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Sample records for oklo natural fission

  1. Isotopic studies relative to the Oklo natural fission reactors

    It has been clearly demonstrated that natural fission reactors operated about 2 109 years ago, in rich uranium one deposits of the Oklo mine in the Republique of Gabon. Six reactions zones have been identified in which approximately six tons of 235U were consumed and the same amount of fission products deposited in the ground. These fission products, their filiation isotopes and nuclei formed from neutron captures are precious tracers, which now can be analysed on well localized samples, to obtain informations on the stability in soil of such elements and data on the nuclear parameters and characteristics of the nuclear reactors. The studies which have been developed at Saclay concern several aspects of this phenomenon: the migrations of fission products, the age of the nuclear reaction, the date of the uranium deposit and the temperature of the reaction zones during the operation of the reactors

  2. Fission yields of molybdenum in the Oklo natural reactor

    The isotopic compositions of molybdenum in six uranium-rich samples from the Oklo Zone 9 natural reactor were accurately measured by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The samples were subjected to an ion exchange separation process that removed the isobaric elements zirconium and ruthenium, with high efficiency and a low blank. Molybdenum possesses seven isotopes of which 92,94,96Mo are unaffected by the fission process, enabling the raw data to be corrected for isotope fractionation by normalising to 92Mo/96Mo, and to use 94Mo to correct for the primordial component in each of the fission-produced isotopes. This enables the relative fission yields of Mo to be calculated from the isotopic composition measurements, to give cumulative fission yields of 1:0.941:0.936:1.025 for 95,97,98,100Mo, respectively. These data demonstrate that the most important nuclear process involved in reactor Zone 9 was the thermal neutron fission of 235U. The consistency of the relative cumulative fission yields of all six samples from different locations in the reactor, implies that Mo is a mobile element in the uraninite comprising Zone 9, and that a significant fraction of molybdenum was mobilized within the reactor zone and probably escaped from Zone 9, a conclusion in agreement with earlier published work. (author)

  3. Heterogeneity and alteration of uraninite from the natural fission reactor 10 at Oklo, Gabon

    A mineralogical study of uranium ore from reactor zone 10 revealed that uraninite in the natural reactors at Oklo, Gabon, has been altered through partial dissolution, Pb loss, and replacement by coffinite, USiO4.nH2O. The dissolution occurred during formation of the clay mantle surrounding the ore body and was probably caused by hydrothermal saline solutions under reducing conditions. The loss of lead (up to 11 wt%) from uraninite occurred approximately one billion years after the operation of the reactors. As a result, there are two generations of uraninite in the reactor zone that differ in chemical composition and unit cell parameters [a1 = 0.5495(2) and a2 = 0.5455(2) nm]. Minor coffinitization of uraninite has also occurred. Thus, the Oklo deposit has been altered since the event of nuclear criticality. This provides several distinct geochemical environments in which one may analyze the corrosion of uraninite and the subsequent retention or migration of fission products. (author). 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  4. Oklo natural reactors: geological and geochemical conditions

    Published as well as unpublished material on the Oklo natural reactors in Gabon was evaluated with regard to the long-term aspects of nuclear waste disposal. Even though the vast data base available at present can provide only a site specific description of the phenomenon, already this material gives relevant information on plutonium retention, metamictization, fission product release, hydrogeochemical stability and migration of fission products. Generalized conclusions applicable to other nuclear waste repository would require the quantitative reconstruction of t s coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical processes. This could be achieved by studying the deviations in the 2H/1H and 18O/16O ratios of minerals at Oklo. A further generalization of the findings from Oklo could be realized by examining the newly-discovered reactor zone 10, which was active under very different thermal conditions than the other reactors. 205 refs

  5. Oklo natural fission reactor program. Progress report, April 1-August 31, 1980

    Curtis, D.B. (comp.)

    1980-12-01

    An interim report has been published on the redistribution of uranium, thorium, and lead in samples representing several million cubic meters of sandstone and metamorphosed sediments in the Athabasca Basin which is located in the northwest corner of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. The region of study includes zones of uranium mineralization at Key Lake. Mineralization occurs at the unconformity between the Athabasca sandstone and the underlying metasediments and in fault zones within the metasediments. Lead isotopes record a radiometric age of 1300 +- 150 m.y. in samples from above and below the unconformity. This age probably reflects the time of deposition of the sandstones and an associated redistribution of uranium and/or lead in the underlying rocks. Many of the samples have been fractionated with respect to radiogenic lead and the actinide parent elements since that time. Sandstones and altered rocks from the region above the unconformity have been a transport path and are a repository for lead. In contrast, mineralized rocks are deficient in radiogenic lead and must be an important source of lead in the local geologic environment. Samples from Oklo reactor zone 9 and nearby host rocks have been prepared for isotopic analyses of ruthenium, molybdenum, uranium and lead.

  6. Inception and evolution of Oklo natural nuclear reactors; Genese et evolution des reacteurs nucleaires fossiles d'Oklo

    Bentridi, Salah-Eddine [UMR 7517, laboratoire d' hydrologie et de geochimie de Strasbourg, CNRS/universite de Strasbourg, 1, rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Laboratoire de l' energie et des systemes intelligents, CUKM, route de Theniet, El-Hed 44225 (Algeria); Gall, Benoit [UMR 7178, institut pluridisciplinaire Hubert-Curien, CNRS-IN2P3/universite de Strasbourg, 23, rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Gauthier-Lafaye, Francois [UMR 7517, laboratoire d' hydrologie et de geochimie de Strasbourg, CNRS/universite de Strasbourg, 1, rue Blessig, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Seghour, Abdeslam [Centre de recherches nucleaires d' Alger - CRNA, 2, boulevard Frantz-Fanon, 16000 Alger (Algeria); Medjadi, Djamel-Eddine [Ecole normale superieure, Vieux-Kouba, 16050 Alger (Algeria)

    2011-11-15

    The occurrence of more than 15 natural nuclear Reactor Zones (RZ) in a geological environment remains a mystery even 40 years after their discovery. The present work gives for the first time an explanation of the chemical and physical processes that caused the start-up of the fission reactions with two opposite processes, uranium enrichments and progressive impoverishment in {sup 235}U. Based on Monte-Carlo neutronics simulations, a solution space was defined taking into account realistic combinations of relevant parameters acting on geological conditions and neutron transport physics. This study explains criticality occurrence, operation, expansion and end of life conditions of Oklo natural nuclear reactors, from the smallest to the biggest ones. (authors)

  7. Recent outputs of the Oklo (Gabon) natural analogue study to nuclear waste disposal

    In the past twenty five years, the natural nuclear reactors of Oklo have been the subject of numerous detailed studies. First investigated for the physical and neutron aspects of the nuclear reaction, they were then reconsidered because they provide a unique opportunity in the world to study the containment of actinides and fission products in a geological formation over a broad timescale (two billion years). Although the sites investigated do not represent a complete analogue of a repository system, many of the processes studied (mass transfer to the surface, transport, migration / retention), the spatial extent of these processes, and the timescales involved, are compatible with processes liable to occur during the lifespan of a repository for the deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. A fresh program was therefore initiated as a European Commission project in 1990, entitled''Oklo as a natural analog for transfer processes in a radioactive waste repository'- phase 7, and then extended by a phase 2 entitled Oklo, Natural Analogue - Behavior of Nuclear Reaction Products in a Natural Environment''. Researches conducted in phase I served to determine the physical conditions of the operation of the natural reactor, reconstruct the geological history of the reactor environment, and decode the behavior of actinides as well as fission products in the surrounding geological formations. Phase N, which ended in June 1999, had three main objectives: i) to assess radionuclide migration and retention processes from the reactor zones to the geological environment, ii) to define the confinement properties and long-term behavior of geological materials; iii) to test models of processes related to radionuclide migration and retention, and eventually to provide suitable data and scenarios for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal. This paper proposes a synthesis of the main outputs of the Oklo project to the performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal, the

  8. Gamma-ray fluxes in Oklo natural reactors

    Gould, C R; Sonzogni, A A; 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.054602

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty in the operating temperatures of Oklo reactor zones impacts the precision of bounds derived for time variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. Improved $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu thermometry has been discussed but its usefulness may be complicated by photo excitation of the isomeric state $^{176m}$Lu by $^{176}$Lu($\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime $) fluorescence. We calculate prompt, delayed and equilibrium $\\gamma$-ray fluxes due to fission of $^{235}$U in pulsed mode operation of Oklo zone RZ10. We use Monte Carlo modeling to calculate the prompt flux. We use improved data libraries to estimate delayed and equilibrium spectra and fluxes. We find $\\gamma$-ray fluxes as a function of energy and derive values for the coefficients $\\lambda_{\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime}$ that describe burn-up of $^{176}$Lu through the isomeric $^{176m}$Lu state. The contribution of the ($\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime $) channel to the $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu isotopic ratio is negligible in comparison to the neutron burn-up channels. Lutetium...

  9. Xenon in oklo al phosphate: implication for operational conditions of natural reactors.

    Meshik, A. P.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Pravdivtseva, O. V.

    2003-04-01

    New data for the Oklo natural reactor (Gabon), obtained by laser microprobe extraction and high precision noble gas mass-spectrometry, confirm our previous findings of large amount of anomalous Xe in U-free Al-phosphate adjacent to uraninite [1]. Compared with known fission spectra, the anomalous Xe is enriched in 132Xe, 131Xe and, to a less extent, 129Xe and 134Xe. It was suggested [1] that the observed Xe anomalies are due to chemical fractionation of Xe from β^ precursors (mainly I and Te) in isobaric decay chains. However, no mechanisms were proposed at that time. In this work, a follow-up to the previous studies, we explore the manner in which these anomalies may be produced. Apparently, under the temperatures present during the active periods of the Oklo reactor (300 - 450^oC), both I and Xe may easily diffuse out of U-oxides. Te in general is less mobile, due to slightly higher ionic radius, and has better retention than I and Xe. When the chain reaction is stopped, the temperature starts dropping and at the certain moment Xe formed from Te starts to retain in the Al-phosphate. Since that moment, accumulation of each Xe isotope must be proportional to decay time of corresponding Te isotope. This may in fact be responsible for the Xe anomalies found in Al-phosphate. 132Te, 131Te and 134Te have different half-lives and therefore ratios of these isotopes will not remain constant after the chain reaction is terminated due to the lack of water. Our calculation demonstrates that to produce the observed Xe anomalies the reactor must have been cycling with about 1frac{3}{4} hour period. Large concentration of fission products found in Al-phosphate also suggests that this material may be suitable for long-term storage of nuclear wastes. We are grateful to Don Bogard and to late Paul K. Kuroda with whom the idea of thermal cycling of Oklo reactor has been discussed. The Oklo sample was provided by Maurice Pagel and Yuri Dymkov. This work is supported by NASA grant

  10. Record of Cycling Operation of the Natural Nuclear Reactor in the Oklo/Okelobondo Area in Gabon

    Meshik, A. P.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Pravdivtseva, O. V.

    2004-10-01

    Using selective laser extraction technique combined with sensitive ion-counting mass spectrometry, we have analyzed the isotopic structure of fission noble gases in U-free La-Ce-Sr-Ca aluminous hydroxy phosphate associated with the 2 billion yr old Oklo natural nuclear reactor. In addition to elevated abundances of fission-produced Zr, Ce, and Sr, we discovered high (up to 0.03 cm3 STP/g) concentrations of fission Xe and Kr, the largest ever observed in any natural material. The specific isotopic structure of xenon in this mineral defines a cycling operation for the reactor with 30-min active pulses separated by 2.5h dormant periods. Thus, nature not only created conditions for self-sustained nuclear chain reactions, but also provided clues on how to retain nuclear wastes, including fission Xe and Kr, and prevent uncontrolled runaway chain reaction.

  11. Record of cycling operation of the natural nuclear reactor in the Oklo/Okelobondo area in Gabon

    Using selective laser extraction technique combined with sensitive ion-counting mass spectrometry, we have analyzed the isotopic structure of fission noble gases in U-free La-Ce-Sr-Ca aluminous hydroxy phosphate associated with the 2 billion yr old Oklo natural nuclear reactor. In addition to elevated abundances of fission-produced Zr, Ce, and Sr, we discovered high (up to 0.03 cm3 STP/g) concentrations of fission Xe and Kr, the largest ever observed in any natural material. The specific isotopic structure of xenon in this mineral defines a cycling operation for the reactor with 30-min active pulses separated by 2.5 h dormant periods. Thus, nature not only created conditions for self-sustained nuclear chain reactions, but also provided clues on how to retain nuclear wastes, including fission Xe and Kr, and prevent uncontrolled runaway chain reaction

  12. Nuclear knowledge drawn from the study of the Oklo phenomenon. Estimation of the age and life of the reactions. Study of the migration of fission products

    The natural fossile reactors of Oklo (Gabon), preserved almost intact for two billion years, represent a field of investigation which is extremely useful and, up to now, unique. The operation of these reactors has deeply transformed the chemical and isotopic composition of the minerals existing in the reaction zones. The chemical and isotopic analysis of the fission products is possible for the first time after the complete decay of the radioactive isotopes. The methods applied or specially developed to estimate the age and life of the nuclear reactions are described. The study of uranium and fission product distribution in the reaction zones enables the migration of fission products stored in sedimentary soils for 1800 million years to be determined

  13. Lutetium thermometry for Oklo natural reactors: a new look at old data

    Gould, C R; 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.024610

    2012-01-01

    Lutetium thermometry has been used to analyze Oklo natural nuclear reactor zones but leads to widely varying and puzzling predictions for the temperatures $T_O$ which in turn impacts bounds on time variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. We revisit results for reactor zone RZ10 in light of new measurements of the isomer branching ratio $B^g$ in $^{175}$Lu neutron capture at 5 and 25 keV. We recalculate predictions for $T_O$ as a function of $B^g$ using realistic models of the Oklo neutron flux. We find $T_O = 100 \\pm 30$ C using a new value of $B^g$, in contrast to $350 < T_O < 500 $ C using the evaluated value at thermal energy. Lutetium thermometry can be applicable to analyses of Oklo reactor data, but a better measurement of $B^g$ with thermal neutrons is needed to confirm the reliability of temperature predictions.

  14. Search for fission-produced Rb, Sr, Cs and Ba at Oklo

    Five samples from the 2'P' cross-section, Oklo Mine, Gabon have been analysed to determine the isotopic composition of Rb, Sr, and Ba in order to search for the presence of fission-produced isotopes of these elements, as well as 135Ba and 137Ba which may be enriched due to fission-produced Cs. Three of the samples were powders and the other two U-rich segments of core; all five contain abundant total U (40 to 55%) and are depleted in 235U (0.52 to 0.41% of total U). Further, all samples are mixed to various degrees with silicate plus oxide gangue material. Even on the core samples the gangue is present along grain edges, in cracks, and is virtually impossible to separate from the uraninite. Presumably this gangue material is rich in alkali and alkaline earth elements and thus acts as a diluent for any fission-produced material. Rb, Sr, and Ba were separated by ion-exchange chromatographic techniques following cleansing by leaching with HCl and standard HF:HClO4 dissolution and their isotopic compositions determined by mass spectrometric thermionic emission. The leachate fractions of four of the five samples contain more Rb, Sr, and Ba of normal isotopic composition than the insoluble residues for which three of the five samples indicate the presence of fission-produced Cs (now as Ba isotopes) and Rb; further, increasing (135Ba/137Ba) correlates with decreasing (85Rb/87Rb). All five samples indicate the presence of fission-produced 88Sr as reflected in very low (86Sr/88Sr) ratios; available data suggest correlation between increase in fission 88Sr and depletion in 235U. The collective data suggest that fission-produced Rb, Sr, and Cs (now as Ba isotopes) are present in these samples but highly diluted by large amounts of the normal elements. Enrichment in 138Ba has not been demonstrated; which may be attributed to the high Ba content (i.e. 0.2-0.3%). (author)

  15. Lutetium thermometry for Oklo natural reactors: a new look at old data

    Gould, C.R.; Sharapov, E. I.

    2012-01-01

    Lutetium thermometry has been used to analyze Oklo natural nuclear reactor zones but leads to widely varying and puzzling predictions for the temperatures $T_O$ which in turn impacts bounds on time variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. We revisit results for reactor zone RZ10 in light of new measurements of the isomer branching ratio $B^g$ in $^{175}$Lu neutron capture at 5 and 25 keV. We recalculate predictions for $T_O$ as a function of $B^g$ using realistic models of the Oklo ...

  16. Natural fission reactors from Gabon. Contribution to the study of the conditions of stability of a natural radioactive wastes storage site (2 Ga)

    The natural fission reactors of Oklo consists of a core of uraninite (60%) with fission products, embedded in a pure clay matrix. Thus, the aim of geological, mineral, and geochemical studies of the Oklo Reactors is to assess the behaviour of fission products in an artificial waste depository. Previous studies have shown that Reactor Zone 10, located in the Oklo mine, represents an example for an exceptional confinement of fission products since 2 Ga. In reactor Zone 9, located in Oklo open pit, migrations are more important. Reactor ZOne 13 was influenced by a thermal event due to a doleritic intrusion, located some twenty meters far away, one Ga years after fission reaction operations. In this study,we characterized temperature and redox conditions of fluids by using stable isotopes of uraninites and clays. Moreover mineralogical and chemical characteristics were defined. (author)

  17. The neutron balance of the natural reactors at Oklo

    The authors discuss the main parameters determining criticality: the concentration of fissionable nuclei in the uranium; concentration of neutron-capturing nuclei in the gangue; concentration of uranium in the ore and rearrangement of the uranium to form ''critical masses''; amount of water present. Moderation was caused partly by the water of constitution of the clays in the gangue. Examination of the available data indicates that criticality could quite well have been achieved. A computer code (BINOCLE) was written for handling the neutron physics problems raised by the natural reactors. This very simple code, which can nevertheless handle the important points in sufficient detail, is well suited for describing the ores, providing a clear breakdown of the neutron balance and the quantities necessary for interpreting the analyses. It is designed to serve as a subprogram to a series of other codes: one-dimensional criticality; point evolution; spatial evolution; consideration of thermal transfers. Results showing the role of the main parameters are presented. The physical quantities measured by fission-product analysis are also found: proportions of fast fissions; conversion coefficient; spectral indices

  18. Knowledge gained from the study of natural fossil reactors at Oklo for radioactive waste disposal

    The natural reactors of Oklo operated about two thousand million years ago and since then the uranium has remained in place almost in its entirety; this remarkable state of preservation has made it possible to make some interesting observations regarding the containment or, conversely, the dispersion of fission-produced or radiogenic elements in the ground. The geological environment of the reactors is described briefly; the most important fact is that the thermal convection currents associated with the heat release from nuclear reactions have completely desilicated the sandstones which contained uranium, thereby forming argillaceous lenses. The behaviour of the elements studied is described, these being classified into three categories according to their geochemical stability: (1) Elements that have been almost entirely preserved apart from occasional small redistributions. These are mainly the rare earths, zirconium, the elements of platinum ore (Ru, Rh and Pd) and radiogenic thorium. It is moreover fairly certain that the plutonium remained intact in the uranium before decaying; (2) Elements that have migrated but still exist in considerable quantities, notably radiogenic lead and bismuth and molybdenum; and (3) Elements that have been practically eliminated apart from small traces. These are the rare gases (Kr and Xe), iodine, cadmium, the alkali metals (Rb and Cs) and the alkaline-earth metals (Sr and Br). It seems, however, that in certain cases the migration of these elements from uranium may not have been very rapid. The main conclusion to be drawn from these observations is that uraninite was largely responsible for the preservation; it has exhibited a very remarkable retentive capacity, especially for weakly volatile elements having ionic radii compatible with its crystal lattice. On the other hand, the retentive capacities of argillaceous gangue and of the environment seem to have been rather poor

  19. The Oklo reactors

    The Oklo reactors comprise up to nine 235-U depleted zones in an uranium ore in the Republic of Gabon in West Africa. The depletion in fissile U-235 has been proved to have caused by nuclear chain reactions. The study of the Oklo phenomenon indicates that very efficient retardation mechanisms may operate in nature - at least under special conditions. A closer study of these processes ought to be made to establish the limitations to their occurrence. The Oklo sandstone formation today would probably be considered unacceptable as a host rock for a repository. (EG)

  20. Neutron moderation in the Oklo natural reactor and the time variation of α

    Lamoreaux, S. K.; Torgerson, J. R.

    2004-06-01

    In previous analyses of the Oklo (Gabon) natural reactor to test for a possible time variation of the fine-structure constant α, a Maxwell-Boltzmann low energy neutron spectrum was assumed. We present here an analysis where a more realistic spectrum is employed and show that the most recent isotopic analysis of samples implies a decrease in α, over the last 2×109 years since the reactor was operating, of (αpast-αnow)/α⩾4.5×10-8 (6σ confidence). Issues regarding the interpretation of the shifts of the low energy neutron absorption resonances are discussed.

  1. Neutron Moderation in the Oklo Natural Reactor and the Time Variation of alpha

    Lamoreaux, S K

    2003-01-01

    In the analysis of the Oklo (gabon) natural reactor to test for a possible time variation of the fine structure constant alpha, a Maxwell-Boltzmann low energy neutron spectrum was assumed. We present here an analysis where a more realistic spectrum is employed and show that the most recent isotopic analysis of samples implies a non-zero change in alpha, over the last two billion years since the reactor was operating, of \\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha\\geq 2.2\\times 10^{-7} (6\\sigma confidence). Issues regarding the interpretation of the shifts of the low energy neutron resonances are discussed.

  2. Oklo working group meeting

    Natural analogue studies have been carried out for several years in the framework of the European Community's R and D programme on radioactive waste; and within its recent fourth five-year programme on 'Management and storage of radioactive waste (1990-94)' the Community is participating in the Oklo study, natural analogue for transfer processes in a geological repository. The Oklo project is coordinated by CEA-IPSN (F) and involves laboratories from several CEA directorates (IPSN, DTA and DCC) which collaborate with other institutions from France: CREGU, Nancy; CNRS, Strasbourg and ENSMD, Fontainebleau. Moreover, institutes from non-EC member States are also taking part in the Oklo study. The second joint CEC-CEA progress meeting of the Oklo Working Group was held in April 1992 in Brussels and gave the possibility of reviewing and discussing progress made since its first meeting in February 1991 at CEA in Fontenay-aux-Roses. About 40 participants from 15 laboratories and organizations coming from France, Canada, Gabon, Japan, Sweden and the USA underline the great interest in the ongoing research activities. The meeting focused on the different tasks within the CEC-CEA Oklo project concerning (i) field survey and sampling, (ii) characterization of the source term, (iii) studies of the petrographical and geochemical system, and (iv) studies of the hydrogeological system and hydrodynamic modelling. (author) 17 papers are presented

  3. Thermohydraulic and nuclear modeling of natural fission reactors

    Viggato, Jason Charles

    Experimental verification of proposed nuclear waste storage schemes in geologic repositories is not possible, however, a natural analog exists in the form of ancient natural reactors that existed in uranium-rich ores. Two billion years ago, the enrichment of natural uranium was high enough to allow a sustained chain reaction in the presence of water as a moderator. Several natural reactors occurred in Gabon, Africa and were discovered in the early 1970's. These reactors operated at low power levels for hundreds of thousands of years. Heated water generated from the reactors also leached uranium from the surrounding rock strata and deposited it in the reactor cores. This increased the concentration of uranium in the core over time and served to "refuel" the reactor. This has strong implications in the design of modern geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of accidental fission events in man-made repositories exists and the geologic evidence from Oklo suggests how those events may progress and enhance local concentrations of uranium. Based on a review of the literature, a comprehensive code was developed to model the thermohydraulic behavior and criticality conditions that may have existed in the Oklo reactor core. A two-dimensional numerical model that incorporates modeling of fluid flow, temperatures, and nuclear fission and subsequent heat generation was developed for the Oklo natural reactors. The operating temperatures ranged from about 456 K to about 721 K. Critical reactions were observed for a wide range of concentrations and porosity values (9 to 30 percent UO2 and 10 to 20 percent porosity). Periodic operation occurred in the computer model prediction with UO2 concentrations of 30 percent in the core and 5 percent in the surrounding material. For saturated conditions and 30 percent porosity, the model predicted temperature transients with a period of about 5 hours. Kuroda predicted 3 to 4 hour durations for temperature transients

  4. Two-billion-year-old nuclear reactors: Nature goes fission

    Once it was thought that the isotopic composition of natural uranium was invariant. It was thus surprising in 1972 when French scientists observed small but significant deficiencies of the minor isotope 235U in uranium ore. Subsequent investigations traced the isotopically anomalous material to the Oklo mine in the African Republic of Gabon. In the mine, cubic-dekametre-sized pods of rock were found to contain extraordinary concentrations of uranium, as much as 65%, with as little as half the normal isotopic abundance of 235U. In these rocks, neodymium was found to be deficient in the premordial isotope 142Nd and enriched in the fission-produced isotopes 143-150Nd. The presence of fission products was unambiguous evidence that the 235U deficiencies were the result of sustained nuclear fission. Within the heart of the natural reactors, the fission densities were on the order of 1020 fissions/cm3, producing hundreds of megajoules of energy and tens of microwatts of power per gram of rock. Nature had forestalled man's great discovery of energy production by nuclear fission

  5. Gas, benefits and question marks. The Oklo reactors: 100 % natural. The Kyoto protocol: use it or lose it?. Small hydro power: a great leap forward. The energy mix of South Korea

    This issue of Alternatives newsletter contains a main press-kit about natural gas economics worldwide and 4 articles dealing with the Oklo natural reactor, the Kyoto protocol, the small hydro-power in China, and the energy mix of South Korea: 1 - 'Gas benefits and question marks': The world's most widely distributed fossil fuel, natural gas is also the fastest-growing energy source of the past thirty years. Its position as the fuel of choice in the global energy mix is due in large part to its many domestic and industrial applications. 2 - 'The Oklo reactors: 100% natural': Another look at this extraordinary 2 billion year-old phenomenon in words and pictures: the nuclear fission reaction that created the natural reactors of Gabon. 3 - 'The Kyoto Protocol: use it or lose it?': Nearly eight years after its signature, the Kyoto Protocol is still hotly debated. Two experts give us their views: Spencer Abraham, former U.S. Secretary for Energy, and Jean-Charles Hourcade of CIRED, the international center for research on the environment and development. 4 - 'Small hydro power: a great leap forward': The Chinese government has responded to the need for rural electrification with an aid program for the country's poorest cantons. Enter the small hydro plant in northern Guangxi province. 5 - 'The energy mix of South Korea': Faced with continuing strong economic growth and energy demand, South Korea has multiplied its projects, from hydropower to tidal power to nuclear and even hydrogen in the longer term

  6. Testing for fullerenes in geologic materials: Oklo carbonaceous substances, Karelian shungites, Sudbury Black Tuff

    Mossman, David; Eigendorf, Guenter; Tokaryk, Dennis; Gauthier-Lafaye, François; Guckert, Kristal D.; Melezhik, Victor; Farrow, Catharine E. G.

    2003-03-01

    Fullerenes have been reported from diverse geologic environments since their discovery in shungite from Karelian Russia. Our investigation is prompted by the presence of onionskin-like structures in some carbonaceous substances associated with the fossil nuclear fission reactors of Oklo, Gabon. The same series of extractions and the same instrumental techniques, laser desorption ionization and high-resolution mass spectroscopy (electron-impact mass spectroscopy), were employed to test for fullerenes in samples from three different localities: two sites containing putative fullerenes (Sudbury Basin and Russian Karelia) and one new location (Oklo, Gabon). We confirm the presence of fullerenes (C60 and C70) in the Black Tuff of the Onaping Formation impact breccia in the Sudbury Basin, but we find no evidence of fullerenes in shungite samples from various locations in Russian Karelia. Analysis of carbonaceous substances associated with the natural nuclear fission reactors of Oklo yields no definitive signals for fullerenes. If fullerenes were produced during sustained nuclear fission at Oklo, then they are present below the detection limit (˜100 fmol), or they have destabilized since formation. Contrary to some expectations, geologic occurrences of fullerenes are not commonplace.

  7. Radioactive wastes in Oklo

    The acceptance of the Nuclear Energy as electric power supply implies to give answer to the population on the two main challenges to conquer in the public opinion: the nuclear accidents and the radioactive wastes. Several of the questions that are made on the radioactive wastes, its are the mobility migration of them, the geologic stability of the place where its are deposited and the possible migration toward the aquifer mantels. Since the half lives of the radioactive waste of a Nuclear Reactor are of several hundred of thousands of years, the technical explanations to the previous questions little convince to the public in general. In this work summary the results of the radioactive waste generated in a natural reactor, denominated Oklo effect that took place in Gabon, Africa, it makes several thousands of millions of years, a lot before the man appeared in the Earth. The identification of at least 17 reactors in Oklo it was carried out thanks to the difference in the concentrations of Uranium 235 and 238 prospective, and to the analysis of the non-mobility of the radioactive waste in the site. It was able by this way to determine that the reactors with sizes of hardly some decimeter and powers of around 100 kilowatts were operating in intermittent and spontaneous form for space of 150,000 years, with operation cycles of around 30 minutes. Recent studies have contributed information valuable on the natural confinement of the radioactive waste of the Oklo reactors in matrixes of minerals of aluminum phosphate that caught and immobilized them for thousands of millions of years. This extracted information from the nature contributes guides and it allows 'to verify' the validity of the current proposals on the immobilization of radioactive wastes of a nuclear reactor. This work presents in clear and accessible form to the public in general on the secure 'design', operation, 'decommissioning' and 'storage' of the radioactive waste of the reactors that the nature put

  8. The Oklo phenomenon

    During 1972, research workers of the French Commissariat a I'Energie Atomique made an astonishing discovery: fission chain reactions had been triggered spontaneously in the very remote past within a uranium deposit in Gabon and parts of the deposit had behaved like a modern nuclear reactor for hundreds of thousands of years. Subsequent investigations showed that the reaction sites had remained in a remarkable state of preservation, so that detailed study was possible. he IAEA felt that the Oklo phenomenon would be an excellent subject for international co-operation in fundamental research and agreed to the suggestion of the Gabon Government and the French Commissariat a I'Energie Atomique that a jointly organized symposium be held. The symposium will take place at Franceville, Gabon, from 23 to 27 June 1975. (author)

  9. Oklo as a natural analogue. Reconstruction of ancient fluid circulations using trace-element geochemistry from near to far field

    The natural nuclear reactors located in the Oklo uranium ore deposit (Gabon) represent one of the best analogy of what could be the interaction of a site of radioactive wastes storage with geological medium. It is under this view of natural analogue that reaction zones and uranium ore deposit are studied in part of european program coordinated by C.E.A. The aim of the thesis is to characterize the ancient fluid circulation which have induced some elementary redistributions from near field to far field. Tracing fluid phase geochemistry have been made by study of several mineral populations (apatite, zircon, pyrite chalcopyrite). Fluids escaping from reaction zones during their critically have been identified by isotopic and elementary compositions of apatites located in 'argiles de pile'. Geochemical feature of those fluids have not been founded in the bearing sandstones. Although, mineralogical observations, chemical analysis on whole rocks and analysis of trace elements of zircons and apatites allowed to characterize an early hydrothermal stage which predates criticality in reaction zones. At the scale of uranium ore deposit, study of sulfur allowed to identify several hydrothermal stages. All those stages are later with respect to criticality in reaction zones. The principal fluid circulation stage, present both in pyrites and galena is interpreted as a resulting from mixing between a locally induced fluid and a regional circulation. A second stage is certainly later and correspond to a reworking of lead in galena and precipitation of pyrites and chalcopyrites. (author)

  10. The Oklo bound on the time variation of the fine-structure constant revisited

    Damour, Thibault; Dyson, Freeman

    1996-02-01

    It has been pointed out by Shlyakhter that data from the natural fission reactors which operated about two billion years ago at Oklo (Gabon) had the potential of providing an extremely tight bound on the variability of the fine-structure constant α. We revisit the derivation of such a bound by (i) reanalyzing a large selection of published rare-earth data from Oklo, (ii) critically taking into account the very large uncertainty of the temperature at which the reactors operated, and (iii) connecting in a new way (using isotope shift measurements) the Oklo-derived constraint on a possible shift of thermal neutron-capture resonances with a bound on the time variation of α. Our final (95% C.L.) results are: -0.9 × 10 -7 < ( αOklo - αnow)/ α < 1.2 × 10 -7 and -6.7 × 10 -17yr-1 < αdotaveraged/α < 5.0 × 10 -17yr-1.

  11. The Oklo bound on the time variation of the fine-structure constant revisited

    Damour, Thibault Marie Alban Guillaume; Damour, Thibault; Dyson, Freeman

    1996-01-01

    It has been pointed out by Shlyakhter that data from the natural fission reactors which operated about two billion years ago at Oklo (Gabon) had the potential of providing an extremely tight bound on the variability of the fine-structure constant alpha. We revisit the derivation of such a bound by: (i) reanalyzing a large selection of published rare-earth data from Oklo, (ii) critically taking into account the very large uncertainty of the temperature at which the reactors operated, and (iii) connecting in a new way (using isotope shift measurements) the Oklo-derived constraint on a possible shift of thermal neutron-capture resonances with a bound on the time variation of alpha. Our final (95% C.L.) results are: -0.9 \\times 10^{-7} <(alpha^{Oklo} - alpha^{now})/alpha <1.2\\times 10^{-7} and -6.7 \\times 10^{-17} {yr}^{-1} < {\\dot alpha}^{averaged}/alpha <5.0\\times10^{-17} {yr}^{-1}.

  12. Radioactive wastes in Oklo; Desechos radiactivos en Oklo

    Balcazar, M.; Flores R, J.H.; Pena, P.; Lopez, A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The acceptance of the Nuclear Energy as electric power supply implies to give answer to the population on the two main challenges to conquer in the public opinion: the nuclear accidents and the radioactive wastes. Several of the questions that are made on the radioactive wastes, its are the mobility migration of them, the geologic stability of the place where its are deposited and the possible migration toward the aquifer mantels. Since the half lives of the radioactive waste of a Nuclear Reactor are of several hundred of thousands of years, the technical explanations to the previous questions little convince to the public in general. In this work summary the results of the radioactive waste generated in a natural reactor, denominated Oklo effect that took place in Gabon, Africa, it makes several thousands of millions of years, a lot before the man appeared in the Earth. The identification of at least 17 reactors in Oklo it was carried out thanks to the difference in the concentrations of Uranium 235 and 238 prospective, and to the analysis of the non-mobility of the radioactive waste in the site. It was able by this way to determine that the reactors with sizes of hardly some decimeter and powers of around 100 kilowatts were operating in intermittent and spontaneous form for space of 150,000 years, with operation cycles of around 30 minutes. Recent studies have contributed information valuable on the natural confinement of the radioactive waste of the Oklo reactors in matrixes of minerals of aluminum phosphate that caught and immobilized them for thousands of millions of years. This extracted information from the nature contributes guides and it allows 'to verify' the validity of the current proposals on the immobilization of radioactive wastes of a nuclear reactor. This work presents in clear and accessible form to the public in general on the secure 'design', operation, 'decommissioning' and 'storage' of the radioactive

  13. Far field hydrogeochemistry in the Oklo reactor area (Gabon)

    In the frame of a general study of the Oklo natural reactor, which takes into account the natural analogue aspect, a complete hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical study is undertaken. The partners of this study are the following: - Section de geochimie, CEA (France): P. Toulhoat, J.P. Gallien, P. L'Henoret, V. Moulin (groundwater chemistry and colloids). - Ecole des Mines de Paris (CIG, Fontainebleau) E. Ledoux, I. Gurban (hydrogeology and modelling) - SKB and Conterra AB (Sweden) J.A.T. Smellie, A. Winberg (hydrogeology, isotope geochemistry). The aim of this study is to try to understand and to characterize the possible mobilization of elements or isotopes when groundwaters come in contact with nuclear reaction zones. The first step of the study is presented here, which comprises a general geochemical and hydrodynamical characterization of the site. In this presentation, the site of Bagombe is also mentioned as it has been confirmed as sector in which nuclear fission reactions occurred as in Oklo. (author). 10 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Oklo 2 Billion Years Before Fermi; Les reacteurs naturels d'Oklo (Gabon): 2 milliards d'annees avant Fermi

    Barre, B

    2005-02-15

    The author aims to present the little-known story of the Oklo natural reactors. He recalls the historical aspects of the Oklo reactors discovery by the CEA in 1972, he explains the scientific phenomenon and the interest, notably as a 'natural analogue' for the geological disposal of high level radioactive wastes. (A.L.B.)

  15. Geochemical behaviour study of radionuclides and their radiogenic daughters in the vicinity of Oklo 10 and 13 natural nuclear reactors (Gabon) - Application to high-level radioactive waste disposal

    Since 1981, the discovery of new and almost unaltered natural nuclear reactors in the uranium mine of Oklo (Gabon) renewed the interest of scientific community. Indeed, due to their specific features, these reactors could be extensively investigated as natural analogues to better understand the geochemical processes which may occur in a high level nuclear waste repository. The aim of this PhD thesis is to determine the present distribution of a few radionuclides or their radiogenic daughters initially formed within the reaction zones and to infer their geochemical behaviour, subsequently to the stopping of nuclear reactions. Our study was focused on reactors 10 and 13 and their immediate sandstone surroundings in order to decipher the fate of U, Y and light rare earth elements which are assumed to be chemical analogues of actinides and fission products. Mineralogical observations, chemical and isotopic analyses on bulk rocks, led us to conclude that a part of radionuclides, as well as their daughters, remained confined within the reactions zones, in association with secondary mineral phases, whereas another part migrated towards tbe reactor rims. The radionuclides were concentrated at the reactor border or migrated within the first few metres of the surrounding sandstone, according to the intensity of nuclear reactors and the presence of the so-called 'facies argile de pile' which constitutes an intermediate facies between that of reactor cores and that of the surrounding sandstone. In the latter, long range elemental transfers occurred via fissures. Some of them, contemporaneous to the nuclear reactions drained radionuclides-rich fluids at temperatures of about 150-170 deg. C. More recent fissures, observed only in the environment of reactor 13, have allowed the transport of hotter hydrothermal fluids (about 310 deg. C), likely related to the nearby intrusion of dolerite dyke. The principal implications of this work for the disposal of nuclear wastes

  16. Natural fission reactors in the Franceville basin, Gabon: A review of the conditions and results of a open-quotes critical eventclose quotes in a geologic system

    Natural nuclear fission reactors are only known in two uranium deposits in the world, the Oklo and Bangombe deposits of the Franceville basin: Gabon. Since 1982, five new reactor zones have been discovered in these deposits and studied since 1989 in a cooperative European program. New geological, mineralogical, and geochemical studies have been carried out in order to understand the behavior of the actinides and fission products which have been stored in a geological environment for more than 2.0 Ga years. The Franceville basin and the uranium deposits remained geologically stable over a long period of time. Therefore, the sites of Oklo and Bangombe are well preserved. For the reactors, two main periods of actinide and radionuclides migration have been observed: during the criticality, under P-T conditions of 300 bars and 400-500 degrees C, respectively, and during a distention event which affected the Franceville basin 800 to 900 Ma ago and which was responsible for the intrusion of dolerite dikes close to the reactors. New isotopic analyses on uranium dioxides, clays, and phosphates allow us to determine their respective importance for the retention of fission products. The UO2 matrix appears to be efficient at retaining most actinides and fission products such as REEs, Y, and Zr but not the volatile fission products (Cd, Cs, Xe, and Kr) nor Rb, Sr, and Ba. Some fissiogenic elements such as Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Te could have formed metallic and oxide inclusion in the UO2 matrix which are similar to those observed in artificial spent fuel. Clays and phosphate minerals also appear to have played a role in the retention of fissiogenic REEs and also of Pu. 82 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs

  17. Characterization of near- to far-field ancient migrations around Oklo reaction zones (Gabon) using minerals as geochemical tracers

    We developed a method allowing the identification of ancient fluid circulations through trace-element patterns in hydrothermal minerals. Application of this technique to Oklo nuclear reactors as natural analogues involves apatite and lanthanides for early circulations, and sulfides and chalcophile elements for late events. At least four different fluid generations have been found, and are tentatively assigned to episodes of Oklo site history. (1) Zr- and U-rich fluids predate criticality near reaction zone 10. (2) Isotopic anomalies of lanthanides provide evidence for mobility of fission products during criticality. Up to now, anomalies are restricted to the near field (desilicified zone around reaction zones). (3) A first pyrite stage is focused around reaction zones, up to a few tens of meters. (4) The latest event is most probably of regional extent. Besides direct evidence of fission-product migration, the present study is expected to provide the geological background and geochemical constraints for modelling ancient fluid circulation and consequent element migration near reaction zones. (orig.)

