photons and “live-action.”

  16. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  17. Providing palliative care in primary care: how satisfied are GPs and district nurses with current out-of-hours arrangements?

    OpenAIRE

    Shipman, C.; Addington-Hall, J.; Barclay, S.; Briggs, J.; Cox, I.; Daniels, L.; Millar, D.

    2000-01-01

    The complex needs of palliative care patients require an informed, expert, and swift response from out-of-hours general medical services, particularly if hospital admission is to be avoided. Few general practitioners (GPs) reported routinely handing over information on their palliative care patients, particularly to GP co-operatives. District nurses and inner-city GPs were least satisfied with aspects of out-of-hours care. Most responders wanted 24-hour availability of specialist palliative c...

  18. Survival in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Who Opted out of Cancer-Specific Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, Li-Cher; Tan, Ru-Yu; Chan, Li-Yen; Govindaraju, Selvaratnam; Ratnavelu, Kananathan; Kumar, Shalini; Raman, Sree; Vijayasingham, Pillai; Thayaparan, Tamizi

    2006-01-01

    In Malaysia, many patients opted out of cancer-specific treatment for various reasons. This study was undertaken to investigate the survival rate of patients with stages I to III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who opted out of treatment, compared with those who accepted treatment. Case records of 119 patients diagnosed with NSCLC between 1996 and 2003 in two urban-based hospitals were retrospectively examined. Survival status was ascertained from follow-up medical clinic records or teleph...

  19. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  20. [Future cardiac pacemakers technical visions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberlin, Andreas; Zurbuchen, Adrian; Pfenniger, Alos; Fuhrer, Jrg; Vogel, Rolf

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac pacemakers are routinely used for the treatment of bradyarrhythmias. Contemporary pacemakers are reliable and allow for a patient specific programming. However, pacemaker replacements due to battery depletion are common (~25 % of all implantation procedures) and bear the risk of complications. Batteryless pacemakers may allow overcoming this limitation. To power a batteryless pacemaker, a mechanism for intracorporeal energy harvesting is required. Such a generator may consist out of subcutaneously implanted solar cells, transforming the small amount of transcutaneously available light into electrical energy. Alternatively, intravascular turbines may harvest energy from the blood flow. Energy may also be harvested from the ventricular wall motion by a dedicated mechanical clockwork converting motion into electrical energy. All these approaches have successfully been tested in vivo. Pacemaker leads constitute another Achilles heel of contemporary pacemakers. Thus, leadless devices are desired. Miniaturized pacemaker circuits and suitable energy harvesting mechanisms (incorporated in a single device) may allow catheter-based implantation of the pacemaker in the heart. Such miniaturized battery- and leadless pacemakers would combine the advantages of both approaches and overcome major limitations of todays systems. PMID:26227982

  1. Cardiac amyloidosis detection with pyrophosphate-99mTc scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, D.S.F.; Ichiki, W.A.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Izaki, M.; Giorgi, M.C.P.; Soares Junior, J; Meneghetti, J.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Instituto do Coracao. Servico de Medicina Nuclear e Imagem Molecular

