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Sample records for orthodontic bracket materials

  1. Effects of fluoride release from orthodontic bonding materials on nanomechanical properties of the enamel around orthodontic brackets

    Raji, Seyed Hamid; Banimostafaee, Hamed; Hajizadeh, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effects of a fluoride-releasing composite resin bonding material on reducing enamel demineralization underneath and around orthodontic brackets and compare that with a conventional adhesive system. Materials and Methods: Buccal surfaces of 10 intact extracted premolar teeth were divided into two parts with nail varnish and stainless steel brackets were randomly bonded by two resin composite systems: (Transbond XT) and (Transbond XT plus Color Change) (3M, Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) on two sides of the teeth and then samples were placed in a demineralization solution. It is claimed that the second system has the ability of fluoride release. Elastic modulus and hardness of enamel were measured with nanoindentation test in 6 depths in 1-36 μm from the enamel surface and in 7 regions: Control (intact enamel surface), underneath the brackets and also 50 and 100 μm from the brackets edge. These nanomechanical features were evaluated in different regions and depths using analysis of variance and paired t-test (P < 0.05). Results: Considerable difference can be seen in different depths and regions in terms of hardness and elastic modulus. The region under the bracket with fluoridated adhesive shows similar results with intact enamel, whereas these parameters in fluoride less side show a significant reduction (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Results show that use of resin composite bonding system with the ability of fluoride release for bracket bonding, may reduce demineralization of enamel around brackets during orthodontic treatment. PMID:24688563

  2. Effects of fluoride release from orthodontic bonding materials on nanomechanical properties of the enamel around orthodontic brackets

    Seyed Hamid Raji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effects of a fluoride-releasing composite resin bonding material on reducing enamel demineralization underneath and around orthodontic brackets and compare that with a conventional adhesive system. Materials and Methods: Buccal surfaces of 10 intact extracted premolar teeth were divided into two parts with nail varnish and stainless steel brackets were randomly bonded by two resin composite systems: (Transbond XT and (Transbond XT plus Color Change (3M, Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA on two sides of the teeth and then samples were placed in a demineralization solution. It is claimed that the second system has the ability of fluoride release. Elastic modulus and hardness of enamel were measured with nanoindentation test in 6 depths in 1-36 μm from the enamel surface and in 7 regions: Control (intact enamel surface, underneath the brackets and also 50 and 100 μm from the brackets edge. These nanomechanical features were evaluated in different regions and depths using analysis of variance and paired t-test (P < 0.05. Results: Considerable difference can be seen in different depths and regions in terms of hardness and elastic modulus. The region under the bracket with fluoridated adhesive shows similar results with intact enamel, whereas these parameters in fluoride less side show a significant reduction (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Results show that use of resin composite bonding system with the ability of fluoride release for bracket bonding, may reduce demineralization of enamel around brackets during orthodontic treatment.

  3. Fluoride-Releasing Materials to Prevent White Spot Lesions around Orthodontic Brackets: A Systematic Review.

    Nascimento, Patrícia Layane de Menezes Macêdo; Fernandes, Micaelle Tenório Guedes; Figueiredo, Fabricio Eneas Diniz de; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis

    2016-02-01

    The relation between orthodontic fixed appliances use and enamel demineralization is well established. Different preventive approaches have been suggested to this problem, but controversy remains about which is the best. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of clinical trials that investigated the effectiveness of materials containing fluorides to lute brackets or cover the bonding interface in order to inhibit the development and progression of white spot lesions. The null hypothesis was that fluoride materials do not affect the incidence of white spot lesions around brackets. A MEDLINE search was conducted for randomized clinical trials evaluating the development of white spot lesions in patients using fixed orthodontic appliances, followed by meta-analysis comparing the results for patients for whom dental materials containing fluorides were used (experimental group) to those for whom these materials were not used (control group). The pooled relative risk of developing white spot lesions for the experimental group was 0.42 (95% confidence interval: 0.25 to 0.72); hence, when fluoride-releasing materials are used, the patient has 58% less risk of white spot lesion development. Regarding white spot lesion extent, the pooled mean difference between the experimental and control groups was not statistically significant (-0.12; 95% confidence interval: -0.29 to 0.04). In conclusion, the results of the present systematic review suggest that fluoride-releasing materials can reduce the risk of white spot lesions around brackets. However, when white spot lesions had already occurred, there is no evidence that fluoride-releasing materials reduce the extent of these lesions. PMID:27007355

  4. [Brackets and friction in orthodontics: experimental study].

    Ben Rejeb Jdir, Saloua; Tobji, Samir; Turki, Wiem; Dallel, Ines; Khedher, Nedra; Ben Amor, Adel

    2015-09-01

    Many authors have been involved in developing brackets in order to improve the quality, stability, speed and efficiency of orthodontic treatment. In order to reduce friction between bracket and archwire, new therapeutic approaches have been devised based on novel technologies. Among these innovative techniques, self-ligating brackets are increasingly popular. SLBs can be classified into several categories according to their mode of action and their materials. We performed an experimental study to compare the friction forces generated during the sliding of orthodontic archwires made from various alloys through conventional and self-ligating brackets. Results show the favorable influence of SLBs, compared to conventional systems using elastomeric or metal ligatures, on the level of friction, particularly when shape-memory Ni-Ti archwires are used. PMID:26370596

  5. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, U...

  6. Microleakage under orthodontic brackets bonded with different adhesive systems

    Alkis, Huseyin; Turkkahraman, Hakan; Adanir, Necdet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study aimed to compare the microleakage of orthodontic brackets between enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces at the occlusal and gingival margins bonded with different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 human maxillary premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons was randomly divided into four groups. Each group was then further divided into three sub-groups. Three total-etching bonding systems (Transbond XT, Greengloo and Kurasper ...

  7. Bond efficacy of recycled orthodontic brackets: A comparative in vitro evaluation of two methods

    Vikram Shetty; Yash Shekatkar; Neesu Kumbhat; Gautam, G; Shalan Karbelkar; Meghna Vandekar

    2015-01-01

    Context: Recycling of orthodontic brackets in developing orthodontic economies is an extremely common procedure. Bonding protocols and reliability of these brackets is, however, questionable, and still the subject of research. Aims: The aim was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of brackets recycled with sandblasting and silicoating. Materials and Methods: Ninety extracted human premolars were bonded with 0.022” SS brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan USA) and then de...

  8. In Vitro Effects of Two Topical Varnish Materials and Er:YAG Laser Irradiation on Enamel Demineralization around Orthodontic Brackets

    Sungurtekin Ekçi, Elif; Sandalli, Nuket

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro was to evaluate the effects of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) containing varnish materials and Er:YAG laser irradiation on enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets. Forty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into four treatment groups (i.e., 10 in each group): (1) 5% NaF-ACP varnish, (2) 5% NaF-TCP varnish, (3) Er:YAG laser, and (4) control (no treatment). Er:YAG laser was operated at a wavelength of 2.94 μm and the energy output was 80 mJ per pulse; a pulse duration of 200 μsec and and a frequency of 2 Hz were used with water cooling. All samples were then put into pH cycles. Surface microhardness values and representative SEM images were assessed. Surface microhardness values were evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The results revealed that demineralization was significantly lower in the TCP and ACP varnish groups, whereas mean surface microhardness values of the TCP varnish were found higher than the ACP (P < 0.05). TCP and ACP varnish materials were found effective for reducing enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets. Use of Er:YAG laser irradiation as described in this study for inhibition of demineralization was found not satisfactory. PMID:24987734

  9. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with glass ionomer cement

    Miti? Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. A great number of techniques have been used for bonding orthodontic brackets to the tooth surfaces. Glass ionomer cements are frequently used material for this purpose. The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with glass ionomer cement Ortho Fuji LC and remained adhesive on the enamel surface after brackets debonding. Material and methods. A total of 40 extracted premolars for orthodontic reasons in different gender patients, 10...

  10. 21 CFR 872.5470 - Orthodontic plastic bracket.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Orthodontic plastic bracket. 872.5470 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5470 Orthodontic plastic bracket. (a) Identification. An orthodontic plastic bracket is a plastic device intended to be bonded to a tooth to...

  11. Evaluation of Perceived Acceptability, Beauty and Value of Different Orthodontic Brackets

    Moshkelgosha V; Salahi M; Rostami Sh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Although different types of aesthetic brackets are introduced to orthodontic profession to reduce the complaints about the metallic braces, little studies have been done to assess patient's views regarding the attractiveness and acceptance of such brackets. Objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the perceived acceptability, beauty and value of different orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, three groups of ...

  12. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    Dalili Kajan, Zahra; Khademi, Jalil; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Babaei Hemmaty, Yasamin; Atrkar Roushan, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and Methods A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin...

  13. Influence of adhesion promoters and curing-light sources on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Claudia Tavares Machado

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The conventional orthodontic adhesive presented higher bond strength than the nanofilled composite, although both materials interacted similarly to the teeth. The curing-light devices tested did not influence on bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  14. Galvanic Corrosion of and Ion Release from Various Orthodontic Brackets and Wires in a Fluoride-containing Mouthwash

    Soodeh Tahmasbi; Mohammad Ghorbani; Mahdis Masudrad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. This study compared the galvanic corrosion of orthodontic wires and brackets from various man-ufacturers following exposure to a fluoride mouthwash. Materials and methods. This study was conducted on 24 lower central incisor 0.022” Roth brackets of four different commercially available brands (Dentaurum, American Orthodontics, ORJ, Shinye). These brackets along with stainless steel (SS) or nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic wires (0.016", round) were immersed in Oral-B...

  15. Microleakage under orthodontic brackets bonded with different adhesive systems

    Alkis, Huseyin; Turkkahraman, Hakan; Adanir, Necdet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study aimed to compare the microleakage of orthodontic brackets between enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces at the occlusal and gingival margins bonded with different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 human maxillary premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons was randomly divided into four groups. Each group was then further divided into three sub-groups. Three total-etching bonding systems (Transbond XT, Greengloo and Kurasper F), three one-step self-etching bonding systems (Transbond Plus SEP, Bond Force and Clearfil S3), three two-step self-etching bonding systems (Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil Protectbond and Clearfil Liner Bond), and three self-adhesive resin cements (Maxcem Elite, Relyx U 100 and Clearfil SA Cement) were used to bond the brackets to the teeth. After bonding, all teeth were sealed with nail varnish and stained with 0.5% basic fuchsine for 24 h. All samples were sectioned and examined under a stereomicroscope to score for microleakage at the adhesive–enamel and adhesive–bracket interfaces from both occlusal and gingival margins. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analyses were performed with Kruskal–Wallis and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: The results indicate no statistically significant differences between the microleakage scores of the adhesives; microleakage was detected in all groups. Comparison of the average values of the microleakage scores in the enamel–adhesive and adhesive–bracket interfaces indicated statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). The amount of the microleakage was higher at the enamel–adhesive interface than at the bracket-adhesive interface. Conclusions: All of the brackets exhibited some amount of microleakage. This result means that microleakage does not depend on the type of adhesive used. PMID:25713494

  16. Stereomicroscope Analysis of Enamel Surface after Orthodontic Bracket Debonding

    Miki?, Martina; laj, Mladen; Metrovi?, Senka

    2003-01-01

    After orthodontic brackets debonding, the remaining resin has to be removed. The purpose of this study was to determine the most efficient method as well as to introduce a new method of composite removal. The study was carried out on a sample of 30 premolars, extracted for orthodontic purposes. Brackets had been bonded using the Ortho One Bisco composite resin. After the removal of brackets, samples were randomly divided into three groups of ten. Composite remnants in the first...

  17. Galvanic corrosion between orthodontic wires and brackets in fluoride mouthwashes.

    Schiff, Nicolas; Boinet, Mickaël; Morgon, Laurent; Lissac, Michèle; Dalard, Francis; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of fluoride in certain mouthwashes on the risk of corrosion through galvanic coupling of orthodontic wires and brackets. Two titanium alloy wires, nickel-titanium (NiTi) and copper-nickel-titanium (CuNiTi), and the three most commonly used brackets, titanium (Ti), iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr), were tested in a reference solution of Fusayama-Meyer artificial saliva and in two commercially available fluoride (250 ppm) mouthwashes, Elmex and Meridol. Corrosion resistance was assessed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-MS), analysis of released metal ions, and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) study of the metal surfaces after immersion of different wire-bracket pairs in the test solutions. The study was completed by an electrochemical analysis. Meridol mouthwash, which contains stannous fluoride, was the solution in which the NiTi wires coupled with the different brackets showed the highest corrosion risk, while in Elmex mouthwash, which contains sodium fluoride, the CuNiTi wires presented the highest corrosion risk. Such corrosion has two consequences: deterioration in mechanical performance of the wire-bracket system, which would negatively affect the final aesthetic result, and the risk of local allergic reactions caused by released Ni ions. The results suggest that mouthwashes should be prescribed according to the orthodontic materials used. A new type of mouthwash for use during orthodontic therapy could be an interesting development in this field. PMID:16428255

  18. Retrieval analysis of different orthodontic brackets: the applicability of electron microprobe techniques for determining material heterogeneities and corrosive potential

    Alexandra Ioana Holst

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of micro-analytical methods with high spatial resolution to the characterization of the composition and corrosion behavior of two bracket systems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The surfaces of six nickel-free brackets and six nickel-containing brackets were examined for signs of corrosion and qualitative surface analysis using an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA, prior to bonding to patient's tooth surfaces and four months after clinical use. The surfaces were characterized qualitatively by secondary electron (SE images and back scattered electron (BSE images in both compositional and topographical mode. Qualitative and quantitative wavelength-dispersive analyses were performed for different elements, and by utilizing qualitative analysis the relative concentration of selected elements was mapped two-dimensionally. The absolute concentration of the elements was determined in specially prepared brackets by quantitative analysis using pure element standards for calibration and calculating correction-factors (ZAF. RESULTS: Clear differences were observed between the different bracket types. The nickel-containing stainless steel brackets consist of two separate pieces joined by a brazing alloy. Compositional analysis revealed two different alloy compositions, and reaction zones on both sides of the brazing alloy. The nickel-free bracket was a single piece with only slight variation in element concentration, but had a significantly rougher surface. After clinical use, no corrosive phenomena were detectable with the methods applied. Traces of intraoral wear at the contact areas between the bracket slot and the arch wire were verified. CONCLUSION: Electron probe microanalysis is a valuable tool for the characterization of element distribution and quantitative analysis for corrosion studies.

  19. An orthodontic bracket embedded in the medial pterygoid surface: a case report.

    Wilmott, Sheryl E; Ikeagwuani, Okechukwu; McLeod, Niall M H

    2016-03-01

    There is a potential risk that orthodontic brackets can become dislodged into the aerodigestive tract. This case illustrates the management of an orthodontic bracket, which became embedded in the deep tissues of the oropharynx. We aim to highlight the potential risk misplaced dental instruments and materials pose, including that they may become embedded in the soft tissues of the throat and suggest that that this possibility should be considered when they cannot be localized. PMID:25588825

  20. Effect of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic bracket bonding

    Ponikvar, Michael J.

    This study examined the effect of bracket manipulation in combination with delayed polymerization times on orthodontic bracket shear bond strength and degree of resin composite conversion. Orthodontics brackets were bonded to extracted third molars in a simulated oral environment after a set period of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation. After curing the bracket adhesive, each bracket underwent shear bond strength testing followed by micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis to measure the degree of conversion of the resin composite. Results demonstrated the shear bond strength and the degree of conversion of ceramic brackets did not vary over time. However, with stainless steel brackets there was a significant effect (p ≤ 0.05) of delay time on shear bond strength between the 0.5 min and 10 min bracket groups. In addition, stainless steel brackets showed significant differences related to degree of conversion over time between the 0.5 min and 5 min groups, in addition to the 0.5 min and 10 min groups. This investigation suggests that delaying bracket adhesive polymerization up to a period of 10 min then adjusting the orthodontic bracket may increase both shear bond strength and degree of conversion of stainless steel brackets while having no effect on ceramic brackets.

  1. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with glass ionomer cement

    Miti? Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A great number of techniques have been used for bonding orthodontic brackets to the tooth surfaces. Glass ionomer cements are frequently used material for this purpose. The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with glass ionomer cement Ortho Fuji LC and remained adhesive on the enamel surface after brackets debonding. Material and methods. A total of 40 extracted premolars for orthodontic reasons in different gender patients, 10-16 years old, were randomly divided into four groups. Using glass ionomer cement Ortho Fuji LC (Tokyo, Japan stainless steel brackets were bonded to the teeth with the average surface area of the bracket base of 14.7 mm2. The shear bond strengths were measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm per minute, and the load applied at the time of fracture was recorded using electronic dynamometer. Remained adhesive on the enamel after bracket debonding was evaluated using the adhesive remnant index (ARI. Results. Shear bond strength had the highest value for the group where enamel was etched right before bonding bracket (9.14 MPa, than in the group 2 (7.43 MPa, while in the groups 1 (6.72 MPa and 3 (6.22 MPa, where etching was not performed, bond strength was lower. Conclusion. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with glass ionomer cement Ortho Fuji LC had higher values when the enamel was etched than without etching.

  2. Laser debonding of ceramic orthodontic brackets: a theoretical approach

    Kearney, Kristine L.; Marangoni, Roy D.; Rickabaugh, Jeff L.

    1992-06-01

    Ceramic brackets are an esthetic substitute for conventional stainless steel brackets in orthodontic patients. However, ceramic brackets are more brittle and have higher bond strengths which can lead to bracket breakage and enamel damage during debonding. It has been demonstrated that various lasers can facilitate ceramic bracket removal. One mechanism with the laser is through the softening of the bracket adhesive. The high energy density from the laser on the bracket and adhesive can have a resultant deleterious thermal effect on the pulp of the tooth which may lead to pulpal death. A theoretical computer model of bracket, adhesive, enamel and dentin has been generated for predicting heat flow through this system. Heat fluxes at varying intensities and modes have been input into the program and the resultant temperatures at various points or nodes were determined. Further pursuit should lead to optimum parameters for laser debonding which would have minimal effects on the pulp.

  3. Does the bracket composition material influence initial biofilm formation?

    Gustavo Antnio Martins Brando; Antonio Carlos Pereira; Ana Maria Martins Brando; Haroldo Amorim de Almeida; Rogrio Heldio Lopes Motta

    2015-01-01

    Context: Orthodontic treatment has been reported to contribute to the development and accumulation of dental biofilm, which is commonly found on bracket and adjacent surfaces. Aims: The aim of this work is to test the hypothesis if there are differences in dental biofilm formation on the surface of orthodontic brackets according to the type of composition material. Subjects and Methods: Three bracket types (metallic, composite, and ceramic) had been evaluated. Subjects wore acrylic pa...

  4. Evaluation of Perceived Acceptability, Beauty and Value of Different Orthodontic Brackets

    Moshkelgosha V

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Although different types of aesthetic brackets are introduced to orthodontic profession to reduce the complaints about the metallic braces, little studies have been done to assess patient's views regarding the attractiveness and acceptance of such brackets. Objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the perceived acceptability, beauty and value of different orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, three groups of subjects consisting of dental school clinic patients, specialty clinic patients, and art students were interviewed. Sample size was decided 116 in each group. The photographic images of six types of brackets which were placed in an adult mouth were shown to the subjects and they were asked to answer the questions that evaluate attractiveness by visual analog scale (VAS, acceptability of different brackets, and willingness to pay (WTP for an aesthetic bracket in comparison to a regular bracket. Reliability was measured by giving questionnaires to 20 respondents by a two-week interval. VAS rating was compared by ANOVA. Mann U Whitney and Chi-square tests were used to compare the acceptability between groups when necessary. Results: The reliability measurement results performed by ICC were 0.86 for attractiveness, 0.6 for acceptability, and 0.93 for WTP questions. Lingual brackets had the highest attractiveness rating while metal brackets were considered the lowest aesthetic appliance by all groups of the study. The acceptability of ceramic bracket was highest in all groups. While most appliances evaluated had average acceptability, the large metallic brackets were rated very low. WTP for aesthetic braces was higher in art students than other groups. Conclusions: Lingual brackets were the most attractive but had very low acceptability rate. Small metal brackets had a good acceptability rate. Large metal brackets were the least attractive and had the lowest acceptability. Parents accepted aesthetic brackets for their children even when it cost more.

  5. Physical and chemical properties of orthodontic brackets after 12 and 24 months: in situ study

    MENDES, Bernardo de Azevedo Bahia; FERREIRA, Ricardo Alberto Neto; PITHON, Matheus Melo; HORTA, Martinho Campolina Rebello; OLIVEIRA, Dauro Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this article was to assess how intraoral biodegradation influenced the surface characteristics and friction levels of metallic brackets used during 12 and 24 months of orthodontic treatment and also to compare the static friction generated in these brackets with four different methods of the ligation of orthodontic wires. Material and Methods Seventy premolar brackets as received from the manufacturer and 224 brackets that were used in previous orthodontic treatments were evaluated in this experiment. The surface morphology and the composition of the deposits found in the brackets were evaluated with rugosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Friction was analyzed by applying tensile tests simulating sliding mechanics with a 0.019x0.025" steel wire. The static friction levels produced by the following ligation methods were evaluated: loosely attached steel ligature around all four bracket wings, steel ligature attached to only two wings, conventional elastomeric ligation around all 4 bracket wings, and non-conventional Slide® elastomeric ligature. Results The results demonstrated the presence of biodegradation effects such as corrosion pits, plastic deformation, cracks, and material deposits. The main chemical elements found on these deposits were Carbon and Oxygen. The maximum friction produced by each ligation method changed according to the time of intraoral use. The steel ligature loosely attached to all four bracket wings produced the lowest friction levels in the new brackets. The conventional elastic ligatures generated the highest friction levels. The metallic brackets underwent significant degradation during orthodontic treatment, showing an increase in surface roughness and the deposit of chemical elements on the surface. Conclusion The levels of static friction decreased with use. The non-conventional elastic ligatures were the best alternative to reduce friction. PMID:25025560

  6. Physical and chemical properties of orthodontic brackets after 12 and 24 months: in situ study

    Bernardo de Azevedo Bahia MENDES

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this article was to assess how intraoral biodegradation influenced the surface characteristics and friction levels of metallic brackets used during 12 and 24 months of orthodontic treatment and also to compare the static friction generated in these brackets with four different methods of the ligation of orthodontic wires. Material and Methods: Seventy premolar brackets as received from the manufacturer and 224 brackets that were used in previous orthodontic treatments were evaluated in this experiment. The surface morphology and the composition of the deposits found in the brackets were evaluated with rugosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Friction was analyzed by applying tensile tests simulating sliding mechanics with a 0.019x0.025" steel wire. The static friction levels produced by the following ligation methods were evaluated: loosely attached steel ligature around all four bracket wings, steel ligature attached to only two wings, conventional elastomeric ligation around all 4 bracket wings, and non-conventional Slide® elastomeric ligature. Results: The results demonstrated the presence of biodegradation effects such as corrosion pits, plastic deformation, cracks, and material deposits. The main chemical elements found on these deposits were Carbon and Oxygen. The maximum friction produced by each ligation method changed according to the time of intraoral use. The steel ligature loosely attached to all four bracket wings produced the lowest friction levels in the new brackets. The conventional elastic ligatures generated the highest friction levels. The metallic brackets underwent significant degradation during orthodontic treatment, showing an increase in surface roughness and the deposit of chemical elements on the surface. Conclusion: The levels of static friction decreased with use. The non-conventional elastic ligatures were the best alternative to reduce friction.

  7. Physical and chemical properties of orthodontic brackets after 12 and 24 months: in situ study

    Bernardo de Azevedo Bahia, MENDES; Ricardo Alberto Neto, FERREIRA; Matheus Melo, PITHON; Martinho Campolina Rebello, HORTA; Dauro Douglas, OLIVEIRA.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this article was to assess how intraoral biodegradation influenced the surface characteristics and friction levels of metallic brackets used during 12 and 24 months of orthodontic treatment and also to compare the static friction generated in these brackets with four different [...] methods of the ligation of orthodontic wires. Material and Methods: Seventy premolar brackets as received from the manufacturer and 224 brackets that were used in previous orthodontic treatments were evaluated in this experiment. The surface morphology and the composition of the deposits found in the brackets were evaluated with rugosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Friction was analyzed by applying tensile tests simulating sliding mechanics with a 0.019x0.025" steel wire. The static friction levels produced by the following ligation methods were evaluated: loosely attached steel ligature around all four bracket wings, steel ligature attached to only two wings, conventional elastomeric ligation around all 4 bracket wings, and non-conventional Slide elastomeric ligature. Results: The results demonstrated the presence of biodegradation effects such as corrosion pits, plastic deformation, cracks, and material deposits. The main chemical elements found on these deposits were Carbon and Oxygen. The maximum friction produced by each ligation method changed according to the time of intraoral use. The steel ligature loosely attached to all four bracket wings produced the lowest friction levels in the new brackets. The conventional elastic ligatures generated the highest friction levels. The metallic brackets underwent significant degradation during orthodontic treatment, showing an increase in surface roughness and the deposit of chemical elements on the surface. Conclusion: The levels of static friction decreased with use. The non-conventional elastic ligatures were the best alternative to reduce friction.

  8. Corrosion of orthodontic brackets in different spices:In vitro study

    Chaturvedi, T. P.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Moist environment in the mouth varies and causes variable amounts of corrosion of dental materials. This is of concern particularly when metallic implants, metallic fillings, orthodontic appliances are placed in the hostile electrolytic environment in the human mouth. Components of diet rich in salt and spices are important factors influencing the corrosion of metallic appliances placed in the oral cavity. Aims: To study in vitro corrosion of orthodontic metallic brackets immerse...

  9. Galvanic Corrosion among Different Combination of Orthodontic Archwires and Stainless Steel Brackets

    Farzin Heravi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the galvanic behavior of different bracket and archwire combinations that are commonly used in orthodontic treatments. Methods: Three types of orthodontic archwires with a diameter of 0.016×0.022 inch and 80 standard edgewise maxillary central incisor brackets were selected. Three groups consisted of different wire-bracket couples and one group was just brackets as a control group. Each group had five samples. Four brackets were then connected to each wire by elastic bands made from electrochemically neutral material. The samples were immersed into capped containers of Fusayama-Meyer artificial saliva. After six weeks, the released nickel ions were quantified via ion absorption technique. The mean and the standard deviation of all four groups were calculated and the data were compared together with Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric statistical test. Results: The highest concentration of released nickel ions was for bracket+ steel archwire and the least for the bracket without archwire. Conclusion: There were not significant differences among experimental groups, so it could be concluded that galvanic corrosion would not be a serious consideration through orthodontic treatment.  

  10. Effectiveness of fluoride sealant in the prevention of carious lesions around orthodontic brackets: an OCT evaluation

    PITHON, Matheus Melo; Santos, Mariana de Jesus; de Souza, Camilla Andrade; Leão, Jorge César Borges; Braz, Ana Karla Souza; de Araujo, Renato Evangelista; TANAKA, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article aimed to evaluate in vitro the efficiency of Pro Seal fluoride sealant application in the prevention of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets. Material and Methods: Brackets were bonded to the buccal surface of bovine incisors, and five groups were formed (n = 15) according to the exposure of teeth to oral hygiene substances and the application of enamel sealant: G1 (control), only brushing was performed with 1.450 ppm fluoride; G2 (control) brushing ...

  11. Comparison of the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded using silorane base and metacrylate base composite

    Abdolrahim Davari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Orthodontic bracket failure during treatment is a common problem. With the introduction of low shrinkage composites the question is that whether: this sufficient has coefficient bond strength for bonding bracket during orthodontic treatment. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS of silorane-based and metacrylate-based composites to metal brackets.   Materials and Methods: 30 human premolar teeth were collected and divided into 2 groups. In group 1, 15 orthodontic brackets were bonded using silorane-based composite, in group 2, 15 orthodontic brackets were bonded using metacrylate-based composite. The shear bond strength of each specimen was determined in an Instron machine. Amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using T-test to compare the shear bond strength between groups and LSD method to compare the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores.   Results: There was significant difference in the SBS between the test groups (P<0.001. The mean bond strength of bonding brackets to silorane-based composite was (42.42 ± 7.03 MPa, and the mean bond strength of bonding brackets metacrylate-based composite was (21.08±2.97 MPa. No significant difference in the ART was found between groups (P=0.66.   Conclusion: Silorane-based composite provided higher bond strength to orthodontic metal brackets.

  12. The effect of chemical recycling on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets

    Heravi F

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Recycling of brackets can significantly reduce the price of fixed orthodontic appliances but if the bond is more prone to failure during treatment, this potential benefit will disappear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chemical recycling on bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets and failure pattern of recycled brackets. Material and Methods: In this experimental study Instron machine was used to measure shear bond strength (SBS of brackets in two stages on 60 human maxillary first premolars using No-Mix composite. Shear bond strength and pattern of failure were compared between recycled and new brackets in two stages. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan tests. Adhesive Remnant Index was evaluated in different groups by Pearson Chi-square test. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Results: Statistical analysis showed that the mean values of SBS for new bracket group was 12.00 MPa and for recycled group and double recycled group, 9.94Mpa and 10.00 MPa respectively. A significant reduction (about 18% in bond strengths of brackets was observed at the first time of recycling. Recycling at the second time had no significant influence on the bond strength. Pattern of bond failure of these brackets showed that a great amount of residual adhesive material was remained on the teeth surfaces after debonding of recycled brackets which indicates that cleaning the teeth surfaces after debonding of recycled brackets is more time consuming. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, before using recycled brackets, several advantages and disadvantages must be considered.

  13. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, USA), (3) Transbond Plus (sixth generation self-etch primer, 3M Unitek, CA, USA) with Transbond XT (4) Xeno V (seventh generation self-etch primer, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) with Xeno Ortho (light-cure adhesive, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) adhesive. Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machine (Model No. 3382 Instron Corp., Canton, Mass, USA). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was recordedIn addition, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: Transbond XT (15.49 MPa) attained the highest bond strength. Self-etching adhesives (Xeno V, 13.51 MPa; Transbond Plus, 11.57 MPa) showed clinically acceptable SBS values and almost clean enamel surface after debonding. The analysis of variance (F = 11.85, P < 0.0001) and Chi-square (χ2 = 18.16, P < 0.05) tests revealed significant differences among groups. The ARI score of 3 (i.e., All adhesives left on the tooth) to be the most prevalent in Transbond XT (40%), followed by Rely-a-Bond (30%), Transbond Plus with Transbond XT (15%), and Xeno V with Xeno Ortho (10%). Under SEM, enamel surfaces after debonding of the brackets appeared porous when an acid-etching process was performed on the surfaces of Rely-a-Bond and Transbond XT, whereas with self-etching primers enamel presented smooth and almost clean surfaces (Transbond Plus and Xeno V group). Conclusion: All adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the recommended bond strength (5.9-7–8 MPa), Seventh generation self-etching primer Xeno V with Xeno Ortho showed clinically acceptable SBS and the least amount of residual adhesive left on the enamel surface after debonding. PMID:24987660

  14. Factors Affecting the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets – a Review of In Vitro Studies

    Waleed Bakhadher

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The adhesive material used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth should neither fail during the treatment period, resulting in treatment delays, untoward expenses or patient inconvenience nor should it damage the enamel on debonding at the end of the treatment. Although the effectiveness of a bonding system and any unfavorable effects on the enamel may be studied by conducting in-vivo studies, it is nearly impossible to independently analyze different variables that influence a specific bonding system in the oral environment. In-vitro studies, on the other hand, may utilize more standardized protocols for testing different bonding systems and materials available. Thus, the present review focused attention on in-vitro studies and made an attempt to discuss material-related, teeth-related (fluorotic vs non-fluorotic teeth and other miscellaneous factors that influences the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Within the limitations of this review, using conventional acid-etch technique, ceramic brackets and bonding to non-fluorotic teeth was reported to have a positive influence on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but higher shear bond strength found on using ceramic brackets can be dangerous for the enamel.

  15. Galvanic Corrosion among Different Combination of Orthodontic Archwires and Stainless Steel Brackets

    Farzin Heravi; Nima Mokhber; Elnaz Shayan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the galvanic behavior of different bracket and archwire combinations that are commonly used in orthodontic treatments. Methods: Three types of orthodontic archwires with a diameter of 0.016×0.022 inch and 80 standard edgewise maxillary central incisor brackets were selected. Three groups consisted of different wire-bracket couples and one group was just brackets as a control group. Each group had five samples. Four brackets were then connected...

  16. Shear bond strength of self-ligating orthodontic brackets on different types of porcelain crowns

    Karamdeep Singh Ahluwalia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to compare shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI of self-ligating orthodontic brackets bonded to different porcelain crowns. Materials and Methods: Three groups of different types of porcelain crowns, each containing 12 crowns were fabricated by the same technician and allocated to one of the study groups as follows: Group I - IPS porcelain crowns (Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein, Group II - Porcelain fused to zirconia crowns (Zirkonzahn GmbH, Gais, Italy, Noritake Co., Tokyo, Japan and Group III - Conventional porcelain fused to metal crowns (Ceramco3, Densply, PA, USA. The orthodontic brackets were bonded to these crowns using hydrofluoric acid (HFA + silane etching protocol. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets were tested with a universal testing machine under standard test conditions. Results: Statistical evaluation using analysis of variance showed a significant difference between the groups (P 0.05. Chi-square comparison revealed no significant difference in ARI scores between groups (P > 0.05. Conclusions: When HFA + silane etching protocol were used, IPS crowns showed the greatest SBS of orthodontic brackets. The ARI score was non-significant. Therefore, if there is a need to place crowns over teeth then these crowns can be used for restoration of teeth before orthodontic treatment.

  17. The influence of size and structure of metal orthodontic bracket base on bond strength on tooth enamel

    Mitić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The factors which may influence the bond strength of the applied orthodontic brackets on the tooth surface are the size and structure of the bracket base. Objective. The aim of the paper was to investigate the influence of size and shape of different types of brackets on bond strength on the enamel and analyze the remaining quality of adhesive material on the tooth surface after debonding of orthodontic brackets (adhesive remnant index - ARI. Methods. In this study, three types of metal brackets of different sizes and shapes of Dentaurum manufacturer were used (Utratrimm, Equilibrium 2, Discovery, Dentaurum, Inspringen, Germany. The brackets were applied onto the middle part of the anatomic crowns of buccal surfaces of 30 premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. In addition, the pre-treatment of teeth by 37% orthophosphoric acid and adhesive material System1+ (Dentaurum, Germany were used. Results. The mean value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Discovery type after debonding was 8.67±0.32 MPa, while the value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Equilibrium 2 type amounted to 8.62±0.22 MPa. The value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Ultratrimm type after debonding was 8.22±0.49 MPa. There were no statistical differences in the values of bond strength regarding all three groups of the investigated orthodontic brackets (F=4.56; p<0.05. Conclusion. The base size and design of metal orthodontic brackets did not play a significant role in bond strength, while the values of ARI index were identical in all three investigated groups.

  18. Galvanic Corrosion of and Ion Release from Various Orthodontic Brackets and Wires in a Fluoride-containing Mouthwash

    Soodeh Tahmasbi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. This study compared the galvanic corrosion of orthodontic wires and brackets from various man-ufacturers following exposure to a fluoride mouthwash. Materials and methods. This study was conducted on 24 lower central incisor 0.022” Roth brackets of four different commercially available brands (Dentaurum, American Orthodontics, ORJ, Shinye. These brackets along with stainless steel (SS or nickel-titanium (NiTi orthodontic wires (0.016", round were immersed in Oral-B mouthwash containing 0.05% sodium fluoride for 28 days. The electric potential (EP difference of each bracket-wire couple was measured with a Satu-rated Calomel Reference Electrode (Ag/AgCl saturated with KCl via a voltmeter. The ions released in the electrolyte weremeasured with an atomic absorption spectrometer. All the specimens were assessed under a stereomicroscope and speci-mens with corrosion were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Results. The copper ions released from specimens with NiTi wire were greater than those of samples containing SS wire. ORJ brackets released more Cu ions than other samples. The Ni ions released from Shinye brackets were significantly more than those of other specimens (P < 0.05. Corrosion rate of brackets coupled with NiTi wires was higher than that of brack-ets coupled with SS wires. Light and electron microscopic observations showed greater corrosion of ORJ brackets. Conclusion. In fluoride mouthwash, Shinye and ORJ brackets exhibited greater corrosion than Dentaurum and American Orthodontics brackets. Stainless steel brackets used with NiTi wires showed greater corrosion and thus caution is recom-mended when using them.

  19. Galvanic Corrosion of and Ion Release from Various Orthodontic Brackets and Wires in a Fluoride-containing Mouthwash.

    Tahmasbi, Soodeh; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Masudrad, Mahdis

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. This study compared the galvanic corrosion of orthodontic wires and brackets from various manufacturers following exposure to a fluoride mouthwash. Materials and methods. This study was conducted on 24 lower central incisor 0.022" Roth brackets of four different commercially available brands (Dentaurum, American Orthodontics, ORJ, Shinye). These brackets along with stainless steel (SS) or nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic wires (0.016", round) were immersed in Oral-B mouthwash containing 0.05% sodium fluoride for 28 days. The electric potential (EP) difference of each bracket-wire couple was measured with a Saturated Calomel Reference Electrode (Ag/AgCl saturated with KCl) via a voltmeter. The ions released in the electrolyte weremeasured with an atomic absorption spectrometer. All the specimens were assessed under a stereomicroscope and specimens with corrosion were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Results. The copper ions released from specimens with NiTi wire were greater than those of samples containing SS wire. ORJ brackets released more Cu ions than other samples. The Ni ions released from Shinye brackets were significantly more than those of other specimens (P Corrosion rate of brackets coupled with NiTi wires was higher than that of brackets coupled with SS wires. Light and electron microscopic observations showed greater corrosion of ORJ brackets. Conclusion. In fluoride mouthwash, Shinye and ORJ brackets exhibited greater corrosion than Dentaurum and American Orthodontics brackets. Stainless steel brackets used with NiTi wires showed greater corrosion and thus caution is recommended when using them. PMID:26697148

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Tooth Enamel After Treatment With Different Tooth Bleaching Methods

    Vahid Dastjerdi, Elahe; Khaloo, Negar; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azarsina, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bleaching treatments decrease shear bond strength between orthodontic brackets and teeth; although definite results have not been reported in this regard. Objectives: This study determined the effects of different bleaching protocols on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to teeth. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed in Iran. Forty-eight extracted human premolars were randomly assigned into four groups. In the control group, no bleaching treatment was performed. In groups 2 - 4, the bleaching procedures were performed using carbamide peroxide 45%, carbamide peroxide 20% and diode laser, respectively. Two weeks later, brackets were bonded to teeth and thermocycled. The shear bond strengths of the brackets to the teeth were measured. Data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Dunnett post-hoc test. Results: Shear bond strength of the brackets to the teeth were 10.54 ± 1.51, 6.37 ± 0.92, 7.67 ± 1.01 and 7.49 ± 1.19 MPa, in groups 1 - 4, respectively. Significant differences were found between control group and all other groups (P laser significantly decreased shear bond strength of brackets to the teeth. 45% carbamide peroxide had a more significant effect on bond strength compared to 20% carbamide peroxide. The difference in bond strength was not significant between laser group and either carbamide peroxide groups. PMID:26734481

  1. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Nano-filled Composites

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with two types of nano-composites in comparison to a conventional orthodontic composite. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human first premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups each containing 20 teeth. In group I, a conventional orthodontic composite (Transbond XT was used to bond the brackets, while two nano-composites (Filtek TM Supreme XT and AELITE Aesthetic Enamel were used in groups II and III respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, thermocycled in distilled water and debonded with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was also evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results: AELITE Aesthetic Enamel nano-composite revealed a SBS value of 8.44±2.09 MPa, which was higher than Transbond XT (6.91± 2.13 and Filtek TM Supreme XT (6.04± 2.01. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between groups II and III (P 0.05. Evaluation of ARI showed that Transbond XT left fewer adhesive remains on teeth after debonding. Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that the aforementioned nano-composites can be successfully used for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  2. Effects of chlorhexidine (gel) application on bacterial levels and orthodontic brackets during orthodontic treatment.

    Al-Bazi, Samar M; Abbassy, Mona A; Bakry, Ahmed S; Merdad, Leena A; Hassan, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of applying 0.50% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel using the dental drug delivery system (3DS) on salivary Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and on the surface topography of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. The study involved 20 orthodontic patients with high levels of salivary S. mutans. The patients were treated with professional mechanical tooth cleaning followed by application of 0.50% CHX using individual trays (3DS). Salivary S. mutans levels were repeatedly measured 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-treatment. In vitro study utilized forty ceramic and metallic brackets that were immersed in 0.50% CHX gel for 10 min, whereas another untreated forty brackets served as controls. The frictional resistances of stainless steel wires to the brackets before and after CHX treatment were recorded using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare changes in the surface topography of brackets. Statistical analyses were used to determine the effect of CHX on bacterial count and to evaluate the effect of CHX on frictional resistance. According to the results of this study, S. mutans levels were reduced significantly (P brackets before or after application of CHX. (J Oral Sci 58, 35-42, 2016). PMID:27021538

  3. Effect of Saliva pH on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    Mohammad Hossein Toodehzaeim; Elham Khanpayeh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of salivary pH on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets to tooth surface.Materials and Methods: Eighty intact premolars were randomly divided into four groups of 20.  After bonding a bracket on each tooth, the groups one to four were stored in artificial saliva at a pH of 3.8, 4.8, 5.8, and 6.8, respectively for two months. The artificial saliva solutions were refreshed weekly. Each tooth was then embedded in an ...

  4. The effect of phosphoric acid application time on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Mitić Vladimir; Janošević Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatment intervals (15, 30 and 45 s) of 37% phosphoric acid on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Seventy extracted premolars, glass ionomer cement Ortho Fuji LC (GC Inc., Tokyo, Japan) and a conventional self-curing adhesive, System 1+ (Dentaurum, Inspringen, Germany) were used. Results: The obtained results suggested that the strongest bond was accomplished after enamel conditioning fo...

  5. Factors Affecting the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets – a Review of In Vitro Studies

    Waleed Bakhadher; Hassan Halawany; Nabeel Talic; Nimmi Abraham; Vimal Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The adhesive material used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth should neither fail during the treatment period, resulting in treatment delays, untoward expenses or patient inconvenience nor should it damage the enamel on debonding at the end of the treatment. Although the effectiveness of a bonding system and any unfavorable effects on the enamel may be studied by conducting in-vivo studies, it is nearly impossible to independently analyze different variables that influence a specific bondi...

  6. In vitro Evaluation of Microleakage of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded Using Methacrylate and Silorane Base Composite

    AR Davari; S Yassaei; AR Danesh Kazemi; Z Tajabadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the orthodontic treatment problems, which causes marginal gaps and microleakage between tooth and composite is microleakage of composite bonding of orthodontic brackets. The microleakage formation permitting the passage of bacteria and oral fluids, which may cause white spot lesions under the brackets surface area.This is a clinical problem during orthodontic treatment. Few studies have been conducted in this area. The aim of this study was comparison of microleakage of com...

  7. Nuclear techniques to identify allergenic metals in orthodontic brackets

    The present study determines the elementary alloy composition of ten commercial brands of brackets, especially related to Ni, Cr, and Co metals, confirmed allergenic elements. The nuclear techniques applied in the analyses were X-ray fluorescence (XRF) - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France (National Center of Scientific Research), and X-ray energy spectrometry (XRES), and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) - CDTN/CNEN, Brazil. The XRES and XRF techniques identified Cr in the 10 samples analyzed and Ni in eight samples. The INAA technique identified the presence of Cr (14% to 19%) and Co (42% to 2400 ppm) in all samples. The semi-quantitative analysis performed by XRF also identified Co in two samples. The techniques were effective in the identification of metals in orthodontic brackets. The elements identified in this study can be considered one of the main reason for the allergic processes among the patients studied. This finding suggests that the patients should be tested for allergy and allergenic sensibility to metals prior to the prescription of orthodontic device. (author)

  8. A comparative study of frictional force in self-ligating brackets according to the bracket-archwire angulation, bracket material, and wire type

    Lee, Souk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare the frictional force (FR) in self-ligating brackets among different bracket-archwire angles, bracket materials, and archwire types. Methods Passive and active metal self-ligating brackets and active ceramic self-ligating brackets were included as experimental groups, while conventional twin metal brackets served as a control group. All brackets were maxillary premolar brackets with 0.022 inch [in] slots and a -7° torque. The orthodontic wires used included 0.018 round and 0.019 × 0.025 in rectangular stainless steel wires. The FR was measured at 0°, 5°, and 10° angulations as the wire was drawn through the bracket slots after attaching brackets from each group to the universal testing machine. Static and kinetic FRs were also measured. Results The passive self-ligating brackets generated a lower FR than all the other brackets. Static and kinetic FRs generally increased with an increase in the bracket-archwire angulation, and the rectangular wire caused significantly higher static and kinetic FRs than the round wire (p < 0.001). The metal passive self-ligating brackets exhibited the lowest static FR at the 0° angulation and a lower increase in static and kinetic FRs with an increase in bracket-archwire angulation than the other brackets, while the conventional twin brackets showed a greater increase than all three experimental brackets. Conclusions The passive self-ligating brackets showed the lowest FR in this study. Self-ligating brackets can generate varying FRs in vitro according to the wire size, surface characteristics, and bracket-archwire angulation. PMID:25667913

  9. Effect of Argon Laser on Enamel Demineralization around Orthodontic Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    Miresmaeili, Amirfarhang; Etrati Khosroshahi, Mohammad; Motahary, Pouya; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Mahjub, Hossein; Dadashi, Maryam; Farhadian, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the effect of argon laser irradiation on development and progress of enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Fifty caries-free, intact human premolars were randomly assigned to one of the following five equal groups: Groups 1 (control) and 2: The brackets were bonded using conventional halogen light for 40s and argon laser for 10s, respectively. Teeth in group 3 were lased with argon laser for 10s before bracket bonding with halogen light. Group 4 was the same as group 3 except that brackets were also bonded with argon laser. In group 5 samples were bonded conventionally, immersed in an artificial caries solution for two days and then irradiated for 10s with argon laser. All samples were subjected to demineralization by artificial caries solution for 10 days. After bracket removal, samples were buccolingually sectioned and evaluated by polarized light microscopy. Decalcified lesion depth in each section was measured by a trained examiner in a blind fashion. Data were analyzed in SPSS 14 using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc test. Results: The control group showed the greatest mean lesion depth while group 5 revealed the lowest. The laser-treated groups had significantly lower mean lesion depth compared with the control group (P<0.05) except for group 4 (P=0.192). Conclusion: Argon laser irradiation for 10s before or during bracket bonding can increase caries resistance of intact and demineralized enamel. PMID:25584052

  10. Effect of Saliva pH on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    Mohammad Hossein Toodehzaeim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of salivary pH on the shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets to tooth surface.Materials and Methods: Eighty intact premolars were randomly divided into four groups of 20. After bonding a bracket on each tooth, the groups one to four were stored in artificial saliva at a pH of 3.8, 4.8, 5.8, and 6.8, respectively for two months. The artificial saliva solutions were refreshed weekly. Each tooth was then embedded in an acrylic block so that the crown was exposed and its buccal surface was parallel to the direction of the force during SBS testing. All brackets were debonded using Dartec universal testing machine, and the mean values of SBS in different groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA.Results: The mean SBS value in group 1 (pH 3.8 was significantly lower than that in other groups (P value<0.05. The differences between other groups were not sig- nificant (P>0.05.Conclusion: Decreased salivary pH, due to poor oral hygiene, and/or frequent con- sumption of acidic beverages, may be responsible for orthodontic bracket bond fail- ure.

  11. Alterations in plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation promoted by treatment with self-ligating and conventional orthodontic brackets

    Mauricio de Almeida Cardoso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate, comparatively, the periodontal response during orthodontic treatment performed with self-ligating and conventional brackets. METHODS: Sixteen Caucasian individuals of both sexes, aged between 12 and 16 years old and in permanent dentition were selected. Eight individuals were treated with conventional brackets installed on the lower dental arch and self-ligating brackets on the upper arch. Another eight individuals received self-ligating brackets in the lower arch and conventional brackets in the upper arch. The subjects received material and instructions for oral hygiene. Visible plaque index (VPI, gingival bleeding index (GBI and clinical attachment level (CAL were evaluated just after installation of orthodontic appliances, and 30, 60 and 180 days later. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare differences between groups (self-ligating and conventional, two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test was used to assess CAL at each site of each tooth. Significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: No significant changes were found with regard to the assessed parameters (VPI, GBI and CAL in either one of the systems. CONCLUSION: No significant changes were found with regard to the periodontal response to orthodontic treatment for the variables assessed and between subjects receiving passive self-ligating and conventional brackets. All individuals had received oral hygiene instructions and had their periodontal conditions monitored.

  12. Root resorption, treatment time and extraction rate during orthodontic treatment with self-ligating and conventional brackets

    Jacobs, Collin; Gebhardt, Philipp F; Jacobs, Viviana; Hechtner, Marlene; Meila, Dan; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study determined the amount and severity of EARR (external apical root resorption) after orthodontic treatment with self-ligating (SL) and conventional (Non-SL) brackets. Differences regarding rate of extraction cases, appointments and treatment time were evaluated. Material and methods 213 patients with a mean age of 12.4 ± 2.2 years were evaluated retrospectively. The treatments were performed with SL brackets (n = 139, Smartclip, 3 M Unitek, USA) or Non-SL brackets (n = 7...

  13. Rebonding of unused brackets with different orthodontic adhesives

    Emigdio Enrique Orellana, Jimenez; Srgio Paulo, Hilgenberg; Mrcia Cristina, Rastelli; Gibson Luiz, Pilatti; Bruno, Orellana; Ulisses, Coelho.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare in vitro shear bond strength (SBS) of different orthodontic adhesives in bonding and repeatedly rebonding metal brackets, and to evaluate the bond failure site with the adhesive remnant index (ARI). METHODS: Specimens consisted of 90 extracted human first premolars, randomly di [...] vided into three groups (n=30). The adhesives Alpha Plast (AP), ConciseTM (CO) and TransbondTM XT (TB) were used in each group. Three SBS tests were performed, i.e., one at T0 (initial) and the other two at T1 and T2 (first and second rebondings, respectively), observing a 24-hour interval. The tests were performed in a Shimadzu AG-I (10kN) SBS testing machine, at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: SBS data were subjected to ANOVA, Tukey's test and Bonferroni test (p

  14. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

    Soghra Yassaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to eval- uate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium sur- faces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF, and the other three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1 W, and 2 W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing ma- chine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min.Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa followed in a descending order by 2 W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa, 1 W laser group (6.87±0.92MPa and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa. The differences between the study groups, were statistically significant except between the laser groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: In terms of higher bond strength and safety, sandblasting and Er: YAG laser irradiation with power output of 1 W and 2 W can be considered more appropriate alterna- tives to HF acid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding.

  15. The Effect of Different Soft Drinks on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    M Omid Khoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is proved that acidic soft drinks that are commonly used, have an adverse effect on dental structures, and may deteriorate oral heath of our patients and orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of yoghurt drink with other soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: Seventy-five first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected and standard twin metal brackets were bonded on the center of buccal surface with No-Mix composite. The teeth were thermocycled for 625 cycles and randomly divided into five groups of artificial saliva, carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, non-carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, 7 up with citric acid base and Pepsi with phosphoric acid base. In all groups, the teeth were immersed in liquid for five-minute sessions three times with equal intervening intervals for 3 months. SBS was measured by a universal testing machine with a speed of 0.5mm/min. Data was analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA.Results: The results showed that mean values for the shear bond strength of carbonated yoghurt drinks, non-carbonated yoghurt drinks, 7up and Pepsi groups were 12.98(+_2.95, 13.26(+_4.00, 16.11(+_4.89, 14.73(+_5.10, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups (P-value= 0.238Conclusion: Soft drinks used in this study did not decrease the bond strength of the brackets bonded with this specific type of composite.

  16. Optimal enamel conditioning strategy for rebonding orthodontic brackets: a laboratory study

    Zhang, Qi-Feng; Yao, Hua; Li, Zhi-Yong; Jin, Li; Wang, Hui-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the conventional etching and primer method (CEP) and the self-etching primer method (SEP) in rebonding brackets. Methods: Forty human maxillary second premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were randomly divided into 4 equal groups. Group 1 and Group 2 were bonded using the CEP method; Group 3 and Group 4 using the SEP method. All the brackets were debonded and 40 new brackets were rebonded with four different protocols after surface cleaning: Group 1: CEP + adhesiv...

  17. In vitro peel/shear bond strength evaluation of orthodontic bracket base design

    Willems, Guy; Carels, Carine; Verbeke, Geert

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The adhesive capacity of 17 different bracket types was evaluated in an in vitro peel/shear test. METHODS: Silane-treated metal bars were used as substrates with all bonding being performed using the orthodontic adhesive Concise. The effect of aluminium oxide air abrasion on the bonding performance of recycled metal bracket bases was evaluated. Morphological examination of the bracket bases was carried out under scanning electron microscopy. Statistics analysis included one-way AN...

  18. Effect of Enamel Preparation and Light Curing Methods on Microleakage under Orthodontic Brackets

    Hamidreza Pakshir

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to compare the microleakage beneath metallic brackets following two different methods of enamel preparation and light curing.Materials and Methods: A total of 120 bovine deciduous lower incisors were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth. The preparations were as follows: Group I: Acid etching + Transbond XT primer + direct illumination, group II: acid etching + Transbond XT primer + transillumination, group III: Transbond XT self-etching primer + direct illumination and Group IV: Transbond XT self-etching primer + transillumination. Dye penetration was used as the method of microleakage evaluation. Sections made at the enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at P<0.05.Results: All groups showed greater microleakage at the gingival in comparison to the incisal margin and the differences were significant among groups with transillumination (P<0.001. No significant differences were observed in the microleakage scores at the gingival and incisal margins in any of the interfaces (P>0.05. Mesiodistal margins of the self-etching group with direct illumination showed significantly lower scores in comparison with acid etched group (P<0.05.Conclusion: Use of self-etching primers for bonding of orthodontic brackets yields acceptable results if all bracket margins are cured directly.

  19. In Vitro Evaluation of Microleakage Around Orthodontic Brackets Using Laser Etching and Acid Etching Methods

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Yassaei, Sogra; Karandish, Maryam; Farzaneh, Sedigeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: path of microleakage between the enamel and adhesive potentially allows microbial ingress that may consequently cause enamel decalcification. The aim of this study was to compare microleakage of brackets bonded either by laser or acid etching techniques. Materials and Method: The specimens were 33 extracted premolars that were divided into three groups as the acid etching group (group 1), laser etching with Er:YAG at 100 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 2), and laser etching with Er:YAG at 140 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 3). After photo polymerization, the teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 2% methylen blue for 24hs, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. They were scored for marginal microleakage that occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the occlusal and gingival margins. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal- Wallis test. Results: For the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive surfaces, significant differences were not observed between the three groups. Conclusion: According to this study, the Er:YAG laser with 1.5 and 2.1 watt settings may be used as an adjunctive for preparing the surface for orthodontic bracket bonding. PMID:25628661

  20. Rebonding of unused brackets with different orthodontic adhesives

    Emigdio Enrique Orellana Jimenez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare in vitro shear bond strength (SBS of different orthodontic adhesives in bonding and repeatedly rebonding metal brackets, and to evaluate the bond failure site with the adhesive remnant index (ARI. METHODS: Specimens consisted of 90 extracted human first premolars, randomly divided into three groups (n=30. The adhesives Alpha Plast (AP, ConciseTM (CO and TransbondTM XT (TB were used in each group. Three SBS tests were performed, i.e., one at T0 (initial and the other two at T1 and T2 (first and second rebondings, respectively, observing a 24-hour interval. The tests were performed in a Shimadzu AG-I (10kN SBS testing machine, at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: SBS data were subjected to ANOVA, Tukey's test and Bonferroni test (p<0.05. For the ARI, the Kruskal Wallis test was performed, followed by the Dunn test. The results revealed that at T0 groups AP and CO showed SBS values that were near, but above TB values; and at T1 and T2, the highest SBS values were observed for the AP group, followed by the CO and TB groups. CONCLUSION: Statistically significant differences were found in SBS between groups AP, CO and TB during bonding and repeated rebondings of unused metal brackets, with group AP achieving the highest SBS value. Regarding ARI, adhesive AP exhibited bond failure at the enamel-adhesive interface, with a higher enamel fracture frequency.

  1. A scanning electron microscopic investigation of ceramic orthodontic brackets

    Ceramic brackets were introduced to overcome the esthetic disadvantages of stainless steel brackets. The clinical impression of these brackets is very favorable. However, the sliding mechanics used in the Straightwire (A Company, San Diego, CA, USA) system appear to produce slower tooth movements with ceramic compared to stainless steel brackets. To determine whether this was due to any obvious mechanical problem in the bracket slot, Transcend (Unitek Corporation/3M, Monrovia, CA, USA) ceramic brackets were examined by a scanning electron microscope and compared to stainless steel brackets.Consistently, large surface defects were found in the ceramic bracket slots that were not present in the metal bracket slots. These irregularities could obviously hinder the sliding mechanics of the bracket slot-archwire system and create a greater demand on anchorage. Conversely, the fitting surface of the Transcend ceramic bracket showed extremely smooth surface characteristics, and it would seem advisable for the manufacturers to incorporate this surface within the bracket slot. (author)

  2. Evaluation of bond strength of orthodontic brackets without enamel etching

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Khazaei, Yegane; Motaghi, Shiva; Moghaddas, Mohmmadjavad

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the shear bond strength of brackets with and without enamel etching. Material and Methods In this study, 60 sound premolars were randomly divided into four different groups: 1- TXE group: Enamel etching+Transbond XT adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 2- TXS group: Transbond plus self-etch adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 3- PQ1E group: Enamel etching+ PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 4- PQ1 group: PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. The shear bond strengths of bra...

  3. Comparison of frictional resistance between self-ligating and conventional brackets tied with elastomeric and metal ligature in orthodontic archwires

    Leite, Vanessa Vieira; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues; Moura, Sandra Kiss; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the frictional resistance between self-ligating and conventional brackets tied to different types of wire. Material and Methods Abzil Kirium Capelozza (Pattern I) and Easy Clip (Roth prescription) incisor brackets were used. An elastomeric ligature or a ligating wire 0.10-in was used to ligate the wire to the Abzil bracket. Three types of orthodontic archwire alloys were assessed: 0.016-in NiTi wire, 0.016 x 0.021-in NiTi wire and 0.019 x 0.025-in steel wire. Ten observations were carried out for each bracket-archwire angulation combination. Brackets were mounted in a special appliance, positioned at 90 degrees in relation to the wire and tested in two angulations. Frictional test was performed in a Universal Testing Machine at 5 mm/min and 10 mm of displacement. The means (MPa) were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test set at 5% of significance. The surfaces of wires and brackets were observed at SEM. Results Steel-tied brackets (16.48 ± 8.31) showed higher means of frictional resistance than elastomeric-tied brackets (4.29 ± 2.16 ) and self-ligating brackets (1.66 ± 1.57) (P 0.05). No statistical differences (P > 0.05) were found between zero (7.76 ± 8.46) and five-degree (7.19 ± 7.93) angulations. Conclusions Friction was influenced not only by the type of bracket, but also by the ligating systems. Different morphological aspects were observed for the brackets and wires studied PMID:25162575

  4. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after acid-etched and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-etched

    Alavi, Shiva; Birang, Reza; Hajizadeh, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Laser ablation has been suggested as an alternative method to acid etching; however, previous studies have obtained contrasting results. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets that are bonded to enamel etched with acid and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, buccal surfaces of 15 non-carious human premolars were divided into mesial ...

  5. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    Kajan, Zahra Dalili; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Hemmaty, Yasmin Babael; Roushan, Zahra Atrkar; Khademi, Jalil [Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires.

  6. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires

  7. Spectrophotometric evaluation of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket in enamel and dentin

    Lunardi, Nadia; Correr, Americo Bortolazzo; Alessandra Nara de Souza RASTELLI; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2014-01-01

    Aware of the diffusion capacity of bleaching in the dental tissues, many orthodontists are subjecting their patients to dental bleaching during orthodontic treatment for esthetic purposes or to anticipate the exchange of esthetic restorations after the orthodontic treatment. For this purpose specific products have been developed in pre-loaded whitening trays designed to fit over and around brackets and wires, with clinical efficacy proven. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluat...