  18. Geochemistry of neo-formed minerals at Oklo (Gabon), geologic history of the Oklo basin: a contribution for the studies of geologic disposals of radioactive wastes

    Oklo uranium ore deposit (Francevillian basin, Gabon) is the unique place in the world where 2000 Ma old fossil nuclear reactors were described. The geological and thermal history of this basin, since 2000 Ma was retraced. Tholeiitic intrusion was 755 ± 83 Ma with Sm-Nd isochron on whole rock and plagioclase and 746 ± 16 Ma old with U-Pb dating on zircons. This event was linked to a pre-Pan-African rifting stage. A green schist facies metamorphism was detected on the granitic rocks of the substratum and seemed to affect the tholeiitic intrusion. Apatite fission tracks dating performed on granitic basement revealed a thermal event between Permian and middle-Jurassic time, linked to the Atlantic ocean opening. Fission track ages distribution suggest a brittle tectonics (T < 60 deg. C) occurred after middle Jurassic times. Geochemical and isotopic studies on apatites and zircons which crystallized on natural nuclear reactors let compare the confinement of these two crystalline structures. These minerals were affected by self-irradiation due to actinide incorporation. U, Pu and fission products (REE, Rb, Sr) were trapped by apatites. Zircons contain fissiogenic REE and radiogenic Ba. Apatites crystallized during the nuclear reactions, zircons at the end of this phenomenon. Isotopic study of tholeiitic intrusion minerals point out fissiogenic Nd and Sm incorporation in clinopyroxenes. This result implies a fissiogenic products remobilization during the tholeiitic intrusion event. (author)

  19. Galena crystallization and the origin of sulfur in the Oklo and Bangombe natural reactors: the effects of ca. 900 Ma thermal event

    Galena in the ca. 1950 Ma old natural fossil fission reactors in Gabon crystallized sometime between 980 Ma and 750 Ma during a period of regional extension and the intrusion of a dolerite dyke swarm. The S isotopic composition of galena, containing radiogenic Pb from uraninite, gives information about the origin of the S. Results from ion microprobe analyses of galena from the reactor zones indicate that S mainly originates from the surrounding sediment. Galena in a thin, altered dolerite dyke also contains non-magmatic S. The presented data gives no positive evidence for the involvement of magmatic S during the ca. 900 Ma galena crystallisation, however, the possibility cannot be ruled out. Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  20. Time-variability of alpha from realistic models of Oklo reactors

    Gould, C R; Lamoreaux, S K

    2006-01-01

    We reanalyze Oklo $^{149}$Sm data using realistic models of the natural nuclear reactors. Disagreements among recent Oklo determinations of the time evolution of $\\alpha$, the electromagnetic fine structure constant, are shown to be due to different reactor models, which led to different neutron spectra used in the calculations. We use known Oklo reactor epithermal spectral indices as criteria for selecting realistic reactor models. Two Oklo reactors, RZ2 and RZ10, were modeled with MCNP. The resulting neutron spectra were used to calculate the change in the $^{149}$Sm effective neutron capture cross section as a function of a possible shift in the energy of the 97.3-meV resonance. We independently deduce ancient $^{149}$Sm effective cross sections, and use these values to set limits on the time-variation of $\\alpha$. Our study resolves a contradictory situation with previous Oklo $\\alpha$-results. Our suggested $2 \\sigma$ bound on a possible time variation of $\\alpha$ over two billion years is stringent: $ -...

  1. The Oklo reactors: five years of exploration of the site

    The main phases of the exploration of the Oklo site since the discovery of the ''reactor'' phenomenon are outlined briefly. Over 180 sampling holes were drilled during the interruption of the mining activities in the sector concerned. Several new zones have been found. Mining was resumed in the second half of 1975, providing an opportunity for highly fruitful geological follow-up work: more precise knowledge was gained of the morphology of the reactors, and very many additional samples were taken. Plant treatment of the ore and the systematic analysis of batches have made it possible to establish a balance of missing uranium-235. A small portion containing sites of intense reaction has been preserved by being anchored to the quarry wall. Mining in this sector has now finished, but new indications of fission have been found, especially in the Okelobondo sector. (author)

  2. Criticality in a high level waste repository. A review of some important factors and an assessment of the lessons that can be learned from the Oklo reactors

    The conditions and scenarios that might allow sufficient 239Pu and/or 235U to accumulate together with enough water to allow for moderation of neutron energies and thereby achieving a state where neutron-induced fission reactions could be sustained at a rate significantly above the natural rate of spontaneous fission is discussed. The uranium deposit in Oklo, Gabon, which was the site of naturally-occurring neutron-induced fission reactions approximately 2000 My ago is described. The chemistry, mineralogy, and conditions of the nuclear reactor operations are reviewed. Results of modelling the conditions for criticality at Oklo are used to estimate the amounts of spent fuel uranium that must be assembled in a favorable geometry in order to produce a similar reactive situation in a geologic repository. The amounts of uranium that must be transported and redeposited to reach a critical configuration are extremely large in relation to those that could be transported under any reasonably achievable conditions. In addition, transport and redeposition scenarios often require opposite chemical characteristics. It is concluded that the likelihood of achieving a critical condition due to accumulation of a critical mass of uranium outside the canisters after disposal is negligible. Criticality inside the canister is rendered impossible by the use of low-solubility materials inside the canisters that fill space and prevent the entry of enough water to allow moderation of neutron energies. Criticality due to plutonium outside the canister can be ruled out because it requires a series of processes, each of which has a vanishingly small probability. 25 refs, 9 tabs, 8 figs

  3. Hydrogeology of the Oklo-Okelobondo site

    This study gives an account of all the hydrogeological data from the Oklo-Okelobondo site obtained so far. This hydrogeological overview has led to the proposal of a hydrodynamic flow pattern for the system and the choice of a study area as a basis for a preliminary modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in the far field. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs

  4. Reconstitution of fluid paleo-circulations and element migrations in the environments of Oklo's natural nuclear reactors (Gabon) and of Tournemire's argillites (France)

    To better characterize the mobilization and migration process in rocks, a petrological and geochemical study of fluid paleo-circulation through fractures has been made in two different sites: (1) The environment of natural nuclear reactors from Proterozoic Oklo uranium ores (Gabon). The Archean basement typical of TTG series and the sandstones-pelites series of the Franceville basin are affected by a fracturing mainly filled by quartz-daphnite-calcite-sulfides and barren ou mineralized bitumens. Three paragenetic stages has been correlated to three regional structural phases. During the first extensional phase, a low saline (1.7-6.5 wt% NaCl), heated in the basement (190-210 deg. C) and impoverished in 18O meteoric recharge is injected into the basin, along major N-S faults. It was responsible of silicification. The circulation of diagenetic brines is able to leach U, Pb, Zr, REEs and P resulting from accessory minerals alteration, at the basin-scale between 2104 Ma and 1719 Ma (Pb/Pb isochrone obtained on galena incorporated in zircons). These brines are responsible of anomalous Th/La ratios (1.8) of FA silicified sandstones higher than those (0.25) of most of Archean and Proterozoic metasediments. They are highly chlorine, calco-sodic ([Cl] > 6 m, from 28 wt% NaCl to 30 wt% CaCl2), equilibrated with carbonate and evaporitic layers of FA sandstones, with low temperatures (130 deg. C) and rich in Ca, Li and Br. They are expulsed laterally due to the compaction of FA sandstones, and upwards along sub-vertical fractures. During the second extensional phase, the mineralization stage, mainly controlled by N-S faults corresponds to a mixing (155-220 deg. C) between the brines, the meteoric recharge and hydrocarbons C9 and C10-rich fluids derived from organic matter maturation in the FB pelites. The interaction of the three fluids is responsible of the mineralization in sandstones and in calcites displaying an organic carbon origin (δ13C=-10 to -15 0/00 vs. PDB). The

  5. Uranium deposits of Gabon and Oklo reactors. Metallogenic model for rich deposits of the lower proterozoic

    The geology of the Franceville basin (Gabon) is examined: stratigraphy, tectonics and geodynamics. The mobile zone of the Ogooue is specially studied: lithology, metamorphism and tectonics, isotopic geochronologic data are given. The different uranium deposits are described. A whole chapter is devoted to the study of Oklo natural nuclear reactor. A metallogenic model is proposed evidencing conditions required for deposit genesis. Tectonics, microstructures sedimentology, organic matter, diagenesis and uraniferous mineralizations are examined

  6. Geochemistry of actinides and fission products in natural aquifer systems

    The progress in the research area of the community project MIRAGE: 'Geochemistry of actinides and fission products in natural aquatic systems' has been reviewed. This programme belongs to a specific research and technical development programme for the European Atomic Energy Community in the field of management and storage of radioactive waste. The review summarizes research progresses in subject areas: complexation with organics, colloid generation in groundwater and basic retention mechanisms in the framework of the migration of radionuclides in the geosphere. The subject areas are being investigated by 23 laboratories under interlaboratory collaborations or independent studies. (orig.)

  7. Implications of the Oklo Phenomenon in a Chiral Approach to Nuclear Matter

    It has been customary to use data from the Oklo natural nuclear reactor to place bounds on the change that has occurred in the electromagnetic fine structure constant α over the last 2 billion years. Alternatively, an analysis could be based on a recently proposed expression for shifts in resonance energies which relates them to changes in both α and the average mq of the u and d current quark masses, and which makes explicit the dependence on mass number A and atomic number Z. (Recent model independent results on hadronic σ -terms suggest sensitivity to the strange quark mass is negligible.) The most sophisticated analysis, to date, of the quark mass term invokes a calculation of the nuclear mean-field within the Walecka model of quantum hadrodynamics. We comment on this study and consider an alternative in which the link to low-energy quantum chromodynamics and its pattern of chiral symmetry-breaking is more readily discernible. Specifically, we investigate the sensitivity to changes in the pion mass Mπ of a single nucleon potential determined by an in-medium chiral perturbation theory (χPT) calculation which includes virtual Δ-excitations. Subject to some reasonable assumptions about low-energy constants, we confirm that the mq-contribution to resonance shifts is enhanced by a factor of 10 or so relative to the α-term and deduce that the Oklo data for Sm imply that |mq(Oklo)−mq(now)|≲10−9 mq(now) . (author)

  8. Technical Application of Nuclear Fission

    Denschlag, J. O.

    The chapter is devoted to the practical application of the fission process, mainly in nuclear reactors. After a historical discussion covering the natural reactors at Oklo and the first attempts to build artificial reactors, the fundamental principles of chain reactions are discussed. In this context chain reactions with fast and thermal neutrons are covered as well as the process of neutron moderation. Criticality concepts (fission factor η, criticality factor k) are discussed as well as reactor kinetics and the role of delayed neutrons. Examples of specific nuclear reactor types are presented briefly: research reactors (TRIGA and ILL High Flux Reactor), and some reactor types used to drive nuclear power stations (pressurized water reactor [PWR], boiling water reactor [BWR], Reaktor Bolshoi Moshchnosti Kanalny [RBMK], fast breeder reactor [FBR]). The new concept of the accelerator-driven systems (ADS) is presented. The principle of fission weapons is outlined. Finally, the nuclear fuel cycle is briefly covered from mining, chemical isolation of the fuel and preparation of the fuel elements to reprocessing the spent fuel and conditioning for deposit in a final repository.

  9. The Nature of Singlet Exciton Fission in Carotenoid Aggregates

    Musser, Andrew J.; Maiuri, Margherita; Brida, Daniele; Cerullo, Giulio; Friend, Richard H.; Clark, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Singlet exciton fission allows the fast and efficient generation of two spin triplet states from one photoexcited singlet. It has the potential to improve organic photovoltaics, enabling efficient coupling to the blue to ultraviolet region of the solar spectrum to capture the energy generally lost as waste heat. However, many questions remain about the underlying fission mechanism. The relation between intermolecular geometry and singlet fission rate and yield is poorly understood and remains...

  10. Dating by fission track method: study of neutron dosimetry with natural uranium thin films

    Fission track dating is described, focalizing the problem of the decay constant for spontaneous fission of 238 U and the use of neutron dosimetry in fission track analysis. Experimental procedures using thin films of natural uranium as neutron dosimeters and its results are presented. The author shows a intercomparison between different thin films and between the dosimetry with thin film and other dosimetries. (M.V.M.). 52 refs, 12 figs, 9 tabs

  11. Migration paths for Oklo reactor products and applications to the problem of geological storage of nuclear wastes

    Escape of the products from the Oklo reactor proceeds, first, by escape from the uraninite (UO2) grains and, second, by transport out of the gangue. Escape from the grain by fission recoil accounts for prompt deposition in the gangue of 5 to 10 percent of the products. Escape by volume diffusion is very slow. The rate of loss by diffusion was highest during the operating period of the reactor and may have been of the order of 10-6 fraction/a for the most volatile elements. The least volatile elements have been retained in the grains. Their diffusion rates are less than 5 x 10-10/a. If similar loss rates can be achieved in synthetic uraninite (or thorianite), the overall rate of transport of most reactor products would be sufficiently limited by diffusion to insure that essentially all of the radioactive species would decay in situ. The principal geochemical requirements for a suitable storage site are those that insure the survival of the UO2 matrix, particularly that the pH and Eh are similar to the values at Oklo. Previous work has demonstrated wide variations in the rates of transport of Oklo products out of the reactor zones. Quantitative or semiquantitative estimates of these rates can be made for those elements which were retained in significant amounts but the estimates become qualitative for the very mobile elements. On a relative scale the losses are lowest in a group of elements including Zr, Nb, Ru, Pd, Ag, Te, the rare earths, Bi, Th, U, and Pu, and are high in a group including Sr, Mo, Ba, Kr, Xe, Rb, and Cs. Retention of the various reactor products varied from greater than or equal to 90 percent down to approximately 0.01 percent

  12. Decontamination of radioactive waste fission products by treated natural clays

    The removal of carrier free long living fission products such as iodine-131, strontium-90 and cesium-137 by treated local clays is successfully achieved with large capacity. Iodine-131 which is difficultly adsorbed has been removed completely by silver treated phosphate clay. Strontium-90 and cesium-137 have been almost removed by adequate heat treating of the clays. The results of column experiments agree well with the authors' batch experiments. (author)

  13. Migration paths for Oklo reactor products and applications to the problem of geological storage of nuclear wastes

    Escape of the products from the Oklo reactor proceeds, first, by escape from the uraninite (UO2) grains and, second, by transport out of the gangue. Escape from the grain by fission recoil accounts for prompt deposition in the gangue of 5-10% of the products. Escape by volume diffusion is very slow. The rate of loss by diffusion was highest during the operating period of the reactor and may have been of the order of 10-6 fraction/a for the most volatile elements. The least volatile elements have been retained in the grains. Their diffusion rates are less than 5x10-10/a. If similar loss rates can be achieved in synthetic uraninite (or thorianite), the overall rate of transport of most reactor products would be sufficiently limited by diffusion to ensure that essentially all the radioactive species would decay in situ. The principal geochemical requirements for a suitable storage site are those that ensure the survival of the UO2 matrix, particularly that the pH and Eh are similar to the values at Oklo. (author)

  14. Chemically fractionated fission-xenon in meteorites and on the earth

    Shukolyukov, Yuri A.; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Meshik, Alexander P.; Vu Minh, Dang; Jordan, Jimmy L.

    1994-07-01

    This is a report on the nature of isotopically anomalous xenon, which has been detected in two Ca-Al-rich inclusions of the Allende carbonaceous chondrite. It is extremely enriched in 132Xe, 129Xe, and to a lesser extent in 131Xe. Similar large excesses of 132Xe as well as of 131Xe, 134Xe, and 129Xe have previously been found in material processed in a natural nuclear reactor (Oklo phenomenon). Excess of these isotopes had also been encountered in MORB-glasses, in an ancient Greenland anorthosite. Thus, this Xe-type, which had previously been termed "alien" ( JORDON et al., 1980a) does not seem to be unique. To determine the origin of "alien" Xe, we analysed Xe (a) in neutron irradiated pitchblende and in the irradiation capsule, (b) in non-irradiated extremely fine-grained pitchblende (so-called Colorado-type deposit), and (c) in sandstone taken from the epicentre of an atomic explosion. In addition, the isotopic composition of xenon released by stepwise degassing and after selective dissolving of rocks from the Oklo natural reactor was determined. The results of these dedicated experiments demonstrate that the formation of alien Xe is due to the migration of the radioactive precursors of the stable isotopes 134Xe, 132Xe, 131Xe, and 129Xe. Due to this reason we now call it CFF-Xe - Chemically Fractionated Fission Xenon. Prerequisites for its formation are the simultaneous prevalence of two conditions: (1) fission (of 238U, 235U, and/ or 244Pu) and (2) a physicochemical environment (temperature, pressure, fluidity) at which the precursors of xenon (mainly Te and I) are mobile. Taking into account the occurrence of xenon in meteorites and terrestrial rocks, not all excesses of 129Xe in mantle rocks and natural gases are necessarily connected with the decay of primordial 129I.

  15. Summary of the mineralogical and petrographic studies of the Oklo ores, their gangues and the country rock

    Observations on the spot and mineralogical studies (reflection and transmission microscopy, X-ray examination, thermal analyses) have shown that the ore in the reaction zones differs from ''normal'' Oklo ore as regards both the nature of the mineralization and the gangue and the country rock. The relationship between the two ore types on one hand and between them and the country rock on the other is studied. Theories concerning the creation of the uraniferous deposit and the effects of subsequent changes due to diagenesis and recent weathering are discussed

  16. Cumulative fission yields of short-lived isotopes under natural-abundance-boron-carbide-moderated neutron spectrum

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Pierson, Bruce; Wittman, Richard S.; Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2015-04-09

    The availability of gamma spectroscopy data on samples containing mixed fission products at short times after irradiation is limited. Due to this limitation, data interpretation methods for gamma spectra of mixed fission product samples, where the individual fission products have not been chemically isolated from interferences, are not well-developed. The limitation is particularly pronounced for fast pooled neutron spectra because of the lack of available fast reactors in the United States. Samples containing the actinide isotopes 233, 235, 238U, 237Np, and 239Pu individually were subjected to a 2$ pulse in the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor. To achieve a fission-energy neutron spectrum, the spectrum was tailored using a natural abundance boron carbide capsule to absorb neutrons in the thermal and epithermal region of the spectrum. Our tailored neutron spectrum is unique to the WSU reactor facility, consisting of a soft fission spectrum that contains some measurable flux in the resonance region. This results in a neutron spectrum at greater than 0.1 keV with an average energy of 70 keV, similar to fast reactor spectra and approaching that of 235U fission. Unique fission product gamma spectra were collected from 4 minutes to 1 week after fission using single-crystal high purity germanium detectors. Cumulative fission product yields measured in the current work generally agree with published fast pooled fission product yield values from ENDF/B-VII, though a bias was noted for 239Pu. The present work contributes to the compilation of energy-resolved fission product yield nuclear data for nuclear forensic purposes.

  17. Neutronic study of an innovative natural uranium–thorium based fusion–fission hybrid energy system

    Highlights: • An innovative fusion-fission hybrid reactor blanket design is presented. • The blanket adopts seed–blanket concept to improve overall neutron economy. • The blanket is designed with two types of modules, i.e. uranium and thorium module. • The reactor could reach multi operating system purpose. - Abstract: An innovative design for a water cooled fusion–fission hybrid reactor (FFHR), aiming at efficiently utilizing natural uranium and thorium resources, is presented. The major objective is to study the feasibility of this concept balanced with multi-purposes, including energy gain, tritium breeding and 233U breeding. In order to improve overall neutron economy of the system, the fission blanket is designed with two types of modules, i.e. the natural uranium modules (U-modules) and thorium modules (Th-modules), which are alternately arranged in the toroidal and poloidal directions of the blanket. This innovative design is based on a simple intuition of neutron distribution: with the alternate geometrical arrangement, energy multiplication by uranium fission, tritium breeding and 233U breeding are performed separately in different sub-zones in the blanket. The uranium modules which has excellent neutron economy under the combined neutron spectrum, plays the dominant role in the energy production, neutron multiplication and tritium breeding. Excess neutrons produced by the uranium modules are then used to drive the thorium modules (which have poor neutron economy) to breed 233U fuel. Therefore, it creates a new free dimension to realize the blanket’s balanced design. The COUPLE code developed by INET of Tsinghua University is used to simulate the neutronic behavior in the blanket. The simulated results show that with the volumetric ratio of thorium modules about 0.4, the balanced design for multi purposes is achievable, with energy multiplication M ⩾ 9, tritium breeding ratio TBR ⩾ 1.05, and at the end of the five years refueling cycle

  18. News on the natural nuclear reactor

    Data characterizing conditions of occurrence and the status of a natural nuclear reactor the remnants of which are discovered in the ore open pit of the Oklo deposit (Gabon) are presented. Transport of alkali earth elements (Rb, Sr, Cs and Ba) as well as Pd, Ag, Cd and Te isotopes near the reactor was investigated. Reactor criticality arose, probably, during or soon after U deposition. The reactor has ceased after 500000 years of operation; the energy of about 15 GW x year was generated. Approximately 80 t of uranium (12 tons of sup(235)U) were utilized during reactor operation. Approximately 10 tons of fission products and 4 tons of sup(239)Pu were formed. Reactor operation was periodical, multiply repeated. Water migrating over sandstone pores was not only a moderator but a self-regulator as well

  19. Enhanced effect of quark mass variation in 229Th and limits from Oklo data

    Flambaum, V V

    2008-01-01

    The effects of the variation of the dimensionless strong interaction parameter Xq=mq/Lambda{QCD} (mq is the quark mass, Lambda{QCD} is the QCD scale) are enhanced about 1.5 x 10**5 times in the 7.6 eV "nuclear clock" transition between the ground and first excited states in the 229Th nucleus and about 1 x 10**8 times in the relative shift of the 0.1 eV compound resonance in 150Sm.The best terrestrial limit on the temporal variation of the fundamental constants, |delta(Xq)/Xq| < 4 x 10**-9 at 1.8 billion years ago (|d(Xq/Xq)/dt| < 2.2 x 10**-18 y**-1), is obtained from the shift of this Sm resonance derived from the Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. The results for 229Th and 150Sm are obtained by extrapolation from light nuclei where the many-body calculations can be performed more accurately. The errors produced by such extrapolation may be smaller than the errors of direct calculations in heavy nuclei. The extrapolation results are compared with the "direct" estimates obtained using the Walecka model....

  20. An attempt to concentrate new natural spontaneously fissioning nuclide from geothermal brine of Cheleken peninsula

    In order to concentrate a new not yet identified spontaneously fissioning nuclide (NSFN) discovered in geothermal brines of Cheleken Peninsula various heterogenic processes were used in the brine-solid phase systems (ionites, inorganic sorbents, metals, etc.). Besides, natural inorganic collectors selected on the borehole mouths were analysed. Concentrates with approx. 105 enrichment coefficient have been obtained. It is shown that NSFN has a low degree of coprecipitation with sulfides and metal hydroxydes. It is not reduced by neither iron, nor by aluminium, is sorbed on cationites and anionites. The results obtained allow one to draw a conclusion that NSFN is not an isotope of transuranium elements. NSFN is near by its chemical properties to gold and mercury. According to the experimental data, its standard electrode potential equals (1.3+-0.2) B

  1. Oklo: The fossil nuclear reactors. Physics study - Translation of chapters 6, 13 and conclusions

    Three parts of the 1991 book 'Oklo: reacteurs nucleaires fossiles. Etude physique' have been translated in this report. The chapters bear the titles 'Study of criticality'(45 p.), 'Some problems with the overall functioning of the reactor zones'(45 p.) and 'Conclusions' (15 p.), respectively

  2. Naturally etched tracks in apatites and the correction of fission track dating

    Naturally etched tracks have been found in apatites from the rapid cooled, high-level Kunon pluton in the Zhangzhou Igneous Complex, SE China. This is manifested by the fact that the apatite fission track (FT) age derived from conventional counting of spontaneous and induced tracks yields a result of 140.6±6.5 Ma, which is much older than the ages determined using other methods on different minerals from the same rock. When tracks are observed after etching the polished inner sections of the apatite grains, the naturally etched tracks characterized by having hazy boundaries can be distinguished from the normal tracks with sharp boundaries. The age obtained by omitting these fading-resistant hazy tracks, 76.5±4.0 Ma, indicates the time of the Kunon pluton cooling down to ∼100 deg. C. The corrected peak age (73.8 Ma) is consistent with the other apatite FT peak ages (79.2 to 70.2 Ma) of the nearly contemporaneous plutons in the same igneous complex

  3. Naturally etched tracks in apatites and the correction of fission track dating

    Tien, J L

    1999-01-01

    Naturally etched tracks have been found in apatites from the rapid cooled, high-level Kunon pluton in the Zhangzhou Igneous Complex, SE China. This is manifested by the fact that the apatite fission track (FT) age derived from conventional counting of spontaneous and induced tracks yields a result of 140.6+-6.5 Ma, which is much older than the ages determined using other methods on different minerals from the same rock. When tracks are observed after etching the polished inner sections of the apatite grains, the naturally etched tracks characterized by having hazy boundaries can be distinguished from the normal tracks with sharp boundaries. The age obtained by omitting these fading-resistant hazy tracks, 76.5+-4.0 Ma, indicates the time of the Kunon pluton cooling down to approx 100 deg. C. The corrected peak age (73.8 Ma) is consistent with the other apatite FT peak ages (79.2 to 70.2 Ma) of the nearly contemporaneous plutons in the same igneous complex.

  4. High-energy Neutron-induced Fission Cross Sections of Natural Lead and Bismuth-209

    Tarrio, D; Carrapico, C; Eleftheriadis, C; Leeb, H; Calvino, F; Herrera-Martinez, A; Savvidis, I; Vlachoudis, V; Haas, B; Koehler, P; Vannini, G; Oshima, M; Le Naour, C; Gramegna, F; Wiescher, M; Pigni, M T; Audouin, L; Mengoni, A; Quesada, J; Becvar, F; Plag, R; Cennini, P; Mosconi, M; Rauscher, T; Couture, A; Capote, R; Sarchiapone, L; Vlastou, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dillmann, I; Pavlopoulos, P; Karamanis, D; Krticka, M; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Martinez, T; Trubert, D; Oberhummer, H; Karadimos, D; Plompen, A; Isaev, S; Terlizzi, R; Cortes, G; Cox, J; Cano-Ott, D; Pretel, C; Colonna, N; Berthoumieux, E; Vaz, P; Heil, M; Lopes, I; Lampoudis, C; Walter, S; Calviani, M; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Embid-Segura, M; Stephan, C; Igashira, M; Papachristodoulou, C; Aerts, G; Tavora, L; Berthier, B; Rudolf, G; Andrzejewski, J; Villamarin, D; Ferreira-Marques, R; Tain, J L; O'Brien, S; Reifarth, R; Kadi, Y; Neves, F; Poch, A; Kerveno, M; Rubbia, C; Lazano, M; Dahlfors, M; Wisshak, K; Salgado, J; Dridi, W; Ventura, A; Andriamonje, S; Assimakopoulos, P; Santos, C; Voss, F; Ferrant, L; Patronis, N; Chiaveri, E; Guerrero, C; Perrot, L; Vicente, M C; Lindote, A; Praena, J; Baumann, P; Kappeler, F; Rullhusen, P; Furman, W; David, S; Marrone, S; Tassan-Got, L; Gunsig, F; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Tagliente, G; Haight, R; Chepel, V; Kossionides, E; Badurek, G; Marganiec, J; Lukic, S; Pavlik, A; Goncalves, I; Duran, I; Alvarez, H; Abbondanno, U; Fujii, K; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n\\_TOF) facility is well suited to measure small neutron-induced fission cross sections, as those of subactinides. The cross section ratios of (nat)Pb and (209)Bi relative to (235)U and (238)U were measured using PPAC detectors. The fragment coincidence method allows to unambiguously identify the fission events. The present experiment provides the first results for neutron-induced fission up to 1 GeV for (nat)Pb and (209)Bi. A good agreement with previous experimental data below 200 MeV is shown. The comparison with proton-induced fission indicates that the limiting regime where neutron-induced and proton-induced fission reach equal cross section is close to 1 GeV.

  5. Searches for superheavy elements in nature: Cosmic-ray nuclei; spontaneous fission

    Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    There is little chance that superheavy nuclei with lifetimes of no less than 100 million years are present on the stability island discovered at present. Also, pessimistic are the results of estimates made about their nucleosynthesis in r-process. Nevertheless, the search for these nuclei in nature is justified in view of the fundamental importance of this topic. The first statistically significant data set was obtained by the LDEF Ultra-Heavy Cosmic-Ray Experiment, consisting of 35 tracks of actinide nuclei in galactic cosmic rays. Because of their exceptionally long exposure time in Galaxy, olivine crystals extracted from meteorites generate interest as detectors providing unique data regarding the nuclear composition of ancient cosmic rays. The contemporary searches for superheavy elements in the earth matter rely on knowledge obtained from chemical studies of artificially synthesized superheavy nuclei. New results finding out the chemical behavior of superheavy elements should be employed to obtain samples enriched in their homologues. The detection of rare spontaneous fission events and the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry are employed in these experiments.

  6. Reactor AQUILON. The hardening of neutron spectrum in natural uranium rods, with a computation of epithermal fissions (1961)

    - Microscopic flux measurements in reactor Aquilon have allowed to investigate the thermal and epithermal flux distribution in natural uranium rods, then to obtain the neutron spectrum variations in uranium, Wescott 'β' term of the average spectrum in the rod, and the ratio of epithermal to therma fissions. A new definition for the infinite multiplication factor is proposed in annex, which takes into account epithermal parameters. (authors)

  7. Uranium transport around the reactor zone at Okelobondo (Oklo). Data evaluation with M3 and HYTEC

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is conducting and participating in Natural Analogue activities as part of various studies regarding the final disposal of high level nuclear waste (HLW). The aim of this study is to use the hydrogeological and hydrochemical data from Okelobondo (Oklo Natural Analogue) to compare the outcome of two independent modelling approaches (HYTEC and M3). The modelling helps to evaluate the processes associated with nuclear natural reactors such as redox, adsorption/desorption and dissolution/precipitation of the uranium and to develop more realistic codes which can be used for site investigations and data evaluation. HYTEC (1D and 2D) represents a deterministic, transport and multi-solutes reactive coupled code developed at Ecole des Mines de Paris. M3 (Multivariate Mixing and Mass balance calculations) is a mathematical-statistical concept code developed for SKB. M3 can relatively easily be used to calculate mixing portions and to identify sinks or sources of element concentrations that may exist in a geochemical system. M3 helped to address the reactions in the coupled code HYTEC. Thus, the major flow-paths and reaction paths were identified and used for transport evaluation. The reactive transport results (one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations) are in good agreement with the statistical approach using the M3 model. M3 and HYTEC show a dissolution of the uranium layer in contact with upwardly oxidising waters. M3 and HYTEC show a gain of manganese rich minerals downstream the reactor. A comparison of the U and Mn plots for M3 deviation and HYTEC results showed an almost mirror behaviour. The U transport stops when the Mn gain increases. Thus, HYTEC and M3 modelling predict that a possible reason for not having U transport up to the surface in Okelobondo is due to an inorganic trap which may hinder the uranium transport. The two independent modelling approaches can be used to complement each other and to

  8. Indications of uranium transport around the reactor zone at Bagombe (Oklo)

    The aim of this study is to use the hydrogeological and hydrochemical data from Oklo Natural Analogue to compare the outcome of two independent modelling approaches (HYTEC-2D and M3) which can be used to model natural conditions surrounding the reactor. HYTEC-2D represents a 2D, deterministic, transport and multi-solutes reactive coupled code developed at Ecole des Mines de Paris. M3 (named Multivariate Mixing and Mass balance) is a mathematical-statistical concept code developed for SKB. The M3 results are visualised using the Voxel Analyst code and the outcome of the uranium transport predictions are made from a performance assessment point of view. This exercise was in the beginning intended to represent a validation for M3, by comparing this statistic approach with the standard hydrodynamic - geochemical coupled code HYTEC-2D. It was realized that the codes complete each other and a better understanding of the geochemical studied system is obtained. Thus, M3 can relatively easily be used to calculate mixing portions and to identify sinks or sources of element concentrations that may exist in a geochemical system. This can help to address the reactions in the coupled code such as HYTEC-2D, to identify the hydrodynamic and hydrochemical system and to reduce the computation time. M3 shows the existence of the buffer around the reactor. No transport of uranium was indicated downstream the reactor. HYTEC-2D gives the same result in the case when we consider the existence of the redox buffer in the model. M3 shows an increase of the alkalinity in the reactor zone. The increase of the alkalinity was indicated by the M3 modelling to be associated with microbial decomposition of organic material which added reducing capacity to the system. The modelling result was supported by new results from the last field campaign, which included in-situ Eh measurements and microbial sampling and identification. The effects from the same process was indicated also by the HYTEC-2D

  9. From natural to synthetic apatites: the use of apatites as conditioning material for separated nuclear wastes

    The minerals with an apatite structure formed two billion years ago during natural nuclear reactions in Oklo (Gabon) are phospho-silicate apatites called britholites. In the lattice, they contain as substitutions or inclusions radioactive elements or the fission products. They remain totally stable and appear to be excellent to be excellent nuclear waste conditioning materials. From these observations, the study of synthetics britholites was carried out. The optimal chemical composition was determined, solid/solid synthesis was performed and the stability under radioactive, thermal conditions was studied in relation to geological observations. The first results indicating resistance to radiation and leaching open a supplementary way for the preparation of conditioning material for separated nuclear waste. (authors)

  10. Petrographic analysis of samples from the uranium deposit at Oklo, Republic of Gabon

    This study is preliminary to detailed X-ray diffraction analysis and additional electron microprobe analyses. Twenty samples were examined; seven from reactor zone 9 (RZ-9), ten from RZ-10, two from RZ-13 and one from RZ-16. This suite of samples includes examples from reactor cores and their associated hydrothermal alteration haloes. The most striking characteristic of the Oklo samples is their heterogeneity. In particular, the samples vary with respect to texture, mineralogy, uranium mineral content, and evidence for deformation. Deformation features provide evidence for both shear and extensional stresses and include brecciation and a variety of mineralized fractures. Opaque phases include orgainc matter, uraninite, coffinite, and sulfides. In many cases, the opaque assemblage is concentrated along fractures. Considerable textural evidence, viz., embayed grain margins and fractures with nonparallel margins, suggests partial dissolution of uraninite in the Oklo ores. Uraninite with embayed margins is commonly accompanied by organic matter. Oklo uraninites are, in many cases, altered to produce coffinite (USiO4.nH2O) and are associated with varying quantities of galena at grain boundaries, within fractures, and within individual grains at intracrystalline locations. Textural evidence suggests multiple periods of uraninite formation. Electron microprobe data are presented for uraninites from RZ-13. Analytical data are discussed for Oklo reactor zones 2, 9, 10, 13, and 16 and for the reactor at Bangombe. Uraninites are compositionally similar with respect to Pb for RZ-2, RZ-9, RZ-13, RZ-16 and for the Bangombe reactor (average content of PbO is 5.92 weight %). Lead contents for uraninites from RZ-10 are generally higher and more variable than for the other reactor zones (e.g., PbO content for RZ-10 uraninites ranges from approximately 12 to 18 weight %). (orig.)

  11. Resolution of the nature of the coupling in subthreshold fission in 238U+n

    The analysis of a recent high-resolution neutron capture measurement at 152 m has provided the first evidence that the strong fission resonance at 721 eV is a class-II resonance. This conclusion is based on the measured capture width of 4.7 +- 0.6 MeV, which is considerably smaller than the average capture width of 23.5 MeV for the neighboring resonances. Furthermore, after analyzing the fission widths for the 721- and 1211-eV clusters, we conclude for the J/sup π/ = 1/2+ fission barrier in 239U that the inner barrier is lower than the outer barrier by approx.1.5 MeV

  12. Comparison of the Economic Aspects of the Treatment and Storage of Fission Products from Installations Processing Irradiated Natural Uranium

    The paper summarizes the main policies adopted for the management of fission product effluents and briefly describes the essential technical features of the stainless steel storage installations (in acid medium) used in France, giving a breakdown of the costs involved. The dependence of these costs on the activity of the solutions stored and on their heat release is shown. The second part of the paper discusses the cost of storage in terms of feasible tank size. The optimum size for such tanks and the rate at which they are placed in service are determined in relation to the characteristics of the fission products to be stored and to the respective capacities of the installations for processing irradiated natural uranium. It is shown that although storage costs depend on the assumptions made regarding the useful life of installations, rates of interest and operating costs, optimum policy decisions (as to size and rate of entry into service) are independent of these assumptions, being determined solely by the variation in the cost of tanks, according to size. These are the factors which enter into the optimized cost of storing these effluents indefinitely. In the third part, this method of indefinite storage is compared with other possibilities of fission product management, e.g. vitrification and separation of Cs and Sr. The paper discusses the economics of the various methods and summarizes some possible long-term solutions. (author)

  13. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  14. Fission, total and neutron capture cross section measurements at ORELA for {sup 233}U, {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine

    Guber, K.H.; Spencer, R.R.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, D.C.; Santos, G. Dos; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1998-08-01

    The authors have made use of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure the fission cross section of {sup 233}U in the neutron energy range of 0.36 eV to {approximately} 700 keV. This paper reports integral data and average cross sections. In addition they measured the total neutron cross section of {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine, as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  15. Natural uranium impurities in fission track detectors and associated geocronological parameters

    A technique, based in counting neutron induced fission tracks, has been developed for the measurement of uranium impurities in mica. Uranium concentrations of 10-10 and 10-9 (U atom/mica atom) have been measured. As a part of the development of this technique, the mica geological age was also measured, by fossil and induced track detection. The agreement obtained by this method, T = (472+-52) x 106 years with that of (450+-15) x 106 years obtained by the Ar-K technique is satisfactory and is an indirect test of the fission track technique used. A careful analysis of the neutron field parameters and nuclear data used in the age determination was made. This analysis is useful for applications in geocronology. According to this analysis a value of lambdasub(f)=(7.1+-0.1) x 10-17 years-1 is recommended for the spontaneous fission of U238. However, in order to compare the results, the quoted age, T=(472+-52) x 106 years, was obtained with the generally accepted value of lambdasub(f)=(6.85-0.20) x 10-17 years-1 (Fleischer and Price 1964). (author)

  16. Isotopic composition and neutronics of the Okelobondo natural reactor

    Palenik, Christopher Samuel

    The Oklo-Okelobondo and Bangombe uranium deposits, in Gabon, Africa host Earth's only known natural nuclear fission reactors. These 2 billion year old reactors represent a unique opportunity to study used nuclear fuel over geologic periods of time. The reactors in these deposits have been studied as a means by which to constrain the source term of fission product concentrations produced during reactor operation. The source term depends on the neutronic parameters, which include reactor operation duration, neutron flux and the neutron energy spectrum. Reactor operation has been modeled using a point-source computer simulation (Oak Ridge Isotope Generation and Depletion, ORIGEN, code) for a light water reactor. Model results have been constrained using secondary ionization mass spectroscopy (SIMS) isotopic measurements of the fission products Nd and Te, as well as U in uraninite from samples collected in the Okelobondo reactor zone. Based upon the constraints on the operating conditions, the pre-reactor concentrations of Nd (150 ppm +/- 75 ppm) and Te (operation were calculated as a function of burnup. These results provide a source term against which the present elemental and decay abundances at the fission reactor can be compared. Furthermore, they provide new insights into the extent to which a "fossil" nuclear reactor can be characterized on the basis of its isotopic signatures. In addition, results from the study of two other natural systems related to the radionuclide and fission product transport are included. A detailed mineralogical characterization of the uranyl mineralogy at the Bangombe uranium deposit in Gabon, Africa was completed to improve geochemical models of the solubility-limiting phase. A study of the competing effects of radiation damage and annealing in a U-bearing crystal of zircon shows that low temperature annealing in actinide-bearing phases is significant in the annealing of radiation damage.