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Amyloidosis is a rare disease, characterized by extracellular deposition of insoluble amyloid fibrils in organs and tissues. It may affect virtually any system, preferably heart, kidneys and liver. The cardiac involvement produces a spectrum of clinical features, usually with progressive dysfunction. Early diagnosis is important for institution of appropriate therapy. Case report: Male patient, 75 years old, with diagnosed congestive heart failure functional class III and Mobitz II second-degree atrial-ventricular block, was hospitalized for implantation of definitive cardiac pacemaker. Patient mentioned history of worsening effort dyspnoea over a one-month period, progressing to minimum effort, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea and paroxysms of dry cough, and swelling of lower limbs. Echocardiography showed diffuse hypertrophy of left ventricle (LV), with systolic dysfunction due to diffuse hypokinesia and hyperrefringent aspect in the septum. It was questioned a cardiac infiltrating process. Cardiac amyloidosis was considered as a diagnostic hypothesis. The patient underwent a pyrophosphate-{sup 99m}Tc scintigraphy, which showed abnormal tracer uptake in the heart projection, with diffuse pattern on the left ventricle walls, compatible with the clinical suspicion cardiac amyloidosis, which was later confirmed by endomyocardial biopsy. Discussion: In this case report, the patient had clinical and other auxiliary examinations, such as electrocardiography and Doppler echocardiography, compatible with cardiac amyloidosis, which led to implementation with pyrophosphate-{sup 99m}Tc scintigraphy and later endomyocardial biopsy. Cardiac amyloidosis occurs in about half the cases of primary amyloidosis (AL) and is rare in secondary amyloidosis (AA). Its clinical presentation is polymorphic and it can be classified into four distinctive types: restrictive cardiomyopathy, systolic dysfunction, postural hypotension and conduction disorders. Cardiac amyloidosis is often under diagnosed due to unspecific and varied signs and symptoms. The diagnosis is confirmed by endomyocardial biopsy, an invasive procedure with inherent risks to this technique. Pyrophosphate-{sup 99m}Tc scintigraphy is a simple, non-invasive, low cost, with good sensitivity method for detection of cardiac amyloidosis. The scintigraphy pattern observed in cardiac amyloidosis cases is abnormal diffuse tracer uptake in both heart ventricles. Planar and/or tomographic imaging may be performed. It is considered a highly sensitive test, with low rates of false-negative results despite the existing little literature. Therefore the scintigraphy can be useful to select patients for biopsy. Conclusion: Scintigraphy can be of great assistance in cardiac amyloidosis, despite its low specificity. Due to its high sensibility, it can be a useful test to early discriminate patients who should undergo biopsy, allowing treatment optimization. (author)

  2. Cardiac amyloidosis detection with pyrophosphate-99mTc scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Amyloidosis is a rare disease, characterized by extracellular deposition of insoluble amyloid fibrils in organs and tissues. It may affect virtually any system, preferably heart, kidneys and liver. The cardiac involvement produces a spectrum of clinical features, usually with progressive dysfunction. Early diagnosis is important for institution of appropriate therapy. Case report: Male patient, 75 years old, with diagnosed congestive heart failure functional class III and Mobitz II second-degree atrial-ventricular block, was hospitalized for implantation of definitive cardiac pacemaker. Patient mentioned history of worsening effort dyspnoea over a one-month period, progressing to minimum effort, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea and paroxysms of dry cough, and swelling of lower limbs. Echocardiography showed diffuse hypertrophy of left ventricle (LV), with systolic dysfunction due to diffuse hypokinesia and hyperrefringent aspect in the septum. It was questioned a cardiac infiltrating process. Cardiac amyloidosis was considered as a diagnostic hypothesis. The patient underwent a pyrophosphate-99mTc scintigraphy, which showed abnormal tracer uptake in the heart projection, with diffuse pattern on the left ventricle walls, compatible with the clinical suspicion cardiac amyloidosis, which was later confirmed by endomyocardial biopsy. Discussion: In this case report, the patient had clinical and other auxiliary examinations, such as electrocardiography and Doppler echocardiography, compatible with cardiac amyloidosis, which led to implementation with pyrophosphate-99mTc scintigraphy and later endomyocardial biopsy. Cardiac amyloidosis occurs in about half the cases of primary amyloidosis (AL) and is rare in secondary amyloidosis (AA). Its clinical presentation is polymorphic and it can be classified into four distinctive types: restrictive cardiomyopathy, systolic dysfunction, postural hypotension and conduction disorders. Cardiac amyloidosis is often under diagnosed due to unspecific and varied signs and symptoms. The diagnosis is confirmed by endomyocardial biopsy, an invasive procedure with inherent risks to this technique. Pyrophosphate-99mTc scintigraphy is a simple, non-invasive, low cost, with good sensitivity method for detection of cardiac amyloidosis. The scintigraphy pattern observed in cardiac amyloidosis cases is abnormal diffuse tracer uptake in both heart ventricles. Planar and/or tomographic imaging may be performed. It is considered a highly sensitive test, with low rates of false-negative results despite the existing little literature. Therefore the scintigraphy can be useful to select patients for biopsy. Conclusion: Scintigraphy can be of great assistance in cardiac amyloidosis, despite its low specificity. Due to its high sensibility, it can be a useful test to early discriminate patients who should undergo biopsy, allowing treatment optimization.