  8. Transparent magnesium aluminate spinel: a prospective biomaterial for esthetic orthodontic brackets.

    Krishnan, Manu; Tiwari, Brijesh; Seema, Saraswathy; Kalra, Namitha; Biswas, Papiya; Rajeswari, Kotikalapudi; Suresh, Madireddy Buchi; Johnson, Roy; Gokhale, Nitin M; Iyer, Satish R; Londhe, Sanjay; Arora, Vimal; Tripathi, Rajendra P

    2014-11-01

    Adult orthodontics is recently gaining popularity due to its importance in esthetics, oral and general health. However, none of the currently available alumina or zirconia based ceramic orthodontic brackets meet the esthetic demands of adult patients. Inherent hexagonal lattice structure and associated birefringence limits the visible light transmission in polycrystalline alumina and make them appear white and non transparent. Hence focus of the present study was to assess the feasibility of using magnesium aluminate (MgAl2O4) spinel; a member of the transparent ceramic family for esthetic orthodontic brackets. Transparent spinel specimens were developed from commercially available white spinel powder through colloidal shaping followed by pressureless sintering and hot isostatic pressing at optimum conditions of temperature and pressure. Samples were characterized for chemical composition, phases, density, hardness, flexural strength, fracture toughness and optical transmission. Biocompatibility was evaluated with in-vitro cell line experiments for cytotoxicity, apoptosis and genotoxicity. Results showed that transparent spinel samples had requisite physico-chemical, mechanical, optical and excellent biocompatibility for fabricating orthodontic brackets. Transparent spinel developed through this method demonstrated its possibility as a prospective biomaterial for developing esthetic orthodontic brackets. PMID:25027301

  9. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Enamel Prepared By Er:YAG Laser and Conventional Acid-Etching

    M.H. Hosseini; F. Namvar; J. Chalipa; Saber, K.; N. Chiniforush; S Sarmadi; Mirhashemi, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel prepared by Er:YAG laser with two different powers and conventional acid-etching.Materials and Methods: Forty-five human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly assigned to three groups based on conditioning method: Group 1- conventional etching with 37% phosphoric acid; Group 2- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1 W; and Group 3- irradiation with Er:YAG ...

  10. Influence of adhesion promoters and curing-light sources on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Claudia Tavares Machado; Boniek Castillo Dutra Borges; Gustavo Jales Rodrigues Araujo; Alex Jose Souza dos Santos; Fabio Roberto Dametto; Fabio Henrique de Sa Leitao Pinheiro

    2012-01-01

    Context: The effect of different curing units on bond strength of orthodontic brackets is still unclear when utilizing nanofilled composites in comparison with traditional Transbond-XT. Aim: To evaluate the influence of two adhesive promoters and two curing-light units on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. Settings and Design: The factors under study were adhesive promoters (nanofilled composite - Filtek-Z350 flowable restorative and conventional orthodontic adhesive...

  11. Orthodontic Molar Brackets: The Effect of Three Different Base Designs on Shear Bond Strength

    Hudson, Athol P.; Grobler, Sias R; Harris, Angela M. P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the relative base designs of three different maxillary molar stainless steel brackets with reference to the shear bond strength of three different adhesive resins. The molar brackets used were Victory series (3M Unitek), Upper Molar (GAC) and Optimesh XRT (Ormco). The adhesives used were Transbond XT (3M Unitek), Enlight (Ormco) and Sure Ortho Light Bond (Sure Orthodontics). The human enamel specimens (144) were randomly divided into nine groups and each...

  12. Orthodontic brackets in high field MR imaging: experimental evaluation of magnetic field interactions at 3.0 tesla

    Purpose: To evaluate static magnetic field interactions for 32 commonly used orthodontic brackets in a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Materials and methods: 32 orthodontic brackets consisting of a steel alloy (n=27), a cobalt-chromium alloy (n=2), ceramic (n=1), ceramic with a steel slot (n=1), and titanium (n=1) from 13 different manufacturers were tested for magnetic field interactions in a static magnetic field at 3.0 T (Gyroscan Intera 3.0 T, Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands). The magnetic deflection force FZ [mN] was evaluated by determining the deflection angle β[ ] using the established deflection angle test according to the ASTM guidelines. The magnetic-field-induced rotational force Frot or torque was qualitatively determined using a 5-point grading scale (0: no torque; +4: very strong torque). Results: In 18 of the 32 brackets, the deflection angle β was found to be > 45 and the translational force exceeded the gravitational force FG on the particular bracket (FZ: 1.2-45.7 mN). The translational force FZ was found to be up to 68.5 times greater than the gravitational force FG (FZ/FG: 1.4-68.5). The rotational force Frot was correspondingly high (+3/+4) for those brackets. For the remaining 14 objects, the deflection angles were < 45 and the torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. The static magnetic field did not affect the titanium bracket and the ceramic bracket. No measurable translational and rotational forces were found. (orig.)

  13. Shear bond strength of precoated orthodontic brackets: an in vivo study

    Ali H Hassan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ali H HassanDepartment of Preventive Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To evaluate the shear bond strength of precoated orthodontic brackets bonded with self-etching primer relative to that of noncoated conventionally-bonded brackets at two different time intervals.Methods: Twenty-one subjects were selected for randomized split-mouth bonding of two types of brackets to the maxillary arch. Half of the teeth had precoated brackets bonded using selfetching adhesive, and the other half had regular brackets bonded using Transbond XT adhesive. Nitinol wires were tied to the upper arch and were left until the time of debonding. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: one debonded after one hour and the other debonded two weeks after the initial wire placement. The shear bond strength was directly recorded from the patients’ mouths using an in vivo debonding device.Results: There were no significant differences in shear bond strength between the precoated and conventional groups or within each group at different time intervals. There were significant differences between anterior and posterior teeth in both the precoated and conventional groups. Conclusion: Pre-coated brackets bonded with self-etching adhesive have the same bonding strength as the conventionally bonded brackets.Keywords: shear bond, bonding, orthodontics, precoated, brackets, self-etching adhesive

  14. Electron microscopy analysis of different orthodontic brackets and their adhesion to the tooth enamel.

    Ciocan, Delia Ioana; Stanciu, Drago?; Popescu, Manuela Anca; Miculescu, Florin; Plotog, Ioan; V?rzaru, Gauden?iu; Ciocan, Lucian Toma

    2014-01-01

    This study proposed to evaluate the surface morphology of different types of orthodontic brackets and the characteristics of their adhesion to the tooth enamel. There have been taken into study six metallic, five ceramic and one polymeric bracket from different brands (Ormco, Lancer, Leone, Damon, 3M, Ultradent, American Orthodontics, Rocky Mountain). The surface base of the each bracket it have been ESEM analyzed using scanning electron microscope Phillips XL-30 ESEM. There have been investigated several parameters that have a potential influence of the bracket-bonding agent interface joint: chemical composition, roughness, surface morphology and wideness. After ESEM analysis, the same metallic and ceramic brackets have been afterwards collated on extracted teeth and subjected to mechanical tests. After the mechanical testing, the samples were once again ESEM investigated. All fractures occurred in the area of the adhesive system, recording adhesive fractures of the tooth-composite resin and composite-bracket, cohesive fractures and both. The metallic brackets surfaces that are optima for a good adhesion is that of a mesh sand blasted and acid etched. From the esthetic brackets, the ceramic ones are superior to polymeric ones regarding bonding to teeth. PMID:25178330

  15. Effects of Two Soft Drinks on Shear Bond Strength and Adhesive Remnant Index of Orthodontic Metal Brackets

    Soodabeh Sadat Sajadi; Gholamreza Eslami Amirabadi; Sepideh Sajadi

    2014-01-01

    Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro.Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic ...

  16. Effect of fluoridated casein phospopeptide-amorphous-calcium phosphate complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets: A comparative in vitro study

    C A Abdul Shahariyar; Anurag D Mahale; . Kishore Kumar; Rohan Rai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium-phosphate (CPP-ACP) complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strengths (SBSs) of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: About sixty extracted healthy human premolar teeth with intact buccal enamel were divided into two equal groups to which brackets were bonded using self-etching primers (SEPs) and conventional means respectively. These were further equally divi...

  17. Effect of fluoridated casein phospopeptide-amorphous-calcium phosphate complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets: A comparative in vitro study

    C A Abdul Shahariyar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium-phosphate (CPP-ACP complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strengths (SBSs of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: About sixty extracted healthy human premolar teeth with intact buccal enamel were divided into two equal groups to which brackets were bonded using self-etching primers (SEPs and conventional means respectively. These were further equally divided into three subgroups - (1 control (2 CPP-ACP (3 chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash. The SBSs were then measured using a universal testing machine. Results: SBS of the conventional group was significantly higher than the self-etching group. The intragroup differences were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: CPP-ACP, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash did not adversely affect SBS of orthodontic brackets irrespective of the method of conditioning. Brackets bonded with conventional technique showed greater bond strengths as compared to those bonded with SEP.

  18. Frictional and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon-coated orthodontic brackets.

    Muguruma, Takeshi; Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Nakagaki, Susumu; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on frictional and mechanical properties of orthodontic brackets. DLC films were deposited on stainless steel brackets using the plasma-based ion implantation/deposition (PBIID) method under two different atmospheric conditions. As-received metal brackets served as the control. Two sizes of stainless steel archwires, 0.018 inch diameter and 0.017 × 0.025 inch cross-section dimensions, were used for measuring static and kinetic friction by drawing the archwires through the bracket slots, using a mechanical testing machine (n = 10). The DLC-coated brackets were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Values of hardness and elastic modulus were obtained by nanoindentation testing (n = 10). Friction forces were compared by one-way analysis of variance and the Scheffé test. The hardness and elastic modulus of the brackets were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. SEM photomicrographs showed DLC layers on the bracket surfaces with thickness of approximately 5-7 μm. DLC-coated brackets deposited under condition 2 showed significantly less static frictional force for the stainless steel wire with 0.017 × 0.025 inch cross-section dimensions than as-received brackets and DLC-coated brackets deposited under condition 1, although both DLC-coated brackets showed significantly less kinetic frictional force than as-received brackets. The hardness of the DLC layers was much higher than that of the as-received bracket surfaces. In conclusion, the surfaces of metal brackets can be successfully modified by the PBIID method to create a DLC layer, and the DLC-coating process significantly reduces frictional forces. PMID:21934113

  19. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontics brackets on composite resin restorations with different surface treatments

    Alexandre Antonio Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Orthodontic patients frequently present composite resin restorations, however there are few studies that evaluate the best way for orthodontic bonding in this situation. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this work was to evaluate the bond strength of orthodontic brackets in resin restorations with surface treatment. METHODS: Fifty one bovine lower incisors were randomly divided into three groups. On the control group (CG the brackets were bonded to dental enamel; on experimental groups, brackets were bonded to resin restoration with diamond drill treatment (EGT and with no treatment (EGN. The teeth were placed in PVC tubes with autopolymerized acrylic resin. The shear test was performed in EMIC universal testing machine. The groups were submitted to ANOVA analysis of variance with Tukey post test to verify the statistical difference between groups (α = 0.05. RESULTS: CG (6.62 MPa and EGT (6.82 MPa groups presented similar results, while EGN (5.07 MPa obtained statistically lower results (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Therefore, it is concluded that the best technique for bonding of orthodontic brackets on composite resin restorations is the performance of surface detritions.

  20. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding.

    Soghra Yassaei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets.Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22. In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT, respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan. After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°. The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA.RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (P<0.001 with more adhesive remaining on the teeth bonded with composite resin.RMGIs have significantly lower SBS compared to composite resin for orthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range.

  1. Assessment of clinical outcomes of Roth and MBT bracket prescription using the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System

    Mahesh Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is always a need to assess whether small changes in bracket prescription can lead to visually detectable differences in tooth positions. However, with little clinical evidence to show advantages of any of the popularly used bracket systems, orthodontists are forced to make clinical decisions with little scientific guidance. Aim: To compare the orthodontic cases finished with Roth and MBT prescription using American Board of Orthodontics-Objective Grading System (ABO-OGS. Settings and Design: Department of Orthodontics, Post-graduate dental college, retrospective cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Forty patients selected were divided into two groups of 20 patients each finished with straight wire appliance using Roth and MBT prescription, respectively. The examiner ability was assessed and calibrated by one of the ABO certified clinician to grade cases using the OGS. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired student t-test was used and P < 0.05 was accepted as significant. Results and Conclusions: MBT bracket group had a lower score of 2.60 points in buccolingual inclination and lower score of 1.10 points in occlusal contact category that was statistically significant when compared with Roth group. The difference in total ABO-OGS score was 2.65 points showing that the outcome for the MBT prescription was better than that of the Roth prescription, which is statistically significant, but with little or no clinical significance. It can be concluded that use of either one of the Roth and MBT bracket prescriptions have no impact to the overall clinical outcome and quality of treatment entirely depends on clinician judgment and experience.

  2. Effects of Two Soft Drinks on Shear Bond Strength and Adhesive Remnant Index of Orthodontic Metal Brackets

    Sajadi, Soodabeh Sadat; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza; Sajadi, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro. Materials and Methods: Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak), and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552). The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035); but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999). Conclusion: Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. PMID:25584049

  3. Effectiveness of fluoride sealant in the prevention of carious lesions around orthodontic brackets: an OCT evaluation

    Matheus Melo Pithon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This article aimed to evaluate in vitro the efficiency of Pro Seal fluoride sealant application in the prevention of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets. Material and Methods: Brackets were bonded to the buccal surface of bovine incisors, and five groups were formed (n = 15 according to the exposure of teeth to oral hygiene substances and the application of enamel sealant: G1 (control, only brushing was performed with 1.450 ppm fluoride; G2 (control brushing associated with the use of mouthwash with 225 ppm fluoride; G3, only Pro Seal sealant application was performed with 1.000 ppm fluoride; G4 Pro Seal associated with brushing; G5 Pro Seal associated with brushing and mouthwash. Experimental groups alternated between pH cycling and the procedures described. All specimens were kept at a temperature of 37 °C throughout the entire experiment. Both brushing and immersion in solutions were performed within a time interval of one minute, followed by washing in deionized water three times a day for 28 days. Afterwards, an evaluation by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT of the spectral type was performed. In each group, a scanning exam of the white spot lesion area (around the sites where brackets were bonded and depth measurement of carious lesions were performed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was applied to determine whether there were significant differences among groups. For post hoc analysis, Tukey test was used. Results: There was statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.003, 1 and 3 (p = 0.008, 1 and 4 (p = 0.000 and 1 and 5 (p = 0.000. The group in which only brushing was performed (Group 1 showed deeper enamel lesion. Conclusion: Pro Seal sealant alone or combined with brushing and/or brushing and the use of a mouthwash with fluoride was more effective in protecting enamel, in comparison to brushing alone.

  4. The effects of silver coating on friction coefficient and shear bond strength of steel orthodontic brackets.

    Arash, Valiollah; Anoush, Keivan; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood; Rahmatei, Manuchehr; Tavanafar, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Aims of the present study was to measure frictional resistance between silver coated brackets and different types of arch wires, and shear bond strength of these brackets to the tooth. In an experimental clinical research 28 orthodontic brackets (standard, 22 slots) were coated with silver ions using electroplate method. Six brackets (coated: 3, uncoated: 3) were evaluated with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. The amount of friction in 15 coated brackets was measured with three different kinds of arch wires (0.019 × 0.025-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in Nickel-Titanium [Ni-Ti]) and compared with 15 uncoated steel brackets. In addition, shear bond strength values were compared between 10 brackets with silver coating and 10 regular brackets. Universal testing machine was used to measure shear bond strength and the amount of friction between the wires and brackets. SPSS 18 was used for data analysis with t-test. SEM and AFM results showed deposition of a uniform layer of silver, measuring 8-10 μm in thickness on bracket surfaces. Silver coating led to higher frictional forces in all the three types of arch wires, which was statistically significant in 0.019 × 0.025-in SS and 0.018-in Ni-Ti, but it did not change the shear bond strength significantly. Silver coating with electroplating method did not affect the bond strength of the bracket to enamel; in addition, it was not an effective method for decreasing friction in sliding mechanics. PMID:25997114

  5. Dental plaque associated with self-ligating brackets during the initial phase of orthodontic treatment: A 3-month preliminary study

    Al-Anezi, Saud A

    2014-01-01

    Background: To compare changes in the amount and distribution of dental plaque associated with placement of elastomeric modules over a self-ligating bracket during orthodontic treatment and to relate these changes to the periodontal inflammation. Materials and Methods: A cross-arch randomization trial was carried out at Bristol Dental School, United Kingdom. Clinical measurements of periodontal inflammation and plaque accumulation and microbiological test were done on 24 patients aged 11-14 years [Mean (SD) age = 12.6 (1.01) years] wearing fixed appliances (Damon 2 brackets, Ormco, Orange, CA, USA) at the start and 3 months into fixed orthodontic treatment. Results: In the first 3 months of treatment there was no statistically significant difference in bleeding on probing between incisors with and without elastomeric modules (P = 0.125 and 0.508, respectively). The difference in plaque accumulation was not statistically significant (P = 0.78). The difference in probing depths between the incisors was not statistically significant (P = 0.84). The microbiological analysis showed no difference. Conclusions: Based on this preliminary 3 months study, elastomeric modules were not significantly associated with any increased risk during treatment when compared to self-ligating brackets. The longer term studies are needed to further confirm the findings of the present study. PMID:24987657

  6. Effect of various commercially available mouthrinses on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets: An in vitro study

    Nazeer Ahmed Meeran

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Alcohol containing mouthrinses affect the shear bond strength of the metal orthodontic brackets bonded with composite resin (Transbond XT in the present study, more when compared with alcohol-free mouthrinses. It is, therefore, highly advisable to avoid alcohol containing mouthrinses in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and use alcohol-free mouthrinses as adjuncts to regular oral hygiene procedures for maintaining good enamel integrity and periodontal health, without compromising the shear bond strength of the bonded metal brackets.

  7. Optimal enamel conditioning strategy for rebonding orthodontic brackets: a laboratory study

    Zhang, Qi-Feng; Yao, Hua; Li, Zhi-Yong; Jin, Li; Wang, Hui-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the conventional etching and primer method (CEP) and the self-etching primer method (SEP) in rebonding brackets. Methods: Forty human maxillary second premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were randomly divided into 4 equal groups. Group 1 and Group 2 were bonded using the CEP method; Group 3 and Group 4 using the SEP method. All the brackets were debonded and 40 new brackets were rebonded with four different protocols after surface cleaning: Group 1: CEP + adhesive; Group 2: CEP without etch step + adhesive; Group 3: SEP + adhesive; Group 4: non-acidic primer + adhesive. Then, the shear bond strength (SBS) of each group was tested and the measurements of adhesive remnant index scores (ARI) and SEM examination were performed. Results: The mean SBSs for Group 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 14.18, 6.57, 11.90, 5.91 MPa, respectively. Statistical differences of the SBS existed between Group 1 and 2 (P < 0.05) and between Group 3 and 4 (P < 0.05). No difference was found between Group 1 and 3, or Group 2 and 4. Conclusion: Omission of the acid-etching step in rebonding orthodontic brackets may be adequate for the clinical requirement. No differences in SBS and ARI of the rebonded brackets were showed between CEP and SEP methods. PMID:25356128

  8. Effect of orthodontic brackets and different wires on radiofrequency heating and magnetic field interactions during 3-T MRI

    Görgülü, S; Ayyıldız, S; Gökçe, S; Ozen, T

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the heating and magnetic field interactions of fixed orthodontic appliances with different wires and ligaments in a 3-T MRI environment and to estimate the safety of these orthodontic materials. Methods: 40 non-carious extracted human maxillary teeth were embedded in polyvinyl chloride boxes, and orthodontic brackets were bonded. Nickel–titanium and stainless steel arch wires, and elastic and stainless steel ligaments were used to obtain four experimental groups in total. Specimens were evaluated at 3 T for radiofrequency heating and magnetic field interactions. Radiofrequency heating was evaluated by placing specimens in a cylindrical plastic container filled with isotonic solution and measuring changes in temperature after T1 weighted axial sequencing and after completion of all sequences. Translational attraction and torque values of specimens were also evaluated. One-way ANOVA test was used to compare continuous variables of temperature change. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: None of the groups exhibited excessive heating (highest temperature change: <3.04 °C), with the maximum increase in temperature observed at the end of the T1 weighted axial sequence. Magnetic field interactions changed depending on the material used. Although the brackets presented minor interactions that would not cause movement in situ, nickel–titanium and stainless steel wires presented great interactions that may pose a risk for the patient. Conclusions: The temperature changes of the specimens were considered to be within acceptable ranges. With regard to magnetic field interactions, brackets can be considered “MR safe”; however, it would be safe to replace the wires before MRI. PMID:24257741

  9. Evaluation of an alternative technique to optimize direct bonding of orthodontic brackets to temporary crowns

    Dias, Francilena Maria Campos Santos; Pinzan-Vercelino, Célia Regina Maio; Tavares, Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus; Gurgel, Júlio de Araújo; Bramante, Fausto Silva; Fialho, Melissa Nogueira Proença

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare shear bond strength of different direct bonding techniques of orthodontic brackets to acrylic resin surfaces. METHODS: The sample comprised 64 discs of chemically activated acrylic resin (CAAR) randomly divided into four groups: discs in group 1 were bonded by means of light-cured composite resin (conventional adhesive); discs in group 2 had surfaces roughened with a diamond bur followed by conventional direct bonding by means of light-cured composite resin; discs in gro...

  10. Effect of enamel protective agents on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Montasser, Mona A; Taha, Mahasen

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper aimed to study the effect of two enamel protective agents on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with conventional and self-etching primer (SEP) adhesive systems. Methods The two protective agents used were resin infiltrate (ICON) and Clinpro; the two adhesive systems used were self-etching primer system (Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer + Transbond XT adhesive) and a conventional adhesive system (37% phosphoric acid etch + Transbond XT primer ...

  11. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using various zirconia primers

    Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Jin-Seok; Hwang, Chung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to zirconia surfaces using three different zirconia primers and one silane primer, and subjected to thermocycling. Methods We designed 10 experimental groups following the surface treatment and thermocycling. The surface was treated with one of the following method: no-primer (NP), Porcelain Conditioner (PC), Z-PRIME Plus (ZP), Monobond Plus (MP) and Zirconia Liner Premium (ZL) (n=20). ...

  12. Effect of clearfil protect bond and transbond plus self-etch primer on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    S Hamid Raji

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The shear bond strength of clearfil protect bond and transbond plus self-etch primer was enough for bonding the orthodontic brackets. The mode of failure of bonded brackets with these two self-etch primers is safe for enamel.

  13. Effects of modifying the bonding protocol on the shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets.

    Fernandes, Thais Maria Friere; Janson, Guilherme; Somensi, Joyce; Pinzan, Arnaldo; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Sathler, Renata; Henriques, Jose Fernando Castanha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro shear bond strength and failure site of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets with modified bonding protocols. Sixty bovine mandibular incisors with similar anatomy were selected and divided into six groups (n = 10). In the first protocol, metallic and ceramic brackets were bonded according to the manufacturers' directions (controls); in the second protocol, the step of photocuring with the primer agent was eliminated; and in the third protocol, the primer agent was applied on the tooth and on the bracket base, followed by application of the composite adhesive on the bracket base, with one-step photocure. The same orthodontic adhesive was used for all groups. Shear bond strengths were measured and adhesive remnant index scores (ARI) were determined after bracket failure. The results demonstrated similar shear bond strengths in the protocols but presented significantly greater values for the metallic groups (two-way ANOVA, P adhesion of the brackets. PMID:22313980

  14. Morphological and Structural Characterization of Two Types of As-Received and In vivo Orthodontic Stainless Steel Brackets

    Hoste, Sofie; Celis, Jean-Pierre; Willems, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To perform a) a topographical analysis of the bracket slot of 12 as-received stainless steel brackets and of in vivo used stainless steel brackets from 7 patients and b) a compositional characterization of the constituting materials of two types of brackets. Study Design: In vitro laboratory study. Methodology: 12 as-received brackets and in vivo used brackets of seven patients were analysed. Two commercially available brackets were used for this study. A SEM analysis evaluated the topo...

  15. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching. PMID:27148662

  16. Properties of composite materials used for bracket bonding.

    Gama, Ana Caroline Silva; Moraes, André Guaraci de Vito; Yamasaki, Lilyan Cardoso; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Bauer, José

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the shear bond strength to enamel, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and contraction stress of one orthodontic composite and two flowable composites. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to 45 human maxillary premolars with the composites Transbond XT, Filtek Z-350 flow and Opallis flow and tested for shear bond strength. For measurement of flexural strength and flexural modulus, specimens were fabricated and tested under flexion. For the contraction stress test, cylindrical specimens were tested and an extensometer determined the height of the specimens. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The shear bond strength values were significantly lower (p0.05) while the flexural modulus was significantly higher (p<0.05) for Transbond XT than for Filtek Z-350 flow and Opallis flow. The orthodontic composite presented significantly lower contraction stress values than the flowable composites (p<0.05). The light-activated orthodontic composite material presented higher flexural modulus and shear bond strength and lower contraction stress than both flowable composites. PMID:23969920

  17. Enamel Surface Roughness after Debonding of Orthodontic Brackets and Various Clean-Up Techniques

    Farzaneh Ahrari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to evaluate enamel roughness after adhesive removal using different burs and an Er:YAG laser.Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of forty human premolars were sealed by two layers of nail varnish, except for a circular area of 3 mm in diameter on the middle third. The enamel surfaces were initially subjected to profilometry analysis and four parameters of surface irregularity (Ra, Rq, Rt and Rz were recorded. Following bracket bonding and debonding, adhesive remnants were removed by tungsten carbide burs in low- or high- speed handpieces (group 1 and 2, respectively, an ultrafine diamond bur (group 3 or an Er:YAG laser (250 mJ, long pulse, 4 Hz (group 4, and surface roughness parameters were measured again. Then, the buccal surfaces were polished and the third profilometry measurements were performed.Results: The specimens that were cleaned with a low speed tungsten carbide bur showed no significant difference in surface irregularity between the different treatment stages (p>0.05. Surface roughness increased significantly after clean-up with the diamond bur and the Er:YAG laser (p<0.01. In comparison between groups, adhesive removal with tungsten carbide burs at slow- or high-speed handpieces produced the lowest, while enamel clean-up with the Er:YAG laser caused the highest values of roughness measurements (P<0.05.Conclusion: Under the study conditions, application of the ultrafine diamond bur or the Er:YAG laser caused irreversible enamel damage on tooth surface, and thus these methods could not be recommended for removing adhesive remnants after debonding of orthodontic brackets.

  18. Longitudinal monitoring of demineralization peripheral to orthodontic brackets using cross polarization optical coherence tomography

    Nee, Alexander; Chan, Kenneth; Kang, Hobin; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) can be used to longitudinally monitor demineralization peripheral to orthodontic brackets in an extended clinical study. Methods A high-speed CP-OCT system was used to acquire 3D volumetric images of the area at the base of orthodontic brackets over a period of 12-months after placement. The reflectivity was measured at 3-month intervals for 12-months to determine if there was increased demineralization. Two teeth were monitored on twenty test subjects and the brackets were bonded using two types of adhesives This was a randomized controlled clinical study with a split mouth design such that each subject served as his or her own control. On one side, the control premolar was bonded with a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond from 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN) and composite (Transbond XT from 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA) that lacked fluoride. On the other side, the experimental premolar was bonded with a fluoride releasing glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji Ortho LC from GC America, Alsip, IL). Results There was a small but significant increase in the calculated lesion depth and integrated reflectivity over that depth (Δ R) for both adhesive types (p<0.0001) indicating increasing demineralization with time. There was no significant difference in the lesion depth (p=0.22) and Δ R (p=0.91) between the groups with the fluoride releasing glass ionomer cement and the conventional composite. Conclusions CP-OCT was able to measure a significant increase in demineralization (P<0.0001) at the base of orthodontic brackets over a period of 12-months. PMID:24561340

  19. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment

    Bezerra, Gisele Lima; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n = 16): XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction) tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p < 0.05). Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC) remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT) and self-etching (SEP) adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL) provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance. PMID:26380371

  20. Comparison of the frictional characteristics of aesthetic orthodontic brackets measured using a modified in vitro technique

    Arici, Nursel; Akdeniz, Berat Serdar; Arici, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Objective The coefficients of friction (COFs) of aesthetic ceramic and stainless steel brackets used in conjunction with stainless steel archwires were investigated using a modified linear tribometer and special computer software, and the effects of the bracket slot size (0.018 inches [in] or 0.022 in) and materials (ceramic or metal) on the COF were determined. Methods Four types of ceramic (one with a stainless steel slot) and one conventional stainless steel bracket were tested with two ty...

  1. Effects of long-term repeated topical fluoride applications and adhesion promoter on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets

    Endo, Toshiya; Ishida, Rieko; Komatsuzaki, Akira; Sanpei, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of long-term repeated topical application of fluoride before bonding and an adhesion promoter on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 bovine incisors were collected and divided equally into four groups. In group 1, the brackets were bonded without topical fluoride application or adhesion promoter. In group 2, before bonding, the adhesion promoter was applied to nonfluoridated enamel. In group 3, the brackets were bonded without the application of the adhesion promoter to enamel, which had undergone long-term repeated topical fluoride treatments. Teeth in group 4 received the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride, and the brackets were bonded using the adhesion promoter. All the brackets were bonded using BeautyOrtho Bond self-etching adhesive. The shear bond strength was measured and the bond failure modes were evaluated with the use of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after debonding. Results: The mean shear bond strength was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1, 2, and 4, and there were no significant differences between the groups except for group 3. There were significant differences in the distribution of ARI scores between groups 2 and 3, and between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The adhesion promoter can recover the bond strength reduced by the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride to the prefluoridation level and had a significantly great amount of adhesives left on either fluoridated or nonfluoridated enamel. PMID:25512720

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets on Pretreatment with CPPACP, Fluor Protector and Phosflur: An In-vitro Study

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate bond strength, bracket tooth interface of Orthodontic brackets that are bonded for fixed Orthodontic treatment procedure on pretreatment with CPPACP, Fluor Protector and Phosflur. The goal is to assess the adhesive remnants following application of these remineralizing agents using Adhesive Remnant Index. Materials and Methods: Two hundred freshly extracted premolar teeth each divided into Control, CPP-ACP, Fluor Protector and Phosflur. Teeth were pretreated with these agents prior to bonding procedure. Shear Bond Strength was tested using a Universal Testing Machine. A jig was attached to upper jaw of the machine. The acrylic block containing the embedded teeth was secured in the lower jaw of the machine such that the bracket base of the teeth parallel the direction of the shear force at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute until bracket failure. The force required to dislodge the bracket was recorded. Results: Mean Shear bond strength value is highest for Phosflur (15.3658 ± 2.4546 ) followed by Fluor Protector , CPP-ACP and lowest for Control (7.0462 ± 0.8838 MPa). Conclusion: Phosflur, Fluor protector,CPP-ACP have comparable Shear bond strength values in comparison to control. PMID:24995233

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets on Pretreatment with CPPACP, Fluor Protector and Phosflur: An In-vitro Study

    Mishra, Sumita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate bond strength, bracket tooth interface of Orthodontic brackets that are bonded for fixed Orthodontic treatment procedure on pretreatment with CPPACP, Fluor Protector and Phosflur. The goal is to assess the adhesive remnants following application of these remineralizing agents using Adhesive Remnant Index.

  4. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after acid-etched and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-etched

    Alavi, Shiva; Birang, Reza; Hajizadeh, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Laser ablation has been suggested as an alternative method to acid etching; however, previous studies have obtained contrasting results. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets that are bonded to enamel etched with acid and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, buccal surfaces of 15 non-carious human premolars were divided into mesial and distal regions. Randomly, one of the regions was etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and another region irradiated with Er:YAG laser at 100 mJ energy and 20 Hz frequency for 20 s. Stainless steel brackets were then bonded using Transbond XT, following which all the samples were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to 500 thermal cycles. SBS was tested by a chisel edge, mounted on the crosshead of universal testing machine. After debonding, the teeth were examined under ×10 magnification and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score determined. SBS and ARI scores of the two groups were then compared using t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Significant level was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean SBS of the laser group (16.61 ± 7.7 MPa) was not significantly different from that of the acid-etched group (18.86 ± 6.09 MPa) (P = 0.41). There was no significant difference in the ARI scores between two groups (P = 0.08). However, in the laser group, more adhesive remained on the brackets, which is not suitable for orthodontic purposes. Conclusion: Laser etching at 100 mJ energy produced bond strength similar to acid etching. Therefore, Er:YAG laser may be an alternative method for conventional acid-etching. PMID:25097641

  5. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after acid-etched and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-etched

    Shiva Alavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laser ablation has been suggested as an alternative method to acid etching; however, previous studies have obtained contrasting results. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets that are bonded to enamel etched with acid and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG laser. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, buccal surfaces of 15 non-carious human premolars were divided into mesial and distal regions. Randomly, one of the regions was etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and another region irradiated with Er:YAG laser at 100 mJ energy and 20 Hz frequency for 20 s. Stainless steel brackets were then bonded using Transbond XT, following which all the samples were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to 500 thermal cycles. SBS was tested by a chisel edge, mounted on the crosshead of universal testing machine. After debonding, the teeth were examined under Χ10 magnification and adhesive remnant index (ARI score determined. SBS and ARI scores of the two groups were then compared using t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Significant level was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean SBS of the laser group (16.61 ± 7.7 MPa was not significantly different from that of the acid-etched group (18.86 ± 6.09 MPa (P = 0.41. There was no significant difference in the ARI scores between two groups (P = 0.08. However, in the laser group, more adhesive remained on the brackets, which is not suitable for orthodontic purposes. Conclusion: Laser etching at 100 mJ energy produced bond strength similar to acid etching. Therefore, Er:YAG laser may be an alternative method for conventional acid-etching.

  6. Orthodontic brackets in high field MR imaging: experimental evaluation of magnetic field interactions at 3.0 tesla; Kieferorthopaedische Brackets in der Hochfeld-Magnetresonanz-Tomographie: Experimentelle Beurteilung magnetischer Anziehungs- und Rotationskraefte bei 3 Tesla

    Kemper, J.; Adam, G. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Klocke, A.; Kahl-Nieke, B. [Poliklinik fuer Kieferorthopaedie, Universitaetsklinikum Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate static magnetic field interactions for 32 commonly used orthodontic brackets in a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Materials and methods: 32 orthodontic brackets consisting of a steel alloy (n=27), a cobalt-chromium alloy (n=2), ceramic (n=1), ceramic with a steel slot (n=1), and titanium (n=1) from 13 different manufacturers were tested for magnetic field interactions in a static magnetic field at 3.0 T (Gyroscan Intera 3.0 T, Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands). The magnetic deflection force F{sub Z} [mN] was evaluated by determining the deflection angle {beta}[ ] using the established deflection angle test according to the ASTM guidelines. The magnetic-field-induced rotational force F{sub rot} or torque was qualitatively determined using a 5-point grading scale (0: no torque; +4: very strong torque). Results: In 18 of the 32 brackets, the deflection angle {beta} was found to be > 45 and the translational force exceeded the gravitational force F{sub G} on the particular bracket (F{sub Z}: 1.2-45.7 mN). The translational force F{sub Z} was found to be up to 68.5 times greater than the gravitational force F{sub G} (F{sub Z}/F{sub G}: 1.4-68.5). The rotational force F{sub rot} was correspondingly high (+3/+4) for those brackets. For the remaining 14 objects, the deflection angles were < 45 and the torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. The static magnetic field did not affect the titanium bracket and the ceramic bracket. No measurable translational and rotational forces were found. (orig.)

  7. In vitro evaluation of microleakage around orthodontic brackets using laser etching and Acid etching methods.

    Mohammad Hossein Toodehzaeim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available path of microleakage between the enamel and adhesive potentially allows microbial ingress that may consequently cause enamel decalcification. The aim of this study was to compare microleakage of brackets bonded either by laser or acid etching techniques.The specimens were 33 extracted premolars that were divided into three groups as the acid etching group (group 1, laser etching with Er:YAG at 100 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 2, and laser etching with Er:YAG at 140 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 3. After photo polymerization, the teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 2% methylen blue for 24hs, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. They were scored for marginal microleakage that occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the occlusal and gingival margins. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal- Wallis test.For the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive surfaces, significant differences were not observed between the three groups.According to this study, the Er:YAG laser with 1.5 and 2.1 watt settings may be used as an adjunctive for preparing the surface for orthodontic bracket bonding.

  8. Root resorption, treatment time and extraction rate during orthodontic treatment with self-ligating and conventional brackets

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study determined the amount and severity of EARR (external apical root resorption) after orthodontic treatment with self-ligating (SL) and conventional (Non-SL) brackets. Differences regarding rate of extraction cases, appointments and treatment time were evaluated. Material and methods 213 patients with a mean age of 12.4 ± 2.2 years were evaluated retrospectively. The treatments were performed with SL brackets (n = 139, Smartclip, 3 M Unitek, USA) or Non-SL brackets (n = 74, Victory Series, 3 M Unitek, USA). Measurements of the crown and root length of the incisors were taken using panoramic radiographs. Three-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for an appliance effect. Results There was no difference between patients treated with Non-SL or SL brackets regarding the amount (in percentage) of EARR (Non-SL: 4.5 ± 6.6 vs. SL: 3.0 ± 5.6). Occurrence of severe EARR (sEARR) did also not differ between the two groups (Non-SL 0.5 vs. SL: 0.3). The percentage of patients with need of tooth extraction for treatment (Non SL: 8.1 vs. SL: 6.9) and the number of appointments (Non-SL: 12.4 ± 3.4 vs. SL: 13.9 ± 3.3) did not show any differences. The treatment time was shorter with Non-SL brackets (Non-SL: 18.1 ± 5.3 vs. SL: 20.7 ± 4.9 months). Conclusions This is the largest study showing that there is no difference in the amount of EARR, number of appointments and extraction rate between conventional and self-ligating brackets. For the first time we could demonstrate that occurrence of sEARR does not differ between the two types of brackets. PMID:24456620

  9. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded using halogen light and light-emitting diode at different debond times

    Rebeca Di Nicoló; Maria Amelia Maximo Araujo; Levy Anderson César Alves; Rodrigo Othavio de Assunção e Souza; Daniel Maranha da Rocha

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the photoactivation effects of QTH (Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen) and LED (Light-Emitting Diode) on the SBS (Shear Bond Strength) of orthodontic brackets at different debond times. Seventy-two bovine lower incisors were randomly divided into two groups according to the photoactivation system used (QTH or LED). The enamel surfaces were conditioned with Transbond self-etching primer, and APC (Adhesive Pre-Coated) brackets were used in all specimens. Grou...

  10. The effect of tooth bleaching on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using self-etching primer systems

    Akin, Mehmet; Aksakalli, Sertac; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Demir, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using self-etching primer systems. Methods: Forty five freshly extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 15 teeth each: control (group 1), 10% carbamide peroxide at-home bleached (group 2), and 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleached (group 3). Three weeks later, all brackets were b...

  11. Recycling stainless steel orthodontic brackets with Er:YAG laser An environmental scanning electron microscope and shear bond strength study

    Chacko, Prince K; Kodoth, Jithesh; John, Jacob; Kumar, Kishore

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine the efficiency of erbium: Yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) and shear bond strength analysis as a method of recycling stainless steel orthodontic brackets and compare with other methods of recycling. Materials and Methods: Eighty samples of extracted premolar teeth bonded to SS brackets were tested for rebonded shear bond strength after recycling by four methods and compared with a control group of 20 samples. These 80 samples were randomized into four groups which were recycled by four methods, namely, sandblasting, thermal method, adhesive grinding by tungsten carbide bur, and Er: YAG laser method. After recycling, ESEM and shear bond strength analysis were used to analyze the efficiency of the recycling methods Results: Er: YAG laser group was found to be having the greatest bond strength among the recycled brackets (8.332.51 followed by the sandblasting at 6.121.12 MPa, thermal and electropolishing at 4.440.95 MPa, and lastly the adhesive grinding method at 3.081.07 MPa. The shear bond strength of Er: YAG laser group was found to be having no statistically significant difference with that of the control group (P>0.05 and had statistical signifance with sandblasting, thermal and electropolishing and adhesive grinding groups at P>0.001. ESEM analysis showed complete removal of adhesive from the brackets recycled with Er: YAG laser which mimicked that of the control group. Conclusion: Er: YAG laser (2940 nm) was found to be the most efficient method for recycling, followed by the sandblasting, thermal, and the tungsten carbide methods, which had the least shear bond strength value and is not fit for clinical usage. PMID:24987647

  12. Microleakage under Orthodontic Metal Brackets Bonded with Three Different Bonding Techniques with/without Thermocycling

    Berahman Sabzevari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of beneath the orthodontic brackets bonded with 3 different bonding techniques and evaluate the effect of thermocycling. Methods: One hundred and twenty premolars were randomly divided into 6 groups, received the following treatment: group 1: 37% phosphoric acid gel+Unite primer+Unite adhesive, group 2: 37% phosphoric acid gel+ Transbond XT primer+Transbond XT adhesive, group 3: Transbond plus Self Etching Primer (TSEP+Transbond XT adhesive. Groups 4, 5, and 6 were similar to groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Evaluation of microleakage was done following to thermocycling test. After bonding, the specimens were sealed with nail varnish except for 1 mm around the brackets and then stained with 0.5% basic fuchsine. The specimens were sectioned at buccolingual direction in 2 parallel planes and evaluated under a stereomicroscope to determine the amount of microleakage at bracket-adhesive and adhesive-enamel interfaces from gingival and occlusal margins. Results: Microleakage was observed in all groups, and increased significantly after thermocycling at some interfaces of Unite adhesive group and conventional etching+Transbond XT adhesive group, but the increase was not significant in any interface of TSEP group. With or without thermocycling, TSEP displayed more microleakage than other groups. In most groups, microleakage at gingival margin was significantly higher than occlusal margin. Conclusion: Thermocycling and type of bonding technique significantly affect the amount of microleakage.

  13. Effects of high-speed curing devices on shear bond strength and microleakage of orthodontic brackets.

    James, Jeffrey W; Miller, Barbara H; English, Jeryl D; Tadlock, Larry P; Buschang, Peter H

    2003-05-01

    This study evaluated the shear-peel bond strength and mode of bond failure of 3 curing devices (plasma arc light, argon laser, and conventional halogen light) and 2 orthodontic bracket adhesives with different filler contents (Transbond XT and Adhesive Precoated [APC]). Observations of microleakage were also reported. Ninety human adolescent premolars were randomly divided into 6 groups, and standardized brackets were bonded according to the manufacturers' recommendations. The plasma arc light produced significantly (P =.006) higher bond strength than did the halogen light or the argon laser when Transbond was used. When APC was used, the plasma arc light and the halogen light produced similar results, and they both produced significantly (P =.015) higher bond strengths than did the argon laser. Overall, the APC showed substantially less variation in bond strength than did the Transbond. Although all curing methods showed significant microleakage (P curing lights occurred only when APC was used. Microscopic evaluations demonstrated that 95% of the specimens failed for adhesion at the bracket or tooth surface; the argon laser produced the highest adhesive remnant index scores. On the basis of bond strength and microleakage results, the plasma arc light was comparable with or superior to the other curing devices, depending on the adhesive used. PMID:12750676

  14. In vitro Effects of a Neutral Fluoride Agent on Shear Bond Strength and Microleakage of Orthodontic Brackets

    Farzaneh Ahrari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pretreatment with a neutral fluoride agent on shear bond strength (SBS and microleakage of orthodontic brackets, and to investigate any significant relationship between SBS and microleakage. Methods: Forty intact premolars were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 served as the control, while group 2 underwent treatment with a 2% sodium fluoride (NaF gel, which was applied on the enamel surface for 4 minutes before etching. After bonding orthodontic brackets, the teeth were immersed for 12 hours in methylen blue dye, followed by mounting in acrylic resin. Shear bond strength was determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the amount of microleakage and the adhesive remnant index (ARI were assessed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The mean SBS and microleakage beneath metal brackets were not significantly different among the control and NaF-treated groups (P>0.05. Furthermore, no significant correlation was found between SBS and microleakage (r=-0.04, P=0.796. The ARI scores revealed that in both groups, most of the adhesive remained on the enamel surface after debonding. Conclusions: It may be concluded that pretreatment of enamel with 2% NaF prior to the bonding procedure does not significantly affect microleakage and SBS of orthodontic brackets and thus, it can be recommended as a suitable approach to reduce the incidence of white spot lesions in orthodontically treated patients, especially those at high risk of caries formation.  

  15. Effect of remineralizing agents on bond strength of orthodontic brackets: an in vitro study

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and CPP-ACP with fluoride (CPP-ACP-F) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with two different adhesive systems. Methods One hundred twenty-six human premolar teeth were selected. One hundred twenty teeth were used for SBS testing, and six teeth were used for scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination. One hundred twenty premolars were divided into mainly three groups: CPP-ACP (group A), CPP-ACP-F (group B), and control group (group C). Each group was sub-divided into two groups according to the bonding adhesive, light cure (groups A1, B1, and C1) and chemical cure (groups A2, B2, and C2). The teeth were pre-treated with the group-specified preventive agent 1 h/day for five consecutive days. Standard edgewise brackets were bonded with the respective adhesives. SBS evaluation was done with the universal testing machine. After debonding, all the teeth were scored for adhesive remaining on the buccal surface, in accordance to adhesive remnant index, under a stereomicroscope. The acid-etched enamel surfaces were observed under SEM after treatment with CPP-ACP, CPP-ACP-F, and artificial saliva. Result In light-cure adhesive group, CPP-ACP-F (B1) showed superior results compared to the control group (C1), whereas the CPP-ACP group (A1) showed lower mean SBS than the control group (C1). Both these differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). In chemical-cure adhesive group, control group C2 showed significantly superior results (p  0.01). Conclusion The SBS of the orthodontic brackets was non-significantly affected when the brackets were cured with light-cure bonding system and treated with either CPP-ACP or CPP-ACP-F, whereas with chemical-cure adhesive, decreased bond strength was seen, which was within the clinically acceptable limits. PMID:24935482

  16. Effect of Fast Curing Lights, Argon Laser, and Plasma Arc on Bond Strengths of Orthodontic Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    M. Hashem-Hoseini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nowadays light-cured composites are used widely by orthodontists to bond brackets. As these composites require 20-40 seconds time per tooth to be light cured, more chair-time in needed compared to self-cured composites. In recent years, the argon laser and plasma arc lights have been introduced in dentistry to reduce this curing time. The purpose of this study was to compare bond strength of brackets bonded with the argon la-ser and plasma arc light with those bonded with the conventional halogen light.Materials and Methods: Fifty-one intact human premolars were randomly divided into three groups of 17 teeth each. Stainless steel twin premolar brackets (018- in Dyna lock, 3M Unitek were bonded to the teeth using one of these curing devices in each group: the halogen unit (Coltolux 75, Switzerland, the argon laser unit (Bo-5, Iran , and the plasma arc unit (Remecure 15, Belgium. The orthodontic adhesive was the same in the three groups (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek. After thermal cycling, the diametral tensilebond strength of specimens was measured using a debonding plier in a Zwick Universal Testing machine (Z/100, Germany.Results: The mean bond strengths was 17.344 MPa (SD=4.567 for halogen 19.172 MPa(SD=6.328 for laser and 19.322 MPa (SD=4.036 for plasma arc groups. No statistically significant difference existed in the mean bond strengths among three groups.Conclusion: Argon laser lights, significantly reducing the curing time of orthodonticbrackets without affecting bond strength, have the potential to be considered as advanta-geous alternatives to conventional halogen light.

  17. Comparison of Microleakage under Rebonded Stainless Steel Orthodontic Brackets Using Two Methods of Adhesive Removal: Sandblast and Laser.

    Mohamad Hossein Tudehzaeim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Debonding is a common occurrence in orthodontic treatment and a considerable number of orthodontists prefer to rebond the detached brackets because of economic issues. The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage beneath rebonded stainless steel brackets using two methods of adhesive removal namely sandblast and laser.Sixty human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups. Following bonding the brackets, group 1 served as the control group. Brackets in groups 2 and 3 were debonded, and adhesive removal from the bracket bases was done by means of sandblasting and Er-YAG laser, respectively. After rebonding, teeth in each group were stained with 2% methylene blue for 24 hours, sectioned and examined under a stereomicroscope. Marginal microleakage at the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces in the occlusal and gingival margins was determined. Statistical analysis was done using the Kruskal-Wallis test.Comparison of the microleakage scores among the three groups revealed no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05. At the enamel-adhesive interface, the gingival margins in all groups showed higher microleakage while in the adhesive-bracket interface, the occlusal margin exhibited greater microleakage.Er-YAG laser irradiation and sandblasting for adhesive removal from the debonded brackets yielded clinically acceptable microleakage scores.

  18. Clinical Survival of Rebonded Brackets with Different ARI Scores

    Mohammad Hossein Ahangar Atashi; Setareh Khosravib; Seyyed Mahdi Vahid Pakdel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bracket debonding is one of the most common events in orthodontics. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively compare clinical survival of rebonded brackets with different ARI scores with new brackets rebonding. Materials and Methods: The subjects in the present study consisted of 74 patients with 76 debonded brackets on maxillary first and second premolars. After refreshing the bracket base of the debonded brackets, they were assigned in two groups: group A with 27 bra...

  19. Are Bonding Agents being Effective on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to the Composite?

    Fahimeh Farzanegan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the clinical problems in orthodontics is the bonding of brackets tocomposite restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bondstrength of brackets bonded to composite restorations using Excite. Methods:Forty brackets were bonded to composite surfaces, which were embedded inacrylic resin. One of the following four protocols was employed for surfacepreparation of the composite: group 1 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group2 roughening with a diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group3 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds and the applying Excite®, group4 roughening with diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds andapplying Excite®. Maxillary central brackets were bonded onto thecomposite prepared samples with Transbond XT. Shear Bond Strength (SBS wasmeasured by a universal testing machine. The ANOVA and Tukey test was utilizedfor data analysis. Results: There was a significant difference betweenthe four groups (P

  20. The effect of argon laser irradiation on demineralization resistance of human enamel adjacent to orthodontic brackets: an in vitro study.

    Noel, Lloyd; Rebellato, Joe; Sheats, Rose D

    2003-06-01

    Argon lasers, because of their significant timesavings over conventional curing lights, have been investigated for use in bonding orthodontic brackets. They are also being investigated for their ability to confer demineralization resistance on enamel, which is of great interest in orthodontics. A two-part in vitro study on 86 human posterior teeth was conducted to determine the effects of a five-second argon laser exposure on shear bond strength and to evaluate the effects of a five- and 10-second argon laser exposure (250 mW) on demineralization of enamel surrounding orthodontic brackets after exposure to an artificial caries bath. Brackets cured with the argon laser for five seconds yielded mean bond strengths similar to those attained with a 40-second conventional light-cured control (n = 13 per group, 20.4 vs 17.8 MPa). Brackets cured with the argon laser for 10 seconds resulted in significantly lower mean lesion depth when compared with a visible light control (n = 20 per group, 107.8 vs 137.2 microm, P = .038). There were no statistically significant differences in lesion depth between the five-second argon laser and the visible light control groups. Overall, there was a 15% and 22% reduction in lesion depths for the five- and 10-second group, respectively. Poor correlations were found between the clinical appearance of decalcifications and their lesion depth. Argon lasers used for bonding orthodontic brackets would save a significant amount of chair time while possibly conferring demineralization resistance upon the enamel. PMID:12828433

  1. Analysis of Shear Bond Strength and Morphology of Er:YAG Laser-Recycled Ceramic Orthodontic Brackets

    Han, Ruo-qiao; Yang, Kai; Ji, Ling-fei; Ling, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the recycling of deboned ceramic brackets via an Er:YAG laser or via the traditional chairside processing methods of flaming and sandblasting; shear bond strength and morphological changes were evaluated in recycled brackets versus new brackets. Materials and Methods. 3M Clarity Self-Ligating Ceramic Brackets with a microcrystalline base were divided into groups subjected to flaming, sandblasting, or exposure to an Er:YAG laser. New ceramic brac...

  2. Effect of chlorhexidine-containing prophylactic agent on the surface characterization and frictional resistance between orthodontic brackets and archwires: an in vitro study

    Hosseinzadeh Nik, Tahereh; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Farazdaghi, Habibeh; Mehrabi, Arash; Razavi, Elham S Emadian

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the surface characterization and frictional resistance between stainless steel brackets and two types of orthodontic wires made of stainless steel and nickel-titanium alloys after immersion in a chlorhexidine-containing prophylactic agent. Methods Stainless steel orthodontic brackets with either stainless steel (SS) or heat-activated nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) wires were immersed in a 0.2% chlorhexidine and an artificial saliva environment for 1...

  3. A comparative study on time efficiency management of self ligating brackets with conventional ligating brackets on orthodontic subjects in North Karnataka

    Smita B. Patil; M.B. Halkati; Amit Shaikh; Srinivas Ambarkar; Shakeel Galgali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Self-Ligating brackets were originally designed with the intention to reduce the time needed to change wires compared with the use of wire ligatures. However, the advent of elastomeric ligatures meant that this perceived advantage was diminished. Objective: To compare aligning efficiency, rate of retraction and torque expression of Self Ligating bracket (SLB) system with Conventional Pre adjusted Edgewise bracket (CLB) system. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients were selected a...

  4. An Investigation about the Influence of Bleaching on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and on Enamel Colour

    Isabell Immerz; Peter Proff; Piero Roemer; Claudia Reicheneder; Andreas Faltermeier

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of bleaching on the colouration of tooth enamel and shear bond strength of orthodontic ceramic brackets based upon current whitening practice. The bleaching and bonding techniques were performed on extracted bovine teeth for the investigation of their colorimetric spectrum and the adhesive bond strength on surface enamel. One group was designated as the control group with no pre-treatment. Another group was treated with a 45% hydrogen peroxid...

  5. Comparative in vitro study of the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with restorative and orthodontic resins

    Hassan Isber

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with different restorative systems and compare it with that afforded by an established orthodontic bonding system. Seventy human bicuspids were used, divided into five different groups with 14 teeth each. Whereas a specific orthodontic bonding resin (TransbondTM XT was used in the control group, the restorative systems Charisma, Tetric Ceram, TPH Spectrum and Z100 were used in the other four groups. Seven days after bonding the brackets to the samples, shear forces were applied under pressure in a universal testing machine. The data collected was evaluated using the ANOVA test and, when a difference was identified, the Tukey test was applied. A 5% level of significance was adopted. The mean results of the shear bond strength tests were as follows: Group 1 (Charisma, 14.98 MPa; Group 2 (Tetric Ceram, 15.16 MPa; Group 3 (TPH, 17.70 MPa; Group 4 (Z100, 13.91 MPa; and Group 5 or control group (TransbondTM XT, 17.15 MPa. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. It was concluded that all tested resins have sufficient bond strength to be recommended for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  6. Diode-pumped solid-state laser for bonding orthodontic brackets: effect of light intensity and light-curing time.

    Kim, Young-Oh; Park, Soo-Byung; Son, Woo-Sung; Ko, Ching-Chang; García-Godoy, Franklin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to teeth using a diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) laser of 473 nm with various light intensity and light-curing settings. For the study, a total of 150 extracted human teeth were divided into ten groups. In the control group, the brackets were bonded to the teeth using a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) light with an intensity of 900 mW/cm(2). In the experimental groups, the brackets were bonded using a DPSS laser with three different light intensities and light-curing times. The same bracket type and adhesive were used in all groups throughout the study. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the SBS, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) among the groups. As results, brackets bonded using the DPSS laser with an intensity of 700 mW/cm(2) for 40 s (totally) showed a slightly higher SBS (12.2 ± 1.8 MPa) than that of those bonded using a QTH light (control; 11.6 ± 1.6 MPa). The SBS values linearly increased with increasing energy density (light intensity × light-curing time) of the DPSS laser (R = 0.95, p light-curing conditions. A comparison of the ARI scores among the groups suggested a similar bracket failure mode. PMID:20532581

  7. Load-deflection and surface properties of coated and conventional superelastic orthodontic archwires in conventional and metal-insert ceramic brackets

    Shiva Alavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Properties of coated archwires, which have been introduced for esthetic demands during orthodontic treatments, along with the use of tooth-colored brackets, are not clear. The aim of this study is to compare the load-deflection and surface properties of coated superelastic archwires with conventional superelastic archwires in conventional and metal-insert ceramic brackets. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 3 types of archwires including ultraesthetic polycoated, ultraesthetic epoxyresin coated and conventional (uncoated superelastic nickel-titanium (NiTi archwires were used in each of 2 types of brackets including conventional and metal-insert ceramic. To simulate oral environment, all specimens were incubated in artificial saliva using thermocycling model and then were tested in three-bracket bending test machine. Loading and unloading forces, plateau gap and end load deflection point (ELDP were recorded. Archwires were investigated with a stereomicroscope before and after the experiment. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used at P<0.05. Results: Epoxyresin archwires produced lower forces (19 to 310 gr compared to polycoated (61 to 359 gr and NiTi (61 to 415 gr (P<0.0001. The maximum ELDP (0.43 mm was observed in epoxyresin archwires (P<0.001. Coatings of some epoxyresin wires were torn and of polycoated wires peeled off. Conventional ceramic bracket produced higher loading forces with polycoated and NiTi archwires and lower unloading forces with all 3 types of archwires compared to metal-insert type (P<0.05. Conclusion: Epoxyresin-coated archwire had the lowest force and highest ELDP. Coatings were not durable in these experimental conditions. Conventional ceramic bracket produced higher frictional force compared to metal-insert type.

  8. Analysis of Shear Bond Strength and Morphology of Er:YAG Laser-Recycled Ceramic Orthodontic Brackets

    Han, Ruo-qiao; Ji, Ling-fei; Ling, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the recycling of deboned ceramic brackets via an Er:YAG laser or via the traditional chairside processing methods of flaming and sandblasting; shear bond strength and morphological changes were evaluated in recycled brackets versus new brackets. Materials and Methods. 3M Clarity Self-Ligating Ceramic Brackets with a microcrystalline base were divided into groups subjected to flaming, sandblasting, or exposure to an Er:YAG laser. New ceramic brackets served as a control group. Shear bond strengths were determined with an Electroforce test machine and tested for statistical significance through analysis of variance. Morphological examinations of the recycled ceramic bracket bases were conducted with scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Residue on the bracket base was analyzed with Raman spectroscopy. Results. Faded, dark adhesive was left on recycled bracket bases processed via flaming. Adhesive was thoroughly removed by both sandblasting and exposure to an Er:YAG laser. Compared with new brackets, shear bond strength was lower after sandblasting (p < 0.05), but not after exposure to an Er:YAG laser. The Er:YAG laser caused no damage to the bracket. Conclusion. Er:YAG lasers effectively remove adhesive from the bases of ceramic brackets without damaging them; thus, this method may be preferred over other recycling methods. PMID:27047964

  9. Analysis of Shear Bond Strength and Morphology of Er:YAG Laser-Recycled Ceramic Orthodontic Brackets.

    Han, Ruo-Qiao; Yang, Kai; Ji, Ling-Fei; Ling, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the recycling of deboned ceramic brackets via an Er:YAG laser or via the traditional chairside processing methods of flaming and sandblasting; shear bond strength and morphological changes were evaluated in recycled brackets versus new brackets. Materials and Methods. 3M Clarity Self-Ligating Ceramic Brackets with a microcrystalline base were divided into groups subjected to flaming, sandblasting, or exposure to an Er:YAG laser. New ceramic brackets served as a control group. Shear bond strengths were determined with an Electroforce test machine and tested for statistical significance through analysis of variance. Morphological examinations of the recycled ceramic bracket bases were conducted with scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Residue on the bracket base was analyzed with Raman spectroscopy. Results. Faded, dark adhesive was left on recycled bracket bases processed via flaming. Adhesive was thoroughly removed by both sandblasting and exposure to an Er:YAG laser. Compared with new brackets, shear bond strength was lower after sandblasting (p bracket. Conclusion. Er:YAG lasers effectively remove adhesive from the bases of ceramic brackets without damaging them; thus, this method may be preferred over other recycling methods. PMID:27047964

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Recycled Brackets using Different Methods: An In vitro Study

    Kumar, Mukesh; Maheshwari, Amit; Lall, Rajeev; Navit, Pragati; Singh, Rajeshwar; Navit, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of brackets commonly occurs during orthodontic treatment. Due to increase in costs replacement of a damaged bracket is not liked by the dentist. This study is done to assess the shear bond strength of recycled brackets using different methods. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using five groups of orthodontic brackets (0.022” × 0.028”, MBT prescription) bonded on the premolars mounted in cubes. Other materials required were cubical trays, bonding material, ...

  11. Effect of Enamel Preparation and Light Curing Methods on Microleakage under Orthodontic Brackets

    Hamidreza Pakshir; Shabnam Ajami

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the microleakage beneath metallic brackets following two different methods of enamel preparation and light curing.Materials and Methods: A total of 120 bovine deciduous lower incisors were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth. The preparations were as follows: Group I: Acid etching + Transbond XT primer + direct illumination, group II: acid etching + Transbond XT primer + transillumination, group III: Transbond XT self-etching primer + direct i...