  17. Fast fission phenomena

    Experimental studies of fast fission phenomena are presented. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first part, problems associated with fast fission processes are examined in terms of interaction potentials and a dynamic model is presented in which highly elastic collisions, the formation of compound nuclei and fast fission appear naturally. In the second part, a description is given of the experimental methods employed, the observations made and the preliminary interpretation of measurements suggesting the occurence of fast fission processes. In the third part, our dynamic model is incorporated in a general theory of the dissipative processes studied. This theory enables fluctuations associated with collective variables to be calculated. It is applied to highly inelastic collisions, to fast fission and to the fission dynamics of compound nuclei (for which a schematic representation is given). It is with these calculations that the main results of the second part can be interpreted

  18. Entrance-channel dependence of fission transients

    Charity, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Fission transients describe the fission rate as it evolves towards the quasistationary value given by Kramers' formula. The nature of fission transients is dependent on the assumed initial distribution of the compound nuclei along the fission coordinate. Although the standard initial assumption of a near-spherical object leads to a transient suppression of the fission rate (fission delay), a moderate initial fissionlike deformation can reduce the magnitude of this suppression. For still large...

  19. Delayed fission

    Delayed fission is a nuclear process that couples beta decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes beta decay or electron capture and thus populates excited states in the daughter nucleus. This review covers experimental methods for detecting and measuring delayed fission. Experimental results (ECDF activities and beta-DF activities) and theory are presented. The future prospects for study of delayed fission are discussed. 50 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Reactor AQUILON. The hardening of neutron spectrum in natural uranium rods, with a computation of epithermal fissions (1961); Pile AQUILON. Durcissement du spectre des neutrons dans les barreaux d'uranium et calcul des fissions epithermiques (1961)

    Durand -Smet, R.; Lourme, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    - Microscopic flux measurements in reactor Aquilon have allowed to investigate the thermal and epithermal flux distribution in natural uranium rods, then to obtain the neutron spectrum variations in uranium, Wescott '{beta}' term of the average spectrum in the rod, and the ratio of epithermal to therma fissions. A new definition for the infinite multiplication factor is proposed in annex, which takes into account epithermal parameters. (authors) [French] - Un certain nombre de mesures effectuees dans la pile Aquilon ont permis d'etablir la distribution fine des flux thermique et epithermique dans les barreaux d'uranium, et d'en deduire les variations du spectre des neutrons dans l'uranium, le terme {beta} du spectre de Wescott moyen dans le barreau et le nombre de fissions epithermiques. En annexe, il est propose une definition nouvelle du coefficient de multiplication infini, qui fait intervenir les parametres epithermiques. (auteurs)

  1. Ternary Fission

    The fission process in which heavy nuclei fragment into three large charged panicles, in place of the usual two, has been studied in the case of thermal-neutron-induced fission of U235 and the spontaneous fission of Cf252. Solid-state detectors, a fast triple coincidence system and a three-coincident-parameter analyser were used to measure the three fission fragment energies parallel with the detection of each ternary fission event. Experimental evidence is presented supporting the existence of ternary fission by specifically excluding recoil phenomena and accidental events as contributing to the observed three-fold coincidence events. Mass-energy-angular correlations of ternary fission have been determined and are summarized as follows: The total kinetic energy release in ternary fission appears to be slightly higher (by approximately 10 MeV) than that for binary fission. In the case of the spontaneous ternary fission of Cf252, the frequency of occurrence is observed to be greater than 2.2 x 10-6 ternary fission events per binary fission event. Tripartition of Cf252 results preferentially in division into two medium mass particle (one of which has a mass number near 56) and one larger mass. In the case of thermal-neutron-induced fission of U235, the frequency of occurrence is observed to be greater than 1.2 x 10-6 ternary fission events per binary fission event. Ternary fission of U236: results in the formation of one light fragment (near mass 36) and two large fragments or, as in the case of Cf252, two medium fragments and one large one. These results indicate that axially asymmetric distortion modes are possible in the pre-scission configurations of the fissioning nucleus. A description is given of experiments designed to radiochemically detect the light fragment resulting from ternary fission. (author)

  2. Chemistry and migration behaviour of the actinides and fission products in natural aquatic systems

    The 66th PTB seminar was held on April 24th and 25th, 1986, at the Munich Technical University (TUM) in Garching in cooperation with the Institute for Radiochemistry of the Munich Technical University, the 'Nuclear Chemistry' special group of the Society of German Chemists, and UB/SN responsible for the BMFT project. The seminar was organized by the TUM's Institute for Radiochemistry. The seminar dealt with the following main topics: primary geochemical reactions and colloid formation; sorption mechamisms and migration behaviour in Konrad/Gorleben aquifer systems; sampling and experimental investigations; evaluation and interpretation of the data obtained by experiments. The seminar was to achieve the following objectives: information and exchange of experience with regard to the work carried out up to the present; if necessary, formulation of new issues to be discussed; improvement of the interdisciplinary cooperation (chemistry, geosciences, modelling). The following topics and individual aspects were of particular interest and were given special attention: complementary basic research in order to interpret, support and model the results obtained by experiments (sorption mechanisms and thermodynamic data for natural systems); comparability of batch, column and diffusion tests; transferability of laboratory data to natural systems (e.g. Gorleben, Konrad); redox transitions for Np, Tc at Eh values of the natural systems; dependence of the sorption/desorption data on different influencing factors, importance of the influencing factors and selection of data for model calculations. Subject analyses of the individual contributions have been made for the Energy data base. (orig./RB)

  3. Nuclear fission

    The nuclear fission process is pedagogically reviewed from a macroscopic-microscopic point of view. The Droplet model is considered. The fission dynamics is discussed utilizing path integrals and semiclassical methods. (L.C.)

  4. Nuclear fission

    V.M. STRUTINSKY's semi-classical method is the most precise to determine the energy of the different states along the fission way. The double-humped fission barrier explains fission isomerism. V.M. STRUTINSKY's barrier explains the ''intermediate structure'' observed in the cross section under the threshold; it provides also the observed effect of ''vibrational resonances'' with an interpretation. Taking an asymmetry parameter in consideration, a triple-humped fission barrier seems to be essential now for the light actinides. There is still a microscopic fission barrier to be explained

  5. Spontaneous fission

    Recent experimental results for spontaneous fission half-lives and fission fragment mass and kinetic-energy distributions and other properties of the fragments are reviewed and compared with recent theoretical models. The experimental data lend support to the existence of the predicted deformed shells near Z = 108 and N = 162. Prospects for extending detailed studies of spontaneous fission properties to elements beyond hahnium (element 105) are considered. (orig.)

  6. Spontaneous Fission

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  7. Calculations of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis

    Panov, I. V.; Kolbe, E.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Kratz, K.-L.; Thielemann, F. -K.

    2004-01-01

    Fission plays an important role in the r-process which is responsible not only for the yields of transuranium isotopes, but may have a strong influence on the formation of the majority of heavy nuclei due to fission recycling. We present calculations of beta-delayed and neutron-induced fission rates, taking into account different fission barriers predictions and mass formulae. It is shown that an increase of fission barriers results naturally in a reduction of fission rates, but that neverthe...

  8. Bacteria, colloids and organic carbon in groundwater at the Bangombe site in the Oklo area

    This report describes how microorganisms, colloids and organic matter were sampled from groundwater from six boreholes at the Bangombe site in the Oklo region and subsequently analyzed. For analysis of microorganisms, DNA was extracted from groundwater, amplified and cloned and information available in the ribosomal 16S rRNA gene was used for mapping diversity and distribution of bacteria. Each borehole was dominated by species that did not dominate in any of the other boreholes, a result that probably reflects documented differences in the geochemical environment. Analyses of sampled colloids included SEM and ICP-MS analysis of colloids on membrane and single particle analysis of samples in bottles. The colloid concentration was rather low in these Na-Mg-Ca-HCO3 type waters. Trace element results show that transition metals and some heavy metals are associated with the colloid phase. Distribution coefficients of trace elements between the water and colloid phases were estimated. For example for uranium, an average of 200 pg/ml was detected in the water, and 40 pg/ml was detected in the colloid phase. A Kp value of 2* 106 ml/g was calculated, considering (colloid) = 100 ng/ml. Groundwater samples were collected for analysis of the concentration of organic carbon (TOC), humic substances and metals associated with the humic substances. TOC varied in the range 4-14 mg/l in three boreholes, one borehole had a TOC<1.5 mg/l. The metal speciation study indicated that a large fraction, 8-67% of uranium was bound to the humic matter compared to the fractions of Ca and Fe (<0.4% and 0.02-10%, resp.). 60 refs, 8 figs, 16 tabs

  9. Bacteria, colloids and organic carbon in groundwater at the Bangombe site in the Oklo area

    Pedersen, K. [ed.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes how microorganisms, colloids and organic matter were sampled from groundwater from six boreholes at the Bangombe site in the Oklo region and subsequently analyzed. For analysis of microorganisms, DNA was extracted from groundwater, amplified and cloned and information available in the ribosomal 16S rRNA gene was used for mapping diversity and distribution of bacteria. Each borehole was dominated by species that did not dominate in any of the other boreholes, a result that probably reflects documented differences in the geochemical environment. Analyses of sampled colloids included SEM and ICP-MS analysis of colloids on membrane and single particle analysis of samples in bottles. The colloid concentration was rather low in these Na-Mg-Ca-HCO{sub 3} type waters. Trace element results show that transition metals and some heavy metals are associated with the colloid phase. Distribution coefficients of trace elements between the water and colloid phases were estimated. For example for uranium, an average of 200 pg/ml was detected in the water, and 40 pg/ml was detected in the colloid phase. A K{sub p} value of 2* 10{sup 6} ml/g was calculated, considering (colloid) = 100 ng/ml. Groundwater samples were collected for analysis of the concentration of organic carbon (TOC), humic substances and metals associated with the humic substances. TOC varied in the range 4-14 mg/l in three boreholes, one borehole had a TOC<1.5 mg/l. The metal speciation study indicated that a large fraction, 8-67% of uranium was bound to the humic matter compared to the fractions of Ca and Fe (<0.4% and 0.02-10%, resp.). 60 refs, 8 figs, 16 tabs.

  10. The transantarctic mountains: A natural laboratory for apatite fission-track analysis. Results from Italian antarctic expeditions

    Apatite fission-track analysis has been applied to samples collected during the 1991/1992, 1993/1994 and 1996/1997 campaigns of the Italian Antarctic Project in the Transantarctic Mountains. Samples from the first two campaigns, collected in the area between the Mariner and the David Glaciers (northern Victoria Land), reveal that a Late Cretaceous uplift - denudation phase already identified in other sectors of the chain took place also in this region. They also confirm the occurrence of a more recent phase starting in the Late Paleocene. Offsets in apatite age profiles regarding samples collected further north during the third campaign reveal Cenozoic normal faulting with variable sense of offset

  11. Dissolution studies of natural analogues spent fuel and U(VI)-Silicon phases of and oxidative alteration process

    In order to understand the long-term behavior of the nuclear spent fuel in geological repository conditions, we have performed dissolution studies with natural analogues to UO2 as well as with solid phases representatives of the oxidative alteration pathway of uranium dioxide, as observed in both natural environment and laboratory studies. In all cases, we have studied the influence of the bicarbonate concentration in the dissolution process, as a first approximation to the groundwater composition of a granitic environment, where carbonate is one of the most important complexing agents. As a natural analogue to the nuclear spent fuel some uraninite samples from the Oklo are deposit in Gabon, where chain fission reactions took place 2000 millions years ago, as well as a pitchblende sample from the mine Fe ore deposit, in Salamanca (spain) have been studied. The studies have been performed at 25 and 60 deg C and 60 deg C, and they have focussed on the determination of both the thermodynamic and the kinetic properties of the different samples studied, using batch and continuous experimental methodologies, respectively. (Author)

  12. A study of the effect of natural radiation damage in a zircon crystal using thermoluminescence, fission track etching and X-ray diffraction

    The natural radiation damage in zircon caused by the decay of uranium and thorium, present as impurities, is studied. The radiation damage is first gauged by etching the fission tracks. It is found that thermoluminescence (TL) sensitivity (defined as light output per unit test-dose) decreases as the radiation damage increases, suggesting a destruction of TL centers. The spacing d of the (112)-plane is also measured. It is also found that the d-value increases with radiation damage, suggesting the displacement of atoms from their normal lattice sites. However, as the track density increases beyond ≅ 3x106 tracks/cm2, the d-value remains at ≅ 2.52 A. By annealing the crystal, the displaced atoms are found to return to the original lattice sites, and this is followed by a reduction in d-value as well as the recovery of TL sensitivity. The fission track density also decreases and all the tracks disappear at the annealing temperature of ≅ 8000C. (orig.)

  13. Ternary fission

    M Balasubramaniam; K R Vijayaraghavan; C Karthikraj

    2015-09-01

    We present the ternary fission of 252Cf and 236U within a three-cluster model as well as in a level density approach. The competition between collinear and equatorial geometry is studied by calculating the ternary fragmentation potential as a function of the angle between the lines joining the stationary middle fragment and the two end fragments. The obtained results for the 16O accompanying ternary fission indicate that collinear configuration is preferred to equatorial configuration. Further, for all the possible third fragments, the potential energy surface (PES) is calculated corresponding to an arrangement in which the heaviest and the lightest fragments are considered at the end in a collinear configuration. The PES reveals several possible ternary modes including true ternary modes where the three fragments are of similar size. The complete mass distributions of Si and Ca which accompanied ternary fission of 236U is studied within a level density picture. The obtained results favour several possible ternary combinations.

  14. Benchmarking Nuclear Fission Theory

    G. F. Bertsch(INT, Seattle, USA); Loveland, W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Talou, P.

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a small set of fission observables to be used as test cases for validation of theoretical calculations. The purpose is to provide common data to facilitate the comparison of different fission theories and models. The proposed observables are chosen from fission barriers, spontaneous fission lifetimes, fission yield characteristics, and fission isomer excitation energies.

  15. A study of 239Pu production rate in a water cooled natural uranium blanket mock-up of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    Feng, Song; Liu, Rong; Lu, Xinxin; Yang, Yiwei; Xu, Kun; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Tonghua; Jiang, Li; Qin, Jianguo; Jiang, Jieqiong; Han, Zijie; Lai, Caifeng; Wen, Zhongwei

    2016-03-01

    The 239Pu production rate is important data in neutronics design for a natural uranium blanket of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, and the accuracy and reliability should be validated by integral experiments. The distribution of 239Pu production rates in a subcritical natural uranium blanket mock-up was obtained for the first time with a D-T neutron generator by using an activation technique. Natural uranium foils were placed in different spatial locations of the mock-up, the counts of 277.6 keV γ-rays emitted from 239Np generated by 238U capture reaction were measured by an HPGe γ spectrometer, and the self-absorption of natural uranium foils was corrected. The experiment was analyzed using the Super Monte Carlo neutron transport code SuperMC2.0 with recent nuclear data of 238U from the ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0u2, JEFF-3.2 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. Calculation results with the JEFF-3.2 library agree with the experimental ones best, and they agree within the experimental uncertainty in general with the average ratios of calculation results to experimental results (C/E) in the range of 0.93 to 1.01.

  16. Fission Spectrum

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  17. Singlet Fission

    Smith, M. B.; Michl, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 11 (2010), s. 6891-6936. ISSN 0009-2665 Grant ostatní: Department of Energy(US) DE-FG36-08GO18017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : solar energy conversion * photovoltaics * singlet fission Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 33.033, year: 2010

  18. Ideological Fission

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    materialisation of an ideological fission which attempts to excise certain ideological constructions, yet paradoxically casting them in a form that is recognizable and familiar. The monstrous metonomy which is used shows us glimpses of a horrid being, intended to vilify the attack on New York City. However, it is...

  19. An evaluation of the dissolution process of natural uranium ore as an analogue of nuclear fuel

    The assumption of congruent dissolution of uraninite as a mechanism for the dissolution behaviour of spent fuel was critically examined with regard to the fate of toxic radionuclides. The fission and daughter products of uranium are typically present in spent unreprocessed fuel rods in trace abundances. The principles of trace element geochemistry were applied in assessing the behaviour of these radionuclides during fluid/solid interactions. It is shown that the behaviour of radionuclides in trace abundances that reside in the crystal structure can be better predicted from the ionic properties of these nuclides rather than from assuming that they are controlled by the dissolution of uraninite. Geochemical evidence from natural uranium ore deposits (Athabasca Basin, Northern Territories of Australia, Oklo) suggests that in most cases the toxic radionuclides are released from uraninite in amounts that are independent of the solution behaviour of uranium oxide. Only those elements that have ionic and thus chemical properties similar to U4+, such as plutonium, americium, cadmium, neptunium and thorium can be satisfactorily modelled by the solution properties of uranium dioxide and then only if the environment is reducing. (84 refs., 7 tabs.)

  20. Fission meter

    Rowland, Mark S.; Snyderman, Neal J.

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  1. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: deformation-induced fission

    Goddard, P M; Rios, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus, and the daughter products. Purpose: To explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe fast fission processes beyond the fission barrier, using the nuclide $^{240}$Pu as an example. Methods: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations based on the Skyrme interaction are used to calculate non-adiabatic fission paths, beginning from static constrained Hartree-Fock calculations. The properties of the dynamic states are interpreted in terms of the nature of their collective motion. Fission product properties are compared to data. Results: Parent nuclei constrained to begin dynamic evolution with a deformation less than the fission barrier exhibit giant-resonance-type behaviour. Those beginning just beyond the ...

  2. Calculations of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis

    Panov, I V; Pfeiffer, B; Rauscher, T; Kratz, K L; Thielemann, F K

    2005-01-01

    Fission plays an important role in the r-process which is responsible not only for the yields of transuranium isotopes, but may have a strong influence on the formation of the majority of heavy nuclei due to fission recycling. We present calculations of beta-delayed and neutron-induced fission rates, taking into account different fission barriers predictions and mass formulae. It is shown that an increase of fission barriers results naturally in a reduction of fission rates, but that nevertheless fission leads to the termination of the r-process. Furthermore, it is discussed that the probability of triple fission could be high for $A>260$ and have an effect on the formation of the abundances of heavy nuclei. Fission after beta-delayed neutron emission is discussed as well as different aspects of the influence of fission upon r-process calculations.

  3. Thermal annealing of fission tracks in synthetic apatites

    Carpena, J.; Lacout, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic analogues of poor-silicated natural apatites have been doped with uranium. These minerals have been irradiated with a thermal neutron dose in the aim to induce the 235U fission and to obtain a fission track population. Thermal annealing experiments have been performed on the fission track population and allow us to compare the ability of the synthetic minerals to anneal such nuclear damages with their natural analogues. The thermal of the fission tracks in the synthetic minerals nee...

  4. Natural genetic variation impacts expression levels of coding, non-coding, and antisense transcripts in fission yeast

    Clément-Ziza, Mathieu; Marsellach, Francesc X.; Codlin, Sandra;

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of how natural genetic variation affects gene expression beyond well-annotated coding genes is still limited. The use of deep sequencing technologies for the study of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) has the potential to close this gap. Here, we generated...... to be affected by eQTLs as protein-coding RNAs. We identified a genetic variation of swc5 that modifies the levels of 871 RNAs, with effects on both sense and antisense transcription, and show that this effect most likely goes through a compromised deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z. The strains, methods......, and datasets generated here provide a rich resource for future studies....

  5. Dissolution studies of natural analogues spent fuel and U(VI)-Silicon phases of and oxidative alteration process; Estudios de disolucion de analogos naturales de combustible nuclear irradiado y de fases de U(VI)-Silicio representativas de un proceso de alteracion oxidativa

    Perez Morales, I.

    2000-07-01

    In order to understand the long-term behavior of the nuclear spent fuel in geological repository conditions, we have performed dissolution studies with natural analogues to UO{sub 2} as well as with solid phases representatives of the oxidative alteration pathway of uranium dioxide, as observed in both natural environment and laboratory studies. In all cases, we have studied the influence of the bicarbonate concentration in the dissolution process, as a first approximation to the groundwater composition of a granitic environment, where carbonate is one of the most important complexing agents. As a natural analogue to the nuclear spent fuel some uraninite samples from the Oklo are deposit in Gabon, where chain fission reactions took place 2000 millions years ago, as well as a pitchblende sample from the mine Fe ore deposit, in Salamanca (spain) have been studied. The studies have been performed at 25 and 60 degree centigree and 60 degree centigree, and they have focussed on the determination of both the thermodynamic and the kinetic properties of the different samples studied, using batch and continuous experimental methodologies, respectively. (Author)

  6. Fission Research at IRMM

    Al-Adili A.; Fabry I.; Borcea R.; Zeynalov S.; Kornilov N.; Hambsch F.-J.; Oberstedt S.

    2010-01-01

    Fission Research at JRC-IRMM has a longstanding tradition. The present paper is discussing recent investigations of fission fragment properties of 238 U(n,f), 234 U(n,f), prompt neutron emission in fission of 252 Cf(SF) as well as the prompt fission neutron spectrum of 235 U(n,f) and is presenting the most important results.

  7. Search for β-delayed fission of 228Ac

    Radium was radiochemically separated from natural thorium. Thin 228Ra→β-228Ac sources were prepared and exposed to mica fission track detectors, and measured by an HPGe γ-ray detector. The β-delayed fission events of 228Ac were observed and its β-delayed fission probability was found to be (5±2)x10-12

  8. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: Deformation-induced fission

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2015-11-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe fast fission processes beyond the fission barrier, using the nuclide Pu240 as an example. Methods: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations based on the Skyrme interaction are used to calculate nonadiabatic fission paths, beginning from static constrained Hartree-Fock calculations. The properties of the dynamic states are interpreted in terms of the nature of their collective motion. Fission product properties are compared to data. Results: Parent nuclei constrained to begin dynamic evolution with a deformation less than the fission barrier exhibit giant-resonance-type behavior. Those beginning just beyond the barrier explore large-amplitude motion but do not fission, whereas those beginning beyond the two-fragment pathway crossing fission to final states which differ according to the exact initial deformation. Conclusions: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock is able to give a good qualitative and quantitative description of fast fission, provided one begins from a sufficiently deformed state.

  9. Synthesis report on the relevant diffusion coefficients of fission products and helium in spent nuclear fuels

    This document corresponds to the deliverable D2 of the Work Package 1 of the 'Spent Fuel Stability under repository conditions' (SFS) European project. It constitutes a synthesis report on relevant diffusion coefficients of fission products and helium in spent nuclear fuels at high and low temperatures. Coefficients corresponding to thermally activated diffusion were reviewed from literature data for O, U (self-diffusion coefficients), fission gases and other fission products. Data showed that thermal diffusion was irrelevant at temperatures expected in repository conditions. The occurrence of diffusion enhanced by alpha self-irradiation was studied through different theoretical approaches. A 'best estimate' value of the alpha self-irradiation diffusion coefficient, D (m2.s-1), is proposed. It is extrapolated from enhanced diffusion under irradiation observed in reactor and would be proportional to the volume alpha activity in the spent nuclear fuel, Av (Bq.m-3) as: D/Av ≅ 2.10-41 (m5)The migration of stable Pb in Oklo's uraninites was studied in order to validate the proposed diffusion coefficient. The obtained value is one order of magnitude higher than the theoretical proposed value. As for He behaviour in spent nuclear fuel, a few data are today available in open literature. The document will be completed as soon as new experimental results are available. (authors)

  10. Advanced Fission Reactor Program objectives

    The objective of an advanced fission reactor program should be to develop an economically attractive, safe, proliferation-resistant fission reactor. To achieve this objective, an aggressive and broad-based research and development program is needed. Preliminary work at Brookhaven National Laboratory shows that a reasonable goal for a research program would be a reactor combining as many as possible of the following features: (1) initial loading of uranium enriched to less than 15% uranium 235, (2) no handling of fuel for the full 30-year nominal core life, (3) inherent safety ensured by core physics, and (4) utilization of natural uranium at least 5 times as efficiently as light water reactors

  11. Energy released in fission

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  12. Fine structure in the fission fragment yields

    Discussed are the most interesting experiments on the fine structure of fission product yields of U, Pu, Th, Cf, Es, Cm, Fr, Np isotopes. Modern comprehension of the fine structure nature in connection with other problems of fission dynamics is considered. It is noted, that the fine structure results from pairing correlations in a nucleus. The conclusion is drawn, that the available set of experimental data is not sufficient to elucidate the fine structure nature

  13. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  14. Fast fission phenomenon

    In these lectures we have described two different phenomena occuring in dissipative heavy ion collisions : neutron-proton asymmetry and fast fission. Neutron-proton asymmetry has provided us with an example of a fast collective motion. As a consequence quantum fluctuations can be observed. The observation of quantum or statistical fluctuations is directly connected to the comparison between the phonon energy and the temperature of the intrinsic system. This means that this mode might also provide a good example for the investigation of the transition between quantum and statistical fluctuations which might occur when the bombarding energy is raised above 10 MeV/A. However it is by no means sure that in this energy domain enough excitation energy can be put into the system in order to reach such high temperatures over the all system. The other interest in investigating neutron-proton asymmetry above 10 MeV/A is that the interaction time between the two incident nuclei will decrease. Consequently, if some collective motion should still be observed, it will be one of the last which can be seen. Fast fission corresponds on the contrary to long interaction times. The experimental indications are still rather weak and mainly consist of experimental data which cannot be understood in the framework of standard dissipative models. We have seen that a model which can describe both the entrance and the exit configuration gives this mechanism in a natural way and that the experimental data can, to a good extend, be explained. The nicest thing is probably that our old understanding of dissipative heavy ion collisions is not changed at all except for the problems that can now be understood in terms of fast fission. Nevertheless this area desserve further studies, especially on the experimental side to be sure that the consistent picture which we have on dissipative heavy ion collisions still remain coherent in the future.

  15. Nuclear fission induced by Pi mesons

    Pi mesons are an important part of the interactions among strongly-interacting particles, and their reactions with complex nuclei involve reactions with a wide range of interactions and time scales, with the slowest being the familiar fission process. Decades of effort have produced a wide range of fission data with stopped and energetic charged beams, both positive and negative. These results are the result of many uncoordinated studies, but in total can give a very good view of pion-induced fission. This review will compare and combine the measurements, with comparisons to a range of theoretical expectations. It is found that the nature of fission induced by pi mesons is not significantly different from fission induced by other energetic particles, in spite of the special features of the mesonic beam. This specific arena of nuclear science may now be considered complete. (author)

  16. Fission Mass Yield Studies

    Mass yields from fission induced by a span of neutron energies up to 18 MeV have been measured for Th232, U235 and U238 target nuclei. Particular attention has been given to the dependence of symmetric fission yields on energy. To study the effect of angular momentum, fission yields from the U236 compound nucleus formed by alpha-particle irradiations of Th232 were also studied over the same span of excitation energies. A standard set of Pd109, Ag111, Pd112 and Ag113 symmetric fission yields was generally measured for all irradiations. In addition, yields of Eu156, Cs136 and 2.3-d Cd115 were measured for some selected combinations of projectile, energy and target nucleus. Assays for Zr97 and sometimes also Ba139 served as fission monitors. Altogether 150 fission yields were measured for these combinations of target nucleus, projectile and incident energy. About one-third of these were checked by replicated irradiations. At highest energies for the U236 compound nucleus the symmetric fission yield from alpha-particle-induced fission is about 13% higher than for neutron-induced fission. Dips in symmetric fission yield were observed at the energy onset of third-chance fission for each target and projectile. Some indication of a small central peak in the mass distribution was observed in the yields from U236 compound nucleus fission, but not from the Th233 compound nucleus fission. Detailed mathematical methods have been developed to separate the effects of fissions preceding and following neutron emission. These methods were used to remove the effects of second- and third-chance fissions from the measured symmetric fission yields. These calculated yields for first-chance fission show no dips with energy. The calculations also show that perhaps half the difference between symmetric yields for alpha- particle-induced fission of Th232 and neutron-induced fission of U235 is attributable to angular momentum effects. Both calculated first-chance yields and measured yields

  17. Excitation-energy dependence of the nuclear fission characteristics

    Baba, H.; Saito, T.; Takahashi, N. [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science] [and others

    1996-03-01

    It is known that the width parameter of the fragment mass yield distribution follows a beautiful systematics with respect to the excitation energy. According to this systematics, the fission characteristics following the systematics should disappear when the excitation energy Ex goes down to 14 MeV. The present purpose is to elucidate if, where, how and why a transition takes place in the fission characteristics of the asymmetric fission of light actinide elements. Two types of experiments are performed, one is the double-energy measurement of the kinetic energies of complementary fragments in the thermal-neutron fission of {sup 235,233}U and proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U at 13.3- and 15.7-MeV excitations, and the other is the radiochemical study of proton-induced fission and photofission of {sup 238}U at various excitation energies. In conclusion, it has demonstrated that there are two distinctive fission mechanisms in the low-energy fission of light actinide elements and the transition between them takes place around 14-MeV excitation. The characteristics of proton fission and photofission in the energy range lower than the above transition point are the essentially the same as those of thermal-neutron fission and also spontaneous fission. The results of GDR fission indicates the fission in the high-energy side starts from the nuclear collective states, whereas the lower-energy fission is of non-collective nature. It is likely that thermal-neutron fission is rather of the barrier-penetrating type like spontaneous fission than the threshold fission. (S.Y.)

  18. Fission Research at IRMM

    Al-Adili A.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fission Research at JRC-IRMM has a longstanding tradition. The present paper is discussing recent investigations of fission fragment properties of 238 U(n,f, 234 U(n,f, prompt neutron emission in fission of 252 Cf(SF as well as the prompt fission neutron spectrum of 235 U(n,f and is presenting the most important results.

  19. Complex fission phenomena

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena can be studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle-point) nuclear shapes, may be obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in cold fission phenomena can be explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are outlined. Predictions of two alpha accompanied fission are experimentally confirmed.

  20. To fission or not to fission

    Pomorski, Krzysztof; Ivanyuk, Fedir A

    2016-01-01

    The fission-fragments mass-yield of 236U is obtained by an approximate solution of the eigenvalue problem of the collective Hamiltonian that describes the dynamics of the fission process whose degrees of freedom are: the fission (elongation), the neck and the mass-asymmetry mode. The macroscopic-microscopic method is used to evaluate the potential energy surface. The macroscopic energy part is calculated using the liquid drop model and the microscopic corrections are obtained using the Woods-Saxon single-particle levels. The four dimensional modified Cassini ovals shape parametrization is used to describe the shape of the fissioning nucleus. The mass tensor is taken within the cranking-type approximation. The final fragment mass distribution is obtained by weighting the adiabatic density distribution in the collective space with the neck-dependent fission probability. The neck degree of freedom is found to play a significant role in determining that final fragment mass distribution.

  1. Fission neutron statistical emission

    The statistical model approach FINESSE (FIssion NEutronS' Statistical Emission) for the description of fission neutron multiplicities, energy spectra and angular distributions is described. Based on an extended Weisskopf ansatz and on a realistic temperature distribution it provides a fragment mass number dependent description of fission neutron data. Model parameters (optical potential, n/γ competition) were fixed on the basis of the 252Cf(sf) (nuclear data standard). Combined with a phenomenological fission model for predicting relevant fragment data as function of asymmetry. FINESSE can be applied to any fission reaction of actinides in the Th-Cf region without further parameter adjustment. Results are presented for 252Cf(sf) and neutron induced fission of 235U, 239Pu, 232Th. Effects of multiple-chance fission are discussed for 232Th(n,xnf) reacation. (author). 46 refs, 11 figs

  2. Synthesis report on the relevant diffusion coefficients of fission products and helium in spent nuclear fuels; Rapport de synthese sur les coefficients de diffusion des produits de fission et de l'helium dans le combustible irradie

    Lovera, P.; Ferry, C.; Poinssot, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DPC), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Johnson, L. [Nagra, Baden (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    This document corresponds to the deliverable D2 of the Work Package 1 of the 'Spent Fuel Stability under repository conditions' (SFS) European project. It constitutes a synthesis report on relevant diffusion coefficients of fission products and helium in spent nuclear fuels at high and low temperatures. Coefficients corresponding to thermally activated diffusion were reviewed from literature data for O, U (self-diffusion coefficients), fission gases and other fission products. Data showed that thermal diffusion was irrelevant at temperatures expected in repository conditions. The occurrence of diffusion enhanced by alpha self-irradiation was studied through different theoretical approaches. A 'best estimate' value of the alpha self-irradiation diffusion coefficient, D (m{sup 2}.s{sup -1}), is proposed. It is extrapolated from enhanced diffusion under irradiation observed in reactor and would be proportional to the volume alpha activity in the spent nuclear fuel, A{sub v} (Bq.m{sup -3}) as: D/A{sub v} {approx_equal} 2.10{sup -41} (m{sup 5})The migration of stable Pb in Oklo's uraninites was studied in order to validate the proposed diffusion coefficient. The obtained value is one order of magnitude higher than the theoretical proposed value. As for He behaviour in spent nuclear fuel, a few data are today available in open literature. The document will be completed as soon as new experimental results are available. (authors)

  3. Complex fission phenomena

    Poenaru, Dorin N.; Gherghescu, Radu A.; Greiner, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena are studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle point) nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are ou...

  4. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  5. Fission product yields

    Data are summed up necessary for determining the yields of individual fission products from different fissionable nuclides. Fractional independent yields, cumulative and isobaric yields are presented here for the thermal fission of 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu and for fast fission (approximately 1 MeV) of 235U, 238U, 239Pu, 241Pu; these values are included into the 5th version of the YIELDS library, supplementing the BIBFP library. A comparison is made of experimental data and possible improvements of calculational methods are suggested. (author)

  6. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, Junchen

    2016-01-01

    The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective ...

  7. Is channeling of fission tracks taking place?

    Yada, K

    1999-01-01

    A single crystal of natural zircon which is sliced to have (010) basal plane and thinned by ion thinning is electron microscopically observed after slow neutron irradiation to ascertain whether channeling of the nuclear fission fragments is taking place or not. A fairly large number of the induced fission tracks are recognized at low magnification images where a considerable number of them are parallel to low-index lattice planes such as 100, 001, 101, 301, 103 though their directions changed some time up to several degrees. High resolution images of fission tracks often show a variety of zigzag passing of the tracks along low-index lattice planes in atomistic level. The rate of the tracks which are parallel to these low-index lattice planes is fairly high as about 45%, which strongly suggests that channeling of the fission tracks is taking place.

  8. Muon-induced fission

    A review of recent experimental results on negative-muon-induced fission, both of 238U and 232Th, is given. Some conclusions drawn by the author are concerned with muonic atoms of fission fragments and muonic atoms of the shape isomer of 238U. (author)

  9. Fission gas detection system

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  10. Fission Xenon on Mars

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.; Marty, B.