  3. Opium Addiction as a Novel Predictor of Atrial Fibrillation after Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Soleimani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is one of the most frequent complications after cardiac surgery. It occurs in approximately 20% to 35% of patients after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery and in more than 50% of patients after valve surgery (1. AF after cardiac surgery is a major cause of patients’ morbidity and mortality. Moreover, it can prolong hospitalization and increase health care costs in these patients (2.

  4. Rhabdomyolysis following Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective, Descriptive, Single-Center Study

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Amr S.; Hesham Ewila; Sameh Aboulnaga; Alejandro Kohn Tuli; Rajvir Singh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Rhabdomyolysis (RML) following cardiac surgery and its relationship with acute kidney injury (AKI) require investigation. Patients and Methods. All patients undergoing cardiac surgery in our hospital were enrolled in this prospective study during a 1-year period. To investigate the occurrence of RML and its association with AKI, all patients in the study underwent serial assessment of serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin levels. Serial renal function, prior statin treatment, and ...

  5. Acute Kidney Injury after Using Contrast during Cardiac Catheterization in Children with Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Young Ju; Hyun, Myung Chul; Choi, Bong Seok; Chun, So Young; Cho, Min Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children. The purpose of our study was to assess the evidence of contrast-induced AKI after cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease and evaluate the clinical usefulness of candidate biomarkers in AKI. A total of 26 children undergoing cardiac catheterization due to various heart diseases were selected and urine and blood ...

  6. An ECG Monitoring System For Prediction Of Cardiac Anomalies Using WBAN

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjem, Medina; Salem, Osman; Naït-Abdesselam, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are known to be the most widespread causes to death. Therefore, detecting earlier signs of cardiac anomalies is of prominent importance to ease the treatment of any cardiac complication or take appropriate actions. Electrocardiogram (ECG) is used by doctors as an important diagnosis tool and in most cases, it's recorded and analyzed at hospital after the appearance of first symptoms or recorded by patients using a device named holter ECG and analyzed afterward by...

  7. Depression among hospitalized and non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients in tertiary care public hospitals in Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Tahira; Zadeh, Zainab Fotowwat

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed at determining the differences in the levels of depression between hospitalized and non-hospitalized Gonadal cancer patients in tertiary care public hospitals in Karachi. The present study was conducted at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre and Civil Hospital, Karachi, from July to October 2009. One hundred adult patients diagnosed with Gonadal cancer volunteered for the study. Cases with any other co-morbidity were excluded. Urdu version of Siddiqui Shah Depression Scale (SSDS) was administered. Purposive and snowball sampling methods were used for data collection. The ages of participants in the sample ranged from 20 to 27 years with the mean age of 23.85 years. The participants belonged to the lower and middle classes. Out of the 30 hospitalized gonadal cancer patients 40% were moderately depressed and 60% were severely depressed, whereas out of 70 non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients 74.3% were mildly depressed, 24.3% were moderately depressed and only 1.4% were severely depressed, which clearly indicated that the depression level of hospitalized gonadal cancer patients was high as compared to non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients. PMID:25772968

  8. Electrolyte disturbances and cardiac failure with hypomagnesaemia in anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, V.; Havard, C W

    1985-01-01

    A 32 year old woman with anorexia nervosa was admitted to hospital with severe hypocalcaemia and hypokalaemia that was refractory to replacement treatment but that responded immediately to an infusion of magnesium. She also had congestive cardiac failure that responded to magnesium replacement. The mild hypomagnesaemia found in this patient was responsible for the refractory hypocalcaemia. Minor deficiencies of magnesium may cause severe hypocalcaemia and hypokalaemia that are refractory to r...