  12. Effect of tooth bleaching on orthodontic stainless steel bracket bond strength

    Yadav, Deepti; Golchha, Vineet; Paul, Rahul; Sharma, Pooja; Wadhwa, Jitesh; Taneja, Sidhant

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective was to assess the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite resins on stainless steel brackets immediately bonded to previously bleached teeth with 35% hydrogen peroxide and to compare the neutralization effect of various antioxidant agents on the bond strength after bleaching. Materials and Methods: One hundred sound human maxillary premolars were used for the study. Teeth were divided into 5 groups (n = 20); Group 1 (control), Group 2 (bleach treatment), Group 3 (sodi...

  13. Effects of two soft drinks on shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of orthodontic metal brackets.

    Soodabeh Sadat Sajadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro.Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak, and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test.No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552. The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035; but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999.Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  14. Comparative evaluation of nickel discharge from brackets in artificial saliva at different time intervals

    Jithesh, C.; Venkataramana, V.; Penumatsa, Narendravarma; Reddy, S N.; Poornima, K. Y.; Rajasigamani, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine and compare the potential difference of nickel release from three different orthodontic brackets, in different artificial pH, in different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven samples of three different orthodontic brackets were selected and grouped as 1, 2, and 3. Each group was divided into three subgroups depending on the type of orthodontic brackets, salivary pH and the time interval. The Nickel release from each subgroup were analyzed by using indu...

  15. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded using halogen light and light-emitting diode at different debond times

    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the photoactivation effects of QTH (Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen and LED (Light-Emitting Diode on the SBS (Shear Bond Strength of orthodontic brackets at different debond times. Seventy-two bovine lower incisors were randomly divided into two groups according to the photoactivation system used (QTH or LED. The enamel surfaces were conditioned with Transbond self-etching primer, and APC (Adhesive Pre-Coated brackets were used in all specimens. Group I was cured with QTH for 20 s and Group II with LED for 10 s. Both groups were subdivided according to the different experimental times after bonding (immediately, 24 h and 7 days. The specimens were tested for SBS and the enamel surfaces were analyzed according to the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. The statistical analysis included the Tukey's test to evaluate the main effects of photoactivation and debond time on SBS. The Chi-square test was used to compare the ARI values found for each group, and no statistically significant difference was observed. The debond time of 7 days for QTH photoactivation showed statistically greater values of SBS when compared to the immediate and 24 h periods. There was no statistically significant difference between the QTH and LED groups immediately and after the 24 h period. In conclusion, bonding orthodontic brackets with LED photoactivation for 10 s is suggested because it requires a reduced clinical chair time.

  16. Biodegradao de braquetes ortodnticos: anlise por microscopia eletrnica de varredura Analysis of biodegradation of orthodontic brackets using scanning electron microscopy

    Luciane Macedo de Menezes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar, por meio de microscopia eletrnica de varredura, as alteraes qumicas e estruturais de braquetes metlicos submetidos a um processo de biodegradao in vitro. MTODOS: a amostra foi dividida em dois grupos, de acordo com a marca comercial dos acessrios - Grupo A = Dyna-Lock, 3M/Unitek (AISI 303 e Grupo B = LG Edgewise Standard, American Orthodontics (AISI 316L. Os corpos de prova, aparelhos ortodnticos simulados, permaneceram imersos em soluo salina (0,05% por um perodo de 60 dias, a 37C, sob agitao. As alteraes decorrentes da exposio dos acessrios soluo salina foram investigadas atravs da observao com microscpio eletrnico de varredura (MEV e anlise da composio qumica (EDX, realizadas antes e aps o perodo de imerso (T0 e T5, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: em T5, houve formao de produtos de corroso sobre a superfcie dos braquetes, especialmente no Grupo A, alm disso, houve alteraes na composio da liga metlica dos braquetes de ambos os grupos, sendo que, no Grupo A, houve reduo dos ons ferro e cromo e, no Grupo B, reduo de ons cromo. CONCLUSO: os acessrios do Grupo A apresentaram-se menos resistentes biodegradao in vitro, o que poderia estar associado ao tipo de ao utilizado em sua fabricao (AISI 303.OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to analyze, with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, the chemical and structural changes in metal brackets subjected to an in vitro biodegradation process. METHODS: The sample was divided into three groups according to brackets commercial brand names, i.e., Group A = Dyna-Lock, 3M/Unitek (AISI 303 and Group B = LG standard edgewise, American Orthodontics (AISI 316L. The specimens were simulated orthodontic appliances, which remained immersed in saline solution (0.05% for a period of 60 days at 37C under agitation. The changes resulting from exposure of the brackets to the saline solution were investigated by microscopic observation (SEM and chemical composition analysis (EDX, performed before and after the immersion period (T0 and T5, respectively. RESULTS: The results showed, at T5, the formation of products of corrosion on the surface of the brackets, especially in Group A. In addition, there were changes in the composition of the bracket alloy in both groups, whereas in group A there was a reduction in iron and chromium ions, and in Group B a reduction in chromium ions. CONCLUSIONS: The brackets in Group A were less resistant to in vitro biodegradation, which might be associated with the type of steel used by the manufacturer (AISI 303.

  17. Bacterial adhesion forces and biofilm prevention on orthodontic materials

    Mei, Li,

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation cause a variety of serious problems during orthodontic treatment, such as enamel demineralization and soft tissue inflammation. Understanding bacterial adhesion forces to orthodontic materials is an important challenge in both clinical and fundamental orthodontics and allows for the development of preventive measures. The thesis investigated the adhesion forces of oral bacterial strains to orthodontic materials using atomic force microscopy (AFM). This...

  18. A comparison of shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets using various light sources, light guides, and cure times.

    Evans, Larry James; Peters, Charles; Flickinger, Craig; Taloumis, Louis; Dunn, William

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different cure times, light sources, and light guides on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) to bovine enamel. Specifically, the Power Slot (Reliance Orthodontic Products, Itasca, Ill) light guide was placed on 4 visible light sources to compare shear bond strengths and recommended cure times with the light guides provided with each light source. We randomly divided 240 bovine mandibular incisors into 16 groups; each group consisted of 15 teeth mounted in an acrylic block. Each group of teeth was polymerized with a specific light and light guide combination. Eight groups were sheared after 5 minutes and the remaining 8 groups after 24 hours. After bonding, all brackets were subjected to a shear force with a testing machine. Overall, there was a significant increase in bond strengths of the 24-hour groups compared with the 5-minute shearing groups. However, there were no statistical differences (P =.05) within the 24-hour test groups or the 5-minute test groups. The results of this study indicate that, compared with standard light guides, the Power Slot and the Turbo Tip (Ormco Sybron Dental Specialties, Orange, Calif) light guides can significantly reduce the curing times (10 seconds per bracket; 5 seconds each from mesial and distal) without affecting their shear bond strengths. Therefore, the Power Slot and the Turbo Tip light guides with their collimation of visible light to increase its intensity can be recommended as advantageous alternatives for curing composite resins for orthodontic bonding procedures. PMID:12045769

  19. Evaluation of Self-Etching Adhesive and Er:YAG Laser Conditioning on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    Rosala Contreras-Bulnes; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J.; Laura E. Rodrguez-Vilchis; Claudia Centeno-Pedraza; Oscar F. Olea-Meja; Mara del Carmen Z. Alcntara-Galena

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength, the adhesive remnant index scores, and etch surface of teeth prepared for orthodontic bracket bonding with self-etching primer and Er:YAG laser conditioning. One hundred and twenty bovine incisors were randomly divided into four groups. In Group I (Control), the teeth were conditioned with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. In Group II the teeth were conditioned with Transbond Plus SEP (5?sec); III and IV were irradiated with...

  20. Corrosion Inhibitory Ability of Ocimum Sanctum Linn (Tulsi) Rinse on Ion Release from Orthodontic Brack-ets in Some Mouthwashes: An Invitro Study

    Roopal Patel, Sheron Bhanat, Dolly Patel, Bhadra Shah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the oral environment, orthodontic appliances are exposed to potentially damaging physical and chemical agents which may cause metallic corrosion. Corrosion will occur continuously in mouth, due to release of irons with abrasion by food, liquids etc. The purpose of this study was to measure the amount of metal ion release from orthodontic brackets when kept in different mouthwashes and effect of tulsi rinse on ion release when combined with different mouthwashes. Methods:...

  1. Clinical Survival of Rebonded Brackets with Different ARI Scores

    Mohammad Hossein Ahangar Atashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bracket debonding is one of the most common events in orthodontics. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively compare clinical survival of rebonded brackets with different ARI scores with new brackets rebonding. Materials and Methods: The subjects in the present study consisted of 74 patients with 76 debonded brackets on maxillary first and second premolars. After refreshing the bracket base of the debonded brackets, they were assigned in two groups: group A with 27 brackets of ARI≥4 and group B with 28 brackets of ARI≤2. In 21 cases, new brackets were used (group C. The frequency of the debonding in each rebonded group during treatment was calculated in intervals of 6,12,18 mounths after onset of bracket rebonding . Chi-squared test was used to compare the frequency of debonded brackets. Results: The frequency of debonded brackets was significantly higher in group B (ARI≤2 than those of groups A (ARI≥4 and C (new brackets. The number of debonded brackets were not significantly different between groups A (ARI≥4 and C (new brackets. Conclusion: Rebonding strength of debonded brackets in those that the failure is presented between adhesive and enamel (ARI≥4 could be clinically acceptable with no need to use new brackets.  Key words: dental bonding; orthodontic brackets; prevalence 

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging artifacts caused by brackets of various materials - An in vivo study

    Deepti Razdan

    2012-01-01

    Patients who might require repeated MRI scans, can be treated orthodontically with ceramic/composite/anterior ceramic and posterior stainless steel brackets. When the region of interest is above the orbit or beyond the posterior wall of the pharynx, no demonstrable artifacts were recorded with various types of brackets included in the present study.

  3. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded using two different hydrophilic primers: An in vitro study

    M Kumaraswamy Anand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Salivary control and maintenance of a dry operating field is a prime requisite of orthodontic bonding. Moisture insensitive primer (MIP with a clinical significant bond strength values have a better edge over the conventional hydrophobic bonding systems. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of two hydrophilic primers with respect to conventional hydrophobic primer by comparing their shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive-failure locations after contamination with saliva and saliva substitute. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 extracted human premolars were randomly divided into five group s ; Group A (Transbond MIP/saliva substitute, Group B (Opal Primo/saliva substitute, Group C (Transbond MIP/natural saliva, Group D (Opal Primo/natural saliva, control group - Group E (Transbond XT/dry, adhesive-Transbond XT used for all five groups and bonded using stainless steel brackets. Shear forces were applied to the samples with a universal testing machine. SBSs was measured in megapascals. The mode of bond failure was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI. Results: The mean SBS produced by Transbond MIP was higher than Opal Primo, which was statistically significant according to one-way analysis of variance. Both the tested groups showed lesser bond strength values than Transbond XT (the control. ARI scores revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the site of bond failure between study groups. ARI scores were found to be lower for study groups suggesting adhesive failure, compared to higher ARI scores for the control group suggesting cohesive failure. Conclusion: Transbond XT adhesive with Transbond MIP or Opal Primo have clinically acceptable bond strength in wet fields. Opal Primo is a viable option to use as a hydrophilic primer clinically.

  4. Orthodontic materials research and applications: part 2. Current status and projected future developments in materials and biocompatibility.

    Eliades, Theodore

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this 2-part opinion article was to project the developments expected to occur in the next few years in orthodontic materials research and applications. Part 1 reviewed developments in bonding to enamel. Part 2 looks at other orthodontic materials applications and explores emerging research strategies for probing the biological properties of materials. In the field of metallic brackets, expansion of the use of titanium alloys with improved hardness and nickel-free steels with better corrosion resistance and increased hardness is expected. Manufacturing techniques might be modified to include laser-welding methods and metal injection molding. Esthetic bracket research will involve the synthesis of high-crystallinity biomedical polymers with increased hardness and stiffness, decreased water sorption, and improved resistance to degradation. New plastic brackets might incorportate ceramic wings. Fiber-reinforced composite archwires, currently experimental, could soon be commercially available, and long-term applications of shape-memory plastics might become viable. Advancements in elastomeric materials will result in polymers with reduced relaxation, broader use of fluoride-releasing elastomers with decreased relaxation, and large-scale film coating of elastomers to decrease reactivity, water sorption, and degradation. Finally, biocompatibility assessments will incorporate testing of potential endocrinological action. New polymer formulations might be tested in adhesive and plastic bracket manufacturing, based on benzoic ring-free monomers to avoid the adverse effects of the estrogenic molecule bisphenol-A. PMID:17276868

  5. Comparison of the shear bond strengths of conventional mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases

    Isabel Cristina Prado Torres Lugato; Lilian Maria Brisque Pignatta; Flávia de Moraes Arantes; Eduardo César Almada Santos

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to compare in vitro the shear bond strength between metallic brackets (Abzil) with conventional mesh bases and metallic brackets with bases industrially sandblasted with aluminum oxide using three adhesive systems, in order to assess the influence of sandblasting on adhesiveness and to compare 3 different bonding systems. Two hundred and forty bovine incisors were used and randomly divided into 6 groups (40 teeth in each group), according to the bracket base and to the bondin...

  6. Evaluation of Friction in Orthodontics Using Various Brackets and Archwire Combinations-An in Vitro Study

    Kumar, Sujeet; Hamsa P.R, Rani; Ahmed, Sameer; Prasanthma; Bhatnagar, Apoorva; Sidhu, Manreet; Shetty, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare frictional resistance which was produced between conventional brackets (0.022 slot Otho-Organiser) and self ligating brackets (active Forestadent and passive Damon III) by using various arch wire combinations (0.016 Niti, 0.018 Niti, 0.017 x 0.025 SS and 0.019 x 0.025 SS). Methods: An experimental model which consisted of 5 aligned stainless steel 0.022-in brackets was used to assess frictional forces which were produced by SLBs (self ligating brackets) and CELs (conventional elastomeric ligatures) with use of 0.016 nickel titanium, 0.018 nickel titanium, 0.017 X 0.025”stainless steel and 0.019 X 0.025”stainless steel wires. Statistical analysis: One way ANOVA test was used to study the effect of the bracket type, wire alloy and section on frictional resistance test . Results: Conventional brackets produced highest levels of friction for all bracket/archwire combinations. Both Damon III and Forestadent brackets were found to produce significantly lower levels of friction when they were compared with elastomerically tied conventional brackets. Conclusion: SLBs are valid alternatives for low friction during sliding mechanics. PMID:24995241

  7. Orthodontics

    Hemrend, Bernard; Altuna, Gurkan; Tompson, Bryan

    1989-01-01

    The authors of this article offer an introduction to the field of orthodontics. They present the latest advances in orthodontic appliances and some of the possible consequences of orthodontic treatment. They discuss a number of cases and offer examples of some of the more common problems that the orthodontist is asked to treat. Such cases include severe Class II, division 1 malocclusion, surgical orthodontics, “long-face” syndrome, adult orthodontics-TMJ-periodontics, late adult growth, and p...

  8. Effects of ultrasonic instrumentation with different scaler-tip angulations on the shear bond strength and bond failure mode of metallic orthodontic brackets

    Incerti Parenti, Serena; Ippolito, Daniela Rit; Gatto, Maria Rosari; Luigi, Checchi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of ultrasonic instrumentation with different scaler-tip angulations on the shear bond strength (SBS) and bond failure mode of metallic orthodontic brackets. Methods Adhesive pre-coated metallic brackets were bonded to 72 extracted human premolars embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 24 each) to undergo no treatment (control group) or ultrasonic instrumentation with a scaler-tip angulation of 45° (45°-angulation group) or 0° (0°-angulation group). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were recorded. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test were used for statistical analysis. Results The control group had a significantly higher mean SBS value than the treated groups, which showed no significant differences in their mean SBS values. The ARI scores were not significantly different among the groups. Conclusions Ultrasonic instrumentation around the bracket base reduces the SBS of metallic orthodontic brackets, emphasizing the need for caution during professional oral hygiene procedures in orthodontic patients. The scaler-tip angulation does not influence the SBS reduction and bond failure mode of such brackets. PMID:24511515

  9. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Enamel Prepared By Er:YAG Laser and Conven-tional Acid-Etching

    M.H. Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel prepared by Er:YAG laser with two different powers and conventional acid-etching.Materials and Methods: Forty-five human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly assigned to three groups based on conditioning method: Group 1- conventional etching with 37% phosphoric acid; Group 2- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1 W; and Group 3- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1.5 W. Metal brackets were bonded on prepared enamel using a light-cured composite. All groups were subjected to thermocycling process. Then, the specimens mounted in auto-cure acryle and shear bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per second. After debonding, the amount of resin remaining on the teeth was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI scored 1 to 5. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare shear bond strengths and the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate differences in the ARI for different etching types.Results: The mean and standard deviation of conventional acid-etch group, 1W laser group and 1.5W laser group was 3.82 1.16, 6.97 3.64 and 6.93 4.87, respectively.Conclusion: The mean SBS obtained with an Er:YAG laser operated at 1W or 1.5W is approximately similar to that of conventional etching. However, the high variability of values in bond strength of irradiated enamel should be considered to find the appropriate parameters for applying Er:YAG laser as a favorable alternative for surface conditioning.

  10. Effect of laser-assisted bleaching with Nd:YAG and diode lasers on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Mirhashemi, Amirhossein; Emadian Razavi, Elham Sadat; Behboodi, Sara; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser-assisted bleaching with neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. One hundred and four extracted human premolars were randomly divided into four groups: group 1: No bleaching applied (control group); group 2: Teeth bleached with 40 % hydrogen peroxide; group 3: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 2.5 W, 25 Hz, pulse duration of 100 μs, 6 mm distance); and group 4: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with diode laser (810 nm, 1 W, CW, 6 mm distance). Equal numbers of teeth in groups 2, 3, and 4 were bonded at start, 1 h, 24 h, and 1 week after bleaching. A universal testing machine measured the SBS of the samples 24 h after bonding. After bracket debonding, the amount of residual adhesive on the enamel surface was observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. The SBS in the unbleached group was significantly higher than that in the bleached groups bonded immediately and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching (P < 0.05). In groups 3 and 4 at start and group 2 at start and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching, the SBS was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group. Significant differences in the ARI scores existed among groups as well. The SBS of brackets seems to increase quickly within an hour after laser-assisted bleaching and 24 h after conventional bleaching. Thus, this protocol can be recommended if it is necessary to bond the brackets on the same day of bleaching. PMID:26319247

  11. Comparison of frictional forces between aesthetic orthodontic coated wires and self-ligation brackets

    Kim, Yunmi; Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Yu, Hyung Seog; Tahk, Seon Gun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of polymer- and rhodium-coated wires compared to uncoated wires by measuring the frictional forces using self-ligation brackets. Methods 0.016-inch nickel titanium (NiTi) wires and 0.017 × 0.025-inch stainless steel (SS) wires were used, and the angulations between the brackets and wires were set to 0°, 5°, and 10°. Upper maxillary premolar brackets (Clippy-C®) with a 0.022-inch slot were selected for the study and a te...

  12. Evaluation of Friction in Orthodontics Using Various Brackets and Archwire Combinations-An in Vitro Study

    Kumar, Sujeet; Singh, Shamsher; Hamsa P.R, Rani; Ahmed, Sameer; Prasanthma,; Bhatnagar, Apoorva; Sidhu, Manreet; Shetty, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare frictional resistance which was produced between conventional brackets (0.022 slot Otho-Organiser) and self ligating brackets (active Forestadent and passive Damon III) by using various arch wire combinations (0.016 Niti, 0.018 Niti, 0.017 x 0.025 SS and 0.019 x 0.025 SS).

  13. Comparison of the shear bond strengths of conventional mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases

    Isabel Cristina Prado Torres Lugato

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare in vitro the shear bond strength between metallic brackets (Abzil with conventional mesh bases and metallic brackets with bases industrially sandblasted with aluminum oxide using three adhesive systems, in order to assess the influence of sandblasting on adhesiveness and to compare 3 different bonding systems. Two hundred and forty bovine incisors were used and randomly divided into 6 groups (40 teeth in each group, according to the bracket base and to the bonding system. The brackets were direct-bonded in bovine teeth with 3 adhesive systems: System A - conventional TransbondTM XT (3M - Unitek; System B - TransbondTM Plus Self Etching Primer + TransbondTM XT (3M - Unitek and System C - Fuji ORTHO LC resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement in capsules (GC Corp.. Shear bond strength tests were performed 24 hours after bonding, in a DL-3000 universal testing machine (EMIC, using a load cell of 200 kgf and a speed of 1 mm/min. The results were submitted to statistical analysis and showed no significant difference between conventional and sandblasted bracket bases. However, comparison between the bonding systems presented significantly different results. System A (14.92 MPa and system C (13.24 MPa presented statistically greater shear bond strength when compared to system B (10.66 MPa. There was no statistically significant difference between system A and system C.

  14. An overview of orthodontic material degradation in oral cavity

    Chaturvedi T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of metallic orthodontic appliances are used in the management of malocclusion. These appliances are placed in oral environnent under many stresses and variations such as masticatory forces, appliance loading, temperature fluctuations, varieties of ingested food and saliva. These metals undergo electrochemical reactions with the oral environment resulting in dissolution or formation of chemical compounds. Various microorganisms and many aggressive ions containing oral environment can cause material degradation (corrosion and its associated problems during long time exposure. Orthodontic alloys must have excellent corrosion resistance to the oral environment, which is highly important for biocompatibility as well as for orthodontic appliance durability. This article reviews various aspects of corrosion (surface degradation of orthodontic alloys. It explores the emerging research strategies for probing the biocompatibility of materials. During orthodontic treatment, use of nickel free, better corrosion resistance alloys and less use of fluoride containing toothpaste or gel is expected.

  15. Are torque values of preadjusted brackets precise?

    Alessandra Motta Streva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to verify the torque precision of metallic brackets with MBT prescription using the canine brackets as the representative sample of six commercial brands. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty maxillary and 20 mandibular canine brackets of one of the following commercial brands were selected: 3M Unitek, Abzil, American Orthodontics, TP Orthodontics, Morelli and Ortho Organizers. The torque angle, established by reference points and lines, was measured by an operator using an optical microscope coupled to a computer. The values were compared to those established by the MBT prescription. RESULTS: The results showed that for the maxillary canine brackets, only the Morelli torque (-3.33º presented statistically significant difference from the proposed values (-7º. For the mandibular canines, American Orthodontics (-6.34º and Ortho Organizers (-6.25º presented statistically significant differences from the standards (-6º. Comparing the brands, Morelli presented statistically significant differences in comparison with all the other brands for maxillary canine brackets. For the mandibular canine brackets, there was no statistically significant difference between the brands. CONCLUSIONS: There are significant variations in torque values of some of the brackets assessed, which would clinically compromise the buccolingual positioning of the tooth at the end of orthodontic treatment.

  16. Corrosion Inhibitory Ability of Ocimum Sanctum Linn (Tulsi Rinse on Ion Release from Orthodontic Brack-ets in Some Mouthwashes: An Invitro Study

    Roopal Patel, Sheron Bhanat, Dolly Patel, Bhadra Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the oral environment, orthodontic appliances are exposed to potentially damaging physical and chemical agents which may cause metallic corrosion. Corrosion will occur continuously in mouth, due to release of irons with abrasion by food, liquids etc. The purpose of this study was to measure the amount of metal ion release from orthodontic brackets when kept in different mouthwashes and effect of tulsi rinse on ion release when combined with different mouthwashes. Methods: Three hundred and twenty stainless steel brackets (0.022” were divided randomly into 8 equal groups and immersed in Mouthwash-A and, Mouthwash-B and mouthwash-C and distilled deionized water. These mouthwashes and distilled deionized water were all sepa-rately mixed with tulsi rinse and incubated at 37°C for 45 days. Nickel, Chromium, iron, copper and manganese released from the orthodontic brackets were measured with an inductively coupled plasma spectrometer. Results: Ion release in deionized water was higher (p<0.05 than in the 3 mouthwashes. Higher ion release was also found with Mouthwash-B compared with other 2 mouthwashes. There is no difference (p>0.05 in nickel, chromium, iron and copper ion release in the Mouthwash-A and Mouthwash-C. Tulsi rinse showed significant reduction (p<0.05 in all ion release in 3 mouthwashes used along with distilled deionzed water group. Conclusion: If ion release is concerned, Mouthwash-C mixed with tulsi rinse might be better option than Mouthwash-A as well as Mouthwash-B for orthodontic patients with stainless steel brackets.

  17. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Britto, Fernanda Alves Rodrigues; Lucato, Adriana Simoni; Valdrighi, Heloisa Cristina; Vedovello, Sílvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied...

  18. Comparison of frictional forces between aesthetic orthodontic coated wires and self-ligation brackets

    Kim, Yunmi; Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Tahk, Seon Gun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of polymer- and rhodium-coated wires compared to uncoated wires by measuring the frictional forces using self-ligation brackets. Methods 0.016-inch nickel titanium (NiTi) wires and 0.017 × 0.025-inch stainless steel (SS) wires were used, and the angulations between the brackets and wires were set to 0°, 5°, and 10°. Upper maxillary premolar brackets (Clippy-C®) with a 0.022-inch slot were selected for the study and a tensile test was performed with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The maximum static frictional forces and kinetic frictional forces were recorded and compared. Results The maximum static frictional forces and the kinetic frictional forces of coated wires were equal to or higher than those of the uncoated wires (p < 0.05). The maximum static frictional forces of rhodium-coated wires were significantly higher than those of polymer-coated wires when the angulations between the brackets and wires were set to (i) 5° in the 0.016-inch NiTi wires and (ii) all angulations in the 0.017 × 0.025-inch SS wires (p < 0.05). The kinetic frictional forces of rhodium-coated wires were higher than those of polymer-coated wires, except when the angulations were set to 0° in the 0.016-inch NiTi wires (p < 0.05). Conclusions Although the frictional forces of the coated wires with regards to aesthetics were equal to or greater than those of the uncoated wires, a study under similar conditions regarding the oral cavity is needed in order to establish the clinical implications. PMID:25133130

  19. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  20. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  1. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Fernanda Alves Rodrigues Britto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20: Group 1, control group (without bleaching; Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: Group 5 (29.33 MPa showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa, Group 2 (20.59 MPa and Group 4 (23.25 MPa, but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. CONCLUSION: Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel.

  2. Conforto e fonao com a nova gerao de brquetes ortodnticos linguais individualizados Comfort and phonation with new generation of individualized lingual orthodontics brackets

    Adriano Marotta Arajo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: recentemente o nmero de pacientes desejando um tratamento ortodntico e esttico ao mesmo tempo aumentou consideravelmente. A tcnica lingual oferece a opo mais esttica de tratamento ortodntico, pois os brquetes ficam invisveis colados na superfcie lingual dos dentes e os lbios no ficam protuberantes. Apesar da grande vantagem esttica, essa terapia possui desvantagens como restrio no conforto oral, na fala, na higiene, irritaes na lngua, restrio no espao da lngua e dificuldades na alimentao. Para amenizar essas desvantagens uma nova gerao de brquetes linguais otimizados ao mximo atravs da individualizao das bases dos brquetes, da posio de colagem e dos fios utilizados no tratamento ortodntico foi desenvolvida recentemente. OBJETIVO: realizar uma reviso sistemtica da literatura para verificar a adaptao do paciente a diferentes dispositivos ortodnticos linguais e a influncia desses dispositivos no conforto e na fala, principalmente. CONCLUSO: atualmente a literatura suporta que os brquetes linguais de ltima gerao individualizados por computador proporcionam maior conforto e facilidade na fonao quando comparados aos brquetes tradicionais da tcnica lingual. No entanto, o sucesso na terapia requer orientaes detalhadas sobre o potencial de restrio do conforto oral, articulao de palavras, mastigao e higiene oral, independente do sistema de brquetes a ser utilizado.BACKGROUND: the number of patients desiring an orthodontic and esthetic treatment at the same time recently increased considerably. The lingual technique offers the most aesthetic orthodontic treatment option because the brackets are invisible on the lingual surface of the teeth and the lips are not protruding. Despite the aesthetic advantage, this therapy has disadvantages such as restriction in oral comfort, in speech, in oral hygiene, injuries in the tongue and difficulties for eating. To improve these disadvantages, a new generation of lingual brackets optimized to the maximum through the individualization of the bases, the position of the bracket and wires used in orthodontic treatment have been recently developed. PURPOSE: to make a systematically review of literature to verify the patient's adaptation to different lingual orthodontic devices and the influence of these appliance in comfort and speech, as well. CONCLUSION: the literature currently supports that the latest generation of lingual individualized brackets provides greater comfort and speech easiness when compared to the traditional lingual technique brackets. However, success in therapy requires detailed guidelines on the potential for restriction of the oral comfort, word articulation, chewing and oral hygiene, regardless of the bracket system to be used.

  3. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with Er-YAG laser etching

    S Hamid Raji

    2012-01-01

    Results: The mean shear bond strength of the teeth lased with 150 mj was 12.26 ± 4.76 MPa, which was not significantly different from the group with acid etching (15.26 ± 4.16 MPa. Irradiation with 100 mj resulted in mean bond strengths of 9.05 ± 3.16 MPa, which was significantly different from that of acid etching (P < 0.001. Conclusions: laser etching at 150 and 100 mj was adequate for bond strength but the failure pattern of brackets bonded with laser etching is dominantly at adhesive - enamel interface and is not safe for enamel during debonding.

  4. Biodegradação de braquetes ortodônticos: avaliação da liberação iônica in vitro Biodegradation of orthodontic brackets: in vitro ion release

    Gabriel Schmidt Dolci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar, in vitro, a biodegradação de aparelhos ortodônticos simulados constituídos de braquetes e fios de aço inoxidável. METODOLOGIA: a amostra foi dividida em 2 grupos, de acordo com a marca dos braquetes usados: grupo A - Dyna-Lock, 3M/Unitek (AISI 303; e grupo B - LG Edgewise Standard, American Orthodontics (AISI 316L. Os corpos-de-prova permaneceram incubados em solução salina (0,05% a 36ºC, sob agitação por um período de até 60 dias. A análise da liberação iônica foi realizada por meio de espectrofotometria de absorção atômica. O peso em massa dos braquetes também foi medido antes e após o experimento. RESULTADOS: os resultados indicaram que o grupo A apresentou maior liberação de íons ferro, níquel e cromo do que o grupo B. Além disso, os braquetes do grupo A também mostraram perda de massa, considerada outro indicativo de corrosão. CONCLUSÃO: concluiu-se que, nas condições deste experimento, os braquetes do grupo A apresentaram maior biodegradação que os acessórios do grupo B, o que pode estar associado à liga metálica e/ou ao processo de fabricação dos mesmos.OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the biodegradation of simulated orthodontic appliances consisting of stainless steel brackets and wires. MATERIALS AND METHODOS: The sample was divided in 2 groups, according to brackets brand: group A - Dyna-Lock, 3M/ Unitek (AISI 303; and group B - LG Edgewise Standard, American Orthodontics (AISI 316L. The specimens (simulated orthodontic appliances were incubated in saline solution (0.05%, in shake, at 36ºC, for 60 days. The ion release was detected by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The weight of brackets was also measured before and after the test. RESULTS: The results indicated that group A released more ions iron, nickel and chromium than group B. Moreover, the brackets in group A also presented weight loss, which is considered an indicator of corrosion. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that, under the present study conditions, the brackets from group A presented a higher biodegradation than group’s B brackets, what could be associated to composition and manufacturing process of these brackets.

  5. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Fernanda Alves Rodrigues, Britto; Adriana Simoni, Lucato; Heloisa Cristina, Valdrighi; Slvia Amlia Scudeler, Vedovello.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar, in vitro, a influncia do gel clareador e da utilizao de dessensibilizante na resistncia adesiva de braquetes cermicos colados ao esmalte bovino. MTODOS: cem incisivos bovinos foram aleatoriamente divididos em cinco grupos (n = 20). Grupo 1, [...] sem clareamento (controle); Grupo 2, clareamento com perxido de hidrognio a 35%; Grupo 3, clareamento com perxido de hidrognio a 35%, sendo trs aplicaes de 15 minutos cada, e aplicao do dessensibilizante por 10 minutos; Grupo 4, clareamento com perxido de hidrognio a 35% durante 40 minutos; Grupo 5, clareamento com perxido de hidrognio a 35% durante 40 minutos e aplicao do dessensibilizante durante 10 minutos. Os braquetes foram colados sete dias aps o clareamento e submetidos ao teste de resistncia ao cisalhamento aps 24 horas, a uma velocidade de compresso de 1mm/minuto. Aps a fratura, avaliava-se o braquete, com lupa estereoscpica, com magnificao de 40x, e o ndice de Remanescente Adesivo (IRA). Os dados de resistncia ao cisalhamento (MPa) foram submetidos anlise de varincia e ao teste de Tukey, com nvel de significncia de 5%. RESULTADOS: os resultados mostraram que as amostras do Grupo 5 apresentaram resistncia de unio significativamente superior dos grupos 1, 2 e 4, mas sem diferena do Grupo 3. No houve diferena significativa entre a resistncia de unio dos demais grupos. O ndice de Remanescente Adesivo mostrou predominncia do escore 3, ou seja, toda resina permaneceu aderida ao esmalte, para todos os grupos. CONCLUSO: pde-se concluir que o clareamento com perxido de hidrognio a 35%, com clcio associado aplicao do dessensibilizante, produziu maior resistncia dos braquetes ao esmalte bovino. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group [...] 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: Group 5 (29.33 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa), Group 2 (20.59 MPa) and Group 4 (23.25 MPa), but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. CONCLUSION: Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel.

  6. Effect of self-etching primer/adhesive and conventional bonding on the shear bond strength in metallic and ceramic brackets

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Hydari, Mahboubeh; Shahrbaf, Shirin; Mirzakouchaki-Boroujeni, Parvin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Bracket debonding from the tooth surface is a common problem in fixed orthodontics. The aims of the present study were to assess the bond strength and failure sites in two ways of bonding technique, with metallic and ceramic brackets. Material and Methods: One hundred premolars were assigned to 4 groups of 25 each: Group A, metallic brackets/ conventional procedure; Group B, metallic brackets/Transbond XT; Group C, ceramic brackets/conventional procedure; and Grou...

  7. Orthodontics and Aligners

    ... teeth, ranging from conventional braces (with wires and brackets) to invisible braces (clear orthodontic aligners). Each method ... a dental patient’s teeth without the wires and brackets of traditional braces. The aligners consist of a ...

  8. The effect of surface treatment with Er: YAG laser on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to fiber-reinforced composite

    Dehghani, Mahboobe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of surface treatment with Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets to fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). Study Design: Ninety human premolars were randomly divided into six groups of 15. FRC bars were bonded to the teeth with a flowable composite (FC) and then underwent following treatments. In group 1 no further treatment was performed. In group 2 the FRC surfaces were covered by FC. An Er:YAG laser was employed to treat FRCs in groups 3 ( 200 mJ/10 Hz) and 4 (300 mJ/15 Hz). The FRC strips in groups 5 and 6 were first covered by FC and then irradiated with Er:YAG laser at 200 mJ/10 Hz (group 5) or 300 mJ/15 Hz (group 6). Stainless steel brackets were bonded to FRCs using a light-cure adhesive system. After 24 hours, the samples were tested for SBS and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were determined. Results: There was a significant difference in SBS among the study groups (P <0.001). Pairwise comparisons indicated that SBS was significantly lower in group 1 compared to all other groups (p<0.05) except group 2. Bond strength in group 6 was significantly greater than all the study groups (p<0.05) except group 5. No significant difference was found in ARI scores among the groups. Conclusions: Covering the FRC surface by a layer of flowable composite and then application of Er:YAG laser at 300 mJ/15 Hz could be recommended to increase bond strength of orthodontic attachments to FRC. Key words:Fiber-reinforced composite, orthodontics, Sshear bond strength, laser, Er:YAG, surface treatment, bracket, FRC. PMID:25593660

  9. A comparative clinical study of the failure rate of orthodontic brackets bonded with two adhesive systems: conventional and self-etching primer (SEP

    Gladys Cristina Dominguez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study compared the clinical performance of orthodontic brackets bonded with Transbond adhesive paste after two priming systems: a two-stage conventional system (acid etching + Transbond XT adhesive primer and a singlestage self-etching primer (SEP (Transbond Plus. METHODS: The sample comprised 480 metal brackets bonded to the teeth of 24 consecutive patients treated for 36 to 48 months. A split-mouth design was used for bonding, and both systems were used in each patient. Bracket failure rates for each system were analyzed; and failure causes as reported by the patients and the quadrant of teeth for which brackets failed were recorded. RESULTS: The conventional system group had a failure rate of 5.41%, whereas the rate for SEP was 4.58%. In this group, there were 5 failures (38.4% in the right maxillary quadrant, 2 (15.4% in the left maxillary quadrant, 4 (30.8% in the right mandibular quadrant, and 2 (15.4% in the left mandibular quadrant. In the SEP group, there were 4 (36.4% failures in the right maxillary quadrant, 1 (9% in the left maxillary quadrant, 3 (27.3% in the right mandibular quadrant, and 3 (27.3% in the left mandibular quadrant. Results of descriptive statistical analysis and odds ratio did not show any significant differences between rates (p = 0.67. CONCLUSION: The clinical efficiency of SEP was similar to that of the conventional system.

  10. Estudo comparativo de seis tipos de braquetes ortodnticos quanto fora de adeso A comparative study of six types of orthodontic brackets with regard to bond strength

    Leonardo de Aquino Fleischmann

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUO: a realizao de um diagnstico acurado, assim como a correta seleo de materiais, especificamente dos braquetes, so requisitos importantes para o xito da terapia ortodntica. OBJETIVOS: investigar a influncia de variados tipos de desenho da base de braquetes na fora de adeso. METODOLOGIA: seis modelos foram avaliados mediante ensaio de cisalhamento - Discovery (Dentaurum - metlico com retenes por laser e 13,12mm de rea da base; Monobloc (Morelli - metlico em corpo nico com protuberncias e 10,22mm de rea; Edgewise Standard (Ortho Organizers - metlico com base MIM (Metal Injection Molding e 12,02mm de rea; Illusion Plus (Ortho Organizers - porcelana com sulcos de reteno e 13,49mm de rea; Composite (Morelli - policarbonato com protuberncias para reteno mecnica e 14,68mm de rea; e Edgewise Standard (Morelli - metlico com tela de reteno e 14,31mm de rea. Os braquetes foram colados em dentes bovinos (incisivos com o sistema adesivo Fill Magic Ortodntico (Vigodent, para a realizao do teste. O ensaio foi executado em uma mquina de ensaios universal (EMIC, e a fora de adeso foi computada, no momento da ciso, pelo software TESC, verso 3.01, medida em Newtons (N e em Megapascal (Mpa. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSES: no houve diferena estatstica entre os braquetes testados, sendo que o grupo que apresentou a maior mdia de fora de adeso foi o Discovery com 10,12Mpa.INTRODUCTION: An accurate diagnosis as well as the correct selection of materials, brackets in particular, are important pre-requisites for success in orthodontic therapy. AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the influence of various brackets-base designs on bond strength. METHODS: Six models were evaluated by a test of sheer bond strength: Discovery (Dentaurum - metallic with laser grooves and 13.12mm of base area; Monobloc (Morelli - metallic one-piece with raised bumps and 10.22mm of area; Edgewise Standard (Ortho Organizers - metallic with MIM (Metal Injection Molding and 12.02mm of area; Illusion Plus (Ortho Organizers - ceramic with retention ridges and 13.49mm of area; Composite (Morelli - polycarbonate with raised bumps for mechanical retention with 14.68mm of area; and Edgewise Standard (Morelli - metallic with single mesh and 14.31mm of area. The brackets were bonded on bovine teeth with Fill Magic Ortodntico (Vigodent bond agent, for testing. The study was conduced in a universal test machine (EMIC, and the bond strength was recorded at the moment of split by TESC software, 3.01 version; it was calculated in newtons (N and megapascal (Mpa. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: No statistical difference among tested brackets was found, and the group with the greatest average bond strength was Discovery with 10,12Mpa.

  11. Friction between different wire bracket combinations in artificial saliva: an in vitro evaluation

    Tatiana Kelly da Silva Fidalgo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective this work was to assess the friction coefficient between brackets and wires of different materials under conditions simulating the oral environment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Stainless steel (SS and titanium-molybdenum alloy (TMA wires of 0.019x0.025-in diameter (American Orthodontics and polycarbonate bracket (American Orthodontics, ceramic bracket (American Orthodontics, and metal bracket (3M Unitek with slots of 0.022x0.030-in were used. The friction coefficient was assessed by means of mechanical traction with the system immersed in artificial saliva. The mean roughness of both wire surface and bracket slots was evaluated by using a surface profilometer. RESULTS: The system using TMA wire and polycarbonate bracket had the highest roughness (p<0.05. SS wire with ceramic bracket had the highest friction coefficient, whereas the use of metallic bracket yielded the lowest (p<0.05. However, it was observed a statistically significant difference in the system using TMA wire and ceramic bracket compared to that using TMA wire and polycarbonate bracket (p=0.038. CONCLUSIONS: Ceramic brackets in association with SS wire should be judiciously used, since this system showed a high friction coefficient.

  12. Prototype of a new tip developed to be coupled to dental light-curing units for optimizing bonding of orthodontic brackets and accessories

    Sergio Luiz, Mota Jnior; Mrcio Jos da Silva, Campos; Marco Abdo, Gravina; Marcelo Reis, Fraga; Robert Willer Farinazzo, Vitral.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: desenvolver uma nova ponteira para ser acoplada aos aparelhos fotopolimerizadores utilizados para colagem de braquetes e acessrios ortodnticos, e testar sua da efetividade em ensaio mecnico in vitro. A ponteira espelhada na superfcie interna e baseia-se em conceitos fsicos de refra [...] o e reflexo de luz. Apresenta como principal vantagem o menor tempo clnico durante o procedimento de colagem, reduzindo a possibilidade de contaminao durante o processo. MTODOS: por meio de ensaio de resistncia ao cisalhamento e determinao do ndice remanescente de adesivo (IRA), testou-se a ponteira desenvolvida em 120 corpos de prova. A amostra foi dividia em dois grupos. No grupo 1, foi utilizado aparelho fotopolimerizador de fonte de luz halgena e, no grupo 2, fonte de LED. Cada grupo foi subdividido. Nos subgrupos H1 e L1, utilizou-se a ponteira convencional. Nos subgrupos H2 e L2 a colagem foi feita utilizando a ponteira desenvolvida para a polimerizao do material de colagem. RESULTADOS: os valores dos testes de cisalhamento e IRA para os subgrupos foram comparados entre si. Os resultados mostraram que no houve diferena estatisticamente significativa para o ensaio de resistncia ao cisalhamento (p > 0,05) nem para o IRA (p > 0,05) entre os subgrupos. CONCLUSO: os testes de ensaio mecnico, assim como a anlise do IRA, mostraram que a nova ponteira desenvolvida cumpriu os requisitos necessrios colagem dos acessrios ortodnticos, e que o tempo de colagem foi reduzido pela metade, sendo necessria uma s incidncia. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: development of a new device to be coupled to light-curing units for bonding orthodontic brackets and accessories, and test its efficacy in an in vitro mechanical trial. The inner surface of the device is mirrored and is based on physical concepts of light refraction and reflection. The ma [...] in advantage of such device is the reduced clinical time needed for bonding and the low possibility of contamination during the process. METHODS: One hundred and twenty specimens were used for testing the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with the device. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was also determined. The sample was divided into 2 groups. In group 1 a halogen light-curing unit was used while in group 2 a led light-curing unit was used. Each group was then subdivided. In subgroups H1 and L1, a conventional light guide rod was used while in subgroups H2 and L2 bonding was performed with the mirrored device coupled to the tip of the guide light rod. RESULTS: The values obtained for the shear bond strength and the ARI in the subgroups were compared. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference for the shear strength (p > 0.05) and the ARI (p > 0.05) between the subgroups. CONCLUSION: The tests of mechanical trials and the ARI analysis showed that the new device fulfilled the requirements for bonding orthodontic accessories, and that the time for bonding was reduced to half, being necessary only one light exposure.

  13. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans to different bracket materials

    Shrinivaasan Nambi Rammohan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify the adherence of Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans on brackets made of stainless steel, plastic, ceramic, titanium, and gold, and to evaluate the various sites of adherence of these microorganisms with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Materials and Methods: Brackets made of stainless steel, plastic, ceramic, titanium, and gold were used. The adherence of S. mutans and C. albicans were studied. The brackets were placed in flat-bottomed vials containing basal medium with 20% sucrose added; the flasks were inoculated with each of the microbial suspensions. The samples were incubated at 37°C for 48 h, after which the brackets were removed. The cells adhering to the glass were counted and the brackets were studied with SEM. Results: When evaluated together, the adherence of S. mutans and C. albicans was increased in the ceramic bracket group. When evaluated separately, metallic brackets had increased number of colony-forming units (CFUs of S. mutans and the use of titanium brackets increased the CFUs of C. albicans. SEM demonstrated that the adherence of S. mutans and C. albicans together varied according to the bracket materials, with ceramic having the greatest and stainless steel having the least adherence. Conclusions: Oral hygiene may be of greater concern with esthetic brackets since this study shows that microbial adhesion is greater with these brackets.

  14. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded on the tooth surface after internal bleaching / Avaliao da resistncia ao cisalhamento de briquettes ortodnticos colados na superfcie dentria aps clareamento interno

    Nadia de Souza, FERREIRA; Patrcia Campos Ferreira da, ROSA; Raffaela Di Iorio Jeronymo, FERREIRA; Marcia Carneiro, VALERA.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduo : O apelo esttico de pacientes que possuem dentes escurecidos grande, pois atualmente os padres estticos se tornaram rigorosos e muitos pacientes antes ou durante o tratamento ortodntico, realizam o procedimento de clareamento dental. Objetivo: Avaliar a adeso de braquetes or [...] todnticos em molares humanos que receberam clareamento interno. Material e mtodo: Quarenta coroas de molares humanos foram divididas em quatro grupos, de acordo com o agente clareador utilizado: SP) perborato de sdio + gua; SP) perxido de carbamida; CP+SP) perxido de carbamida + perborato de sdio; Cont) gua (grupo controle). Os agentes clareadores colocados no interior das cmaras pulpares foram substitudos a cada 7 dias por 2 semanas, e a colagem dos braquetes foi efetuada aps 30 dias do final do clareamento. O teste de resistncia ao cisalhamento foi realizado em mquina de ensaios universal (Emic). Resultado: O teste estatstico ANOVA com nvel de significncia de 5% (p > 0,05), mostrou que no houve diferena estatstica significante entre os grupos (p = 0,1214). Concluso: Concluiu-se que os diferentes agentes clareadores estudados no interferem na resistncia de adeso dos braquetes ao esmalte dentrio e a colagem dos braquetes 30 dias aps o clareamento interno um procedimento seguro. Abstract in english Introduction: There is great demand for esthetic treatment by patients who have discolored teeth, because currently aesthetic standards have become stricter and many patients have tooth bleaching procedures performed before or during orthodontic treatment. Objective: To evaluate the bonding of [...] orthodontic brackets to human molars after internal tooth bleaching. Material and method: Forty molars were divided into four groups according to the bleaching agent used: PS) sodium perborate + water; PC) carbamide peroxide; PC + PS) carbamide peroxide + sodium perborate; Cont) water (control group). Bleaching agents placed inside the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days for 2 weeks, and the brackets were bonded 30 days after the end of bleaching. The shear strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (Emic). Result: ANOVA with a significance level of 5% (p > 0.05), showed no statistically significant difference between groups (p = 0.1214). Conclusion: It was concluded that the different bleaching agents studied did not interfere with the bond strength of brackets to enamel and bonding the brackets 30 days after internal bleaching is a safe procedure.

  15. Frictional resistance of self-ligating versus conventional brackets in different bracket-archwire-angle combinations

    Maria Regina Guerra MONTEIRO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the influence of archwire material (NiTi, beta-Ti and stainless steel and brackets design (self-ligating and conventional on the frictional force resistance. Material and Methods: Two types of brackets (self-ligating brackets - Smartclip, 3M/Unitek - and conventional brackets - Gemini, 3M/Unitek with three (0, 5, and 10 degrees slot angulation attached with elastomeric ligatures (TP Orthodontics were tested. All brackets were tested with archwire 0.019"x0.025" nickel-titanium, beta-titanium, and stainless steel (Unitek/3M. The mechanical testing was performed with a universal testing machine eMIC DL 10000 (eMIC Co, Brazil. The wires were pulled from the bracket slots at a cross-head speed of 3 mm/min until 2 mm displacement. Results: Self-ligating brackets produced significantly lower friction values compared with those of conventional brackets. Frictional force resistance values were directly proportional to the increase in the bracket/ wire angulation. With regard to conventional brackets, stainless steel wires had the lowest friction force values, followed by nickel-titanium and beta-titanium ones. With regard to self-ligating brackets, the nickel-titanium wires had the lowest friction values, significantly lower than those of other materials. Conclusion: even at different angulations, the self-ligating brackets showed significantly lower friction force values than the conventional brackets. Combined with nickel-titanium wires, the self-ligating brackets exhibit much lower friction, possibly due to the contact between nickel-titanium clips and wires of the same material.

  16. Frictional resistance of self-ligating versus conventional brackets in different bracket-archwire-angle combinations

    MONTEIRO, Maria Regina Guerra; da SILVA, Licinio Esmeraldo; ELIAS, Carlos Nelson; VILELLA, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the influence of archwire material (NiTi, beta-Ti and stainless steel) and brackets design (self-ligating and conventional) on the frictional force resistance. Material and Methods Two types of brackets (self-ligating brackets - Smartclip, 3M/Unitek - and conventional brackets - Gemini, 3M/Unitek) with three (0, 5, and 10 degrees) slot angulation attached with elastomeric ligatures (TP Orthodontics) were tested. All brackets were tested with archwire 0.019"x0.025" nickel-titanium, beta-titanium, and stainless steel (Unitek/3M). The mechanical testing was performed with a universal testing machine eMIC DL 10000 (eMIC Co, Brazil). The wires were pulled from the bracket slots at a cross-head speed of 3 mm/min until 2 mm displacement. Results Self-ligating brackets produced significantly lower friction values compared with those of conventional brackets. Frictional force resistance values were directly proportional to the increase in the bracket/ wire angulation. With regard to conventional brackets, stainless steel wires had the lowest friction force values, followed by nickel-titanium and beta-titanium ones. With regard to self-ligating brackets, the nickel-titanium wires had the lowest friction values, significantly lower than those of other materials. Conclusion even at different angulations, the self-ligating brackets showed significantly lower friction force values than the conventional brackets. Combined with nickel-titanium wires, the self-ligating brackets exhibit much lower friction, possibly due to the contact between nickel-titanium clips and wires of the same material. PMID:25025564

  17. An in Vitro Evaluation of Remineralization Potential of Novamin® on Artificial Enamel Sub-Surface Lesions Around Orthodontic Brackets Using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX)

    Padmanabhan, Sridevi; Chitharanjan, Arun B

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the Ca/P ratio of enamel samples around the orthodontic brackets for time periods of 0, 2 and 10 days in two groups (control group and study group). Materials and Methods: Forty extracted teeth were randomly divided into control group and study group. All samples were demineralized and incubated in artificial saliva at 37°C for a period of 10 days after demineralization. During this phase the enamel samples in the study group were treated with remineralizing paste (NuproNusolution containing Novamin®-Dentsply) for 10 days. At the end of the incubation period, Ca/P ratios were analyzed for both the groupsby EDX analysis. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using student t-test for paired samples and Student t- test for individual samples (p ≤ 0.05). Results: It was found that the mean Ca/P ratio was significantly lower for the control group as compared to the study group (p-value < 0.05) after 10 d of incubation. Conclusion: Novamin® containing remineralization toothpaste showed significant remineralizing potential in inhibition of artificial enamel sub-surface lesion around bracket after 10 days of remineralization phase. EDX element analysis was found to be an efficient method to quantify the changes in mineral content of a sample during in vitro caries studies. PMID:25584326

  18. Effect of multiple debonding sequences on shear bond strength of new stainless steel brackets

    Eslamian, Ladan; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Tavakol, Pegah; Tavakol, Ali; Amini, Nazila; Lynch, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study aimed at evaluating the effect of three debonding sequences on the shear bond strength (SBS) of new stainless steel (SS) brackets. Materials and Methods: Stainless steel twin brackets (0.022-inch, American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA) were bonded with light cure adhesive (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, St. Paul, MN, USA) to 80 newly extracted human premolars after acid etching with 37% phosphoric acid (30 s). Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machi...

  19. Comparison of Galvanic Currents Generated Between Different Combinations of Orthodontic Brackets and Archwires Using Potentiostat: An In Vitro Study

    Nayak, Rabindra S; Shafiuddin, Bareera; Pasha, Azam; K Vinay; Narayan, Anjali; Shetty, Smitha V

    2015-01-01

    Background: Technological advances in wire selection and bracket design have led to improved treatment efficiency and allowed longer time intervals between appliance adjustments. The wires remain in the mouth for a longer duration and are subjected to electrochemical reactions, mechanical forces of mastication and generalized wear. These cause different types of corrosion. This study was done to compare the galvanic currents generated between different combinations of brackets and archwires c...

  20. Prototype of a new tip developed to be coupled to dental light-curing units for optimizing bonding of orthodontic brackets and accessories

    Sergio Luiz Mota Júnior

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: development of a new device to be coupled to light-curing units for bonding orthodontic brackets and accessories, and test its efficacy in an in vitro mechanical trial. The inner surface of the device is mirrored and is based on physical concepts of light refraction and reflection. The main advantage of such device is the reduced clinical time needed for bonding and the low possibility of contamination during the process. METHODS: One hundred and twenty specimens were used for testing the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with the device. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI was also determined. The sample was divided into 2 groups. In group 1 a halogen light-curing unit was used while in group 2 a led light-curing unit was used. Each group was then subdivided. In subgroups H1 and L1, a conventional light guide rod was used while in subgroups H2 and L2 bonding was performed with the mirrored device coupled to the tip of the guide light rod. RESULTS: The values obtained for the shear bond strength and the ARI in the subgroups were compared. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference for the shear strength (p > 0.05 and the ARI (p > 0.05 between the subgroups. CONCLUSION: The tests of mechanical trials and the ARI analysis showed that the new device fulfilled the requirements for bonding orthodontic accessories, and that the time for bonding was reduced to half, being necessary only one light exposure.

  1. Effect of fluoridated milk on enamel demineralization adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances

    Sköld-Larsson, Kerstin; Sollenius, Ola; Karlsson, Lena; Petersson, Lars G; Twetman, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To investigate the effect of daily intake of fluoridated milk on enamel demineralization adjacent to fixed orthodontic brackets assessed with quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). Materials and methods. Sixty-four healthy adolescents (13-18 years) undergoing orthodontic...

  2. A bracket design proposal for the first molar

    Roberto Scalon

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The advent of bracket bonding simplified the assembly of orthodontic braces, besides giving more comfort to the patient and decreasing the risk of decalcification. However, there is no first molar bracket with accessory tube and hooks in the market, except for the convertible type.Objective:To present a patent for utility model of a bracket Roth prescription, Straight-Wire technique for first molar, in order to facilitate orthodontic treatment where there is a need for placing accessories in second molars.Material and methods:This patent consists of a molar bracket for bonding, which contains a retentive base for this, similar to the bracket used in the Edgewise technique,with fins for placing alastic or metal ligature,but containing pre-angles and torques as the tubes of the molar Straight-Wire technique with Roth prescription.It also includes an accessory tube for placing arches or cantilevers and hooks for placing elastics.Results and conclusion:With this bracket design proposal it is possible to obtain an accessory that facilitates the inclusion of the second molar in the assembly of the orthodontic brace without the use of bands.Moreover, this bracket has fins for placing ligatures,accessory tube for placing arches or cantilevers and hooks for placing elastics.

  3. Torque efficiency of different archwires in 0.018- and 0.022-inch conventional brackets.

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos; Bourauel, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the archwires inserted during the final stages of the orthodontic treatment with the generated moments at 0.018- and 0.022-inch brackets. MATERIALS AND METHODS The same bracket type, in terms of prescription, was evaluated in both slot dimensions. The brackets were bonded on two identical maxillary acrylic resin models, and each model was mounted on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system. Ten 0.017 × 0.025-inch TMA and ten 0.017 × 0.025-inch stainle...

  4. Torque efficiency of different archwires in 0.018- and 0.022-inch conventional brackets

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos; Bourauel, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the archwires inserted during the final stages of the orthodontic treatment with the generated moments at 0.018- and 0.022-inch brackets. Materials and Methods: The same bracket type, in terms of prescription, was evaluated in both slot dimensions. The brackets were bonded on two identical maxillary acrylic resin models, and each model was mounted on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system. Ten 0.017 × 0.025-inch TMA and ten 0.017 × 0.025-inch stainless steel a...

  5. Intraoral corrosion of self-ligating metallic brackets and archwires and the effect on friction

    Tima, Lori Lynn

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the frictional coefficient was affected due to intraoral use. A secondary aim of this study was to determine whether or not there was a relationship between corrosion of orthodontic alloys and friction via scanning electron microscopic qualitative analysis. Orthodontic brackets and 0.019 x 0.025 inch stainless steel archwires were collected and divided into three groups of n=10: used bracket and used wires (UBUW), used brackets and new wires (UBNW), and new brackets and new wires (NBNW). New materials were as-received from the manufacturer, and used materials were clinically used bracket and wires collected from patients following orthodontic treatment. Archwires were pulled through bracket slots at a rate of 0.5mm/min while friction forces were measured. Following a cleaning process, the surface topography of the bracket slots was examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Based on a 1-factor MANOVA, there was no significant group effect (all p>0.05) on frictional forces. Partial eta squared values indicated that intraoral exposure had only a small effect on frictional forces (≤ 3%). Qualitative analysis of SEM images did not show an association between surface characteristics of the bracket slots and magnitude of frictional force. Results suggest that surface corrosion from intraoral use does not significantly affect friction at the bracket wire interface.

  6. Effect of Fast Curing Lights, Argon Laser, and Plasma Arc on Bond Strengths of Orthodontic Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    M. Hashem-Hoseini; H. Mahmood-Hashemi; F. Soltan-Moradi; Hooshmand, T.; I.HARIRIAN; Motahhary, P.; J. Chalipa

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Nowadays light-cured composites are used widely by orthodontists to bond brackets. As these composites require 20-40 seconds time per tooth to be light cured, more chair-time in needed compared to self-cured composites. In recent years, the argon laser and plasma arc lights have been introduced in dentistry to reduce this curing time. The purpose of this study was to compare bond strength of brackets bonded with the argon la-ser and plasma arc light with those bonded with the conve...

  7. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material

    Jens Johannes Bock; Jacqueline Bailly; Christian Ralf Gernhardt; Robert Andreas Werner Fuhrmann

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic w...

  8. Evaluation of the influence of dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide in orthodontic bracket shear bond strength

    Marcus Vinicius Neiva Nunes do Rego

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the bond strength of brackets bonded to premolars previously subjected to bleaching with a 35% hydrogen peroxide. METHODS: Twenty one healthy premolars were selected and randomly divided into three groups (n = 7. Group I (G1 included teeth that were not submitted to bleaching. The enamel surfaces of Groups II (G2 and III (G3 were submitted to a bleaching process with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP Maxx. On Group II (G2, after bleaching, the teeth were stored for 24 hours in distilled water at 98.6 ºF, and then, premolar metallic brackets were bonded using Transbond XT (3M resin. Group III (G3 was submitted to the same procedure seven days after bleaching. After bonding, all teeth were stored in distilled water at 98.6 ºF for 24 hours. All groups were submitted to a traction test using an EMIC DL2000 universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The bracket resistance to debonding was compared between the groups by the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test (p < 0.05 and it was verified that the bleaching agent significantly reduced bracket adhesion when bonded 24 hours after bleaching. However, seven days after bleaching, there was no significant difference on the resistance to debonding among groups G1 (19,52 kgf and G3 (18,44 kgf, meaning that it is necessary to wait longer after bleaching to bond brackets.

  9. Biodegradao de braquetes ortodnticos: anlise por microscopia eletrnica de varredura Analysis of biodegradation of orthodontic brackets using scanning electron microscopy

    Luciane Macedo de Menezes; Rodrigo Matos de Souza; Gabriel Schmidt Dolci; Berenice Anina Dedavid

    2010-01-01

    OBJETIVO: analisar, por meio de microscopia eletrnica de varredura, as alteraes qumicas e estruturais de braquetes metlicos submetidos a um processo de biodegradao in vitro. MTODOS: a amostra foi dividida em dois grupos, de acordo com a marca comercial dos acessrios - Grupo A = Dyna-Lock, 3M/Unitek (AISI 303) e Grupo B = LG Edgewise Standard, American Orthodontics (AISI 316L). Os corpos de prova, aparelhos ortodnticos simulados, permaneceram imersos em soluo salina (0,05%) por um ...