    2002-01-01

    Fission Xe components due to Pu-244 decay in the early history of Mars have been identified in nakhlites; as in the case of ALH84001 and Chassigny the fission gas was assimilated into indigenous solar-type Xe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Fission 2009 4. International Workshop on Nuclear Fission and Fission Product Spectroscopy - Compilation of slides

    This conference is dedicated to the last achievements in experimental and theoretical aspects of the nuclear fission process. The topics include: mass, charge and energy distribution, dynamical aspect of the fission process, nuclear data evaluation, quasi-fission and fission lifetime in super heavy elements, fission fragment spectroscopy, cross-section and fission barrier, and neutron and gamma emission. This document gathers the program of the conference and the slides of the presentations

  12. Uranium content of petroleum by fission track technique

    The feasibility of the fission track registration technique to investigate the natural uranium concentration in petroleum is examined. The application of this technique to petroleum is briefly described and discussed critically. The results obtained so far indicate uranium concentrations in samples of Brazilian petroleum which are over the detect ion limit of fission track technique. (Author)

  13. Nuclear waste criticality analysis. Final report, 1 July 1995--30 June 1996

    The natural reactors that occurred in Gabon, Africa over 2 billion years ago present an interesting analog to the underground repositories proposed around the world for the long-term storage of high-level spent nuclear fuel. Many articles have been written concerning the low migration rates of actinides and fission products from the Oklo reactor sites, but Oklo also presents researchers with an opportunity to discover the conditions that led to nuclear criticality in uranium oxides with low enrichments. A computer model was developed to predict the conditions that were necessary to lead to criticality in the Oklo reactors. Critical core dimensions and infinite multiplication factors are presented as a function of time, the porosity of the host rock, and the water and uranium content of the sandstone deposits at Oklo

  14. Nucleon-induced fission at intermediate energies

    The absence of a satisfactory theoretical description to predict isotope yields as well as the need for experimental fragment mass and charge distributions at intermediate-energies form the motivation of this work. Like the objects under study, the research presented in this thesis consists two main parts. Part 1 concerns an activation experiment that has been performed at the 'Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut' (Nuclear Physics Accelerator Institute) in Groningen, Netherlands, using the AGOR cyclotron. Fission product yields have been measured resulting from 190 MeV proton-induced fission of natW, 197Au, natPb, 208Pb and 232Th. In Chapter 2 the experimental set up is discussed, followed in Chapter 3 by a description of the data analysis. The results on the reconstructed mass yields and the total fission cross sections are presented in Chapter 4. Part 2 is of a theoretical nature. The objective is to compute fission product mass yields from intermediate-energy nucleon-induced reactions. In the approach presented here, two stages can be distinguished. In the first stage the fission cross section is determined for the various fissioning isotopes as a function of their excitation energy in competition with other processes like pre-equilibrium decay and particle evaporation. ALICE-91 is a nuclear reaction code that takes care of this first stage. The second stage consists of constructing the total fission-fragment mass and charge distributions from the different contributions of all the equilibrated fissioning systems. Hence, a model is needed that gives a prediction for the fission-product mass yields in a large range of mass, charge, and excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus. For this purpose, the multi-modal random neck-rupture model by Brosa is extended with temperature-dependent shell and pairing corrections and a temperature-dependent LDM. The combination of ALICE-91 and the modified Brosa approach is used for the analysis of the experiments given in the

  15. Study on Fission Blanket Fuel Cycling of a Fusion-Fission Hybrid Energy Generation System

    Full text: Direct application of ITER-scale tokamak as a neutron driver in a subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor to generate electric power is of great potential in predictable future. This paper reports a primary study on neutronic and fuel cycle behaviors of a fission blanket for a new type of fusion-driven system (FDS), namely a subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation aiming at energy generation fueled with natural or depleted uranium. Using COUPLE2 developed at INET of Tsinghua University by coupling the MCNP code with the ORIGEN code to study the neutronic behavior and the refueling scheme, this paper focuses on refueling scheme of the fissionable fuel while keeping some important parameters such as tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and energy gain. Different fission fuels, coolants and their volumetric ratios arranged in the fission blanket satisfy the requirements for power generation. The results show that soft neutron spectrum with optimized fuel to moderator ratio can yield an energy amplifying factor of M> 20 while maintaining the TBR > 1.1 and the CR > 1 (the conversion ratio of fissile materials) in a reasonably long refueling cycle. Using an in-site fuel recycle plant, it will be an attractive way to realize the goal of burning 238U with such a new type of fusion-fission hybrid reactor system to generate electric power. (author)

  16. Fission Fragments Discriminator

    Nuclear fission reaction between Uranium-235 nucleus and thermal neutron caused the high energy fission fragments with uncertainly direction. The particle direction discrimination was determined. The 2.5 x 3.0 mm2 polyethylene gratings with 1-6 mm thickness were used. The grating was placed between uranium screen that fabricated from ammonium-diurinate compound and polycarbonate nuclear track film recorder irradiated by neutron from Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1) facility. The nuclear track density was inversely with grating thickness. It's only fission fragments normal to uranium screen pass through film recorder when grating thickness was 4-6 mm

  17. Discovery of Naturally Etched Fission Tracks and Alpha-Recoil Tracks in Submarine Glasses: Reevaluation of a Putative Biosignature for Earth and Mars

    Jason E. French

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, conspicuously “biogenic-looking” corrosion microtextures have been found to occur globally within volcanic glass of the in situ oceanic crust, ophiolites, and greenstone belts dating back to ~3.5 Ga. These so-called “tubular” and “granular” microtextures are widely interpreted to represent bona fide microbial trace fossils; however, possible nonbiological origins for these complex alteration microtextures have yet to be explored. Here, we reevaluate the origin of these enigmatic microtextures from a strictly nonbiological standpoint, using a case study on submarine glasses from the western North Atlantic Ocean (DSDP 418A. By combining petrographic and SEM observations of corrosion microtextures at the glass-palagonite interface, considerations of the tectonic setting, measurement of U and Th concentrations of fresh basaltic glass by ICP-MS, and theoretical modelling of the present-day distribution of radiation damage in basaltic glass caused by radioactive decay of U and Th, we reinterpret these enigmatic microtextures as the end product of the preferential corrosion/dissolution of radiation damage (alpha-recoil tracks and fission tracks in the glass by seawater, possibly combined with pressure solution etch-tunnelling. Our findings have important implications for geomicrobiology, astrobiological exploration of Mars, and understanding of the long-term breakdown of nuclear waste glass.

  18. Natural occurring radioactive substances. Vol. 1

    Naturally occurring radioactive substances produced by cosmic rays of those of terrestrial origin are surveyed. The different radioactive decay series are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the element radium as regards its properties and distribution in different environmental samples. The properties of naturally occurring k-40 and its distribution in different natural media are also outlined. Induced radionuclides which are formed as a result of the interaction of cosmic rays with the constituents of the atmosphere are mentioned. In this respect the intensity of natural background radiation and the dose at different locations and levels is surveyed. Some regions of exceptionally high radioactivity which result in high exposure rates are mentioned. Monazite deposits and water springs are mentioned in some detail. The Oklo phenomenon as a natural reactor is also discussed. 8 tabs

  19. How good are the laws of physics

    The nature of the stringent constraints on the temporal variation of the basic interactions of physics which has been demonstrated in studies of the relative abundances of naturally occurring and fission fragment produced isotopes at the natural reactor site at Oklo, are considered. (U.K.)

  20. Fission fragment rocket concept

    A new propulsion scheme is outlined which may permit interstellar missions for spacecraft. This scheme is based on the idea of allowing fission fragments to escape from the core of a nuclear reactor. (orig.)

  1. Fission Systems for Mars Exploration

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, T.; Dorney, D. J.; Swint, Marion Shayne

    2012-01-01

    Fission systems are used extensively on earth, and 34 such systems have flown in space. The energy density of fission is over 10 million times that of chemical reactions, giving fission the potential to eliminate energy density constraints for many space missions. Potential safety and operational concerns with fission systems are well understood, and strategies exist for affordably developing such systems. By enabling a power-rich environment and highly efficient propulsion, fission systems could enable affordable, sustainable exploration of Mars.

  2. Review of Fission Theory

    A survey of the present state of fission theory is attempted. The basic requirements of a theory of a physical process are outlined and against this background the state of fission theory is summarized, with special emphasis on developments in the past few years. An attempt is made to bring out the most important outstanding problems to be settled by future experiments and theory. (author)

  3. Fission product detection

    The response of photovoltaic cells to heavy ions and fission products have been tested on beam. Their main advantages are their extremely low price, their low sensitivity to energetic light ions with respect to fission products, and the possibility to cut and fit them together to any shape without dead zone. The time output signals of a charge sensitive preamplifier connected to these cells allows fast coincidences. A resolution of 12ns (F.W.H.M.) have been measured between two cells

  4. Feasibility of Producing Molybdenum-99 on a Small Scale Using Fission of Low Enriched Uranium or Neutron Activation of Natural Molybdenum

    This publication documents the work performed within the IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on Developing Techniques for Small Scale Indigenous Molybdenum-99 Production Using LEU Fission or Neutron Activation. The project allowed participating institutions to receive training and information on aspects necessary for starting production of molybdenum-99 (99Mo) on a small scale, that is, to become national level producers of this medical isotope. Stable production of 99Mo is one of the most pressing issues facing the nuclear community at present, because the medical isotope technetium-99m (99mTc), which decays from 99Mo, is one of the most widely used radionuclides in diagnostic imaging and treatment around the world. In the past five years, there have been widespread shortages of 99Mo owing to the limited number of producers, many of which use ageing facilities. To assist in stabilizing the production of 99Mo, and to promote the use of production methods that do not rely on the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU), the IAEA initiated the abovementioned CRP on small scale 99Mo production using low enriched uranium (LEU) fission or neutron activation methods. The intention was to enable participating institutions to gain the knowledge necessary to become national level producers of 99Mo in the event of further global shortages. Some of the institutions that participated in the CRP have continued their work on 99Mo production, and are enlisting the assistance of other CRP members and the IAEA’s technical cooperation programme to set up a small scale production capability. In total, the CRP was active for six years, and concluded in December 2011. During the CRP, fourteen IAEA Member States took part; four research coordination meetings were held, and four workshops were held on operational aspects of 99Mo production, LEU target fabrication and waste management. Most participants carried out work related to the entire production process, from target assembly to

  5. Fission gas release (FGASRL)

    During irradiation of water reactor fuel rods, gaseous fission products are produced in the fuel and are slowly released to various voipd volumes in the fuel rods. The released fission gases degrade the initial fill gas thermal conductivity and thus change the thermal response of the fuel rods. Moreover, fuel rod internal pressure is increased so that the cladding mechanical response is affected. The fission gas release subcode FGASRL is intended for use in analytical codes which predict water reactor fuel pin behavior. The development effort was directed primarily at improving code predictions of the gas release model used in FRAP-S3 which overpredicts release of fuels irradiated at relatively low operating temperatures and therefore small gas release fractions. The fission gas release subcode (FGASRL) presented in the report describes a two-step gas release process: (a) fission gas release from fuel grains to the grain boundaries, and (b) fission gas release from the grain boundaries to internal free volume of the fuel pin

  6. Potential Operating Orbits for Fission Electric Propulsion Systems Driven by the SAFE-400

    Houts, Mike; Kos, Larry; Poston, David; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Safety must be ensured during all phases of space fission system design, development, fabrication, launch, operation, and shutdown. One potential space fission system application is fission electric propulsion (FEP), in which fission energy is converted into electricity and used to power high efficiency (Isp greater than 3000s) electric thrusters. For these types of systems it is important to determine which operational scenarios ensure safety while allowing maximum mission performance and flexibility. Space fission systems are essentially nonradioactive at launch, prior to extended operation at high power. Once high power operation begins, system radiological inventory steadily increases as fission products build up. For a given fission product isotope, the maximum radiological inventory is typically achieved once the system has operated for a length of time equivalent to several half-lives. After that time, the isotope decays at the same rate it is produced, and no further inventory builds in. For an FEP mission beginning in Earth orbit, altitude and orbital lifetime increase as the propulsion system operates. Two simultaneous effects of fission propulsion system operation are thus (1) increasing fission product inventory and (2) increasing orbital lifetime. Phrased differently, as fission products build up, more time is required for the fission products to naturally convert back into non-radioactive isotopes. Simultaneously, as fission products build up, orbital lifetime increases, providing more time for the fission products to naturally convert back into non-radioactive isotopes. Operational constraints required to ensure safety can thus be quantified.

  7. Prompt Neutrons from Fission

    A survey is given of the present state of knowledge of the spectrum, angular distribution and number of prompt fission neutrons, as functions of incident neutron energy and individual fragment mass, for low-energy fission. The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons has been found to be of the same form (nearly Maxwellian) for many different types of fission. It has been shown that this type of spectrum is to be expected on the basis of evaporation from moving fragments, and theoretical predictions of the spectrum agree very accurately with experimental data. Some data are now available on the variation of the neutron spectrum with fragment mass and angle of emission. Only recently has it become possible to take accurate data on the angular distribution of the neutrons. It appears that the neutrons have the angular distribution to be expected if emitted almost isotropically from the moving fragments, with a possibility that some small fraction are not emitted in this way, but directly from the fissioning nuclide. Much work has been done on the variation of fission neutron number v with incident neutron energy for neutron-induced fission. The neutron number increases roughly linearly with energy, with a slope of about 0.15 n/MeV. There is now evidence that this slope changes somewhat with energy. This change must be associated with other changes in the-fission process. The most interesting recent discovery concerning fission neutrons is the strong dependence of neutron number on individual fragment mass. The data are being rapidly improved by means of the newer techniques of determining fragment mass yields from velocity and pulse-height data, and of determining neutron yields from cumulative mass yields. There is evidence of similar dependence of neutron yield on fragment mass in a number of cases. It has been suggested that this property is directly connected with the deformability of the fragments, and in particular with the near-spherical shapes of magic

  8. Fission waves can oscillate

    Osborne, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Under the right conditions, self sustaining fission waves can form in fertile nuclear materials. These waves result from the transport and absorption of neutrons and the resulting production of fissile isotopes. When these fission, additional neutrons are produced and the chain reaction propagates until it is poisoned by the buildup of fission products. It is typically assumed that fission waves are soliton-like and self stabilizing. However, we show that in uranium, coupling of the neutron field to the 239U->239Np->239Pu decay chain can lead to a Hopf bifurcation. The fission reaction then ramps up and down, along with the wave velocity. The critical driver for the instability is a delay, caused by the half-life of 239U, between the time evolution of the neutron field and the production of 239Pu. This allows the 239Pu to accumulate and burn out in a self limiting oscillation that is characteristic of a Hopf bifurcation. Time dependent results are obtained using a numerical implementation of a reduced order r...

  9. Current position on fission product behavior

    The following phenomena are treated and modeled: fission product release from fuel, both in-vessel and ex-vessel; fission product deposition in the primary system, fission product deposition in the containment, and fission product revolatization

  10. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Léonie

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ , e-) . The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  11. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Leonie [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e{sup -}). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for

  12. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e-). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  13. Characteristics of Coulomb fission

    Oberacker, Volker; Greiner, Walter; Kruse, Hans; Pinkston, William T.

    2006-01-01

    Within an extended semiquantal theory we perform large-sized coupled-channel calculations involving 260 collective levels for Coulomb fission of 238U. Differential Coulomb fission cross sections are studied as a function of bombarding energy and impact parameter for several projectiles. In the Xe + U case, total cross sections are also given. We find a strong dependence on projectile charge number, PCF(180°)∼(Zp)6 in the region 50≤Zp≤92 for a fixed ratio E/ECoul, which might...

  14. Fission dynamics of hot nuclei

    Santanu Pal; Jhilam Sadhukhan

    2014-04-01

    Experimental evidence accumulated during the last two decades indicates that the fission of excited heavy nuclei involves a dissipative dynamical process. We shall briefly review the relevant dynamical model, namely the Langevin equations for fission. Statistical model predictions using the Kramers’ fission width will also be discussed.

  15. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  16. Microscopic Description of Induced Fission

    Schunck, N

    2013-01-01

    Selected aspects of the description of neutron-induced fission in 240Pu in the framework of the nuclear energy density functional theory at finite temperature are presented. In particular, we discuss aspects pertaining to the choice of thermodynamic state variables, the evolution of fission barriers as function of the incident neutron energy, and the temperatures of the fission fragments.

  17. Status of fission yield measurements

    Fission yield measurement and yield compilation activities in the major laboratories of the world are reviewed. In addition to a general review of the effort of each laboratory, a brief summary of yield measurement activities by fissioning nuclide is presented. A new fast reactor fission yield measurement program being conducted in the US is described

  18. Monte Carlo simulation based toy model for fission process

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear fission has been modeled notoriously using two approaches method, macroscopic and microscopic. This work will propose another approach, where the nucleus is treated as a toy model. The aim is to see the usefulness of particle distribution in fission yield calculation. Inasmuch nucleus is a toy, then the Fission Toy Model (FTM) does not represent real process in nature completely. The fission event in FTM is represented by one random number. The number is assumed as width of distribution probability of nucleon position in compound nuclei when fission process is started. By adopting the nucleon density approximation, the Gaussian distribution is chosen as particle distribution. This distribution function generates random number that randomizes distance between particles and a central point. The scission process is started by smashing compound nucleus central point into two parts that are left central and right central points. The yield is determined from portion of nuclei distribution which is proportional with portion of mass numbers. By using modified FTM, characteristic of particle distribution in each fission event could be formed before fission process. These characteristics could be used to make prediction about real nucleons interaction in fission process. The results of FTM calculation give information that the γ value seems as energy.

  19. Fission product data library

    A library is described of data for 584 isotopes of fission products, including decay constants, branching ratios (both burn-up and decay), the type of emitted radiation, relative and absolute yields, capture cross sections for thermal neutrons, and resonance integrals. When a detailed decay scheme is not known, the mean energies of beta particles and neutrino and gamma radiations are given. In the ZVJE SKODA system the library is named BIBFP and is stored on film No 49 of the NE 803 B computer. It is used in calculating the inventory of fission products in fuel elements (and also determining absorption cross sections for burn-up calculations, gamma ray sources, heat generation) and in solving radioactivity transport problems in the primary circuit. It may also be used in the spectrometric method for burn-up determination of fuel elements. The library comprises the latest literary data available. It serves as the basis for library BIBGRFP storing group constants of fission products with independent yields of isotopes from fission. This, in turn, forms the basis for the BIBDN library collecting data on the precursors of delayed neutron emitters. (author)

  20. Fission yields in the thermal neutron fission of plutonium-239

    Fission yields for 27 mass numbers were determined in the thermal neutron fission of 239Pu using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry and radiochemical method. The results obtained using gamma ray spectrometry and from the investigations on the fission yield of 99Mo using radiochemical method were reported earlier. These data along with fission yields for 19 mass numbers determined using radiochemical method formed a part of Ph.D. thesis. The data given here are a compilation of all the results and are presented considering the neutron temperature correction to 239Pu fission cross-section which is used for calculating the total number of fissions in these studies. A comparison is made of the resulting fission yield values with the latest experimentally determined values and those given in two recent compilations. (author)

  1. Neutrino-driven nucleon fission reactors: Supernovae, quasars, and the big bang

    The purpose of this work is to establish the existence of naturally occurring celestial neutrino-driven nucleon fission chain reaction reactors as the first step in the development of controlled nucleon fission reactors on Earth. Celestial nucleon fission reactors provide functioning models that serve as starting points for reactor development. Recognizing supernovae, quasars, and the Big Bang as functioning neutrino-driven nucleon fission reactors presents the nuclear industry with a new and significant challenge. That challenge is our technological prowess to achieve a controlled nucleon fission chain reaction using the Earth's resources

  2. Fission modes of mercury isotopes

    Warda, M; Nazarewicz, W

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments on beta-delayed fission in the mercury-lead region and the discovery of asymmetric fission in $^{180}$Hg [1] have stimulated renewed interest in the mechanism of fission in heavy nuclei. Here we study fission modes and fusion valleys in $^{180}$Hg and $^{198}$Hg using the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory employing Skyrme and Gogny energy density functionals. We show that the observed transition from asymmetric fission in $^{180}$Hg towards more symmetric distribution of fission fragments in $^{198}$Hg can be explained in terms of competing fission modes of different geometries that are governed by shell effects in pre-scission configurations. The density distributions at scission configurations are studied and related to the experimentally observed mass splits.

  3. Dynamical features of nuclear fission

    Santanu Pal

    2015-08-01

    It is now established that the transition-state theory of nuclear fission due to Bohr and Wheeler underestimates several observables in heavy-ion-induced fusion–fission reactions. Dissipative dynamical models employing either the Langevin equation or equivalently the Fokker–Planck equation have been developed for fission of heavy nuclei at high excitations (T ∼1 MeV or higher). Here, we first present the physical picture underlying the dissipative fission dynamics. We mainly concentrate upon the Kramers’ prescription for including dissipation in fission dynamics. We discuss, in some detail, the results of a statistical model analysis of the pre-scission neutron multiplicity data from the reactions 19F+194,196,198Pt using Kramers’ fission width. We also discuss the multi-dimensional Langevin equation in the context of kinetic energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments.

  4. Fission product revaporization

    One of the major developmental advances in severe accident analysis since the Reactor Safety Study relates to the accounting for radionuclide retention in the reactor coolant system (RCS). The retention is predicted to occur as materials released during core heatup and degradation are transported through the RCS to the break (broken pipe, relief valve, etc.). For accidents involving relatively long RCS-transit times (e.g., station blackout in PWRs), the fraction of released material predicted to remain in the RCS can be large. For example, calculations for the Surry station blackout sequence showed retention of approximately 80% of the cesium and iodine species. Factors affecting fission product revaporization are post-vessel-failure thermal hydraulics, heat loss through vessel and pipe walls, and revaporization chemistry. The accident conditions relevant to this issue range from those present immediately after vessel failure to those present after containment failure. The factors that affect fission product revaporization are discussed

  5. Fission fragment angular distributions

    Recently a Letter appeared (Phys. Rev. Lett., 522, 414(1984)) claiming that the usual expression for describing the angula distribution of fission fragments from compound nuclear decay is not a necessarily valid limit of a more general expression. In this comment we wish to point out that the two expressions arise from distinctly different models, and that the new expression as used in the cited reference is internally inconsistent

  6. Statistical theory of fission

    In nuclear reactions where a compound nucleus is formed at high excitation energies, one is forced to use a statistical theory to explain the observables of the reaction. The statistical theory of fission of Weisskopf-Ewing-Newton and Ericson is applied to binary spallation of 16O, 20Ne, and 14N by protons in the proton energy range of 20 to 150 MeV, 0 to 105 MeV, and 0 to 41.9 MeV, respectively. The capture cross section of the incident proton is calculated from the reaction cross section using appropriate optical model potentials. The differential and total cross sections for binary fragmentation into near symmetric mass nuclei are calculated which are in reasonable agreement with experimental results. The kinetic energy spectrum and decay widths in the final channels are also calculated, however these have not been measured experimentally for comparison. All of these calculations are done using three different ion-ion optical potentials suggested by others. One then reformulated the statistical theory to include the second law of thermodynamics. Both theories are applied to neutron induced fission of 239Pu, 235U, 233U, 229Th, and 226Ra at several different neutron and alpha energies using the recently proposed external barrier between the saddle and the scission point. The transmission functions are calculated using a set of coupled equations in the exit channels. The computed results indicate that the model can account for the observed variation of the percentage mass yield spectra. Furthermore one calculated the most probable kinetic energy in the fission in all cases and found it to agree with the observation. The spontaneous and isomer fission half lives are calculated giving good agreement with experimental data. The kinetic energy spectrums are also computed for some representative daughter pairs. The inclusion of the second law of thermodynamics improves the agreement between theory and experiment

  7. Extended optical model for fission

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for U,235234(n ,f ) , while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n ,f ) reactions. The 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for U,238235(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. The extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  8. Measurement of the Ratio of Fissions in U238 to Fissions in U233 Using 1.60 Mev Gamma Rays of the Fission Product La140

    This paper describes a method for measuring δ28, the ratios of fissions in U238 to fissions in U235. The method was developed as a part of the D2O lattice programme at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) ; however, it can be used for measurements in any thermal reactor of natural or slightly enriched uranium. The fast fission factor in uranium cannot be measured directly. It is, however, related to δ28 which can be measured: ϵ =1 + Cδ28 , where C is a constant involving nuclear properties of U238 and U235: Previous methods of measuring δ28 utilize a comparison of fission-product gamma or beta activity in foils of differing U235 concentration irradiated within a fuel rod in the lattice. A double fission chamber is then used to relate the U238 and U235 fission product activity to the ratio of the corresponding fission rates. Most of the experimental uncertainty associated with the measurement of δ28 a is generally attributed to the fission chamber calibration. The method developed at MIT avoids the need for a fission chamber calibration and is accomplished directly with foils irradiated within a fuel rod in the lattice. Two foils of differing U235 concentration are irradiated and allowed to cool for at least a week. The relative activity of the 1.60 MeV gamma ray of the fission product La140 is determined for the two foils. This ratio, the foil weights and atomic densities, and the ratio of fission yields β25/β28 for La140 are then used to determine δ28. This value of δ28 is used to calibrate simpler measurements in which the relative gamma activity above 0.72 MeV is determined for sets of foils irradiated in fuel rods of the lattices of interest. The energy 0.72 MeV is a convenient discrimination level, as it is the maximum energy of Bremsstrahlung from 2.3-d Np239. This method appears to offer the advantages of direct measurement and increased accuracy (the major uncertainty being the ratio of β25/β28 La140). In addition, the results can be

  9. Low-energy ternary fission

    With the detector system DIOGENES thermal neutron induced and spontaneous α particle associated fission and spontaneous nuclear tripartition into three fragments of similar masses has been investigated. DIOGENES is a concentric arrangement of toroidal angular position sensitive ionization chambers and proportional counters to measure the kinetic energies and relative angular distributions of the three reaction products of ternary fission. For α-particle accompanied fission some of the many possible α particle fission-fragment parameter correlations will be discussed. For nearly symmetric low-energy nuclear tripartition new upper limits are presented. Former experimental results which pretended evidence for so called true ternary fission could be explained by charged-particle associated fission with a light particle in the mass range of 13 < A < 23

  10. Fission in Rapidly Rotating Nuclei

    A. K. Rhine Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of rotation in fission of the atomic nucleus 256Fm using an independent-particle shell model with the mean field represented by a deformed Woods-Saxon potential and the shapes defined through the Cassinian oval parametrization. The variations of barrier height with increasing angular momentum, appearance of double hump in fission path are analysed. Our calculations explain the appearance of double hump in fission path of 256Fm nucleus. The second minimum vanishes with increase in angular momentum which hints that the fission barrier disappears at large spin.

  11. Hidden systematics of fission channels

    Schmidt Karl-Heinz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is a common procedure to describe the fission-fragment mass distributions of fissioning systems in the actinide region by a sum of at least 5 Gaussian curves, one for the symmetric component and a few additional ones, together with their complementary parts, for the asymmetric components. These components have been attributed to the influence of fragment shells, e.g. in the statistical scission-point model of Wilkins, Steinberg and Chasman. They have also been associated with valleys in the potential-energy landscape between the outer saddle and the scission configuration in the multi-channel fission model of Brosa. When the relative yields, the widths and the mean mass-asymmetry values of these components are fitted to experimental data, the mass distributions can be very well reproduced. Moreover, these fission channels are characterised by specific values of charge polarisation, total kinetic energy and prompt-neutron yields. The present contribution investigates the systematic variation of the characteristic fission-channel properties as a function of the composition and the excitation energy of the fissioning system. The mean position of the asymmetric fission channels in the heavy fragment is almost constant in atomic number. The deformation of the nascent fragments at scission, which is the main source of excitation energy of the separated fission fragments ending up in prompt-neutron emission, is found to be a unique function of Z for the light and the heavy fragment of the asymmetric fission channels. A variation of the initial excitation energy of the fissioning system above the fission saddle is only seen in the neutron yield of the heavy fragment. The charge polarisation in the two most important asymmetric fission channels is found to be constant and to appreciably exceed the macroscopic value. The variation of the relative yields and of the positions of the fission channels as a function of the composition and excitation energy

  12. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Lantz M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f and Th(p,f have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  13. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  14. Fission approach to cluster radioactivity

    D N Poenaru; R A Gherghescu

    2015-09-01

    Fission theory is used to explain decay. Also, the analytical superasymmetric fission (ASAF) model is successfully employed to make a systematic search and to predict, with other models, cluster radioactivity. The macroscopic–microscopic method is illustrated for the superheavy nucleus 286Fl. Then a few results of the theoretical approach of decay (ASAF, UNIV and semFIS models), cluster decay (ASAF and UNIV) and spontaneous fission dynamics are described with Werner–Wheeler and cranking inertia. UNIV denotes universal curve and semFIS the fission-based semiempirical formula.

  15. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural material of the fission chamber, etc

  16. Fission decay properties of ultra neutron-rich uranium isotopes

    L Satpathy; S K Patra; R K Choudhury

    2008-01-01

    The fission decay of highly neutron-rich uranium isotopes is investigated which shows interesting new features in the barrier properties and neutron emission characteristics in the fission process. 233U and 235U are the nuclei in the actinide region in the beta stability valley which are thermally fissile and have been mainly used in reactors for power generation. The possibility of occurrence of thermally fissile members in the chain of neutron-rich uranium isotopes is examined here. The neutron number = 162 or 164 has been predicted to be magic in numerous theoretical studies carried out over the years. The series of uranium isotopes around it with = 154-172 are identified to be thermally fissile on the basis of the fission barrier and neutron separation energy systematics; a manifestation of the close shell nature of = 162 (or 164). We consider here the thermal neutron fission of a typical representative 249U nucleus in the highly neutron-rich region. Semiempirical study of fission barrier height and width shows that 250U nucleus is stable against spontaneous fission due to increase in barrier width arising out of excess neutrons. On the basis of the calculation of the probability of fragment mass yields and the microscopic study in relativistic mean field theory, this nucleus is shown to undergo exotic decay mode of thermal neutron fission (multi-fragmentation fission) whereby a number of prompt scission neutrons are expected to be simultaneously released along with the two heavy fission fragments. Such properties will have important implications in stellar evolution involving -process nucleosynthesis.

  17. Determination for β-delayed fission probability of 230Ac

    袁双贵; 杨维凡; 徐岩冰; 肖永厚; 罗亦孝

    2002-01-01

    The 230Ra has been produced via 232Th-2p reaction induced by 60 MeV/u 18O ion irradia-tion of natural thorium. The radium was radiochemically separated from the mixture of thorium andreaction products. Thin Ra sources in which 230Ac was got through 230Ra β- → 230Ac were pre-pared for observing fission fragments from β-delayed fission of 230Ac. The sources were exposedto the mica fission track detectors and measured by the HPGe γ detector. The precursor 230Ac wasidentified by means of observed two fission events as well as γ spectra, and the β-delayed fissionprobability of 230Ac was obtained to be (1.19±0.85) × 10-8.

  18. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) has been developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement

  19. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Shields, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Arnold, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Blakeley, R. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hecht, A.A.; Heffern, L.E. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mader, D. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); O' Donnell, J.M.; Sierk, A.; White, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-07-11

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) has been developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using {sup 229}Th and {sup 252}Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Mass yield results measured from {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.

  20. Energy from nuclear fission(*

    Ripani M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  1. Disintegration constant of uranium-238 by spontaneous fission redetermined by glass track method

    The disintegration constant of U238 by spontaneous fission using glass as fission fragment detector was redetermined. A film of natural uranium (UO3) prepared by chemical methods on the glass lamina was used in a long time experience of exposure (about 16 years). The good conditions of sample preparation and storage allow to observe, after chemical etching, fission fragment tracks. (M.C.K.)

  2. Observation of cold fission in 242Pu spontaneous fission

    Coincidence γ-ray data from the spontaneous fission of 242Pu were collected at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory high purity Ge (HPGe) array, GAMMASPHERE. Data from several cold-fission (0 neutron emission) isotopic pairs were observed and are presented. An interesting trend in the fractional population of cold-fission events was observed and is discussed. Relative yields of Zr-Xe, Sr-Ba, and Mo-Te pairs were measured. The Zr-Xe system has the most complete data set. Some speculations on the trend in the number of neutrons emitted as a function of the mass of the Xe isotope populated are presented. Comparisons between the yields from the spontaneous fission of 242Pu and the yields from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 241Pu are also presented. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Spatial distribution of thorium fission rate in a fast spallation and fission neutron field: An experimental and Monte Carlo study

    The Energy plus Transmutation (EpT) set-up of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia is composed of a lead spallation target surrounded by a blanket of natural uranium. The resultant neutron spectrum is a combination of spallation and fission spectra, modified by a reflective external layer of polyethylene and an internal absorbing layer of cadmium. The EpT set-up was irradiated with a beam of 4 GeV deuterons from the Nuclotron Accelerator at JINR. The spatial distribution of thorium fission rate within the assembly was determined experimentally, using a fission track detector technique, and compared with Monte Carlo predictions of the MCNPX code. Contributions of neutrons, protons, deuterons, photons and pions to total fission were taken into account. Close agreement between the experimental and calculated results was found.

  4. Fission throughout the periodic table

    The dualistic view of fission and evaporation as two distinct compound nucleus processes is substituted with a unified view in which fission, complex fragment emission, and light particle evaporation are seen as different aspects of a single process. 47 refs., 22 figs

  5. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  6. Fission at high angular momenta

    By studies on the system 40Ar+165Ho by means of selected measuring methods which made a differential selection of certain angular momentum ranges and by this a discrimination between ''fast fission'' and compound-nucleus fission possible the validity of fundamental predictions of the model of the ''fast fission'' hitherto experimentally no yet confirmed was studied: 1) At the turning point of the trajectory for ''fast fission'' calculated by Gregoire the corresponding shape of which must be responsible for the angular distribution the centers of the two fragments must be separated by about 11 fm. 2) The widths of the mass distributions after ''fast fission'' and compound-nucleus fission must be different by a factor 2. The measurements of the angular dependence showed that both prediction cannot be simultaneously brought into accordance with the experimental results. The results of coincidence measurements between fission fragments and alpha particles confirmed the assumption mentioned under topic 2. The analysis of the angular dependence then yielded for the shape of the nuclear complex leading to ''fast fission'' a more compact shape than that indicated by Gregoire, namely with a distance of the fragments of about 7 fm. (orig.)

  7. Fission throughout the periodic table

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-04-01

    The dualistic view of fission and evaporation as two distinct compound nucleus processes is substituted with a unified view in which fission, complex fragment emission, and light particle evaporation are seen as different aspects of a single process. 47 refs., 22 figs.

  8. Fission of Halving Edges Graphs

    Khovanova, Tanya; Yang, Dai

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an operation on halving edges graph that we call fission. Fission replaces each point in a given configuration with a small cluster of k points. The operation interacts nicely with halving edges, so we examine its properties in detail.

  9. Fission Dynamics of Compound Nuclei

    Iwata, Yoritaka; Heinz, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Collisions between $^{248}$Cm and $^{48}$Ca are systematically investigated by time-dependent density functional calculations with evaporation prescription. Depending on the incident energy and impact parameter, fusion, deep-inelastic and quasi-fission events are expected to appear. In this paper, possible fission dynamics of compound nuclei is presented.

  10. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    Karpeshin, F. F., E-mail: fkarpeshin@gmail.com [D.I. Mendeleev Institute forMetrology (VNIIM) (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values.

  11. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the tenth issue of a report series on Fission Product Data, which informs us about all the activities in this field, which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products, lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption, etc.). There is also a section with recent references relative to fission product nuclear data

  12. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values

  13. Nature

    Ferretti, Federico; Schmidt Di Friedberg, Marcella

    2012-01-01

    International audience From the ancient times to the present debates on nature and environment, the idea of Nature has been one of the main concepts which interested Geographers. This paper deals with the representations of this idea in the works of thinkers who played a major role in shaping modern Geography, with a special focus on the Mediterranean world. It aims to clarify how Nature was important in defining heuristic strategies of the geographical sciences and their explications of r...

  14. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    The news of the discovery of nuclear fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fifieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty Years with Nuclear Fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent development in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicated a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two fully days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main site of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered in this Volume 1 by this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled: Preclude to the First Chain Reaction -- 1932 to 1942; Early Fission Research -- Nuclear Structure and Spontaneous Fission; 50 Years of Fission, Science, and Technology; Nuclear Reactors, Secure Energy for the Future; Reactors 1; Fission Science 1; Safeguards and Space Applications; Fission Data; Nuclear Fission -- Its Various Aspects; Theory and Experiments in Support of Theory; Reactors and Safeguards; and General Research, Instrumentation, and By-Product. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  15. Prompt Fission Neutron Emission in Resonance Fission of 239Pu

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Varapai, Natallia; Zeinalov, Shakir; Oberstedt, Stephan; Serot, Olivier

    2005-05-01

    The prompt neutron emission probability from neutron-induced fission in the resonance region is being investigated at the time-of-flight facility GELINA of the IRMM. A double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is used as a fission-fragment detector. For the data acquisition of both the fission-fragment signals as well as the neutron detector signals the fast digitization technique has been applied. For the neutron detection, large-volume liquid scintillation detectors from the DEMON collaboration are used. A specialized data analysis program taking advantage of the digital filtering technique has been developed to treat the acquired data. Neutron multiplicity investigations for actinides, especially in resonance neutron-induced fission, are rather scarce. They are, however, important for reactor control and safety issues as well as for understanding the basic physics of the fission process. Fission yield measurements on both 235U and 239Pu without prompt neutron emission coincidence have shown that fluctuation of the fission-fragment mass distribution exists from resonance to resonance, larger in the case of 235U. To possibly explain these observations, the question now is whether the prompt neutron multiplicity shows similar fluctuations with resonance energy.

  16. Fission fragment angular distribution in heavy ion induced fission

    S. Soheyli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available   We have calculated the fission fragment angular anisotropy for 16O + 232Th,12C + 236U , 11B + 237 Np , 14 N + 232 Th , 11B + 235U , 12C + 232Th systems with the saddle point statistical model and compared the fission fragment angular anisotropy for these systems. This comparison was done with two methods a without neutron correction and b with neutron correction. Also we studied normal and anomalous behavior of the fission fragment angular anisotropy. Finally, we have predicted the average emitted neutron from compound nuclei considering the best fit for each system.

  17. Fission fragment angular distribution in heavy ion induced fission

    S. Soheyli; I. Ziaeian

    2006-01-01

      We have calculated the fission fragment angular anisotropy for 16O + 232Th,12C + 236U , 11B + 237 Np , 14 N + 232 Th , 11B + 235U , 12C + 232Th systems with the saddle point statistical model and compared the fission fragment angular anisotropy for these systems. This comparison was done with two methods a) without neutron correction and b) with neutron correction. Also we studied normal and anomalous behavior of the fission fragment angular anisotropy. Finally, we have predicted the averag...

  18. Prompt fission neutron emission in resonance fission of 239Pu

    The prompt fission neutron emission probability was investigated at the time-of-flight facility GELINA at the IRMM. A double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. For the data acquisition of both fission fragment signals as well as the neutron detector signals the fast digitization technique has been applied. For the neutron detection large volume liquid scintillation detectors from the DEMON collaboration were used. A specialized data analysis program taking advantage of the digital filtering technique has been developed to treat the acquired data

  19. Monte Carlo Based Toy Model for Fission Process

    Kurniadi, R; Viridi, S

    2014-01-01

    Fission yield has been calculated notoriously by two calculations approach, macroscopic approach and microscopic approach. This work will proposes another calculation approach which the nucleus is treated as a toy model. The toy model of fission yield is a preliminary method that use random number as a backbone of the calculation. Because of nucleus as a toy model hence the fission process does not represent real fission process in nature completely. Fission event is modeled by one random number. The number is assumed as width of distribution probability of nucleon position in compound nuclei when fission process is started. The toy model is formed by Gaussian distribution of random number that randomizes distance like between particle and central point. The scission process is started by smashing compound nucleus central point into two parts that are left central and right central points. These three points have different Gaussian distribution parameters such as mean ({\\mu}CN, {\\mu}L, {\\mu}R), and standard d...

  20. Fission fragment angular distribution measurements in 18O+194Pt reaction

    Fission fragment angular distributions were measured for 18O + 194Pt in energy range 78.2 - 87.3 MeV. The normal nature of angular anisotropy suggests that the reaction proceeded through true CN formation. The present results are consistent with result obtained from fission fragment mass distribution measurements carried out for reaction using other isotopes of platinum

  1. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    The news of the discovery of nucler fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fiftieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty years with nuclear fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent developments in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicating a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two full days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main sites of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered by Volume 2 of this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled, Nuclear fission -- a prospective; reactors II; fission science II; medical and industrial applications by by-products; reactors and safeguards; general research, instrumentation, and by-products; and fission data, astrophysics, and space applications. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  2. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    High-resolution measurements on γ rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author)

  3. Fission track studies of tektites

    The fission track analysis method was used for the age determination of tektites. The tektite samples were obtained from Hainan Island and Leizhou Peninsula. The method consists in cutting and polishing two sections of a sample, irradiating one of these with a known thermal neutron flux (5.90 x 1015/cm2), etching each section identically with hydrofluoric acid, and then comparing the fission track densities in two cases with a microscope. Their fission track age is found to be around 0.7 Ma

  4. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Change over from compound nuclear fission to quasi-fission

    Bhattacharya P; Golda K. S.; Rana T. K.; Mukhopadhyay S; Mukherjee G; Meena J. K.; Kundu S.; Bhattacharya S; Bhattacharya C.; Banerjee K; Ghosh T. K.