  9. Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery: Evidences and controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Cotogni, Paolo; Barbero, Cristina; Rinaldi, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Despite many advances in prevention and perioperative care, deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) remains a pressing concern in cardiac surgery, with a still relevant incidence and with a considerable impact on in-hospital mortality and also on mid- and long-term survival. The permanent high impact of this complication is partially related to the increasing proportion of patients at high-risk for infection, as well as to the many patient and surgical risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of...

  10. Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    MILICA RADISIC; GORDANA VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick),compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3) can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of p...

  11. Cardiac Surgeryduring Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Anish; Asopa, Sanjay; Tang, Augustine T.M.; Ohri, Sunil K

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular adaptations during pregnancy are normally well tolerated in healthy women. However, 2% to 4% of women of childbearing age have some degree of concomitant heart disease, and these changes may compromise cardiac function. Of these, a few who do not respond to medical treatment may require surgical correction. In this setting, maternal mortality rate has improved to levels similar to those in non-pregnant counterparts. However, the fetal mortality rate remains high (up to 33%). Fa...

  12. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hospital for cardiovascular disease compared to many other causes of illness. And if you look at the ... It claims as many lives as the next causes, including cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease or emphysema, ...

  13. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ll see on this next slide, you're looking at discharges from the hospital for cardiovascular disease, ... four in the pocket, a sponge. What we looking is antibiotics so the patient can be sterile ...

  14. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that they were boasting about getting with the drug-eluding stents. And we had a cardiology meeting ... even to this day, we use far fewer drug-eluding stents than many hospitals because of the ...

  15. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have here, you'll notice that deaths from cardiovascular disease have been declining over the last decade ... re looking at discharges from the hospital for cardiovascular disease, you'll see that although it may ...

  16. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stoner, Chief Medical Officer at Halifax Health and cardiologist; as well as Dr. Hanscy Seide, board-certified ... many hospitals because of the skill of our cardiologists and the success of this team of being ...

  17. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... requires and incredible amount of teamwork. Under the leadership of Mark in the lab and Lee and ... eluding stents than many hospitals because of the skill of our cardiologists and the success of this ...

  18. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect

  19. Cardiac tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILICA RADISIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick,compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3 can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of perfluorocarbons, or with electrical stimulation (continuous application of biphasic pulses, 2 ms, 5 V, 1 Hz. Tissue constructs cultured without perfusion or electrical stimulation served as controls. Medium perfusion and addition of perfluorocarbons resulted in compact, thick constructs containing physiologic density of viable, electromechanically coupled cells, in contrast to control constructs which had only a ~100 mm thick peripheral region with functionally connected cells. Electrical stimulation of cultured constructs resulted in markedly improved contractile properties, increased amounts of cardiac proteins, and remarkably well developed ultrastructure (similar to that of native heart as compared to non-stimulated controls. We discuss here the state of the art of cardiac tissue engineering, in light of the biomimetic approach that reproduces in vitro some of the conditions present during normal tissue development.