  10. Orthodontic brackets removal under shear and tensile bond strength resistance tests – a comparative test between light sources

    We have investigated if a new LEDs system has enough efficient energy to promote efficient shear and tensile bonding strength resistance under standardized tests. LEDs 470 ± 10 nm can be used to photocure composite during bracket fixation. Advantages considering resistance to tensile and shear bonding strength when these systems were used are necessary to justify their clinical use. Forty eight human extracted premolars teeth and two light sources were selected, one halogen lamp and a LEDs system. Brackets for premolar were bonded through composite resin. Samples were submitted to standardized tests. A comparison between used sources under shear bonding strength test, obtained similar results; however, tensile bonding test showed distinct results: a statistical difference at a level of 1% between exposure times (40 and 60 seconds) and even to an interaction between light source and exposure time. The best result was obtained with halogen lamp use by 60 seconds, even during re-bonding; however LEDs system can be used for bonding and re-bonding brackets if power density could be increased

  11. Shear bond strength and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with conventional acid-etch and self-etch primer systems: An in-vivo study

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh; Moghimi, Mahsan; Shahrbaf, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Background Different in-vitro studies have reported various results regarding shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets when SEP technique is compared to conventional system. This in-vivo study was designed to compare the effect of conventional acid-etching and self-etching primer adhesive (SEP) systems on SBS and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. Material and Methods 120 intact first maxillary and mandibular premolars of 30 orthodontic patients were selected and bonded with metal and ceramic brackets using conventional acid-etch or self-etch primer system. The bonded brackets were incorporated into the wire during the study period to simulate the real orthodontic treatment condition. The teeth were extracted and debonded after 30 days. The SBS, debonding characteristics and adhesive remnant indices (ARI) were determined in all groups. Results The mean SBS of metal brackets was 10.63±1.42 MPa in conventional and 9.38±1.53 MPa in SEP system, (P=0.004). No statistically significant difference was noted between conventional and SEP systems in ceramic brackets. The frequency of 1, 2 and 3 ARI scores and debonding within the adhesive were the most common among all groups. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding ARI or failure mode of debonded specimens in different brackets or bonding systems. Conclusions The SBS of metal brackets bonded using conventional system was significantly higher than SEP system, although the SBS of SEP system was clinically acceptable. No significant difference was found between conventional and SEP systems used with ceramic brackets. Total SBS of metal brackets was significantly higher than ceramic brackets. Due to adequate SBS of SEP system in bonding the metal brackets, it can be used as an alternative for conventional system. Key words:Shear bond strength, Orthodontic brackets, Adhesive remnant index, self-etch. PMID:26855704

  12. Biodegradao de braquetes ortodnticos: avaliao da liberao inica in vitro Biodegradation of orthodontic brackets: in vitro ion release

    Gabriel Schmidt Dolci; Luciane Macedo de Menezes; Rodrigo Matos de Souza; Berenice Anina Dedavid

    2008-01-01

    OBJETIVO: avaliar, in vitro, a biodegradao de aparelhos ortodnticos simulados constitudos de braquetes e fios de ao inoxidvel. METODOLOGIA: a amostra foi dividida em 2 grupos, de acordo com a marca dos braquetes usados: grupo A - Dyna-Lock, 3M/Unitek (AISI 303); e grupo B - LG Edgewise Standard, American Orthodontics (AISI 316L). Os corpos-de-prova permaneceram incubados em soluo salina (0,05%) a 36C, sob agitao por um perodo de at 60 dias. A anlise da liberao inica foi reali...

  13. Quantitative analysis of S. mutans and S. sobrinus cultivated independently and adhered to polished orthodontic composite resins

    VELAZQUEZ-ENRIQUEZ, Ulises; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio Jose; CONTRERAS-BULNES, Rosalia; FLORES-ESTRADA, Jaime; UEMATSU, Shinsuke; YAMAGUCHI, Ryozo

    2012-01-01

    In Orthodontics, fixed appliances placed in the oral cavity are colonized by microorganisms. Objective The purpose of this study was to quantitatively determine the independent bacterial colonization of S. mutans and S. sobrinus in orthodontic composite resins. Material and methods Seven orthodontic composite adhesives for bonding brackets were selected and classified into 14 groups; (GIm, GIs) Enlight, (GIIm, GIIs) Grengloo, (GIIIm, GIIIs) Kurasper F, (GIVm, GIVs) BeautyOrtho Bond, (GVm, GVs...

  14. Quantitative analysis of S. mutans and S. sobrinus cultivated independently and adhered to polished orthodontic composite resins

    Ulises Velazquez-Enriquez; Rogelio Jose Scougall-Vilchis; Rosalia Contreras-Bulnes; Jaime Flores-Estrada; Shinsuke Uematsu; Ryozo Yamaguchi

    2012-01-01

    In Orthodontics, fixed appliances placed in the oral cavity are colonized by microorganisms. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively determine the independent bacterial colonization of S. mutans and S. sobrinus in orthodontic composite resins. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seven orthodontic composite adhesives for bonding brackets were selected and classified into 14 groups; (GIm, GIs) Enlight, (GIIm, GIIs) Grengloo, (GIIIm, GIIIs) Kurasper F, (GIVm, GIVs) BeautyOrtho Bond, (GVm, G...

  15. Avaliao da influncia dos tipos de tratamento superficial da porcelana glazeada na colagem de braquetes ortodnticos Evaluation of the influence of porcelain conditioning techniques in orthodontic brackets bonding

    Camila Belo Falco

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influncia do tipo de tratamento superficial da porcelana na resistncia adesiva da colagem de braquetes ortodnticos e o modo de fratura aps a descolagem. METODOLOGIA:foram confeccionados 80 corpos-de-prova de porcelana, divididos em quatro grupos (n = 18 de acordo com os diferentes tratamentos de superfcie: (G1 ponta diamantada; (G2 ponta diamantada e silano; (G3 cido hidrofluordrico e (G4 cido hidrofluordrico e silano. Aps o preparo das superfcies, braquetes Edgewise (Morelli foram colados com resina (Transbond XT, 3M e submetidos ao teste de cisalhamento. Os resultados foram avaliados estatisticamente pelo teste de Kruskal-Wallis. RESULTADO: o grupo G1 apresentou uma mdia de resistncia de 3,35, o G2 3,97, o G3 2,56 e o G4 3,10. CONCLUSO: constatou-se que no houve diferena estatisticamente significativa na resistncia adesiva do braquete entre os tipos de tratamentos estudados (p > 0,05 e os modos de fratura ocorreram, em sua grande maioria, na interface braquete/resina. Este estudo indica que todos os tipos de tratamentos apresentados so eficientes para a colagem.AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of various porcelain surface treatments on the strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to porcelain and the fracture mode after debonding. METHODS: Eighty samples of porcelain were randomly divided into four groups according to their surface preparation, as follows: (G1 diamond bur, (G2 diamond bur with silane, (G3 hydrofluoridic acid and (G4 hydrofluoridic acid with silane. After surface treatment the Edgewise brackets (Morelli were bonded with resin (Transbond XT, 3M and sheared off. The Kruskal-Wallis statistical test were applied on the data. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in bond strength between the groups (p > 0.05 and the fracture mode in most of the porcelain occurred in the composite/bracket interface. The G1 had an resistance average of 3.35, G2 = 3.97, G3 = 2.56 and G4 = 3.10.

  16. Avaliao da influncia dos tipos de tratamento superficial da porcelana glazeada na colagem de braquetes ortodnticos / Evaluation of the influence of porcelain conditioning techniques in orthodontic brackets bonding

    Camila Belo, Falco; Adriano Marques, Brito; Fernando Jorge Mendes, Ahid.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influncia do tipo de tratamento superficial da porcelana na resistncia adesiva da colagem de braquetes ortodnticos e o modo de fratura aps a descolagem. METODOLOGIA:foram confeccionados 80 corpos-de-prova de porcelana, divididos em quatro grupos [...] (n = 18) de acordo com os diferentes tratamentos de superfcie: (G1) ponta diamantada; (G2) ponta diamantada e silano; (G3) cido hidrofluordrico e (G4) cido hidrofluordrico e silano. Aps o preparo das superfcies, braquetes Edgewise (Morelli) foram colados com resina (Transbond XT, 3M) e submetidos ao teste de cisalhamento. Os resultados foram avaliados estatisticamente pelo teste de Kruskal-Wallis. RESULTADO: o grupo G1 apresentou uma mdia de resistncia de 3,35, o G2 3,97, o G3 2,56 e o G4 3,10. CONCLUSO: constatou-se que no houve diferena estatisticamente significativa na resistncia adesiva do braquete entre os tipos de tratamentos estudados (p > 0,05) e os modos de fratura ocorreram, em sua grande maioria, na interface braquete/resina. Este estudo indica que todos os tipos de tratamentos apresentados so eficientes para a colagem. Abstract in english AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of various porcelain surface treatments on the strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to porcelain and the fracture mode after debonding. METHODS: Eighty samples of porcelain were randomly divided into four groups according to their surface p [...] reparation, as follows: (G1) diamond bur, (G2) diamond bur with silane, (G3) hydrofluoridic acid and (G4) hydrofluoridic acid with silane. After surface treatment the Edgewise brackets (Morelli) were bonded with resin (Transbond XT, 3M) and sheared off. The Kruskal-Wallis statistical test were applied on the data. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in bond strength between the groups (p > 0.05) and the fracture mode in most of the porcelain occurred in the composite/bracket interface. The G1 had an resistance average of 3.35, G2 = 3.97, G3 = 2.56 and G4 = 3.10.

  17. The effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate on the in vitro shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Park, Sun-Youn; Cha, Jung-Yul; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Hwang, Chung-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded to non-demineralized teeth with either phosphoric acid etching or self-etching primer. Methods Sixty human premolars were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups (n = 15 each): phosphoric acid etching (group 1); self-etching primer (group 2); CPP-ACP for 2 weeks + phosphoric acid etching (group 3), and CPP-ACP fo...

  18. Comparison of Frictional Forces Generated by a New Ceramic Bracket with the Conventional Brackets using Unconventional and Conventional Ligation System and the Self-ligating Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    Pasha, Azam; Vishwakarma, Swati; Narayan, Anjali; Vinay, K; Shetty, Smitha V; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed orthodontic mechanotherapy is associated with friction between the bracket - wire - ligature interfaces during the sliding mechanics. A sound knowledge of the various factors affecting the magnitude of friction is of paramount importance. The present study was done to analyze and compare the frictional forces generated by a new ceramic (Clarity Advanced) bracket with the conventional, (metal and ceramic) brackets using unconventional and conventional ligation system, and the self-ligating (metal and ceramic) brackets in the dry condition. Materials and Methods: The various bracket wire ligation combinations were tested in dry condition. The brackets used were of 0.022″ × 0.028″ nominal slot dimension of MBT prescription: Stainless steel (SS) self-ligating bracket (SLB) of (SmartClip), SS Conventional bracket (CB) (Victory series), Ceramic SLB (Clarity SL), Conventional Ceramic bracket with metal slot (Clarity Bracket), Clarity Advanced Ceramic Brackets (Clarity™ ADVANCED, 3M Unitek). These brackets were used with two types of elastomeric ligatures: Conventional Elastomeric Ligatures (CEL) (Clear medium mini modules) and Unconventional Elastomeric Ligatures (UEL) (Clear medium slide ligatures, Leone orthodontic products). The aligning and the retraction wires were used, i.e., 0.014″ nickel titanium (NiTi) wires and 0.019″ × 0.025″ SS wires, respectively. A universal strength testing machine was used to measure the friction produced between the different bracket, archwires, and ligation combination. This was done with the use of a custom-made jig being in position. Results: Mean, standard deviation, and range were computed for the frictional values obtained. Results were subjected to statistical analysis through ANOVA. The frictional resistance observed in the new Clarity Advanced bracket with a conventional elastomeric ligature was almost similar with the Clarity metal slot bracket with a conventional elastomeric ligature. When using the UEL, the Clarity Advanced bracket produced lesser friction than the conventional metal bracket; but not less than the ceramic metal slot bracket. Ceramic SLB produced lesser friction when compared with the Clarity Advanced bracket with UEL, but the metal SLB produced the least friction among all the groups and subgroups. Conclusion: The present study concluded that the SS SLB produced least friction among all groups. Using the archwire and ligation method, frictional forces observed in the Clarity Advanced bracket and the conventional ceramic with metal slot bracket were almost similar; but the least resistance was determined in SS CB using both the ligation (CEL and UEL) system. PMID:26435628

  19. Resistncia remoo de braquetes ortodnticos sob ao de diferentes cargas contnuas / Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using different static loading application

    Carla, Giannini; Paulo Afonso Silveira, Francisconi.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: testar se existe alterao na resistncia adesiva de dois cimentos utilizados na colagem de acessrios ortodnticos ao esmalte dentrio bovino, sendo um de polimerizao qumica (Concise ortodntico) e outro fotopolimerizvel (Transbond XT), aps a aplicao de cargas contnuas. METODOLOGI [...] A: foram utilizados para este estudo 80 dentes bovinos e 80 braquetes metlicos. O esmalte bovino foi condicionado com cido fosfrico a 37% por 1 minuto e depois lavado e seco. A aplicao dos adesivos, manipulao e aplicao dos dois cimentos foram feitas de acordo com as instrues dos fabricantes. Aps 24 horas, todos os braquetes foram submetidos a cargas contnuas de 30g, 70g e 120g, menos o grupo controle, que no recebeu carga alguma. Os espcimes ficaram imersos em gua filtrada por 28 dias dentro de uma estufa a 37C. Depois deste perodo, as amostras foram submetidas a testes de cisalhamento em uma Mquina de Ensaios Universal Kratos. Os resultados foram registrados e enviados para anlise estatstica. CONCLUSES: (1) o cimento Concise apresentou maior resistncia remoo que o cimento Transbond XT para todas as cargas utilizadas, (2) no houve diferena estatisticamente significante na resistncia adesiva frente s trs cargas utilizadas para os dois cimentos testados; (3) no momento da fratura, conforme ocorreu o aumento da carga, a porcentagem de fratura do esmalte diminuiu para o Concise, ao contrrio do cimento Transbond XT, onde a porcentagem de fratura de esmalte se manteve constante com o aumento das cargas. Abstract in english AIM: The purpose of this study was to test differences on bond strength between auto-cured (Concise) and light-cured (Transbond XT) cements after static loading and shear test. METHODS: Eighty bovine teeth and metallic orthodontic brackets (Morelli Ortodontia Braquete Edgewise/Rickets) were tested a [...] fter static loads of 30, 70 and 120grs. Bovine enamel was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid gel for one minute, rinsed and dried. Adhesives were applied and brackets were bonded according to manufacturers instructions. Cement thickness was standardized with the use of a heavier Gilmore needle. After 24 hours, half of the specimens were submitted to the static loads of 30, 70 and 120grs. Control group remained unloaded. Then, specimens were immersed in distilled water for 28 days at 37C. Afterwards, orthodontic brackets were attached to a loop wire and submitted to a shear force (Mquina de Ensaios Kratos Universal Kratos) under a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min and load cell of 500Kgf. A two-way ANOVA test (alpha = 0.05) was used to detect significant interactions between cements and static loads. CONCLUSIONS: (1) The Concise cement showed more statistically significant bond strength values than the Transbond XT cement for all static loads; (2) No statistically significant differences were observed regarding static loads for all cements tested and (3) Higher static loads provided less enamel fracture in the Concise group after shear test, whereas in the Transbond XT the rate of enamel fracture remained unchanged regardless of previous load applied.

  20. Influência da secção transversa de fios ortodônticos na fricção superficial de braquetes autoligados Influence of the cross-section of orthodontic wires on the surface friction of self-ligating brackets

    Roberta Buzzoni

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o objetivo do presente trabalho foi determinar a força de atrito estático entre braquetes de aço inoxidável autoligados com sistema de fechamento resiliente e fios ortodônticos redondos e retangulares do mesmo material. MÉTODOS: empregaram-se 30 braquetes referentes aos caninos superiores divididos em 6 grupos formados por braquetes autoligados Smartclip, In-Ovation R e convencionais Gemini amarrados com ligaduras elásticas. A hipótese testada neste trabalho foi quanto à possibilidade dos braquetes autoligados ativos serem suscetíveis à elevação da força de atrito com o aumento e alteração da secção transversal dos fios ortodônticos. Os ensaios foram realizados com tração de 30s em fios de aço inoxidável 0,020" e 0,019"X0,025" na máquina de ensaios Emic DL 10000, com uma célula de carga de 20 newtons. Cada conjunto braquete/fio foi responsável pela geração de quatro corpos de prova, totalizando 120 leituras. As comparações entre as médias foram realizadas através da Análise de Variância (one way ANOVA com correções pelo coeficiente de Bonferroni. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: os braquetes autoligados apresentaram maior força de atrito do que os braquetes convencionais amarrados com ligaduras elásticas. O grupo Smartclip foi o mais efetivo no controle do atrito (pOBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the surface friction produced by self-ligating stainless steel brackets equipped with a resilient closure system and compare the friction generated during traction of round and rectangular orthodontic wires made from the same material. METHODS: Thirty maxillary canine brackets were divided into six groups comprising SmartClip and In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets, and conventional Gemini brackets tied with elastomeric ligatures. This investigation tested the hypothesis that self-ligating brackets are susceptible to increases in friction that are commensurate with increases and changes in the cross-section of orthodontic wires. Traction was performed with the aid of thirty segments of 0.020" and 0.019" x 0.025" stainless steel wires in an EMIC DL 10000 testing machine with a 2N load cell. Each set of bracket/wire generated four samples, totaling 120 readings. Comparisons between means were performed using analysis of variance (one way ANOVA corrected with the Bonferroni coefficient. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The self-ligating brackets exhibited lower friction than conventional brackets tied with elastomeric ligatures. The SmartClip group was the most effective in controlling friction (p <0.01. The hypothesis under test was confirmed to the extent that the traction performed with rectangular 0.019" x 0.025" cross-section wires resulted in higher friction forces than those observed in the 0.020" round wire groups (p<0.01. The SmartClip system was more effective even when the traction produced by rectangular wires was compared with the In-Ovation R brackets combined with round wires (p<0.01.

  1. Comparative study on direct and indirect bracket bonding techniques regarding time length and bracket detachment

    Jefferson Vinicius Bozelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the time spent for direct (DBB - direct bracket bonding and indirect (IBB - indirect bracket bonding bracket bonding techniques. The time length of laboratorial (IBB and clinical steps (DBB and IBB as well as the prevalence of loose bracket after a 24-week follow-up were evaluated. METHODS: Seventeen patients (7 men and 10 women with a mean age of 21 years, requiring orthodontic treatment were selected for this study. A total of 304 brackets were used (151 DBB and 153 IBB. The same bracket type and bonding material were used in both groups. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by Wilcoxon non-parametric test at 5% level of significance. RESULTS: Considering the total time length, the IBB technique was more time-consuming than the DBB (p < 0.001. However, considering only the clinical phase, the IBB took less time than the DBB (p < 0.001. There was no significant difference (p = 0.910 for the time spent during laboratorial positioning of the brackets and clinical session for IBB in comparison to the clinical procedure for DBB. Additionally, no difference was found as for the prevalence of loose bracket between both groups. CONCLUSION: the IBB can be suggested as a valid clinical procedure since the clinical session was faster and the total time spent for laboratorial positioning of the brackets and clinical procedure was similar to that of DBB. In addition, both approaches resulted in similar frequency of loose bracket.

  2. Scanning electron microscopic examination of enamel surface after fixed orthodontic treatment: In-vivo study

    Sessa Tijana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Therapy with fixed orthodontic appliances starts with bracket bonding and ends with debonding of brackets, leaving enamel surface varied. Objective. The aim of this pilot study was to examine enamel surface before and after debonding of orthodontic brackets by the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Methods. Epoxy replicas of four patients’ premolars indicated for therapy with fixed orthodontic appliances were made and brackets were bonded to their teeth with a different adhesives (Enlight, No-mix, Fuji Ortho LC and Heliosit Orthodontic (n=4. Two months later, brackets on premolars were debonded and amounts of adhesive left on the tooth surfaces and the bracket bases were evaluated with the adhesive remnant index (ARI. After resin removal, epoxy replicas were made and the surface of premolars was evaluated with the enamel surface index (ESI. All replicas of premolars (n=32 were prepared for SEM examination and compared under different magnifications. Tooth damage was estimated based on correlation between ARItooth and ESI. Results. Pearson’s χ2 test showed no significant differences between ARItooth and ARIbracket of four materials used. Nonparametric correlations showed significant differences between ARItooth and ARIbracket, ESI and ARItooth, and between ESI and ARIbracket. Increasing of ARItooth is followed with the descent of ARIbracket and the ascent of ESI. Multivariate regression analysis showed a significant correlation between ESI and ARItooth. Conclusion. Most bond failures took place at enamel-adhesive interface. ARItooth was a predictor to enamel surface damage. The type of material did not affect enamel surface damage.

  3. Impact of brackets on smile esthetics: laypersons and orthodontists perception

    Seandra Cordeiro de Oliveira; Rachel D'Aurea Furquim; Adilson Luiz Ramos

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the influence of orthodontic appliances on smile esthetics assessed by lay adolescents, lay adults and orthodontists. METHODS: A facial photograph of a smiling young woman was used under the following conditions: With metal orthodontic brackets ligated by different elastic ligature colors (green, red and gray), with ceramic bracket brackets (transparent elastic ligature) and without brackets, totaling five 15 x 20 cm pictures. For the photograph assessment, 16 ...

  4. Avaliao do uso do Self Etching Primer na colagem de braquetes ortodnticos metlicos Assessment of the Self-Etching Primer on bonding of metallic orthodontic brackets

    Adriane Regina Sponchiado

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Nesta pesquisa laboratorial foi avaliada a resistncia de unio ao cisalhamento de braquetes metlicos colados ao esmalte dentrio bovino, utilizando um sistema adesivo convencional, composto de cido fosfrico + primer + resina adesiva, e de um sistema SEP (self-etching primer que combina cido e primer em uma nica soluo, avaliado em ambiente seco e mido (com gua. Quarenta e oito incisivos inferiores bovinos foram divididos em trs grupos de 16 unidades, que foram assim preparados: grupo 1 (controle cido fosfrico 37% + primer + resina Transbond XT; o grupo 2 Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer em ambiente seco + resina Transbond XT e no grupo 3 o Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer foi aplicado em ambiente mido com gua + Transbond XT. Efetuada a colagem, procedeu-se o ensaio mecnico em uma mquina Instron, a uma velocidade de 1mm/min. As mdias da resistncia de unio ao cisalhamento encontradas foram: 9,29MPa para o grupo 1; 10,57MPa para o grupo 2 e 7,45MPa para o grupo 3, sendo que os trs grupos apresentaram resistncia compatvel com o uso clnico. No houve diferena estatisticamente significante entre o sistema convencional e o SEP em ambiente seco, nem em ambiente mido. Houve reduo significativa na resistncia de unio ao cisalhamento para o SEP em ambiente mido quando comparado ao SEP em ambiente seco. Conclumos que o Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer apresenta resistncia de unio ao esmalte similar ao cido fosfrico 37% + primer, sendo indicado para uso clnico na colagem de braquetes ortodnticos.This research evaluated the shear bond strength of metallic brackets bonded to bovine teeth, using conventional adhesive system consisting of phosphoric acid + primer + adhesive resin, and a system SEP (self-etching primer that combines acid and primer in one solution. The SEP system was evaluated in either dry and moist (water environments. Forty-eight lower bovine incisors teeth were divided in three groups of sixteen units each one, prepared as following: group 1(control phosphoric acid 37% + primer + Transbond XT resin; group 2 Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer in dry environment + Transbond XT resin, and group 3 the Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer applied in moist environment + Transbond XT.After bonding, the mechanical test was performed with an Instron machine (crosshead speed of 1mm/min. The shear bond strength were: 9,29 MPa for group 1;10,57 MPa for group 2 and 7,45 MPa for group 3.All groups showed clinical acceptable resistance. There wasn't significant difference between conventional system and the SEP in dry environment, neither in moist environment. However, there was a significant reduction in the shear bond strength for the SEP in moist environment when compared with SEP in dry environment. It was concluded that Transbond + Self Etching Primer showed shear bond strength to enamel similar to phosphoric acid 37% + primer, therefore it is indicated to clinically bond orthodontic brackets.

  5. Plaque accumulation and Streptococcus mutans levels around self-ligating bracket clips and elastomeric modules: A randomized controlled trial

    Dhaval Fadia; Meghna Vandekar; Nikhilesh Vaid; Viraj Doshi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the effect of two different ligating systems that is, elastomeric modules and self-ligating (SL) bracket systems (Smartclip - 3M Unitek) with respect to harboring bacterial plaque in fixed orthodontic treatment. Objectives: To assess, evaluate, and compare the amount of plaque accumulation and Streptococcus mutans colonization around elastomeric ligation and SL clips in the smart clip appliance. Materials and Methods: A total of 111 orthodontic patients scheduled for fixed o...

  6. Influence of Water Storage and Bonding Material on Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to Ceramic.

    Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Consani, Simonides; Giorgi, Maria Cecília Caldas; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia; Vedovello Filho, Mário; Santos, Eduardo Cesar Almada; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of water storage (24 h and 6 months), and Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC bonding materials on the bond strength of metallic brackets bonded to feldspathic ceramic. Four cylinders of feldspathic ceramic were etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s. Each cylinder received two layers of silane. Metallic brackets were bonded to the cylinders using Transbond XT or Fuji Ortho LC. Light-activation was carried out with 40 s total exposure time using Bluephase G2. Half the specimens for each bonding materials (n=20) were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h and the other half for 6 months. Shear bond strength testing was performed after storage times at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to evaluate the amount of adhesive remaining on the ceramic surface at ×8 magnification. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Transbond XT showed significantly higher bond strength (p<0.05) than Fuji Ortho LC. Significant differences in bond strength (p<0.05) were found when 24 h and 6 months storage times were compared between materials. ARI showed a predominance of score 0 for all groups, and higher scores at 1, 2 and 3 for 24 h storage time. In conclusion, storage time and bonding materials showed significant influence on the bond strength of brackets to ceramic. PMID:26647936

  7. Effect of light-curing units in shear bond strength of metallic brackets: an in vitro study

    Luciana Borges Retamoso; Niége Michelle Lazzari Onofre; Luciane Hann; Ernani Menezes Marchioro

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the influence of the light curing units on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventy-two premolars were divided into six groups (n=12): Group I: brackets bonded with Transbond and polymerization with halogen light; Group II: Transbond and LED; Group III: Fuji Ortho and halogen light; Group IV: Fuji Ortho and LED; Group V: Fuji Ortho, without acid and halogen light; Group VI: Fuji Ortho, without acid and LED. The groups were tested ...

  8. Comparison of the effect of hydrogel and solution forms of sodium ascorbate on orthodontic bracket-enamel shear bond strength immediately after bleaching: An in vitro study

    Kimyai Soodabeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study compared the effects of hydrogel and solution forms of sodium ascorbate (SA with two different application times on bracket bond strength subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: A total of 72 sound premolars were randomly divided into six groups (n = 12: An unbleached control group (group one and five experimental groups of carbamide peroxide. Specimens in group two were bonded immediately after bleaching; specimens in groups three and four were bleached, then treated with SA solution for ten minutes and three hours, respectively, and then bonded. In groups five and six, SA hydrogel was used and the specimens were prepared similar to groups three and four, respectively. Following debonding, bond strengths were recorded in MPa. To evaluate the amount of resin left on the enamel surfaces, adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were used. Statistical Analysis: The bond strength data were analyzed with ANOVA and pairwise comparisons were made by Tukey test. The ARI data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis test and two-by-two comparisons were made by the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: There were significant differences in bond strengths between the groups ( P < 0.0005. However, the differences between groups three, four, five and six were not significant. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between group one and groups four and six, whereas the differences between the other groups were significant ( P < 0.05. Regarding ARI, there were significant differences among the groups ( P = 0.004. Conclusion: Bleaching significantly decreased the bracket bond strength. Compromised bonding was reversed with a three-hour application of both forms of SA.

  9. Evaluation of the Friction of Self-Ligating and Conventional Bracket Systems

    Tecco, Simona; Di Iorio, Donato; Nucera, Riccardo; Di Bisceglie, Beatrice; Cordasco, Giancarlo; Festa, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study evaluated the friction (F) generated by aligned stainless steel (SS) conventional brackets, self-ligating Damon MX© brackets (SDS Ormco, Glendora, California, USA), Time3© brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, USA), Vision LP© brackets (American Orthodontics), and low-friction Slide© ligatures (Leone, Firenze, Italy) coupled with various SS, nickel-titanium (NiTi), and beta-titanium (TMA) archwires. Methods: All brackets had a 0.022-inch slot, ...

  10. Analysis of mesiodistal angulations of preadjusted brackets

    Marcos Rogério de MENDONÇA; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Aubrey Fernando FABRE; Cuoghi, Osmar Aparecido

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturers offer various prescriptions of preadjusted brackets for use in the “straight-wire” orthodontic technique. However, the need to incorporate bends in the rectangular wires during orthodontic finishing has led to concerns regarding the type of prescription chosen and the credibility of information provided by the manufacturer. The aim of this study was to compare the slot angulations of Roth prescription preadjusted metallic brackets for the maxillary left central incisor and maxil...

  11. Application of particle-induced X-ray emission, backscattering spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy in the evaluation of orthodontic materials

    The focus of this investigation was on orthodontic materials used in the manufacture of dental brackets. The properties of these dental materials are subjected to various physical parameters such as elongation, yield strength and elasticity that justify their application. In turn, these parameters depend on the quantitative elemental concentration distribution (QECD) in the materials used in the manufacture. For compositional analysis, proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), backscatter spectrometry (BS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied. QECD analysis was performed to correlate the physical parameters with the composition and to quantify imperfections in the materials. PIXE and BS analyses were performed simultaneously with a 3 MeV proton beam while electrons accelerated at 25 keV were used for the SEM analysis. From the QECDs it was observed that: (1) the major elements Cr, Fe and Ni were homogeneously distributed in the orthodontic plate; (2) the distribution of Mo and O correlated with one another; (3) there was a spread of Cr around regions of high C concentration; and, (4) areas of high concentrations of Mo and O corresponded to a decrease in C concentrations. Elemental concentration correlations are shown to indicate the similarities and differences in the ease of formation of phases, based on the tangent of linearity. (author)

  12. Derived brackets

    Kosmann-Schwarzbach, Yvette

    2003-01-01

    We survey the many instances of derived bracket construction in differential geometry, Lie algebroid and Courant algebroid theories, and their properties. We recall and compare the constructions of Buttin and Vinogradov, and we prove that the Vinogradov bracket is the skew-symmetrization of a derived bracket. Odd (resp., even) Poisson brackets on supermanifolds are derived brackets of canonical even (resp., odd) Poisson brackets on their cotangent bundle (resp., parity-reversed cotangent bund...

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Recycled Brackets using Different Methods: An In vitro Study

    Kumar, Mukesh; Maheshwari, Amit; Lall, Rajeev; Navit, Pragati; Singh, Rajeshwar; Navit, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of brackets commonly occurs during orthodontic treatment. Due to increase in costs replacement of a damaged bracket is not liked by the dentist. This study is done to assess the shear bond strength of recycled brackets using different methods. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using five groups of orthodontic brackets (0.022” × 0.028”, MBT prescription) bonded on the premolars mounted in cubes. Other materials required were cubical trays, bonding material, light cure unit, universal testing machine, digital camera and sandblasting unit. Results: From the result of ANOVA test we observed the test is significant (F = 20.79, P < 0.01) and the test is rejected. When the Tukey’s t-test result was applied it was seen that the mean shear bond strength of all groups of brackets is as follows: Group I (5.31 Megapascals [Mpa]) < Group II (7.37 Mpa) < Group III (8.96 Mpa) < Group IV (5.56 Mpa) < Control group (9.24 Mpa). Alternatively we can say that shear bond strength of following bracket groups can be arranged as Group I < Group IV < Group II < Group III. Conclusion: From this study we conclude that Group III, which was recycled with an ultrasonic cleaner with electropolisher and silane coupling agent in place of primer, showed the highest shear bond strength. PMID:25395785

  14. Stress distributions of a bracket type orthodontic miniscrew and the surrounding bone under moment loadings: Three-dimensional finite element analysis

    Ajami, Shabnam; Mina, Ahmad; Nabavizadeh, Seyed Amin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of moments and the combination of forces and moments on the mechanical properties of a bracket type miniscrew, resembling engagement of a rectangular wire by three-dimensional (3D) finite element study. Materials and Methods: By solid work software (Dassaunlt systems solid works, concord, Mass), a 3D miniscrew model of 6, 8, 10 mm lengths was designed and inserted in the osseous block, consisted of the cortical, and cancellous bones. The stress distributions, maximum stresses, and deflections of the miniscrew were evaluated for all parts using ANSYS (Work Bench, 2014). Results: As the magnitudes of the load increased from 100 to 200, 400 and 800 grf-mm, the peak of stresses in the 6 mm long miniscrew were increased from 7.7 to 61.5 Mpa. The maximum values of Von Mises in the cancellous bone were tremendously lower in comparison to the cortical bone by one hundredth. As the length of the miniscrew in contact with the bone was increased, the amounts and patterns of stress distribution in the cortical bone and the miniscrew did not change significantly. Conclusions: As the moment magnitude increased, the pick stresses increased linearly. The existence of cancellous bone was not significantly responsible for the stress distribution. The pattern of stress distribution did not change by the length of the miniscrew.

  15. Nanoparticles in orthodontics, a review of antimicrobial and anti-caries applications.

    Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Borzabadi, Ebrahim; Lynch, Edward

    2014-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are insoluble particles smaller than 100 nm in size. In order to prevent microbial adhesion or enamel demineralization in orthodontic therapy, two broad strategies have been used. These are incorporating certain NPs into orthodontic adhesives/cements or acrylic resins (nanofillers, silver, TiO2, SiO2, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite, fluorohydroxyapatite) and coating surfaces of orthodontic appliances with NPs (i.e. coating bracket surfaces with a thin film of nitrogen-doped TiO2). Although the use of NPs in orthodontics can offer new possibilities, previous studies investigated the antimicrobial or physical characteristic over a short time span, i.e. 24 hours to a few weeks, and the limitations of in vitro studies should be recognized. Information on the long-term performance of orthodontic material using nanotechnology is lacking and necessitates further investigation and so do possible safety issues (toxicity), which can be related to the NP sizes. PMID:24325608

  16. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material

    Jens Johannes Bock

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05 and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05. In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N. Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N. Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test. In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  17. Plaque accumulation and Streptococcus mutans levels around self-ligating bracket clips and elastomeric modules: A randomized controlled trial

    Dhaval Fadia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the effect of two different ligating systems that is, elastomeric modules and self-ligating (SL bracket systems (Smartclip - 3M Unitek with respect to harboring bacterial plaque in fixed orthodontic treatment. Objectives: To assess, evaluate, and compare the amount of plaque accumulation and Streptococcus mutans colonization around elastomeric ligation and SL clips in the smart clip appliance. Materials and Methods: A total of 111 orthodontic patients scheduled for fixed orthodontic treatments were selected for this split maxillary arch study. All the patients were bonded with smart-clip (3M Unitek SL brackets, and the wire was placed into the bracket slots, on the randomly selected hemi arch, elastomeric modules were placed for the study to be conducted. Microbial and periodontal plaque accumulation was recorded at 3-time intervals post ligation. Plaque index-by Silness and Loe, modified Quigely Hein index, bleeding on probing were evaluated, and biofilm was collected from the tooth surface after 30 days and placed in petri dishes containing Mitis Salivarius agar for bacterial culturing. Result: It was observed that the side where ligation was done with elastomeric modules accumulated more plaque and increase in S. mutans colony forming units as compared to the side without external ligation (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Reduced bacterial colonization and better plaque control was seen with SL orthodontic bracket appliance system as compared to conventional ligation method.

  18. Comparative bond strength of brackets cured using a pulsed xenon curing light with 2 different light-guide sizes.

    Oesterle, Larry J; Newman, Sheldon M; Shellhart, W Craig

    2002-09-01

    Light curing of composite resin material beneath orthodontic brackets is common in clinical orthodontics. Experiences with composite resins and high-intensity lights indicate some advantages to staged curing of the composite. In this study, the shear/peel bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to bovine enamel and cured with a pulsed xenon plasma arc light was compared with that of bonds cured with a conventional tungsten-quartz-halogen light and a nonpulsed xenon plasma arc light. The pulsed light provided less light energy than the nonpulsed lights. A small and a larger light-guide tip were used with the pulsed xenon plasma arc light. Three different orthodontic composite resin adhesives were tested with each light. The pulsed xenon plasma arc light resulted in either the same or decreased shear/peel bond strength when compared with the nonpulsed lights. There appeared to be no advantage to the use of a pulsed xenon plasma arc light in bonding orthodontic brackets. Results from using either a small or a large light-guide tip varied with the adhesive tested. PMID:12226604

  19. Avaliao da resistncia ao cisalhamento de braquetes colados com resinas ortodnticas fluoretadas Evaluation of shear bond strength of brackets bonded with orthodontic fluoride-releasing composite resins

    Marcia Cristina Rastelli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistncia ao cisalhamento de braquetes metlicos colados com resinas que contm flor, comparando-as a uma resina convencional; e analisar a quantidade de adesivo remanescente na superfcie do esmalte. MTODOS: sessenta pr-molares foram divididos aleatoriamente em 3 grupos: Grupo I - Concise (3M, Grupo II - Ultrabond (Aditek do Brasil e Grupo III - Rely-a-Bond (Reliance. Aps a colagem dos braquetes, as amostras foram termocicladas (500 ciclos nas temperaturas de 5C e 55C. Aps 48 horas, foram submetidas aos ensaios mecnicos de cisalhamento na direo oclusocervical, com velocidade de carga de 0,5mm/min, em uma mquina MTS 810. RESULTADOS: foram observadas resistncias mdias ao cisalhamento de 24,546,98MPa para o Grupo I, de 11,536,20MPa para o Grupo II e de 16,465,72MPa para o Grupo III. A Anlise de Varincia determinou diferena estatstica entre as mdias de resistncia ao cisalhamento entre os grupos (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the shear bond strength of stainless steel brackets bonded with fluoride releasing composite resins, comparing them with a conventional resin and to analyze the amount of resin left on the enamel surface. METHODS: Sixty premolars were randomly divided into three groups: Group I - Concise (3M, Group II - Ultrabond (Aditek do Brasil and Group III - Rely-a-Bond (Reliance. After bonding, the samples were thermocycled (500 cycles at 5C and 55C temperatures. After 48 hours they were subjected to shear bond strength testing, in the occluso-gingival direction, using an MTS 810 Universal Testing Machine with load speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: The results demonstrated a mean shear bond strength of 24.54 6.98 MPa for Group I, 11.53 6.20 MPa for Group II, and 16.46 5.72 MPa for Group III. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA determined a statistical difference in the mean shear bond strengths between groups (p < 0.001. The Tukey test evidenced that the averages of the three groups were significantly different (p < 0.05, with the highest values for Group I and the lowest for Group II. The Kruskal-Wallis test did not show significant differences in the amount of resin left on the enamel in any of the three groups (p = 0.361. CONCLUSION: All materials exhibited adequate adhesive bond strength for clinical use. Concise exhibited the highest degree of shear bond strength but no significant differences were found in Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI between the groups.

  20. Color stability of ceramic brackets immersed in potentially staining solutions

    Guignone, Bruna Coser; Silva, Ludimila Karsbergen; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarim; Akaki, Emilio; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; PITHON, Matheus Melo; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the color stability of five types of ceramic brackets after immersion in potentially staining solutions. METHODS: Ninety brackets were divided into 5 groups (n = 18) according to brackets commercial brands and the solutions in which they were immersed (coffee, red wine, coke and artificial saliva). The brackets assessed were Transcend (3M/Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA), Radiance (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA), Mystique (GAC International Inc., Bohemia, NY, USA) a...

  1. Vitalidade pulpar em dentes portadores de brackets ortodônticos: apresentação de uma técnica = Pulp vitality test on teeth having orthodontics brackets: technique presentation

    Barletta, Fernando Branco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a confiabilidade do teste de vitalidade pulpar com o gás refrigerante tetrafluoretano (CS 68 em dentes portadores de brackets ortodônticos. Foram selecionados 37 pacientes de clínica privada, com faixa etária entre 12 e 60 anos de idade. O teste de vitalidade pulpar foi realizado na face palatina ou lingual, na região de terço médio dos dentes, abaixo do cíngulo, nos grupos dentários dos incisivos, caninos e pré-molares superiores e inferiores, totalizando 402 dentes. Quando a resposta de sensibilidade pulpar era negativa ao teste, o mesmo era repetido; confirmando-se o resultado como negativo, realizavase uma tomada radiográfica pela técnica periapical do dente em questão. Os resultados evidenciaram 4 elementos dentários com resposta negativa ao teste de vitalidade pulpar, sendo 3 pré-molares e um incisivo central. A resposta dos demais foi positiva ao teste. Diante dos resultados, verificou-se que a aplicação do teste de vitalidade pulpar pela face palatina em pacientes portadores de brackets ortodônticos constitui-se em uma alternativa segura e confiável.

  2. Tiedown Bracket

    Mashburn, D.; Wald, J. E.; Helmsin, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    Tiedown bracket secured to concrete slab with lag anchor and lag bolt. A trailer or other heavy equipment can be anchored by tethering it to strapping bolt. When bracket is no longer needed, it can be removed, leaving behind only lag anchor. Bracket is easily installed and removed without damage to concrete slab.

  3. A clinical trial comparing the failure rates of two orthodontic bonding systems.

    Trimpeneers, L M; Dermaut, L R

    1996-11-01

    A clinical trial was carried out to compare the failure rates of a visible light-cured fluoride-releasing material with a chemically cured adhesive. Fifty patients were used for the trial and 762 brackets were bonded in a split-mouth experimental design. Bracket failures were reported over the full period of orthodontic treatment. Statistical data analysis was carried out by means of chi 2 tests. The results of this study indicate that brackets, bonded with a chemically cured material (Lee Insta-bond, Lee Pharmaceuticals, EI Monte, Calif.), showed significantly fewer failures than brackets bonded with the light-cured material (Orthon, Orthon Dental Inc., Victoria, Canada). When the site of bond failure was evaluated in an overall manner, there were significantly more lower than upper, and more posterior than anterior bond failures. PMID:8922515

  4. A study in vitro on radiation effects by Er:YAG laser combined with the fluorine therapy in the acid resistance of the dental enamel submitted to orthodontical brackets

    Several researches have been demonstrating an increase in the resistance acid of the enamel surface when irradiated by some lasers types as Nd:YAG, C02, Er:YAG, and others, mainly when combined with the fluoride therapy after the irradiation of the laser. This study in vitro used the laser of Er:YAG which density of energy of 8.1 J/cm2 on the enamel about of orthodontical brackets of teeth extracted pre-molars. These teeth were then submitted to a rich way in S. mutans for twenty one days. The cases were analyzed: (1) enamel surface without any treatment, (2) enamel surface without any irradiation laser, but with therapy with acidulated phosphate fluoride, (3) enamel surface irradiated with laser of Er:YAG and (4) enamel surface irradiated by laser of Er:YAG and with application of acidulated phosphate fluoride. The results were analyzed through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The morphologic changes observed to the scanning electron microscopy suggest increase in the acid resistance of the enamel surface. However, to the optical microscopy, it was still possible to visualize undesirable white stains in the surface of the enamel. (author)

  5. [Adult orthodontic technique: development and challenge].

    Li, Song; Zhou, Jiemin; Ren, Chaochao

    2013-12-01

    Orthodontic treatments have increasingly become accepted by adults. However, the treatment therapies and philosophies for adults and adolescents have numerous differences. Orthodontic treatment for adults requires more careful planning, flexible management, interdisciplinary cooperation, and rational expectations. New techniques, such as mini-screw implants, invisalign, and self-ligating brackets, have recently been used to update treatments and widen the application of adult orthodontics by improving the treatment results. However, orthodontists still face a number of risks and challenges. PMID:24437283

  6. Are claims made in orthodontic journal advertisements evidence-supported?

    Livas, Christos; Kouskoura, Thaleia; Ren, Yijin; Katsaros, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the supporting evidence of advertisements published in six leading orthodontic journals. MATERIALS AND METHODS The 2012-2013 printed issues of American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Australian Orthodontic Journal, Journal of Orthodontics, European Journal of Orthodontics, Journal of Clinical Orthodontics, and Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics were screened for advertisements implying superior performance compared with competitor products....

  7. SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF BRACKETS BONDED TO PORCELAIN SURFACE: IN VITRO STUDY

    Fidan Alakuş Sabuncuoğlu; Ergül Ertürk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effects of different porcelain surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Seventy feldspathic porcelain disk samples mounted in acrylic resin blocks were divided into seven groups (n=10) according to type of surface treatment: I, Diamond bur; II, Orthosphoric acid (OPA); III, hydrofluoric acid (HFA); IV, sandblasted with aluminum oxide (SB); V, SB+HFA; VI, Neodymiu...

  8. SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF BRACKETS BONDED TO PORCELAIN SURFACE: IN VITRO STUDY

    ALAKUŞ SABUNCUOĞLU, Fidan; ERTÜRK, Ergül

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effects of different porcelain surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: Seventy feldspathic porcelain disk samples mounted in acrylic resin blocks were divided into seven groups (n=10) according to type of surface treatment: I, Diamond bur; II, Orthosphoric acid (OPA); III, hydrofluoric acid (HFA); IV, sandblasted with aluminum oxide (SB); V, SB+HFA; VI, Neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet...

  9. Evaluación in vitro de la resistencia friccional entre brackets cerámicos y arcos de acero inoxidable con y sin recubrimiento vítreo aplicado por el método Sol-Gel In vitro evaluation of frictional resistance between ceramic brackets and orthodontic steel wires with and without glass coatings applied by Sol-Gel method

    Luz Adriana Rendón Arias

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: comparar la resistencia friccional estática y dinámica in vitro entre brackets cerámicos y alambres de acero inoxidable con recubrimiento vítreo aplicado por el método Sol-Gel y sin él. MÉTODOS: se prepararon 58 alambres de acero inoxidable AISI 304 de 0.016 x 0.016 con recubrimiento vítreo aplicado por Sol-Gel y sin él. Posteriormente se evaluó la resistencia a la fricción estática y dinámica in vitro de los alambres sobre brackets cerámicos de zafiro monocristalino y se caracterizaron las superficies en contacto por microscopia óptica y electrónica de barrido (SEM. RESULTADOS: se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre ambos grupos tanto para la fuerza de fricción estática (p = 0,000 como dinámica (p = 0,001. El grupo de los alambres recubiertos presentó una fuerza de fricción estática y dinámica mayor (estática: 1,78 ± 0,44 N, dinámica: 1,75 ± 0,49 N que el grupo sin recubrimientos (estática: 1,37 ± 0,31 N, dinámica: 1,41 ± 0,27 N. La caracterización por SEM mostró que se producen defectos superficiales en los recubrimientos después de las pruebas de fricción. CONCLUSIÓN: los recubrimientos evaluados no mostraron mejor comportamiento friccional sobre brackets de zafiro monocristalino cuando son comparados con el grupo control.INTRODUCTION: to compare the in vitro static and dynamic frictional resistance between ceramic brackets and stainless steel wires with and without glass coatings applied by sol-gel method. METHODS: 58 commercial stainless steel orthodontic wires AISI 304 (0.016 x 0.016 inch were prepared with and without vitreous coating applied by Sol- Gel method. The in vitro static and dynamic frictional resistance of the wires on the mono-crystalline ceramic brackets were evaluated; also, the wire surfaces were characterized by means of Optical Microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM. RESULTS: statistically significant differences were found between both groups under static (p = 0.000 as well as dynamic (p = 0.001 friction test. The friction values found in the coated group were higher (Static friction: 1.78 ± 0.44 N, Dynamic friction: 1.75 ± 0.49 N than the group with no coating (Static friction: 1.37 ± 0.31 N, Dynamic friction: 1.41 ± 0.27 N. Characterization by SEM showed surface defects in both groups after the friction tests. CONCLUSION: the evaluated coatings did not perform better in terms of frictional behavior on sapphire mono-crystalline ceramic brackets when compared with the control group.

  10. Avaliação da superfície da porcelana após a descolagem de braquetes ortodônticos Porcelain surface evaluation after debonding of orthodontic brackets

    André Moreira Mattos

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência do tempo de condicionamento ácido em superfície de porcelana e o estado desta após a descolagem de braquetes ortodônticos. METODOLOGIA: foram utilizadas 20 amostras de porcelana feldspática para esmalte (Duceram-LFC divididas em 2 grupos de acordo com o tempo de condicionamento com ácido fluorídico 10% (15 segundos e 1 minuto. Após o ataque ácido, foi aplicado silano (3M Scotchbond, adesivo resinoso (Optibond Solo Plus e resina (Fill Magic nestas superfícies. A descolagem foi realizada através de força de cisalhamento numa máquina universal de ensaios (DL 500 - EMIC calibrada com velocidade fixa de 0,5mm/minuto. O índice do adesivo remanescente (ARI nas superfícies cerâmicas e o estado destas após a remoção dos braquetes foram avaliados através de fotos digitais. RESULTADOS: no grupo 15 segundos, a força de adesão média foi de 3,63MPa, significantemente inferior à do grupo 1 minuto, que foi de 7,18MPa (pAIM: the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of acid conditioning time in porcelain surface and its characteristics after debonding of orthodontic brackets. METHODS: twenty samples of feldspathic porcelain for enamel (Duceram-LFC were divided in 2 groups according with the amount of time of acid conditioning with hydrofluoric acid 10% (15 seconds and 1 minute. After acid etching, it was applied silane (3M Scotchbond, adhesive (Optibond Solo Plus and resin (Fill Magic in these surfaces. The debonding was done with shear strength through a universal testing machine (DL 500 - EMIC calibrated with a fixed speed of 0.5mm/minute. The adhesive remnant index (ARI in the porcelain surfaces and their characteristics after removal of the brackets were evaluated through digital pictures. RESULTS: in the 15 seconds group, the mean bond strength was 3.63Mpa, significantly lower than the 1 minute group, that was 7.18Mpa (p<0.0001. All fractures during debonding were cohesive in the composite resin layer (70% or bond between the bracket and the resin (30%. In relation to the ARI analysis, the Chi-square test showed no statistically significant difference between both groups. CONCLUSION: conditioning with hydrofluoric acid 10% for 1 minute, followed by the application of silane, adhesive and resin was considered the best porcelain preparation method before orthodontic bonding.

  11. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives

    Aisha de Souza Gomes Stumpf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. METHODS: Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  12. Biocompatibilidade dos materiais em Ortodontia: mito ou realidade? Biocompatibility of orthodontic materials: myth or reality?

    Luciane Macedo de Menezes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é apresentar uma revisão sobre os conceitos relacionados à biocompatibilidade dos materiais empregados em Ortodontia. Fatos relacionados às reações de hipersensibilidade aos diversos materiais ortodônticos são discutidos, sendo apresentadas as condutas recomendáveis nestas situações.The aim of this paper is to present a review on the biocompatibility of orthodontic materials. Hypersensitivity reactions to these materials are discussed and the recommended conduct in this kind of situation are presented.

  13. Orthodontic material applications over the past century: Evolution of research methods to address clinical queries.

    Eliades, Theodore

    2015-05-01

    The advances in the field of materials as they relate to orthodontics can be divided into the actual evolution of materials applied to daily practice and the changes in research methods to study the performance and the biologic properties of the materials. Although it is evident that new materials have saturated the market during the past century, the basic concepts of attaching one appliance to the enamel to use as a grip and inserting wires into that to control the spatial orientation of a tooth are identical to the original concepts. In contrast to that, the numbers of treatises about those subjects and the complexity of instrumentation and analytic tools used in published research have advanced tremendously and at a frenetic pace. This highly specialized pattern of research may effectively raise boundaries across research areas, since the complexity of the issues allows researchers to comprehend the content of journal articles in a narrow spectrum of disciplines. The purposes of this article were to review the advances in the research methods for investigating the various properties of orthodontic materials and to assist the reader in navigating this topic. A synopsis of the materials is also provided, listing future applications that already exist at the experimental stage or are yet unavailable but with the relevant technology already presented in broader scientific disciplines. PMID:25925652

  14. Hypersensitivity to conventional and to nickel-free orthodontic brackets Hipersensibilidade a bráquetes ortodônticos convencionais e a bráquetes "nickel-free"

    Mariele Cristina Garcia Pantuzo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the allergenic potential of orthodontic brackets, comparing the cutaneous sensitivity provoked by metals present in conventional metallic brackets to that provoked by brackets with a low concentration of nickel, known as "nickel-free". A sample was selected from 400 patients undergoing treatment in the orthodontic clinic of the Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais (Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, in the period from the beginning of 2002 to the end of 2003. A cutaneous sensitivity patch test containing 5% nickel sulphate was used in 58 patients (30 males and 28 females, aged between 11 and 30, which were using fixed appliances with Morelli® brackets in both arches. In a second phase, 30 days later, a comparative test of cutaneous sensitivity was applied to the whole sample with two types of test specimens, in the form of a disc. Two alloys were tested: discs composed of the alloy used in the construction of conventional brackets and discs composed of a nickel-free alloy. The internal part of the forearm was chosen for testing, and 20 test specimens of each experiment (corresponding to the twenty brackets of a complete fixed appliance were applied. Of the 58 patients evaluated, 16 patients were sensitive to the patch test with 5% nickel sulphate. Out of these 16 patients, 12 developed an allergic reaction to experiment 1 (test specimen with nickel, while in experiment 2, only 5 patients showed sensitivity to that sample. The McNemar test revealed that the nickel-free test specimens provoked less allergic reaction when compared with the conventional alloy (p = 0.016.Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a capacidade alergênica provocada pelos bráquetes ortodônticos, comparando a sensibilidade cutânea provocada pelos metais presentes nos bráquetes metálicos convencionais com a provocada por bráquetes com baixa concentração de níquel ("nickel-free". A amostra foi selecionada dos 400 pacientes em tratamento da clínica de Ortodontia da Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais (Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil, no período compreendido entre o início de 2002 e o final de 2003. A amostra consistiu de 58 pacientes (30 homens e 28 mulheres, com idades variando de 11 a 30 anos, os quais eram portadores de aparelho ortodôntico fixo Morelli® em ambos os arcos. Estes pacientes foram diagnosticados quanto à sensibilidade ao níquel, por meio da aplicação do "patch test" com sulfato de níquel a 5%. Em uma segunda fase, trinta dias após o "patch test", comparou-se a sensibilidade cutânea provocada pelos metais presentes nos bráquetes convencionais e nos "Nickel Free", por meio de um teste de sensibilidade cutânea utilizando-se dois tipos de corpos-de-provas, em formato de disco, com a mesma composição destes bráquetes. A área de eleição para realização deste teste foi a parte interna do antebraço, sendo aplicados vinte corpos-de-prova de cada experimento (referente a uma boca completa de bráquetes. Dos 58 pacientes avaliados, 16 deles foram sensíveis ao "patch test" com sulfato de níquel a 5%. Dentre estes 16 pacientes, 12 deles desenvolveram reação alérgica ao Experimento 1 (corpo-de-prova com níquel, enquanto que no Experimento 2 (corpo-de-prova "Niquel Free" apenas 5 pacientes apresentaram sensibilidade a esta amostra. O teste de McNemar revelou que os corpos-de-prova "nickel-free" provocaram menor reação alérgica quando comparados aos convencionais (p = 0.016.

  15. Comparison of Antibacterial Effects of ZnO and CuO Nanoparticles Coated Brackets against Streptococcus Mutans

    Baratali Ramazanzadeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: During the orthodontic treatment, microbial plaques may accumulate around the brackets and cause caries, especially in high-risk patients. Finding ways to eliminate this microbial plaque seems to be essential. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the antibacterial effects of nano copper oxide (CuO and nano zinc oxide (ZnO coated brackets against Streptococcus mutans (S.mutans in order to decrease the risk of caries around the orthodontic brackets during the treatment. Materials and Method: Sixty brackets were coated with nanoparticles of ZnO (n=20, CuO (n=20 and CuO-ZnO (n=20. Twelve uncoated brackets constituted the control group. The brackets were bonded to the crowns of extracted premolars, sterilized and prepared for antimicrobial tests (S.mutans ATCC35668. The samples taken after 0, 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours were cultured on agar plates. Colonies were counted 24 hours after incubation. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: In CuO and CuO-ZnO coated brackets, no colony growth was seen after two hours. Between 0-6 hours, the mean colony counts were not significantly different between the ZnO and the control group (p>0.05. During 6-24 hours, the growth of S.mutans was significantly reduced by ZnO nanoparticles in comparison with the control group (p< 0.001. However, these bacteria were not totally eliminated. Conclusion: CuO and ZnO-CuO nanoparticles coated brackets have better antimicrobial effect on S.mutans than ZnO coated brackets.

  16. Comparison of frictional resistance of esthetic and semi-esthetic self-ligating brackets

    Kannan, M. S.; Murali, R. V.; S Kishorekumar; Gnanashanmugam, K.; Jayanth, V.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The frictional resistance encountered during sliding mechanics has been well established in the orthodontic literature, and it consists of complex interactions between the bracket, archwire, and method of ligation the claim of reduced friction with self-ligating brackets is often cited as a primary advantage over conventional brackets. This study was done to compare and evaluate the frictional forces generated between fully esthetic brackets and semi-aesthetic self-ligating brackets, whi...

  17. Indirect orthodontic bonding - a modified technique for improved efficiency and precision

    Lincoln Issamu Nojima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The indirect bonding technique optimizes fixed appliance installation at the orthodontic office, ensuring precise bracket positioning, among other advantages. In this laboratory clinical phase, material and methods employed in creating the transfer tray are decisive to accuracy. OBJECTIVE: This article describes a simple, efficient and reproducible indirect bonding technique that allows the procedure to be carried out successfully. Variables influencing the orthodontic bonding are analyzed and discussed in order to aid professionals wishing to adopt the indirect bonding technique routinely in their clinical practice.

  18. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi; Farzaneh Aghajani; Javad Chalipa; Amir Hooman Sadrhaghighi

    2014-01-01

    Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting,...

  19. Improvement in adhesion of the brackets to the tooth by sandblasting treatment.

    Espinar-Escalona, Eduardo; Barrera-Mora, Jos Mara; Llamas-Carreras, Jos Mara; Solano-Reina, Enrique; Rodrguez, D; Gil, F J

    2012-02-01

    In oral orthodontic treatments, achievement of a good adhesion between brackets and teeth surfaces is essential. One way to increase adhesion is to apply a surface treatment of teeth facing surfaces through the projection of abrasive particles to produce a surface roughness which improves adhesion of the bracket to the tooth, because of the significantly increased contact between the two surfaces. The effect on adhesion through the use of this technique in different types of brackets, as well as through the use of different blasting particles, however, is yet not well described. In this study we have included three types of brackets which are commonly used in orthodontic therapies (two of them a mesh-type and the third one a micro-milled type) with a contact surface area of 11.16, 8.85 and 6.89 mm(2) respectively. These brackets were used combined with a sandblasting treatment with two different types of abrasive particles, alumina (Al(2)O(3)) and silicon carbide (SiC) and applied to natural teeth in vitro. The abrasive particles used are bio-compatible and usually used in achieving increased roughness for improved adherence in biomedical materials. Sandblasting was performed at 2 bars for 2 s; three particle sizes were used: 80, 200 and 600 ?m. Non-blasted samples were used as control. Each of the pieces were cemented to natural teeth with a self-curing composite. Samples were stored in physiologic serum at 5C temperature. Tensile tests were performed with a universal testing machine. Brackets treated with sandblasted particles were measured to have an increased adhesion as compared to the control sample. The highest bond strength was measured for samples sandblasted with alumina particles of 80 and 200 ?m combined with micro-milled brackets. The recorded stresses did not exceed the tensile strength of tooth enamel. PMID:22143910

  20. A study on the frictional changes of steel bracket on the stainless steel wire during sliding

    Shiva Alavi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Though sliding techniques are quite common in orthodontics, the produced friction however hampers ideal movement of teeth. Increased friction not only necessitates a greater orthodontic force but also results in anchorage loss. The aim of this study was to evaluate frictional changes of steel brackets on stainless steel wires while sliding. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study a total of 69 stainless steel brackets (Dentaurum with 0.018 inch slots were randomly divided into three groups of 23 brackets. With each group either 0.016 or 0.016 0.016 or 0.016 0.022 inch steel wires of the same company (Dentaurum were used in combination with brackets. There were 5 slots on each piece and every slot was 1mm apart from the next. Therefore each piece of wire was pulled via Dartec machine in every bracket slot with an average speed of 0.5mm/min in five sections. The amounts of friction were recorded. The collected data were then compared with repeated measurement ANOVA and paired sample T-test.(? = 0.05 Three brackets were randomly examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM at the beginning and after the first, the third and the fifth tractions.Results: Repeated measurement ANOVA showed statistical significant differences in static and kinetic frictions between first to fifth tractions in three sizes of wires. Based on paired sample t-test, significant differences were seen between first traction and the others. However, differences between the third and the forth, the third and the fifth and the forth and the fifth tractions were not significant between the three sizes of wires and the two kinds of frictions.Conclusion: It seems that friction would decrease during sliding of steel brackets on steel wires. Diameter and cross section of wires would have little effect on friction. Key words: Frictional changes, Sliding, Static friction, Kinetic friction.