    2010-01-01

    Fission fragment mass distribution has been measured in two reactions to populate compound nucleus 246Bk. Both the target nuclei were deformed. However, entrance channel mass asymmetry of the two systems was on the either side of the Businaro Gallone mass asymmetry parameter. Near the Coulomb barrier, at similar excitation energies, the width of the fission fragment mass distribution was found to be significantly different for the 14N+232Th reaction compared to the 11B+235U reaction. T...

  6. Thirty years of nuclear fission in Yugoslavia

    Experimental nuclear reactor 'RB' in Boris Kidric Institute in Vinca is the first nuclear facility built in Yugoslavia in which the first Yugoslav controlled nuclear fission was achieved thirty years ago on April 26, 1958. Designed by Yugoslav scientist as a bare, natural uranium-heavy water critical assembly, the 'RB' reactor has survived a series of modifications trying to follow directions of contemporary nuclear research. The actual 'RB' reactor technical characteristics and experimental possibilities are described. The modifications are underlined, the experience gained and plans for future are presented. A brief review of reactor operation and experiments performed is shown. (author)

  7. Chemical Production using Fission Fragments

    Some reactor design considerations of the use of fission recoil fragment energy for the production of chemicals of industrial importance have been discussed previously in a paper given at the Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy [A/Conf. 15/P.76]. The present paper summarizes more recent progress made on this topic at AERE, Harwell. The range-energy relationship for fission fragments is discussed in the context of the choice of fuel system for a chemical production reactor, and the experimental observation of a variation of chemical effect along the length of a fission fragment track is described for the irradiation of nitrogen-oxygen mixtures. Recent results are given on the effect of fission fragments on carbon monoxide-hydrogen gas mixtures and on water vapour. No system investigated to date shows any outstanding promise for large-scale chemical production. (author)

  8. Background radiation from fission pulses

    England, T.R.; Arthur, E.D.; Brady, M.C.; LaBauve, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    Extensive source terms for beta, gamma, and neutrons following fission pulses are presented in various tabular and graphical forms. Neutron results from a wide range of fissioning nuclides (42) are examined and detailed information is provided for four fuels: /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 239/Pu; these bracket the range of the delayed spectra. Results at several cooling (decay) times are presented. For ..beta../sup -/ and ..gamma.. spectra, only /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu results are given; fission-product data are currently inadequate for other fuels. The data base consists of all known measured data for individual fission products extensively supplemented with nuclear model results. The process is evolutionary, and therefore, the current base is summarized in sufficient detail for users to judge its quality. Comparisons with recent delayed neutron experiments and total ..beta../sup -/ and ..gamma.. decay energies are included. 27 refs., 47 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Measurement of fission cross sections

    A review is presented on the recent progress in the experiment of fission cross section measurement, including recent activity in Japan being carried out under the project of nuclear data measurement. (author)

  10. Microscopic Description of Nuclear Fission Dynamics

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.; Maruhn, J. A.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss possible avenues to study fission dynamics starting from a time-dependent mean-field approach. Previous attempts to study fission dynamics using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory are analyzed. We argue that different initial conditions may be needed to describe fission dynamics depending on the specifics of the fission phenomenon and propose various approaches towards this goal. In particular, we provide preliminary calculations for studying fission following a heavy-io...

  11. Advanced Space Fission Propulsion Systems

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2010-01-01

    Fission has been considered for in-space propulsion since the 1940s. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) systems underwent extensive development from 1955-1973, completing 20 full power ground tests and achieving specific impulses nearly twice that of the best chemical propulsion systems. Space fission power systems (which may eventually enable Nuclear Electric Propulsion) have been flown in space by both the United States and the Former Soviet Union. Fission is the most developed and understood of the nuclear propulsion options (e.g. fission, fusion, antimatter, etc.), and fission has enjoyed tremendous terrestrial success for nearly 7 decades. Current space nuclear research and technology efforts are focused on devising and developing first generation systems that are safe, reliable and affordable. For propulsion, the focus is on nuclear thermal rockets that build on technologies and systems developed and tested under the Rover/NERVA and related programs from the Apollo era. NTP Affordability is achieved through use of previously developed fuels and materials, modern analytical techniques and test strategies, and development of a small engine for ground and flight technology demonstration. Initial NTP systems will be capable of achieving an Isp of 900 s at a relatively high thrust-to-weight ratio. The development and use of first generation space fission power and propulsion systems will provide new, game changing capabilities for NASA. In addition, development and use of these systems will provide the foundation for developing extremely advanced power and propulsion systems capable of routinely and affordably accessing any point in the solar system. The energy density of fissile fuel (8 x 10(exp 13) Joules/kg) is more than adequate for enabling extensive exploration and utilization of the solar system. For space fission propulsion systems, the key is converting the virtually unlimited energy of fission into thrust at the desired specific impulse and thrust

  12. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragment.

    Llanes Estrada, Felipe José; Martínez Carmona, Belén; Muñoz Martínez, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramers-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fr...

  13. Laser spectroscopy of fission fragments

    The study of the nuclear structure of fission fragments is discussed. They are neutron-rich nuclei the structure of which possesses some peculiarities. Two regions of fission fragments are discussed: near the shell closures N = 50 and N = 82 and at the boundary of the deformation. A view on the optical properties of these elements is presented and different laser spectroscopic methods for their investigation are proposed. (author)

  14. The microscopic theory of fission

    Younes, W.; Gogny, D.

    2009-01-01

    Fission-fragment properties have been calculated for thermal neutron-induced fission on a $^{239}\\textrm{Pu}$ target, using constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations with a finite-range effective interaction. A quantitative criterion based on the interaction energy between the nascent fragments is introduced to define the scission configurations. The validity of this criterion is benchmarked against experimental measurements of the kinetic energies and of multiplicities of neutrons emi...

  15. Hidden systematics of fission channels

    Schmidt Karl-Heinz; Jurado Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    It is a common procedure to describe the fission-fragment mass distributions of fissioning systems in the actinide region by a sum of at least 5 Gaussian curves, one for the symmetric component and a few additional ones, together with their complementary parts, for the asymmetric components. These components have been attributed to the influence of fragment shells, e.g. in the statistical scission-point model of Wilkins, Steinberg and Chasman. They have also been associated with valleys in th...

  16. Energy dependence of fission observables

    Paşca, Horia

    2016-01-01

    The mass, charge and isotopic distributions of fission fragments are studied within an improved scission-point statistical model in the reaction 235U+n at different energies of the incident neutron. The available experimental data are well reproduced and the energy-dependencies of the observable characteristics of fission are predicted for future experiments. The calculated mass distribution of 238U+n is also compared with experimental data.

  17. Fission hindrance and nuclear viscosity

    Indranil Mazumdar

    2015-08-01

    We discuss the role of nuclear viscosity in hindering the fission of heavy nuclei as observed in the experimental measurements of GDR -ray spectra from the fissioning nuclei. We review a set of experiments carried out and reported by us previously [see Dioszegi et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 024613 (2000); Shaw et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 044612 (2000)] and argue that the nuclear viscosity parameter has no apparent dependence on temperature. However, it may depend upon the deformation of the nucleus.

  18. Superheavy nuclei and fission barriers

    Lu, Bing-Nan; Zhao, Jie; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    In this chapter, we will present relativistic mean field (RMF) description of heavy and superheavy nuclei (SHN). We will discuss the shell structure and magic numbers in the mass region of SHN, binding energies and α decay Q values, shapes of ground states and potential energy surfaces and fission barriers. We particularly focus on the multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theories (CDFT) and the applications of CDFT to the study of exotic nuclear shapes and fission barriers.

  19. Dynamin-mediated membrane fission

    Morlot, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    Membrane fission is required for vesicular traffic between intracellular compartments. Dynamin is a GTPase implicated in vesicle scission during Clathrin-mediated endocytosis. It polymerizes into a helix at the neck of endocytic buds. Upon GTP hydrolysis, conformational changes reduce the helical radius and pitch showing that fission proceeds through a constriction mechanism. We show that the deformation of Dynamin helices is highly concerted and damped by the friction between membrane and Dy...

  20. Alpha Particle Emission in Fission

    Soon after it was discovered that alpha particles are occasionally emitted in fission, it was concluded, on the basis of the energy and angular distributions of these particles, that they are emitted from the space between the fragments at times close to that of the snapping of the neck that connects them. It is shown that, independent of any (still unknown) dynamic features of the alpha-particle ejection process, the energy required to emit alpha particles from between the fragments at the indicated time is barely available. Presumably the rareness of alpha particles in fission, and the apparent absence of still heavier ''third'' particles, is associated with the marginal energy supply at the time of actual fragment division. The fact that the total kinetic energy release in so-called ternary fission is roughly equal to that in normal binary fission instead of being about 20 MeV larger is shown to imply that the mean fragment separation at the division time is larger in ternary fission. This is interpreted to indicate that alpha particles are emitted with greatest probability n those fissions where ample energy happens to be provided through the stretching of an abnormally long neck between the fragments before they actually divide. It is suggested that the release of the alpha particles is a sudden rather than adiabatic process. (author)

  1. Fission fragment angular distributions and fission cross section validation

    The present knowledge of angular distributions of neutron-induced fission is limited to a maximal energy of 15 MeV, with large discrepancies around 14 MeV. Only 238U and 232Th have been investigated up to 100 MeV in a single experiment. The n-TOF Collaboration performed the fission cross section measurement of several actinides (232Th, 235U, 238U, 234U, 237Np) at the n-TOF facility using an experimental set-up made of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC), extending the energy domain of the incident neutron above hundreds of MeV. The method based on the detection of the 2 fragments in coincidence allowed to clearly disentangle the fission reactions among other types of reactions occurring in the spallation domain. I will show the methods we used to reconstruct the full angular resolution by the tracking of fission fragments. Below 10 MeV our results are consistent with existing data. For example in the case of 232Th, below 10 MeV the results show clearly the variation occurring at the first (1 MeV) and second (7 MeV) chance fission, corresponding to transition states of given J and K (total spin and its projection on the fission axis), and a much more accurate energy dependence at the 3. chance threshold (14 MeV) has been obtained. In the spallation domain, above 30 MeV we confirm the high anisotropy revealed in 232Th by the single existing data set. I'll discuss the implications of this finding, related to the low anisotropy exhibited in proton-induced fission. I also explore the critical experiments which is valuable checks of nuclear data. The 237Np neutron-induced fission cross section has recently been measured in a large energy range (from eV to GeV) at the n-TOF facility at CERN. When compared to previous measurements, the n-TOF fission cross section appears to be higher by 5-7 % beyond the fission threshold. To check the relevance of n-TOF data, we simulate a criticality experiment performed at Los Alamos with a 6 kg sphere of 237Np. This sphere was

  2. Status of fission power

    Fission energy is reviewed from the viewpoints of technology, economics, politics, manufacturers, consumers, and foreign countries. Technically, the reactor program is operating and the light water reactor industry shows signs of maturing, although recent business has been disappointing. Marketing of gas-cooled reactors depends, not on technical, but economic and political issues. Liquid metal fast breeder reactors have been demonstrated worldwide, while the gas-cooled fast breeder remains an undemonstrated option. Nuclear plants, currently costing the same as coal plants with scrubbers, are the cheapest option for utilities because most of the cost is imbedded. The defeat of nuclear initiatives in seven states indicates that public feeling is not as anti-nuclear as opponents to nuclear power claim. The harshness of last winter demonstrated the advantages of a power source that is not so sensitive to the weather for reliable operation and transport, as well as low cost energy. Other nations are proceeding to build a nuclear capability, which the U.S. may jeopardize because of concerns about the fuel cycle, nuclear waste disposal, uranium reserves, and nuclear proliferation

  3. Protactinium neutron-induced fission up to 200 MeV

    The theoretical evaluation of 230-233Pa(n,F) cross sections is based on direct data, 230-234Pa fission probabilities and ratios of fission probabilities in first-chance and emissive fission domains, surrogate for neutron-induced fission. First chance fission cross sections trends of Pa are based on consistent description of 232Th(n,F), 232Th(n,2n) and 238U(n,F), 238U(n,xn) data, supported by the ratio surrogate data by Burke et al., 2006, for the 237U(n,F) reaction. Ratio surrogate data on fission probabilities of 232Th(6Li,4He)234Pa and 232Th(6Li,d)236U by Nayak et al., 2008, support the predicted 233Pa(n,F) cross section at En=11.5-16.5 MeV. The predicted trends of 230-232Pa(n,F) cross section up to En=20 MeV, are consistent with fissile properties of Pa nuclides, extracted by 232Th(p,F) (Isaev et al., 2008) and 232Th(p,3n) (Morgenstern et al., 2008) data analysis. The excitation energy and nucleon composition dependence of the transition from asymmetric to symmetric scission for fission observables of Pa nuclei is defined by analysis of p-induced fission of 232Th at Ep=1-200 MeV. Predominantly symmetric fission in 232Th(p,F) at En(p)=200 MeV as revealed by experimental branching ratios (Dujvestijn et al., 1999) is reproduced. Steep transition from asymmetric to symmetric fission with increase of nucleon incident energy is due to fission of neutron-deficient Pa (A≤229) nuclei. A structure of the potential energy surface (a drop of symmetric and asymmetric fission barriers difference (Ef(SYM) - Ef(ASYM)) from about 3.5 MeV to 1 MeV) of N-deficient Pa nuclides (A≤226) and available phase space at outer fission saddles, are shown to be responsible for the sharp increase with En(p) of the symmetric fission component contribution for 232Th(p,F) and 230-233Pa(n,F) reactions. That is a strong evidence of emissive fission nature of moderately excited Pa nuclides, reliably quantified only up to En(p) about 20(30) MeV. Predicted fission cross section of 232Pa

  4. Protactinium neutron-induced fission up to 200 MeV

    Maslov V.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical evaluation of 230-233Pa(n,F cross sections is based on direct data, 230-234Pa fission probabilities and ratios of fission probabilities in first-chance and emissive fission domains, surrogate for neutroninduced fission. First chance fission cross sections trends of Pa are based on consistent description of 232Th(n,F, 232Th(n,2n and 238U(n,F, 238U(n,xn data, supported by the ratio surrogate data by Burke et al., 2006, for the 237U(n,F reaction. Ratio surrogate data on fission probabilities of 232Th(6 Li,4 He234Pa and 232 Th(6 Li,d236U by Nayak et al., 2008, support the predicted 233Pa(n, F cross section at En=11.5-16.5 MeV. The predicted trends of 230-232Pa(n, F cross section up to En=20 MeV, are consistent with fissilities of Pa nuclides, extracted by 232Th(p,F (Isaev et al., 2008 and 232Th(p,3n (Morgenstern et al., 2008 data analysis. The excitation energy and nucleon composition dependence of the transition from asymmetric to symmetric scission for fission observables of Pa nuclei is defined by analysis of p-induced fission of 232Th at Ep=1-200 MeV. Predominantly symmetric fission in 232Th(p,F at En( p=200 MeV as revealed by experimental branching ratios (Dujvestijn et al., 1999 is reproduced. Steep transition from asymmetric to symmetric fission with increase of nucleon incident energy is due to fission of neutron-deficient Pa (A≤229 nuclei. A structure of the potential energy surface (a drop of f f symmetric and asymmetric fission barriers difierence (EfSYM - EfASYM from ~3.5 MeV to ~1 MeV of N-deficient Pa nuclides (A≤226 and available phase space at outer fission saddles, are shown to be responsible for the sharp increase with En( p of the symmetric fission component contribution for 232Th(p,F and 230-233 Pa(n, F reactions. That is a strong evidence of emissive fission nature of moderately excited Pa nuclides, reliably quantified only up to En( p~20(30 MeV. Predicted fission cross section of 232Pa(n,F coincides with

  5. Properties and detection of ionizing radiation resulting from instantaneous fission and fission product mixture

    The different types of ionizing radiation accompanying fission and mixtures of fission products, their activity, the determination of the age of fission products and the biological hazard of radiation caused by instantaneous fission are described. The possibility is described of detection, and of the dosimetry of ionizing radiation resulting from instantaneous fission and emitted by a mixture of fission products, the determination of the dose of neutron radiation, surface contamination, internal contamination and the contamination of water and foods. (J.P.)

  6. Temperature transients of a fusion-fission ITER pebble bed reactor in loss of coolant accident

    In this preliminary scoping study, post-accident temperature transients of several fusion-fission designs utilizing ITER-FEAT-like parameters and fission pebble bed fuel technology are examined using a 1-D cylindrical MATLAB heat transfer code along with conventional fission decay heat approximations. Scenarios studied include systems with no additional passive safety features to systems with melting reflectors designed to increase emissivity after reaching a specified temperature. Results show that for a total fission power of ∼1400-2800 MW, two of the realistic variants investigated are passively safe. The crucial time, defined as the time when either any structural part of the fusion-fission tokamak reaches melting point, or when the pebble fuel reaches 1873 K, ranges from 5.7 to 76 h for the unsafe configurations. Additionally, it is illustrated that, fundamentally, the LOCA characteristics of pure fission pebble beds and fusion-fission pebble beds are different. Namely, the former depends on the pebble fuel's large thermal capacity, along with external radiation and natural convective cooling, while the latter depends significantly more on the tokamak's sizeable total internal heat capacity. This difference originates from the fusion-fission reactor's conflicting goal of having to minimize heat transfer to the magnets during normal operation. These results are discussed in the context of overall fusion-fission reactor design and safety

  7. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated nuclear fuel elements

    A fission gas measurement system for the analysis of released gases from MOX and PHWR fuels has been designed, fabricated and commissioned in the hot cells of Post Irradiation Examination Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The system was used for the measurement of fission gases released from natural UO2 fuels and ThO2 fuels from PHWRs. The burnups of these fuels ranged from 2 GWD/TeU to 15 GWD/TeU. Some of the results from PHWR fuel elements from Kakrapar Atomic Power Station are presented in the paper, to highlight the utility of the system. (author)

  8. Sequential Detection of Fission Processes for Harbor Defense

    Candy, J V; Walston, S E; Chambers, D H

    2015-02-12

    With the large increase in terrorist activities throughout the world, the timely and accurate detection of special nuclear material (SNM) has become an extremely high priority for many countries concerned with national security. The detection of radionuclide contraband based on their γ-ray emissions has been attacked vigorously with some interesting and feasible results; however, the fission process of SNM has not received as much attention due to its inherent complexity and required predictive nature. In this paper, on-line, sequential Bayesian detection and estimation (parameter) techniques to rapidly and reliably detect unknown fissioning sources with high statistical confidence are developed.

  9. Relative quantifying technique to measure mass of fission plate in a fission chamber

    Under the same neutron radiation conditions, fission counts are proportional to the number of fission nuclei. Based on this concept, a relative quantifying method has been developed to measure the mass of fission plate in fission chamber on a 14 MeV accelerator neutron source at the Neutron Physics Laboratory, INPC, CAEP. The experimental assembly was introduced and mass of the fission material in several fission chambers was measured. The results by this method agree well (within 1%) with the α-quantifying method. Therefore, it is absolutely feasible to quantify the fission plate mass in fission chambers. The measurement uncertainty is 2%-4%. (authors)

  10. Fission product solvent extraction

    Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF)

  11. A precursor of β-delayed fission:230Ac

    2002-01-01

    The 230Ra has been produced via multinucleon transfer and dissipativefragmentation of heavy target in the 60 MeV/u 18O ion reaction with natural thorium.The radium was radiochemically separated from irradiated thorium targets. 230Acwas obtained by 230Ra β-→ 230Ac. Thin Ra sources were prepared for observing fissionfragments from β-delayed fission of 230Ac. The sources were exposed to the micafission track detectors and measured by a HPGe γ detector. The two fission eventswere obtained and could been assigned to theβ-delayed fission of 230Ac. The β-delayedfission probability of 230Ac was determined to be (1.19+0.85) × 10-8.

  12. Developments for neutron-induced fission at IGISOL-4

    Gorelov, D.; Penttilä, H.; Al-Adili, A.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Koponen, J.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Reinikainen, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2016-06-01

    At the IGISOL-4 facility, neutron-rich, medium mass nuclei have usually been produced via charged particle-induced fission of natural uranium and thorium. Neutron-induced fission is expected to have a higher production cross section of the most neutron-rich species. Development of a neutron source along with a new ion guide continues to be one of the major goals since the commissioning of IGISOL-4. Neutron intensities at different angles from a beryllium neutron source have been measured in an on-line experiment with a 30 MeV proton beam. Recently, the new ion guide coupled to the neutron source has been tested as well. Details of the neutron source and ion guide design together with preliminary results from the first neutron-induced fission experiment at IGISOL-4 are presented in this report.

  13. Prompt Emission in Fission Induced with Fast Neutrons

    Wilson, J. N.; Lebois, M.; Halipré, P.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.

    Prompt gamma-ray and neutron emission data in fission integrates a large amount of information on the fission process and can shed light on the partition of energy. Measured emission spectra, average energies and multiplicities also provide important information for energy applications. While current reactors mostly use thermal neutron spectra, the future reactors of Generation IV will use fast neutron spectra for which little experimental prompt emission data exist. Initial investigations on prompt emission in fast neutron induced fission have recently been carried out at the LICORNE facility at the IPN Orsay, which exploits inverse reactions to produce naturally collimated, intense beams of neutrons. We report on first results with LICORNE to measure prompt fission gamma-ray spectra, average energies and multiplicities for 235U and 238U. Current improvements and upgrades being carried out on the LICORNE facility will also be described, including the development of a H2 gas target to reduce parasitic backgrounds and increase intensities, and the deployment of 11B beams to extend the effective LICORNE neutron energy range up to 12 MeV. Prospects for future experimental studies of prompt gamma-ray and neutron emission in fast neutron induced fission will be presented.

  14. Separation of fission molybdenum for the production of technetium generators

    There are two basically different methods for Mo-99 production: Activation of Mo-98 contained at about 24% in natural isotopic mixtures. Mo-98 enriched targets are irradiated in high-flux reactors in order to achieve the highest possible specific acitivity of the product. Isolation of fission molybdenum from irradiated nuclear fuel targets which have undergone short-term cooling. Maximum fission yields can be attained by irradiation of uranium-235 with the highest possible enrichment. On account of its approximately 1000 times higher specific activity, fission molybdenum has almost replaced worldwide the product fabricated by activation. However, fission molybdenum-99 production has as its prerequisite a suitably advanced technology by which the production process taking place under high activity conditions can be controlled. An integral part of the process consists in the retention of the fission gases the recycling of non-consumed nuclear fuel, and the treatment of the waste streams arising. Ths publication will deal with the individual steps in the process. (orig.)

  15. The latest progress of fission track analysis

    Fission track analysis as a new nuclear track technique is based on fission track annealing in mineral and is used for oil and gas exploration successfully. The west part of China is the main exploration for oil and gas. The oil and gas basins there experienced much more complicated thermal history and higher paleotemperature. In order to apply fission track analysis to these basins, following work was be carried out: 1. The decomposition of grain age distribution of zircon fission tracks. 2. Study on thermal history of Ordos basin using zircon fission track analysis. 3. The fission track study on the Qiang Tang basin in tibet

  16. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: approximately twice the efficiency if the fission fragment energy can be directly converted into electricity; reduction of the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collection of the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem.

  17. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: Approximately twice as efficient if one can directly convert the fission fragment energy into electricity; by reducing the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor one could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collecting the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Contribution to the study of nuclear fission

    The author proposes an overview of his research activity during the past fifteen years and more particularly that dealing with nuclear fission. The first part reports works on nucleus physics at the scission via the investigation of ternary fission (experimental procedure, influence of fission modes, influence of resonance spin, influence of excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus, emission probabilities, energy spectra of ternary alphas and tritons, emission mechanism). The second part reports measurements and assessments of neutron-induced fission cross sections. The third part reports the investigation of some properties of fission products (efficiencies, branching ratios of the main delayed neutron precursors)

  19. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 BF2 crystals with equal solid-angle coverage. DANCE is a 4π γ-ray calorimeter and designed to study the neutron-capture reactions on small quantities of radioactive and rare stable nuclei. These reactions are important for the radiochemistry applications and modeling the element production in stars. The recognition of capture event is made by the summed γ-ray energy which is equivalent of the reaction Q-value and unique for a given capture reaction. For a selective group of actinides, where the neutron-induced fission reaction competes favorably with the neutron capture reaction, additional signature is needed to distinguish between fission and capture γ rays for the DANCE measurement. This can be accomplished by introducing a detector system to tag fission fragments and thus establish a unique signature for the fission event. Once this system is implemented, one has the opportunity to study not only the capture but also fission reactions. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to α particles, which is important for experiments with α-emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. A PPAC with an ingenious design was fabricated in 2006 by integrating amplifiers into the target assembly. However, this counter was proved to be unsuitable for this application because of issues related to the stability of amplifiers and the ability to separate fission fragments from α's. Therefore, a new design is needed. A LLNL proposal to develop a new PPAC for DANCE was funded by NA22 in FY09. The design goal is to minimize the mass for the proposed counter and still be able to maintain a stable

  20. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Carter, D; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J

    2010-11-06

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 BF{sub 2} crystals with equal solid-angle coverage. DANCE is a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter and designed to study the neutron-capture reactions on small quantities of radioactive and rare stable nuclei. These reactions are important for the radiochemistry applications and modeling the element production in stars. The recognition of capture event is made by the summed {gamma}-ray energy which is equivalent of the reaction Q-value and unique for a given capture reaction. For a selective group of actinides, where the neutron-induced fission reaction competes favorably with the neutron capture reaction, additional signature is needed to distinguish between fission and capture {gamma} rays for the DANCE measurement. This can be accomplished by introducing a detector system to tag fission fragments and thus establish a unique signature for the fission event. Once this system is implemented, one has the opportunity to study not only the capture but also fission reactions. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to {alpha} particles, which is important for experiments with {alpha}-emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. A PPAC with an ingenious design was fabricated in 2006 by integrating amplifiers into the target assembly. However, this counter was proved to be unsuitable for this application because of issues related to the stability of amplifiers and the ability to separate fission fragments from {alpha}'s. Therefore, a new design is needed. A LLNL proposal to develop a new PPAC for DANCE was funded by NA22 in FY09. The design goal is to minimize the mass for the proposed

  1. Neutron emission prior to fission

    In recent years, many groups have measured neutrons and light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments in heavy ion reactions. In most cases, particles emitted with an energy spectrum and angular distribution characteristic of that of compound nucleus evaporation have been measured in excess of statistical model predictions. They have chosen to investigate this effect in detail by studying neutron emission in the 158Er composite system. The advantage of this system is that it can be produced by a variety of projectile target combinations. They have chosen four combinations which form 158Er with similar critical angular momenta but varying excitation energy. The rationale is to form the same system with different neutron emission times; if the enhanced neutrons are being emitted during the fission process, the different emission time scales might possibly be used to time the fission process. In addition, they impose an additional constraint - that they have a significant fission barrier for most of the partial waves involved in the fission process. The reactions they have selected are 16O + 142Nd (207 MeV beam energy), 24Mg + 134Ba (180 MeV), 32S + 126Te (180 MeV), 50Ti + 108Pd (216 MeV)

  2. Change over from compound nuclear fission to quasi-fission

    Bhattacharya P.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fission fragment mass distribution has been measured in two reactions to populate compound nucleus 246Bk. Both the target nuclei were deformed. However, entrance channel mass asymmetry of the two systems was on the either side of the Businaro Gallone mass asymmetry parameter. Near the Coulomb barrier, at similar excitation energies, the width of the fission fragment mass distribution was found to be significantly different for the 14N+232Th reaction compared to the 11B+235U reaction. The entrance channel mass asymmetry was found to play a significant role in deciding the fusion process.

  3. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    James, G D; Michaudon, A; Michaudon, A; Cierjacks, S W; Chrien, R E

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Fission and Neutron-Induced Fission Cross-Sections is the first volume in a series on Neutron Physics and Nuclear Data in Science and Technology. This volume serves the purpose of providing a thorough description of the many facets of neutron physics in different fields of nuclear applications. This book also attempts to bridge the communication gap between experts involved in the experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear properties and those involved in the technological applications of nuclear data. This publication will be invaluable to those interested in studying nuclear fis

  4. Early results utilizing high-energy fission product gamma rays to detect fissionable material in cargo

    Full text: A concept for detecting the presence of special nuclear material (235U or 239Pu) concealed in inter modal cargo containers is described. It is based on interrogation with a pulsed beam of 6-8 MeV neutrons and fission events are identified between beam pulses by their β-delayed neutron emission or β -delayed high-energy γ-radiation. The high-energy γ-ray signature is being employed for the first time. Fission product γ-rays above 3 MeV are distinct from natural radioactivity and from nearly all of the induced activity in a normal cargo. High-energy γ-radiation is nearly 10X more abundant than the delayed neutrons and penetrates even thick cargo's readily. The concept employs two large (8x20 ft) arrays of liquid scintillation detectors that have high efficiency for the detection of both delayed neutrons and delayed γ-radiation. Detector backgrounds and potential interferences with the fission signature radiation have been identified and quantified. This information, together with predicted signature strength, has been applied to the estimation of detection probability for the nuclear material and estimation of false alarm rates. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48

  5. Fission Yields in the Iodine Region

    Independent yields of all iodine isotopes from l118 to I134 except I122 (short-lived), I127(stable) and I129(long-lived) resulting from irradiating natural uranium with 590-MeV and 19-GeV protons have been measured. In addition, cross-sections (mostly cumulative) of many xenon and tellurium isotopes have been obtained. In the experiments extensive use has been made of an electromagnetic isotope separator, constructed at CERN for nuclear reaction studies, by which the iodine (or tellurium) isotopes were separated from samples chemically isolated from the irradiated targets. In the study of xenon isotopes the uranium target was heated in a small oven connected to the separator via a cold trap to stop unwanted activities. After the separation, the activity of the samples was measured by counting methods. In certain cases (I118, I119, I120,I121, Xe118, Xe119, Xe120, Xe121) spectroscopic investigations were performed to provide information for the conversion of the counting data to absolute counting-rates needed for the determination of the fission yields. The experiments show a significant shift in the isotopic cross-section distribution when the 19-GeV results are compared with those obtained at the lower irradiation energy. The yields far out ai the neutron-deficient wing increase considerably whereas the other part of the distribution is depressed. A comparison with spallation data indicates that the neutron-deficient part of the distribution might result from the spallation of uranium. Spallation gives negligible yields in the iodine regional 590 MeV, but at 19 GeV these cross-sections a re expected to be much larger. The competition with spallation decreases the probability for fission, and consequently the yields of the fission products will decrease. (author)

  6. Weathering processes at the natural nuclear reactor of Bangombe (Gabon). Identification and geochemical modeling of the retention and migration mechanisms of uranium and rare earth elements

    The natural nuclear fission reactor of Bangombe (Gabon) was discovered in 1985. It is located 30 km SE of the uranium Oklo ore deposit which is well-known for its reactors discovered in 1972. In contrast to the latter ones, the reaction zone of Bangombe is situated close to the surface and therefore has been affected by supergene weathering processes. The purpose of this study was to characterize the main effects related to these alteration processes on the rocks surrounding the Bangombe reactor zone as well as to determine the major mechanisms, influencing the migration and retention of U and REE in this geological system. The different approaches considered in this study comprise mineralogical and geochemical investigations, mass balance calculations, sequential extraction experiments as well as thermodynamic simulations. It could be shown that the present rock and mineral assemblages result from a complex and multi-stage history during which the rocks were affected by diagenetic, hydrothermal, tectonic and recent alteration processes. Multiple transformations led to the setting of different horizons characterized by very specific physico-chemical conditions and mineral associations. It has been shown that in the various units of the weathering sequence, the mechanisms and mineral phases determining the U and REE migration/retention behaviour are quite different and highly dependent on the physico-chemical conditions prevailing in the ambient environment. Apart from residual and neo-formed clays, especially amorphous and crystalline Fe- and Mn oxides and oxy-hydroxides, phosphates as well as minor phases such as carbonates and heavy minerals were identified to play an important role in REE and U mobility. The acquisition of hydrodynamic data enabled to simulate water-rock interaction and mass-transfer processes which have been produced during the alteration of the Bangombe reactor zone. Thermodynamic simulations showed that elevated U-concentrations downstream

  7. Ternary fission of superheavy elements

    Balasubramaniam, M.; Vijayaraghavan, K. R.; Manimaran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Ternary fission of superheavy nuclei is studied within the three-cluster model potential energy surfaces (PESs). Due to shell effects, the stability of superheavy nuclei has been predicted to be associated with Z =114 , 120, and 126 for protons and N =184 for neutrons. Taking some representative nuclei we have extended the ternary fission studies to superheavy nuclei. We adopted two minimization procedures to minimize the potential and considered different arrangements of the fragments. The PES from one-dimensional minimization reveals a strong cluster region favoring various ternary breakups for an arrangement in which the lightest fragment is kept at the center. The PES obtained from two-dimensional minimization reveals strong preference of ternary fragmentation in the true ternary fission region. Though the dominant decay mode of superheavy nuclei is α decay, the α -accompanied ternary breakup is found to be a nonfavorable one. Further, the prominent ternary combinations are found to be associated with the neutron magic number.

  8. Status of fission yield data

    In this paper we summarize the current status of the recent US evaluation for 34 fissioning nuclides at one or more neutron incident energies and for spontaneous fission. Currently there are 50 yields sets, and for each we have independent and cumulative yields and uncertainties for approximately 1100 fission products. When finalized the recommended data will become part of Version VI of the US ENDF/B. Other major evaluations in progress that are included in a recently formed IAEA Coordinated Research Program are also summarized. In a second part we review two empirical models in use to estimate independent yields. Comparison of model estimates with measured data is presented, including a comparison with some recent data obtained from Lohengrin (Cf-249 T). 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Report of fission study meeting

    This book is the report of fission Study Meeting held from September 19 to 21, 1985 in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. The objective of this study meeting was to stimulate the research on nuclear physics in Japan, which began to show new development accompanying the advance of the research on heavy ion nuclear reaction, and to make this a new starting point. More than 50 participants from physical, chemical and engineering fields, who have interest in the theory and experiment related to nuclear fission, gathered, and the meeting was a success beyond expectation. The contents covered a wide range including nuclear smashing reaction as well as nuclear fission in a narrow sense. In this book, the gists of 28 papers are collected. (Kako, I.)

  10. Observation of Two Triplet-Pair Intermediates in Singlet Exciton Fission.

    Pensack, Ryan D; Ostroumov, Evgeny E; Tilley, Andrew J; Mazza, Samuel; Grieco, Christopher; Thorley, Karl J; Asbury, John B; Seferos, Dwight S; Anthony, John E; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-07-01

    Singlet fission is an excitation multiplication process in molecular systems that can circumvent energy losses and significantly boost solar cell efficiencies; however, the nature of a critical intermediate that enables singlet fission and details of its evolution into multiple product excitations remain obscure. We resolve the initial sequence of events comprising the fission of a singlet exciton in solids of pentacene derivatives using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. We propose a three-step model of singlet fission that includes two triplet-pair intermediates and show how transient spectroscopy can distinguish initially interacting triplet pairs from those that are spatially separated and noninteracting. We find that the interconversion of these two triplet-pair intermediates is limited by the rate of triplet transfer. These results clearly highlight the classical kinetic model of singlet fission and expose subtle details that promise to aid in resolving problems associated with triplet extraction. PMID:27281713

  11. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Frégeau M.O.; Bryś T.; Gamboni Th.; Geerts W.; Oberstedt S.; Oberstedt A.; Borcea R.

    2013-01-01

    The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF) technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This conf...

  12. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    R A Gherghescu; D N Poenaru

    2015-09-01

    The macroscopic–microscopic method is extended to calculate the deformation energy and penetrability for binary nuclear configurations typical for fission processes. The deformed two-centre shell model is used to obtain single-particle energy levels for the transition region of two partially overlapped daughter and emitted fragment nuclei. The macroscopic part is obtained using the Yukawa-plus-exponential potential. The microscopic shell and pairing corrections are obtained using the Strutinsky and BCS approaches and the cranking formulae yield the inertia tensor. Finally, the WKB method is used to calculate penetrabilities and spontaneous fission half-lives. Calculations are performed for the decay of 282,292120 nuclei.

  13. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J; Martinez, Jose L Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramer-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  14. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Carmona, Belén Martínez; Martínez, Jose L. Muñoz

    2016-02-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramers-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  15. Search for Singlet Fission Chromophores

    Havlas, Z.; Akdag, A.; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Singlet fission, in which a singlet excited chromophore shares its energy with a ground-state neighbor and both end up in their triplet states, is of potential interest for solar cells. Only a handful of compounds, mostly alternant hydrocarbons, are known to perform efficiently. In view of the large number of conditions that a successful candidate for a practical cell has to meet, it appears desirable to extend the present list of high performers to additional classes of compounds. We have (i) identified design rules for new singlet fission chromophores and for their coupling to covalent dimers, (ii) synthesized them, and (iii) evaluated their performance as neat solids or covalent dimers.

  16. Surface fission tracks in diamond

    Scanning Probe Microscope (SPM) images reveal important fingerprint features of latent tracks induced in diamond by fission fragments from a californium source. Collimated fission fragments with a binary distribution of the predominant energies of 79.4 and 103.8 MeV, are assumed. Cavities, reticular formations around these cavities, and black spots of graphite were found. A brief discussion on the possible track formation mechanism is given on the basis of the explosion spike theory; an attempt to determine latent track core and halo parameters is included

  17. The wastes of nuclear fission

    In this paper the author presents the problems of the radioactive wastes generated by the nuclear fission. The first part devoted to the fission phenomenon explains the incident neutron energy and the target nuclei role. The second part devoted to the nuclear wastes sources presents the production of wastes upstream of the reactors, in the reactors and why these wastes are dangerous. The third part discusses the radioactive wastes management in France (classification, laws). The last part details the associated research programs: the radionuclides separation, the disposal, the underground storage, the transmutation and the thorium cycle. (A.L.B.)

  18. Fission properties of the heaviest elements

    The authors discuss fission properties of the heaviest elements. In particular they focus on stability with respect to spontaneous fission and on the prospects of extending the region of known nuclei beyond the peninsula of currently known nuclides

  19. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the 12th issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the IAEA. The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The type of activities included are: measurements, compilations and evaluations of fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The first part of the report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The second part contains recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted, and selected papers from conferences

  20. Absolute calibration technique for spontaneous fission sources

    An absolute calibration technique for a spontaneously fissioning nuclide (which involves no arbitrary parameters) allows unique determination of the detector efficiency for that nuclide, hence of the fission source strength

  1. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Oberstedt A.; Martinez T.; Kis Z.; Karlsson J.; Hambsch F.-J.; Cano-Ott D.; Göök A.; Borcea R.; Billnert R.; Belgya T.; Oberstedt S.; Szentmiklosi L.; Takác K.

    2010-01-01

    For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments’ heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energ...

  2. Shell effects and fission fragments angular anisotropy

    The impact of the shell corrections attenuation effect with growth of the fissionable nuclei temperature on the angular anisotropy of the fission fragments is considered. The experimental data on the anisotropy of the fission fragments angular distributions of the compound nucleus, formed in the 4He + 238U reactions, are analyzed within the frames of the transition states model in the fission barriers saddle point and statistic theory of nuclear reactions. The obvious kind of the shell corrections attenuation function is obtained

  3. Nuclear fission in covariant density functional theory

    The current status of the application of covariant density functional theory to microscopic description of nuclear fission with main emphasis on superheavy nuclei (SHN) is reviewed. The softness of SHN in the triaxial plane leads to an emergence of several competing fission paths in the region of the inner fission barrier in some of these nuclei. The outer fission barriers of SHN are considerably affected both by triaxiality and octupole deformation. (authors)

  4. Superfluid fission dynamics with microscopic approaches

    Simenel, C; Lacroix, D; Umar, A S

    2016-01-01

    Recent progresses in the description of the latter stage of nuclear fission are reported. Dynamical effects during the descent of the potential towards scission and in the formation of the fission fragments are studied with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with dynamical pairing correlations at the BCS level. In particular, this approach is used to compute the final kinetic energy of the fission fragments. Comparison with experimental data on the fission of 258Fm are made.