  20. Cardiac hybrid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging allows combined assessment of anatomical and functional aspects of cardiac disease. In coronary artery disease (CAD), hybrid SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of coronary artery stenosis and myocardial perfusion abnormalities. The clinical value of hybrid imaging has been documented in several subsets of patients. In selected groups of patients, hybrid imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy to detect CAD compared to the single imaging techniques. Additionally, this approach facilitates functional interrogation of coronary stenoses and guidance with regard to revascularization procedures. Moreover, the anatomical information obtained from CT coronary angiography or coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) adds prognostic information over perfusion data from SPECT. The use of cardiac hybrid imaging has been favoured by the dissemination of dedicated hybrid systems and the release of dedicated image fusion software, which allow simple patient throughput for hybrid SPECT/CT studies. Further technological improvements such as more efficient detector technology to allow for low-radiation protocols, ultra-fast image acquisition and improved low-noise image reconstruction algorithms will be instrumental to further promote hybrid SPECT/CT in research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  1. Feocromocitoma cardaco / Cardiac Pheochromocytoma

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gustavo L., Knop; Roberto A., Margaria; Aldo, Arvalo; Omar D., Bergs; Jos L., Galarza.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Los feocromocitomas cardacos primarios (FCP) son sumamente infrecuentes. Hasta el presente son menos de 50 los casos comunicados en el mundo. Presentamos el caso de un tumor intrapericrdico, que result ser un feocromocitoma primario, en una mujer de mediana edad, cuyo signo principal fue hiperten [...] sin arterial severa (HTAs). Los estudios diagnsticos por imgenes corroboraron la presencia de un tumor intrapericrdico como nico hallazgo y los estudios bioqumicos de catecolaminas y sus metabolitos excretados por orina reafirmaron el diagnstico etiolgico. El tumor fue resecado quirrgicamente sin complicaciones mediante ciruga cardaca convencional con circulacin extracorprea (CEC) y paro cardaco con cardiopleja. Siete meses despus de la operacin, la paciente se encuentra asintomtica y normotensa. Abstract in english Primary cardiac pheochromocytomas (PCP) are extremely rare. To date, less than 50 cases have been reported worldwide. In this report we present the case of an intrapericardial tumor in a middle aged woman, that was finally diagnosed as a primary pheochromocytoma, of which the main sign was severe hy [...] pertension (sHTN). Diagnostic imaging studies confirmed the presence of an intrapericardial tumor as the only finding, and biochemical assessment of urinary catecholamines and their metabolites further confirmed the diagnosis. The tumor was surgically resected without complications, using conventional on-pump cardiac surgery with cardiac arrest and cardioplegia. At follow-up seven months post surgery, the patient remains asymptomatic and normotensive.

  2. Cardiac hybrid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaemperli, Oliver [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Nuclear Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Hybrid cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging allows combined assessment of anatomical and functional aspects of cardiac disease. In coronary artery disease (CAD), hybrid SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of coronary artery stenosis and myocardial perfusion abnormalities. The clinical value of hybrid imaging has been documented in several subsets of patients. In selected groups of patients, hybrid imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy to detect CAD compared to the single imaging techniques. Additionally, this approach facilitates functional interrogation of coronary stenoses and guidance with regard to revascularization procedures. Moreover, the anatomical information obtained from CT coronary angiography or coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) adds prognostic information over perfusion data from SPECT. The use of cardiac hybrid imaging has been favoured by the dissemination of dedicated hybrid systems and the release of dedicated image fusion software, which allow simple patient throughput for hybrid SPECT/CT studies. Further technological improvements such as more efficient detector technology to allow for low-radiation protocols, ultra-fast image acquisition and improved low-noise image reconstruction algorithms will be instrumental to further promote hybrid SPECT/CT in research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  3. Clinicians ignore best practice guidelines: Prospective audit of cardiac injury marker ordering in patients with chest pain