  1. DAS?s incisal and occlusal window transfer tray for indirect bonding in lingual orthodontics

    Surya Kanta Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This bracket transfer tray is so designed in such a way that the excess composite flash during indirect bracket bonding is pushed in the incisal and occlusal direction only so that it can easily be removed by rotary instruments. In lingual orthodontics, where accessing the gingival and interdental areas with rotary instruments is very difficult, this transfer tray system is helpful for easy flash removal and simple clinical maneuver. Additional silicon putty material is used to make this tray that has a palatal strip, a labial/bucal strip with incisal and occlusal stops and interbracket connectors.

  2. Staining of esthetic brackets by plaque disclosing solutions

    Luiza Novelino Acatauass, Ismael; Mauro de Amorim Acatauass, Nunes; Ana Maria Novelino Acatauass, Nunes; Rogrio Heldio Lopes, Motta; Ana Paula Dias, Demasi; Flvia Marto, Flrio.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the staining of esthetic orthodontic brackets by plaque disclosing solutions. METHODS: Two types of brackets manufactured by GAC/DENTSPLY(r) were evaluated: ceramic (n=30) and polycarbonate (n=30). The brackets were divided into 6 groups. Two control groups (n=6) were immersed [...] in absolute ethanol: GI - ceramic brackets and GII - polycarbonate brackets. Four experimental groups (n=12) were immersed in different plaque disclosing solutions: GIII (ceramic brackets) and GIV (polycarbonate brackets) were immersed in Replak(r); GV (ceramic brackets) and GVI (polycarbonate brackets) were immersed in Replasul "S"(r). Relative quantitative analysis of the influence of plaque disclosing tablets on bracket staining was performed using reflectance spectrophotometry of stain deposition. Exploratory analysis of the data was performed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) in a 2x2 factorial setup (bracket x immersion) with additional treatments (controls). RESULTS: The results demonstrated that the ceramic brackets presented the highest amount of staining when Replasul "S"(r) was used (pd"0.05). However, when Replak(r) was used, no statistically significant difference was found in comparison with the control group (p>0.05). For polycarbonate brackets, staining was detected for both disclosing solutions (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The disclosing solutions caused stain formation on polycarbonate brackets and, under the tested conditions, use of Replak(r) on ceramic brackets did not cause staining.

  3. Evaluation of mechanical properties of esthetic brackets

    Matsui, Shigeyuki; Umezaki, Eisaku; Komazawa, Daigo; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Suda, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Plastic brackets, as well as ceramic brackets, are used in various cases since they have excellent esthetics. However, their mechanical properties remain uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine how deformation and stress distribution in esthetic brackets differ among materials under the same wire load. Using the digital image correlation method, we discovered the following: (1) the strain of the wings of plastic brackets is within 0.2% and that of ceramic and metal brackets is n...

  4. O efeito do jateamento do esmalte na força de adesão na colagem de braquetes The effect of air abrasion in enamel adhesion of orthodontic bracket

    Carla D'Agostini Derech

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o propósito deste estudo in vitro foi avaliar o efeito do jateamento com óxido de alumínio na adesão de braquetes ortodônticos e compará-lo à tradicional técnica de condicionamento ácido do esmalte. METODOLOGIA: foram utilizados 80 dentes bovinos distribuídos aleatoriamente entre quatro grupos, sendo que a superfície do esmalte foi tratada da seguinte maneira: grupo 1 (somente jateamento com óxido de alumínio, grupo 2 (profilaxia com pedra-pomes e condicionamento com ácido, grupo 3 (jateamento com óxido de alumínio e condicionamento ácido e grupo 4 (somente condicionamento ácido. Após, foi aplicado sistema adesivo e o braquete colado com resina. Os corpos-de-prova foram submetidos ao teste de cisalhamento e análise do IAR. Aos resultados foram aplicados o teste de variância múltipla (ANOVA e a comparação entre pares (Tukey. Para a análise do IAR foi aplicado o teste Qui-quadrado. RESULTADOS: o grupo 1 apresentou a menor resistência ao cisalhamento (3,6MPa e o 3 a maior (13,27MPa. A análise Qui-quadrado do IAR demonstrou que o tratamento da superfície do esmalte tem influência sobre a quantidade de remanescente de resina sobre o esmalte e os grupos 3 e 4 apresentaram a maior quantidade de resina aderida. CONCLUSÕES: o jateamento de óxido de alumínio não deve ser o único procedimento utilizado no preparo da superfície do esmalte na colagem de braquetes, porém, quando associado ao condicionamento ácido, mostrou-se eficaz no aumento da retenção entre esmalte e resina. Novos estudos são necessários visando menor dano do esmalte e adesão satisfatória.AIM: The purpose of this study in vitro was to evaluate the effect of the air abrasion with Al-oxide in the adhesion of orthodontic brackets and compare with traditional technique of acid conditioning of the enamel. METHODS: Eighty bovine teeth distributed randomly between four groups had been used and the surface of the enamel was prepared in the following way: group 1 (only air abrasion, group 2 (enamel pumiced and acid conditioning, group 3 (air abrasion and acid conditioning and group 4 (only acid conditioning. After, adhesive system was applied and bracket was bonded with resin. Shear bond was assessed and analysis of the IAR was performed. Test of multiple variance (ANOVA and the comparison between pairs had been applied (Tukey on the results. For the analysis of the IAR the Qui-square test was applied. RESULTS: Group 1 presented the lowest shear strength (3,6MPa and 3 the greater (13,27MPa. The Qui-square analysis of the IAR demonstrated that the treatment of the enamel surface has influence on the amount of resin remainder on the enamel and groups 3 and 4 had presented the biggest amount of adhered resin. CONCLUSIONS: The air abrasion doesn’t have to be the only procedure used in the preparation of the enamel surface in the brackets bonding, however, when associated to the acid conditioning it revealed efficient in adhesion increase. New studies are necessary aiming at lesser damage of the enamel and satisfactory adhesion.

  5. Evaluation of mechanical properties of esthetic brackets

    Umezaki, Eisaku; Komazawa, Daigo; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Suda, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Plastic brackets, as well as ceramic brackets, are used in various cases since they have excellent esthetics. However, their mechanical properties remain uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine how deformation and stress distribution in esthetic brackets differ among materials under the same wire load. Using the digital image correlation method, we discovered the following: (1) the strain of the wings of plastic brackets is within 0.2% and that of ceramic and metal brackets is negligible, (2) polycarbonate brackets having a stainless steel slot show significantly smaller displacement than other plastic brackets, and (3) there is a significant difference between plastic brackets and ceramic and stainless steel brackets in terms of the displacement of the bracket wing. PMID:25755677

  6. Potential application of shape memory plastic as elastic material in clinical orthodontics.

    Nakasima, A; Hu, J R; Ichinose, M; Shimada, H

    1991-06-01

    Polynorbornen, a shape memory plastic developed in Japan, has a glass transitional point of 35 degrees C. Once the environmental temperature exceeds the critical point, this plastic will begin to display an elastic property, then return to its original shape, if deformed. We examined whether the force generated during the elastic phase of polynorbornen could be used to displace human teeth. We found that the shape memory plastic wire of 1 mm in diameter stretched to two to three times of its original length at a temperature of 50 degrees C and a speed of 0.5 mm/sec would exert a relatively stable continuous light force of 119-156 g to move the teeth. This new material, compared with conventional elastic modules used in orthodontic therapy, exhibited a lesser degree of force degradation at a body temperature of 37 degrees C for a long period, and can be manufactured to near the tooth colour required. These advantages make feasible clinical application of the shape memory plastic in orthodontics. PMID:1936135

  7. Avaliao da resistncia ao cisalhamento de braquetes colados com resinas ortodnticas fluoretadas / Evaluation of shear bond strength of brackets bonded with orthodontic fluoride-releasing composite resins

    Marcia Cristina, Rastelli; Ulisses, Coelho; Emgdio Enrique Orellana, Jimenez.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistncia ao cisalhamento de braquetes metlicos colados com resinas que contm flor, comparando-as a uma resina convencional; e analisar a quantidade de adesivo remanescente na superfcie do esmalte. MTODOS: sessenta pr-molares foram divididos aleatoriamente em 3 grupos: Gr [...] upo I - Concise (3M), Grupo II - Ultrabond (Aditek do Brasil) e Grupo III - Rely-a-Bond (Reliance). Aps a colagem dos braquetes, as amostras foram termocicladas (500 ciclos) nas temperaturas de 5C e 55C. Aps 48 horas, foram submetidas aos ensaios mecnicos de cisalhamento na direo oclusocervical, com velocidade de carga de 0,5mm/min, em uma mquina MTS 810. RESULTADOS: foram observadas resistncias mdias ao cisalhamento de 24,546,98MPa para o Grupo I, de 11,536,20MPa para o Grupo II e de 16,465,72MPa para o Grupo III. A Anlise de Varincia determinou diferena estatstica entre as mdias de resistncia ao cisalhamento entre os grupos (p Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the shear bond strength of stainless steel brackets bonded with fluoride releasing composite resins, comparing them with a conventional resin and to analyze the amount of resin left on the enamel surface. METHODS: Sixty premolars were randomly divided into three groups: Group [...] I - Concise (3M), Group II - Ultrabond (Aditek do Brasil) and Group III - Rely-a-Bond (Reliance). After bonding, the samples were thermocycled (500 cycles) at 5C and 55C temperatures. After 48 hours they were subjected to shear bond strength testing, in the occluso-gingival direction, using an MTS 810 Universal Testing Machine with load speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: The results demonstrated a mean shear bond strength of 24.54 6.98 MPa for Group I, 11.53 6.20 MPa for Group II, and 16.46 5.72 MPa for Group III. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) determined a statistical difference in the mean shear bond strengths between groups (p

  8. Rapid orthodontics

    Bhagyalakshmi, A; B S Avinash; Nitin V Muralidhar

    2012-01-01

    Every orthodontic patient requires that the treatment be completed in a short duration. During orthodontic treatment, wearing of orthodontic braces, besides being unaesthetic will also restrict patients from eating certain food; it would also make it difficult for patient to maintain good oral hygiene. Because of these reasons many patients decline for orthodontic treatment. But recently there are many techniques in orthodontics like distraction osteogenesis, corticotomy, etc. where treatment...

  9. Experiense with remineraling means in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Stepanova Ye.A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment using bracket-technology a high risk of caries development. The algorithm of preventive interventions for the prevention of hair demineralization of enamel of the teeth

  10. An innovative approach for investigating the ceramic bracket-enamel interface - optical coherence tomography and confocal microscopy

    Romînu, Roxana Otilia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Romînu, Mihai; Negrutiu, Meda; Laissue, Philippe; Mihali, Sorin; Cuc, Lavinia; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2008-09-01

    Bonding has become a routine procedure in several dental specialties - from prosthodontics to conservative dentistry and even orthodontics. In many of these fields it is important to be able to investigate the bonded interfaces to assess their quality. All currently employed investigative methods are invasive, meaning that samples are destroyed in the testing procedure and cannot be used again. We have investigated the interface between human enamel and bonded ceramic brackets non-invasively, introducing a combination of new investigative methods - optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal microscopy (CM). Brackets were conventionally bonded on conditioned buccal surfaces of teeth The bonding was assessed using these methods. Three dimensional reconstructions of the detected material defects were developed using manual and semi-automatic segmentation. The results clearly prove that OCT and CM are useful in orthodontic bonding investigations.

  11. Comparison of frictional resistance of esthetic and semi-esthetic self-ligating brackets

    M S Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The frictional resistance encountered during sliding mechanics has been well established in the orthodontic literature, and it consists of complex interactions between the bracket, archwire, and method of ligation the claim of reduced friction with self-ligating brackets is often cited as a primary advantage over conventional brackets. This study was done to compare and evaluate the frictional forces generated between fully esthetic brackets and semi-aesthetic self-ligating brackets, which are of passive form and SEM (scanning electron microscope study of the Brackets after Frictional evaluation. Materials and Methods: Two types of self-ligating esthetic brackets, Damon clear (Ormco made of fully ceramic and Opal (Ultradent Products, USA and, Two types of self-ligating semi-esthetic brackets, Clarity SL (3M Unitek and Damon 3 (Ormco both of which are made of ceramic with metal slot. Arch wires with different dimensions and quality 17 × 25, 19 × 25 Titanium Molybdenum Alloy (TMA and 17 × 25, 19 × 25 stainless steel that came from plain strands of wire were used for frictional comparison test. The brackets used in this study had 0.022 × 0.028 inch slot. Results: The statistical tests showed significantly smaller amount of kinetic frictional forces is generated by Damon 3 (semi-esthetic self-ligating brackets. For each wire used, Damon 3 displayed significantly lower frictional forces (P ≤ 0.05 than any of the self-ligating system, followed by Opal (fully esthetic self-ligating brackets which generated smaller amount of frictional forces but relatively on the higher side when compared with Damon 3. Damon clear (fully esthetic self-ligating brackets generated the maximum amount of kinetic forces with all types of wire dimensions and properties when compared to the other three types of self-ligating system. Clarity SL (semi-esthetic self-ligating brackets generated smaller amount of frictional forces when compared with Damon clear and relatively higher amount of frictional forces when compared to Opal and Damon 3

  12. Interferência dos diferentes glazeamentos na colagem de bráquetes ortodônticos em superfícies cerâmicas Effects of the different glazed ceramic surfaces on the bond of orthodontic brackets

    A. C Dalvi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliadas diferentes formas de glazeamento da superfície de porcelana quanto à resistência ao cisalhamento de bráquetes metálicos colados com diferentes cimentos. Quarenta e dois corpos de prova de metalocerâmica foram confeccionados (2 controles e divididos em quatro grupos de acordo com o tipo de glazeamento, com camada extra de glaze (G ou auto-glazeados (AG, e o cimento utilizado, resina fotopolimerizável (r ou ionômero de vidro resinosos (i, formando os seguintes grupos: Gr, Gi, AGr e AGi com 10 corpos de prova cada grupo. Todas as superfícies dos corpos de prova receberam tratamento com ácido fosfórico 35% por 30 s seguidos de uma camada de silano. Quarenta bráquetes metálicos foram colados. Os corpos de prova foram submetidos a termociclagem e ao teste de resistência ao cisalhamento com uma máquina universal de ensaios mecânicos. Uma amostra de cada grupo após descolagem, remoção da resina e polimento, foi avaliado em microscópio eletrônico de varredura. O índice de fratura coesiva da porcelana foi também avaliado. Os resultados mostram valores acima da média aceitável na literatura para todos os grupos, sendo que o grupo AGr apresentou valor menor (10,38 MPa e estatisticamente significativo em relação aos demais. A análise no microscópio eletrônico de varredura mostrou que as superfícies, após polimento, não readquirem as características de antes da colagem, apesar de se apresentarem aceitáveis clinicamente. Houve fratura da porcelana em todos os grupos. Conclui-se que é possível se conseguir colagem adequada de bráquetes metálicos em superfícies metalocerâmicas auto-glazeadas e com camada extra de glaze, preservando-o, não necessitando reconhecer previamente a forma de glazeamento.Different glazing techniques for porcelain surface were evaluated in terms of shear bond strength of metallic brackets bonded with different cements. Forty-two metal-ceramic samples were made (2 controls and then divided into four groups according to type of glazing technique, either using extra glaze layer (G or self-glazing material (SG, and type of adhesive material, that is, self-curing resin (r or resin glass-ionomer cement (i, thus forming the following groups: Gr, Gi, SGr, and SGi with 10 samples each. The whole surface of all samples was treated with 35% phosphoric acid for 30 s, followed by application of silane layer. Forty metallic brackets were bonded. The samples were submitted to thermocycling process and shear bond strength test with a universal testing machine. After bracket debonding, removal of resin, and polishing, one sample from each group was evaluated with a scanning electron microscope (SEM. The index of cohesive porcelain fracture was also assessed. The results show that all the groups had, on average, values higher than those found in the literature, with AGr presenting the lowest value (10.38 MPa compared to other groups. SEM analysis showed that the porcelain surfaces did not recover their original characteristics before the bracket debonding procedure, although they were considered acceptable for clinical use. Porcelain fracture was observed in all groups. One can conclude that it is possible to bond metallic brackets adequately to metal-ceramic porcelain surfaces previously treated with either self-glazing material or extra glaze layer without having to recognise the glazing technique originally employed.

  13. Rapid orthodontics

    A Bhagyalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Every orthodontic patient requires that the treatment be completed in a short duration. During orthodontic treatment, wearing of orthodontic braces, besides being unaesthetic will also restrict patients from eating certain food; it would also make it difficult for patient to maintain good oral hygiene. Because of these reasons many patients decline for orthodontic treatment. But recently there are many techniques in orthodontics like distraction osteogenesis, corticotomy, etc. where treatment can be completed in a very short duration when compared to conventional treatment. This article discusses one of such technique known as "Wilkodontics" which helps in faster orthodontic tooth movement, thus helping the clinician to complete the treatment at the earliest.

  14. Resistance to Sliding in Clear and Metallic Damon 3 and Conventional Edge-wise Brackets: an In vitro Study

    Mohammad Karim Soltani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Frictional forces are considered as important counter-force to orthodontic tooth movement. It is claimed that self-ligating brackets reduce the frictional forces. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the resistance to sliding in metallic and clear Damon brackets with the conventional brackets in a wet condition. Materials and Method: The samples included 4 types of brackets; metallic and clear Damon brackets and metallic and clear conventional brackets (10 brackets in each group. In this study, stainless steel wires sized 0.019×0.025 were em-ployed and the operator’s saliva was used to simulate the conditions of oral cavity. The tidy-modified design was used for simulation of sliding movement. The resistance to sliding and static frictional forces was measured by employing Testometric machine and load cell. Results: The mean (±SD of resistance to sliding was 194.88 (±26.65 and 226.62 (±39.9 g in the esthetic and metallic Damon brackets, while these values were 187.81(±27.84 and 191.17(±66.68 g for the clear and metallic conventional brackets, respectively. Static frictional forces were 206.4(±42.45 and 210.38(±15.89 g in the esthetic and metallic Damon brackets and 220.63(±49.29 and 215.13(±62.38 g in the clear and metallic conventional brackets. According to two-way ANOVA, no significant difference was observed between the two bracket materials (clear and metal and the two types of bracket (self-ligating versus conventional regarding resistance to sliding (p= 0.17 and p= 0.23, respectively and static frictional forces (p= 0.55 and p= 0.96, respectively. Conclusion: Neither the type of bracket materials nor their type of ligation made difference in resistance to sliding and static friction.

  15. Analysis of mesiodistal angulations of preadjusted brackets

    Marcos Rogério de MENDONÇA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturers offer various prescriptions of preadjusted brackets for use in the “straight-wire” orthodontic technique. However, the need to incorporate bends in the rectangular wires during orthodontic finishing has led to concerns regarding the type of prescription chosen and the credibility of information provided by the manufacturer. The aim of this study was to compare the slot angulations of Roth prescription preadjusted metallic brackets for the maxillary left central incisor and maxillary left canine. For each tooth type, 10 brackets of three commercial brands (GAC, Forestadent and Morelli were selected. Two individual metal matrices for brackets and tooth positioning were made for each group of teeth. Captured images were obtained by standardized ortho-radial photography with a digital camera. Images were exported and analyzed with the Image J software package. One-way ANOVA and Tukey statistical analyses were performed at the 5% significance level. For brackets of the maxillary left central incisor, differences in mean angulation were observed between the Morelli and GAC groups (p < 0.01 and between the Forestadent and GAC groups (p < 0.01. For brackets of the maxillary left canine, differences in mean angulation were found between the Morelli and GAC groups (p < 0.01 and between the Morelli and Forestadent groups (p < 0.05. In conclusion, despite their same prescription name, the different brands exhibited significantly different angulation measurements.

  16. Self-Ligating Brackets and Their Impact on Oral Health-Related Quality of Life in Chinese Adolescence Patients: A Longitudinal Prospective Study

    Zhou, Yu; Zheng, MinLing; Lin, Jiaqiang; Wang, Yi; Ni, Zhen Yu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Although the associations between orthodontic and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) have been explored, little research has been done to address the influence of brackets type on perceived OHRQOL. The aim of this study was to assess whether the levels of OHRQOL in Chinese adolescence patients were influenced by the type of brackets. Materials and Methods. One hundred fifty Chinese orthodontic adolescence patients completed the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14, Chinese version) at five distinct intervals: after insertion of the fixed appliance at 1 week (T1), 1 month (T2), 3 months (T3), and 6 months (T4); and after treatment (T5). Results. Patients with self-ligating brackets were associated with less pain and discomfort at any intervals compared with conventional brackets, but no significant difference of overall OHIP-14 scores could be found between two groups. Moreover, in both groups, overall scores at T1 and T2 were significantly higher than the scores at any other intervals in both groups. Conclusions. The type of orthodontic appliance did not affect oral health-related quality of life in Chinese adolescence patients. PMID:25202720

  17. Avaliação do Índice de Remanescente Adesivo utilizando braquetes com e sem tratamento na base e a interação com três sistemas de colagem Evaluation of Adhesive Remnant Index using conventional mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases and three bonding systems

    Lilian Maria Brisque Pignatta

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o Índice de Remanescente Adesivo (IRA em dentes bovinos após a descolagem de braquetes com e sem tratamento na base. METODOLOGIA: foram utilizados três sistemas de colagem ortodôntica para os dois padrões de base. Os dentes bovinos foram divididos em seis grupos de 40, de acordo com a base do braquete e o sistema de colagem. Vinte e quatro horas após a colagem foram realizados os testes de compressão em uma máquina de ensaios. A avaliação do IRA foi realizada em um estereomicroscópio por três examinadores calibrados. Foi utilizado o teste não paramétrico de Kruskal-Wallis, seguido do método de Dunn, para fazer as comparações múltiplas entre todos os grupos. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: observou-se que o tratamento das bases dos braquetes com óxido de alumínio não foi determinante para o aumento da adesividade entre o braquete e o adesivo. O grupo em que se utilizou braquetes com tratamento na base e adesivo TXT (3M-Unitek + Transbond Plus SEP (3M-Unitek apresentou a maior parte das fraturas na interface dente-adesivo (escore 4.AIM: To assess the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI in bovine teeth after debonding mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases. METHODS: Were used three bonding systems for the two standards of base. The bovine teeth were divided into 6 groups of 40, according to the bracket base and to the bonding system. Twenty four hours after bonding they had been carried through shear bond strength tests in a universal testing machine. The assessment of ARI was performed in a stereomicroscopy by three calibrated examiners. It was used the non-parametric Kruskall-Wallis test, followed by Dunn's method, to do the multiple comparisons among all groups. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: It was observed that the aluminum oxide sandblasting bracket bases was not determinative to the increase of the adhesiveness between bracket and adhesive. The group where it was used sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases and bonding system TXT (3M-Unitek + Transbond Plus SEP (3M-Unitek presented the majority of the failures at the teeth-adhesive interface (score 4.

  18. Dentoalveolar mandibular changes with self-ligating versus conventional bracket systems: A CBCT and dental cast study

    de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; Futagami, Cristina; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; NAVARRO, Ricardo de Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to compare dentoalveolar changes in mandibular arch, regarding transversal measures and buccal bone thickness, in patients undergoing the initial phase of orthodontic treatment with self-ligating or conventional bracket systems. METHODS: A sample of 25 patients requiring orthodontic treatment was assessed based on the bracket type. Group 1 comprised 13 patients bonded with 0.022-in self-ligating brackets (SLB). Group 2 included 12 patients bonded wi...

  19. Influence of lingual bracket position on microbial and periodontal parameters in vivo

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Lingual orthodontics is becoming more popular in dental practice. The purpose of the present investigation was to compare plaque formation on teeth bonded with the same bracket onto buccal or lingual surface, with non-bonded control teeth, via an in vivo growth experiment over a 30-day period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A randomized controlled trial with split-mouth design was set up enrolling 20 dental students. Within each subject sites with buccal and lingual brackets and control sites were followed. Clinical periodontal parameters (periodontal pocket depth: PPD; bleeding on probing: BOP were recorded at baseline and on days 1, 7 and 30. Microbiological samples were taken from the brackets and the teeth on days 1, 7 and 30 to detect colony-forming units (CFU. Total CFU, streptococci CFU and anaerobe CFU were measured. RESULTS: No significant differences (P>0.05 were found between buccal and lingual brackets in terms of clinical periodontal parameters and microbiological values. Conclusion: Bracket position does not have significant impact on bacterial load and on periodontal parameters.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Friction Resistance of Titanium, Stainless Steel, Ceramic and Ceramic with Metal Insert Brackets with Varying Dimensions of Stainless Steel Wire: An In vitro Multi-center Study

    Kumar, B Sunil; Miryala, Suresh; Kumar, K Kiran; Shameem, K; Regalla, Ravindra Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The orthodontist seeks an archwire–bracket combination that has both good biocompatibility and low friction. Hence, the aim of this multicenter in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the frictional resistance generated between titanium (Ti), stainless steel (SS), ceramic and ceramic with metal insert (CMI) brackets with SS wires of varying dimensions in a specially designed apparatus. Materials and Methods: The material used in this study were Ti, SS, Ceramic and CMI with 0.018″ slot manufactured with zero degree tip and −7° torque premolar brackets (3M, Unitek) and SS wires of varying dimensions (0.016″ round, 0.016 × 0.016″ square, 0.016 × 0.022″ rectangular and 0.017 × 0.025″ rectangular) used. The frictional resistance was measured using Instron Universal testing machine (Model no. 4301). The specimen population in each center composed each of 160 brackets and wires. Differences among the all bracket/wire combinations were tested using (one-way) ANOVA, followed by the student Newman Keuls multiple comparisons of means ranking (at P < 0.05) for the determination of differences among the groups. Results: Ti bracket in combination with 0.017 × 0.025″ SS rectangular wire produced significant force levels for an optimum orthodontic movement with least frictional resistance. Conclusion: Ti brackets have least resistance and rectangular wires produced significant force. These can be used to avoid hazards of Nickel. SS brackets revealed higher static frictional force values as the wire dimension increased and showed lower static friction than Ti brackets for all wires except the thicker wire. Our study recommends the preclusion of brackets with rough surface texture (Ti brackets) with SS ligature wire for ligating bracket and archwire are better to reduce friction. PMID:25395796

  1. Comparison of Frictional Forces Generated by a New Ceramic Bracket with the Conventional Brackets using Unconventional and Conventional Ligation System and the Self-ligating Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    Pasha, Azam; Vishwakarma, Swati; Narayan, Anjali; Vinay, K; Shetty, Smitha V; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed orthodontic mechanotherapy is associated with friction between the bracket - wire - ligature interfaces during the sliding mechanics. A sound knowledge of the various factors affecting the magnitude of friction is of paramount importance. The present study was done to analyze and compare the frictional forces generated by a new ceramic (Clarity Advanced) bracket with the conventional, (metal and ceramic) brackets using unconventional and conventional ligation system, and the...

  2. Fixed orthodontic appliances cause pain and disturbance in somatosensory function

    Shen, Huijie; Shao, Sheng; Zhang, Jinglu; Wang, Zhendong; Lv, Dong; Chen, Wenjing; Svensson, Peter; Wang, Kelun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the short-term effects of orthodontic pain on quantitative sensory testing (QST) in subjects receiving fixed orthodontic treatment. Twenty patients and 12 healthy volunteers (as controls) participated. All 20 patients had bonded AO self-ligating brackets, with a 0...... results suggest clear signs of sensitization of the trigeminal nociceptive system up to 1 month after force application and orthodontic pain. Quantitative assessment of somatosensory function may help to provide a better understanding and profiling of the underlying neurobiological mechanisms related to...... orthodontic pain....

  3. Frictional Resistance of Three Types of Ceramic Brackets

    Williams, Claire L; Khaled Khalaf

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To investigate the static frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface in two recently introduced bracket systems and compare them to conventional ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems. Three variables were considered including the bracket system, archwire type and archwire angulation. Material and Methods Four bracket systems were tested in vitro: Self ligating ceramic, ceramic with metal slot and module, conventional ceramic with module and convention...

  4. What is the best method for debonding metallic brackets from the patient’s perspective?

    PITHON, Matheus Melo; Santos Fonseca Figueiredo, Daniel; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas; Coqueiro, Raildo da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this clinical investigation was to compare the level of discomfort reported by patients during the removal of orthodontic metallic brackets performed with four different debonding instruments. Methods The sample examined in this split-mouth study comprised a total of 70 patients (840 teeth). Four different methods of bracket removal were used: lift-off debonding instrument (LODI), straight cutter plier (SC), how plier (HP), and bracket removal plier (BRP). Prior to debon...

  5. Color stability of ceramic brackets immersed in potentially staining solutions

    Bruna Coser Guignone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the color stability of five types of ceramic brackets after immersion in potentially staining solutions.METHODS: Ninety brackets were divided into 5 groups (n = 18 according to brackets commercial brands and the solutions in which they were immersed (coffee, red wine, coke and artificial saliva. The brackets assessed were Transcend (3M/Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA, Radiance (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA, Mystique (GAC International Inc., Bohemia, NY, USA and Luxi II (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, CO, USA. Chromatic changes were analyzed with the aid of a reflectance spectrophotometer and by visual inspection at five specific time intervals. Assessment periods were as received from the manufacturer (T0, 24 hours (T1, 72 hours (T2, as well as 7 days (T3 and 14 days (T4 of immersion in the aforementioned solutions. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with ANOVA and Bonferroni correction, as well as to a multivariate profile analysis for independent and paired samples with significance level set at 5%.RESULTS: The duration of the immersion period influenced color alteration of all tested brackets, even though these changes could not always be visually observed. Different behaviors were observed for each immersion solution; however, brackets immersed in one solution progressed similarly despite minor variations.CONCLUSIONS: Staining became more intense over time and all brackets underwent color alterations when immersed in the aforementioned solutions.

  6. Shear bond strength of metallic brackets: influence of saliva contamination

    Luciana Borges Retamoso

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of saliva contamination on shear bond strength and the bond failure pattern of 3 adhesive systems (Transbond XT, AdheSE and Xeno III on orthodontic metallic brackets bonded to human enamel. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventy-two permanent human molars were cut longitudinally in a mesiodistal direction, producing seventy-two specimens randomly divided into six groups. Each system was tested under 2 different enamel conditions: no contamination and contaminated with saliva. In T, A and X groups, the adhesive systems were applied to the enamel surface in accordance with manufacturer's instructions. In TS, AS and XS groups, saliva was applied to enamel surface followed by adhesive system application. The samples were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h, and then tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine (Emic, DL 2000 running at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. After bond failure, the enamel surfaces were observed under an optical microscope at 40x magnification. RESULTS: The control and contaminated groups showed no significant difference in shear bond strength for the same adhesive system. However, shear bond strength of T group (17.03±4.91 was significantly higher than that of AS (8.58±1.73 and XS (10.39±4.06 groups (p<0.05. Regarding the bond failure pattern, TS group had significantly higher scores of no adhesive remaining on the tooth in the bonding area than other groups considering the adhesive remnant index (ARI used to evaluate the amount of adhesive left on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: Saliva contamination showed little influence on the 24-h shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  7. Adult Orthodontics

    Anita G; Asiya Begum

    2010-01-01

    Adult orthodontics is becoming a larger proportion of many practices. Adult orthodontics is concerned with striking a balance between achieving optimal proximal and occlusal contact of the teeth, acceptable dentofacial esthetics, normal function, and reasonable stability. With the adult, it is more frequently concerned with physiological adaptation and is often symptom related, whereas with the child the dealing is with the signs. In the past three decades, a major reorientation of orthodonti...

  8. Influence of various surface-conditioning methods on the bond strength of metal brackets to ceramic surfaces

    Schmage, P.; Nergiz, [No Value; Herrmann, W.; M. Ozcan; Nergiz, Ibrahim; �zcan, Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    With the increase in adult orthodontic treatment comes the need to find a reliable method for bonding orthodontic brackets onto metal or ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures. In this study, shear bond strength and surface roughness tests were used to examine the effect of 4 different surface conditioning methods: fine diamond bur, sandblasting, 5% hydrofluoric acid, and silica coating for bonding metal brackets to ceramic surfaces of feldspathic porcelain. Sandblasting and hydrofluoric a...

  9. Avaliao da resistncia trao de artifcios ortodnticos - braquete, boto e tela - colados em pr-molares com resina autopolimerizvel. estudo "in vitro" Evaluation of the resistance to traction of orthodontic devices - bracket, bouton and frame - bonded in premolar with autopolimerizable resin. "in vitro" study

    Walter Leal de Moura

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Reteno dentria a condio fisiopatolgica em que o dente, uma vez chegado o seu momento fisiolgico de erupo, apresenta algum impedimento para realiz-lo. O tratamento, com envolvimento cirrgico-ortodntico, visa deslocar o elemento dental para a correta posio na arcada dentria, sem causar danos aos elementos dentais adjacentes, restabelecendo a esttica e a funo. A colagem direta de botes e braquetes ortodnticos para trao de dentes inclusos transformou-se na tcnica preferida, pois exige menor extenso cirrgica e remoo de tecido para acesso coroa dental. A pesquisa objetivou analisar a intensidade da fora aplicada ao conjunto dente/artifcio/fio de amarrilho, pelo tracionamento, e observar o local do rompimento. Utilizaram-se 45 pr-molares, conservados em soro fisiolgico 0,9%, que foram divididos em 3 grupos (15 com braquetes, 15 com botes e 15 com telas. Os dentes foram fixados em canos de PVC preenchidos com resina acrlica e os acessrios fixados ao dente com resina autopolimerizvel. Aps a colagem dos acessrios ortodnticos, os dentes voltaram a ser conservados em soro fisiolgico e o teste realizado aps 72 horas, com a utilizao de um sensor de fora e um programa de computador (Logger Pro. Com os resultados, observou-se que o braquete resistiu a uma fora mdia de 36,0N, sendo a juno fio/braquete o local menos resistente; o boto resistiu a uma fora mdia de 41,2N, a juno fio/boto ortodntico foi o local menos resistente e a tela resistiu a uma fora mdia de 28,8N, sendo a juno dente/tela o local menos resistente.Restrained is the tooth which, reached its physiological moment of eruption, shows some obstruction to accomplish it. The treatment, with orthodontic-surgical involvement, type drives at to dislocate the dental element for right position in the dental arch, without to cause damages for adjacent dental element, re-establishing the aesthetics and function. Therefore, the direct bonding of orthodontic bracket and bouton for retained teeth traction became the preferred technic for, besides more clear, it demands smaller surgical amplitude and tissue removal to grant access to the dental crown. The research intended analyse the intensity of applied force to the entirety teeth/device/tie-wire, tractioning through, and to observe the splot rupture. Maked use of 45 premolar, conserved in 0.9% physiological serum, that was divided into three groups (15 with brackets, 15 with boutons and 15 with frames. The tooth was filled in PVC pipe filled with acrylic resin and the devices was bonded to the teeth with autopolimerizable resin. After the bonding realization of the orthodontic devices, the tooth was be preserved in physiological serum and the tests was be realized after 72 hours of the bonding by means of a computer program. The bracket endured to medium force of 36,0N, being the junction wire-device the spot less resistant; the bouton endured to medium force of 41,2N, the juncion wire-bouton was the plot less resistant and the frame was endured to medium force of 28,8N, being the junction teeth/frame the plot less resistant.

  10. Using Little's Irregularity Index in orthodontics: outdated and inaccurate?

    Macauley, Donal

    2012-12-01

    Little\\'s Irregularity Index (LII) was devised to objectively score mandibular incisor alignment for epidemiological studies but has been extended to assess the relative performance of orthodontic brackets, retainer or treatment modalities. Our aim was to examine the repeatability and precision of LII measurements of four independent examiners on the maxillary arch of orthodontic patients. The hypothesis was that the reproducibility of individual contact point displacement measurements, used to calculate the LII score, are inappropriate.

  11. Parametric and nonparametric assessment of speech changes in labial and lingual orthodontics: A prospective study

    Ambesh Kumar Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To prospectively evaluate and compare the duration of changes in speech between labial and lingual orthodontics. Materials and Methods: Speech evaluation of 12 patients with labial and lingual brackets (six per group was performed using an objective spectrographic, semiobjective auditive analysis by two speech professionals and subjective auditive evaluation by four laypersons. The tests were performed before (T1, within 24 h (T2, after 1 week (T3 and after 1-month (T4 of the start of therapy. Results: In comparison with pretreatment findings, a significant deterioration in articulation was observed with all test methods at T2 in both the groups. The speech performance in labial and lingual group was worst at T2 and T3, respectively. Conclusion: Our investigations showed the need for detailed briefing of patients about the extent and duration of changes in speech resulting from lingual brackets when compared with their labial counterparts.

  12. Motivational Goal Bracketing

    Nafziger, Julia; Koch, Alexander

    It is a puzzle why people often evaluate consequences of choices separately (narrow bracketing) rather than jointly (broad bracketing). We study the hypothesis that a present-biased individual, who faces two tasks, may bracket his goals narrowly for motivational reasons. Goals motivate because they...... tasks. Narrow goals have a stronger motivational force and thus can be optimal. In particular, if one task outcome becomes known before working on the second task, narrow bracketing is always optimal....

  13. A study in vitro on radiation effects by Er:YAG laser combined with the fluorine therapy in the acid resistance of the dental enamel submitted to orthodontical brackets; Um estudo in vitro sobre os efeitos da irradiacao pelo laser de Er:YAG combinado com a terapia com fluor na resistencia acida do esmalte de dentes submetidos a aparelho ortodontico fixo

    Yoshiyasu, Roseli Y.A

    2001-07-01

    Several researches have been demonstrating an increase in the resistance acid of the enamel surface when irradiated by some lasers types as Nd:YAG, C0{sub 2}, Er:YAG, and others, mainly when combined with the fluoride therapy after the irradiation of the laser. This study in vitro used the laser of Er:YAG which density of energy of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2} on the enamel about of orthodontical brackets of teeth extracted pre-molars. These teeth were then submitted to a rich way in S. mutans for twenty one days. The cases were analyzed: (1) enamel surface without any treatment, (2) enamel surface without any irradiation laser, but with therapy with acidulated phosphate fluoride, (3) enamel surface irradiated with laser of Er:YAG and (4) enamel surface irradiated by laser of Er:YAG and with application of acidulated phosphate fluoride. The results were analyzed through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The morphologic changes observed to the scanning electron microscopy suggest increase in the acid resistance of the enamel surface. However, to the optical microscopy, it was still possible to visualize undesirable white stains in the surface of the enamel. (author)

  14. Universal Cable Brackets

    Vanvalkenburgh, C.

    1985-01-01

    Concept allows routing easily changed. No custom hardware required in concept. Instead, standard brackets cut to length and installed at selected locations along cable route. If cable route is changed, brackets simply moved to new locations. Concept for "universal" cable brackets make it easy to route electrical cable around and through virtually any structure.

  15. Force loss in archwire-guided tooth movement of conventional and self-ligating brackets.

    Montasser, Mona A; El-Bialy, Tarek; Keilig, Ludger; Reimann, Susanne; Jger, Andreas; Bourauel, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the differences in the force loss during simulated archwire-guided canine retraction between various conventional and self-ligating brackets. Three types of orthodontic brackets have been investigated experimentally using a biomechanical set-up: 1. conventional ligating brackets (Victory Series and Mini-Taurus), 2. self-ligating brackets (SmartClip: passive self-ligating bracket, and Time3 and SPEED: active self-ligating brackets), and 3. a conventional low-friction bracket (Synergy). All brackets had a nominal 0.022? slot size. The brackets were combined with three rectangular 0.0190.025? archwires: 1. Remanium (stainless steel), 2. Nitinol SE (nickel-titanium alloy, NiTi), and 3. Beta III Titanium (titanium-molybdenum alloy). Stainless steel ligatures were used with the conventional brackets. Archwire-guided tooth movement was simulated over a retraction path of up to 4mm using a superelastic NiTi coil spring (force: 1 N). Force loss was lowest for the Victory Series and SmartClip brackets in combination with the steel guiding archwire (35 and 37.6 per cent, respectively) and highest for the SPEED and Mini-Taurus brackets in combination with the titanium wire (73.7 and 64.4 per cent, respectively). Force loss gradually increased by 10 per cent for each bracket type in combination with the different wires in the following sequence: stainless steel, Nitinol, and beta-titanium. Self-ligating brackets did not show improved performance compared with conventional brackets. There was no consistent pattern of force loss when comparing conventional and self-ligating brackets or passive and active self-ligating brackets. PMID:23382468

  16. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Han Xianglong [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu Xiaolin [Department of Orthodontics, Stomatology Hospital, Dalian University, Dalian 116021 (China); Bai Ding [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: baiding88@hotmail.com; Meng Yao; Huang Lan [Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  17. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure

  18. Adjunctive orthodontic treatment with lingual orthodontic system.

    Kafle, D; Humagain, M; Upadhaya, C

    2011-01-01

    The lingual orthodontic therapy though started in 1972, could not be popular till the beginning of 1990. In Nepal it does not have a history of more than a year. It is started in Dhulikhel Hospital for the first time in Nepal. Usually orthodontic therapy is meant for putting braces on the labial surface of the teeth which is called labial orthodontic system. Lingual orthodontic system is a purely invisible kind of orthodontic therapy in which braces are placed behind the teeth. The advantages of lingual orthodontic therapy are: invisibility, better biomechanics and improved patient compliance. On the other hand it is difficult to master and costlier than labial orthodontics. We have presented six adjunctive orthodontic cases treated by lingual system with the same end result comparable to labial orthodontic system. PMID:22710545

  19. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives

    Aisha de Souza Gomes, Stumpf; Carlos, Bergmann; Jos Renato, Prietsch; Juliane, Vicenzi.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar a resistncia adesiva trao de braquetes ortodnticos usando resinas coloridas que se propem a ajudar na remoo do excesso de material adesivo e compar-las com um adesivo tradicional. MTODOS: Noventa braquetes metlicos e 90 cermicos foram colados com dois adesivos color [...] idos e com um adesivo tradicional em incisivos inferiores bovinos, sendo aplicada trao com uma mquina de ensaios universal. Aps a descolagem, os dentes foram observados em microscpio para a determinao do ndice de adesivo remanescente (ARI). RESULTADOS: a anlise estatstica (testes ANOVA, de Tukey e de Kruskall-Wallis) demonstrou que a fora de unio mdia foi significativa entre os adesivos usados. Os ARIs mais comuns foram aqueles onde o adesivo permaneceu no esmalte. CONCLUSO: a resistncia adesiva foi similar entre braquetes metlicos e cermicos quando o mesmo adesivo foi usado. Os resultados do ARI demonstraram que esses adesivos so seguros, mesmo com o uso de braquetes cermicos. A resistncia adesiva foi muito baixa para Ortodontia no grupo colado com Ortho Lite Cure. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. METHODS: Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using t [...] wo color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests) demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  20. A comparative study to evaluate the effects of ligation methods on friction in sliding mechanics using 0.022" slot brackets in dry state: An In-vitro study

    Vinay, K; Venkatesh, M J; Nayak, Rabindra S; Pasha, Azam; Rajesh, M; Kumar, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Background: Friction between archwires and brackets is assuming greater importance for finishing with increased use of sliding mechanics in orthodontics as friction impedes the desired tooth movement. The following study is conducted to compare and evaluate the effect of ligation on friction in sliding mechanics using 0.022" slot bracket in dry condition. Materials & Methods: In the study 48 combinations of brackets, archwires and different ligation techniques were tested in order to provide best combination that offers less friction during sliding mechanics. Instron- 4467 machine was used to evaluate static and kinetic friction force values and the results were subjected to Statistical Analysis and Anova test. Results: The results of the study showed that 0.022" metal brackets, Stainless steel wires and Slick modules provided the optimum frictional resistance to sliding mechanics. It is observed that frictional forces of 0.019" x 0.025" were higher when compared with 0.016" x 0.022" Stainless steel archwire due to the increase in dimension. Self-ligating brackets offered least friction followed by mini twin, variable force, regular stainless steel, ceramic with metal insert bracket and ceramic brackets. The stainless steel ligature offered less resistance than slick and grey modules, and TMA wires recorded maximum friction. Conclusion: The stainless steel archwire of 0.019" x 0.025" dimension are preferred during sliding mechanics, these archwires with variable force brackets ligated with Slick Modules offer decreased friction and is cost effective combination which can be utilized during sliding mechanics. How to cite the article: Vinay K, Venkatesh MJ, Nayak RS, Pasha A, Rajesh M, Kumar P. A comparative study to evaluate the effects of ligation methods on friction in sliding mechanics using 0.022" slot brackets in dry state: An In-vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):76-83. PMID:24876706

  1. Frictional Resistance of Three Types of Ceramic Brackets

    Claire L Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the static frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface in two recently introduced bracket systems and compare them to conventional ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems. Three variables were considered including the bracket system, archwire type and archwire angulation. Material and Methods: Four bracket systems were tested in vitro: Self ligating ceramic, ceramic with metal slot and module, conventional ceramic with module and conventional metal with module. A specially constructed jig and an Instron testing machine were used to measure the static frictional resistance for 0.014 inches round and 0.018 x 0.025 inches rectangular stainless steel wires at 0° and 7° angulations. Main outcome measures: static frictional force at the bracket/archwire interface; recorded and measured in units of force (Newtons. Results: Self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems generated significantly less static frictional resistance than conventional ceramic bracket systems with the wire at both angulations (P < 0.05. Changing the wire from 0.014 round to 0.018 x 0.025 rectangular wire significantly increased frictional forces for metal slot ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems (P < 0.01. Increasing wire angulation significantly increased frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface for all four types of bracket systems tested (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Compared to conventional ceramic, self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems should give improved clinical performance, matching that of conventional metal brackets.

  2. Avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana de adesivo ortodôntico associado a verniz de clorexidina e timol na colagem de braquetes Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of orthodontic adhesive associated with chlorhexidine-thymol varnish in bracket bonding

    Carolina Freire de Carvalho Calabrich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a atividade antimicrobiana da associação de um adesivo ortodôntico com um verniz de clorexidina e timol. MÉTODOS: foram utilizados 32 pré-molares humanos divididos em 4 grupos. O grupo 1 consistiu do grupo controle, no qual o adesivo utilizado para a colagem do braquete não estava associado a nenhum agente antimicrobiano. Os grupos 2, 3 e 4 foram colados com um sistema adesivo associado a um verniz de clorexidina e timol. Os grupos 3 e 4 foram armazenados em água por 7 dias e 30 dias, respectivamente, enquanto os corpos de prova do grupo 2 foram, logo depois da colagem, colocados em ágar semeado com Streptococcus mutans por 48h a 37ºC. RESULTADOS: os grupos experimentais, com exceção do grupo controle, apresentaram atividade antimicrobiana com tendência de redução do seu potencial de ação com maior tempo de imersão em água. CONCLUSÃO: a associação do verniz de clorexidina a um sistema adesivo utilizado em Ortodontia apresenta-se vantajosa pela sua atividade antimicrobiana.OBJECTIVE: To assess the antimicrobial activity resulting from the association of an orthodontic adhesive with chlorhexidine-thymol varnish. METHODS: Thirty-two extracted human premolars were used, divided into four groups. In Group 1, the control group, the adhesive used to bond the bracket was not associated with any antimicrobial agent. Groups 2, 3 and 4 were bonded with an adhesive system associated with chlorhexidine-thymol varnish. Groups 3 and 4 were stored in water for 7 days and 30 days, respectively, while the specimens from group 2 were, soon after bonding, placed on agar seeded with Streptococcus mutans for 48 hours, at 37º C. RESULTS: The experimental groups, with the exception of the control group, showed antimicrobial activity whose action tended to decline commensurately with the amount of time that they remained immersed in water. CONCLUSIONS: The association of chlorhexidine-thymol varnish with an adhesive system used in orthodontics proved to be advantageous due to its antimicrobial activity.

  3. Dental Extrusion with Orthodontic Miniscrew Anchorage: A Case Report Describing a Modified Method

    Horliana, Ricardo Fidos; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Wuo, Alexandre do Vale; Perez, Flvio Eduardo Guillin; Abro, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the skeletal anchorage through miniscrews has expanded the treatment options in orthodontics (Yamaguchi et al., 2012). We hereby present a modified method for tooth extrusion for cases where crown-lengthening surgery is contraindicated for aesthetic reasons. This modified method uses three orthodontic appliances: a mini-implant, an orthodontic wire, and a bracket. The aim of this case report was to increase the length of the clinical crown of a fractured tooth (tooth 23) by means of an orthodontic extrusion with the modified method of Roth and Diedrich. PMID:25713739

  4. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid and silane. Maxillary incisor metal brackets were bonded to half of the disks in each group by conventional orthodontic bonding resin and the other half bonded with a nano-filled composite. The samples then were thermocycled for 2000 cycle between 5-55° C. Shear bond strength was measured and the mode of failure was examined. Randomly selected samples were also evaluated by SEM.The lowest bond strength value was found infeldespathic ceramic bonded by nano-filled composite (p<0.05. There was not any statistically significant difference between other groups regarding bond strength. The mode of failure in the all groups except group 1 was cohesive and porcelain damages were detected.Since less damages to feldspathic porcelain was observed when the nano-filled composite was used to bond brackets, the use of nano-filled composite resins can be suggested for bonding brackets to feldspathic porcelain restorations.

  5. Generalized Moshinsky bracket recurrence relations

    Recurrence relations for generalized Talmi-Moshinsky brackets are derived. These relations permit the generation of transformation brackets once appropriate starting brackets are determined. The savings in computer time, when compared with generating brackets individually, is at least a factor of 10 for brackets with radial quantum numbers as large as 9 and angular quantum numbers as large as 2. (author)

  6. Bracket for photovoltaic modules

    Ciasulli, John; Jones, Jason

    2014-06-24

    Brackets for photovoltaic ("PV") modules are described. In one embodiment, a saddle bracket has a mounting surface to support one or more PV modules over a tube, a gusset coupled to the mounting surface, and a mounting feature coupled to the gusset to couple to the tube. The gusset can have a first leg and a second leg extending at an angle relative to the mounting surface. Saddle brackets can be coupled to a torque tube at predetermined locations. PV modules can be coupled to the saddle brackets. The mounting feature can be coupled to the first gusset and configured to stand the one or more PV modules off the tube.

  7. Comparative analysis of slot dimension in lingual bracket systems

    Dittmer Marc P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances requires - among others - the correct clinical expression of torque, which depends on the precise fitting of archwire and slot. Especially in the lingual technique torque problems become clinically more evident than in labial appliances also with respect to the vertical alignment of teeth due to different distances from the center of resistance. The purpose of the present study was to compare the preciseness of slot dimensions of different lingual bracket systems. Methods Three lingual bracket systems were included in the study (7th Generation and STb, Ormco, Glendora, CA, USA; Incognito, TOP-Service/3 M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA. Non destructive analysis of vertical slot dimensions was performed using precision pin gauges (Azurea, Belprahon, Switzerland that were tapered in increments of 0.002 mm (0.00008 inch. The sizes of 240 incisor and canine brackets were measured per system (total: 720. Data were compared using one-way ANOVA. A p-value Results Average slot dimensions were 0.467 mm ± 0.007 mm (0.0184 inch ± 0.0003 inch for the 7th Generation bracket system, 0.466 mm ± 0.004 mm (0.0183 inch ± 0.0001 inch for the STb bracket system and 0.459 mm ± 0.004 mm (0.0181 inch ± 0.0001 inch for the Incognito bracket system. Differences between systems were statistically significant (p Conclusions The analyzed bracket systems for lingual treatment exhibited significant differences in slot dimension that will clinically result in torque play. These aspects must be considered in lingual orthodontic treatment.

  8. Improvement in adhesion of the brackets to the tooth by sandblasting treatment

    Espinar, Eduardo; J. Barrera; Llamas, Jos Mara; Solano, E.; Rodrguez Rius, Daniel; Gil Mur, Francisco Javier

    2011-01-01

    In oral orthodontic treatments, achievement of a good adhesion between brackets and teeth surfaces is essential. One way to increase adhesion is to apply a surface treatment of teeth facing surfaces through the projection of abrasive particles to produce a surface roughness which improves adhesion of the bracket to the tooth, because of the significantly increased contact between the two surfaces. The effect on adhesion through the use of this technique in different ty...

  9. Influência do agente clareador peróxido de carbamida a 10% na resistência mecânica da colagem de braquetes ortodônticos Influence of 10% carbamide peroxide gel on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Edgard Norões R. da Matta

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste estudo in vitro foi determinar a influência do agente clareador peróxido de carbamida a 10% na resistência mecânica da colagem de braquetes ortodônticos. Foram estudados três grupos denominados G1 (não submetido ao clareamento, G2 (com clareamento e colagem realizada 1 semana após e G3 (com clareamento e colagem realizada 24h após. O teste de cisalhamento foi conduzido na máquina de ensaios mecânicos Emic, com a velocidade de deformação de 0,5 mm/min.A resitência ao cisalhamento em relação à área de colagem foi calculada para cada dente e expressa em MPa. Os resultados mostraram aumento estatisticamente significante (pThe purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the influence of 10% carbamide peroxide gel on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Three group were studied: G1 (without bleaching, G2 (bleaching and bonding after 1 week and G3 (bleaching and bonding after 24h. The shear test was conduced in a Emic testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0,5 mm/min. The shear bond strength was calculated for each tooth and expressed in MPa. The results show enhance statistical significant (p<0,001 on the shear bond strength after bleaching and encreased with the time interval between bleaching and bonding, significantily.

  10. Allergy and orthodontics

    Chakravarthi, Sunitha; Padmanabhan, Sridevi; Chitharanjan, Arun B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the current literature on allergy in orthodontics and to identify the predisposing factors and the implications of the allergic reaction in the management of patients during orthodontic treatment. A computerized literature search was conducted in PubMed for articles published on allergy in relation to orthodontics. The MeSH term used was allergy and orthodontics. Allergic response to alloys in orthodontics, particularly nickel, has been extensively studied a...

  11. Comparision of Shear Bond Strength of Stainless Steel and Ceramic Brackets at 24 Hours after Etching Enamel with Different Proportions of Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride

    Abinaya; Karthikeyan; Sarvanan; Vikram, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of stainless steel brackets and ceramic brackets at 24h after etching the enamel with acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (1.23% APF) at different proportions (40%,30%,20%) incorporated in conventional etchant (37% phosphoric acid). Materials and Methods: Eighty premolars (maxillary and mandibular first and second premolars) extracted for orthodontic purpose has been selected for the study and samples were divided into 4 groups containing 10 teeth each. Comprised of teeth etched Group 1 with 40% of APF gel etchant is Group 2 teeth etched with 30% of APF gel in Group 3 teeth etched with 20% of APF gel etchant and Group 4 teeth were etched with conventional etchant (37% phosphoric acid). Results: The experimental group of Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride (APF) at different proportion (40%, 30%, 20%) incorporated with etchant application for 40s on the enamel surface at 24h indicated that group 4 showed the higher bond strength of all other remaining groups and the groups 1, 2 and 3 showed satisfactory bond strength. The statistical evaluation also revealed that the bond strength of control group (37% phosphoric acid) was greater than those of experimental groups. Conclusion: The present study results shows that the ceramic brackets have higher bond strength than stainless steel brackets (material wise). PMID:25302260

  12. Formality in Brackets

    Garsten, Christina; Nyqvist, Anette

    Ethnographic work in formal organizations involves learning to recognize the many layers of front stage and back stage of organized life, and to bracket formality. It means to be alert to the fact that what is formal and front stage for one some actors, and in some situations, may in fact be back...... the informal, one that places formality in brackets....

  13. Plasma arc curing lights for orthodontic bonding.

    Klocke, Arndt; Korbmacher, Heike M; Huck, Lothar G; Kahl-Nieke, Brbel

    2002-12-01

    Xenon plasma arc lights were introduced recently for light-cured orthodontic bonding. Compared with a conventional tungsten-quartz-halogen light source, these high-intensity lights promise a dramatic reduction in curing time. The purpose of this in vitro investigation was to evaluate bond strength with 2 commercially available plasma arc lights and reduced curing intervals. Brackets were bonded to 150 extracted human teeth (75 premolars, 75 incisors) with a composite adhesive. Intervals of 2 and 6 seconds were used for curing with the plasma arc lights; a control group was bonded with a halogen light source and 20 seconds of light exposure per bracket. Bond strength testing was performed with a universal testing machine. A substantial reduction in curing time was possible with both plasma arc units. Significantly lower bond strength values were found for premolar brackets bonded with plasma arc curing lights and the shortest curing interval of 2 seconds compared with the longer curing time of 6 seconds or the standard curing time with the halogen light. Although 2 seconds of curing might be adequate to achieve acceptable bond strength values for the incisors, the Weibull analysis indicated a higher probability of bond failure for premolar brackets in particular. Six seconds of curing time is recommended for bonding stainless steel brackets with xenon plasma arc light sources. PMID:12490876

  14. Development and evaluation of a reinforced polymeric biomaterial for use as an orthodontic wire

    Zufall, Scott William

    Composite archwires have the potential to provide esthetic and functional improvements over conventional wires. As part of an ongoing effort to bring these materials into general use, composite wires were fabricated using a photo-pultrusion manufacturing technique, and subsequently coated with a 10 mum layer of poly(chloro-p-xylylene). Coated and uncoated composites were subjected to several different evaluations to assess their ability to perform the functions of an orthodontic archwire. An investigation of the viscoelastic behavior of uncoated composite wires was conducted at a physiological temperature of 37C using a bend stress relaxation test. Over 90 day testing periods, energy losses increased with decreasing reinforcement levels from to 8% of the initial wire stress. Final viscous losses were 1% for all reinforcement levels. Relaxed elastic moduli for the composite wires were comparable to the reported elastic moduli of conventional orthodontic wires that are typically used for initial and intermediate alignment procedures. Frictional characteristics were evaluated in passive and active configurations for uncoated composite wires against three contemporary orthodontic brackets. Kinetic coefficients of friction were the same for all wire-bracket combinations tested and were slightly lower than the reported coefficients of other initial and intermediate alignment wires. Wear patterns on the wires, which were largely caused by sharp leading edges of the bracket slots, were characteristic of plowing and cutting wear behaviors. This wear caused glass fibers to be released from the surface of the wires, presenting a potential irritant. Coated composite wires were subjected to the same frictional analysis as the uncoated wires. A mathematical model of the archwire-bracket system was derived using engineering mechanics, and used to define a coefficient of binding. The coating increased the frictional coefficients of the wires by 72%, yet the binding coefficient was unchanged. When frictional data for initial and intermediate alignment wires were compared, the coated composites had higher friction than all but one couple. However, binding coefficients were comparable. Glass fibers were contained for all testing conditions, although the coating was often damaged by plowing or cutting wear. Overall, the coating improved the clinical acceptability of the composite wires.

  15. Lingual Orthodontics simplified : Incognito -customization perfected

    Haroutioun Dedeyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthetic orthodontics is the need of the hour, fuelled by the increasing number of adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment. Alternatives to labial appliance include clear aligners and lingual appliance. Conventional lingual treatment is laborious in terms of laboratory setup and manual dexterity of the operator, coupled with less than optimum treatment results. Customization of the appliance to meet varied requirements of each patient due to highly variable lingual morphology within and amongst patients is the key to successful treatment in lingual orthodontics. Efforts at bracket base customization using intra-oral jigs and laboratory setups are fraught with unavoidable errors affecting treatment outcome. With the advent of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology the Eldorado of true customization is now a reality. This paper introduces the Incognito Appliance System based on custom-made brackets and custom-made series of pre-bent wires using state of art CAD/CAM manufacturing procedures.