  5. Nuclear fission in covariant density functional theory

    Afanasjev A.V.; Abusara H.; Ring P.

    2013-01-01

    The current status of the application of covariant density functional theory to microscopic description of nuclear fission with main emphasis on superheavy nuclei (SHN) is reviewed. The softness of SHN in the triaxial plane leads to an emergence of several competing fission pathes in the region of the inner fission barrier in some of these nuclei. The outer fission barriers of SHN are considerably affected both by triaxiality and octupole deformation.

  6. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    Peter C Kong

    2010-07-01

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  7. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  8. Production techniques of fission 99Mo

    Generally two different techniques are available for molybdenum-99 production for use in medical technetium-99 generation. The first one is based on neutron irradiation of molybdenum targets of natural isotopic composition or enriched in molybdenum-98. In these cases the Mo-99 is generated via the nuclear reaction 98Mo (n,γ) 99Mo. Although this process can be carried out at low expenditure it gives a product of low specific activity and, hence, restricted applicability. In a second process Mo-99 is obtained as a result of the neutron induced fission of U-235 according to 235U (n,f) 99Mo. This technique provides a product with a specific activity several orders of magnitude higher than that obtained from the 98Mo (n,γ) 99Mo nuclear reaction and perhaps even more important up to several thousands curies of Mo-99 per production run. In this paper a modern production procedure of Mo-99 via the fission reaction, which was developed at the Institute of Radiochemistry of the Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe will be described. The targeting, irradiation of U-235, the separation and purification steps involved as well as the recycling of the non-converted U-235, which should be a major consideration in any production technique, will be discussed. (author). 24 refs, 14 figs, 1 tab

  9. Fission distribution measurements of Atucha's fuel pellets with solid state track detectors

    Distribution of fissions in a UO2 rod has been measured by means of solid state detectors. Mica muscovite and Makrofol-N detectors were used in the experiment. The merits of mica muscovite relative to the Makrofol-N for the detection of fission fragments have been verified. However both fission track detectors closely agree (0,5%) in the final fission distribution of the UO2 rod. Sensitivity of the detectors shows to be linear in the range between 50.000and 360.000 fission tracks per square centimeter. Due to the high spatial resolution this method is better than any other technique. Determination were made in UO2 pellets similar to the fuel element of the Atucha reactor. The average fission rate in the rod has been measured within 0,8% error, and provides an accurate determination for the distribution of fissions in the rod wich is needed for the determination of energy liberated per fission in the natural uranium rod.(author)

  10. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: Deformation-induced fission

    Rios Huguet, A; Stevenson, PD; Goddard, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus, and the daughter products. Purpose: To explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe fast fission processes beyond the fission barrier, using the nuclide $^{240}$Pu as an example. Met...

  11. Nuclear-fission studies with relativistic secondary beams: analysis of fission channels

    Boeckstiegel, C.; Steinhaeuser, S.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Clerc, H. -G.; Grewe, A.; Heinz, A.; de Jong, M; JUNGHANS A. R.; Mueller, J.; Voss, B.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fission of several neutron-deficient actinides and pre-actinides from excitation energies around 11 MeV was studied at GSI Darmstadt by use of relativistic secondary beams. The characteristics of multimodal fission of nuclei around 226Th are systematically investigated and interpreted as the superposition of three fission channels. Properties of these fission channels have been determined for 15 systems. A global view on the properties of fission channels including previous results is...

  12. Brownian shape dynamics in fission

    Randrup Jørgen; Möller Peter

    2013-01-01

    It was recently shown that remarkably accurate fission-fragment mass distributions are obtained by treating the nuclear shape evolution as a Brownian walk on previously calculated five-dimensional potentialenergy surfaces; the current status of this novel method is described here.

  13. Brownian shape dynamics in fission

    Randrup Jørgen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It was recently shown that remarkably accurate fission-fragment mass distributions are obtained by treating the nuclear shape evolution as a Brownian walk on previously calculated five-dimensional potentialenergy surfaces; the current status of this novel method is described here.

  14. Search for singlet fission chromophores

    Havlas, Zdeněk; Akdag, Akin; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, Josef

    Philadelphia: American Chemical Society, 2012. 31PHYS. ISSN 0065-7727. [National Fall Meeting of the American Chemical Society /244./. 19.08.2012-23.08.2012, Philadelphia] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : singlet fission * chromophores Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  15. How spontaneous fission was discovered

    The 70th anniversary of the discovery of spontaneous fission by the young Russian physicists Konstantin A. Petrzhak and Georgii N. Flerov is commemorated. The situation in the 1940s is described and the activities of the 2 scientists, including their involvement in the development of the A-bomb, is outlined. (P.A.)

  16. Hybrid nuclear cycles for nuclear fission sustainability

    Nuclear fission can play and must play an important role in paving the road to Energy Sustainability. Nuclear Fission does not produce CO2 emissions, and it is already exploited at commercial level with the current NPP (Nuclear Power Plants). Most of them are based on LWR reactors, which have a very good safety record. It must be noted, however, that all LWR (including the advanced or evolutionary ones) have some drawbacks, particularly their very poor efficiency in exploiting the natural resources of nuclear fuels. In this paper, an analysis is presented on how to maximize the energy actually generated from the potential contents of fission natural resources. The role of fertile-to-fissile breeding is highlighted, as well as the need of attaining a very high safety performance in the reactors and other installations of the fuel cycle. The proposal presented in this paper is to use advanced and evolutionary LWR as energy producing reactors, and to use subcritical fast assemblies as breeders. The main result would be to increase by two orders of magnitude the percentage of energy effectively exploited from fission natural resources, while keeping a very high level of safety standards in the full fuel cycle. Breeders would not be intended for energy production, so that safety standards could rely on very low values of the thermal magnitudes, so allowing for very large safety margins for emergency cooling. Similarly, subcriticality would offer a very large margin for not to reach prompt criticality in any event. The main drawback of this proposal is that a sizeable fraction of the energy generated in the cycle (about 1/3, maybe a little more) would not be useful for the thermodynamic cycle to produce electricity. Besides that, a fraction of the generated electricity, between 5 and 10 %, would have to be recirculated to feed the accelerator activating the neutron source. Even so, the overall result would be very positive, because more than 50 % of the natural resources

  17. Spontaneous fission. A many-body approach

    Iwamoto, Akira; Bonasera, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    We propose new model to calculate the fission phenomena in tunnel region. By the Vlasov equation and the imaginary time method, we could calculate actinides nuclear fission. This method makes possible to describe unified the motion of fission inside and outside of potential wall. The potential energy and mass parameters can be calculated by no means of the special model. The freedom of internal motion are calculated automatically both collective and a particle motion. Accordingly, particle released during fission process can be calculated. The kinetic energy of fragment after fission was very agreeable with the calculation results. (S.Y.)

  18. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    Kessler, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  19. Theory of nuclear fission. A textbook

    This book brings together various aspects of the nuclear fission phenomenon discovered by Hahn, Strassmann and Meitner almost 70 years ago. Beginning with an historical introduction the authors present various models to describe the fission process of hot nuclei as well as the spontaneous fission of cold nuclei and their isomers. The role of transport coefficients, like inertia and friction in fission dynamics is discussed. The effect of the nuclear shell structure on the fission probability and the mass and kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments is presented. The fusion-fission process leading to the synthesis of new isotopes including super-heavy elements is described. The book will thus be useful for theoretical and experimental physicists, as well as for graduate and PhD students. (orig.)

  20. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the eleventh issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS

  1. The nucleon phase of binary fission

    Full text: The main step of the fission process is a sharing-out of nucleons, within a 'nucleon-phase', between the valence shells of the primordial cluster of the internally-dissociated fissioning system and the valence shells of the 'A =126 nucleon core' of the nascent heavy fragment. The formation of an 'A = 82 nucleon core' in the nascent light fragment explains the asymmetric fission mode of the light actinide nuclei. The nucleon partition in the nucleon phase can be understood in the framework of chemical thermodynamics. The formation of an 'A = 126 nucleon core' in the nascent light fragment of heavier fissioning systems explains the symmetric fission mode of 258Fm and that of heavier nuclei. But the new phenomenon of 'barrier-free' fission, discovered in 258Fm (s.f.), plays in this system and all symmetrically fissioning superheavy nuclei a very important role. (author)

  2. Fission product behaviour in severe accidents

    The understanding of fission product (FP) behaviour in severe accidents is important for source term assessment and accident mitigation measures. For example in accident management the operator needs to know the effect of different actions on the behaviour and release of fission products. At VTT fission product behaviour have been studied in different national and international projects. In this presentation the results of projects in EU funded 4th framework programme Nuclear Fission Safety 1994-1998 are reported. The projects are: fission product vapour/aerosol chemistry in the primary circuit (FI4SCT960020), aerosol physics in containment (FI4SCT950016), revaporisation of test samples from Phebus fission products (FI4SCT960019) and assessment of models for fission product revaporisation (FI4SCT960044). Also results from the national project 'aerosol experiments in the Victoria facility' funded by IVO PE and VTT Energy are reported

  3. Fission dynamics at low excitation energy

    Aritomo, Y

    2013-01-01

    The origin of mass asymmetry in the fission of uranium at a low excitation energy is clarified by a trajectory analysis of the Langevin equation. The positions of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments are mainly determined by fission saddle points originating from the shell correction energy. The widths of the peaks, on the other hand, result from a shape fluctuation around the scission point caused by the random force in the Langevin equation. We found that a random vibration in the oblate direction of fissioning fragments is essential for the fission process. According to this picture, fission does not occur with continuous stretching in the prolate direction, similarly to that observed in starch syrup. This is expected to lead to a new viewpoint of fission dynamics and the splitting mechanism.

  4. The Fission of Thorium with Alpha Particles

    Newton, Amos S.

    1948-04-15

    The fission distribution of fission of thorium with alpha particle of average energy 37.5 Mev has been measured by the chemical method. The distribution found shows that the characteristic dip in the fission yield mass spectrum has been raised to within a factor of two of the peaks compared to a factor of 600 in slow neutron fission of U{sup 235}. The raise in the deip has caused a corresponding lowering in fission yield of these elements at the peaks. The cross section for fission of thorium with 37.5 Mev alphas was found to be about 0.6 barn, and the threshold for fission was found to be 23 to 24 Mev.

  5. The decay and fission of uranium

    According to the Bernai liquid drop alpha particle model, the nuclear structure of uranium contains a core of 38 alpha particles comprised of 5 concentric layers. The innermost core of 4 alpha particles corresponding to the oxygen 16 nuclide is enclosed by 4 more alpha particles giving the structure of the sulphur 32 nuclide. The third layer of 6 alpha particles completes the 14 alpha particle model of nickel 56. The fourth and fifth layers each contain 12 alpha particles. It will be shown that the fifth layer forms a barrier to the natural radioactive decay of uranium isotopes. Furthermore, it appears that whist the fourth layer sets a limit on the minimum size of the larger daughter fragment of the thermal neutron induced fission of a uranium isotope, the third layer sets a limit on the minimum size of the smaller fragment

  6. The risks of the nuclear fission fuel cycle

    An overview is given of the title subject in comparison with other electric power generating techniques. This overview is based on reports from several foreign institutes (UNSCEAR, EPRI, US-DOE, EC, and ORNL) and Dutch institutes (VROM, COVRA, URENCO, and ECN). It appears that the Dutch nuclear power plants (Dodewaard and Borssele) and other installations of the nuclear fission fuel cycle in the Netherlands show a lower individual risk than the risk values estimated by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). The risks, outlined by UNSCEAR, is mainly determined by ore exploration and processing, the reactor operation and the breeder conversion. The total global risk of the nuclear fission fuel cycle (with 200 GWej and 100% recycling) is a factor 10,000 lower than the risk, caused by natural radiation. The main cause of risks of the cycle by accidents are nuclear power plant accidents (varying in the literature from circa 95% to more than 99%). For normal operational conditions nuclear fission, natural gas, wind and thermal solar energy are more favourable than coal, oil and photovoltaic solar cells. It is expected that the use of hydro power (dam collapse and floods) and coal (mine disasters) on average per GWje will cause the largest amount of immediate victims. A separate abstract has been prepared for the appendices in which descriptions are given of all the processes of the nuclear fission fuel cycle: mining and extraction, refining and conversion, enrichment, fission fuel elements fabrication, reactor operation, reprocessing, aboveground storage facilities, ultimate storage, and transport. 4 figs., 14 refs., 2 appendices, 17 refs

  7. A fission fragment detector for correlated fission output studies

    Mosby, S., E-mail: smosby@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tovesson, F.; Couture, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Duke, D.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Kleinrath, V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States); Meharchand, R.; Meierbachtol, K.; O' Donnell, J.M.; Perdue, B.; Richman, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Shields, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A digital data acquisition system has been combined with a double Frisch gridded ionization chamber for use at both moderated and unmoderated neutron sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science (LANSCE) facility. The high efficiency of the instrument combined with intense LANSCE beams and new acquisition system permits fission output measurements across 11 orders of magnitude incident neutron energy. The acquisition and analysis system is presented along with the first in-beam performance tests of the setup.

  8. A fission fragment detector for correlated fission output studies

    A digital data acquisition system has been combined with a double Frisch gridded ionization chamber for use at both moderated and unmoderated neutron sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science (LANSCE) facility. The high efficiency of the instrument combined with intense LANSCE beams and new acquisition system permits fission output measurements across 11 orders of magnitude incident neutron energy. The acquisition and analysis system is presented along with the first in-beam performance tests of the setup

  9. Cluster fission from the standpoint of nuclear fission

    Lee, Sangmoo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Physics

    1996-03-01

    Atomic nucleus belongs to a quantal finite many body system. Nucleus shows great resemblance to cluster, above all metal cluster, although the strength of interaction is different. The works of Brechignac group, Saunder, Martin and P. Froeblich are explained by the critical size Nc as the central term. The differences between cluster and nucleus are investigated and a future view of cluster fission is explained. (S.Y.)

  10. DSP Algorithms for Fission Fragment and Prompt Fission Neutron Spectroscopy

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Fabry, I.

    2009-10-01

    Digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms are in high demand for modern nuclear fission investigation due to importance of increase the accuracy of fissile nuclear data for new generation of nuclear power stations. DSP algorithms for fission fragment (FF) and prompt fission neutron (PFN) spectroscopy are described in the present work. The twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (GTIC) is used to measure the kinetic energy-, mass- and angular distributions of the FF in the 252Cf(SF) reaction. Along with the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurement the correlation between neutron emission and FF mass and energy is investigated. The TOF is measured between common cathode of the GTIC and the neutron detector (ND) pulses. Waveform digitizers (WFD) having 12 bit amplitude resolution and 100 MHz sampling frequency are used for the detector pulse sampling. DSP algorithms are developed as recursive procedures to perform the signal processing, similar to those available in various nuclear electronics modules, such as constant fraction discriminator (CFD), pulse shape discriminator (PSD), peak-sensitive analogue-to-digital converter (pADC) and pulse shaping amplifier (PSA). To measure the angle between FF and the cathode plane normal to the GTIC a new algorithm is developed having advantage over the traditional analogue pulse processing schemes. Algorithms are tested by comparing the numerical simulation of the data analysis of the 252Cf(SF) reaction with data available from literature.

  11. The fundamental role of fission during r-process nucleosynthesis in neutron star mergers

    Goriely, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP-226, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-02-01

    The rapid neutron-capture process, or r-process, is known to be of fundamental importance for explaining the origin of approximately half of the A > 60 stable nuclei observed in nature. Despite important efforts, the astrophysical site of the r-process remains unidentified. Here we study r-process nucleosynthesis in a material that is dynamically ejected by tidal and pressure forces during the merging of binary neutron stars. r-process nucleosynthesis during the decompression is known to be largely insensitive to the detailed astrophysical conditions because of efficient fission recycling, producing a composition that closely follows the solar r-abundance distribution for nuclei with mass numbers A > 140. Due to the important role played by fission in such a scenario, the impact of fission is carefully analyzed. We consider different state-of-the-art global models for the determination of the fission paths, nuclear level densities at the fission saddle points and fission fragment distributions. Based on such models, the sensitivity of the calculated r-process abundance distribution is studied. The fission path is found to strongly affect the region of heavy nuclei responsible for the fission recycling, while the fission fragment distribution of nuclei along the A ≅ 278 isobars defines the abundance pattern of nuclei produced in the 110 fission neutrons is also shown to affect the abundance distribution, and in particular the shape of the third r-process peak around A ≅ 195. (orig.)

  12. A brief history of the ''Delayed'' discovery of nuclear fission

    This year marks the Fiftieth Anniversary of the discovery of Nuclear Fission. In the early 1930's, the neutron was discovered, followed by the discovery of artificial radioactivity and then the use of the neutron to produce artificial radioactivity. The first experiments resulting in the fission of uranium took place in 1934. A paper which speculated on fission as an explanation was almost immediately published, yet no one took it seriously not even the author herself. Why did it take an additional five years before anyone realized what had occurred? This is an abnormally long time in a period when discoveries, particularly in nuclear physics, seemed to be almost a daily occurrence. The events which led up to the discovery are recounted, with an attempt made to put them into their historical perspective. The role played by Mendeleev's Periodic Table, the role of the natural radioactive decay chain of uranium, the discovery of protactinium, the apparent discovery of masurium (technetium) and a speculation on the reason why Irene Curie may have missed the discovery of nuclear fission will all be discussed. 43 refs

  13. Swi1Timeless Prevents Repeat Instability at Fission Yeast Telomeres

    Gadaleta, Mariana C.; Das, Mukund M.; Hideki Tanizawa; Ya-Ting Chang; Ken-ichi Noma; Nakamura, Toru M.; Eishi Noguchi

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability associated with DNA replication stress is linked to cancer and genetic pathologies in humans. If not properly regulated, replication stress, such as fork stalling and collapse, can be induced at natural replication impediments present throughout the genome. The fork protection complex (FPC) is thought to play a critical role in stabilizing stalled replication forks at several known replication barriers including eukaryotic rDNA genes and the fission yeast mating-type locus...

  14. Nuclear Dissipation from Fission Time

    Gontchar, I.; Morjean, M.; Basnary, S. [GANIL DSM/CEA, IN2P3/CNRS, BP 5027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2000-04-21

    Fission times, pre-scission neutron multiplicities and GDR pre-scission {gamma}-ray multiplicities measured for uranium or thorium nuclei formed with temperatures T {approx} 1.8 MeV have been compared with calculations performed with CDSM2, a two-dimensional dynamical model combined with a statistical one. Among the three experimental approaches considered, fission times give access to the most precise pieces of information on nuclear dissipation at high excitation energy. For the temperature range under consideration, an agreement between the model and data is achieved if one-body dissipation is used with a strength factor k{sub red} {approx} 0.45 {+-} 0.10 applied to the wall term for the mononuclear configuration. (authors)

  15. Fission product yields from 22 MeV neutron-induced fission of 235U

    The chain yields of 28 product nuclides were determined for the fission of 235U induced by 22 MeV neutrons for the first time. Absolute fission rate was monitored with a double-fission chamber. Fission product activities were measured by HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. Time of flight technique was used to measure the neutron spectrum in order to estimate fission events induced by break-up neutrons and scattering neutrons. A mass distribution curve was obtained and the dependence of fission yield on neutron energy is discussed

  16. Fission product yields from 19.1 MeV neutron induced fission of 238U

    36 chain yields were determined for the fission of 238U induced by 19.1 MeV neutrons for the first time. Absolute fission rate was monitored with a double-fission chamber. Fission product activities were measured by HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. Threshold detector method was used to measure the neutron spectrum in order to estimate the fission events induced by break-up neutrons and scattering neutrons. A mass distribution curve was obtained and the dependence of fission yield on neutron energy was discussed

  17. Fission Data and Nuclear Technology

    Accurate nuclear data for fissile nuclei are required not only by reactor designers, but also by reactor physicists for the interpretation of integral experiments, e.g. studies of the change of reactivity with irradiation. Some of the requests that have been made for such fission data, and the reasons behind them, are discussed, along with the progress that has been made towards their fulfilment. An attempt is made to outline those areas where better data are required. (author)

  18. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF) technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD) show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution. (authors)

  19. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  20. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D;

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation) a......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  1. Experimental techniques for fission data measurements

    Progresses in the development of experimental techniques or fission data measurements are reviewed briefly. This review comprises techniques for the preparation of special compound nuclei leading to fission (fission entrance) as well as experimental techniques which permit the measurement of the diversified characteristics of the emitted radiations in fission (fission exit). The latter developments are only considered when also other parameters than yield, mass, and energy of fission fragments are determined. Ionization chambers developed at CBNM are described in more detail. A simple ionization chamber with Frisch grid was used to determine fission layer characteristics, e.g. the number of fissile nuclei of a sample with an accuracy of smaller than 0.3 %. A twin ionization chamber is described which has an advantageous 2 x 2π solid angle for fission fragment detection, a timing jitter of less than 0.7 ns, an energy resolution of smaller than 500 keV for fission fragments, and an angular resolution of ΔcosΘ < 0.005. Also the nuclear charge distribution of the fragments can be determined. A pulse pile-up rejection circuit was developed, which reduces pulse pile-up by more than a factor 30. This detector is well suited for correlation measurements between fission fragment parameters, like mass and total kinetic energy, and the characteristics of the different radiations emitted from the fragments. This type of ionization chamber was successfully used in several experiments and some results are shown to demonstrate its capabilities. (author)

  2. Sensitivity of Makrofol fission track detectors

    Neutron fluence can be determined by means of fission track detectors consisting of fission foils in contact with suitable dielectrics (Makrofol E plastic was used in this case). Fission fragments emitted from the fissionable material into the plastic sheet generate permanent damage trails which can be made visible by an etching process. These tracks are then counted by means of an optical microscope or other methods and the number of tracks is proportional to the neutron fluence. The efficiency is defined as the ration of the number of tracks counted to the number of fissions in the fissionable layer. It is calculated from the mean range of the fission products in the fissionable material and in the plastic. The loss of very flat tracks with a small penetration angle caused by etching a certain bulk layer from the plastic foil is also taken into account. The formulas for the efficiency are deduced for thin fission layers and for thick fission foils. These calculations are made on the basis of the experimentally confirmed assumption that the ratio V of the track etching rate to the bulk etching rate is at least equal to 200. These high values for this ratio V are valid if an adequate period (several days) of oxygen influence to the damage trails is guaranteed. The calculated values of the efficiency are compared with experimental values and the uncertainty is discussed. (orig./HP)

  3. Status of fission yield evaluations

    Very few yield compilations are also evaluations, and very few contain an extensive global library of measured data and extensive models for unmeasured data. The earlier U.K. evaluations and US evaluations were comparable up to the retirements of the primary evaluators. Only the effort in the US has been continued and expanded. The previous U.K. evaluations have been published. In this paper we summarize the current status of the US evaluation, philosophy, and various integral yield tests for 34 fissioning nuclides at one or more neutron incident energies and/or for spontaneous fission. Currently there are 50 yield sets and for each we have independent and cumulative yields and uncertainties for approximately 1100 fission products. When finalized, the recommended data will become part of the next version of the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-VI). The complete set of data, including the basic input of measured yields, will be issued as a sequel to the General Electric evaluation reports (better known by the authors' names: Rider - or earlier - Meek and Rider). 16 references

  4. The discovery of uranium fission

    Uranium was discovered 200 years ago. Its radioactive character was first demonstrated in 1896 and two years later radium was extracted from uranium minerals. In 1911 studies with alpha rays from radioactive decay led to the unexpected discovery of the atomic nucleus. Exposure of beryllium to alpha rays yielded neutrons, first detected in 1932. Starting in 1934, neutron irradiation of uranium produced radioactive substances erroneously attributed to transuranium elements but with confusing properties. Painstaking experiments by chemists left no doubt on 17 December 1938 that barium was produced by these irradiations: the neutrons had split some uranium nuclei. The physics of the fission process was understood two weeks later; after a few months, neutron multiplication was found to be probable. This review deals with the eminent scientists involved, their successes, errors and disappointments, and the unexpected insights which occurred on the paths and detours of scientific research. It is, therefore, instructive also to discuss how fission was not discovered. The momentous discovery must be considered inevitable; the great tragedy was that Germany started World War II just at the time when the possibility of nuclear chain reactions and bombs became known. The consequences and anxieties that remain after 50 years of nuclear fission demand that mankind act with reason and conscience to maintain peace. (author)

  5. Fission fusion hybrids- recent progress

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Valanju, P.; Mahajan, S.; Covele, B.

    2012-03-01

    Fission-fusion hybrids enjoy unique advantages for addressing long standing societal acceptability issues of nuclear fission power, and can do this at a much lower level of technical development than a competitive fusion power plant- so it could be a nearer term application. For waste incineration, hybrids can burn intransigent transuranic residues (with the long lived biohazard) from light water reactors (LWRs) with far fewer hybrid reactors than a comparable system within the realm of fission alone. For fuel production, hybrids can produce fuel for ˜4 times as many LWRs with NO fuel reprocessing. For both waste incineration or fuel production, the most severe kind of nuclear accident- runaway criticality- can be excluded, unlike either fast reactors or typical accelerator based reactors. The proliferation risks for hybrid fuel production are, we strongly believe, far less than any other fuel production method, including today's gas centrifuges. US Thorium reserves could supply the entire US electricity supply for centuries. The centerpiece of the fuel cycle is a high power density Compact Fusion Neutron Source (major+minor radius ˜ 2.5-3.5 m), which is made feasible by the super-X divertor.

  6. Study of actinides fission induced by multi-nucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics

    The study of actinide fission encounters two major issues. On one hand, measurements of the fission fragment distributions and the fission probabilities allow a better understanding of the fission process itself and the discrimination among the models of nuclear structure and dynamics. On the other hand, new measurements are required to improve nuclear data bases, which are a key component for the design of new generation reactors and radio-toxic waste incinerators. This thesis is in line with different French and American experimental projects using the surrogate method, i.e. transfer reactions leading to the same compound nuclei as in neutron irradiation, allowing the study of fission of actinides which are inaccessible by conventional techniques, whereas they are important for applications. The experiment is based on multi-nucleon transfer reactions between a 238U beam and a 12C target, using the inverse kinematics technique to measure, for each transfer channel, the complete isotopic distributions of the fission fragments with the VAMOS spectrometer. The work presented in this dissertation is focused on the identification of the transfer channels and their properties, as their angular distributions and the distributions of the associated excitation energy, using the SPIDER telescope to identify the target recoil nuclei. This work of an exploratory nature aims to generalize the surrogate method to heavy transfers and to measure, for the first time, the fission probabilities in inverse kinematics. The obtained results are compared with available direct kinematics and neutron irradiation measurements. (author)

  7. Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2013-01-01

    The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent ...

  8. Collective spectra along the fission barrier

    Pigni M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Discrete and continuous spectra of fissioning nuclei at the humps of fission barriers (Bohr transition states and in the intermediate wells (superdeformed and hyperdeformed states play a key role in the calculation of fission cross sections. A theoretical evaluation of the collective parts of the spectra is possible within the framework of the dinuclear system model, which treats the wave function of the fissioning nucleus as a superposition of a mononucleus configuration and two–cluster configurations in a dynamical way, permitting exchange of upper–shell nucleons between clusters. The impact of theoretical spectra on neutron–induced fission cross sections and, in combination with an improved version of the scission–point model, on angular distribution of fission fragments is evaluated for plutonium isotopes of interest to nuclear energy applications.

  9. Radiochemical studies on nuclear fission at Trombay

    Asok Goswami

    2015-08-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear fission in the year 1939, both physical and radiochemical techniques have been adopted for the study of various aspects of the phenomenon. Due to the ability to separate individual elements from a complex reaction mixture with a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity, a chemist plays a significant role in the measurements of mass, charge, kinetic energy, angular momentum and angular distribution of fission products in various fissioning systems. At Trombay, a small group of radiochemists initiated the work on radiochemical studies of mass distribution in the early sixties. Since then, radiochemical investigations on various fission observables have been carried out at Trombay in , , and heavy-ion-induced fissions. An attempt has been made to highlight the important findings of such studies in this paper, with an emphasis on medium energy and heavy-ion-induced fission.

  10. International conference on fifty years research in nuclear fission

    These proceedings contain extended abstracts of the papers presented at the named conference. They deal with static properties of fission, instrumentation for fission studies, fission in compound-nucleus reactions, fission dynamics, fission-like heavy ion reactions, and fusion reactions. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  11. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 2: Power from nuclear fission

    Clement, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Different types of nuclear fission reactors and fissionable materials are compared. Special emphasis is placed upon the environmental impact of such reactors. Graphs and charts comparing reactor facilities in the U. S. are presented.

  12. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Fission and Fusion

    van der Bliek, Alexander M.; Shen, Qinfang; Kawajiri, Sumihiro

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria continually change shape through the combined actions of fission, fusion, and movement along cytoskeletal tracks. The lengths of mitochondria and the degree to which they form closed networks are determined by the balance between fission and fusion rates. These rates are influenced by metabolic and pathogenic conditions inside mitochondria and by their cellular environment. Fission and fusion are important for growth, for mitochondrial redistribution, and for maintenance of a hea...

  13. Measurements of Fission Cross Sections of Actinides

    Wiescher, M; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M

    2002-01-01

    A measurement of the neutron induced fission cross sections of $^{237}$Np, $^{241},{243}$Am and of $^{245}$Cm is proposed for the n_TOF neutron beam. Two sets of fission detectors will be used: one based on PPAC counters and another based on a fast ionization chamber (FIC). A total of 5x10$^{18}$ protons are requested for the entire fission measurement campaign.

  14. Fission product retention in HTGR fuels

    Retention data for gaseous and metallic fission products are presented for both Triso-coated and Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles. Performance trends are established that relate fission product retention to operating parameters, such as temperature, burnup, and neutron exposure. It is concluded that Biso-coated particles are not adequately retentive of fission gas or metallic cesium, and Triso-coated particles which retain cesium still lose silver. Design implications related to these performance trends are identified and discussed

  15. Nuclear fission with a Langevin equation

    A microscopically derived Langevin equation is applied to thermally induced nuclear fission. An important memory effect is pointed out and discussed. A strong friction coefficient, estimated from microscopic quantities, tends to decrease the stationary limit of the fission rate and to increase the transient time. The calculations are performed with a collective mass depending on the collective variable and with a constant mass. Fission rates calculated at different temperatures are shown and compared with previous available results. (author) 23 refs.; 7 figs

  16. Fission barriers and half-lives

    The authors briefly review the development of theoretical models for the calculation of fission barriers and half-lives. They focus on how results of actual calculations in a unified macroscopic-microscopic approach provide an interpretation of the mechanisms behind some of the large number of phenomena observed in fission. As instructive examples they choose studies of the rapidly varying fission properties of elements at the end of the periodic system

  17. Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy

    Ma, X. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Wang, L. Z.; Y. X. Chen; Cao, J

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel isotopes, with improvements on three aspects. ...

  18. Fission of nuclei far from stability

    The secondary-beam facility of GSI provided the technical equipment for a new kind of fission experiment. Fission properties of short-lived neutron-deficient nuclei have been investigated in inverse kinematics. The measured element distributions reveal new kinds of systematics on shell structure and even-odd effects and lead to an improved understanding of structure effects in nuclear fission. Prospects for further experimental studies are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Superfluid dynamics of 258Fm fission

    Scamps, Guillaume; Simenel, Cédric; Lacroix, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical description of nuclear fission remains one of the major challenges of quantum many-body dynamics. The slow, mostly adiabatic motion through the fission barrier is followed by a fast, non-adiabatic descent of the potential between the fragments. The latter stage is essentially unexplored. However, it is crucial as it generates most of the excitation energy in the fragments. The superfluid dynamics in the latter stage of fission is obtained with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theor...

  20. Fission dynamics at low excitation energy

    Aritomo, Y.; Chiba, S.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of mass asymmetry in the fission of uranium at a low excitation energy is clarified by a trajectory analysis of the Langevin equation. The positions of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments are mainly determined by fission saddle points originating from the shell correction energy. The widths of the peaks, on the other hand, result from a shape fluctuation around the scission point caused by the random force in the Langevin equation. We found that a random vibrati...

  1. Rapid Separation of Fission Product 141La

    XIA; Wen; YE; Hong-sheng; LIN; Min; CHEN; Ke-sheng; XU; Li-jun; ZHANG; Wei-dong; CHEN; Yi-zhen

    2013-01-01

    141La was separated and purified from fission products in this work for physical measurements aimed at improving the accuracy of its decay parameters.As the impact of 142La and other fission products,cesium(141Cs,142Cs included)was rapid separated from the fission products,141Cs and 142Ba separation was prepared after a cooling time about 25 s when 142Cs decays to daughter 142Ba,141La purification then

  2. Fission-track dating using object-based image analysis

    Full text: Geological dating with the help of fission track analysis is based on a time-consuming counting of the spontaneous and induced tracks in the minerals. Fission tracks are damage trails in minerals caused by fast charged particles, released in nuclear fission. In this study the 950;-method is used for fission-track dating. In order to determine the age, spontaneous tracks in the apatite and induced tracks in the muscovite external detector have to be counted. The automatic extraction and identification would not only improve the speed of track counting and eliminate the personal factor. Pixel values alone are not enough to distinguish between tracks and background. Traditional pixel based approaches are therefore inefficient for fission track counting. Image analysis based on objects, which include shape, texture and contextual information is a more promising method. A procedure for automatic object - based classification is used to extract the track objects. Resolving the individual tracks in a multi-track object is based on morphological operations. The individual track objects are skeletonized and the number of individual tracks in the object is counted by processing the skeletons. To give the right fission track age, there has to be a calibration of every single user manually counting the tracks. We calibrate the automatic approach for counting in the same way. Durango apatite standard samples are used to determine the 950;- and Z-calibration factor. The automatic approach is useful for counting tracks in apatite standards and induced tracks in muscovite external detectors where the quality and quantities of the etched tracks is high. Muscovite detectors irradiated against glasses can also be used to determine the thermal neutron fluence, which is necessary to determine an absolute age. These images are of high quality and free of disturbing background irregularities. Here the automatic approach is a practical alternative. However for natural samples

  3. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: boost-induced fission

    Goddard, P. M.; Stevenson, P. D.; Rios, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus, and the daughter products. Purpose: To explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide $^{240}$Pu as an example. Method...

  4. Fission Product Decay Heat Calculations for Neutron Fission of 232Th

    Son, P. N.; Hai, N. X.

    2016-06-01

    Precise information on the decay heat from fission products following times after a fission reaction is necessary for safety designs and operations of nuclear-power reactors, fuel storage, transport flasks, and for spent fuel management and processing. In this study, the timing distributions of fission products' concentrations and their integrated decay heat as function of time following a fast neutron fission reaction of 232Th were exactly calculated by the numerical method with using the DHP code.

  5. Shell Effects in Nuclear Fission

    The important part played by shell effects in nuclear fission has been reliably established experimentally and forms the basis of the theory of asymmetry of fission and other properties of fission fragments. However, from the theoretical point of view there are certain difficulties in understanding these effects, since at the moment of scission the fragments axe considerably deformed. When the shell effects are calculated in succession, the energy of the fissioning nucleus before scission may be presented in the form of the sum of the energies of the spherical fragments taking shell effects into account, the Coulomb interaction energy of the fragments and their deformation energy. The deformation energy of the fragments should be calculated not using the elasticity values of the fragments according to the drop model, but, for very low deformations, the single particle elasticity values taking into account the magic effects, with a gradual transition to the drop values for deformations at which the levels of neighbouring shells intersect. The single-particle elasticity values can be obtained from the experimental data on the Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. In Vandenbosch's calculations of fragment deformation, the elasticity of the fragments was based on the condition of coincidence between the deformation energy of the fragments and the experimental values for their excitation energy. However, in this case the elasticity was assumed to be constant at all deformations, and for this reason, although the elasticity values found in Vandenbosch do show magic'effects, they differ considerably in magnitude from the experimental elasticity values (see above).. The calculations of Vandenbosch also failed to take into account the magic effects for non-deformed fragments that lead to a reduction in the energy of the magic nucleus. Therefore, according to these calculations fission should be symmetrical, since the elasticity and consequently also the deformation energy (at

  6. Theoretical Description of the Fission Process

    Witold Nazarewicz

    2003-07-01

    The main goals of the project can be summarized as follows: Development of effective energy functionals that are appropriate for the description of heavy nuclei. Our goal is to improve the existing energy density (Skyrme) functionals to develop a force that will be used in calculations of fission dynamics. Systematic self-consistent calculations of binding energies and fission barriers of actinide and trans-actinide nuclei using modern density functionals. This will be followed by calculations of spontaneous fission lifetimes and mass and charge divisions using dynamic adiabatic approaches based on the WKB approximation. Investigate novel microscopic (non-adiabatic) methods to study the fission process.

  7. Theoretical Description of the Fission Process

    The main goals of the project can be summarized as follows: Development of effective energy functionals that are appropriate for the description of heavy nuclei. Our goal is to improve the existing energy density (Skyrme) functionals to develop a force that will be used in calculations of fission dynamics. Systematic self-consistent calculations of binding energies and fission barriers of actinide and trans-actinide nuclei using modern density functionals. This will be followed by calculations of spontaneous fission lifetimes and mass and charge divisions using dynamic adiabatic approaches based on the WKB approximation. Investigate novel microscopic (non-adiabatic) methods to study the fission process

  8. Fission properties for r-process nuclei

    Erler, J.; Langanke, K; Loens, H. P.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematics of fission barriers and fission lifetimes for the whole landscape of super-heavy elements (SHE), i.e. nuclei with Z>100. The fission lifetimes are also compared with the alpha-decay half-lives. The survey is based on a self-consistent description in terms of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach. Results for various different SHF parameterizations are compared to explore the robustness of the predictions. The fission path is computed by quadrupole constrained SHF. Th...

  9. Some aspects of fission and quasifission processes

    B B Back

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of nuclear fission in 1938–1939 had a profound influence on the field of nuclear physics and it brought this branch of physics into the forefront as it was recognized for having the potential for its seminal influence on modern society. Although many of the basic features of actinide fission were described in a ground-breaking paper by Bohr and Wheeler only six months after the discovery, the fission process is very complex and it has been a challenge for both experimentalists and theorists to achieve a complete and satisfactory understanding of this phenomenon. Many aspects of nuclear physics are involved in fission and it continues to be a subject of intense study even three quarters of a century after its discovery. In this talk, I will review an incomplete subset of the major milestones in fission research, and briefly discuss some of the topics that I have been involved in during my career. These include studies of vibrational resonances and fission isomers that are caused by the second minimum in the fission barrier in actinide nuclei, studies of heavy-ion-induced fission in terms of the angular distributions and the mass–angle correlations of fission fragments. Some of these studies provided evidence for the importance of the quasifission process and the attendant suppression of the complete fusion process. Finally, some of the circumstances around the establishment of large-scale nuclear research in India will be discussed.