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    U, Bellbhudder; J C, Stanfliet.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chest pain is a frequent presenting symptom and is a diagnostic challenge. Recent recommendations state that high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays are the only biochemical test required in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and that other biomarkers such as myoglobin or cr [...] eatine kinase (CK)-MB isoform are not indicated. OBJECTIVE: To establish whether clinician ordering in the setting of suspected ACS was in keeping with recent recommendations. METHODS: A prospective audit was undertaken of all requests for cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and CK-MB received at a large tertiary hospital in Durban, South Africa, during a 20-day period in December 2012. RESULTS: A total of 193 cardiac marker requests were received: 12 (6.2%) requests were for cTnI alone; 8 (4.1%) were for CK-MB alone; and the remaining 173 (89.7%) were for both cTnI and CK-MB. Therefore, a total of 181 (93.8%) incorrect requests were received during this period. A total of 103 (53.4%) patients had values below the cut-off point of 40 ng/l for cTnI, i.e. ACS was ruled out. Of these, 15 had CK-MB values above the reference interval. A total of 12 (6.2%) patients had cTnI values >500 ng/l, i.e. ACS was ruled in; 33.3% of this group had normal CK-MB values. CONCLUSION: Ordering patterns in the setting of ACS did not reflect current recommendations and were wasteful and potentially dangerous.

  4. Hospitality and hostility in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Aanestad, Margunn

    2007-01-01

    propose to use the concepts of hospitality and hostility to turn our attention to the interaction between the host (the surgeons) and the guest (the information system) and consider how the boundaries between them evolved in the everyday work practices. As an alternative to previous studies on technology...... adoption, these concepts help us appreciate and put special emphasis on particular aspects of the adoption process: the mutual and co-constitutive relationship between the users and the technology and the continued coexistence of both positive and negative attitudes among the users. The findings suggest an...

  5. 38 CFR 3.58 - Child adopted out of family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Child adopted out of family. 3.58 Section 3.58 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... out of family. A child of a veteran adopted out of the family of the veteran either prior...

  6. Approaching hospital administration about adopting cooling technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Lisa L; Parham, William M; Pastores, Stephen M

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide intensivists with information and examples regarding cooling technology selection, cost assessment, adaptation, barriers, and presentation to hospital administrators. A review of medical and business literature was conducted using the following search terms: technology assessment, organizational innovation, intensive care, critical care, hospital administration, and presentation to administrators. General recommendations for intensivists are made for assessing cooling technology with descriptions of common new technology implementation stages. A study of 16 hospitals implementing a new cardiac surgery technology is described. A description of successful implementation of an induced hypothermia protocol by one of the authors is presented. Although knowledgeable about the applications of new technologies, including cooling technology, intensivists have little guidance or training on tactics to obtain a hospital administration's funding and support. Intensive care unit budgets are usually controlled by nonintensivists whose interests are neutral, at best, to the needs of intensivists. To rise to the top of the large pile of requisition requests, an intensivist's proposal must be well conceived and aligned with hospital administration's strategic goals. Intensivists must understand the hospital acquisition process and administrative structure and participate on high-level hospital committees. Using design thinking and strong leadership skills, the intensivist can marshal support from staff and administrators to successfully implement cooling technology. PMID:19535961

  7. EVALUATION OF CARDIAC MURMURS IN NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravathy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardio vascular malformations are the most common congenital malformations. Early recognition of congenital heart disease is important in the neonatal period, as many of them may be fatal if undiagnosed. AIM : To study the epidemiology of neonatal cardiac murmurs. To identify clinical characteristics which differentiates pathological murmur from functional murmurs to assess the reliability of clinical evaluation in diagnosing congenital heart diseas e? METHODS : The study population included all neonates admitted in a Hospital in Visakhapatnam to the NICU, postnatal ward, attending pediatric OPD and were detected to have cardiac murmurs. It was a cross sectional study over a period of 16 months. A clinical diagnosis was made based on history and clinical examination. Then Chest X ray and ECG were done in symptomatic infants. Echo cardiography was done in all neonates for confirmation of diagnosis, the neonates were again examined daily till they were in hospital and during the follow up visit at 6 weeks. RESULTS : A total of 61 neonates were included and was conducted over a period of 16 months . T he incidence of cardiac murmurs among intramural neonates was 13.5 for 1000 live births. Most frequent symptom was fast breathing in 10[16.4%] cases. VSD was the most common diagnosis clinically in 19[31.47%] babies. The most frequent diagnosis was acyanotic complex congenital heart disease, Only intra mural neonates were considered for the incidence of murmurs and the incidence of cardiac murmurs among them babies was 13.5 for 1000 live in 23[37.7%] cases followed by 10[16.4%] cases each of VSD and ASD respectively. Overall in our study 73.77% [45 cases] of the murmurs were diagnosed correctly and confirmed by Echocardiography. INTERPRETATIONS & CONCLUSIONS: 1. It is possible to make clinical diagnosis in many cases of congenital heart diseases. 2. The functional murmurs could be differentiated from those arising from structural heart disease. 3. By evaluation of these infants only based on murmurs few congenital heart diseases be missed.