  16. Correlation between frictional force and surface roughness of orthodontic archwires.

    Choi, Samjin; Hwang, Eun-Young; Park, Hun-Kuk; Park, Young-Guk

    2015-11-01

    Lateral force microscopy measures the lateral bending of the cantilever depending on the frictional force acting between the tip and surface. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the relationship between the surface roughness and frictional resistance of four archwire and bracket combinations consisting of the 0.016-inch NiTi and 0.019 × 0.025-inch stainless steel archwires interacting clinically with two representative self-ligating brackets, active-type Clippy-C(®) ceramic self-ligating brackets, and passive-type Damon(®) stainless steel self-ligating brackets, using the lateral force microscopy technique. A 0.016-inch NiTi archwire interacting with passive-type Damon(®) stainless steel self-ligating brackets showed the smoothest surface roughness and the lowest frictional resistance compared to other combinations. The archwires interacting with passive-type Damon(®) stainless steel self-ligating brackets showed significantly lower surface roughness and frictional resistance than those interacting with active-type Clippy-C(®) ceramic self-ligating brackets. The frictional force in the in vivo archwire and bracket system increased with increasing surface roughness of the archwire. This positive correlation suggests that surface roughness can be used as an evaluating marker for estimating the efficiency of orthodontic treatment, rather than the direct measurement of frictional force. SCANNING 37:399-405, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26018223

  17. Prospects on Nambu Bracket

    Kiyoshige, Kazuki; Yano, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in formulating the worldvolume theory of the M2-branes using the Nambu bracket. Although it is generally agreed that this formulation should be replaced by another using the superconformal Chern-Simons theory, we try to pursue a possible complementary role played by the Nambu bracket. Since the partition function of the superconformal Chern-Simons theory implies a hidden super gauge group, we study the supersymmetric generalization of the Nambu bracket. We construct explicitly the super unitary Nambu algebra.

  18. On the Leibniz bracket, the Schouten bracket and the Laplacian

    Coll, Bartolomé; Ferrando, Joan Josep

    2003-01-01

    The Leibniz bracket of an operator on a (graded) algebra is defined and some of its properties are studied. A basic theorem relating the Leibniz bracket of the commutator of two operators to the Leibniz bracket of them, is obtained. Under some natural conditions, the Leibniz bracket gives rise to a (graded) Lie algebra structure. In particular, those algebras generated by the Leibniz bracket of the divergence and the Laplacian operators on the exterior algebra are considered, and the expressi...

  19. Quantitative analysis of S. mutans and S. sobrinus cultivated independently and adhered to polished orthodontic composite resins

    Ulises Velazquez-Enriquez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In Orthodontics, fixed appliances placed in the oral cavity are colonized by microorganisms. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively determine the independent bacterial colonization of S. mutans and S. sobrinus in orthodontic composite resins. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seven orthodontic composite adhesives for bonding brackets were selected and classified into 14 groups; (GIm, GIs Enlight, (GIIm, GIIs Grengloo, (GIIIm, GIIIs Kurasper F, (GIVm, GIVs BeautyOrtho Bond, (GVm, GVs Transbond CC, (GVIm, GVIs Turbo Bond II, (GVIIm, GVIIs Blugloo. 60 blocks of 4x4x1 mm of each orthodontic composite resin were made (total 420 blocks, and gently polished with sand-paper and ultrasonically cleaned. S. mutans and S. sobrinus were independently cultivated. For the quantitative analysis, a radioactive marker was used to codify the bacteria (³H adhered to the surface of the materials. The blocks were submerged in a solution with microorganisms previously radiolabeled and separated (210 blocks for S. mutans and 210 blocks for S. sobrinus for 2 hours at 37ºC. Next, the blocks were placed in a combustion system, to capture the residues and measure the radiation. The statistical analysis was calculated with the ANOVA test (Sheffè post-hoc. RESULTS: Significant differences of bacterial adhesion were found amongst the groups. In the GIm and GIs the significant lowest scores for both microorganisms were shown; in contrast, the values of GVII for both bacteria were significantly the highest. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the orthodontic composite resin evaluated in the GIm and GIs, obtained the lowest adherence of S. mutans and S. sobrinus, which may reduce the enamel demineralization and the risk of white spot lesion formation.

  20. Effects of Different Ligature Materials on Friction in Sliding Mechanics

    Khamatkar, Aparna; Sonawane, Sushma; Narkhade, Sameer; Gadhiya, Nitin; Bagade, Abhijit; Soni, Vivek; Betigiri, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Background: During orthodontic tooth movement friction occurs at the bracket wire interface. Out of the total force applied to the tooth movement, some of it is dissipated as friction, and the remainder is transferred to the supporting structures of the tooth to mediate tooth movement. However many factors affect friction, and method of arch wire ligation being an important contributing factor. Hence, this study was carried out to evaluate the effects of different ligature materials on fricti...

  1. Mechanical properties of a new thermoplastic polymer orthodontic archwire

    A new thermoplastic polymer for orthodontic applications was obtained and extruded into wires with round and rectangular cross sections. We evaluated the potential of new aesthetic archwire: tensile, three point bending, friction and stress relaxation behaviour, and formability characteristics were assessed. Stresses delivered were generally slightly lower than typical beta-titanium and nickel-titanium archwires. The polymer wire has good instantaneous mechanical properties; tensile stress decayed about 2% over 2 h depending on the initial stress relaxation for up to 120 h. High formability allowed shape bending similar to that associated with stainless steel wires. The friction coefficients were lower than the metallic conventional archwires improving the slipping with the brackets. This new polymer could be a good candidate for aesthetic orthodontic archwires. - Highlights: • A new thermoplastic polymer for orthodontic applications was obtained. • This polymer could be a good candidate for aesthetic orthodontic archwires. • The polymer has good mechanical properties as orthodontic wire coating. • The friction coefficients were lower than the metallic archwires improving the slipping with the brackets. • High formability allowed shape bending similar to that associated with stainless steel wires

  2. Mechanical properties of a new thermoplastic polymer orthodontic archwire

    Varela, Juan Carlos; Velo, Marcos [Grupo de investigación en Ortodoncia, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Espinar, Eduardo; Llamas, Jose Maria [Grupo de investigación en Ortodoncia, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Rúperez, Elisa; Manero, Jose Maria [Dept. C. Materiales e Ing. Metalúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Centre de Recerca Nanoenginyeria, Member of Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, CIBER-BBN (Spain); Javier Gil, F., E-mail: francesc.xavier.gil@upc.edu [Dept. C. Materiales e Ing. Metalúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Centre de Recerca Nanoenginyeria, Member of Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, CIBER-BBN (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    A new thermoplastic polymer for orthodontic applications was obtained and extruded into wires with round and rectangular cross sections. We evaluated the potential of new aesthetic archwire: tensile, three point bending, friction and stress relaxation behaviour, and formability characteristics were assessed. Stresses delivered were generally slightly lower than typical beta-titanium and nickel-titanium archwires. The polymer wire has good instantaneous mechanical properties; tensile stress decayed about 2% over 2 h depending on the initial stress relaxation for up to 120 h. High formability allowed shape bending similar to that associated with stainless steel wires. The friction coefficients were lower than the metallic conventional archwires improving the slipping with the brackets. This new polymer could be a good candidate for aesthetic orthodontic archwires. - Highlights: • A new thermoplastic polymer for orthodontic applications was obtained. • This polymer could be a good candidate for aesthetic orthodontic archwires. • The polymer has good mechanical properties as orthodontic wire coating. • The friction coefficients were lower than the metallic archwires improving the slipping with the brackets. • High formability allowed shape bending similar to that associated with stainless steel wires.

  3. Algebraic string bracket as a Poisson bracket

    Abbaspour, Hossein; Tradler, Thomas; Zeinalian, Mahmoud

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we construct a Lie algebra representation of the algebraic string bracket on negative cyclic cohomology of an associative algebra with appropriate duality. This is a generalized algebraic version of the main theorem of [AZ] which extends Goldman's results using string topology operations.The main result can be applied to the de Rham complex of a smooth manifold as well as the Dolbeault resolution of the endomorphisms of a holomorphic bundle on a Calabi-Yau manifold.

  4. Orthodontic treatment of an anterior openbite with the aid of corticotomy procedure: Case report

    Ali S. Aljhani; Aldrees, Abdullah M

    2010-01-01

    This case report illustrates the orthodontic treatment combined with the corticotomy technique in an adult patient to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time. The patient was a 22-year-old woman with an anterior open bite and flared and spaced upper and lower incisors. First, fixed orthodontic appliances (bidimensional edgewise brackets) were bonded, and a week later buccal and lingual corticotomy with alveolar augmentation procedure in the maxillary arch from the first molar...

  5. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontics

    Cano, J; Campo, Julián; Bonilla, Elena; Colmenero Ruiz, César

    2012-01-01

    The use of orthodontic treatment in adult patients is becoming more common and these patients have different requirements specially regarding duration of treatment and facial and dental aesthetics. Alveolar corticotomy is an effective means of accelerating orthodontic treatment. This literature revision include an historical background, biological and orthodontic fundamentals and the most significant clinical applications of this technique. Orthodontic treatment time is reduced with this tech...

  6. Er:YAG Laser for Brackets Bonding: A SEM Study after Debonding

    Ierardo, G.; Di Carlo, G.; Petrillo, F.; Luzzi, V.; Vozza, I.; Migliau, G.; Kornblit, R.; Rocca, J. P.; Polimeni, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The introduction of Er:YAG laser in dentistry for ablation of hard tissues advocated an alternative method of enamel etching for orthodontics purpose. Materials and Methods. 55 extracted human third molars were inserted in acrylic resin blocks and divided into five groups of 11 teeth. Group 1 was treated with 37% orthophosphoric acid for 30 seconds. Group 2 was treated with laser irradiation (Er:YAG Fidelius III, Fotona, Slovenia) at 80 mJ and 4 Hz. Group 3 underwent laser treatment (80 mJ, 4 Hz), followed by 37% orthophosphoric acid for 30 seconds. The teeth in Group 4 were treated with laser at 40 mJ and 10 Hz. The teeth in Group 5 were treated with laser (40 mJ, 10 Hz), followed by 37% orthophosphoric acid for 30 seconds. The adhesive remnant index was determined after debonding. Results. Kruskas-Wallis test showed that location parameters (median and mean) are significantly different between Groups 2 and 4 when compared with control group; on the contrary no significant difference was detected between Groups 3 and 5 with the controls. Conclusion. The use of Er:YAG laser alone, as in Groups 2 and 4, showed no significant advantages over phosphoric acid in the bonding procedure for orthodontics brackets. PMID:25405238

  7. Influence of in vitro pigmenting of esthetic orthodontic ligatures on smile attractiveness

    Camila Ferraz; Marcelo Castellucci; Márcio Sobral

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the perception of dental students and orthodontists on the degree of influence that pigmented esthetic elastic ligatures have on smile attractiveness, by judging clinical photographs. METHODS: Sixteen clinical facial photographs of the smile and 16 close up images of the smile of a single patient wearing monocrystalline porcelain orthodontic brackets, Teflon coated NiTi wire brackets and esthetic elastic ligatures of five different commercial brands were distributed int...

  8. Influência do tempo pós-fixação na resistência ao cisalhamento de bráquetes colados com diferentes materiais Influence of post-fixation time on shear bond strength of brackets fixed with different bonding materials

    Lourenço CORRER SOBRINHO

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avaliou a resistência ao cisalhamento da união, nos tempos pós-fixação de 10 minutos e 24 horas, de quatro materiais para colagem de bráquetes e os tipos de falhas na fratura. Foram utilizados 64 pré-molares humanos recém-extraídos embutidos em resina. As faces vestibulares de 32 pré-molares foram condicionadas com ácido fosfórico a 35%, por 30 segundos e em 16 deles, os bráquetes foram colados com Concise Ortodôntico (3M e nos demais com resina composta Z100 (3M. Em 32 dentes, os bráquetes foram colados sem condicionamento do esmalte, com ionômeros de vidro Fuji I (GC e Fuji Ortho LC (GC. Após a fixação, 32 corpos-de-prova foram armazenados em água destilada a 37ºC, por 10 minutos e o restante por 24 horas e submetidos ao teste de cisalhamento numa máquina com velocidade de 0,5 mm/min. Os resultados submetidos à ANOVA e ao teste de Tukey (5% mostraram que os maiores valores de resistência ao cisalhamento aos 10 minutos e 24 horas foram observados com o Concise Ortodôntico, com diferença estatística significativa em relação ao Fuji Ortho LC, Z100 e Fuji I. Nenhuma diferença estatística foi observada entre Fuji Ortho LC, Z100 e Fuji I. Os autores concluíram que o Concise Ortodôntico apresentou maiores valores de resistência ao cisalhamento em relação aos outros materiais, nos tempos de 10 minutos e 24 horas, os valores obtidos no período de 24 horas foram superiores em relação aos de 10 minutos, para todos materiais e um grande número de falhas adesivas foi observada para o Fuji I, Concise Ortodôntico e Z100.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of four bonding materials for brackets, 10 minutes and 24 hours after their fixation, as well as the kinds of fracture observed. The buccal surfaces of 32 premolars were etched for 30 seconds with 35% phosphoric acid, and brackets were bonded using Orthodontic Concise (3M and Z100 (3M. In other 32 premolars, brackets were bonded with Fuji I (GC and Fuji Ortho LC (GC on the buccal surfaces, without acid etching. After the bonding procedures, 32 samples were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 10 minutes, and 32 samples were stored at the same temperature for 24 hours. The samples were then submitted to shear bond strength testing in an Instron testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. The results indicated that, for 10 minutes and 24 hours, Orthodontic Concise showed shear bond strength values (6.22 and 7.73 MPa, respectively higher than Fuji Ortho LC (3.32 and 5.10 MPa, Z100 (2.72 and 4.51 MPa and Fuji I (2.52 and 4.54 MPa. No statistical difference was verified between Fuji Ortho LC, Z100 and Fuji I (p < 0.05. In conclusion, Orthodontic Concise showed better shear bond strength values than the other three bonding materials, for both 10-minute and 24-hour storage periods; the shear bond strength averages were higher for the storage time of 24 hours, for all tested materials, and a great number of adhesive fractures were observed in the specimens which received Fuji I, Orthodontic Concise and Z100.

  9. Canine retraction and anchorage loss self-ligating versus conventional brackets: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Zhou, Qiaozhen; ul Haq, Abdul Azeem Amin; Tian, Liu; Chen, Xiaofeng; Huang, Kui; Zhou, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this systematic review is to identify and review the orthodontic literature with regards to assessing possible differences in canine retraction rate and the amount of antero-posterior anchorage (AP) loss during maxillary canine retraction, using conventional brackets (CBs) and self-ligating brackets (SLBs). Methods An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertake in September 2014 in the following electronic databases: The Cochrane Oral Health...

  10. The spectrum of Apert syndrome: phenotype, particularities in orthodontic treatment, and characteristics of orthognathic surgery

    Ehmer Ulrike

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the PubMed accessible literature, information on the characteristics of interdisciplinary orthodontic and surgical treatment of patients with Apert syndrome is rare. The aim of the present article is threefold: (1 to show the spectrum of the phenotype, in order (2 to elucidate the scope of hindrances to orthodontic treatment, and (3 to demonstrate the problems of surgery and interdisciplinary approach. Children and adolescents who were born in 1985 or later, who were diagnosed with Apert syndrome, and who sought consultation or treatment at the Departments of Orthodontics or Craniomaxillofacial Surgery at the Dental School of the University Hospital of Mnster (n = 22; 9 male, 13 female were screened. Exemplarily, three of these patients (2 male, 1 female, seeking interdisciplinary (both orthodontic and surgical treatment are presented. Orthodontic treatment before surgery was performed by one experienced orthodontist (AH, and orthognathic surgery was performed by one experienced surgeon (UJ, who diagnosed the syndrome according to the criteria listed in OMIM. In the sagittal plane, the patients suffered from a mild to a very severe Angle Class III malocclusion, which was sometimes compensated by the inclination of the lower incisors; in the vertical dimension from an open bite; and transversally from a single tooth in crossbite to a circular crossbite. All patients showed dentitio tarda, some impaction, partial eruption, idopathic root resorption, transposition or other aberrations in the position of the tooth germs, and severe crowding, with sometimes parallel molar tooth buds in each quarter of the upper jaw. Because of the severity of malocclusion, orthodontic treatment needed to be performed with fixed appliances, and mainly with superelastic wires. The therapy was hampered with respect to positioning of bands and brackets because of incomplete tooth eruption, dense gingiva, and mucopolysaccharide ridges. Some teeth did not move, or moved insufficiently (especially with respect to rotations and torque irrespective of surgical procedures or orthodontic mechanics and materials applied, and without prognostic factors indicating these problems. Establishing occlusal contact of all teeth was difficult. Tooth movement was generally retarded, increasing the duration of orthodontic treatment. Planning of extractions was different from that of patients without this syndrome. In one patient, the sole surgical procedure after orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances in the maxilla and mandible was a genioplasty. Most patients needed two- jaw surgery (bilateral sagittal split osteotomy [BSSO] with mandibular setback and distraction in the maxilla. During the period of distraction, the orthodontist guided the maxilla into final position by means of bite planes and intermaxillary elastics. To our knowledge, this is the first article in the PubMed accessible literature describing the problems with respect to interdisciplinary orthodontic and surgical procedures. Although the treatment results are not perfect, patients undergoing these procedures benefit esthetically to a high degree. Patients need to be informed with respect to the different kinds of extractions that need to be performed, the increased treatment time, and the results, which may be reached using realistic expectations.

  11. Influence of surface treatments on bond strength of metal and ceramic brackets to a novel CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic material.

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four different surface treatments methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of ceramic and metal brackets to Vita Enamic (VE) CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic. A total of 240 plates (10 mm × 10 mm × 3 mm) were cut from VE ceramic blocks and divided into two groups. In each group, four subgroups were prepared by hydrofluoric acid (HF); phosphoric acid (H3PO4); diamond ceramic grinding bur; and silica coating using CoJet system (CJ). Maxillary central incisor metal (Victory Series) and ceramic (Clarity) brackets were bonded with light-cure composite and then stored in artificial saliva for 1 week and thermocycled. The SBS test was performed, and the failure types were classified with adhesive remnant index scores. Surface morphology of the ceramic was characterized after treatment using a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test, and Weibull analysis. SBS was significantly affected by the type of bracket and by type of treatment (P HF > Bur > H3PO4. Ceramic bracket showed higher SBS compared to metal bracket. Adhesive failures between the ceramic and composite resin were the predominant mode of failure in all groups. Surface treatment of VE CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic with silica coating enhanced the adhesion with ceramic and metal brackets. PMID:25585677

  12. Development of a standardized testing system for orthodontic sliding mechanics

    Fathimani, Maryam; Melenka, Garrett W; Romanyk, Dan L; Toogood, Roger W; Heo, Giseon; Carey, Jason P.; Major, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study was to develop a computer-controlled three-dimensional friction measuring system, the orthodontic friction simulator (OFS). A clinically-based in vitro experiment considering wet and dry friction for conventionally and self-ligated brackets is presented to elucidate debate surrounding sliding mechanics and illustrate capabilities of the OFS. Methods The OFS was designed and manufactured using sound engineering principles and with the primary conc...

  13. Poisson Brackets of Orthogonal Polynomials

    Cantero, M J; Cantero, Maria Jose; Simon, Barry

    2006-01-01

    For the standard symplectic forms on Jacobi and CMV matrices, we compute Poisson brackets of OPRL and OPUC, and relate these to other basic Poisson brackets and to Jacobians of basic changes of variable.

  14. Orthodontic Tooth Movement with Clear Aligners

    Carl T. Drake; Susan P. McGorray; Calogero Dolce; Madhu Nair; Wheeler, Timothy T.

    2012-01-01

    Clear aligners provide a convenient model to measure orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). We examined the role of in vivo aligner material fatigue and subject-specific factors in tooth movement. Fifteen subjects seeking orthodontic treatment at the University of Florida were enrolled. Results were compared with data previously collected from 37 subjects enrolled in a similar protocol. Subjects were followed prospectively for eight weeks. An upper central incisor was programmed to move 0.5 mm. ev...

  15. Orthodontic instrument sterilization with microwave irradiation

    Arif Yezdani; Krishnan Mahalakshmi; Kesavaram Padmavathy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of microwave sterilization of orthodontic instruments and molar bands immersed in plain distilled water with and without oral rinse, and to ascertain the minimum time of exposure required to sterilize. Materials and Methods: The orthodontic instruments (hinged and nonhinged), molar bands and mouth mirrors used in the patient′s mouth were selected for the study. The instruments were divided into two groups - Group I with oral rinse-...

  16. A study of a novel aesthetic archwire on its frictional properties and its applications to orthodontics

    Chai Kiat Chng; Kelvin Foong; Narayan Gandedkar; Yiong Huak Chan; Chong Lin Chew

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare sliding friction of prototype 0.018-inch fiber-reinforced polymer composite (FRPC) archwire with 0.018-inch nickel titanium archwire using various bracket-arch wire combinations. Materials and Methods: Two wires were tested against four different brackets (3M Gemini Twin bracket; 3M Clarity metal-reinforced ceramic bracket; Ormco Inspire ICE ceramic bracket; and 3M SmartClip) using the Universal testing machine to study and compare frictional characteristics. Results: T...

  17. Correlates of Narrow Bracketing

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    We examine whether different phenomena of narrow bracketing can be traced back to some common characteristic and whether and how different phenomena are related. We find that making dominated lottery choices or ignoring the endowment when making risky choices are related phenomena and are both...

  18. Fixed orthodontic appliances cause pain and disturbance in somatosensory function.

    Shen, Huijie; Shao, Sheng; Zhang, Jinglu; Wang, Zhendong; Lv, Dong; Chen, Wenjing; Svensson, Peter; Wang, Kelun

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the short-term effects of orthodontic pain on quantitative sensory testing (QST) in subjects receiving fixed orthodontic treatment. Twenty patients and 12 healthy volunteers (as controls) participated. All 20 patients had bonded AO self-ligating brackets, with a 0.014 super elastic nickel-titanium arch wire placed in the brackets. Pain [self-reported on a visual analog scale (VAS)], and thermal and mechanical thresholds, were tested at six time points--before (baseline), and 2 h, 24 h, 7 d, 14 d, and 30 d after, force application--in the treatment group. The attached gingiva adjacent to the left upper central incisor (21 gingiva) was hypersensitive to cold stimuli (i.e. increased cold detection thresholds were detected) in the treatment group. The pressure pain thresholds of the left upper central incisor (21) and 21 gingiva were significantly reduced. Our results suggest clear signs of sensitization of the trigeminal nociceptive system up to 1 month after force application and orthodontic pain. Quantitative assessment of somatosensory function may help to provide a better understanding and profiling of the underlying neurobiological mechanisms related to orthodontic pain. PMID:26715259

  19. Finite element modeling of superelastic nickel-titanium orthodontic wires.

    Naceur, Ines Ben; Charfi, Amin; Bouraoui, Tarak; Elleuch, Khaled

    2014-11-28

    Thanks to its good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, superelastic Ni–Ti wire alloys have been successfully used in orthodontic treatment. Therefore, it is important to quantify and evaluate the level of orthodontic force applied to the bracket and teeth in order to achieve tooth movement. In this study, three dimensional finite element models with a Gibbs-potential-based-formulation and thermodynamic principles were used. The aim was to evaluate the influence of possible intraoral temperature differences on the forces exerted by NiTi orthodontic arch wires with different cross sectional shapes and sizes. The prediction made by this phenomenological model, for superelastic tensile and bending tests, shows good agreement with the experimental data. A bending test is simulated to study the force variation of an orthodontic NiTi arch wire when it loaded up to the deflection of 3 mm, for this task one half of the arch wire and the 3 adjacent brackets were modeled. The results showed that the stress required for the martensite transformation increases with the increase of cross-sectional dimensions and temperature. Associated with this increase in stress, the plateau of this transformation becomes steeper. In addition, the area of the mechanical hysteresis, measured as the difference between the forces of the upper and lower plateau, increases. PMID:25458153

  20. Orthodontic Implants: Concepts for the Orthodontic Practitioner

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; de Oliveira Ruellas, Antnio Carlos; Fernandes, Daniel Jogaib

    2012-01-01

    Orthodontic implants have become a reliable method in orthodontic practice for providing temporary additional anchorage. These devices are useful to control skeletal anchorage in less compliant patients or in cases where absolute anchorage is necessary. There are a great number of advantages in this new approach which include easy insertion, decreased patient discomfort, low price, immediate loading, reduced diameter, versatility in the forces to be used, ease of cleaning, and ease of removal. However, a proper management of the screws by the practitioner is necessary in order to increase the success rate of the technique. The purpose of this paper is to update practitioners on the current concepts of orthodontic implants and orthodontic mechanics. PMID:23209470

  1. Femtosecond laser etching of dental enamel for bracket bonding.

    Kabas, Ayse Sena; Ersoy, Tansu; Glsoy, Murat; Akturk, Selcuk

    2013-09-01

    The aim is to investigate femtosecond laser ablation as an alternative method for enamel etching used before bonding orthodontic brackets. A focused laser beam is scanned over enamel within the area of bonding in a saw tooth pattern with a varying number of lines. After patterning, ceramic brackets are bonded and bonding quality of the proposed technique is measured by a universal testing machine. The results are compared to the conventional acid etching method. Results show that bonding strength is a function of laser average power and the density of the ablated lines. Intrapulpal temperature changes are also recorded and observed minimal effects are observed. Enamel surface of the samples is investigated microscopically and no signs of damage or cracking are observed. In conclusion, femtosecond laser exposure on enamel surface yields controllable patterns that provide efficient bonding strength with less removal of dental tissue than conventional acid-etching technique. PMID:24045693

  2. Evaluation In Vitro of Frictional Resistance of Self-Ligating Esthetic and Conventional Brackets / Evaluacin In Vitro de la Resistencia Friccional en Brackets de Autoligado Estticos y Convencionales

    Maria Rita Danelon do, Amaral; Perrim Smith, Neto; Matheus Melo, Pithon; Dauro Douglas, Oliveira.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue evaluar la resistencia a la friccin producida en de brackets de autoligado estticos y convencionales durante la simulacin mecnica de deslizamiento ortodncico. Se utilizaron cuatro tipos diferentes de soportes: 3 de tipo autoligado de diferentes marcas (Clarity SL, 3M Unitek; Dam [...] on 3, Ormco Corporation; In-Ovation C, GAC International), adems de brackets estticos convencionales (Radiance, American Orthodontics) asociado con ligaduras elsticas convencionales (Sani-tie, GAC International) y ligaduras de baja friccin (Slide, Leone). Para simular la mecnica de deslizamiento, se utilizaron alambres de acero inoxidable con un espesor de 0,018" y 0,017"x0.025" (GAC Internacional). Cinco grupos (n = 10) fueron sometidos a cinco pruebas mecnicas consecutivas en una mquina de prueba universal modelo Emic DL 500. Los resultados mostraron niveles bajos de friccin en todos brackets de autoligado probados y con el uso de alambre de 0.018" (p0,05). Por otra parte, los brackets estticos convencionales asociados con ligaduras convencionales resultaron tener una mayor resistencia a la friccin con ambos alambres probados (p>0,05). Todos los brackets de autoligado presentan niveles de friccin ms bajo que los accesorios convencionales. El brackets activo de autoligado In-Ovation C, demostr un mayor grado de fuerza friccional cuando se asocia con alambre rectangular. La ligadura Slide puede ser una alternativa al uso de brackets de autoligado. Abstract in english The objective of this study was to evaluate the frictional resistance created in self-ligating esthetic and conventional brackets during simulated orthodontic sliding mechanics. Four different types of brackets were used: 3 self-ligating type of different brands (Clarity SL, 3M Unitek; Damon 3, Orm [...] co Corporation; In-Ovation C, GAC International), in addition to conventional esthetic brackets (Radiance, American Orthodontics) associated with conventional elastic ligatures (Sani-tie, GAC International) and low friction ligatures (Slide, Leone). To simulate sliding mechanics, stainless steel wires with thicknesses of 0.018" and 0.017"x0.025" (GAC International) were used. Five groups (n=10) were submitted to five consecutive mechanical tests in a universal test machine model Emic DL 500. The results showed low frictional levels in all tested self-ligating brackets and with use of 0.018" wire (p0.05). Moreover, conventional esthetic brackets associated with conventional ligatures resulted in greater frictional resistance with both wires tested (p>0.05). All the self-ligating brackets presented lower frictional levels than the conventional accessories. Active self-ligating bracket In-Ovation C, demonstrated higher degree of frictional force when associated with rectangular wire. The Slide ligature may be an alternative to the use of self-ligating brackets.

  3. Effect of light-curing units in shear bond strength of metallic brackets: an in vitro study

    Luciana Borges Retamoso

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the influence of the light curing units on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventy-two premolars were divided into six groups (n=12: Group I: brackets bonded with Transbond and polymerization with halogen light; Group II: Transbond and LED; Group III: Fuji Ortho and halogen light; Group IV: Fuji Ortho and LED; Group V: Fuji Ortho, without acid and halogen light; Group VI: Fuji Ortho, without acid and LED. The groups were tested to shear strength in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. RESULTS: The composite resin presented higher shear bond strength than the resin-modified glass ionomer cement (p0.05. CONCLUSION: The shear bond strength was influenced by the material but not by the light-curing unit. The use of LED reduced the experimental time by approximately 60%, with the same curing efficiency.

  4. Cariogram caries risk profiles in adolescent orthodontic patients with and without some salivary variables

    Petsi, Georgia; Gizani, Sotiria; Twetman, Svante; Kavvadia, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the Cariogram caries risk profiles with and without salivary buffer capacity and mutans streptococci (MS) counts in adolescents with fixed orthodontic appliances. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 90 healthy Greek adolescents who were undergoing orthodontic...... orthodontic practice....

  5. The Dirac bracket

    In the extensive literature devoted to the Hamiltonian dynamics of constrained systems, the case when there are no second-class constraints has been thoroughly studied. In particular, the geometrical significance of the objects encountered in generalized Hamiltonian dynamics has been clarified. The foundation of the geometrical interpretation is the symplectic structure generated in the phase space by the Poisson bracket. It is this structure that permits the introduction of Hamiltonian vector fields isomorphic to the differentials of functions in the phase space and to elucidate the structure of the constraint surface. In this work, the possibility of giving a geometrical meaning to Hamiltonian dynamics in the presence of second-class constraints by using the Dirac bracket to define a symplectic structure on the phase space is discussed. 5 refs

  6. Inequalities from Poisson brackets

    Alekseev, Anton; Davydenkova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the notion of tropicalization for Poisson structures on $\\mathbb{R}^n$ with coefficients in Laurent polynomials. To such a Poisson structure we associate a polyhedral cone and a constant Poisson bracket on this cone. There is a version of this formalism applicable to $\\mathbb{C}^n$ viewed as a real Poisson manifold. In this case, the tropicalization gives rise to a completely integrable system with action variables taking values in a polyhedral cone and angle variables spanning a...

  7. Allergic reactions seen in orthodontic treatment

    Hande Görücü Coşkuner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergy can be defined as inappropriate and harmful response to harmless and ordinary materials. Allergic reactions, like in other fields of dentistry, can also be seen in the field of orthodontics. The reactions that occur against orthodontic materials can be seen as irritant or hypersensitivity reactions. The main reason of the irritant reactions is friction between soft tissues and orthodontic appliances. However, the reason of the hypersensitivity reactions is usually the antigenicity of the materials. Hypersensitivity reactions are usually seen as allergic contact dermatitis on face and neck; the occurrence of mucosal-gingival reactions and dermal and systemic reactions are rare. Latex, metal and acrylic resins are the most common allergens in orthodontics. Apart from these materials, allergic reactions can occur against bonding materials, extraoral appliances, disinfectants and antimicrobial agents. The reactions that occur against extraoral appliances usually result from metallic and elastic parts of the appliances or the appliance parts that are in contact with skin. Orthodontists should be aware of the allergic reactions to protect their patients’ health. The aim of this review was to evaluate the allergic reactions seen in orthodontic patients and discuss the cautions that orthodontists can take.

  8. Improvement of orthodontic friction by coating archwire with carbon nitride film

    Wei Songbo [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shao Tianmin, E-mail: shaotm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ding Peng [Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-10-01

    In order to reduce frictional resistance between archwire and bracket during orthodontic tooth movement, carbon nitride (CNx) thin films were deposited on the surface of archwires with ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) analysis showed that the CNx film was successfully deposited on the surface of the orthodontic wires. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis suggested that the deposited CNx film was sp{sup 2} carbon dominated structures, and diversiform bonds (N-C, N{identical_to}C, et al.) coexisted in the film. The friction tests indicated that the CNx film significantly reduced the wire-bracket friction both in ambient air and in artificial saliva. The sp{sup 2}C rich structure of the CNx film as well as its protection function for the archwire was responsible for the low friction of the wire-bracket sliding system.

  9. Improvement of orthodontic friction by coating archwire with carbon nitride film

    In order to reduce frictional resistance between archwire and bracket during orthodontic tooth movement, carbon nitride (CNx) thin films were deposited on the surface of archwires with ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) analysis showed that the CNx film was successfully deposited on the surface of the orthodontic wires. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis suggested that the deposited CNx film was sp2 carbon dominated structures, and diversiform bonds (N-C, N≡C, et al.) coexisted in the film. The friction tests indicated that the CNx film significantly reduced the wire-bracket friction both in ambient air and in artificial saliva. The sp2C rich structure of the CNx film as well as its protection function for the archwire was responsible for the low friction of the wire-bracket sliding system.

  10. Comparative study of torque expression among active and passive self-ligating and conventional brackets

    Érika Mendonça Fernandes Franco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to compare torque expression in active and passive self-ligating and conventional brackets. Methods: A total of 300 segments of stainless steel wire 0.019 x 0.025-in and six different brands of brackets (Damon 3MX, Portia, In-Ovation R, Bioquick, Roth SLI and Roth Max were used. Torque moments were measured at 12°, 24°, 36° and 48°, using a wire torsion device associated with a universal testing machine. The data obtained were compared by analysis of variance followed by Tukey test for multiple comparisons. Regression analysis was performed by the least-squares method to generate the mathematical equation of the optimal curve for each brand of bracket. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed in the expression of torque among all evaluated bracket brands in all evaluated torsions (p < 0.05. It was found that Bioquick presented the lowest torque expression in all tested torsions; in contrast, Damon 3MX bracket presented the highest torque expression up to 36° torsion. Conclusions: The connection system between wire/bracket (active, passive self-ligating or conventional with elastic ligature seems not to interfere in the final torque expression, the latter being probably dependent on the interaction between the wire and the bracket chosen for orthodontic mechanics.

  11. Glass transition and degree of conversion of a light-cured orthodontic composite

    Michela M. D. S. Sostena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the glass transition temperature (Tg and degree of conversion (DC of a light-cured (Fill Magic versus a chemically cured (Concise orthodontic composite. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Anelastic relaxation spectroscopy was used for the first time to determine the Tg of a dental composite, while the DC was evaluated by infrared spectroscopy. The light-cured composite specimens were irradiated with a commercial LED light-curing unit using different exposure times (40, 90 and 120 s. RESULTS: Fill Magic presented lower Tg than Concise (35-84ºC versus 135ºC, but reached a higher DC. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that Fill Magic has lower Tg than Concise due to its higher organic phase content, and that when this light-cured composite is used to bond orthodontic brackets, a minimum energy density of 7.8 J/cm² is necessary to reach adequate conversion level and obtain satisfactory adhesion.

  12. Effect on enamel shear bond strength of adding microsilver and nanosilver particles to the primer of an orthodontic adhesive

    Blöcher, Sonja; Frankenberger, Roland; Hellak, Andreas; Schauseil, Michael; Roggendorf, Matthias J; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine whether the addition of microsilver or nanosilver particles to an orthodontic primer affects shear bond strength (SBS) and bracket/adhesive failure. Methods Bovine incisors were randomly divided into six groups with 16 specimens in each: In group 1 (control), brackets were bonded with Transbond™ XT primer. In the experimental groups, microsilver (groups 2 and 3) and nanosilver (groups 4–6) particles of different sizes were added to Trans...

  13. USE OF ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT NEEDS INDICES FOR ORAL HEALTH SURVEY

    Nakas, Enita; Tiro, Alisa; Vrazalica, Lejla Redzepagic; Hadzihasanovic, Dzana; Dzemidzic, Vildana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of our study is to compare incidence of orthodontic malocclusion based on occlusal indices and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN), and to evaluate the most commonly used method among the dentists for orthodontic treatment in Sarajevo. Material and Methods: The sample consisted of 110 (31 female and 79 male)subjects older than 16 years with complete permanent dentition. Subjects were examined according to Occlusal Index (Angle classification of malocclusion, overjet, overbite, dental arch crowding and tooth rotation) and IOTN index. We conduct survey regarding which indexes are used in deciding on orthodontic treatment need, among primary health care and Orthodontist. Results: The present study show differences between the presence of malocclusion and treatment need as assessed by these two used indices. Based on the survey that we conduct all primary health care doctors use Occlusal Index to decide need for orthodontic treatment, more than 95% of orthodontic specialist use Occlusal Index for treatment need estimation. Conclusion: When measuring and grading treatment needs we should rely on Index of orthodontic treatment need. In such high demand for orthodontic treatment need it is necessary to establish need for the orthodontic treatment as fundamental, so that individuals with greatest treatment need can be assigned priority. PMID:27147922

  14. Relationship between friction force and orthodontic force at the leveling stage using a coated wire

    Masaki MURAYAMA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between orthodontic force and friction produced from an archwire and brackets affects the sliding of the wire in the leveling stage. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between force and friction in a small esthetic nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti wire. Material and Methods: Five esthetic wires (three coated and two plated and two small, plain Ni-Ti wires (0.012 and 0.014 inches were used. We performed a three-point bending test according to ISO 15841 and the drawing test with a dental arch model designed with upper linguoversion of the lateral incisor in the arch (displacements of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mm, and evaluated the relationship between them. Results: Unloading bending forces of all wires at displacements of less than 1.0 mm were larger than friction forces, but all friction forces at displacements exceeding 2.0 mm were larger than unloading bending forces. The arch likely expands when displacement from the proximal brackets exceeds 1.0 mm. The friction force of a martensite 0.014-inch Ni-Ti wire was significantly greater than those of the other esthetic and austenitic wires. Conclusions: A wire with the smallest possible friction force should be used in cases with more than 1.0 mm displacement.

  15. How Is the Enamel Affected by Different Orthodontic Bonding Agents and Polishing Techniques?

    Heravi, Farzin; Shafaee, Hooman; Abdollahi, Mojtaba; Rashed, Roozbeh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the effect of new bonding techniques on enamel surface. Materials and Methods: Sixty upper central incisors were randomly divided into two equal groups. In the first group, metal brackets were bonded using TransbondXT and, in the second group, the same brackets were bonded with Maxcem Elite. The shear bond strength (SBS) of both agents to enamel was measured and the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding, after debonding and after polishing were compared. The number of visible cracks and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores in each group were also measured. Results: There were significantly more enamel cracks in the Transbond XT group after debonding and polishing compared to the Maxcem Elite group. There was no significant difference in the length of enamel cracks between the two groups; but, in each group, a significant increase in the length of enamel cracks was noticeable after debonding. Polishing did not cause any statistically significant change in crack length. The SBS of Maxcem Elite was significantly lower than that of Transbond XT (95% confidence interval). Conclusion: Maxcem Elite offers clinically acceptable bond strength and can thus be used as a routine adhesive for orthodontic purposes since it is less likely to damage the enamel. PMID:26622271

  16. How Is the Enamel Affected by Different Orthodontic Bonding Agents and Polishing Techniques?

    Farzin Heravi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the effect of new bonding techniques on enamel surface.Materials and Methods: Sixty upper central incisors were randomly divided into two equal groups. In the first group, metal brackets were bonded using Trans- bondXT and, in the second group, the same brackets were bonded with MaxcemElite. The shear bond strength (SBS of both agents to enamel was measured and the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding, after debonding and after polishing were compared. The number of visible cracks and the adhesive remnant index (ARI scores in each group were also measured.Results: There were significantly more enamel cracks in the Transbond XT group after debonding and polishing compared to the Maxcem Elite group. There was no significant difference in the length of enamel cracks between the two groups; but, in each group, a significant increase in the length of enamel cracks was noticeable after debonding. Polishing did not cause any statistically significant change in crack length. The SBS of Maxcem Elite was significantly lower than that of Transbond XT (95% confidence interval.Conclusion: Maxcem Elite offers clinically acceptable bond strength and can thus be used as a routine adhesive for orthodontic purposes since it is less likely todamage the enamel.

  17. General quantum anti-brackets

    The recently introduced quantum anti-brackets are further generalized which makes it possible the odd Q operator to be arbitrary one. Obvious formulae for higher quantum anti-brackets of arbitrary orders and their Jacobian generalized identities are presented. The limitation, leading to an ordinary quantum anti-bracket, which is characterized by the same properties as its classical analogue, is considered. The attachments to the Batalin-Vilkovisky-Fradkin quantizations are considered. Some remarks on the corresponding properties and the quantum Sp(2) anti-brackets attachments are presented

  18. [Antimicrobial activity of orthodontic band cements].

    Pavic, J; Arriagada, M; Elgueta, J; García, C

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of enamel decalcification and caries beneath orthodontic bands, has indicated the need for a new enamel binding adhesive orthodontic cement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, in vitro, on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus, acidophillus, of three materials used to cements the orthodontic bands. The cements studied were: Zinc phosphate cement, Glass-ionomer cement, and Policarboxylate cement. Thirty petri plates were seeded with S. mutans, and thirty with L. acidophillus; on each plate three pellet were placed, one of each cement studied. Petri plates were incubated under microaerophilic conditions at 37 C, and checked at 72 hrs. for Streptococcus, mutans, and four days for Lactobacillus acidophillus to evaluate the inhibition zone. The results were tabulated for each material. It was demonstrated that exists important variations in the antimicrobial properties of the materials studied, as in the microbial sensitivity to these cements. PMID:2135908

  19. Biodegradation of orthodontic appliances and their effects on the blood level of nickel and chromium. Master's thesis

    Barrett, R.D.

    1990-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels containing approximately 18 percent chromium and 8 percent nickel for orthodontic bands, brackets and wires is universally used in orthodontic practices. With the introduction of nickel-titanium alloys as orthodontic archwires in the 1970's an additional source of patient exposure to metal corrosion products has been introduced. Since the oral environment is particularly ideal for the biodegradation of metals due to its ionic, thermal, microbiologic and enzymatic properties some level of patient exposure to the corrosion products of these alloys is assured.

  20. Effect of dental bleaching after bracket bonding and debonding using three different adhesive systems

    Lucianna de Oliveira Gomes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets on dental in-home bleaching, taking into account three different adhesive systems. METHODS: Forty-four bovine incisors were divided into four groups according to the primer system used for orthodontic bracket bonding. Following the debonding of orthodontic brackets, the teeth were stored in staining solution for 96 hours. Then, teeth were whitened using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks at a 6-hour-a-day regime. Standardized digital photographs were taken at the following intervals: T0 (initial; T1 (after debonding; T2 (after pigmentation; T3, T4 and T5 representing 1, 7, and 14 days of bleaching. Repeatability and stability tests were carried out to check the method accuracy. Images were analyzed using Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software considering (L*a*b*color coordinate values and a modified color difference total (Δ;E'. RESULTS: The results of this study (ANOVA and Tukey; p < 0.01 demonstrated that after 7 days of bleaching, experimental groups showed significantly less teeth whitening compared to the control group. However, there were no significant color differences between the groups after 14 days, according to values of lightness (L*. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of the adhesive primer system applied, bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets alters the outcome of tooth whitening in the first 7 days of bleaching, however it has no influence on the whitening of the dental structure after 14 days of in-home dental bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide.

  1. Resin bonding of metal brackets to glazed zirconia with a porcelain primer

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Milim; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Hwang, Chung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to compare the shear bond strength between orthodontic metal brackets and glazed zirconia using different types of primer before applying resin cement and to determine which primer was more effective. Methods Zirconia blocks were milled and embedded in acrylic resin and randomly assigned to one of four groups: nonglazed zirconia with sandblasting and zirconia primer (NZ); glazed zirconia with sandblasting, etching, and zirconia primer (GZ); glazed zirconi...

  2. Orthodontic treatment of an anterior openbite with the aid of corticotomy procedure: Case report.

    Aljhani, Ali S; Aldrees, Abdullah M

    2011-04-01

    This case report illustrates the orthodontic treatment combined with the corticotomy technique in an adult patient to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time. The patient was a 22-year-old woman with an anterior open bite and flared and spaced upper and lower incisors. First, fixed orthodontic appliances (bidimensional edgewise brackets) were bonded, and a week later buccal and lingual corticotomy with alveolar augmentation procedure in the maxillary arch from the first molar to the contralateral first molar, and from canine to canine in the mandibular arch was performed. Orthodontic therapy proceeded with frequent activation of the appliances to retract the incisors every 2weeks. The total treatment time was 5months and no adverse effects were observed at the end of active treatment. The addition of the decortication procedure to the conventional orthodontic therapy decreased the duration of treatment significantly. Successful closure of the anterior open bite with adequate overbite and interdigitation of the teeth were achieved. PMID:24151417

  3. Plaque Index in Multi-Bracket Fixed Appliances

    To compare the plaque index in patients receiving multi-bracket fixed orthodontic treatment for various factors like age, gender, socio-economic status, brushing practices, meal habits, types of brackets, types of ligations, use of mouthwash and duration of treatment. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Orthodontics Clinic, The Aga Khan University Hospital, from September to November 2011. Methodology: Socio-demographic and clinical modalities were defined and recorded for 131 patients having multi-bracket fixed appliances. The plaque index of subjects were recorded according to the Silness and Loe plaque index method. Independent sample t-test was used to see difference in plaque index in factors having two variables. One way ANOVA and Post-Hoc Tukey tests were used to see difference in plaque index in factors having three variables. Kappa statistics was used to assess inter examiner reliability. P-value 0.05 was taken to be significant. Results: The sample comprised of 37% males (n = 48) and 63% females (n = 83). The plaque index had statistically significant association with practice of brushing i.e., timing of brushing (p=0.001), method of brushing (p=0.08), type of ligatures (p=0.05) and frequency of visits (p=0.01). Conclusion: The plaque accumulation is significantly decreased in subjects who brush the teeth twice or more than twice a day and those who brush their teeth after breakfast. The use of interdental brush and stainless steel ligatures had significantly low plaque. Subjects presenting with more frequent appointments of short-period had significantly less plaque. (author)

  4. A comparative evaluation of the shear bond strength of five different orthodontic bonding agents polymerized using halogen and light-emitting diode curing lights: An in vitro investigation

    Sujoy Banerjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With the introduction of photosensitive (light-activated restorative materials in orthodontics, various methods have been suggested to enhance the polymerization of the materials used, including use of more powerful light curing devices. Bond strength is an important property and determines the amount of force delivered and the treatment duration. Many light-cured bonding materials have become popular but it is the need of the hour to determine the bonding agent that is the most efficient and has the desired bond strength. Aim: To evaluate and compare the shear bond strengths of five different orthodontic light cure bonding materials cured with traditional halogen light and low-intensity light-emitting diode (LED light curing unit. Materials and Methods: 100 human maxillary premolar teeth, extracted for orthodontic purpose, were used to prepare the samples. 100 maxillary stainless steel bicuspid brackets of 0.018 slot of Roth prescription, manufactured by D-tech Company, were bonded to the prepared tooth surfaces of the mounted samples using five different orthodontic bracket bonding light-cured materials, namely, Enlight, Fuji Ortho LC (resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Orthobond LC, Relybond, and Transbond XT. The bond strength was tested on an Instron Universal testing machine (model no. 5582. Results: In Group 1 (halogen group, Enlight showed the highest shear bond strength (16.4 MPa and Fuji Ortho LC showed the least bond strength (6.59 MPa (P value 0.000. In Group 2 (LED group, Transbond showed the highest mean shear bond strength (14.6 MPa and Orthobond LC showed the least mean shear bond strength (6.27 MPa (P value 0.000. There was no statistically significant difference in the shear bond strength values of all samples cured using either halogen (mean 11.49 MPa or LED (mean 11.20 MPa, as the P value was 0.713. Conclusion: Polymerization with both halogen and LED resulted in shear bond strength values which were above the clinically acceptable range given by Reynolds. The LED light curing units produced comparable shear bond strength to that of halogen curing units.

  5. Shear bond strength of metal brackets to feldspathic porcelain treated by Nd:YAG laser and hydrofluoric acid.

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Sobouti, Farhad; Etemadi, Ardavan; Chiniforush, Nasim; Shariati, Mahsa

    2015-02-01

    Adult orthodontic treatment requires bonding orthodontic attachment to dental restorations. Ceramics are commonly used as esthetic restorative materials for the crowns and bridges. The present study evaluated the shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets to the feldspathic porcelain surfaces following conditioning by different powers of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and hydrofluoric acid as a conventional method. Seventy-two glazed porcelain samples were prepared and randomly attributed to six equal groups of 12. In the conventional hydrofluoric (HF) group, the specimens were etched by 9.6% hydrofluoric acid for 4 min. In laser groups, samples were conditioned by 0.75-, 1-, 1.25-, 1.5-, and 2-W Nd:YAG laser for 10 s. Metal brackets were bonded to porcelain samples and after being stored in distilled water for 24 h, they were subjected to thermocycling for 500 cycles. The debonding was carried out by a Zwick testing machine. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tamhane multiple comparisons tests. The mean ± SD of the shear bond strength in the laser group 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, and 2 W and HF group was 2.2 ± 0.9, 4.2 ± 1.1, 4.9 ± 2.4, 7 ± 1.7, 9.6 ± 2.7, and 9.4 ± 2.5, respectively. Together with the increased power of laser, the mean shear bond strength was increased continuously and no significant differences were found between the HF group and the laser groups with power of 1.5 or 2 W. Also, there was no significant difference between all test groups in ARI scores. There was no significant difference between bond strength of laser groups with power of 1.5 and 2 W and HF-etched group. So, Nd:YAG laser with appropriate parameters can be used as an alternative method for porcelain etching. PMID:24142046

  6. Orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors: a 3D finite element method study

    Armando Yukio Saga

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In orthodontic treatment, intrusion movement of maxillary incisors is often necessary. Therefore, the objective of this investigation is to evaluate the initial distribution patterns and magnitude of compressive stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL in a simulation of orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors, considering the points of force application. Methods: Anatomic 3D models reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography scans were used to simulate maxillary incisors intrusion loading. The points of force application selected were: centered between central incisors brackets (LOAD 1; bilaterally between the brackets of central and lateral incisors (LOAD 2; bilaterally distal to the brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 3; bilaterally 7 mm distal to the center of brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 4. Results and Conclusions: Stress concentrated at the PDL apex region, irrespective of the point of orthodontic force application. The four load models showed distinct contour plots and compressive stress values over the midsagittal reference line. The contour plots of central and lateral incisors were not similar in the same load model. LOAD 3 resulted in more balanced compressive stress distribution.

  7. Orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors: a 3D finite element method study

    Saga, Armando Yukio; Maruo, Hiroshi; Argenta, Marco André; Maruo, Ivan Toshio; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In orthodontic treatment, intrusion movement of maxillary incisors is often necessary. Therefore, the objective of this investigation is to evaluate the initial distribution patterns and magnitude of compressive stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL) in a simulation of orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors, considering the points of force application. Methods: Anatomic 3D models reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography scans were used to simulate maxillary incisors intrusion loading. The points of force application selected were: centered between central incisors brackets (LOAD 1); bilaterally between the brackets of central and lateral incisors (LOAD 2); bilaterally distal to the brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 3); bilaterally 7 mm distal to the center of brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 4). Results and Conclusions: Stress concentrated at the PDL apex region, irrespective of the point of orthodontic force application. The four load models showed distinct contour plots and compressive stress values over the midsagittal reference line. The contour plots of central and lateral incisors were not similar in the same load model. LOAD 3 resulted in more balanced compressive stress distribution. PMID:27007765

  8. Laser diagnostics in orthodontics

    Ryzhkova, Anastasia V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Kharish, Natalia A.

    2003-10-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of intensity fluctuations of light, scattered from mucose membrane of oral cavity of healthy volunteers and patients, abused by the orthodontic diseases, are presented. Analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, is carried out. New approach to monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of measuring system on formation of the speckle-interferometric signal is studied.

  9. Investigations into Orthodontic Anchorage

    Jambi, Safa Abdulsalam A

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives:The control of anchorage is integral to successful orthodontic treatment. The objective of this research was to undertake three related projects to evaluate methods of increasing anchorage with the aim of adding to orthodontic knowledge and improve methods of treatment delivery. Methods:Two Cochrane systematic reviews were undertaken according to the methods published in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, version 5.1.0. The influence of f...

  10. Histological evaluation after electrothermal debonding of ceramic brackets

    Vignesh Kailasam; Ashima Valiathan; Nirmala Rao

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the histological changes following electrothermal debonding (ETD) of ceramic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 first premolar teeth from 14 patients were divided into two groups: Group I consisted of 20 teeth which served as control, and the brackets were debonded using conventional pliers. (7 teeth were extracted 24 hours after conventional debonding, 7 teeth were extracted 28 to 32 days after conventional debonding and 6 teeth were extracted 56-60 days afte...

  11. DEBONDING OF CERAMIC BRACKETS BY ER:YAG LASER

    Fidan ALAKUŞ-SABUNCUOĞLU; ERŞAHAN, Şeyda; ERTÜRK, Ergül

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effects of Er:YAG laser debonding of ceramic brackets on the bond strength and the amount of adhesive resin remnant. Materials and Methods: Twenty human mandibular incisors were randomly divided into two groups of 10 and polycrystalline ceramic brackets (Transcend series 6000, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) were bonded on enamel surfaces. Group 1 was the control group in which no laser application was ...

  12. Northcroft lecture: how has the spectrum of orthodontics changed over the past decades?

    Melsen, Birte

    2011-06-01

    Three aspects have had a significant impact on orthodontics during the last few decades: the appliances being used, the anchorage being used and finally the distribution of patients being treated. Firstly, the marketing of appliances is increasingly leading the orthodontist to outsource important aspects of treatment such as wirebending and bracket positioning. Brackets and wires are being presented as the solution to all problems and metaphysical terms such as 'intelligent design,' 'working brackets' and 'intelligent wires' are dominating advertising and reducing the impact of evidence-based treatment approaches. Secondly, the introduction of skeletal anchorage has potentially widened the spectrum of orthodontics, allowing for treatments that could not be done with conventional appliances. Biomechanical knowledge is, however, mandatory if we agree that the system should not be abused. Thirdly, the orthodontic population comprises an increasing number of adult patients, many of whom are characterized by a degenerated dentition. The treatment of these patients requires a thorough knowledge not only of biomechanics but also of the reaction of the periodontal tissues to various types of loading. They can be treated only with custom-made appliances adapting the force systems and magnitude to the patient-specific treatment goal. In summary, the orthodontic world is being split between 'appliance-driven fast-food orthodontics' where the results to a large extent are dependent on both growth and function and 'orthodontist-driven' 'slow-food' treatments attempting to push the limits of the possible in relation to complicated problems and reversal of degeneration in adult patients. The latter treatments are performed with individualized appliances adapting the force system to the patient. This paper will attempt to summarize the bearing of these factors on present orthodontics. PMID:21677105

  13. Comparison Of Bond Strength Of Orthodontic Molar Tubes Using Different Enamel Etching Techniques And Their Effect On Enamel

    In fixed orthodontic treatment, brackets and tubes are used for transferring orthodontic forces to the teeth. Those attachments were welded to cemented bands. Fifty years ago, direct bonding of brackets and other attachments has become a common technique in fixed orthodontic treatment. Orthodontists used to band teeth, especially molars and second premolars, to avoid the need for re bonding accessories in these regions of heavy masticatory forces. However, it is a known fact that direct bonding saves chair time as it does not require prior band selection and fitting, has the ability to maintain good oral hygiene, improve esthetics and make easier attachment to crowded and partially erupted teeth. Moreover, when the banding procedure is not performed with utmost care it can damage periodontal and/or dental tissues. Molar tubes bonding decreases the chance of decalcification caused by leakage beneath the bands. Since molar teeth are subjected to higher masticatory impact, especially lower molars, it would be convenient to devise methods capable of increasing the efficiency of their traditional bonding. These methods may include variation in bond able molar tube material, design, bonding materials and etching techniques. For achieving successful bonding, the bonding agent must penetrate the enamel surface; have easy clinical use, dimensional stability and enough bond strength. Different etching techniques were introduced in literature to increase the bond strength which includes: conventional acid etching, sandblasting and laser etching techniques. The process of conventional acid etching technique was invented In (1955) as the surface of enamel has great potential for bonding by micromechanical retention, to form ‘the mechanical lock‘. The primary effect of enamel etching is to increase the surface area. However, this roughens the enamel microscopically and results in a greater surface area on which to bond. By dissolving minerals in enamel, etchants remove the outer 10 micrometers on the enamel surface. The purpose of acid etching is to remove the smear layer and create an irregular surface by preferentially dissolving hydroxyapatite crystals on the outer surface. This topography will facilitate penetration of the fluid adhesive components into the irregularities. After polymerization, the adhesive is locked as proved by Dr. Bounocore into the surface and contributes to micromechanical retention. Sandblasting was introduced in orthodontics in an attempt to achieve proper etching for the enamel surface which would result in a better bond strength through aluminum oxide particles that are emitted from a specific hand piece at a high speed which produce roughness in enamel surfaces. Another method of increasing bond strength is by using an adhesion promoter. The expression 'adhesion promoter' was first used in connection with certain molecules which could achieve chemical bonding in dental structures. The word laser is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. The introduction of laser has revolutionized the bonding procedure. The first laser introduced was the helium-neon laser followed by Nd;YAG and CO2 laser. Then the erbium family(Er;YAG and Er;Cr;YSSG) was introduced to dentistry. It has some advantages such as having no vibration or heat and producing a surface which is acid resistant by altering the calcium to phosphor ratio and formation of less soluble compounds. These characteristics make the erbium family more popular in orthodontics. If laser can achieve the above-mentioned function of acid etching, and even produce a favorable surface for bonding to a restorative material, it may be a viable alternative to acid etching. Although there are studies that have evaluated the effect of laser etching on bond strength, still further studies are needed for evaluating the shear bond strength of orthodontic molar tubes bonded to enamel prepared by the new Er;Cr;YSSG laser, sandblasting versus the conventional acid etching technique

  14. Metal release from simulated fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Hwang, C J; Shin, J S; Cha, J Y

    2001-10-01

    Most orthodontic appliances and archwires are stainless steel or nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys that can release metal ions, with saliva as the medium. To measure metal released from the fixed orthodontic appliances currently in use, we fabricated simulated fixed orthodontic appliances that corresponded to half of the maxillary arch and soaked them in 50 mL of artificial saliva (pH 6.75 +/- 0.15, 37 degrees C) for 3 months. We used brackets, tubes, and bands made by Tomy (Tokyo, Japan). Four groups were established according to the appliance manufacturer and the type of metal in the .016 x .022-in archwires. Groups A and B were stainless steel archwires from Ormco (Glendora, Calif) and Dentaurum (Ispringen, Germany), respectively, and groups C and D were both NiTi archwires with Ormco's copper NiTi and Tomy's Bioforce sentalloy, respectively. Stainless steel archwires were heat treated in an electric furnace at 500 degrees C for 1 minute and quenched in water. We measured the amount of metal released from each group by immersion time. Our conclusions were as follows: (1) there was no increase in the amount of chromium released after 4 weeks in group A, 2 weeks in group B, 3 weeks in group C, and 8 weeks in group D; (2) there was no increase in the amount of nickel released after 2 weeks in group A, 3 days in group B, 7 days in group C, and 3 weeks in group D; and (3) there was no increase in the amount of iron released after 2 weeks in group A, 3 days in group B, and 1 day in groups C and D. In our 3-month-long investigation, we saw a decrease in metal released as immersion time increased. PMID:11606963

  15. Impact of brackets on smile esthetics: laypersons and orthodontists perception

    Seandra Cordeiro de Oliveira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the influence of orthodontic appliances on smile esthetics assessed by lay adolescents, lay adults and orthodontists. METHODS: A facial photograph of a smiling young woman was used under the following conditions: With metal orthodontic brackets ligated by different elastic ligature colors (green, red and gray, with ceramic bracket brackets (transparent elastic ligature and without brackets, totaling five 15 x 20 cm pictures. For the photograph assessment, 16 lay adolescents, 16 lay adults and 16 orthodontists were randomly selected. The photographs were randomly arranged in an album, followed by a visual analog scale (VAS for the scores registration. Scores in both evaluations of each group of evaluators (adolescents, adults and orthodontists were submitted to error analysis by WILCOXON test and multiple comparison among groups performed by Kruskal - Wallis at 5% significance. RESULTS: Orthodontists, adults and adolescents agreed in their opinions, although the orthodontists gave lower scores in their assessments. It could be observed that ceramic brackets were more acceptable concerning the smile esthetics, whereas the metal brackets received the lowest scores. CONCLUSION: Orthodontists, adults and even adolescents seem to prefer esthetic solutions during orthodontic treatment.OBJETIVO: esse estudo analisou a influência dos aparelhos ortodônticos na estética do sorriso em avaliação por adolescentes, adultos e ortodontistas. MÉTODOS: foram utilizadas fotografias faciais do sorriso de uma jovem mulher, usando-se as seguintes combinações: aparelho ortodôntico de metal com ligaduras de diferentes cores (verde, vermelho e cinza; aparelho ortodôntico cerâmico (ligadura transparente; e sem aparelho - resultando em cinco fotografias de 15x20cm. Para a avaliação das fotografias, 16 adolescentes leigos, 16 adultos leigos e 16 ortodontistas foram selecionados de forma randômica. As fotografias foram aleatoriamente organizadas em um álbum, acompanhadas de uma escala visual analógica (EVA para o registro das notas. As notas das duas avaliações de cada grupo (adolescentes, adultos e ortodontistas foram submetidas à análise de erro (teste pareado de Wilcoxon e comparação múltipla de grupos pelo teste de Kruskal-Wallis com significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: ortodontistas, adultos e adolescentes concordaram em suas opiniões, porém, os ortodontistas deram notas menores em suas avaliações. Pôde ser observado que os braquetes cerâmicos foram mais aceitos, considerando-se a estética do sorriso, uma vez que os braquetes metálicos tiveram as menores notas. CONCLUSÃO: ortodontistas, adultos e adolescentes parecem preferir soluções estéticas durante o tratamento ortodôntico.