  10. Fission investigations and evaluation activities at IRMM

    The IRMM has a longstanding tradition in the field of neutron induced fission physics studies. It is especially well equipped with world-class facilities as the high resolution neutron time-of-flight spectrometer GELINA and the 7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator for the quasi-monoenergetic neutron production. During the past decade several neutron induced fission reactions have been studied in the energy range from eV up to 6 MeV and spontaneous fission. The isotopes under investigation were 235,238 U(n,f), 239 Pu(n,f), 237 Np(n,f), 252 Cf(SF) and 233 Pa(n,f). For all isotopes but 233 Pa, the fission fragment mass-yield and total kinetic energy distributions were measured. 233 Pa was only investigated for the fission cross-section. The results have been described within the multi-modal fission model. The three most dominant fission modes, the two asymmetric standard I (S1) and standard II (S2) as well as the the symmetric superlong mode were used for all the isotopes but 252 Cf. For this isotope at least one other fission mode had to be taken into account, the so--called standard III (S3) mode. Since the theoretical interpretation of experimental results was rather successful also an attempt was made to improve the evaluation of the respective fission cross-section as well as their neutron multiplicities and spectra. Here, the statistical model for fission cross-section evaluation was extended by including the multi-modality concept for fission. Based on the underlying model, separate outer fission barriers have been considered for each mode, while the inner barriers and isomeric wells are assumed to be the same. The self-consistent calculations of the fission cross-section as well as total, capture, elastic and inelastic cross-sections were in good agreement with the experimental data and evaluated nuclear data libraries. As a side product, also fission fragment mass yield distributions have been deduced at incident neutron energies hitherto unaccessible. Very

  11. Fission - track age of the Marjalahti Pallasite

    Full text: Investigation of fossil charged-particle tracks in various mineral phases of extraterrestrial samples is a powerful method for research the early stages of the solar system. Over geological time, meteorites crystals have accumulated a record of tracks produced by heavily charged energetic particles from both internal (spontaneous fission of 238U and some other extinct isotopes) and external sources (galactic cosmic rays with Z>20). The fortunate fact that meteorite grains can accumulate latent and very long-lived tracks since soon after the end of nucleosynthesis in the solar nebula enables one to decode their radiation history and to detect any thermal events in the meteorite cosmic history by revealing these tracks through suitable etching procedures. Only a few minerals in meteorites (mainly phosphates) contain small amount of uranium; the fact that 238U undergoes fission with fission-decay constant λf∼8.2x10-17 yr-1 allows one to use this isotope as a chronometer. By measuring the U concentration in the crystals (by reactor irradiation) and the density of the spontaneous-fission tracks it is relatively easy to calculate the 'fission-track age' if 238U is the main source of fission tracks. However the fission-track dating of extraterrestrial samples compared with the terrestrial ones has some peculiar features due to presence of a number of other potential track sources except the spontaneous fission of 238U, such as the spontaneous fission of presently extinct 244Pu, heavy nuclei of cosmic rays and induced fission by cosmic ray primaries. Only tracks from the spontaneous fission of U and Pu are suitable for fission-track dating. The competing effects of these fissioning elements, whose half-lives differ by a factor of ∼50, form a basis for a fission-track chronology for samples older than ∼ 4.0 Gyr. Over small intervals in time (∼ few x108 yr ) the track density from spontaneous fission of 238U is nearly constant. However, the contribution

  12. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy. Technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    Kessler, Guenter

    2012-07-01

    Written by one of the world-leading specialists in reactor physics and safety Most comprehensive book on nuclear fission technology, new safety concepts and waste disposal Complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation Covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements Description of the different fuel cycle options Presents viable solutions for safe and long-term storage of nuclear waste Recently developed new safety concepts for fission reactors Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  13. Analysis of fission-product effects in a Fast Mixed-Spectrum Reactor concept

    The Fast Mixed-Spectrum Reactor (FMSR) concept has been proposed by BNL as a means of alleviating certain nonproliferation concerns relating to civilian nuclear power. This breeder reactor concept has been tailored to operate on natural uranium feed (after initial startup), thus eliminating the need for fuel reprocessing. The fissile material required for criticality is produced, in situ, from the fertile feed material. This process requires that large burnup and fluence levels be achievable, which, in turn, necessarily implies that large fission-product inventories will exist in the reactor. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the effects of large fission-product inventories and to analyze the effect of burnup on fission-product nuclide distributions and effective cross sections. In addition, BNL requested that a representative 50-group fission-product library be generated for use in FMSR design calculations

  14. Probing fusion-fission dynamics in Bi203

    Mukul, Ish; Nath, S.; Golda, K. S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Prasad, E.; Kalkal, Sunil; Naik, M. B.; Banerjee, Tathagata; Varughese, T.; Sugathan, P.; Madhavan, N.; Pal, Santanu

    2015-11-01

    Background: Complete fusion between two massive nuclei after capture inside the potential barrier is inhibited by competing fission-like processes. The target-projectile composite system may reseparate after capture without proceeding towards formation of the compound nucleus (CN), which is equilibrated in all degrees of freedom. The nature of these non-CN fission (NCNF) processes and factors that affect them are not completely known yet. Purpose: The nuclear mass regions from where NCNF processes begin to manifest themselves are not clearly demarcated. This work aims to study the onset of NCNF, if any, in the mass region ˜200 . Methods: Fission fragment (FF) mass and angular distribution (MAD) and pre-scission and post-scission neutron multiplicities were measured for the reaction +W184F19 at a laboratory energy (Elab) range of 84-125 MeV. The measurements were carried out using two multiwire proportional counters (MWPC) to detect the FFs in coincidence and four neutron detectors to measure neutron time of flight (TOF). Statistical model (SM) calculation was performed. Results: No significant mass-angle correlation was observed in the MAD plots. Extracted mass ratio distributions were single-peaked and of Gaussian shape. Measured pre-scission neutron multiplicity values indicated dissipative nature of CN decay for this reaction. Conclusions: No clear signatures of NCNF were observed in the studied reaction, indicating that the target-projectile composite system predominantly proceeds towards formation of the CN after capture.

  15. Channel Effects in the Kinetic Energy of Fragments of Fission Induced by Low-Energy Resonance Neutrons

    Recently, Blyumkina et al. have noted tfte existence ot fission channel ettects in the total kinetic energy of fragments of fission induced by s- and p-wave neutrons. Effects of this nature can also be expected in the variation of the fragment kinetic energies from resonance to resonance in low-energy (s-wave) neutron-induced fission. A fission-fragment detector whose efficiency is dependent on the kinetic energy of the fragments was used in the study of the slow-neutron-induced fission of U235. Comparing the counting-rate of this detector with a conventional fission detector, whose efficiency is independent of the fragment kinetic energy, shows that there exists a variation in the kinetic energy of certain fragments with neutron energy in the neutron energy region from 0.025 to 1 eV. In order to determine the response of the kinetic-energy-sensitive detector, it was necessary to measure the rangè-energy relations of fission fragments in various media, including noble gases and metallic foils. It was estimated from these data that the variation in the fragment kinetic energy release is ∼500 keV, for those fission events that give the lightest and most energetic of the heavy fragments. The variation in fragment kinetic energy is strongly asymmetric about the 0.28-eV resonance in U235, and suggests that the fragment kinetic energy sensitively reflects the presence of interference effects among resonances in fission. A multi-level multi-channel analysis of the data has been made, based on the parameters of Vogt and under the assumption that different fission channels lead to different configurations at scission, such that the kinetic energy release is also different. Previously a major objection to multi-level multi-channel analysis in fission has been that the parameters obtained are not unique. However, the possibility of observing partial fission cross-sections (fission occurring by way of one channel only) removes one of the ambiguities inherent in the multi

  16. The use of recoil for the separation of uranium fission products; Utilisation du recul pour la separation des produits de fission de l'uranium

    Henry, R.; Herczec, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    The recoil distance of fission fragments in U{sub 3}O{sub 8} is about 8 microns. By using highly diluted suspensions of uranium oxide particles having dimension much smaller than this figure (mean diameter 0,5 micron), we were able to study the re-adsorption of fission products on uranium oxide. Separation results have been studied as a function of the nature of the irradiation medium (solid or liquid) and the separation medium, of particle size and of concentration of particles in the dispersing medium. Decay curves can be used to discriminate between {sup 239}Np and mixed fission products. Most of the {sup 239}Np is found in the U{sub 3}O{sub 8} particles. The location of fission products in solid dispersing media has been determined, fission products being found always inside the dispersing medium particles. The results obtained can be applied to the rapid separation of short-lived fission products from a uranium-free starting material. (author) [French] Le parcours de recul des fragments de fission est en moyenne de 8 microns dans l'U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. En prenant des suspensions d'oxyde d'uranium dont les particules, tres diluees, ont des dimensions nettement inferieures a cette valeur (diametre moyen 0,5 micron), on a pu etudier directement la readsorption des produits de fission sur l'oxyde d'uranium. Les resultats de separation ont ete etudies en fonction de la nature du milieu d'irradiation (solide ou liquide) et du milieu de separation, de la taille des particules d'oxyde et de leur concentration dans le milieu dispersant. Les courbes de decroissance permettent de determiner la perturbation apportee dans les mesures par le {sup 239}Np qui reste en majorite dans les grains d'U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. On a determine enfin l'emplacement des produits de fission dans le cas des melanges solides; ils se trouvent toujours a l'interieur des grains du milieu recepteur. Les resultats obtenus permettent d'envisager la

  17. Stochastic resonance in nuclear fission

    Fission decay of highly excited periodically driven compound nuclei is considered in the framework of Langevin approach. We used residual-time distribution (RTD) as a tool for studying the dynamic features in the presence of periodic perturbation. The structure of RTD essentially depends on the relation between Kramers decay rate and the frequency ω of periodic perturbation. In particular, the intensity of the first peak in RTD has a sharp maximum at certain nuclear temperature depending on ω. This maximum should be considered as fist-hand manifestation of stochastic resonance in nuclear dynamics

  18. Fission fragment excited laser system

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  19. Spectroscopy of heavy fissionable nuclei

    S K Tandel

    2015-09-01

    Structural studies of heavy nuclei are quite challenging due to increased competition from fission, particularly at high spins. Nuclei in the actinide region exhibit a variety of interesting phenomena. Recent advances in instrumentation and analysis techniques have made feasible sensitive measurements of nuclei populated with quite low cross-sections. These include isomers and rotational band structures in isotopes of Pu ( = 94) to Rf ( = 104), and octupole correlations in the Th ( = 90) region. The obtained experimental data have provided insights on various aspects like moments of inertia and nucleon alignments at high spins, quasiparticle energies and evolution of quadrupole and octupole collectivity, among others. An overview of some of these results is presented.

  20. Radiometric dating of sediments using fission tracks in conodonts

    Sachs, H.M.; Denkinger, M.; Bennett, C.L.; Harris, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    Conodonts are microfossils which are commonly found in marine rocks of Cambrian to Triassic age. Although their biological affinities are difficult to assess, conodonts are valuable stratigraphical indices for much of their geological range1. Recent work has also established that conodont colour alteration indices (CAI) are useful guides to diagenetic temperatures and hence burial depth2. Fission tracks3 in conodonts allow measurement of uranium concentrations and estimates of 'age' to be made using isotopic methods4. We report here that fission tracks counted in irradiated, thermally unaltered (as indicated by CAI) middle Palaeozoic conodonts indicate typical uranium concentrations of ???1 part in 10 9, with some samples higher. A single specimen of Siphonodella from the Lower Mississippian yielded an age estimate of 380??140 Myr consistent with conventional interpolations. This method may also allow the unroofing of deeply buried sediments to be dated. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. Effect of inertia parameters on static fission path

    Properties of static (minimum potential) fission path in the formalism of Hofmann are investigated. It is pointed out that the inertial parameters greatly affect the fission path and hence the penetrability. The difficulty of determining fission path is discussed

  2. Uranium isotopic data in uraninite spent fuel from the Bangombe natural nuclear reactor (Gabon) and its surroundings

    In the framework of the 'Oklo-Natural Analogue Phase II' Project, uraninite from the Bangombe natural reactor and samples from its host rock were analyzed to determine their uranium isotopic composition by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. There were several objectives for this work: (i) to validate the 235U/238U isotopic ratios obtained by these techniques; (ii) to test the use of the 235U/238U ratio of uraninite as a tracer of migration/retention processes of uranium from the source term to the far field; (iii) to evaluate the most recent migration/retention processes of uranium in the system by U-series disequilibrium

  3. Isoscaling of the Fission Fragments with Langevin Equation

    WANG Kun; TIAN Wen-Dong; ZHONG Chen; ZHOU Xing-Fei; MA Yu-Gang; WEI Yi-Bin; CAI Xiang-Zhou; CHEN Jin-Gen; FANG De-Qing; GUO Wei; MA Guo-Liang; SHEN Wen-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The Langevin equation is used to simulate the fission process of 112Sn + 112Sn and 116Sn + 116Sn. The mass distribution of the fission fragments are given by assuming the process of symmetric fission or asymmetric fission with the Gaussian probability sampling. The isoscaling behaviour has been observed from the analysis of fission fragments of both the reactions, and the isoscaling parameter α seems to be sensitive to the width of fission probability and the beam energy.

  4. Isoscaling of the Fission Fragments with Langevin Equation

    Wang, K.; Ma, Y. G.; Wei, Y. B.; Cai, X. Z.; Chen, J. G.; Fang, D Q; Guo, W; Ma, G. L.; Shen, W.Q.(Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai, 201800, China); Tian, W.D.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, X. F.

    2004-01-01

    Langevin equation is used to simulate the fission process of $^{112}$Sn + $^{112}$Sn and $^{116}$Sn + $^{116}$Sn. The mass distribution of the fission fragments are given by assuming the process of symmetric fission or asymmetric fission with the Gaussian probability sampling. Isoscaling behavior has been observed from the analysis of fission fragments of both reactions and the isoscaling parameter $\\alpha$ seems to be sensitive to the width of fission probability and the beam energy.

  5. Fission

    Progress is reported in the areas of radiation physics; radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics; microdosimetry of internal sources; dosimetry of internal emitters; real-time measurement of Pu in air at below-MPC levels; analytical techniques for measurement of 99Tc in environmental samples; and radiation instrumentation--radiological chemistry

  6. Neutronics of Laser Fission-Fusion Systems

    Neutronics of Fission-Fusion microsystems inertially confined by Lasers are analysed by transport calculation, both stationary (DTF, TIHOC) and time dependent (TDA, TIHEX), discussing the results obtained for the basic parameters of the fission process (multiplication factor, neutron generation time and Rossi-∞). (Author) 14 refs

  7. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the seventh issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The sixth issue of this series has been published in June 1980 as INDC(NDS)-113/G+P. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1980 and 25 May 1981

  8. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Oberstedt A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments’ heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  9. Calculation code of the fission products activity

    The document describes the two codes for the calculation of the fission products activity. The ''Pepin le bref'' code gives the exact value of the beta and gamma activities of completely known fission products. The code ''Plus Pepin'' introduces the beta and gamma activities whose properties are partially known. (A.L.B.)

  10. Options for Affordable Fission Surface Power Systems

    Fission surface power systems could provide abundant power anywhere on the surface of the moon or Mars. Locations could include permanently shaded regions on the moon and high latitudes on Mars. To be fully utilized, however, fission surface power systems must be safe, have adequate performance, and be affordable. This paper discusses options for the design and development of such systems. (authors)

  11. Fission cross section calculations for Pa isotopes

    Based on the recently measured cross-section values for the neutron-induced fission of 231Pa and our experience gained with other isotopes, new self consistent neutron cross section calculations for n+231Pa have been performed up to 30 MeV. The results are quite different to the existing evaluations, especially above the first chance fission threshold. (authors)

  12. Fission gas behavior in safety experiments

    This book examines fission product release from power reactors during reactor safety experiments. Topics considered include modes and mechanisms of gas precipitation and migration, results and analysis of recent transient in pile experiments, modelling of fission gas behavior, and a review of knowledge and future work

  13. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the ninth issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The eighth issue of this series has been published in July 1982 as INDC(NDS)-130. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1982 and 25 June 1983

  14. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  15. Spontaneous fission properties and lifetime systematics

    Half-lives for spontaneous fission of nuclides with even and odd numbers of particles are compared with recent theoretical calculations. A summary of odd particle hindrance factors is given. The most recent measurements of kinetic-energy and mass distributions and neutron emission for spontaneous fission of the heaviest nuclides are summarized and discussed. 51 refs., 9 figs

  16. Theoretical Description of the Fission Process

    Advanced theoretical methods and high-performance computers may finally unlock the secrets of nuclear fission, a fundamental nuclear decay that is of great relevance to society. In this work, we studied the phenomenon of spontaneous fission using the symmetry-unrestricted nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Our results show that many observed properties of fissioning nuclei can be explained in terms of pathways in multidimensional collective space corresponding to different geometries of fission products. From the calculated collective potential and collective mass, we estimated spontaneous fission half-lives, and good agreement with experimental data was found. We also predicted a new phenomenon of trimodal spontaneous fission for some transfermium isotopes. Our calculations demonstrate that fission barriers of excited superheavy nuclei vary rapidly with particle number, pointing to the importance of shell effects even at large excitation energies. The results are consistent with recent experiments where superheavy elements were created by bombarding an actinide target with 48-calcium; yet even at high excitation energies, sizable fission barriers remained. Not only does this reveal clues about the conditions for creating new elements, it also provides a wider context for understanding other types of fission. Understanding of the fission process is crucial for many areas of science and technology. Fission governs existence of many transuranium elements, including the predicted long-lived superheavy species. In nuclear astrophysics, fission influences the formation of heavy elements on the final stages of the r-process in a very high neutron density environment. Fission applications are numerous. Improved understanding of the fission process will enable scientists to enhance the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile and nuclear reactors. The deployment of a fleet of safe and efficient advanced reactors, which will also minimize radiotoxic

  17. Superfluid dynamics of 258Fm fission

    Scamps, Guillaume; Lacroix, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical description of nuclear fission remains one of the major challenges of quantum many-body dynamics. The slow, mostly adiabatic motion through the fission barrier is followed by a fast, non-adiabatic descent of the potential between the fragments. The latter stage is essentially unexplored. However, it is crucial as it generates most of the excitation energy in the fragments. The superfluid dynamics in the latter stage of fission is obtained with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory including BCS dynamical pairing correlations. The fission modes of the 258Fm nucleus are studied. The resulting fission fragment characteristics show a good agreement with experimental data. Quantum shell effects are shown to play a crucial role in the dynamics and formation of the fragments. The importance of quantum fluctuations beyond the independent particle/quasi-particle picture is underlined and qualitatively studied.

  18. Fission dynamics with systems of intermediate fissility

    E Vardaci; A Di Nitto; P N Nadtochy; A Brondi; G La Rana; R Moro; M Cinausero; G Prete; N Gelli; E M Kozulin; G N Knyazheva; I M Itkis

    2015-08-01

    A 4 light charged particle spectrometer, called 8 LP, is in operation at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, for studying reaction mechanisms in low-energy heavy-ion reactions. Besides about 300 telescopes to detect light charged particles, the spectrometer is also equipped with an anular PPAC system to detect evaporation residues and a two-arm time-of-flight spectrometer to detect fission fragments. The spectrometer has been used in several fission dynamics studies using as a probe light charged particles in the fission and evaporation residues (ER) channels. This paper proposes a journey within some open questions about the fission dynamics and a review of the main results concerning nuclear dissipation and fission time-scale obtained from several of these studies. In particular, the advantages of using systems of intermediate fissility will be discussed.

  19. Nuclear Fission as a Markov Process

    Starting from the assumption of a random transfer of nucleons between the two sides of a; fissioning nucleus, during the time from saddle point to scission, it is shown that the mass distribution data in low, intermediate and high energy fission can be given a reasonable -explanation based on the ground state properties of nuclei. The theory is extended to explain the shape of the deformation energy mass curves. These relations follow as a direct consequence of the equilibrium conditions that determine the mass distributions while the gap in the ''zig-zag'' curves is essentially due to the proton transfers. The time of fission is shown to be about 500 nucleonic times in thermal fission and this results from the properties of the transition matrix. The theory is also able to explain the small range of the threshold energies of fission, and the formation of a symmetry axis early in the process. (author)

  20. Microscopic Theory of Nuclear Fission: A Review

    Schunck, N

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. In spontaneous fission, half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, while in induced fission the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are needed. The cornerstone of the current microscopic theory of fission is the energy density functional formalism. Its basic tenets, including tools such as the HFB theory, effective two-body effective nuclear potentials, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections, are presented succinctly. The EDF approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schr\\"odinger equation into a collective Schr\\"odinge...

  1. Systematics of Fission-Product Yields

    Empirical equations representing systematics of fission-product yields have been derived from experimental data. The systematics give some insight into nuclear-structure effects on yields, and the equations allow estimation of yields from fission of any nuclide with atomic number ZF = 90 thru 98, mass number AF = 230 thru 252, and precursor excitation energy (projectile kinetic plus binding energies) PE = 0 thru ∼200 MeV--the ranges of these quantities for the fissioning nuclei investigated. Calculations can be made with the computer program CYFP. Estimates of uncertainties in the yield estimates are given by equations, also in CYFP, and range from ∼ 15% for the highest yield values to several orders of magnitude for very small yield values. A summation method is used to calculate weighted average parameter values for fast-neutron (∼ fission spectrum) induced fission reactions

  2. Fission dynamics at low excitation energy. 2

    Aritomo, Y; Ivanyuk, F A

    2014-01-01

    The mass asymmetry in the fission of U-236 at low excitation energy is clarified by the analysis of the trajectories obtained by solving the Langevin equations for the shape degrees of freedom. It is demonstrated that the position of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments is determined mainly by the saddle point configuration originating from the shell correction energy. The width of the peaks, on the other hand, results from the shape fluctuations close to the scission point caused by the random force in the Langevin equation. We have found out that the fluctuations between elongated and compact shapes are essential for the fission process. According to our results the fission does not occur with continuous stretching in the prolate direction, similarly to that observed in starch syrup, but is accompanied by the fluctuations between elongated and compact shapes. This picture presents a new viewpoint of fission dynamics and the splitting mechanism.

  3. Calculated medium energy fission cross sections

    An analysis has been made of medium-energy nucleon induced fission of 238U and 237Np using detailed models of fission, based upon the Bohr-Wheeler formalism. Two principal motivations were associated with these calculations. The first was determination of barrier parameters for proton-rich uranium and neptunium isotopes normally not accessible in lower energy reactions. The second was examination of the consistency between (p,f) experimental data versus new (n,f) data that has recently become available. Additionally, preliminary investigations were also made concerning the effect of fission dynamics on calculated fission cross sections at higher energies where neutron emission times may be significantly less than those associated with fission

  4. Theory of neutron emission in fission

    Following a summary of the observables in neutron emission in fission, a brief history is given of theoretical representations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) and average prompt neutron multiplicity bar νp. This is followed by descriptions, together with examples, of modern approaches to the calculation of these quantities including recent advancements. Emphasis will be placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the modern approaches. In particular, the dependence of N(E) and bar νp on the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy will be discussed, as will the effects of and competition between first-, second- and third-chance fission in circumstances of high excitation energy. Finally, properties of neutron-rich (fission-fragment) nuclei are discussed that must be better known to calculate N(E) and bar νp with higher accuracy than is currently possible

  5. Physics of neutron emission in fission

    The document contains the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the Physics of Neutron Emission in Fission, Mito City (Japan), 24-27 May 1988. Included are the conclusions and recommendations reached at the meeting and the papers presented by the meeting participants. These papers cover the following topics: Energy dependence of the number of fission neutrons ν-bar (3 papers), multiplicity distribution of fission neutrons (3 papers), competition between neutron and γ-ray emission (4 papers), the fission neutron yield in resonances (2 papers) and the energy spectrum of fission neutrons in experiment (9 papers), theory (4 papers) and evaluation (1 paper). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Status

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited in availability or intensity. NASA is maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for an affordable fission surface power system. Because affordability drove the determination of the system concept that this technology will make possible, low development and recurring costs result, while required safety standards are maintained. However, an affordable approach to fission surface power also provides the benefits of simplicity, robustness, and conservatism in design. This paper will illuminate the multiplicity of benefits to an affordable approach to fission surface power, and will describe how the foundation for these benefits is being developed and demonstrated in the Exploration Technology Development Program s Fission Surface Power Project.

  7. Fission gas behaviour in water reactor fuels

    During irradiation, nuclear fuel changes volume, primarily through swelling. This swelling is caused by the fission products and in particular by the volatile ones such as krypton and xenon, called fission gas. Fission gas behaviour needs to be reliably predicted in order to make better use of nuclear fuel, a factor which can help to achieve the economic competitiveness required by today's markets. These proceedings communicate the results of an international seminar which reviewed recent progress in the field of fission gas behaviour in light water reactor fuel and sought to improve the models used in computer codes predicting fission gas release. State-of-the-art knowledge is presented for both uranium-oxide and mixed-oxide fuels loaded in water reactors. (author)

  8. Fission yield covariance generation and uncertainty propagation through fission pulse decay heat calculation

    Highlights: • Fission yield data and uncertainty comparison between major nuclear data libraries. • Fission yield covariance generation through Bayesian technique. • Study of the effect of fission yield correlations on decay heat calculations. • Covariance information contribute to reduce fission pulse decay heat uncertainty. - Abstract: Fission product yields are fundamental parameters in burnup/activation calculations and the impact of their uncertainties was widely studied in the past. Evaluations of these uncertainties were released, still without covariance data. Therefore, the nuclear community expressed the need of full fission yield covariance matrices to be able to produce inventory calculation results that take into account the complete uncertainty data. State-of-the-art fission yield data and methodologies for fission yield covariance generation were researched in this work. Covariance matrices were generated and compared to the original data stored in the library. Then, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on fission pulse decay heat results for thermal fission of 235U. Calculations were carried out using different libraries and codes (ACAB and ALEPH-2) after introducing the new covariance values. Results were compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by the libraries. The uncertainty quantification was performed first with Monte Carlo sampling and then compared with linear perturbation. Indeed, correlations between fission yields strongly affect the uncertainty of decay heat. Eventually, a sensitivity analysis of fission product yields to fission pulse decay heat was performed in order to provide a full set of the most sensitive nuclides for such a calculation

  9. Contained fissionly vaporized imploded fission explosive breeder reactor

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor system which produces useful thermal power and breeds fissile isotopes wherein large spherical complex slugs containing fissile and fertile isotopes as well as vaporizing and tamping materials are exploded seriatim in a large containing chamber having walls protected from the effects of the explosion by about two thousand tons of slurry of fissile and fertile isotopes in molten alkali metal. The slug which is slightly sub-critical prior to its entry into the centroid portion of the chamber, then becomes slightly more than prompt-critical because of the near proximity of neutron-reflecting atoms and of fissioning atoms within the slurry. The slurry is heated by explosion of the slugs and serves as a working fluid for extraction of heat energy from the reactor. Explosive debris is precipitated from the slurry and used for the fabrication of new slugs

  10. Fission and Properties of Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    Hamilton, Joseph H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Carter, H. K.

    2008-08-01

    near A= 120 / M. A. Stoyer and W. B. Walters -- Nuclear structure IV. First observation of new neutron-rich magnesium, aluminum and silicon isotopes / A. Stolz ... [et al.]. Spectroscopy of [symbol]Na revolution of shell structure with isospin / V. Tripathi ... [et al.]. Rearrangement of proton single particle orbitals in neutron-rich potassium isotopes - spectroscopy of [symbol]K / W. Królas ... [et al.]. Laser spectroscopy and the nature of the shape transition at N [symbol] 60 / B. Cheal ... [et al.]. Study of nuclei near stability as fission fragments following heavy-ion reactions / N. Fotiadis. [symbol]C and [symbol]N: lifetime measurements of their first-excited states / M. Wiedeking ... [et al.] -- Nuclear astrophysics. Isomer spectroscopy near [symbol]Sn - first observation of excited states in [symbol]Cd / M. Pfitzner ... [et al.]. Nuclear masses and what they imply for the structures of neutron rich nuclei / A. Awahamian and A. Teymurazyan. Multiple nucleosynthesis processes in the early universe / F. Montes. Single-neutron structure of neutron-rich nuclei near N = 50 and N = 82 / J. A. Cizewski ... [et al.]. [symbol]Cadmium: ugly duckling or young swan / W. B. Walters ... [et al.] -- Nuclear structure V. Evidence for chiral doublet bands in [symbol]Ru / Y. X. Luo ... [et al.]. Unusual octupole shape deformation terms and K-mixing / J. O. Rasmussen ... [et al.]. Spin assignments, mixing ratios, and g-factors in neutron rich [symbol]Cf fission products / C. Goodin ... [et al.]. Level structures and double [symbol]-bands in [symbol]Mo, [symbol]Mo and [symbol]Ru / S. J. Zhu ... [et al.] -- Nuclear theory. Microscopic dynamics of shape coexistence phenomena around [symbol]Se and [symbol]Kr / N. Hinohara ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure, double beta decay and test of physics beyond the standard model / A. Faessler. Collective modes in elastic nuclear matter / Ş. Mişicu and S. Bastrukov. From N = Z to neutron rich: magnetic moments of Cu isotopes at and above the

  11. Empirical description of beta-delayed fission partial half-lives

    Ghys, L; Antalic, S; Huyse, M; Van Duppen, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: The process of beta-delayed fission (bDF) provides a versatile tool to study low-energy fission in nuclei far away from the beta-stability line, especially for nuclei which do not fission spontaneously. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate systematic trends in bDF partial half-lives. Method: A semi-phenomenological framework was developed to systematically account for the behavior of bDF partial half-lives. Results: The bDF partial half-life appears to exponentially depend on the difference between the Q value for beta decay of the parent nucleus and the fission-barrier energy of the daughter (after beta decay) product. Such dependence was found to arise naturally from some simple theoretical considerations. Conclusions: This systematic trend was confirmed for experimental bDF partial half-lives spanning over 7 orders of magnitudes when using fission barriers calculated from either the Thomas-Fermi or the liquid-drop fission model. The same dependence was also observed, although less p...

  12. Optimal deuteron energy for a neutron rich nuclei source based on fission

    A neutron rich nuclei source can be conceived by using the neutron induced fission process. A high neutron flux can be obtained through the deuteron break-up reaction in the so--called converters. The number of fission events and their isotopic distributions produced in a uranium target depends on the deuteron incident beam energy, characteristics of the converter and geometry of the combination. A theoretical approach is presented in order to optimize the number of fission events in the uranium target as function of the above mentioned parameters. The initial kinetic energy of the deuteron beam, the nature of the converter and its geometry determines the angular and energy distributions of the emerging neutrons. The models used to simulate these distributions are essentially based on the Serber's approximation. The fission is treated in a microscopic-macroscopic approach using the two center shell model. A new concept is used to determine the isotopic distribution of the fission fragments as a function of the neutron energy. A steep dumping of the neutron energy is produced in the compound nucleus which modifies the two humped fission barrier and produces changes of the penetrabilities associated to each binary partition and therefore, in the isotopic distribution. Finally, our results show that a good value of the incident deuteron energy suitable for the production of neutron rich beams is closed to 80 MeV. (authors)

  13. Comparison of fission signatures from β− delayed γ-ray and neutron emissions

    The delayed γ-ray and neutron fission signals utilized in active inspection techniques were measured simultaneously in order to directly compare their detection sensitivities. Fissionable and non-fissionable targets were irradiated by a 15-Hz pulsed bremsstrahlung beam operating at endpoint energies from 7 to 22 MeV. The fissionable mass detection limits for both these signals decreased approximately three orders of magnitude as the irradiation energy was increased with the delayed γ-ray limits 4.3–8.2 times smaller. The signals from the non-fissionable targets were consistent with the natural passive backgrounds for irradiation energies up to 16 MeV. At higher bremsstrahlung energies, there was a target independent active background in the delayed γ-ray signal that accounted for 35% of the gross yield. In addition, these higher irradiation energies resulted in products from 9Be(γ,p)8Li and 18O(γ,p)17N reactions interfering with the delayed γ-ray and neutron fission signals, respectively

  14. Fissioned triangular schemes via sharply 3-transitive groups

    Ma, Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    n [D. de Caen, E.R. van Dam. Fissioned triangular schemes via the cross-ratio, {Europ. J. Combin.}, 22 (2001) 297-301], de Caen and van Dam constructed a fission scheme $\\FT(q+1)$ of the triangular scheme on $\\PG(1,q)$. This fission scheme comes from the naturally induced action of $\\PGL(2,q)$ on the 2-element subsets of $\\PG(1,q)$. The group $\\PGL(2,q)$ is one of two infinite families of finite sharply 3-transitive groups. The other such family $\\Mq(q)$ is a "twisted" version of $\\PGL(2,q)$, where $q$ is an even power of an odd prime. The group $\\PSL(2,q)$ is the intersection of $\\PGL(2,q)$ and $\\Mq(q)$. In this paper, we investigate the association schemes coming from the actions of $\\PSL(2,q)$, $\\Mq(q)$ and $\\PML(2,q)$, respectively. Through the conic model introduced in [H.D.L. Hollmann, Q. Xiang. Association schemes from the actions of $\\PGL(2, q) $ fixing a nonsingular conic, {J. Algebraic Combin.}, 24 (2006) 157-193], we introduce an embedding of $\\PML(2,q)$ into $\\PML(3,q)$. For each of the three grou...

  15. Radiation Specifications for Fission Power Conversion Component Materials

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Shin, E. Eugene; Mireles, Omar R.; Radel, Ross F.; Qualls, A. Louis

    2011-01-01

    NASA has been supporting design studies and technology development that could provide power to an outpost on the moon, Mars, or an asteroid. One power-generation system that is independent of sunlight or power-storage limitations is a fission-based power plant. There is a wealth of terrestrial system heritage that can be transferred to the design and fabrication of a fission power system for space missions, but there are certain design aspects that require qualification. The radiation tolerance of the power conversion system requires scrutiny because the compact nature of a space power plant restricts the dose reduction methodologies compared to those used in terrestrial systems. An integrated research program has been conducted to establish the radiation tolerance of power conversion system-component materials. The radiation limit specifications proposed for a Fission Power System power convertor is 10 Mrad ionizing dose and 5 x 10(exp 14) neutron per square centimeter fluence for a convertor operating at 150 C. Specific component materials and their radiation tolerances are discussed. This assessment is for the power convertor hardware; electronic components are not covered here.

  16. Downstream behavior of fission products

    The downstream behavior of fission products has been investigated by injecting mixtures of CsOH, CsI, and Te into a flowing steam/hydrogen stream and determining the physical and chemical changes that took place as the gaseous mixture flowed down a reaction duct on which a temperature gradient (10000 to 2000C) had been imposed. Deposition on the wall of the duct occurred by vapor condensation in the higher temperature regions and by aerosol deposition in the remainder of the duct. Reactions in the gas stream between CsOH and CsI and between CsOH and Te had an effect on the vapor condensation. The aerosol was characterized by the use of impingement tabs placed in the gas stream

  17. Production of fission 131I

    A method of iodine separation from other radionuclides generated by 235U fission has been developed in order to explore the possibilities to obtain 131I as by-product of the 99Mo routine production in the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. The experiments were designed to remove this element to gas phase, and the recoveries were investigated both with and without carrier addition. High volatilization percentages were achieved in the presence of iodine carrier. Some other alternatives to increase the iodine displacement to the gaseous phase, namely vacuum distillation, addition of hydrogen peroxide and use of a carrier gas, were also studied. The method developed, which employs a carrier gas stream, without carrier addition, allows the recovery of about 97% of the 131I, with high specific activity, in a simple and clean way. (author)

  18. Overview of fission yeast septation.

    Pérez, Pilar; Cortés, Juan C G; Martín-García, Rebeca; Ribas, Juan C

    2016-09-01

    Cytokinesis is the final process of the vegetative cycle, which divides a cell into two independent daughter cells once mitosis is completed. In fungi, as in animal cells, cytokinesis requires the formation of a cleavage furrow originated by constriction of an actomyosin ring which is connected to the plasma membrane and causes its invagination. Additionally, because fungal cells have a polysaccharide cell wall outside the plasma membrane, cytokinesis requires the formation of a septum coincident with the membrane ingression. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a unicellular, rod-shaped fungus that has become a popular model organism for the study of actomyosin ring formation and constriction during cell division. Here we review the current knowledge of the septation and separation processes in this fungus, as well as recent advances in understanding the functional interaction between the transmembrane enzymes that build the septum and the actomyosin ring proteins. PMID:27155541

  19. Aerosols and fission product transport

    A survey is presented of current knowledge of the possible role of aerosols in the consequences of in- and out-of-core LOCAs and of end fitting failures in CANDU reactors. An extensive literature search has been made of research on the behaviour of aerosols in possible accidents in water moderated and cooled reactors and the results of various studies compared. It is recommended that further work should be undertaken on the formation of aerosols during these possible accidents and to study their subsequent behaviour. It is also recommended that the fission products behaviour computer code FISSCON II should be re-examined to determine whether it reflects the advances incorporated in other codes developed for light water reactors which have been extensively compared. 47 refs

  20. Fission studies at the IGISOL facility

    Studies of the properties of the fission products ant the induced fission reaction mechanism have been a significant part of the nuclear physics research program at the IGISOL for more than 20 years. For example, one of the key motivations behind the commitment of the JYFLTRAP was isobaric separation of the fission products for spectroscopic studies. Such experiments have indeed been performed, however, the JYFLTRAP twin trap has turned out to be even more versatile instrument anyone dared dream of in advantage. The precision atomic mass measurements of neutron rich fission products has thus far resulted in considerably improved mass value for more than 150 neutron-rich isotopes, on top of which becomes the work on proton rich side. The purification Penning trap has also proven to be an excellent tool for independent fission cross section measurements. This novel method employs ion counting after JYFLTRAP and is described in a detailed way. The method takes advantage of the fact that JYFLTRAP can be used as a mass filter with a precision such that it allows an unambiguous identification of most of the fragments produced in the low-energy fission of 238U. A satisfactory agreement with previous measurements was found for independent yields of Cs isotopes in 50 MeV proton induced fission

  1. On the mechanism of fission neutron emission

    This review represents the present knowledge of the mechanism of prompt fission neutron emission. Starting with a brief fission process characterization related with neutron emission, possible emission mechanisms are discussed. It is emphasized that the experimental study of special mechanisms, i.e. scission neutron emission processes, requires a sufficiently correct description of emission probabilities on the base of the main mechanism, i.e. the evaporation from fully accelerated fragments. Adequate statistical-model approaches have to account for the complexity of nuclear fission reflected by an intricate fragment distribution. The present picture of scission neutron emission is not clarified neither experimentally nor theoretically. Deduced data are contradictory and depend on the used analysis procedures often involving rough discriptions of evaporated-neutron distributions. The contribution of two secondary mechanisms of fission neutron emission, i.e. the neutron evaporation during fragment acceleration and neutron emission due to the decay of 5He after ternary fission, is estimated. We summarize the recent progress of the theoretical description of fission neutron spectra in the framework of statistical models considering the standard spectrum of 252Cf(sf) neutrons especially. The main experimental basis for the study of fission neutron emission is the accurate measurement of emission probabilities as a function of emission energy and angle (at least) as well as fragment parameters (mass number ratio and kinetic energy). The present status is evaluated. (author)

  2. Dynamical features of Coulomb-fission

    Fission following quasielastic scattering was investigated in the reactions 208Pb -> 238U below the Coulomb Barrier and 7.5 MeV/u 238U -> 238U at scattering angles forward of the grazing angle (870). A kinematically complete analysis of 3-body coincidences was carried out measuring position and time-of-flight of the scattered projectile-like particle and 2 fission fragments in large parallel plate detectors. In the reaction 208Pb -> 238U, measured at backward angles, the slope of the differential cross section at 5.4 MeV/u is in qualitative agreement with the theoretical expectation for Coulomb-fission. The angular distribution of the fission fragments, measured with respect to the semisector axis (apex line towards the projectile), is close to 1/sinTHETA and does not show any of the significant structures predicted by several theories. The anisotropy is smaller in all other coordinate systems investigated. The fission probability in the reaction 238U -> 238U, measured down to 5x10-4 at THETAsub(cm)=540 (corresponding to 75% Esub(cb) at the distance of closest approach) as well as the low excitation energy 0 as expected for Coulomb-fission. The absence of a detectable final state Coulomb interaction yields a lower limit of 1-2x10-20s for the lifetime of the fissioning nucleus. (orig./HSI)

  3. Multimodal nuclear fission model and its application

    As the nuclear fission models, the following are explained: random-neck rupture model; nuclear fission channel theory; breakpoint model, especially breakpoint model by Wilkins et al.; and multimodal random-neck rupture model. In addition, the prompt neutron spectrum analysis of multimodal model, and the application to the energy-dependent analysis of delayed neutron yield are also described. In the random-neck fracture model proposed by S. L. Whetstone, a nucleus has a form like 'elongated gourd' just before the rupture, and the mass distribution is determined by the part of the neck where cleavage occurs. The division of mass and charge in nuclear fission, according to the nuclear fission channel theory, is considered to be determined by which transition state the saddle point of fission barrier is passed through. On the other hand, the model, where the deformation of nucleus further proceeds and the division is determined by the breakpoint just before the division to two fissure pieces, is called the breakpoint model. The multimodal nuclear fission model is the concept to consider that there are several deformation channels for nucleus, and that each of them leads to a different rupture state. The model that combines the random-neck rapture model and multimodal fission model is the multimodal random-neck rupture model. (J.P.N.)