  8. Guidelines for quality improvement in cardiac surgery. The College of Cardiac Surgery : results of the 2007 survey.

    OpenAIRE

    De Smet, J. M.; Kolh, Philippe; Van Kerrebroeck, Chr; Van Nooten, G.; Van Praet, E.; Rodrigus, I

    2008-01-01

    Optimal delivery of health care is a common goal of individual physicians, professional organizations, hospital structures and governmental authorities. A growing concern has emerged from the public, media and third payer organizations concerning the quality of care and the amount of resources spending. In the United States, large databases, guidelines and performance evaluation have been elaborated by medical societies, particularly in the area of cardiac surgery. These tools are useful for ...

  9. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrefai MT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad T Alrefai,1–3 Divya Murali,4 Arghya Paul,4 Khalid M Ridwan,1,2 John M Connell,1,2 Dominique Shum-Tim1,2 1Division of Cardiac Surgery, 2Division of Surgical Research, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. Keywords: stem cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac surgery, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, heart, scaffolds, organoids, cell sheet and tissue engineering

  10. Providing palliative care in primary care: how satisfied are GPs and district nurses with current out-of-hours arrangements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, C; Addington-Hall, J; Barclay, S; Briggs, J; Cox, I; Daniels, L; Millar, D

    2000-06-01

    The complex needs of palliative care patients require an informed, expert, and swift response from out-of-hours general medical services, particularly if hospital admission is to be avoided. Few general practitioners (GPs) reported routinely handing over information on their palliative care patients, particularly to GP co-operatives. District nurses and inner-city GPs were least satisfied with aspects of out-of-hours care. Most responders wanted 24-hour availability of specialist palliative care. This indicates a need to develop and evaluate out-of-hours palliative care procedures and protocols, particularly for GP co-operatives, and to improve inter-agency collaboration. PMID:10962787

  11. Predictors of low cardiac output in decompensated severe heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Eidi Ochiai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of low cardiac output and mortality in decompensated heart failure. INTRODUCTION: Introduction: Patients with decompensated heart failure have a high mortality rate, especially those patients with low cardiac output. However, this clinical presentation is uncommon, and its management is controversial. METHODS: We studied a cohort of 452 patients hospitalized with decompensated heart failure with an ejection fraction of 60 years, and 64.6% were men. Low cardiac output was present in 281 (63% patients on admission. Chagas disease was the cause of heart failure in 92 (20.4% patients who had higher B type natriuretic peptide levels (1,978.38 vs. 1,697.64 pg/mL; P = 0.015. Predictors of low cardiac output were Chagas disease (RR: 3.655, P<0.001, lower ejection fraction (RR: 2.414, P<0.001, hyponatremia (RR: 1.618, P = 0.036, and renal dysfunction (RR: 1.916, P = 0.007. Elderly patients were inversely associated with low cardiac output (RR: 0.436, P = 0.001. Predictors of mortality were Chagas disease (RR: 2.286, P<0.001, ischemic etiology (RR: 1.449, P = 0.035, and low cardiac output (RR: 1.419, P = 0.047. CONCLUSIONS: In severe decompensated heart failure, predictors of low cardiac output are Chagas disease, lower ejection fraction, hyponatremia, and renal dysfunction. Additionally, Chagas disease patients have higher B type natriuretic peptide levels and a worse prognosis independent of lower ejection fraction.