  16. In vitro tooth cleaning efficacy of electric toothbrushes around brackets.

    Schätzle, Marc; Sener, Beatrice; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Imfeld, Thomas; Attin, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    This in vitro study assessed the cleaning efficacy of different electric toothbrushes around upper incisor brackets. Standard and Mini Diamond brackets were fixed on black-stained teeth. The teeth were coated with white titanium oxide and brushed in a machine twice for 1 minute each. Twelve different brush heads with either a wiping or an oscillating-rotating action were tested. After brushing, the teeth were scanned, the black surfaces were assessed planimetrically and a modified plaque index for orthodontic patients (PIOP) was introduced. Tooth areas, which were black again after brushing indicated tooth surface contact of the filaments and were expressed as a percentage of total area. The remaining white areas around the brackets indicated 'plaque-retentive' niches. Analysis of variance was used for individual comparison of the brush types. Bonferroni/Dunn adjustment was applied for multiple testing. The Sonicare toothbrush handle with the brush head 'Compact ProResults' (81.7 per cent) and the brush head 'Standard ProResults' (80.8 per cent), as well as the sonic Waterpik toothbrush SR 800E with the standard brush head (78.2 per cent), showed statistically significantly better cleaning efficacy than all others. The poorest cleaning efficacy was observed for the oscillating-rotating Braun Oral-B Professional Care with the brush head 'Ortho' (less than 50 per cent). The planimetric findings were in correspondence with the results of the PIOP assessment. Cleaning efficacy of electric toothbrushes around brackets on upper incisors was different between the tested brushes. The PIOP was practicable, effective, and easy to use, although it has to be verified in a clinical study. PMID:20551084

  17. Moshinsky brackets for light nuclei

    Znojil, M.

    1977-01-01

    A new formula for calculation of the Moshinsky brackets is derived. As its consequence, simple formulas for the angle-averaged Pauli projector matrix elements and for the transformed two-particle oscillator wave functions are given. (AIP)

  18. Exterior Differentials in Superspace and Poisson Brackets

    Soroka, Dmitrij V.; Soroka, Vyacheslav A.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that two definitions for an exterior differential in superspace, giving the same exterior calculus, yet lead to different results when applied to the Poisson bracket. A prescription for the transition with the help of these exterior differentials from the given Poisson bracket of definite Grassmann parity to another bracket is introduced. It is also indicated that the resulting bracket leads to generalization of the Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket for the cases of superspace and bracke...

  19. Poisson brackets, strings and membranes

    We construct Poisson brackets at the boundaries of open strings and membranes with constant background fields which are compatible with their boundary conditions. The boundary conditions are treated as primary constraints which give infinitely many secondary constraints. We show explicitly that we need only two (the primary one and one of the secondary ones) constraints to determine the Poisson brackets of strings. We apply this to membranes by using canonical transformations. (orig.)

  20. A hierarchy of Poisson brackets

    Pavelka, Michal; Klika, Vaclav; Esen, Ogul; Grmela, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The vector field generating reversible time evolution of macroscopic systems involves two ingredients: gradient of a potential (a covector) and a degenerate Poisson structure transforming the covector into a vector. The Poisson structure is conveniently expressed in Poisson brackets, its degeneracy in their Casimirs (i.e. potentials whose gradients produce no vector field). In this paper we investigate in detail hierarchies of Poisson brackets, together with their Casimirs, that arise in pass...

  1. SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF BRACKETS BONDED TO PORCELAIN SURFACE: IN VITRO STUDY

    Fidan Alakuş Sabuncuoğlu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the effects of different porcelain surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength (SBS and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Seventy feldspathic porcelain disk samples mounted in acrylic resin blocks were divided into seven groups (n=10 according to type of surface treatment: I, Diamond bur; II, Orthosphoric acid (OPA; III, hydrofluoric acid (HFA; IV, sandblasted with aluminum oxide (SB; V, SB+HFA; VI, Neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG laser; VII, Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG laser. Brackets were affixed to treated all-porcelain surfaces with a silane bonding agent and adhesive resin and subjected to SBS testing. Specimens were evaluated according to the adhesive remnant index (ARI, and failure modes were assessed quantitatively under a stereomicroscope and morphologically under a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and the post-hoc Tukey test, with the significance level set at 0.05. Results: The highest SBS values were observed for Group V, with no significant difference between Groups V and III. SBS values for Group I were significantly lower than those of all other groups tested. The porcelain/resin interface was the most common site of failure in Group V (40% and Group III (30%, whereas other groups showed various types of bond failure, with no specific location pre-dominating, but with some of the adhesive left on the porcelain surfaces (ARI scores 2 or 3 in most cases. Conclusion: The current findings indicate that a diamond bur alone is unable to sufficiently etch porcelain surfaces for bracket bonding. Moreover, SB and HFA etching used in combination results in a significantly higher shear-bond strength than HFA or SB alone. Finally, laser etching with either an Nd:YAG or Er:YAG laser was found to be more effective and less time-consuming than both HFA acid and SB for the treatment of deglazed feldspathic porcelain.

  2. The effect of air abrasion on the retention of metallic brackets bonded to fluorosed enamel surface

    S Suma; Anita, G; Chandra Shekar, B.R.; Amitabh Kallury

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bonding brackets to fluorosed enamel remains a clinical challenge and bracket failure at the compromised enamel interface is common. Objective: To check the effect of air abrasion on the retention of metallic brackets bonded to fluorosed enamel surface. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted human premolar teeth having moderate to severe dental fluorosis as per Dean′s criteria were collected and divided into three groups of 20 each. The groups were treated as follo...

  3. The effect of pretreatment with fluoride on the tensile strength of orthodontic bonding

    White spot decalcifications and caries occurring adjacent to bonded orthodontic brackets have long been a concern to orthodontists. One procedure suggested to overcome this problem is fluoride treatment prior to bonding. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of orthodontic self-cured resin from Concise on teeth rinsed 4 minutes in 1.23% APF with untreated controls. Measurements were made on an Instron machine. Debonding interfaces were observed with a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Distributions were calculated. The tensile bond strengths of the fluoride-treated teeth and the untreated teeth were not significantly different. The debonding interfaces between resin and bracket base, within the resin itself, and between enamel and resin were similar in the two experimental groups. However, greater enamel detachment was seen within the fluoride pretreatment group. So while fluoride pretreatment does not significantly affect tensile bond strength, it may cause enamel detachment after debonding

  4. In Vitro Properties of Orthodontic Adhesives with Fluoride or Amorphous Calcium Phosphate

    Clara Ka Wai Chow; Christine D. Wu; Evans, Carla A.

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of orthodontic adhesives with fluoride or amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) in reducing bacterial adhesion and enamel demineralization. Forty human premolars each sectioned buccolingually into three parts were bracketed with control resin (Transbond XT) or adhesives containing ACP (Aegis Ortho) or fluoride (QuickCure). Artificial lesions induced by pH cycling were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometry (XPS) and polarized light microscopy ...

  5. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints

  6. Evaluation of the Effect of Four Surface Conditioning Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Bracket to Porcelain Surface

    Zarif Najafi, Hooman; Oshagh, Morteza; Torkan, Sepideh; Yousefipour, Bahareh; Salehi, Raha

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of superpulse CO2 laser irradiation and deglazing of porcelain surfaces on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal orthodontic brackets, and compared it with two conventional etching techniques. Methods: Forty-eight Feldspathic porcelain fused to metal specimens embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin tubes were fabricated, and all the specimens were divided into four groups. In Group 1, the specimens were roughened with a diamond bur and etched with hy...

  7. Relationship between orthodontic treatment and gingival health: A retrospective study

    Boke, Fatma; Gazioglu, Cagri; Akkaya, Sevil; AKKAYA, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the relationship between orthodontic treatment and gingival health. Materials and Methods: A total of 251 patients among whom 177 were girls and 74 were boys, recruited from the records pool of the Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Gazi, were included in the study. Patients’ treatments have been completed by postgraduate students during the period between 2006 and 2012. Patients’ folders were analyzed...

  8. Cephalometry in orthodontic practice

    Cephalometry is applied in orthodontic practice to: - obtain information on the growth of the skull - assist diagnosis of the relationship between the jaws and abnormalities in dentition - evaluate the results of treatment. The course of the diagnostic procedure with the aid of the Ricketts analysis and evaluation of the treatment results using five superimpositions is demonstrated by means of two examples. (Auth.)

  9. Preparation and antimicrobial assay of ceramic brackets coated with TiO2 thin films

    Cao, Shuai; Wang, Ye; Cao, Lin; Wang, Yu; Lin, Bingpeng; Lan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Different methods have been utilized to prevent enamel demineralization and other complications during orthodontic treatment. However, none of these methods can offer long-lasting and effective prevention of orthodontic complications or interventions after complications occur. Considering the photocatalytic effect of TiO2 on organic compounds, we hoped to synthesize a novel bracket with a TiO2 thin film to develop a photocatalytic antimicrobial effect. Methods The sol-gel dip coating method was used to prepare TiO2 thin films on ceramic bracket surfaces. Twenty groups of samples were composed according to the experimental parameters. Crystalline structure and surface morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively; film thickness was examined with a surface ellipsometer. The photocatalytic properties under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation were analyzed by evaluating the degradation ratio of methylene blue (MB) at a certain time. Antibacterial activities of selected thin films were also tested against Lactobacillus acidophilus and Candida albicans. Results Films with 5 coating layers annealed at 700℃ showed the greatest photocatalytic activity in terms of MB decomposition under UV light irradiation. TiO2 thin films with 5 coating layers annealed at 700℃ exhibited the greatest antimicrobial activity under UV-A light irradiation. Conclusions These results provide promising guidance in prevention of demineralization by increasing antimicrobial activities of film coated brackets. PMID:27226960

  10. Motivations and future practice plans of orthodontic residents in Saudi Arabia

    Al-Hamlan, Nasir; Al-Ruwaithi, Moatazbellah M.; Al-Shraim, Nasir; El-Metwaaly, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Aims: This study aims to explore the criteria used by graduate students while selecting a career as orthodontists and their future aspirations. Materials and Methods: A list of Saudi Board of Orthodontics (SB-Ortho) residents was obtained from the Central and Western regions of the Kingdom and all orthodontic residents (excluding the 1st year residents) were invited to participate in this survey. Permission to contact the orthodontic residents was obtained from the respective program director...

  11. Evaluation of Orthodontic Treatment Needs Using the Dental Aesthetic Index in Iranian Students

    Khanehmasjedi, Mashallah; Bassir, Leila; Haghighizade, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background In the contemporary orthodontics, the number of people who demand orthodontic treatment to improve their psychosocial issues related to facial esthetic is constantly increasing. Even in treatment plans, appearance and esthetic gain more attention. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the need for orthodontic treatment on the basis of the dental aesthetic index (DAI) in the Iranian students of Ahvaz city. Material and Methods This cross sectional study was performed...

  12. Awareness of Orthodontic Treatments among School Teachers of Two Cities in Iran

    Ali Rafighi; Saeid Foroughi Moghaddam; Mahasti Alizadeh; Hadi Sharifzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims. Since most orthodontic patients are children and adolescents, it is believed that teachers can help find these patients and make them aware of their orthodontic problems. Therefore, teachers are expected to have proper knowledge about these problems. The aim of this study was to determine teachers’ awareness about orthodontic treatments in Tabriz and Saqqez and compare it in different educational levels. Materials and methods. A questionnaire was given to 384 ...

  13. Evaluation of Subgingival Dental Plaque Microbiota Changes In Fixed Orthodontic Patients with Syber Green Real Time PCR

    Naser Sargolzaie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most common problems we confront in orthodontic therapy is periodontal diseases. Initial factor which causes these diseases is colonization of anaerobic microorganisms in subgingival plaque. Technically, local environmental changes related to orthodontic band and brackets may influence the bacterial species in periodontal plaque. However, it seems necessary to assess variations in subgingival plaque caused by orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in subgingival microbiota and clinical parameters before and after bracket placement. Methods: Clinical parameters including probing depth (PD, plaque index (PI, clinical attachment level (CAL, bleeding on probing (BOP and gingival index (GI were recorded and subgingival microbial samples were collected in 30 people aged between 13 and 25. As a control group, 15 persons getting matched as to their age and sex with no need to orthodontic treatment were opted using specific primers, SYBER Green Real-Time PCR was carried out in order to determine bacterial flora in stored samples. All mentioned procedures were reassessed in experimental group and in control group three months after band and bracket bonding. A descriptive analysis was conducted, and paired t test and Wilcoxon test were used for differences between groups (P

  14. On Derivation of Goldman Bracket

    Chowdhury, S Hasibul Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Non abelian Gauge field theory on space-time, modeled as a noncompact 3-manifold $\\Sigma\\times\\mathbb{R}$, with $\\Sigma$ being a compact Riemann surface and time taking values in $\\mathbb{R}$, has been considered. The Atiyah-Bott brackets between the gauge fields have been computed in this infinite dimensional setting. Traces of monodromies of the gauge connections around free homotopy classes of closed loops on the underlying Riemann surface and the Poisson brackets between them are computed using the formalism originated from hamiltonian methods of Soliton theory. Finally, the brackets for real Lie groups $GL(n,\\mathbb{R})$, $SL(n,\\mathbb{R})$, U(n), SU(n) and $Sp(2n,\\mathbb{R})$ are explicitly worked out.

  15. Avaliao da resistncia ao cisalhamento de braquetes da tcnica lingual colados sobre superfcie cermica Evaluation of shear strength of lingual brackets bonded to ceramic surfaces

    Michele Balestrin Imakami

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistncia ao cisalhamento de braquetes metlicos (American Orthodontics utilizados na tcnica lingual, colados em facetas de cermica. MTODOS: foram utilizados 40 corpos de prova divididos em quatro grupos de 10, de acordo com o material de colagem e do preparo da porcelana: Grupo I -resina Sondhi Rapid-Set e cido fluordrico; Grupo II -resina Sondhi Rapid-Set e xido de alumnio; Grupo III -resina Transbond XT e cido fluordrico; e Grupo IV -resina Transbond XT e xido de alumnio. Previamente colagem, os braquetes foram preparados com base de resina de carga pesada (Z-250 e as facetas de cermica receberam aplicao de silano. O teste de cisalhamento foi realizado por uma mquina de ensaios Kratos uma velocidade de 0,5mm/min. RESULTADOS: os resultados obtidos foram analisados estatisticamente atravs do teste de Tukey (pOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear strength of lingual metal brackets (American Orthodontics bonded to ceramic veneers. METHODS: A total of 40 specimens were divided into four groups of 10, according to bonding material and ceramics preparation: Group I -Sondhi Rapid-Set resin and Hydrofluoric acid, Group II -Sondhi Rapid-Set resin and aluminum oxide, Group III -Transbond XT resin and Hydrofluoric acid, and Group IV -Transbond XT resin and aluminum oxide. Prior to bonding, the brackets were prepared with heavy-duty resin base (Z-250 and the ceramic veneers were treated with silane. The shear test was conducted with a Kratos testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: The results were statistically analyzed by the Tukey test (p<0.05 and showed a statistically significant difference between groups I (2.77 MPa and IV (6.00 MPa, and between groups III (3.33 MPa and IV. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the bonding of lingual brackets to ceramic surfaces exhibited greater shear strength when aluminum oxide was used in association with the two resins utilized in this study, although Transbond XT showed greater shear strength than Sondhi Rapid-Set.

  16. On Derivation of Goldman Bracket

    Chowdhury, S. Hasibul Hassan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain an infinite dimensional Lie algebra of exotic gauge invariant observables that is closed under Goldman-type bracket associated with monodromy matrices of flat connections on a compact Riemann surface for $G_{2}$ gauge group. As a by-product, we give an alternative derivation of known Goldman bracket for classical gauge groups $GL(n,\\mathbb{R})$, $SL(n,\\mathbb{R})$, $U(n)$, $SU(n)$, $Sp(2n,\\mathbb{R})$ and $SO(n)$.

  17. Multiple q-Zeta Brackets

    Wadim Zudilin

    2015-01-01

    The multiple zeta values (MZVs) possess a rich algebraic structure of algebraic relations, which is conjecturally determined by two different (shuffle and stuffle) products of a certain algebra of noncommutative words. In a recent work, Bachmann constructed a $q$-analogue of the MZVs -- the so-called bi-brackets -- for which the two products are dual to each other, in a very natural way. We overview Bachmann's construction and discuss the radial asymptotics of the bi-brackets, its links to th...

  18. Effect of moisture, saliva, and blood contamination on the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a conventional bonding system and self-etched bonding system

    Prasad, Mandava; Mohamed, Shamil; Nayak, Krishna; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Talapaneni, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The success of bonding brackets to enamel with resin bonding systems is negatively affected by contamination with oral fluids such as blood and saliva. The new self-etch primer systems combine conditioning and priming agents into a single application, making the procedure more cost effective. Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of moisture, saliva and blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with conventional bonding system and self-etch bonding system. Materials and Methods: Each system was examined under four enamel surface conditions (dry, water, saliva, and blood), and 80 human teeth were divided into two groups with four subgroups each of 10 according to enamel surface condition. Group 1 used conventional bonding system and Group 2 used self-etched bonding system. Subgroups 1a and 2a under dry enamel surface conditions; Subgroups 1b and 2b under moist enamel surface condition; Subgroups 3a and 3b under saliva enamel surface condition and Subgroup 4a and 4b under blood enamel surface condition. Brackets were bonded, and all the samples were then submitted to a shear bond test with a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/sec. Results: The results showed that the contamination reduced the shear bond strength of all groups. In self-etch bonding system water and saliva had significantly higher bond strength when compared to other groups. Conclusion: It was concluded that the blood contamination showed lowest bond strength from both bonding systems. Self-etch bonding system resulted in higher bond strength than conventional bonding system under all conditions except the dry enamel surface. PMID:24678210

  19. An alternative approach to debonding lingual brackets.

    Ali, Hesham; Waring, David T; Malik, Ovais H

    2015-01-01

    This clinical pearl describes a technique of debonding the lingual brackets with minimum discomfort to the patient. It also reduces the risk of swallowing or aspirating the brackets and decreases the risk of enamel damage. PMID:25881384

  20. Higher Toda brackets and Massey products

    Baues, Hans-Joachim; Blanc, David; Gondhali, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    We provide a uniform definition of higher order Toda brackets in a general setting, covering the known cases of long Toda brackets for topological spaces and chain complexes and Massey products for differential graded algebras, among others.

  1. Supersymmetry and the Odd Poisson Bracket

    Soroka, Vyacheslav A.

    2002-01-01

    Some applications of the odd Poisson bracket developed by Kharkov's theorists are represented, including the reformulation of classical Hamiltonian dynamics, the description of hydrodynamics as a Hamilton system by means of the odd bracket and the dynamics formulation with the Grassmann-odd Lagrangian. Quantum representations of the odd bracket are also constructed and applied for the quantization of classical systems based on the odd bracket and for the realization of the idea of a composite...

  2. Evaluation of shear bond strength of different treatments of ceramic bracket surfaces Avaliação da resistência ao cisalhamento de diferentes tratamentos na superfície de braquetes cerâmicos

    Patrícia Helou Ramos Andrade

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the bonding strength of the ceramic bracket and composite resin restoration interface, using four types of treatment on the base of the bracket. METHODOLOGY: 48 photoactivated composite resin discs were used (FiltekTM Z250 contained in specimens and divided into 4 groups of 12 specimens for each group according to the type of treatment performed on the base of the brackets. Once the brackets were bonded, the specimens were subjected to shear stress carried out in a universal testing machine (MTS: 810 Material Test System calibrated with a fixed speed of 0.5 mm / minute. The values obtained were recorded and compared by means of appropriate statistical tests - analysis of variance and then Tukey's test. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The surfaces of ceramic brackets conditioned with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 1 minute, followed by aluminum oxide blasting, 50µ, after silane application and primer application, was considered the best method to prepare surfaces of ceramic brackets prior to orthodontic esthetic bonding.OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistência à união da interface entre braquete cerâmico e restauração de resina composta, empregando quatro tipos de tratamento na base do braquete. MÉTODOS: foram utilizados 48 discos de resina fotoativada (Filtek® Z250 incluídos em corpos de prova, divididos em quatro grupos, com 12 espécimes em cada grupo, de acordo com o tipo de tratamento realizado na base do braquete. Uma vez colados os braquetes, os corpos de prova foram submetidos à tensão de cisalhamento, realizado numa máquina universal de ensaios (MTS: 810 Material Test System calibrada com velocidade fixa de 0,5mm/min. Os valores obtidos foram registrados e comparados por meio de médias, utilizando-se testes estatísticos adequados (análise de Variância e, posteriormente, teste de Tukey. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: o condicionamento das superfícies dos braquetes cerâmicos com ácido hidrofluorídrico a 10% por 1 minuto, seguido do jateamento com óxido de alumínio com 50um de tamanho, e posterior aplicação do silano e, depois, aplicação de adesivo, foi considerado o melhor método para o preparo de superfícies de braquetes cerâmicos previamente à colagem estética ortodôntica.

  3. Factors related to orthodontic treatment time in adult patients

    Ana Camila Esteves de Oliveira Melo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The length of time that it takes an orthodontist to treat adult patients varies widely. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate how different variables influence treatment time. METHODS: Seventy clinical case reports of successfully treated adult patients were examined. The patients were selected from 4,723 records held by three experienced orthodontists. The influence exerted by the following variables on treatment time was assessed: age, sex, facial pattern, severity of malocclusion (measured by the PAR index, sagittal relationship of canines, type of brackets (ceramic or metal, tooth extractions, missed appointments and orthodontic appliance issues/breakages, the latter being the dependent variable. Assessment was performed by multiple linear regression analysis, followed by the stepwise method with P < 0.05. RESULTS: The number of times a patient missed their appointment (no-show (R² = 14.4%, p < 0.0001 and the number of appliance issues/breakages (R² = 29.71%, p = 0.0037 significantly affected variability in treatment time, and these two variables together can predict 43.75% (R² total of the overall variability in treatment time. Other factors, such as canine relationship at the beginning of treatment, bracket type (metal or ceramic, tooth extractions, age at start of treatment, severity of the initial malocclusion, sex and facial pattern had no significant bearing on treatment time. CONCLUSIONS: The duration of orthodontic treatment in adults, when performed by experienced orthodontists, is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. However, several factors which were not included in this study may contribute to variability in orthodontic treatment time.

  4. Torque efficiency of square and rectangular archwires into 0.018 and 0.022 in. conventional brackets

    Papageorgiou, Spyridon N.; Sifakakis, Iosif; Doulis, Ioannis; Eliades, Theodore; Bourauel, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the torque efficacy of square and rectangular wires in 0.018- and 0.022-in. conventionally ligated brackets. Methods Brackets of the same prescription were evaluated in both slot dimensions. Identical acrylic resin models of the maxilla were bonded with the brackets and mounted on the Orthodontic Measurement and Simulation System. Ten 0.018 × 0.018 in., 0.018 × 0.022 in., and 0.018 × 0.025 in. stainless steel wires were evaluated in the 0.018-in...

  5. Quadratic brackets from symplectic forms

    We give a physicist oriented survey of Poisson-Lie symmetries of classical systems. We consider finite-dimensional geometric actions and the chiral WZNW model as examples for the general construction. An essential point is the appearance of quadratic Poisson brackets for group-like variables. It is believed that upon quantization they lead to quadratic exchange algebras. ((orig.))

  6. Laser Applications in Orthodontics

    Somayeh Heidari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A laser is a collimated single wavelength of light which delivers a concentrated source of energy. Soon after different types of lasers were invented, investigators began to examine the effects of different wavelengths of laser energy on oral tissues, routine dental procedures and experimental applications. Orthodontists, along with other specialist in different fields of dentistry, can now benefit from several different advantages that lasers provide during the treatment process, from the beginning of the treatment, when separators are placed, to the time of resin residues removal from the tooth surface at the end of orthodontic treatment. This article outlines some of the most common usages of laser beam in orthodontics and also provides a comparison between laser and other conventional method that were the standard of care prior to the advent of laser in this field.

  7. [Gingival recessions and orthodontics].

    Renkema, A M; Padmos, J A D; de Quincey, G de

    2015-11-01

    Gingival recessions represent the most visible periodontal disease. The prevalence of gingival recessions is high. The root surface is literally exposed to negative influences such as erosion, abrasion, discoloration and decay. Moreover, gingival recessions can affect the quality of life by increased thermal sensitivity and reduced dento-gingival aesthetics. The aetiology of gingival recessions is complex and considered to be multifactorial. In order to prevent the development of gingival recessions during and after orthodontic treatment, several factors should be taken into account, among which maintenance of optimal oral hygiene and respect for the 'biological envelope' are decisive. Once gingival recessions have developed, orthodontic therapy can play a positive role in their treatment. PMID:26569002

  8. Lasers in orthodontics

    Nalcaci, Ruhi; Cokakoglu, Serpil

    2013-01-01

    Many types of dental lasers are currently available that can be efficiently used for soft and hard tissue applications in the field of orthodontics. For achieving the desired effects in the target tissue, knowledge of laser characteristics such as power, wavelength and timing, is necessary. Laser therapy is advantageous because it often avoids bleeding, can be pain free, is non-invasive and is relatively quick. The high cost is its primary disadvantage. It is very important to take the necess...

  9. NiTi WIRES FOR ORTHODONTIC APPLICATION

    Thier, M.; Kubla, G.; Drescher, D.; Bourauel, C.

    1991-01-01

    In order to characterize NiTi orthodontic wires microstructure, transformation temperatures, and deformation behaviour have been investigated. Various states of dislocation density were established by additional heat treatment of a work hardened material. The as recieved wire and the change in microstructure due to the chosen heat treatment were described by optical light microscopy. The stress induced transformation behaviour is related with the experimental results in transformation charact...

  10. Oral health: orthodontic treatment.

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Improper tooth alignment due to crowding, malocclusion, and missing teeth can cause difficulties with eating and speech, and premature wear. It is estimated that more than 20% of children would benefit from orthodontic treatment to correct these conditions, many of which will persist into adulthood if not corrected. Orthodontic care is gaining popularity among adults for similar concerns, as well as for correction of cosmetic issues. The psychological effects of malocclusion should not be ignored. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children undergo evaluation at the first recognition of an orthodontic condition and no later than age 7 years. Some children will need early treatment to help eliminate developing conditions and improve the foundations of the bite, which can ease later treatment in adolescence. For others, treatment in adolescence without early treatment is recommended. Standard cemented braces or clear, removable aligners may be used, depending on the patient's corrective needs. Average treatment time is approximately 2 years; this may be shortened by the use of accelerative techniques. Routine preventive dental care should be continued during the treatment period. PMID:25594451

  11. Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self-Esteem

    ... desktop! more... Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Article Chapters Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Orthodontics print full article print this chapter email ...

  12. DNA damage in oral mucosa cells of patients with fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Farzin Heravi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The release of toxic metal ions from orthodontic alloys has induced concerns regarding the biocompatibility of fixed appliances. This study investigated the genotoxic effect of metal appliances in a sample of patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment.The study included twenty-five healthy individuals requiring orthodontic therapy in both jaws. The patients were treated by stainless steel orthodontic brackets and nickel-titanium or stainless steel arch wires. The oral mucosa cells were gathered just before the appliance placement and 9 months later. The cells were centrifuged, fixed and dropped onto slides. After staining, the micronucleus (MN assay was used to determine genome alteration. The data were analyzed by paired sample t-test.The mean micronuclei frequency in the buccal mucosa was 10.6 ± 5.7 per 1000 cells before the appliance placement and 9.2 ± 6.37 per 1000 cells 9 months later. No significant difference was found in the MN count before and 9 months after therapy (p=0.336.Under the conditions used in this study, application of fixed orthodontic appliances did not expose healthy individuals to increased risk of DNA damage in oral mucosa cells.

  13. Interrelationships of endodontic- orthodontic treatments

    Khedmat S

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was reviewing the literature related to the mutual effects of endodontics and orthodontics on each other providing documented information that can be used by dentists in clinical practice. The effect of orthodontic treatment on the dental pulp and its role in root resorption, the influence of previous trauma to the tooth and endodontic treatment in orthodontic tooth movements and root resorption, recommendations regarding endodontic treatment during orthodontic tooth movement and the role of the orthodontic forces in provision and outcome of endodontic treatment are being discussed. The effect of the orthodontic tooth movement on the pulp is focused primarily on the neurovascular system which can cause degenerative and/or inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. Although, most of these changes are considered reversible, it seems that teeth with complete apical foramen and teeth subjected to previous insults, such as trauma, caries, restorations and periodontal diseases are more susceptible to pulpal irreversible changes. Teeth with root canal treatment that are well cleaned shaped, and three- dimensionally obturated, exhibit less propensity to apical root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement. This outcome depends on the absence of microleakage for bacterial ingress. A traumatized tooth can be moved orthodontically with minimal risk of resorption, provided that the pulp has not been severely injured (infection or necrosis. If there is evidence of pulpal demise, appropriate endodontic treatment is necessary prior to orthodontic treatment .If a previously traumatized tooth exhibits resorption, there is a greater chance that orthodontic tooth movement will enhance the resorptive process. If a tooth has been severely traumatized (intrusion, avulsion there would be a greater incidence of resorption with tooth movement. It is recommended that teeth requiring root canal treatment during orthodontic movement be initially cleaned and shaped followed by the interim placement of calcium hydroxide. Final canal obturation with gutta-percha should be accomplished upon the completion of orthodontic treatment. Endodontically treated teeth can be moved orthodontically similar to teeth with vital pulps. In case of endodontic procedures like apexification, there may be no need to delay the orthodontic treatment.

  14. Hausdorff Distance evaluation of orthodontic accessories' streaking artifacts in 3D model superimposition

    José Rino Neto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether image artifacts caused by orthodontic metal accessories interfere with the accuracy of 3D CBCT model superimposition. A human dry skull was subjected three times to a CBCT scan: at first without orthodontic brackets (T1, then with stainless steel brackets bonded without (T2 and with orthodontic arch wires (T3 inserted into the brackets' slots. The registration of image surfaces and the superimposition of 3D models were performed. Within-subject surface distances between T1-T2, T1-T3 and T2-T3 were computed and calculated for comparison among the three data sets. The minimum and maximum Hausdorff Distance units (HDu computed between the corresponding data points of the T1 and T2 CBCT 3D surface images were 0.000000 and 0.049280 HDu, respectively, and the mean distance was 0.002497 HDu. The minimum and maximum Hausdorff Distances between T1 and T3 were 0.000000 and 0.047440 HDu, respectively, with a mean distance of 0.002585 HDu. In the comparison between T2 and T3, the minimum, maximum and mean Hausdorff Distances were 0.000000, 0.025616 and 0.000347 HDu, respectively. In the current study, the image artifacts caused by metal orthodontic accessories did not compromise the accuracy of the 3D model superimposition. Color-coded maps of overlaid structures complemented the computed Hausdorff Distances and demonstrated a precise fusion between the data sets.

  15. Rapid orthodontics with alveolar reshaping: two case reports of decrowding.

    Wilcko, W M; Wilcko, T; Bouquot, J E; Ferguson, D J

    2001-02-01

    Two case reports demonstrate a new orthodontic method that offers short treatment times and the ability to simultaneously reshape and increase the buccolingual thickness of the supporting alveolar bone. A 24-year-old man with a Class I severely crowded malocclusion and an overly constricted maxilla with concomitant posterior crossbites and a 17-year-old female with a Class I moderately to severely crowded malocclusion requested shortened orthodontic treatment times. This new surgery technique included buccal and lingual full-thickness flaps, selective partial decortication of the cortical plates, concomitant bone grafting/augmentation, and primary flap closure. Following the surgery, orthodontic adjustments were made approximately every 2 weeks. From bracketing to debracketing, both cases were completed in approximately 6 months and 2 weeks. Posttreatment evaluation of both patients revealed good results. At approximately 15 months following surgery in one patient, a full-thickness flap was again reflected. Visual examination revealed good maintenance of the height of the alveolar crest and an increased thickness in the buccal bone. The canine and premolars in this area were expanded buccally by more than 3 mm, and yet there had actually been an increase in the buccolingual thickness of the overlying buccal bone. Additionally, a preexisting bony fenestration buccal of the root of the first premolar was covered. Both of these findings lend credence to the incorporation of the bone augmentation procedure into the corticotomy surgery because this made it possible to complete the orthodontic treatment with a more intact periodontium. The rapid expansive tooth movements with no significant apical root resorption may be attributed to the osteoclastic or catabolic phase of the regional acceleratory phenomenon. Instead of bony "block" movement or resorption/apposition, the degree of demineralization/remineralization might be a more accurate explanation of what occurs in the alveolar bone during physiologic tooth movement in these patients. PMID:11829041

  16. Stability of treatment with self-ligating brackets and conventional brackets in adolescents: a long-term follow-up retrospective study

    Yu, Zhou; Jiaqiang, Lin; Weiting, Chen; Wang, Yi; Zhen, MinLing; Ni, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the long-term stability of treatment with self-ligating brackets compared with conventional brackets. Materials and methods The long-term follow-up retrospective study sample consisted of two groups of patients: group SL (including passive and interactive self ligating braces) comprised 30 subjects treated with self-ligating brackets at a mean pretreatment (T0) age of 13.56 years, with a mean follow up period for 7.24 years; group CL comprised 30...

  17. A hierarchy of Poisson brackets

    Pavelka, Michal; Esen, Ogul; Grmela, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The vector field generating reversible time evolution of macroscopic systems involves two ingredients: gradient of a potential (a covector) and a degenerate Poisson structure transforming the covector into a vector. The Poisson structure is conveniently expressed in Poisson brackets, its degeneracy in their Casimirs (i.e. potentials whose gradients produce no vector field). In this paper we investigate in detail hierarchies of Poisson brackets, together with their Casimirs, that arise in passages from more to less detailed (i.e. more macroscopic) descriptions. In particular, we investigate the passage from mechanics of particles (in its Liouville representation) to the reversible kinetic theory and the passage from the reversible kinetic theory to the reversible fluid mechanics. From the physical point of view, the investigation includes binary mixtures and two-point formulations suitable for describing turbulent flows. From the mathematical point of view, we reveal the Lie algebra structure involved in the p...

  18. Shingle assembly with support bracket

    Almy, Charles

    2007-01-02

    A shingle system, mountable to a support surface, includes overlapping shingle assemblies. Each shingle assembly comprises a support bracket, having upper and lower ends, secured to a shingle body. The upper end has an upper support portion, extending away from the shingle body, and an upper support-surface-engaging part, engageable with a support surface so that the upper edge of the shingle body is positionable at a first distance from the support surface to create a first gap therebetween. The lower end has a lower support portion extending away from the lower surface. The support brackets create: (1) a second gap between shingle bodies of the first and second shingle assemblies, and (2) an open region beneath the first shingle assembly fluidly coupling the first and second gaps.

  19. Evaluation of Nickel and Chromium Ion Release During Fixed Orthodontic Treatment Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer: An In Vivo Study

    Nayak, Rabindra S; Khanna, Bharti; Pasha, Azam; Vinay, K; Narayan, Anjali; Chaitra, K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances with the use of stainless steel brackets and archwires made of nitinol have a corrosive potential in the oral environment. Nickel and chromium ions released from these appliances act as allergens apart from being cytotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic in smaller quantities in the range of nanograms. This study was done to evaluate the release of nickel and chromium ions from orthodontic appliances in the oral cavity using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). Materials and Methods: Saliva samples from 30 orthodontic patients undergoing treatment with 0.022″ MBT mechanotherapy were collected prior to commencement of treatment, after initial aligning wires and after 10-12 months of treatment. Salivary nickel and chromium ion concentration was measured in parts per billion (ppb) using ICP-MS. Results: Mean, standard deviation and range were computed for the concentrations of ions obtained. Results analyzed using ANOVA indicated a statistically significant increase of 10.35 ppb in nickel ion concentration and 33.53 ppb in chromium ion concentration after initial alignment. The ionic concentration at the end of 10-12 months of treatment showed a statistically significant increase in of 17.92 ppb for chromium and a statistically insignificant decrease in nickel ion concentration by 1.58 ppb. Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed a positive correlation for an increase in nickel concentration after aligning, but not at the end of 10-12 months. A positive correlation was seen for an increase in chromium ion concentration at both time intervals. Conclusion: Nickel and chromium ion concentration in saliva even though below the recommended daily allowance should not be ignored in light of the new knowledge regarding effects of these ions at the molecular level and the allergic potential. Careful and detailed medical history of allergy is essential. Nickel free alternatives should form an essential part of an orthodontist’s inventory. PMID:26464533

  20. Quantum Enhancements and Biquandle Brackets

    Nelson, Sam; Orrison, Michael E.; Rivera, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new class of quantum enhancements we call biquandle brackets, which are customized skein invariants for biquandle colored links.Quantum enhancements of biquandle counting invariants form a class of knot and link invariants that includes biquandle cocycle invariants and skein invariants such as the HOMFLY-PT polynomial as special cases, providing an explicit unification of these apparently unrelated types of invariants. We provide examples demonstrating that the new invariants a...

  1. Exterior differentials in superspace and Poisson brackets

    It is shown that two definitions for an exterior differential in superspace, giving the same exterior calculus, yet lead to different results when applied to the Poisson bracket. A prescription for the transition with the help of these exterior differentials from the given Poisson bracket of definite Grassmann parity to another bracket is introduced. It is also indicated that the resulting bracket leads to generalization of the Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket for the cases of superspace and brackets of diverse Grassmann parities. It is shown that in the case of the Grassmann-odd exterior differential the resulting bracket is the bracket given on exterior forms. The above-mentioned transition with the use of the odd exterior differential applied to the linear even/odd Poisson brackets, that correspond to semi-simple Lie groups, results, respectively, in also linear odd/even brackets which are naturally connected with the Lie superalgebra. The latter contains the BRST and anti-BRST charges and can be used for calculation of the BRST operator cogomology. (author)

  2. Effectiveness and efficiency in clinical orthodontic practice.

    Rinchuse, Daniel J; Cozzani, Mauro

    2015-12-01

    Proffitt et al. have described "effectiveness and efficiency" (E&E) as achieving desired results without wasting the orthodontist's and patients' time. In 1972, Archibald Cochrane published a monograph entitled "Effectiveness and Efficiency," which challenged the medical community to use medical protocols that were evidence-based. As a possible starting point for E&E, the orthodontist could consider an "Evidence-based clinical practice" (EBCP) model, which integrates the best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. This model considers scientific or evidence-based orthodontics (EBO) together with patient preferences and patient autonomy, clinical or patient circumstances, and clinical experience and judgment. In this paper, therefore, E&E will be discussed from an EBCP perspective which, for our purposes, includes relevant evidence but also our clinical experience and rationale. We will discuss: wire sequence; NiTi Wire types; space closure by sliding; canine retraction versus en masse retraction, 18" slot versus 22" slot, the Bidimensional System; self-ligating brackets (SL); vertical slot; economic aspects. PMID:26527490

  3. Effects of silica coating and silane surface conditioning on the bond strength of rebonded metal and ceramic brackets

    Saadet Atsü; Bülent Çatalbaş; Ibrahim Erhan Gelgör

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tribochemical silica coating and silane surface conditioning on the bond strength of rebonded metal and ceramic brackets. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty debonded metal and 20 debonded ceramic brackets were randomly assigned to receive one of the following surface treatments (n=10 for each group): (1) sandblasting (control); (2) tribochemical silica coating combined with silane. Brackets were rebonded to the enamel surface on the la...

  4. Mechanical properties of one and two-step fluoridated orthodontic resins submitted to different pH cycling regimes

    Paula Passalini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess the in vitro shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI of one and two-step fluoridated orthodontic resins under conditions that simulate high cariogenic challenge. Edgewise brackets for maxillary central incisors were randomly bonded to 80 bovine incisors, using either TransbondTM Plus Color Change orthodontic resin and a self-etching primer adhesive (G1; n = 40 or Orthodontic Fill Magic with a conventional acid-etch technique (G2; n = 40. Each group of resin (n = 10 was divided into: immediate shear (A- pre-cycling control, immersion in artificial remineralizing saliva (neutral saliva for 14 days (B- post-cycling control and pH cycling with high cariogenic challenge (C- acid saliva with pH 5.5 and D- acid saliva with pH 4.5. After 14 days of pH cycling, the shear bond strength and ARI were evaluated. Considering the shear bond strength, TransbondTM Plus Color Change resin was stronger than Orthodontic Fill Magic when it was submitted to high cariogenic challenge (p < 0.05. Also TransbondTM Plus Color Change resin showed better adhesion to enamel than Orthodontic Fill Magic, in all situations evaluated (p < 0.05. It could be concluded that TransbondTM Plus Color Change resin presented better shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index when submitted to high cariogenic challenge, in comparison with Orthodontic Fill Magic.

  5. Influence of in vitro pigmenting of esthetic orthodontic ligatures on smile attractiveness

    Camila, Ferraz; Marcelo, Castellucci; Mrcio, Sobral.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar, atravs de fotografias clnicas, entre estudantes de Odontologia e ortodontistas, o grau de influncia que ligaduras elsticas estticas pigmentadas exercem sobre a atratividade do sorriso. MTODOS: foram utilizadas 16 fotografias clnicas faciais do sorriso e 16 de sorriso aproxi [...] mado de um nico paciente portando braquetes ortodnticos de porcelana monocristalina, fio de NiTi teflonado e ligaduras elsticas estticas de cinco marcas comerciais diferentes, distribudas em oito grupos, G1 a G8 (Morelli, Ortho Technology, TP Orthodontics, 3M/Unitek clear, 3M/Unitek obscure, American Orthodontics clear, American Orthodontics pearl e American Orthodontics metalic pearl). Foram utilizadas 20 ligaduras de cada grupo, totalizando 160 ligaduras. Metade delas foi utilizada em estado natural e a outra metade aps pigmentao in vitro. Todas as fotografias foram julgadas por 40 avaliadores, sendo 20 ortodontistas e 20 estudantes de Odontologia. RESULTADOS: para ortodontistas, as ligaduras American Orthodontics pearl (G7) foram as que menos influenciaram o grau de atratividade do sorriso nos dois tipos de fotografias utilizadas. Para os estudantes de Odontologia, nas fotografias faciais do sorriso, as que obtiveram o melhor desempenho foram Morelli (G1), American Orthodontics clear (G6) e American Orthodontics pearl (G7) e, nas fotografias de sorriso aproximado, American Orthodontics pearl, metalic pearl e clear (G7, G8 e G6, respectivamente). CONCLUSES: tanto para ortodontistas quanto para estudantes de Odontologia, a pigmentao das ligaduras elsticas influenciou de forma negativa o grau de atratividade dos sorrisos nos dois tipos de fotografias clnicas avaliadas. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the perception of dental students and orthodontists on the degree of influence that pigmented esthetic elastic ligatures have on smile attractiveness, by judging clinical photographs. METHODS: Sixteen clinical facial photographs of the smile and 16 close up images of the smile [...] of a single patient wearing monocrystalline porcelain orthodontic brackets, Teflon coated NiTi wire brackets and esthetic elastic ligatures of five different commercial brands were distributed into eight groups, G1 to G8 (Morelli, Ortho Tecnology, TP Orthodontics, Unitek/3Mclear, Unitek/3M obscure, American Orthodontics clear, American Orthodontics pearl and American Orthodontics metallic pearl). Twenty ligatures were used in each group, totaling 160 ligatures. Half of them were used in their natural state, and the other half after in vitro pigmentation. All the photographs were judged by 40 evaluators, 20 orthodontists and 20 dental students. RESULTS: For orthodontists, American pearl (G7) ligatures were those that least influenced the degree of attractiveness of the smile in the two types of photographs used. For the dental students, in the facial photographs of the smile, ligatures with the best performance were Morelli (G1), American clear (G6) and American pearl (G7) and in the close up photographs of the smile, American pearl, metallic pearl and clear (G7, G8 and G6). CONCLUSIONS: For both orthodontists and dental students, pigmentation of the elastic ligatures had a negative influence on the degree of attractiveness of smiles in the two types of clinical photographs evaluated.

  6. Orthodontic instrument sterilization with microwave irradiation

    Arif Yezdani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of microwave sterilization of orthodontic instruments and molar bands immersed in plain distilled water with and without oral rinse, and to ascertain the minimum time of exposure required to sterilize. Materials and Methods: The orthodontic instruments (hinged and nonhinged, molar bands and mouth mirrors used in the patient′s mouth were selected for the study. The instruments were divided into two groups - Group I with oral rinse-set A (0.01% chlorhexidine gluconate and set B (0.025% betadine and Group II (included sets C and D without oral rinse. The instruments of set A, B and C were microwaved at 2,450 MHz, 800 W for 5 min, whereas, set D was microwaved for 10 min at the same above mentioned specifications. The efficacy of sterilization was assessed by stab inoculation of the instruments onto trypticase soya agar plates. The plates were checked for bacterial growth following incubation at 37°C for 24 h. For sterility control, Geobacillus stearothermophilus (MTCC 1518 was included. Results: No growth was observed in the plates that were inoculated with the microwaved orthodontic instruments of sets A, B and D, whereas scanty bacterial growth was observed in the plates inoculated with the microwaved set C instruments. Conclusion: Effective sterilization was achieved when the orthodontic instruments and molar bands were immersed in distilled water without oral rinse and microwaved for 10 min as also for those that were immersed in distilled water with oral rinse and microwaved for 5 min.

  7. Temporary Anchorage Devices in Orthodontics

    Gowri Sankar Singaraju

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Anchorage control is one of the main aspects of orthodontic treatment plan. A good appliance system should put minimum taxation of anchorage on the anchor units. The structures present with in the confinement of oral cavity are very less in number. In such cases the anchor unit gets its reinforcement from extraoral structures or intraoral appliances. Extraoral anchorages have their inherent drawbacks and most of them rely on patient cooperation. The use of implants in orthodontics to reinforce the anchorage is a recent concept. The purpose of this article is to review the implants in the context of orthodontics which are called as TAD- temporary anchorage devices.

  8. Poisson Bracket on the Space of Histories

    Marolf, Donald

    1993-01-01

    We extend the Poisson bracket from a Lie bracket of phase space functions to a Lie bracket of functions on the space of canonical histories and investigate the resulting algebras. Typically, such extensions define corresponding Lie algebras on the space of Lagrangian histories via pull back to a space of partial solutions. These are the same spaces of histories studied with regard to path integration and decoherence. Such spaces of histories are familiar from path integration and some studies...

  9. Degenerate odd Poisson bracket on Grassmann variables

    A linear degenerate odd Poisson bracket (antibracket) realized solely on Grassmann variables is proposed. It is revealed that this bracket has at once three Grassmann-odd nilpotent Δ-like differential operators of the first, second and third orders with respect to the Grassmann derivatives. It is shown that these Δ-like operators, together with the Grassmann-odd nilpotent Casimir function of this bracket, form a finite-dimensional Lie superalgebra

  10. Linear Odd Poisson Bracket on Grassmann Variables

    Soroka, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    A linear odd Poisson bracket (antibracket) realized solely in terms of Grassmann variables is suggested. It is revealed that the bracket, which corresponds to a semi-simple Lie group, has at once three Grassmann-odd nilpotent $\\Delta$-like differential operators of the first, the second and the third orders with respect to Grassmann derivatives, in contrast with the canonical odd Poisson bracket having the only Grassmann-odd nilpotent differential $\\Delta$-operator of the second order. It is ...

  11. Degenerate Odd Poisson Bracket on Grassmann Variables

    Soroka, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    A linear degenerate odd Poisson bracket (antibracket) realized solely on Grassmann variables is presented. It is revealed that this bracket has at once three nilpotent $\\Delta$-like differential operators of the first, the second and the third orders with respect to the Grassmann derivatives. It is shown that these $\\Delta$-like operators together with the Grassmann-odd nilpotent Casimir function of this bracket form a finite-dimensional Lie superalgebra.

  12. Degenerate odd Poisson bracket on Grassmann variables

    A linear degenerate odd Poisson bracket (antibracket) realized solely on Grassmann variables is proposed. It is revealed that this bracket has at once three Grassmann-odd nilpotent Δ-like differential operators of the first, second, and third orders with respect to the Grassmann derivatives. It is shown that these Δ-like operators together with the Grassmann-odd nilpotent Casimir function of this bracket form a finite-dimensional Lie superalgebra

  13. On covariant Poisson brackets in field theory

    Sharapov, Alexey A.

    2014-01-01

    A general approach is proposed to constructing covariant Poisson brackets in the space of histories of a classical field-theoretical model. The approach is based on the concept of Lagrange anchor, which was originally developed as a tool for path-integral quantization of Lagrangian and non-Lagrangian dynamics. The proposed covariant Poisson brackets generalize the Peierls' bracket construction known in the Lagrangian field theory.

  14. Assessment of pain experience in adults and children after bracket bonding and initial archwire insertion

    Marcio José da Silva Campos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ninety five percent of orthodontic patients routinely report pain, due to alterations in the periodontal ligament and surrounding soft tissues, with intensity and prevalence varying according to age. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess toothache and buccal mucosal pain in adults and children during two initial phases of the orthodontic treatment. METHODS: The intensity of toothache and buccal mucosal pain reported by 20 patients, 10 children (11-13 years and 10 adults (18-37 years was recorded with the aid of a Visual Analog Scale (VAS, during 14 days - 7 days with bonded brackets only and 7 days with the initial archwire inserted. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in pain intensity among adults and children. After bracket bonding, 50% of the children and 70% of the adults reported pain. 70% of both groups reported pain after initial archwire insertion. While adults reported constant, low intensity, buccal mucosal pain, the children showed great variation of pain intensity, but with a trend towards decreasing pain during the assessment period. After initial archwire insertion the peaks of toothache intensity and prevalence occurred 24 hours in children and 48 hours in adults. CONCLUSIONS: In general, children reported pain less frequently than adults did, though with greater intensity.

  15. Nambu bracket and M-theory

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nambu proposed an extension of dynamical system through the introduction of a new bracket (Nambu bracket) in 1973. This article is a short review of the developments after his paper. Some emphasis are put on a viewpoint that the Nambu bracket naturally describes extended objects which appear in M-theory and the fluid dynamics. The latter part of the paper is devoted to a review of the studies on the Nambu bracket (Lie 3-algebra) in Bagger-Lambert-Gustavsson theory of multiple M2-branes. This paper is a contribution to the proceedings of Nambu memorial symposium (Osaka City University, September 29, 2015).

  16. Orthodontic Microimplants Assisted Intrusion of Supra-erupted Maxillary Molar Enabling Osseointegrated Implant Supported Mandibular Prosthesis: Case Reports.

    Rai, Deepak; Bhasin, Saranjeet Singh; Rai, Sheetal

    2014-12-01

    Loss of mandibular molars, when not replaced in time, are usually associated with overeruption of maxillary molars. To provide prosthetic replacement for missing lower posteriors, over erupted maxillary teeth have been intruded in past with great difficulty in adults with conventional orthodontics, along with associated problems of root resorption. Currently orthodontic microimplants provide stable intraoral anchorage, allow predictable maxillary molar intrusion enabling reestablishment of functional posterior occlusion with mandibular implant supported prosthesis, thereby reducing need for prosthetic crown reduction in maxillary arch. The added advantage of microimplant is it enables use of sectional appliance in area of concern instead of full arch bracketed appliance which an adult may not accept. The case reports demonstrates, overerupted maxillary molars were intruded using orthodontic microimplants to enable prosthetic rehabilitation of mandibular dentition by osseointegrated implant supported prosthesis. The second case report also demonstrates use of CBCT scan in planning and execution. PMID:26199523

  17. Multiple q-Zeta Brackets

    Wadim Zudilin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The multiple zeta values (MZVs possess a rich algebraic structure of algebraic relations, which is conjecturally determined by two different (shuffle and stuffle products of a certain algebra of noncommutative words. In a recent work, Bachmann constructed a q-analogue of the MZVs—the so-called bi-brackets—for which the two products are dual to each other, in a very natural way. We overview Bachmann’s construction and discuss the radial asymptotics of the bi-brackets, its links to the MZVs, and related linear (independence questions of the q-analogue.

  18. DEBONDING OF CERAMIC BRACKETS BY ER:YAG LASER

    Fidan ALAKUŞ-SABUNCUOĞLU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effects of Er:YAG laser debonding of ceramic brackets on the bond strength and the amount of adhesive resin remnant. Materials and Methods: Twenty human mandibular incisors were randomly divided into two groups of 10 and polycrystalline ceramic brackets (Transcend series 6000, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA were bonded on enamel surfaces. Group 1 was the control group in which no laser application was performed prior to the shear bond strength (SBS testing. In Group 2, Er:YAG was applied in 3W power for 6 seconds using the scanning method. The brackets were tested for SBS with an Instron universal testing machine and results were expressed in megapascals (MPa. The amount of adhesive remnant was evaluated with Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean ± standard deviation of SBS values in the control group was 13.42 ±1.23 MPa and 8.47 ±0.71 MPa in the Er:YAG group and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.05. The evaluation of ARI scores demonstrated more adhesive was left on the enamel surface with Er:YAG group. Conclusion: 3W power Er:YAG laser application with the scanning method to polycrystalline ceramic brackets demonstrated lower bond strengths and higher ARI scores during the debonding procedure.

  19. Histological evaluation after electrothermal debonding of ceramic brackets

    Vignesh Kailasam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the histological changes following electrothermal debonding (ETD of ceramic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 first premolar teeth from 14 patients were divided into two groups: Group I consisted of 20 teeth which served as control, and the brackets were debonded using conventional pliers. (7 teeth were extracted 24 hours after conventional debonding, 7 teeth were extracted 28 to 32 days after conventional debonding and 6 teeth were extracted 56-60 days after conventional debonding. Group II consisted of 30 teeth and the brackets were debonded using the ETD unit. (10 teeth were extracted 24 hours after ETD, 10 teeth were extracted 28 to 32 days after ETD and 10 teeth were extracted 56-60 days after ETD. Immediately after extraction, the teeth were sectioned and prepared for histological examination. Results: The pulp was normal in most samples of the control group. In group II, mild inflammation was observed in the 24 hour sample while the 28 to 32 day sample showed signs of healing. The 56-60 day sample showed that the pulp was similar to the control group in 6 out of the 10 samples. Conclusion: The ETD of ceramic brackets did not affect the pulp and the changes which were observed, were reversible in nature.

  20. Temporary Anchorage Devices in Orthodontics

    Gowri Sankar Singaraju; Vasu Murthy

    2009-01-01

    Anchorage control is one of the main aspects of orthodontic treatment plan. A good appliance system should put minimum taxation of anchorage on the anchor units. The structures present with in the confinement of oral cavity are very less in number. In such cases the anchor unit gets its reinforcement from extraoral structures or intraoral appliances. Extraoral anchorages have their inherent drawbacks and most of them rely on patient cooperation. The use of implants in orthodontics to reinforc...

  1. Awareness of Orthodontic Treatments among School Teachers of Two Cities in Iran

    Ali Rafighi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Since most orthodontic patients are children and adolescents, it is believed that teachers can help find these patients and make them aware of their orthodontic problems. Therefore, teachers are expected to have proper knowledge about these problems. The aim of this study was to determine teachers’ awareness about orthodontic treatments in Tabriz and Saqqez and compare it in different educational levels. Materials and methods. A questionnaire was given to 384 teachers (204 in Tabriz and 180 in Saqqez in randomly selected schools of different levels. The questionnaire had 17 questions in 3 sections, including general information, age, and costs of orthodontic treatments. The teachers’ awareness in two cities was analyzed with independent t-test and in educational levels with one-way ANOVA. Results. About 94% of the participants believed orthodontic treatment consisted of arrangement of teeth with special braces. However, there was no significant difference between the two cities in general information (p=0.23 and the age suitable for orthodontic treatment (p=0.53. The differences in the teachers’ awareness in three educational levels were not statistically significant between the two cities (p=0.23. Conclusion. Awareness of teachers about orthodontic treatment in Saqqez and Tabriz was not sufficient and different; 75% of the participants believed that high cost of orthodontic treatment is the main problem.

  2. Mechanical and topographic evaluation of esthetic brackets and its relation to frictional resistance

    Vikram Pai; Vijay Naik; Ameet Revankar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the frictional characteristics of conventional ceramic versus metal insert ceramic brackets in combination with stainless steel and Teflon-coated stainless steel archwires. Materials and Methods: Twenty brackets each, of ceramic and metal insert ceramic Maxillary canine preadjusted edgewise brackets 0.022 × 0.028 in slot) and 20 archwires, each of stainless steel and Teflon-coated stainless steel (0.019 × 0.025 in) were tested f...

  3. Comparison of shear bond strengths of conventional orthodontic composite and nano-ceramic restorative composite: An in vitro study

    Namit Nagar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-ceramic restorative composite Ceram-X MonoTM♦, a restorative resin with the traditional orthodontic composite Transbond XTTM† and to evaluate the site of bond failure using Adhesive Remnant Index. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolars were divided into two groups of 30 each. Stainless steel brackets were bonded using Transbond XTTM† (Group I and Ceram-X MonoTM♦ (Group II according to manufacturer′s protocol. Shear bond strength was measured on Universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Adhesive Remnant Index scores were assigned to debonded brackets of each group. Data was analyzed using unpaired ′t′ test and Chi square test. Results: The mean shear bond strength of Group I (Transbond XTTM† was 12.89 MPa ± 2.19 and that of Group II (Ceram-X MonoTM was 7.29 MPa ± 1.76. Unpaired ′t′ test revealed statistically significant differences amongst the shear bond strength of the samples measured. Chi-square test revealed statistically insignificant differences amongst the ARI scores of the samples measured. Conclusions: Ceram-X MonoTM♦ had a lesser mean shear bond strength when compared to Transbond XTTM† which was statistically significant difference. However, the mean shear bond of Ceram X Mono was within the clinically acceptable range for bonding. Ceram-X MonoTM† and Transbond XTTM† showed cohesive fracture of adhesive in 72.6% and 66.6% of the specimens, respectively.

  4. Orthodontic mechanics using mini-implant measured by FBG

    Trannin, Pamela G.; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Walmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-07-01

    The magnitude of the force generated during orthodontic mechanics anchored in mini-implant in a maxilla model was analyzed. Data was collected during the insertion of the mini-implant and at the moment of applying forces to the structure of the maxilla and dentition. To obtain quantitative results, the Fibre Bragg Gratings (FBG) were inserted in an elastomeric material reproducing a maxilla model. It was observed levels of forces of approximately 3,78N next to the root of first premolar by the insertion of the mini-implant and different levels of the force to different orthodontic mechanics applied on the dental system.

  5. Tool Releases Optical Elements From Spring Brackets

    Gum, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Threaded hooks retract bracket arms holding element. Tool uses three hooks with threaded shanks mounted in ring-shaped holder to pull on tabs to release optical element. One person can easily insert or remove optical element (such as prism or lens) from spring holder or bracket with minimal risk of damage.

  6. Courant-like brackets and loop spaces

    Ekstrand, Joel; Zabzine, Maxim

    2011-01-01

    We study the algebra of local functionals equipped with a Poisson bracket. We discuss the underlying algebraic structures related to a version of the Courant-Dorfman algebra. As a main illustration, we consider the functionals over the cotangent bundle of the superloop space over a smooth manifold. We present a number of examples of the Courant-like brackets arising from this analysis.

  7. Courant-like brackets and loop spaces

    Ekstrand, Joel

    2009-01-01

    We study the algebra of local functionals equipped with a Poisson bracket. We discuss the underlying algebraic structures related to a version of the Courant-Dorfman algebra. As a main illustration, we consider the functionals over the cotangent bundle of the superloop space over a smooth manifold. We present a number of examples of the Courant-like brackets arising from this analysis.

  8. Hom-Big Brackets: Theory and Applications

    Cai, Liqiang; Sheng, Yunhe

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of hom-big brackets, which is a generalization of Kosmann-Schwarzbach's big brackets. We show that it gives rise to a graded hom-Lie algebra. Thus, it is a useful tool to study hom-structures. In particular, we use it to describe hom-Lie bialgebras and hom-Nijenhuis operators.

  9. Corticotomy facilitated orthodontics: Review of a technique

    AlGhamdi, Ali Saad Thafeed

    2009-01-01

    Corticotomy found to be effective in accelerating orthodontic treatment. The most important factors in the success of this technique is proper case selection and careful surgical and orthodontic treatment.

  10. Problems in Standardization of Orthodontic Shear Bond Strength Tests; A Brief Review

    M.S. A. Akhoundi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Bonding brackets to the enamel surface has gained much popularity today. New adhesive systems have been introduced and marketed and a considerable increase in research regarding bond strength has been published. A considerable amount of these studies deal with shear bond strength of adhesives designed for orthodontic purpose.Previous studies have used variety of test designs. This diversity in test design is due to the fact that there is no standard method for evaluating shear bond strength in orthodontics. Therefore comparison of data obtained from different study is almost impossible.This article tries to briefly discuss the developments occurred in the process of shear bond strength measurement of orthodontic adhesives with an emphasis on the type of test set up and load application.Although the test designs for measuring shear bond strength in orthodontics are still far from ideal, attempts must be made to standardize these tests especially in order to makecomparison of different data easier. It is recommended that test designs be set up in such a manner that better matches with the purpose of the study.

  11. Friction in orthodontics.

    Prashant, P S; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-08-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology used hardly simulates the oral conditions. Lately studies have concluded that more emphasis should be laid on binding and notching of archwires as these are considered to be the primary factors involved in retarding the tooth movement. This article reviews the various components involved in RS and the factors affecting friction. Further, research work should be carried out to provide cost effective alternatives aimed at reducing friction. PMID:26538873

  12. Patients’ acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics

    Zawawi KH

    2015-01-01

    Khalid H Zawawi Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Objective: To study patients’ acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics as a treatment option.Methods: Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment were asked to complete two sets of questionnaires; the first set included questions about age, sex, and level of education and general questions about orthodontic treatment; and the second set was related to the corticoto...

  13. Patients’ acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics

    Khalid H. Zawawi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study patients’ acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics as a treatment option. Methods Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment were asked to complete two sets of questionnaires; the first set included questions about age, sex, and level of education and general questions about orthodontic treatment; and the second set was related to the corticotomy-assisted orthodontics. Before answering the corticotomy questions, a brief description of the clinical procedure was exp...

  14. Orthodontic tooth movement and distraction osteogenesis

    Lucchese, A; Carinci, F; Saggese, V; D. Lauritano

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to compare the rate of orthodontic tooth movement into bone regenerate created after mandibular DO with the rate of orthodontic tooth movement in patients in which extraction was performed and followed by traditional orthodontic treatment. The rate of orthodontic tooth movement into bone regenerate created after mandibular DO in 14 Class II subjects (5 males and 9 females, mean age 25.0 +/- 1.1 years) treated with Distraction Osteogenesis appliance wa...

  15. Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (PAOO) - a review

    Amit, Goyal; JPS, Kalra; Pankaj, Bhatiya; Suchinder, Singla; Parul, Bansal

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of adult patients coming to the orthodontic clinic, the orthodontic professional is constantly looking for ways to accelerate tooth movement. Surgical intervention to affect the alveolar housing and tooth movement has been described in various forms for over a hundred years. However, it is the spirit of interdisciplinary collaboration in orthodontics has expanded the realm of traditional orthodontic tooth movement protocols. Periodontal accelerated osteogenic orthodo...

  16. Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (PAOO) - a review

    Amit, Goyal; Pankaj, Bhatiya; Suchinder, Singla; Parul, Bansal

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of adult patients coming to the orthodontic clinic, the orthodontic professional is constantly looking for ways to accelerate tooth movement. Surgical intervention to affect the alveolar housing and tooth movement has been described in various forms for over a hundred years. However, it is the spirit of interdisciplinary collaboration in orthodontics has expanded the realm of traditional orthodontic tooth movement protocols. Periodontal accelerated osteog...

  17. Preparation and evaluation of orthodontic setup

    Telma Martins de Arajo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: An orthodontic or diagnostic setup consists in cutting and realigning the teeth in plaster models, making it an important resource in orthodontic treatment planning. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to provide a detailed description of a technique to build an orthodontic setup model and a method to evaluate it. CONCLUSIONS: Although laborious, orthodontic setup procedure and analysis can provide important information such as the need for dental extractions, interproximal stripping, anchorage system, among others.

  18. Technical report for quality requirements establishment of in-chimney bracket

    Kim, Kwan Hyun

    2000-06-01

    This technical report provides the methods on how to sustain the items of experimental materials, nuclear fuel on examination, ect. This report applies to the quality assurance(QA) programmes of the design, fabrication in-chimney bracket.The organization having overall responsibility for the nuclear power item design, preservation, fabrication shall be described in this report in each stage of chimney bracket fabrication project.

  19. Herbal and Conventional Toothpastes Roles in Gingivitis Control in Orthodontic Patients

    Stefani A. Dewi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance aims to improve esthetics and function of mastication and speech, however the components on a fixed appliance as bands, brackets and ligatures may increase the amount of plaque as the primary etiology of gingivitis. Objective: a double-blind study of randomized clinical trial was designed to investigate the effectiveness of herbal toothpaste against gingivitis as compared with conventional toothpaste in orthodontic patients with fixed appliance. Methods: Sixteen subjects before the application of fixed orthodonitc appliance was selected based on inclusion criteria. They were then randomized using block randomization method and divided into the test group and the control group. Gingival index of Löe and Sillness examined before brackets bonding and two weeks after. Paired t-test was used to compare the differences within the groups and unpaired t-test was used to compare the differences between groups at baseline and two weeks after. Results: There was a tendency of decreasing in gingival index but there were no significant differences between before and after the application of fixed appliance in the herbal toothpaste group. There was a tendency of increasing in gingival index and there were significant differences between before and after the application of fixed appliance in the conventional toothpaste group. There was significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion: There was significant difference between the two grouups, herbal indicates effectiveness in gingivitis control after the application of fixed orthodontic appliance, so it sould be used as an alternative natural based toothpaste in overcoming gigngivitis in orthodontic patients with fixed appliance.

  20. In vitro assessment of competency for different lingual brackets in sliding mechanics

    Lalithapriya, S; Kumaran, N Kurunji; Rajasigamani, K

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the static frictional resistance of different lingual brackets at different second order angulations when coupled with stainless steel (SS) archwire in dry and wet conditions. Materials and Methods: Using a modified jig, frictional resistance was evaluated under different conditions for a total of 270 upper premolar lingual brackets (0.018″ × 0.025″ - conventional - 7th generation and STb, self-ligating – evolution) with no in-built tip or torque together with 0.016″ × 0.022″ straight length SS archwires. For conventional brackets, the archwire was secured with 0.008″ preformed SS short ligature ties. Statistical Analysis: One way analysis of variance with Tukey HSD as post-hoc test was applied for degree wise and bracket wise comparison within dry condition and wet condition. For pair wise comparison Student's t-test was used. Results: Under both conditions the static frictional resistance is significantly higher for self-ligating brackets at 0°, while at 5° and 10° it is higher for 7th generation brackets. Statistically, significant difference does not exist at 0° between conventional brackets and the same was found at 5° and 10° between STb and self-ligating brackets. With an increase in second order angulations, all the evaluated samples exhibited an increased frictional value. Wet condition samples obtained a higher value than their corresponding dry condition. Conclusion: The self-ligating bracket evaluated in this in vitro study is not beneficial in reducing friction during en-mass retraction due to its interactive clip type. PMID:25657988

  1. The Eulerian buckling test for orthodontic wires.

    De Santis, R; Dolci, F; Laino, A; Martina, R; Ambrosio, L; Nicolais, L

    2008-04-01

    Orthodontic treatment is mainly dependent on the loads developed by metal wires. The load developed by a buckled orthodontic wire is of great concern for molar distalization and cannot be simply derived from mechanical properties measured through classical tests (i.e. tensile, torsion, and bending). A novel testing method, based on the Eulerian approach of a simple supported beam, has been developed in order to measure the load due to buckling of orthodontic wires. Elastic titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA; SDS Ormco) and superelastic Nitinol (3M Unitek) and copper nickel-titanium (NiTi; SDS Ormco) wires, each having a rectangular cross section of 0.016 x 0.022 square inches (0.41 x 0.56 mm(2)), were used. The wires were activated and deactivated by loading and unloading. In order to analyse thermo-mechanical properties in buckling, mechanical tests were assisted by calorimetric measurements through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Statistical analysis to determine differences between the samples was undertaken using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test, and one-way ANOVA to assess differences between the tested wires under similar conditions and different materials. The results suggest that the load due to buckling depends on material composition, wire length, the amount of activation, temperature, and deformation rate. The results can be considered as the lower bound for the loads experienced by teeth as far as a buckled wire is concerned. At a temperature higher than the austenite finish transition temperature, superelastic wires were strongly dependent on temperature and deformation rate. The effect due to an increase of deformation rate was similar to that of a decrease of temperature. Load variations due to temperature of a superelastic wire with a length of 20 mm were estimated to be approximately 4 g/degrees C. The high performance of an applied superelastic wire may be related to the high dynamics of the load in relation to temperature. PMID:18263890

  2. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment

    Hassan, Ali H.; Al-Saeed, Samar H.; Al-Maghlouth, Basma A.; Bahammam, Maha A.; Linjawi, Amal I.; El-Bialy, Tarek H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature to assess the quality of evidence related to corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment (CAOT) as adjunctive treatment in orthodontics. Methods: The study was conducted in the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between 2013 and 2014. Various electronic databases were searched and abstracts were retrieved. Defined inclusion criteria were then applied to the obtained original articles for further evaluation by 2 examiners independently. The criteria of selection included human, or animal studies, which assessed some aspects of CAOT and/or the biological principles behind it. Case reports and series were excluded. The quality of the studies was evaluated by the methodological score for clinical trials developed. Results: Fourteen articles were retrieved initially, but only 12 articles were finally selected for the study. The CAOT was found to accelerate tooth movement by 2-2.5 folds when compared with conventional orthodontic tooth movement. The CAOT was found safe on periodontal health and exhibits no or little risk of root resorption. A localized turnover of alveolar spongiosa and the absence of a hyalinized zone was the acceptable biological explanation of CAOT. There is no evidence to support that CAOT enhances the movement of ankylosed teeth, closing old extraction sites, post-orthodontic stability, or transverse expansion. Conclusions: Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment should be considered with caution. Long term randomized clinical trials are still needed. PMID:26108582

  3. Corrosion of weldments in orthodontic appliances

    The study of corrosion-related problems of dental materials has undergone a considerable development in recent years in order to avoid the use of materials with insufficient corrosion resistance in patients mouth. The subject of the present work was to study a particular type of corrosion: galvanic corrosion. One of the most common case of galvanic couples in patients mouth are the orthodontic appliances. The materials studied in the present work were stainless steel strips and silver-copper wires, isolated and welded between them. The electrochemical tests were performed in a NaCl 0.1M and Lactic Acid 0.1 M solution (pH2.3), and after test, the specimens were observed using the optical and scanning electron microscope. The results show that when stainless steel is coupled with a silver solder, the last is the anode of the galvanic couple. As a consequence of this, the silver solder undergone a severe attack. Stainless steel orthodontic appliances with silver solder are feasibly destroyed due to a severe attack on the filler metal disjoining the welded parts. (author) 9 refs

  4. Surface topography, hardness, and frictional properties of GFRP for esthetic orthodontic wires.

    Inami, Toshihiro; Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Shibata, Yo; Nishiyama, Norihiro; Kasai, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, glass-fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRPs) made from polycarbonate and glass fiber for esthetic orthodontic wires were prepared by using pultrusion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the surface topography, hardness, and frictional properties of GFRPs. To investigate how fiber diameter affects surface properties, GFRP round wires with a diameter of 0.45 mm (0.018 in.) were prepared incorporating either 13 μm (GFRP-13) or 7 μm (GFRP-7) glass fibers. As controls, stainless steel (SS), cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy, β-titanium (β-Ti) alloy, and nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) alloy were also evaluated. Under scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy, the β-Ti samples exhibited greater surface roughness than the other metallic wires and the GFRP wires. The dynamic hardness and elastic modulus of GFRP wires obtained by the dynamic micro-indentation method were much lower than those of metallic wires (p brackets of GFRP-13 and GFRP-7 were 3.45 ± 0.49 and 3.60 ± 0.38 N, respectively; frictional forces against the ceramic brackets of GFRP-13 and GFRP-7 were 3.39 ± 0.58 and 3.87 ± 0.48 N, respectively. For both bracket types, frictional forces of GFRP wires and Ni-Ti wire were nearly half as low as those of SS, Co-Cr, and β-Ti wires. In conclusion, there was no significant difference in surface properties between GFRP-13 and GFRP-7; presumably because both share the same polycarbonate matrix. We expect that GFRP wires will deliver superior sliding mechanics with low frictional resistance between the wire and bracket during orthodontic treatment. PMID:25631358

  5. Heat Exchanger Support Bracket Design Calculations

    This engineering note documents the design of the heat exchanger support brackets. The heat exchanger is roughly 40 feet long, 22 inches in diameter and weighs 6750 pounds. It will be mounted on two identical support brackets that are anchored to a concrete wall. The design calculations were done for one bracket supporting the full weight of the heat exchanger, rounded up to 6800 pounds. The design follows the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of steel construction, Eighth edition. All calculated stresses and loads on welds were below allowables.

  6. Longitudinal tibial epiphyseal bracket in Nievergelt syndrome

    A patient is described with lower extremity mesomelic dwarfism associated with bilateral congenital elbow, hip, and knee dislocations. Rhomboid-shaped tibiae and delayed ossification of the primary fibular ossification centers were demonstrated at birth. Plain films and magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the tibial deformities were due to the presence of longitudinal epiphyseal brackets. These brackets were observed at surgery and confirmed histologically. Recognition of the longitudinal epiphyseal bracket and its relationship to the tibial deformities seen in this patient with Nievergelt syndrome is important for planning surgical treatment. (orig.)

  7. Orthodontic bonded retainers.

    Butler, Jonathan; Dowling, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Retention is usually necessary following orthodontic treatment to overcome the elastic recoil of the periodontal supporting fibres and to allow remodelling of the alveolar bone. The degree of change is variable and largely unpredictable. Bonded lingual retainers have been shown to be an effective means of retaining aligned anterior teeth in the post-treatment position in the long term. Two basic designs of lingual bonded retainers are currently in use. Rigid mandibular canine-to-canine retainers are attached to the canines only. They are effective in maintaining intercanine width but less so in preventing individual tooth rotations. Flexible spiral wire retainers are bonded to each tooth in the segment, their flexibility allowing for physiological movement of the teeth. This design is more effective at preventing rotation of the bonded teeth. Failure of bonded retainers may occur at the wire-composite interface, at the adhesive-enamel interface or as a stress fracture of the wire. Failure of a retainer may lead to unwanted tooth movement. In many cases it will be possible to repair the appliance in the mouth. However, in some instances it will be necessary to replace the retainer. A disadvantage of fixed retainers is that they complicate oral hygiene procedures, and favour the accumulation of plaque and calculus. Despite this, the presence of a bonded retainer appears to cause no increase in incidence of caries or periodontal disease. Use of interdental cleaning aids is required to ensure adequate oral hygiene. PMID:15789987

  8. Speedy orthodontics: a case report.

    Krishnan, K V; Kumaran, N Kurunji; Rajasigamani, K; Vijay, V; Rajaram, R S; Bhaskar, V

    2013-01-01

    Management of severe rotation poses a great challenge for the orthodontist, especially when cortical anchorage occurs. The conventional methods require excessive treatment time, rely on patient compliance, and can cause root resorption. A groundbreaking new procedure developed by Wilcko et al, which is actually a modification of the conventional corticotomy procedure, amalgamates the orthodontic mechanics, alveolar decortications, and augmentation procedure to make treatment time three to four times faster than conventional orthodontic techniques. This procedure uses the dynamics of bone physiology and redirects the emphasis in tooth movement to the manner in which supporting bone responds to orthodontic forces applied to the tooth. This article includes a case report in which the technique is used on a patient who has a severely rotated mandibular left canine. PMID:23646344

  9. Metal Hypersensitivity in Orthodontic Patients

    Sandhya Maheshwari Sanjeev K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment of individuals with metal hypersensitivity is a matter of concern for the orthodontist. Orthodontic appliances contain metals like Nickel, Cobalt and Chromium etc. Metals may cause allergic reactions and are known as allergens. Reaction to these metals is due to biodegradation of metals in the oral cavity. This may lead to the formation of corrosion products and their exposure to the patient. Nickel is the most common metal to cause hypersensitivity reaction. Chromium ranks second among the metals, known to trigger allergic reactions. The adverse biological reactions to these metals may include hypersensitivity, dermatitis and asthma. In addition, a significant carcinogenic and mutagenic potential has been demonstrated. The orthodontist must be familiar with the best possible alternative treatment modalities to provide the safest, most effective care possible in these cases. The present article focuses on the issue of metal hypersensitivity and its management in orthodontic

  10. NSAIDs in orthodontic tooth movement

    Muthukumar Karthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response toward a mechanical force. The movement is induced by prolonged application of controlled mechanical forces, which create pressure and tension zones in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing remodeling of tooth sockets. Orthodontists often prescribe drugs to manage pain from force application to biologic tissues. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the drugs usually prescribed. NSAIDs block prostaglandin synthesis and result in slower tooth movement. Prostaglandins have been found to play a direct role in bone resorption. Aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, vadecoxib, and celecoxib are the commonly prescribed drugs. Acetaminophen is the drug of choice for orthodontic pain without affecting orthodontic tooth movement.

  11. The correlation between pain perception among patients with six different orthodontic archwires and the degree of dental crowding

    Marković Evgenija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Forces generated in orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances create tension and compression zones in the periodontal ligament resulting in a painful experience for patients. In the first phase of orthodontic treatment, when leveling of teeth is needed, nickel-titanium (NiTi archwires can be completely engaged in brackets, even in the cases of extreme crowding, exerting small forces. There is a great individual variation in the pain perception related to the application of orthodontic forces. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the pain perception among patients with dental crowding after insertion of six different NiTi orthodontic archwires as a part of fixed appliances in the first stage of orthodontic treatment. Methods. The study was conducted on a sample of 189 orthodontic patients receiving one of six different either superelastic or heat activated NiTi archwires, in the first phase of orthodontic treatment. Pain perception was evaluated in groups of patients with different degree of crowding. The modified McGill Pain Questionnaire with Visual Analogue Scale was used to evaluate the quality and intensity of pain. Statistical analysis was performed using simple descriptive statistics, and Pearson`s chi-square test with statistical significance of p<0.05. Results. Majority of patients reported pain as discomfort or pressure of moderate intensity caused by chewing or biting, started within 12 hours, carried on for 3-4 days, and decreased over time without self-medication. Conclusion. No correlation was found between pain perception among patients with different types of NiTi archwires and the degree of crowding.

  12. Periodontal status of Pakistani orthodontic patients

    Yousuf MOOSA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the periodontal status of orthodontic patients and non-orthodontic patients, aged 15–28 years, of both genders. The cross-sectional study included 100 orthodontic and 100 non-orthodontic patients evaluated using a Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need (CPITN probe on the index teeth. A questionnaire was distributed to the participants to assess and evaluate the use of oral hygiene aids. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 17, and various comparisons were performed using the chi-square test. The study revealed that there was a statistically significant association in CPITN scores between the orthodontic and non-orthodontic patients (p < 0.01. The study showed that patients undergoing orthodontic treatment have increased plaque accumulation and probing depth resulting in periodontal tissue destruction. Proper oral hygiene practices and interdental aids should be employed to control plaque.

  13. Mechanical and topographic evaluation of esthetic brackets and its relation to frictional resistance

    Vikram Pai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the frictional characteristics of conventional ceramic versus metal insert ceramic brackets in combination with stainless steel and Teflon-coated stainless steel archwires. Materials and Methods: Twenty brackets each, of ceramic and metal insert ceramic Maxillary canine preadjusted edgewise brackets 0.022 × 0.028 in slot and 20 archwires, each of stainless steel and Teflon-coated stainless steel (0.019 × 0.025 in were tested for frictional resistance. Friction was evaluated in a simulated Tidy′s design apparatus on universal testing machine. The kinetic friction data were analyzed using Student′s ′t′ test. The effects of surface characteristics on frictional resistance were qualitatively assessed using scanning electron microscope. Results: Metal insert ceramic brackets generated significantly lower kinetic frictional resistance than the conventional ceramic brackets with Teflon-coated stainless steel archwires (P < 0.001 as well as stainless steel archwires (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Metal insert ceramic bracket with stainless steel archwire is the best possible combination among the materials studied because it generated the least frictional resistance during simulated tooth movement.

  14. Effect of fixed orthodontic appliances on salivary microbial parameters at 6 months: a controlled observational study

    Delphine MARET

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the microbial changes in children with fixed orthodontic appliances compared with a control group of children without orthodontic treatment. Material and Methods: Ninety-five children, aged between 12 and 16 years, participated in this study. Forty-eight subjects were fitted with fixed orthodontic appliances and forty-seven were free of any such appliances. The follow-up was 6 months for all children. The association between orthodontic appliances and high levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp was assessed with logistic regression models, taking age, sex, pH and buffer capacity into account. Results: Differences at baseline between the two groups were not statistically significant. We found that wearing a fixed orthodontic appliance was associated with high levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp (adjusted OR: 6.65, 95% CI [1.98-22.37]; 9.49, 95% CI [2.57-35.07], respectively, independently of other variables. Conclusion: The originality of the present epidemiological study was to evaluate the evolution of salivary microbial parameters in a population of children with fixed orthodontic appliances. Our results show an increase of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp values during the follow-up. The whole dental workforce should be aware that preventive measures are of paramount importance during orthodontic treatment.

  15. Genotoxic evaluation of orthodontic bonding adhesives exposed to electron beam irradiation: an in vitro study

    To evaluate the in vitro genotoxicity of two orthodontic adhesives and to determine the type of cell death they induce on human lymphocytes after exposing to Electron Beam Irradiation. The materials tested were 1. Light cure orthodontic adhesive with conventional primer (Transbond XT3M) and 2. Self cure orthodontic adhesive (Unite, 3M). Cured sterile individual masses were immersed in Phosphate Buffer saline and left at 370℃ for 24 h. Then a volume of 200 μL of the extract medium was mixed with human peripheral blood lymphocyte tested for comet assay by single cell DNA damage assay and apoptosis by DNA diffusion agar assay. The results showed all parameters studied by comet assay were significant (P>0.05). In case of apoptosis, light cure orthodontic adhesive (188.92±55.05) and self cure orthodontic adhesives (255.23±76.43) showed increased diffusion of DNA compared to normal lymphocyte (111.22±8.78). However the level of DNA diffusion was not significantly different between the two adhesives. Light cure orthodontic and self cure orthodontic adhesives were induced apoptosis. Both the adhesives had no significant effect on the percentage of DNA tail and olive tail moment. (author)

  16. Evaluation of frictional forces between ceramic brackets and archwires of different alloys compared with metal brackets

    Ariana Pulido Guerrero

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, frictional forces produced by ceramic brackets and arch wires of different alloys. Frictional tests were performed on three ceramic brackets: monocrystalline (Inspire ICE, polycrystalline (InVu, polycrystalline with metal slot (Clarity, and one stainless steel bracket (Dyna-Lock. Thirty brackets of each were tested, all with .022" slots, in combination with stainless steel and nickel-titanium wires .019" × .025", at 0° and 10° angulation, in artificial saliva. Arch wires were pulled through the slots at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. There were statistically significant differences between the groups of brackets and wires studied (p < .05. The polycrystalline brackets with metal slots had values similar to those of conventional polycrystalline brackets, and the monocrystalline brackets had the highest frictional forces. The nickel-titanium wires produced the lowest friction. The addition of metal slots in the polycrystalline brackets did not significantly decrease frictional values. Nickel-titanium wires produced lower friction than those of stainless steel.

  17. Bihamiltonian Cohomology of KdV Brackets

    Carlet, Guido; Posthuma, Hessel; Shadrin, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    Using spectral sequences techniques we compute the bihamiltonian cohomology groups of the pencil of Poisson brackets of dispersionless KdV hierarchy. In particular, this proves a conjecture of Liu and Zhang about the vanishing of such cohomology groups.

  18. Linear odd Poisson bracket on Grassmann variables

    A linear odd Poisson bracket (antibracket) realized solely in terms of Grassmann variables is suggested. It is revealed that the bracket, which corresponds to a semi-simple Lie group, has at once three Grassmann-odd nilpotent Δ-like differential operators of the first, the second and the third orders with respect to Grassmann derivatives, in contrast with the canonical odd Poisson bracket having the only Grassmann-odd nilpotent differential Δ-operator of the second order. It is shown that these Δ-like operators together with a Grassmann-odd nilpotent Casimir function of this bracket form a finite-dimensional Lie superalgebra. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Bihamiltonian cohomology of KdV brackets

    Carlet, Guido; Posthuma, Hessel; Shadrin, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Using spectral sequences techniques we compute the bihamiltonian cohomology groups of the pencil of Poisson brackets of dispersionless KdV hierarchy. In particular this proves a conjecture of Liu and Zhang about the vanishing of such cohomology groups.

  20. Poisson Bracket on the Space of Histories

    Marolf, D

    1994-01-01

    We extend the Poisson bracket from a Lie bracket of phase space functions to a Lie bracket of functions on the space of canonical histories and investigate the resulting algebras. Typically, such extensions define corresponding Lie algebras on the space of Lagrangian histories via pull back to a space of partial solutions. These are the same spaces of histories studied with regard to path integration and decoherence. Such spaces of histories are familiar from path integration and some studies of decoherence. For gauge systems, we extend both the canonical and reduced Poisson brackets to the full space of histories. We then comment on the use of such algebras in time reparameterization invariant systems and systems with a Gribov ambiguity, though our main goal is to introduce concepts and techniques for use in a companion paper.

  1. A study of a novel aesthetic archwire on its frictional properties and its applications to orthodontics

    Chai Kiat Chng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare sliding friction of prototype 0.018-inch fiber-reinforced polymer composite (FRPC archwire with 0.018-inch nickel titanium archwire using various bracket-arch wire combinations. Materials and Methods: Two wires were tested against four different brackets (3M Gemini Twin bracket; 3M Clarity metal-reinforced ceramic bracket; Ormco Inspire ICE ceramic bracket; and 3M SmartClip using the Universal testing machine to study and compare frictional characteristics. Results: There was no significant difference noted for the frictional wear generated between the various archwire and bracket groups (P = 0.542. No statistical significance was detected within individual archwire-bracket groups. A multiple comparison of groups showed significant difference in frictional wear. Least significance difference multiple comparison revealed statistical significance (P < 0.05 when comparing Gemini-FRPC with ICE-FRPC group. No other groups showed any significant difference. Conclusion: FRPC and NiTi wire show comparable frictional wear when used with ICE, Gemini, Clarity, and SmartClip brackets.

  2. Double Poisson brackets on free associative algebras

    Odesskii, Alexander; Rubtsov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We discuss double Poisson structures in sense of M. Van den Bergh on free associative algebras focusing on the case of quadratic Poisson brackets. We establish their relations with an associative version of Young-Baxter equations, we study a bi-hamiltonian property of the linear-quadratic pencil of the double Poisson structure and propose a classification of the quadratic double Poisson brackets in the case of the algebra with two free generators. Many new examples of quadratic double Poisson...

  3. Linear Odd Poisson Bracket on Grassmann Algebra

    Soroka, Vyacheslav A.

    2000-01-01

    A linear odd Poisson bracket realized solely in terms of Grassmann variables is suggested. It is revealed that with the bracket, corresponding to a semi-simple Lie group, both a Grassmann-odd Casimir function and invariant (with respect to this group) nilpotent differential operators of the first, second and third orders are naturally related and enter into a finite-dimensional Lie superalgebra. A connection of the quantities, forming this Lie superalgebra, with the BRST charge, $\\Delta$-oper...

  4. On the quantization of Nambu brackets

    We present several non-trivial examples of the three-dimensional quantum Nambu bracket which involve square matrices or three-index objects. Our examples satisfy two fundamental properties of the classical Nambu bracket: they are skew-symmetric and they obey the Fundamental Identity. We contrast our approach to the existing literature on the quantum deformations of Nambu mechanics. We also discuss possible applications of our results in M-theory. (author)

  5. Bracketing Numbers of Convex Functions on Polytopes

    Doss, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    We study bracketing numbers for spaces of bounded convex functions in the $L_p$ norms. We impose no Lipschitz constraint. Previous results gave bounds when the domain of the functions is a hyperrectangle. We extend these results to the case wherein the domain is a polytope. Bracketing numbers are crucial quantities for understanding asymptotic behavior for many statistical nonparametric estimators. Our results are of interest in particular in many multidimensional estimation problems based on...

  6. Cone-beam computed tomography evaluation of Pont's index predictability for Malay population in orthodontics

    ALAM, Mohammad Khursheed; Shahid, Fazal; Purmal, Kathiravan; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In orthodontic treatment, three-dimensional (3D) dental casts has a significant role in diagnosis and treatment planning. The aim of this study was to evaluate Pont's index predictability in orthodontics. Materials and Methods: Premolar arch width, molar arch width and mesiodistal width of the maxillary incisors were measured three-dimensionally to assess shape of dental arches. The data source was cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) high volumetric data acquisitions from Malay...

  7. Effect of intrusive and retraction forces in labial and lingual orthodontics: A finite element study

    Rohan Mascarenhas; Ameet V Revankar; Jenny Mary Mathew; Laxmikanth Chatra; Akhter Husain; Satish Shenoy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Lingual orthodontics differs in biomechanics as compared to labial system and has biomechanical advantages. Although theoretical approaches have explained the differences between labial and lingual orthodontics, the finite element method (FEM) may be better suited to analyze these differences. This study analyzes the effect of vertical and horizontal forces together on the tooth using FEM. Materials and Methods: An extracted right maxillary central incisor was radiographed and was...

  8. The Hybrid Aesthetic Functional (HAF) Appliance: A Less Visible Proposal for Functional Orthodontics

    Christos Livas

    2013-01-01

    In modern orthodontics, aesthetics appear to have a decisive influence on orthodontic appliance preferences and acceptability. This paper reports the early application of a newly emerged functional device with enhanced aesthetics in a Class II treatment. Patient perspectives and technical considerations are discussed along with recommendations for further design development. It can be assumed that the use of thermoplastic material-based appliances may meet both the therapeutic and aesthetic d...

  9. The effect of various oral hygiene products on the microbial flora in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Preeti Chauhan; Vinay S Dua; Nitika Kainth; Ashu Tosh; Anshul Tomar

    2015-01-01

    Context: Orthodontic devices lead to significantly greater plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation resulting in a change of gingival flora from cocci and rods to motile organisms like spirochetes. Aims: The aim was to study the effect of various oral hygiene products on the microbial flora in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: The microbial composition of 40 patients, divided into four groups of 10 patients each, was evaluated. Group I patients were prescr...

  10. Discomfort associated with fixed orthodontic appliances: determinant factors and influence on quality of life

    Marques, Leandro Silva; Paiva, Saul Martins de; Vieira-Andrade, Raquel Gonçalves; Pereira, Luciano José; Maria Letícia RAMOS-JORGE

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the determinant factors of discomfort attributed to the use of fixed orthodontic appliance and the effect on the quality of life of adolescents. Material and Methods Two hundred and seventy-two individuals aged between 9 and 18 years old, enrolled in public and private schools and undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance participated in this cross-sectional study. The participants were randomly selected from a sample comprising 62,496 individuals of the s...

  11. Which Factors Affect Dental Esthetics and Smile Attractiveness in Orthodontically Treated Patients?

    Farzaneh Ahrari; Farzin Heravi; Roozbeh Rashed; Mohammad Javad Zarrabi; Yasin Setayesh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to find the factors that affect dental esthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients according to laypeoples judgment, and to determine whether there is any relationship between dental and smile esthetics.Materials and Methods: Using the Q-sort technique, 60 laypersons (30 males, 30 females) rated dental and smile photographs of 48 orthodontically treated patients based on their degree of attractiveness. Dental and smile parameters of eac...

  12. Autoclaving and clinical recycling: Effects on mechanical properties of orthodontic wires

    Oshagh, M.; M R Hematiyan; Y Mohandes; M R Oshagh; L Pishbin

    2012-01-01

    Background: About half of the orthodontists recycle and reuse orthodontic wires because of their costs. So when talking about reuse and sterilization of wires, their effects on mechanical properties of wires should be clarified. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of sterilization and clinical use on mechanical properties of stainless steel wires. Materials and Methods: Thirty stainless steel orthodontic wires were divided into three equal groups of control, autoclave (ster...

  13. A influência da variação da curvatura da base do braquete em uma união ortodôntica submetida a diferentes cargas, através do método dos elementos finitos The influence of the variation of the bracket base curvature in a bonded orthodontic attachment submitted by different load cases using the finite element method

    Cláudio Pereira Viana

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho procurou avaliar, através do Método dos Elementos Finitos, a resistência ao deslocamento de quatro diferentes bases de braquetes "straight-wire" (Morelli, Unitek, A-Company e Abzil-Lancer na aplicação de forças de torção e cisalhamento, correlacionando essa resistência à melhor adaptação das bases à superfície vestibular dentária. As curvaturas das bases de braquetes utilizados no presente estudo foram descritas em um estudo prévio, enquanto o contorno dentário foi obtido a partir do escaneamento e cálculo da curvatura média vestibular do canino inferior de uma amostra de 30 indivíduos brasileiros. Empregou-se a análise tridimensional por Elementos Finitos da interface esmalte vestibular/cimento/base do braquete para cada marca testada. Forças de 1N, promovendo deslocamento lateral e torção, foram aplicadas no centro da base do braquete e observou-se a distribuição desses esforços sobre os modelos assim como as tensões normais e de cisalhamento geradas. Os resultados mostraram que a base que melhor se adaptou à superfície vestibular construída foi a da marca Unitek, seguida pela marca A-Company, Abzil-Lancer e Morelli. As deformações sofridas pelos braquetes foram inversamente proporcionais à adaptação à superfície dentária. Os maiores picos de tensão localizaram-se nas proximidades do ponto de aplicação da força. A interface adesivo/esmalte foi mais sujeita à falha na adesão que a interface braquete/adesivo. A força de cisalhamento demonstrou ser mais provável de causar falha na adesão quando comparada à força de torção.The objective of this study was to evaluate the adaptability of the four straight-wire brackets bases (Morelli, Unitek, A-Company and Abzil-Lancer to facial surface of a lower canine. The lower canine facial curvature data to be used in the three-dimensional finite element model were established by 30 Brazilian adult individuals and the brackets bases curvature used were described in a prior study. The three-dimensional finite element analysis of the interface enamel/cement/base of bracket for each tested mark was used. Loads of 1N promoting lateral displacement and torsion had been applied in the center of the base of brackets and the distribution of these efforts on the models was observed as well as the normal and shear tensions generated. The results had shown that the base that better fit to facial surface was the one from Unitek, followed by the A-Company, Abzil-Lancer and Morelli.The brackets deformations were inversely proportional to its adaptation.The biggest peaks of tensions had been situated near to the point of force application. The cement/enamel interface was more likely to fail in the adhesion that the bracket/cement interface. The torsion load was less likely to cause damage in the adhesion when compared with the shear load.

  14. Effect of pre-strain on microstructure of Ni-Ti orthodontic archwires

    One of the most important applications of shape memory alloy is in medicine, especially orthodontic archwires. In this category Ni-Ti orthodontic archwires is one of the oldest used materials. Biocompatibility, corrosion resistance, super elasticity, etc. are its outstanding properties. In spite of the importance of dependency of pre-strain on microstructure of Ni-Ti there are limited sources concentrated on the subject. For this reason the main purpose of the current study is determination of the effect of pre-strain on microstructure of Ni-Ti orthodontic archwires. In this regard, three-point bending was performed on the orthodontic archwire specimens to apply different amount of strain. The microstructures were compared with the un-strained wire using optical and scanning electron microscopes. The results showed that the stable phase depends strongly on the value of pre-strain. Increasing pre-strain causes to decrease martensite laths and leads the microstructure toward austenite phase

  15. Effect of pre-strain on microstructure of Ni-Ti orthodontic archwires

    Jafari, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Azadi Square, P.O. Box 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zebarjad, S.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Azadi Square, P.O. Box 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Zebarjad@um.ac.ir; Sajjadi, S.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Azadi Square, P.O. Box 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-01-25

    One of the most important applications of shape memory alloy is in medicine, especially orthodontic archwires. In this category Ni-Ti orthodontic archwires is one of the oldest used materials. Biocompatibility, corrosion resistance, super elasticity, etc. are its outstanding properties. In spite of the importance of dependency of pre-strain on microstructure of Ni-Ti there are limited sources concentrated on the subject. For this reason the main purpose of the current study is determination of the effect of pre-strain on microstructure of Ni-Ti orthodontic archwires. In this regard, three-point bending was performed on the orthodontic archwire specimens to apply different amount of strain. The microstructures were compared with the un-strained wire using optical and scanning electron microscopes. The results showed that the stable phase depends strongly on the value of pre-strain. Increasing pre-strain causes to decrease martensite laths and leads the microstructure toward austenite phase.

  16. Body dysmorphic disorder in Iranian orthodontic patients.

    Soghra Yassaei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patient's preoccupations with perceived defect in appearance or excessive concern about minimal flaws are among diagnostic criteria of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD. Sufferers usually seek cosmetic procedures such as orthodontic treatment. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of BDD among a sample of Iranian orthodontic patients. A total of 270 orthodontic patients were evaluated with BDD-YBOCS questionnaire for the diagnosis of BDD. Fifteen patients (5.5% were screened positive for BDD. BDD was more frequent among females, singles and in younger patients. Most of the BDD patients experienced multiple previous orthodontic evaluations. The relative high prevalence of BDD among orthodontic patients in Iran offers that orthodontists should take psychologically based problems such as BDD into account while evaluating patient's orthodontic problems.

  17. Influence of in vitro pigmenting of esthetic orthodontic ligatures on smile attractiveness

    Camila Ferraz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the perception of dental students and orthodontists on the degree of influence that pigmented esthetic elastic ligatures have on smile attractiveness, by judging clinical photographs. METHODS: Sixteen clinical facial photographs of the smile and 16 close up images of the smile of a single patient wearing monocrystalline porcelain orthodontic brackets, Teflon coated NiTi wire brackets and esthetic elastic ligatures of five different commercial brands were distributed into eight groups, G1 to G8 (Morelli®, Ortho Tecnology™, TP Orthodontics™, Unitek/3M™clear, Unitek/3M™ obscure, American Orthodontics™ clear, American Orthodontics™ pearl and American Orthodontics™ metallic pearl. Twenty ligatures were used in each group, totaling 160 ligatures. Half of them were used in their natural state, and the other half after in vitro pigmentation. All the photographs were judged by 40 evaluators, 20 orthodontists and 20 dental students. RESULTS: For orthodontists, American™ pearl (G7 ligatures were those that least influenced the degree of attractiveness of the smile in the two types of photographs used. For the dental students, in the facial photographs of the smile, ligatures with the best performance were Morelli® (G1, American™ clear (G6 and American™ pearl (G7 and in the close up photographs of the smile, American™ pearl, metallic pearl and clear (G7, G8 and G6. CONCLUSIONS: For both orthodontists and dental students, pigmentation of the elastic ligatures had a negative influence on the degree of attractiveness of smiles in the two types of clinical photographs evaluated.OBJETIVO: avaliar, através de fotografias clínicas, entre estudantes de Odontologia e ortodontistas, o grau de influência que ligaduras elásticas estéticas pigmentadas exercem sobre a atratividade do sorriso. MÉTODOS: foram utilizadas 16 fotografias clínicas faciais do sorriso e 16 de sorriso aproximado de um único paciente portando braquetes ortodônticos de porcelana monocristalina, fio de NiTi teflonado e ligaduras elásticas estéticas de cinco marcas comerciais diferentes, distribuídas em oito grupos, G1 a G8 (Morelli, Ortho Technology, TP Orthodontics, 3M/Unitek clear, 3M/Unitek obscure, American Orthodontics clear, American Orthodontics pearl e American Orthodontics metalic pearl. Foram utilizadas 20 ligaduras de cada grupo, totalizando 160 ligaduras. Metade delas foi utilizada em estado natural e a outra metade após pigmentação in vitro. Todas as fotografias foram julgadas por 40 avaliadores, sendo 20 ortodontistas e 20 estudantes de Odontologia. RESULTADOS: para ortodontistas, as ligaduras American Orthodontics pearl (G7 foram as que menos influenciaram o grau de atratividade do sorriso nos dois tipos de fotografias utilizadas. Para os estudantes de Odontologia, nas fotografias faciais do sorriso, as que obtiveram o melhor desempenho foram Morelli (G1, American Orthodontics clear (G6 e American Orthodontics pearl (G7 e, nas fotografias de sorriso aproximado, American Orthodontics pearl, metalic pearl e clear (G7, G8 e G6, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES: tanto para ortodontistas quanto para estudantes de Odontologia, a pigmentação das ligaduras elásticas influenciou de forma negativa o grau de atratividade dos sorrisos nos dois tipos de fotografias clínicas avaliadas.

  18. Orthodontics at a Pivotal Point of Transformation

    MAO, JEREMY J.

    2010-01-01

    The profession of orthodontics is projected to face a multitude of challenges. Do cyclic forces accelerate the rate of tooth movement and hence the speed of orthodontic treatment? Would bioengineered cementum and dentine be a solution to root resorption? What would orthodontics be like when bioengineered periodontal ligament and alveolar bone become clinical practice, or one day, entire teeth are bioengineered? Would it be possible to selectively differentiate stem cells into osteoblasts or o...

  19. Corticotomy-Assisted Orthodontic Treatment: Review

    Hassan, Ali H; Al-Fraidi, Ahmad A; Al-Saeed, Samar H

    2010-01-01

    Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment is an established and efficient orthodontic technique that has recently been studied in a number of publications. It has gradually gained popularity as an adjunct treatment option for the orthodontic treatment of adults. It involves selective alveolar decortication in the form of decortication lines and dots performed around the teeth that are to be moved. It is done to induce a state of increased tissue turnover and a transient osteopenia, whi...

  20. Body dysmorphic disorder in Iranian orthodontic patients.

    Soghra Yassaei; Mahdjoube Goldani Moghadam; Hossein Aghili; Seyed Mahmoud Tabatabaei

    2014-01-01

    Patient's preoccupations with perceived defect in appearance or excessive concern about minimal flaws are among diagnostic criteria of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Sufferers usually seek cosmetic procedures such as orthodontic treatment. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of BDD among a sample of Iranian orthodontic patients. A total of 270 orthodontic patients were evaluated with BDD-YBOCS questionnaire for the diagnosis of BDD. Fifteen patients (5.5%) were screened posit...

  1. Generalized nonholonomic mechanics, servomechanisms and related brackets

    Cendra, H.; Grillo, S.

    2006-02-01

    It is well known that nonholonomic systems obeying D'Alembert's principle are described on the Hamiltonian side, after using the Legendre transformation, by the so-called almost-Poisson brackets. In this paper we define the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian sides of a class of generalized nonholonomic systems (GNHS), obeying a generalized version of D'Alembert's principle, such as rubber wheels (like some simplified models of pneumatic tires) and certain servomechanisms (like the controlled inverted pendulum), and show that corresponding equations of motion can also be described in terms of a bracket. We present essentially all possible brackets in terms of which the mentioned equations can be written down, which include the brackets that appear in the literature, and point out those (if any) that are naturally related to each system. In particular, we show there always exists a Leibniz bracket related to a GNHS, and conversely, that every Leibniz system is a GNHS. The control of the inverted pendulum on a cart is studied as an illustrative example.

  2. REVIEW ON PERIODONTALLY ASSISTED ORTHODONTICS TREATMENT

    Ayesha

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that most of the orthodontic treatments require more time for completion of the treatment. This technique literally accelerates the orthodontic corrections. Periodontally - assisted orthodontic treatment is an established and efficient orthodontic technique that has recently been studied in a number of publications. It has gradually gained popularity as an adjunct treatment option for the orthodontic treatment of adults. It involves selective alveolar decortication in the form of decortication lines and dots performed around the teeth that are to be moved. It is done to induce a state of increased tissue turnover and a transient osteopenia, which is followed by a faster rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Orthodontic treatment time with this technique will be reduced to one-third the time of conventional orthodontics. This technique has several advantages, including faster tooth movement, shorter treatment time, and safer expansion of constricted arches, enhanced post-orthodontic treatment stability and extended envelope of tooth movement. The aim of this article is to present a comprehensive review of the literature, including historical background, contemporary clinical techniques, indications, contraindications, complications and side effects.

  3. Influence of Ortho Primer Morelli adhesion booster on orthodontic brackets shear bond strength

    Sabrina de Mendonça Invernici

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This work aimed at assessing the bond strength (AS, the site of the flaw and the relation between them and Ortho Primer Morelli® (OPM adhesion optimizer. METHODS: Sixty test specimens, made out of bovine permanent lower incisors, were divided into three groups: TXT Primer (control, in which a conventional adhesive system was applied (primer and paste; OPM, in which TXT primer was replaced by OPM; and TXT without Primer, in which only TXT paste was used. A shear force was applied at a speed of 0,5 mm/min. Failure site was assessed by the Remaining Adhesion Index (RAI. RESULTS: Kruskal-Wallis demonstrated that OPM (8.54 ± 1.86 MPa presented a statistically higher AS (p 0.05 between TXT with or without Primer (6.42 ± 2.12 MPa. Regarding the RAI, the K test demonstrated that TXT Primer and OPM (prevailing scores 2 and 3 showed higher values (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: OPM increases AS and presents the same bond failure location if compared to a conventional adhesive system; the use of the TXT adhesive system paste only was shown to have the same AS if compared to conventional systems, except it does not allow to predict the adhesive failure site; there is no correlation between AS and bond failure location, regardless of the use of any adhesion optimizer.

  4. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with halogen and plasma arc light curing

    Mohammad Hossein IndianJPsychiatry

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Using the plasma arc system is superior to other methods due to reduced curing time. Also, since in using the halogen light system, an increase in curing periods from different angles resulted in a significant increase in shear bond strength; it is advisable to apply the halogen light from different angles.

  5. Shadow Hamiltonians, Poisson Brackets, and Gauge Theories

    Kennedy, A D; Clark, M A

    2012-01-01

    Numerical lattice gauge theory computations to generate gauge field configurations including the effects of dynamical fermions are usually carried out using algorithms that require the molecular dynamics evolution of gauge fields using symplectic integrators. Sophisticated integrators are in common use but are hard to optimise, and force-gradient integrators show promise especially for large lattice volumes. We explain why symplectic integrators lead to very efficient Monte Carlo algorithms because they exactly conserve a shadow Hamiltonian. The shadow Hamiltonian may be expanded in terms of Poisson brackets, and can be used to optimize the integrators. We show how this may be done for gauge theories by extending the formulation of Hamiltonian mechanics on Lie groups to include Poisson brackets and shadows, and by giving a general method for the practical computation of forces, force-gradients, and Poisson brackets for gauge theories.

  6. Shadow Hamiltonians, Poisson brackets, and gauge theories

    Kennedy, A. D.; Silva, P. J.; Clark, M. A.

    2013-02-01

    Numerical lattice gauge theory computations to generate gauge field configurations including the effects of dynamical fermions are usually carried out using algorithms that require the molecular dynamics evolution of gauge fields using symplectic integrators. Sophisticated integrators are commonly used but hard to optimize, and force-gradient integrators show promise especially for large lattice volumes. We explain that symplectic integrators lead to very efficient Monte Carlo algorithms because they exactly conserve a shadow Hamiltonian. The shadow Hamiltonian may be expanded in terms of Poisson brackets and can be used to optimize the integrators. We show how this may be done for gauge theories by extending the formulation of Hamiltonian mechanics on Lie groups to include Poisson brackets and shadows and by giving a general method for the practical computation of forces, force gradients, and Poisson brackets for gauge theories.

  7. Effect of different surface treatments for ceramic bracket base on bond strength of rebonded brackets.

    Guarita, Monique Kruger; Moresca, Alexa Helena Köhler; Losso, Estela Maris; Moro, Alexandre; Moresca, Ricardo Cesar; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of rebonded ceramic brackets after subjecting the bracket base to different treatments. Seventy-five premolars were selected and randomly distributed into five groups (n=15), according to the type of the bracket surface treatment: I, no treatment, first bonding (control); II, sandblasting with aluminum oxide; III, sandblasting + silane; IV, silica coating + silane; and V, silicatization performed in a laboratory (Rocatec system). The brackets were fixed on an enamel surface with Transbond XT resin without acid etching. The brackets were then removed and their bases were subjected to different treatments. Thereafter, the brackets were fixed again to the enamel surface and the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) test. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was then evaluated for each specimen. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). A statistically significant difference was observed only between Rocatec and the other groups; the Rocatec group showed the lowest SBS values. The highest SBS values were observed for group 1, without any significant difference from the values for groups II, III and IV. Most groups had a higher percentage of failures at the enamel-resin interface (score 1). It was concluded that the surface treatments of rebonded ceramic brackets were effective, with SBS values similar to that of the control group, except Rocatec group. PMID:25672386

  8. NSAIDs in orthodontic tooth movement

    Muthukumar Karthi; Gobichettipalyam Jagtheeswaran Anbuslevan; Kullampalyam Palanisamy Senthilkumar; Senthilkumar Tamizharsi; Subramani Raja; Krishnan Prabhakar

    2012-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response toward a mechanical force. The movement is induced by prolonged application of controlled mechanical forces, which create pressure and tension zones in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing remodeling of tooth sockets. Orthodontists often prescribe drugs to manage pain from force application to biologic tissues. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the drugs usually prescribed. NSAIDs block prostaglandin ...

  9. Microbiologically influenced corrosion of orthodontic metallic appliances.

    Kameda, Takashi; Oda, Hirotake; Ohkuma, Kazuo; Sano, Natsuki; Batbayar, Nomintsetseg; Terashima, Yukari; Sato, Soh; Terada, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    Biocorrosion (microbiologically influenced corrosion; MIC) occur in aquatic habitats varying in nutrient content, temperature, stress and pH. The oral environment of organisms, including humans, should be one of the most hospitable for MIC. Corrosion of metallic appliances in the oral region is one cause of metal allergy in patients. In this study, an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer revealed elution of Fe, Cr and Ni from stainless steel (SUS) appliances incubated with oral bacteria. Three-dimensional laser confocal microscopy also revealed that oral bacterial culture promoted increased surface roughness and corrosion pits in SUS appliances. The pH of the supernatant was lowered after co-culture of appliances and oral bacteria in any combinations, but not reached at the level of depassivation pH of their metallic materials. This study showed that Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis which easily created biofilm on the surfaces of teeth and appliances, did corrode orthodontic SUS appliances. PMID:24583645

  10. Shear bond strength of orthodontic buccal tubes to porcelain

    Purmal, Kathiravan; Alam, Mohammad K.; Sukumaran, Prema

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bonding of molar tubes is becoming more popular in orthodontics. Occasionally, these bonding are done on posterior porcelain crowns or bridges. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of buccal tubes on feldspathic porcelain crowns with two different methods. Materials and Methods: Forty porcelain right molar crowns were fabricated for this study. The crowns were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, the crowns were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric a...

  11. In vitro corrosion behavior of lingual orthodontic archwires

    Carlos Suárez; Teresa Vilar; Pablo Sevilla; Javier Gil

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the in vitro electrochemical corrosive behavior of archwires used in lingual orthodontics and the effects on the phase transition temperatures. Materials and Methods. Six different types of archwires of stainless steel, titanium-molybdenum, nickel-titanium and nickel-titanium-copper were used. Corrosion tests were performed following ISO-standard 10993-15:2000. Differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy were used. Results. The stainless steel...

  12. Dirac brackets for the chiral Schwinger model with chiral constraint

    Dirac brackets for the chiral Schwinger model with chiral constraint are derived perturbatively from the correlation function by the BJL limit method. The results show that the Poissons brackets are not consistent in this theory. (author)

  13. Faddeev-Jackiw brackets and quantization conditions of constrained systems

    Müller-Kirsten, H. J. W.; Zhang, Jian-zu

    1995-02-01

    The correspondence between the Faddeev-Jackiw brackets and the quantization conditions of constrained systems is clarified: Only in the reduced phase space of the independent variables do the FJ brackets define the quantization conditions.

  14. Desmistificando os braquetes autoligáveis Demystifying self-ligating brackets

    Renata Sathler

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Atualmente, os braquetes autoligáveis têm sido associados a tratamentos mais rápidos e eficazes, o que desperta a curiosidade em compará-los ao sistema convencional. Ao contrário dos braquetes tradicionais, os autoligáveis não necessitam de ligaduras, sejam elásticas ou metálicas. A literatura é farta em concluir que essa característica diminui, ostensivamente, a resistência do atrito durante as mecânicas de deslize. Além disso, existem alegações sobre a dimimuição da necessidade de extrações e de expansão maxilar com o uso desses acessórios. Portanto, o objetivo dessa revisão de literatura foi buscar os mais novos estudos a respeito dos aparelhos autoligáveis atualmente utilizados nos tratamentos ortodônticos, confirmando ou retificando as especulações vigentes.Currently self-ligating brackets have been associated to faster and more efficient treatments, which arouse the curiosity to compare them to the conventional system. Unlike traditional appliances, self-ligating brackets do not require elastomeric or metal ligatures. The literature is abundant in concluding that this feature decreases, ostensibly, the friction resistance during the sliding mechanics. Moreover, there are reports on minimizing the need of extractions and maxillary expansion using these accessories. Therefore, the purpose of this literature review was to seek the newest studies about the self-ligating brackets currently used in orthodontic treatments, confirming or correcting current speculations.

  15. Microleakage and shear bond strength of orthodontc brackets bonded to hypomineralized enamel following different surface preparations

    Shahabi, Mostafa; Mohamadipour, Hamideh; Moosavi, Horieh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the effects of several conditioning methods on shear bond strength (SBS) and microleakage of orthodontic brackets bonded to demineralized enamel. Study Design: One hundred premolars were selected and immersed in a cariogenic solution for 12 weeks. The teeth were randomly assigned into 5 groups. In groups 1 and 2, the teeth underwent acid etching for 30 and 120 seconds, respectively. In group 3, a combination of laser and acid etching was employed. A self-etch primer (SEP) was applied in group 4 and in group 5, the teeth were exposed to acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 4 minutes before etching. After bracket bonding, the teeth were immersed in methylen blue for 12 hours and then were mounted in acrylic resin. SBS was determined with an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the amount of microleakage under the brackets was assessed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The lowest SBS was related to the SEP group and the highest one was observed in the specimens prepared by APF+acid etching. There was a significant difference in SBS (p=0.009), but not in microleakage (p=0.971) of the study groups. The SBS of the specimens treated with SEP was significantly Lower than the other groups, which were not significantly different from each other. The SEP group displayed a higher frequency of bond failure at the enamel-adhesive interface. Conclusions: Enamel preparation with SEP provided the lowest SBS among the groups. All groups showed some degree of microleakage. There was no significant correlation between SBS and microleakage. Key words:Bond strength, microleakage, bonding, self-etch primer, Er:YAG laser. PMID:24790708

  16. Bonded Bracket Assmebly for Frameless Solar Panels

    Murray, Todd [Rayce Americas, Auburn Hills, MI (United States); Jackson, Nick [Rayce Americas, Auburn Hills, MI (United States); Dupont, Luc [ARaymond Tinnerman Industries, Inc., Brunswick, OH (United States); Moser, Jeff [ARaymond Tinnerman Industries, Inc., Brunswick, OH (United States)

    2013-01-30

    In February 2011 the US Department of Energy announced their new Sunshot Initiative. The Sunshot goal is to reduce the total cost of solar energy systems by about 75 percent before the end of the decade. The DOE estimated that a total installed cost of $$1 per watt for photovoltaic systems would be equivalent to 5-6¢/kilowatt hour (kWh) for energy available from the grid. The DOE also estimated that to meet the $1 per watt goal, PV module costs would need to be reduced to $ .50 per watt, balance of systems costs would need to be reduced to $.40 per watt, and power electronic costs would need to reach $.10 per watt. To address the BOS balance of systems cost component of the $1 per watt goal, the DOE announced a funding opportunity called (BOS-X) Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reductions. The DOE identified eight areas within the total BOS costs: 1) installation labor, 2) installation materials, 3) installation overhead and profit, 4) tracker, 5) permitting and commissioning, 6) site preparation, 7) land acquisition, 8) sales tax. The BOS-X funding announcement requested applications in four specific topics;Topic 1: Transformational Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) Modules; Topic 2: Roof and Ground Mount Innovations; Topic 3: Transformational Photovoltaic System Designs; and Topic 4: Development of New Wind Load Codes for PV Systems.The application submitted by ARaymond Tinnerman reflected the requirements listed in Topic #2, Roof and Ground Mount Innovations. The goal of topic #2 was to develop technologies that would result in the extreme reduction of material and labor costs associated with applications that require physical connections and attachments to roof and ground mount structures. The topics researched in this project included component cost reduction, labor reduction, weight reduction, wiring innovations, and alternative material utilization. The project objectives included; 1) The development of an innovative quick snap bracket assembly that would be bonded to frameless PV modules for commercial rooftop installations; 2) The development of a composite pultruded rail to replace traditional racking materials; 3) In partnership with a roofing company, pilot the certification of a commercial roof to be solar panel compliant, eliminating the need for structural analysis and government oversight resulting in significantly decreased permitting costs; and 4) Reduce the sum of all cost impacts in topic #2 from a baseline total of $2.05/watt to $.34/watt.

  17. CBCT imaging – A boon to orthodontics

    Machado, Genevive L.

    2014-01-01

    The application of innovative technologies in dentistry and orthodontics has been very interesting to observe. The development of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a preferred imaging procedure for comprehensive orthodontic treatment is of particular interest. The information obtained from CBCT imaging provides several substantial advantages. For example, CBCT imaging provides accurate measurements, improves localization of impacted teeth, provides visualization of airway abnormalities,...

  18. Corticotomy facilitated orthodontics: Review of a technique.

    Alghamdi, Ali Saad Thafeed

    2010-01-01

    Corticotomy found to be effective in accelerating orthodontic treatment. The most important factors in the success of this technique is proper case selection and careful surgical and orthodontic treatment. Corticotomy facilitated orthodontics advocated for comprehensive fixed orthodontic appliances in conjunction with full thickness flaps and labial and lingual corticotomies around teeth to be moved. Bone graft should be applied directly over the bone cuts and the flap sutured in place. Tooth movement should be initiated two weeks after the surgery, and every two weeks thereafter by activation of the orthodontic appliance. Orthodontic treatment time with this technique will be reduced to one-third the time of conventional orthodontics. Alveolar augmentation of labial and lingual cortical plates were used in an effort to enhance and strengthen the periodontium, reasoning that the addition of bone to alveolar housing of the teeth, using modern bone grafting techniques, ensures root coverage as the dental arch expanded. Corticotomy facilitated orthodontics is promising procedure but only few cases were reported in the literature. Controlled clinical and histological studies are needed to understand the biology of tooth movement with this procedure, the effect on teeth and bone, post-retention stability, measuring the volume of mature bone formation, and determining the status of the periodontium and roots after treatment. PMID:23960473

  19. An Alternate Approach to the Lie Bracket on Hochschild Cohomology

    Negron, Cris; Witherspoon, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    We define Gerstenhaber's graded Lie bracket directly on complexes other than the bar complex, under some conditions. The Koszul complex of a Koszul algebra in particular satisfies our conditions. As examples we recover the Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket for a polynomial ring and the Gerstenhaber bracket for a group algebra of a cyclic group of prime order.

  20. Courant brackets on noncommutative algebras and omni-Lie algebras

    Uchino, Kyousuke

    2006-01-01

    We define a Courant bracket on an associative algebra using the theory of Hochschild homology, and we introduce the notion of Dirac algebra. We show that the bracket of an omni-Lie algebra is quite a kind of Courant bracket.