  12. Indeterminacy of Spatiotemporal Cardiac Alternans

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in action potential duration (at the cellular level) or in ECG morphology (at the whole heart level), is a marker of ventricular fibrillation, a fatal heart rhythm that kills hundreds of thousands of people in the US each year. Investigating cardiac alternans may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and eventually better algorithms for the prediction and prevention of such dreadful diseases. In paced cardiac tissue, alternans develops under increasingly shorter pacing period. Existing experimental and theoretical studies adopt the assumption that alternans in homogeneous cardiac tissue is exclusively determined by the pacing period. In contrast, we find that, when calcium-driven alternans develops in cardiac fibers, it may take different spatiotemporal patterns depending on the pacing history. Because there coexist multiple alternans solutions for a given pacing period, the alternans pattern on a fiber becomes unpredictable. Usin...

  13. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac p...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....... characterized. An ongoing characterization of the molecular heterogeneity will help appreciate the biosynthetic capacity of the endocrine heart and could introduce new diagnostic possibilities. Notably, different biosynthetic products may not be equal markers of the same pathophysiological processes. An...... inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  14. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...... inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  15. Hurricane Katrina's Impact on Tulane's Teaching Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Ian L.

    2007-01-01

    On Monday, August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina passed east of New Orleans causing minimal damage to Tulane's Medical Center. Later that day, levees that protected the city failed and several feet of water entered the hospitals and school buildings. Emergency generators provided power for 36 hours before running out of fuel. Temperatures in the hospitals soared into the upper 90's and conditions were made intolerable by 100% humidity and backed-up sewage. For several days, faculty, residents, nu...

  16. Hospitals for sale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve. PMID:21864058

  17. Challenges in Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Tandon, Nina; Godier, Amandine; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Martens, Timothy P.; Radisic, Milica

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering aims to create functional tissue constructs that can reestablish the structure and function of injured myocardium. Engineered constructs can also serve as high-fidelity models for studies of cardiac development and disease. In a general case, the biological potential of the cell—the actual “tissue engineer”—is mobilized by providing highly controllable three-dimensional environments that can mediate cell differentiation and functional assembly. For cardiac regenerat...

  18. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Guidelines and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine Monpere

    1998-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation has been shown to improve exercise tolerance and symptomatology in patients experiencing angina or heart failure and reduce long term mortality after myocardial infarction, with a good cost-effectiveness ratio. In addition to these `hard' endpoints, cardiac rehabilitation improves the patient's quality of life and risk factor profile through a multifactorial intervention. Indeed, cardiac rehabilitation is no longer restricted to physical reconditioning, but should now b...

  19. Oxidative stress mediated cardiac apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ay?e Tarb?n Jannuzzi, Buket Alpertunga, Mehtap Kara, Eren za?l?,

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Cardiovascular diseases are one of the most common diseases all around the world. In both acute and chronic cardiac diseases, apoptosis is the primary pathway of disease nature and according to current studies apoptotic pathway inhibition has an important role in cardiac disease tretament procedures. There are several studies regarding clarification of molecular pathways of cardiac apoptosis in several heart diseases. Oxidative stress could be defined as imbalance between the antiox...

  20. CMR Features in Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    John R. Payne; Marc Dweck; Sparsh Prasher; Lee, Phong T.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by the formation of noncaseating epithelioid cell granuloma involving various organ systems. Cardiac involvement has an important prognostic factor as it can present with life-threatening arrythmias and sudden death. Here, we present a case of cardiac sarcoidosis in a 46-year-old gentleman who presented with nonspecific signs and symptoms. We also discuss diagnostic difficulties especially when cardiac involvement is t...