  4. Fission-suppressed fusion breeder on the thorium cycle and nonproliferation

    Moir, R. W.

    2012-06-01

    Fusion reactors could be designed to breed fissile material while suppressing fissioning thereby enhancing safety. The produced fuel could be used to startup and makeup fuel for fission reactors. Each fusion reaction can produce typically 0.6 fissile atoms and release about 1.6 times the 14 MeV neutron's energy in the blanket in the fission-suppressed design. This production rate is 2660 kg/1000 MW of fusion power for a year. The revenues would be doubled from such a plant by selling fuel at a price of 60/g and electricity at 0.05/kWh for Q=Pfusion/Pinput=4. Fusion reactors could be designed to destroy fission wastes by transmutation and fissioning but this is not a natural use of fusion whereas it is a designed use of fission reactors. Fusion could supply makeup fuel to fission reactors that were dedicated to fissioning wastes with some of their neutrons. The design for safety and heat removal and other items is already accomplished with fission reactors. Whereas fusion reactors have geometry that compromises safety with a complex and thin wall separating the fusion zone from the blanket zone where wastes could be destroyed. Nonproliferation can be enhanced by mixing 233U with 238U. Also nonproliferation is enhanced in typical fission-suppressed designs by generating up to 0.05 232U atoms for each 233U atom produced from thorium, about twice the IAEA standards of "reduced protection" or "self protection." With 2.4% 232U, high explosive material is predicted to degrade owing to ionizing radiation after a little over 1/2 year and the heat rate is 77 W just after separation and climbs to over 600 W ten years later. The fissile material can be used to fuel most any fission reactor but is especially appropriate for molten salt reactors (MSR) also called liquid fluoride thorium reactors (LFTR) because of the molten fuel does not need hands on fabrication and handling.

  5. Recent progress in analysis for fission products

    A great deal of progress has been achieved in analysis of fission products during the 1980s. In situ analysis of fission products and direct assay of radiowaste packages have been developed to meet the needs of radiowaste treatment and disposal. Activation analysis and non-radiometric method have been used to measure long-lived fission product nuclides. Their sensitivity is superior to that of traditional radiochemical analysis. Some new work on the Cherenkov counting technique and rapid radiochemical analysis has been published. The progress is reviewed from the point of view of methodology

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of volatile organometallic fission products

    The ability to perform rapid separations in a post nuclear weapon detonation scenario is an important aspect of national security. In the past, separations of fission products have been performed using solvent extraction, precipitation, etc. The focus of this work is to explore the feasibility of using thermochromatography, a technique largely employed in superheavy element chemistry, to expedite the separation of fission products from fuel components. A series of fission product complexes were synthesized and the thermodynamic parameters were measured using TGA/DSC methods. Once measured, these parameters were used to predict their retention times using thermochromatography. (author)

  7. Fission induced by nucleons at intermediate energies

    Lo Meo, S., E-mail: sergio.lomeo@enea.it [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Mancusi, D., E-mail: davide.mancusi@cea.fr [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPhN, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Massimi, C., E-mail: cristian.massimi@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Vannini, G., E-mail: gianni.vannini@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Ventura, A., E-mail: alberto.ventura@bo.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Monte Carlo calculations of fission of actinides and pre-actinides induced by protons and neutrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to 1 GeV are carried out by means of a recent version of the Liège Intranuclear Cascade Model, INCL++, coupled with two different evaporation-fission codes, GEMINI++ and ABLA07. In order to reproduce experimental fission cross sections, model parameters are usually adjusted on available (p,f) cross sections and used to predict (n,f) cross sections for the same isotopes.

  8. Fission induced by nucleons at intermediate energies

    Meo, Sergio Lo; Massimi, Cristian; Vannini, Gianni; Ventura, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of fission of actinides and pre-actinides induced by protons and neutrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to 1 GeV are carried out by means of a recent version of the Li\\`ege Intranuclear Cascade Model, INCL++, coupled with two different evaporation-fission codes, GEMINI++ and ABLA07. In order to reproduce experimental fission cross sections, model parameters are usually adjusted on available (p,f) cross sections and used to predict (n,f) cross sections for the same isotopes.

  9. Rearrangement of cluster structure during fission processes

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2004-01-01

    groups of atoms from the parent cluster is largely independent of the isomer form of the parent cluster. The importance of rearrangement of the cluster structure during the fission process is elucidated. This rearrangement may include transition to another isomer state of the parent cluster before actual......Results of molecular dynamics simulations of fission reactions $Na_10^2+ -->Na_7^++ Na_3^+ and Na_18^2+--> 2Na_9^+ are presented. The dependence of the fission barriers on the isomer structure of the parent cluster is analysed. It is demonstrated that the energy necessary for removing homothetic...

  10. Neutron induced fission of 234U

    Pomp S.; Al-Adili A.; Oberstedt S.; Hambsch F.-J.

    2012-01-01

    The fission fragment properties of 234U(n,f) were investigated as a function of incident neutron energy from 0.2 MeV up to 5 MeV. The fission fragment mass, angular distribution and kinetic energy were measured with a double Frisch-grid ionization chamber using both analogue and digital data acquisition techniques. The reaction 234U(n,f) is relevant, since it involves the same compound nucleus as formed after neutron evaporation from highly excited 236U*, the so-called second-chance fission o...

  11. Low energy fission: dynamics and scission configurations

    In the first part of this paper we recall a recent study concerning low energy fission dynamics. Propagation is made by use of the Time Dependent Generator Coordinate Method, where the basis states are taken from self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations with the Gogny force. Theoretical fragment mass distributions are presented and compared with the evaluation made by Wahl. In the second part of this paper, new results concerning scission configurations are shown. Deviations of the fission fragment proton numbers from the Unchanged Charge Distribution prescription and fission fragment deformations are discussed. (authors)

  12. Fission cross section measurements for minor actinides

    Fursov, B. [IPPE, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The main task of this work is the measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section for minor actinides of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243,244,245,246,247,248}Cm. The task of the work is to increase the accuracy of data in MeV energy region. Basic experimental method, fissile samples, fission detectors and electronics, track detectors, alpha counting, neutron generation, fission rate measurement, corrections to the data and error analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  13. Detection of fission fragments by secondary emission

    This fission fragment detecting apparatus is based on the principle that fragments traversing a thin foil will cause emission of secondary electrons. These electrons are then accelerated (10 kV) and directly detected by means of a plastic scintillator and associated photomultiplier. Some of the advantages of such a detector are, its rapidity, its discriminating power between alpha particles and fission fragments, its small energy loss in detecting the fragments and the relatively great amount of fissionable material which it can contain. This paper is subdivided as follows: a) theoretical considerations b) constructional details of apparatus and some experimental details and c) a study of the secondary emission effect itself. (author)

  14. The chemistry of the fission products

    This is a review of chemistry of some chemical elements in fission products. The elements mentioned are krypton, xenon, rubidium, caesium, silver, strontium, barium, cadmium, rare earth elements, zirconium, niobium, antimony, molybdenum, tellurium, technetium, bromine, iodine, ruthenium, rhodium and palladium. The chemistry of elements and their oxides is briefly given together with the chemical species in aqueous solution. The report also contains tables of the physical properties of the elements and their oxides, of fission products nuclides with their half-life and fission yields and of the permissible concentrations. (author)

  15. Fission products measured from highly-enriched uranium irradiated under 10B4C in a research reactor

    Prior work has demonstrated the use of a natural B4C capsule for spectral-tailoring in a mixed spectrum reactor as an alternate and complementary method to critical assemblies for performing nuclear data measurements at near 235U fission-energy neutron spectrum. Previous fission product measurements showed that the neutron spectrum achievable with natural B4C was not as hard as what can be achieved with critical assemblies. New measurements performed with the Washington State University TRIGA reactor using a B4C capsule 96 % enriched in 10B resulted in a neutron spectrum very similar to a critical assembly and a pure 235U fission spectrum. Fission product yields measured following an irradiation of a sample with this new method and subsequent radiochemical separations are presented here. (author)

  16. Binary and ternary fission within the statistical model

    The binary and ternary nuclear fission are treated within the statistical model. At the scission point we calculate the potentials as functions of the deformations of the fragments in the dinuclear model. The potentials give the mass and charge distributions of the fission fragments. The ternary fission is assumed to occur during the binary fission. (author)

  17. Future challenges for nuclear data research in fission (u)

    Chadwick, Mark B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    I describe some high priority research areas in nuclear fission, where applications in nuclear reactor technologies and in modeling criticality in general are demanding higher accuracies in our databases. We focus on fission cross sections, fission neutron spectra, and fission product data.

  18. Effects of fissioning nuclei distributions on fragment mass distributions for high energy fission

    Rossi P C R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects of fissioning nuclei mass- and energy-distributions on the formation of fragments for fission induced by high energy probes. A Monte Carlo code called CRISP was used for obtaining mass distributions and spectra of the fissioning nuclei for reactions induced by 660 MeV protons on 241Am and on 239Np, by 500 MeV protons on 208Pb, and by Bremsstrahlung photons with end-point energies at 50 MeV and 3500 MeV on 238U. The results show that even at high excitation energies, asymmetric fission may still contribute significantly to the fission cross section of actinide nuclei, while it is the dominante mode in the case of lead. However, more precise data for high energy fission on actinide are necessary in order to allow definite conclusions.

  19. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: boost-induced fission

    Goddard, P M; Rios, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus, and the daughter products. Purpose: To explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide $^{240}$Pu as an example. Methods: Quadrupole constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickl...

  20. Active inspection fission signatures for the detection, quantification and identification of fissionable materials

    Recently there has been heightened interest in active inspection techniques that can nondestructively detect, identify and quantify fissionable materials for security, nonproliferation and nuclear forensics applications. These active techniques use a source of neutrons or high energy photons to stimulate nuclear reactions in the inspection object and then monitor the emitted secondary radiation for unique fissionable material signatures. These signatures are based on detecting emissions from fission reactions (e.g., prompt and delayed neutrons) and/or non fission reactions (e.g., nuclear resonance fluorescence). In this presentation, the authors will present recent experimental results using prompt neutrons, delayed neutrons and delayed γ rays as fissionable material signatures. The research first focused on how to detect these emissions in an intense radiation environment and the algorithms required to produce unique fissionable material signatures. The sensitivity, accuracy, speed and isotope specificity of each signature was then explored. Current work is focusing on how to effectively combine multiple signatures. (author)

  1. Fission fragment mass and angular distributions: Probes to study non-equilibrium fission

    R G Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Synthesis of heavy and superheavy elements is severely hindered by fission and fission-like processes. The probability of these fission-like, non-equilibrium processes strongly depends on the entrance channel parameters. This article attempts to summarize the recent experimental findings and classify the signatures of these non-equilibrium processes based on macroscopic variables. The importance of the sticking time of the dinuclear complex with respect to the equilibration times of various degrees of freedom is emphasized.

  2. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock. II. Boost-induced fission

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide 240Pu as an example. Methods: Following upon the work presented in Goddard et al. [Phys. Rev. C 92, 054610 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.054610, quadrupole-constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickly absorbed by the nucleus. In instantaneous boosts, this leads to fast shape rearrangements and violent dynamics that can ultimately lead to fission. This is a qualitatively different process than the deformation-induced fission. Boosts induced within a finite time window excite the system in a relatively gentler way and do induce fission but with a smaller energy deposition. Conclusions: The fission products obtained using boost-induced fission in time-dependent Hartree-Fock are more asymmetric than the fragments obtained in deformation-induced fission or the corresponding adiabatic approaches.

  3. Description of peculiarities of prompt fission neutron spectrum in spontaneous fission of 252Cr

    Full text : 252Cf is the model object in theoretical and experimental studying of prompt fission neutron spectrum in the both spontaneous and induced fission of heavy nuclei. However, the form of spectrum observed has not been clearly understood especially in the region of lower and higher energies. The last compiled data are frequently used as a standart for the test of theoretical prescriptions of the neutron spectrum in spontaneous fission of 252Cf

  4. Spontaneous 238U fission half-life measurements based on fission-track techniques

    In the last recommendation of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (I.U.P.A.C.) on spontaneous fission half-lives for ground-state nuclides, a number of measurements of 238U based on fission-track techniques were discarded. The arguments given by the authors are not clear. A more detailed discussion of these determinations is given, considering the possible systematical errors inherent in fission-track approaches. (author)

  5. Neutron emission as a probe of fusion-fission and quasi-fission dynamics

    Pre- and post scission neutron yeilds have been measured as a function of projectile mass, compound nucleus fissility, and fission mass-split and total kinetic energy (TKE) for 27 fusion-fission and quasi-fission reactions induced by beams of 16,18O, 40Ar and 64Ni. A new method of interpretation of experimental pre-scission neutron multiplicities ν-pre and mean kinetic energies εν allows the extraction of fission time scales with much less uncertainty than previously, all fusion-fission results being consistent with a dynamical time scale of (35±15) x 10-21s for symmetric fission. All reactions show that ν-pre falls quite rapidly with increasing mass-asymmetry; evidence is presented that for fusion-fission reactions this is partly due to a reduction of the dynamical fission time scale with mass-asymmetry. For quasi-fission, the data indicate that the pre-scission multiplicity and mean neutron kinetic energy are very sensitive to the final mass-asymmetry, but that the time scale is virtually independent of mass-asymmetry. It is concluded that for fusion-fission there is no dependence of ν-pre on TKE, whilst for 64Ni-induced quasi-fission reactions, a strong increase of ν-pre with decreasing TKE is observed, probably largely caused by neutron emission during the acceleration time of the fission fragments in these fast reactions. Interpretation of post-scission multiplicities in terms of fragment excitation energies leads to deduced time scales consistent with those determined from the pre-scission data. 54 refs., 17 tabs., 25 figs

  6. A hemi-fission intermediate links two mechanistically distinct stages of membrane fission

    Mattila, Juha-Pekka; Shnyrova, Anna V.; Sundborger, Anna C.; Hortelano, Eva Rodriguez; Fuhrmans, Marc; Neumann, Sylvia; Müller, Marcus; Hinshaw, Jenny E.; Schmid, Sandra L; Frolov, Vadim A.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion and fission drive all vesicular transport. Although topologically opposite, these reactions pass through the same hemi-fusion/fission intermediate 1,2 , characterized by a ‘stalk’ in which only the inner monolayers of the two compartments have merged to form a localized non-bilayer connection 1-3 . Formation of the hemi-fission intermediate requires energy input from proteins catalyzing membrane remodeling; however the relationship between protein conformational rearrangements and hemi...

  7. Present status of fission yield data

    Fission yield data of minor actinides are needed for transmutation of nuclear waste by an ADS system. The yield data, however, are not enough for the application. The present status of the yield data is presented in this report. (author)

  8. Ternary fission induced by polarized neutrons

    Gönnenwein Friedrich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary fission of (e,e U- and Pu- isotopes induced by cold polarized neutrons discloses some new facets of the process. In the so-called ROT effect shifts in the angular distributions of ternary particles relative to the fission fragments show up. In the so-called TRI effect an asymmetry in the emission of ternary particles relative to a plane formed by the fragment momentum and the spin of the neutron appear. The two effects are shown to be linked to the components of angular momentum perpendicular and parallel to the fission axis at the saddle point of fission. Based on theoretical models the spectroscopic properties of the collective transitional states at the saddle point are inferred from experiment.

  9. "UCx fission targets oxidation test stand"

    Lacroix, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    "Set up a rig dedicated to the oxidation of UCx and define a procedure for repeatable, reliable and safe method for converting UC2 fission targets into an acceptable uranium carbide oxide waste for subsequent disposal by the Swiss Authorities."

  10. Energy from nuclear fission an introduction

    De Sanctis, Enzo; Ripani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview on nuclear physics and energy production from nuclear fission. It serves as a readable and reliable source of information for anyone who wants to have a well-balanced opinion about exploitation of nuclear fission in power plants. The text is divided into two parts; the first covers the basics of nuclear forces and properties of nuclei, nuclear collisions, nuclear stability, radioactivity, and provides a detailed discussion of nuclear fission and relevant topics in its application to energy production. The second part covers the basic technical aspects of nuclear fission reactors, nuclear fuel cycle and resources, safety, safeguards, and radioactive waste management. The book also contains a discussion of the biological effects of nuclear radiation and of radiation protection, and a summary of the ten most relevant nuclear accidents. The book is suitable for undergraduates in physics, nuclear engineering and other science subjects. However, the mathematics is kept at a level that...

  11. Development of fission Mo-99 production technology

    Fission Mo-99 is the only parent nuclide of Tc-99m, an extremely useful tool for mdeical diagnosis, with an estimated usage of greater than 80% of nuclear medicine applicatons. HEU and LEU targets to optimize in HANARO irradiation condition suggested and designed for domestic production of fission Mo-99. The optimum process conditions are established in each unit process to meet quality requirements of fission Mo-99 products, and the results of performance test in combined process show Mo separation and purification yield of the above 97%. The concept of Tc generator production process is established, and the result of performance test show Tc production yield of 98.4% in Tc generator procuction process. The drafts is prepared for cooperation of technical cooperation and business investment with foreign country. Evaluation on economic feasibility is accompanied for fission Mo-99 and Tc-99m generator production

  12. Modeling dimer structure for efficient singlet fission

    Havlas, Zdeněk; Jovanovic, M.; Michl, Josef

    Kyoto: -, 2013. Oa1. [JCS International Symposium on Theoretical Chemistry /5./. 02.12.2013-06.12.2013, Nara] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : singlet fission * dimer structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  13. Singlet fission: The chromophores and their coupling

    Wen, Jin; Havlas, Zdeněk; Michl, Josef

    Santiago: -, 2014. IC119. [WATOC 2014. Congress of the World Association of Theoretical and Computational Chemists /10./. 05.10.2014-10.10.2014, Santiago] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : singlet fission * chromophores * coupling Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  14. Adsorption of fission products on mediterranean mud

    Partition coefficients of some fission products have been measured in sea water on mud taken from the bottom of the Mediterranean sea. A discussion follows on the behaviour of these radioisotopes. (author)

  15. TMI-2 fission product inventory estimates (draft)

    This report presents the results of analyses performed to estimate the inventory and distribution of selected radioisotopes within the TMI-2 reactor system. The intent of the report is to document the method used in estimating the fission product inventory and associated uncertainties. The values presented should be viewed as preliminary. Selected radioisotopes for which best-estimate inventories and uncertainties are presented include: Krypton (Kr-85), Cesium (Cs-137), Iodine (I-129), Antimony (Sb-125), Ruthenium (Ru-106), Strontium (Sr-90), Cerium (Ce-144), and Europium (Eu-154). The TMI-2 inventory data will provide a basis for relating the fission product behavior during a large-scale severe accident to smaller-scale experimental data and fission product behavior modeling work. This is an important link in addressing the many technical questions that relate to core damage progression and fission product behavior during severe accidents. 11 refs., 7 figs., 15 tabs

  16. Development of fission Mo-99 production technology

    Park, Jin Ho; Choung, W. M.; Lee, K. I. and others

    2000-05-01

    Fission Mo-99 is the only parent nuclide of Tc-99m, an extremely useful tool for mdeical diagnosis, with an estimated usage of greater than 80% of nuclear medicine applicatons. HEU and LEU targets to optimize in HANARO irradiation condition suggested and designed for domestic production of fission Mo-99. The optimum process conditions are established in each unit process to meet quality requirements of fission Mo-99 products, and the results of performance test in combined process show Mo separation and purification yield of the above 97%. The concept of Tc generator production process is established, and the result of performance test show Tc production yield of 98.4% in Tc generator procuction process. The drafts is prepared for cooperation of technical cooperation and business investment with foreign country. Evaluation on economic feasibility is accompanied for fission Mo-99 and Tc-99m generator production.

  17. Electron spectra from decay of fission products

    Dickens, J K

    1982-09-01

    Electron spectra following decay of individual fission products (72 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 162) are obtained from the nuclear data given in the compilation using a listed and documented computer subroutine. Data are given for more than 500 radionuclides created during or after fission. The data include transition energies, absolute intensities, and shape parameters when known. An average beta-ray energy is given for fission products lacking experimental information on transition energies and intensities. For fission products having partial or incomplete decay information, the available data are utilized to provide best estimates of otherwise unknown decay schemes. This compilation is completely referenced and includes data available in the reviewed literature up to January 1982.

  18. Trajectory Calculations in Light-Particle Fission

    Trajectory calculations based on a three-point-charge model were carried out for fission accompanied by 1H, 2H, 3H, 4He, 6He, 3He emission. The calculations were carried out with the intent of obtaining for each of these modes of fission the initial conditions which best fit the experimental results. The results indicate that both the initial distances between the fission fragments at scission and the initial kinetic energies of the particles tend to decrease as the mass of the light particle increases. In addition it was found that the experimental results could be better fitted by assuming that the particles are emitted off the axis connecting both fission fragments rather than on this axis. (author)

  19. β-delayed fission from 230Ac

    ThO2 is irradiated with 60 MeV/u 18O beams. 230Ra is produced via the multi-nucleon transfer and dissipative fragmentation reactions of the target. 230Ra is radio-chemical separated from ThO2 and the other reaction products. The thin Ra sources are prepared. The mica fission track detectors are exposed to the Ra sources. γ-rays of Ra decay in the sources are measured by a HPGe detector. The mica foil is etched in HF solution. The etched mica foil is scanned with an optical microscope. The fission tracks that should come from β-delayed fission of 230Ac are observed. The β-delayed fission probability of 230Ac is determined to be (1.19 +- 0.85) x 10-8

  20. General view on the progress in nuclear fission : a review

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    An overview is given on some of the main advances in experimental methods, experimental results and theoretical models and ideas of the last years in the field of nuclear fission. New approaches extended the availability of fissioning systems for experimental studies of nuclear fission considerably and provided a full identification of all fission products in A and Z for the first time. In particular, the transition from symmetric to asymmetric fission around 226 Th and some unexpected struct...

  1. General Description of Fission Observables: GEF Model Code

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz; Amouroux, Charlotte; Schmitt, C.

    2015-01-01

    The GEF (" GEneral description of Fission observables ") model code is documented. It describes the observables for spontaneous fission, neutron-induced fission and, more generally, for fission of a compound nucleus from any other entrance channel, with given excitation energy and angular momentum. The GEF model is applicable for a wide range of isotopes from Z = 80 to Z = 112 and beyond, up to excitation energies of about 100 MeV. The results of the GEF model are compared with fission barrie...

  2. Subroutines to Simulate Fission Neutrons for Monte Carlo Transport Codes

    Lestone, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Fortran subroutines have been written to simulate the production of fission neutrons from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and 240Pu, and from the thermal neutron induced fission of 239Pu and 235U. The names of these four subroutines are getnv252, getnv240, getnv239, and getnv235, respectively. These subroutines reproduce measured first, second, and third moments of the neutron multiplicity distributions, measured neutron-fission correlation data for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf, and meas...

  3. Mass and Charge Distribution in Low-Energy Fission

    The mass and charge distributions for thermal-neutron fission of U235 are discussed in considerable detail and compared with the corresponding distributions in other low-energy fission processes. Points discussed in connection with the mass distributions for binary fission include the positions of the peaks, valley and fine structure in a mass yield curve with respect to filled nuclear shells and the changes in the positions that occur with changing fissioning nucleus and excitation energy. The mass distribution from ternary fission is discussed also. For both binary and ternary fission comments are made concerning the mass distributions of primary fragments (before neutron evaporation) and of fission products (after neutron evaporation). Charge distribution is discussed in terms of charge dispersion among fission products with the same mass number and the variation with mass number of Zp, the ''most probable charge'' (non-integral) for a given mass number. Although direct information about charge distribution is limited to fission products, estimates are presented of charge distribution for primary fission fragments. Knowledge and estimates of mass and charge distribution for a fission process allow estimation of primary yields of all fission products or fragments. Although many estimated primary yields are quite uncertain mainly because of lack of knowledge of charge distribution, especially for fission products formed in low yield; some estimates of primary yields are presented to illustrate the need for and possible practicality of further experimentation. Fission processes other than thermal-neutron fission of U235 that are discussed include thermal-neutron fission of U233 and Pu239, spontaneous fission of Pu240 and Cf252, 14-MeV neutron fission of U235 and U238, 11-MeV proton fission of Ra226 and 22-MeV deuteron fission of Bi209. (author)

  4. High efficiency ionization chamber for fission experiments

    Complete text of publication follows. The width of fission fragment mass distribution indicates the number of di rent fragments which are produced during the fission process from a given excited state. Smaller width means more limited variety of fission fragments which can indicate clusterization effect in hyperdeformed states before fission and also means less amount of nuclear waste. A new gridded ionization chamber was constructed at Atomki to examine the mass distribution of the fission fragments from neutron induced fission of some U and Th isotopes. The design is based on a twin ionization chamber developed by C. Budtz-Jorgensen et al. Our aim was to increase the efficiency of the measurements by applying multiple detector units. This compound detector permits simultaneous measurement of the total kinetic energy and fission fragment emission angle with respect to the detector symmetry axis. The chamber consists of five twin parallel plate ionization chambers with Frisch grids. Assuming that at low counting rates only one target emits fission fragments in one event, the an- odes and the grids were interconnected form- ing two groups (A1-G1, A2-G2). In order to identify which target emitted the fission fragments the signals from each cathodes are also processed. The energy of the fission fragments is determined from the anode pulse heights, while the sum of the grid and anode signals is used to deduce the fragment emission angle θ with respect to the symmetry axis of the chamber: Qsum = -n0e[1 - (X/D)cosθ). The angle dependent energy losses in the tar get can be determined using this angular information. In order to minimize the distance between the targets and the neutron source, smaller distance between the plates and a smaller diameter had to be chosen as in Ref. This arrangement required higher gas pressure, which is necessary to stop the fission fragments before reaching the electrodes. A gas mixture of 90% Ar + 10% CH4 at 2 atm pressure was used. With a

  5. Fission-Fusion Neutron Source

    Full text of publication follows: In order to meet the requirement of fusion reactor developing and nuclear waste treatment, a concept of fission-fusion neutron source has been proposed with LiD cylinder in heavy water region of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) by slow neutrons to transfer to fusion neutron. The principal is the reaction of 6Li(n,α) to produce energetic tritium ion with 2.739 MeV in LiD by slow neutron, which will be bombarding the deuteron of LiD to induce fusion reaction to produce 14 MeV neutron. The fusion reaction rate will increase with the accumulation of tritium in LiD by the reaction between tritium and deuteron recoils produced by 14 MeV neutrons. When the concentration of tritium in LiD reaches O.5 x 1022 T/cm3 and the fraction of fusion reaction induced by deuteron recoils with tritium approaches to 1, the 14 MeV neutron flux will be doubled and redoubled increasing to approach saturation in which the produced tritium at time t is exhausted by fusion reaction to keep the constant of tritium concentration in LiD. At this case the 14 MeV neutron production rate is too high, it has to decrease the slow neutron flux with decreasing CARR reactor power progressively when the fusion neutron flux approaches to presetting value, for example 3.5 x 1014 n/cm2 sec and will approach to saturation at the low level of neutron flux. This paper describes the principle of fission-fusion neutron source, including the production rate of fusion neutron, the accumulation rate and concentration of tritium, the fusion reaction rate induced by deuteron recoils with tritium, the 14 MeV neutron flux of inner surface of LiD cylinder in the heavy water region of CARR reactor without neutron depression and the influence factors. To consider the neutron depression an assembly of LiD rods in 20 x 20 cm with a centre hole in CARR reactor must be designed to optimize the fusion neutron flux in centre hole. (author)

  6. The Risoe Fission Gas Project

    The RISOE Fission Gas Project has provided experimental data on fission gas release (FGR) from high-burnup water reactor fuel. The data are well-characterized with respect to pre-irradiation measurement, irradiation and post-irradiation examination, thus enabling their use in fuel performance code validation. The experimental data were obtained with 12 Zircaloy-clad UO2 pellet fuel pins, irradiated to burnups in the range 27,000-36,000 MWD/tU (pin average, peak pellet 43,700 MWD/tU). Most of the fuel pins were subjected to short-term reirradiations at increased power levels (''bump testing''), in order to simulate postulated power increases late in life. The 11 bump tests covered a range of bump terminal levels (BTL) of 301-434 W/cm (peak pellet), with hold time of 24 h except for one test at 72 h. The axial power shape during the bump testing differed from the base irradiation, thus each bump test was in fact a whole series of experiments with a range of BTLs. The integral pin FGR resulting from the bump testing was in the range 0-16%, increasing with BTL above 375 W/cm (peak pellet). Owing to the form of the axial power distributions, local release data were emphasized in the project, some of the observations being: (a) FG and Cs-137 releases seemed to correlate with local BTL as well as axial and radial position, and to do so in a similar manner; at the highest local BTL investigated (414 W/cm), local FGR had apparently saturated at 40% within 24 h; (b) the local releases increased with local BTL above 350 W/cm; (c) bump testing to about 414 W/cm virtually emptied the central region of the fuel for FG and Cs-137; (d) the release measurements and the ceramographic observations for the bump test with 72 h hold time suggest that this longer time may have given more local release for the lower local BTLs. (author)

  7. Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei

    Pei, J C; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Kerman, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The relationship between isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. F...

  8. Energy partition in low energy fission

    Mirea, M.

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic excitation energy of fission fragments is dynamically evaluated in terms of the time dependent pairing equations. These equations are corroborated with two conditions. One of them fixes the number of particles and the another separates the pairing active spaces associated to the two fragments in the vicinity of the scission configuration. The fission path is obtained in the frame of the macroscopic-microscopic model. The single particle level schemes are obtained within the two ...

  9. MCNP6 Fission Multiplicity with FMULT Card

    Wilcox, Trevor [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fensin, Michael Lorne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hendricks, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McKinney, Gregg W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5 into MCNP6, MCNP6 now provides all the capabilities of both codes allowing the user to access all the fission multiplicity data sets. Detailed in this paper is: (1) the new FMULT card capabilities for accessing these different data sets; (2) benchmark calculations, as compared to experiment, detailing the results of selecting these separate data sets for thermal neutron induced fission on U-235.

  10. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission

  11. A revised calculational model for fission

    A semi-empirical parametrization has been developed to calculate the fission contribution to evaporative de-excitation of nuclei with a very wide range of charge, mass and excitation-energy and also the nuclear states of the scission products. The calculational model reproduces measured values (cross-sections, mass distributions, etc.) for a wide range of fissioning systems: Nuclei from Ta to Cf, interactions involving nucleons up to medium energy and light ions. (author)

  12. Our 50-year odyssey with fission: Summary

    On the occasion of this International Conference on Fifty Years Research in Nuclear Fission, we summarize our present understanding of the fission process and the challenges that lie ahead. The basic properties of fission arise from a delicate competition between disruptive Coulomb forces, cohesive nuclear forces, and fluctuating shell and pairing forces. These static forces are primarily responsible for such experimental phenomena as deformed ground-state nuclear shapes, fission into fragments of unequal size, sawtooth neutron yields, spontaneously fissioning isomers, broad resonances and narrow intermediate structure in fission cross sections, and cluster radioactivity. However, inertial and dissipative forces also play decisive roles in the dynamical evolution of a fissioning nucleus. The energy dissipated between the saddle and scission points is small for low initial excitation energy at the saddle point and increases with increasing excitation energy. At moderate excitation energies, the dissipation of collective energy into internal single-particle excitation energy proceeds largely through the interaction of nucleons with the mean field and with each other in the vicinity of the nuclear surface, as well as through the transfer of nucleons between the two portions of the evolving dumbell-like system. These unique dissipation mechanisms arise from the Pauli exclusion principle for fermions and the details of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, which make the mean free path of a nucleon near the Fermi surface at low excitation energy longer than the nuclear radius. With its inverse process of heavy-ion fusion reactions, fission continues to yield surprises in the study of large-amplitude collective nuclear motion. 87 refs., 12 figs

  13. Seventy-five years of nuclear fission

    S S Kapoor

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear fission process is one of the most important discoveries of the twentieth century. In these 75 years since its discovery, the nuclear fission related research has not only provided new insights in the physics of large scale motion, deformation and subsequent division of a heavy nucleus, but has also opened several new frontiers of research in nuclear physics. This article is a narrative giving an overview of the landmarks of the progress in the field.

  14. Detector instrumentation for nuclear fission studies

    Akhil Jhingan

    2015-09-01

    The study of heavy-ion-induced fusion–fission reactions require nuclear instrumentation that include particle detectors such as proportional counters, ionization chambers, silicon detectors, scintillation detectors, etc., and the front-end electronics for these detectors. Using the detectors mentioned above, experimental facilities have been developed for carrying out fusion–fission experiments. This paper reviews the development of detector instrumentation at IUAC.

  15. A revised calculational model for fission

    Atchison, F.

    1998-09-01

    A semi-empirical parametrization has been developed to calculate the fission contribution to evaporative de-excitation of nuclei with a very wide range of charge, mass and excitation-energy and also the nuclear states of the scission products. The calculational model reproduces measured values (cross-sections, mass distributions, etc.) for a wide range of fissioning systems: Nuclei from Ta to Cf, interactions involving nucleons up to medium energy and light ions. (author)

  16. Spontaneous fission of 256Rf, new data

    Svirikhin, A. I.; Yeremin, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Isaev, A. V.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Popov, Yu. A.; Sokol, E. A.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Andel, B.; Asfari, M. Z.; Gall, B.; Yoshihiro, N.; Kalaninova, Z.; Mullins, S.; Piot, J.; Stefanova, E.; Tonev, D.

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous fission properties of the short-lived neutron-deficient 256Rf nucleus produced in the complete fusion reaction with a beam of multiply charged heavy 50Ti ions from the U-400 cyclotron (FLNR, JINR) are experimentally investigated. Its half-life and decay branching ratio are measured. The average number of neutrons per spontaneous fission of 256Rf (bar v = 4.47 ± 0.09) is determined for the first time.

  17. Fission track dating of zircon: a multichronometer

    Scattering in Fission Track ages of zircons of a single rock is possible when they present morphological and geochemical variations, if the greatest care is not taken in the choice of the etching conditions and the counting of tracks. The Fission Track study of two heterogeneous populations of zircons from the Mont Blanc granite and from the Gran Paradiso gneisses allows to show that zircon may work as a multichronometer

  18. Dynamics in heavy ion fusion and fission

    Dynamical aspects of heavy ion fussion and fission, mainly the aspect of damping which is meant as the dissipation of kinetic energy and the aspect of the effective mass of the fission motion, are discussed. Two categories of evidence of damping effects are given. One relates to the damping of the fission motion for the ground state shape and for the isomeric more elongated shape. The other relates to the damping of the fission motion from the last barrier to the scission point. The dependence of the effective mass associated with the fission motion on the deormation of nucleus is shown. As the elongation of the nucleus increases the effective mass of the fission motion varies strongly from being about forty times greater than the reduced mass in the beta-vibrational state of the ground state shape to being equal to the reduced mass in the moment of scission. Damping effects are expected to be propartional to the difference between the effective mass and the reduced mass. It is concluded that the damping in fussion reactions is relatively weak for lighter products and quite strong for superheavy products like 236U or 252Cf. (S.B.)

  19. JNDC nuclear data library of fission products

    The JNDC (Japanese Nuclear Data Committee) FP (Fission Product) nuclear data library for 1172 fission products is described in this report. The gross theory of beta decay has been used extensively for estimating unknown decay data and also some of known decay data with poor accuracy. The calculated decay powers of fission products using the present library show excellent agreement with the latest measurements at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory) and UTT (University of Tokyo, Tokai) for cooling times shorter than 103 s after irradiation. The calculated decay powers by the existing libraries showed systematic deviations at short cooling times; the calculated beta and gamma decay powers after burst fission were smaller than the experimental results for cooling times shorter than 10 s, and in the cooling time range 10 to 103 s the beta-decay power was larger than the measured values and the gamma decay power smaller than the measured results. The present JNDC FP nuclear data library resolved these discrepancies in the short cooling time ranges. The decay power of fission products has been calculated for ten fission types and the results have been fitted by an analytical function with 31 exponentials. This permits the easy application of the present results of decay power calculations to a LOCA (Loss-of-Coolant Accident) analysis of a light water reactor and so on. (author)

  20. Theoretical descriptions of neutron emission in fission

    Brief descriptions are given of the observables in neutron emission in fission together with early theoretical representations of two of these observables, namely, the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) and the average prompt neutron multiplicity bar νp. This is followed by summaries, together with examples, of modern approaches to the calculation of these two quantities. Here, emphasis is placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the new approaches. In particular, the dependencies of N(E) and bar νp upon the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy are discussed. Then, recent work in multiple-chance fission and other recent work involving new measurements are presented and discussed. Following this, some properties of fission fragments are mentioned that must be better known and better understood in order to calculate N(E) and bar νp with higher accuracy than is currently possible. In conclusion, some measurements are recommended for the purpose of benchmarking simultaneous calculations of neutron emission and gamma emission in fission. 32 refs., 26 figs

  1. The Risoe fission gas project - an overview

    The Risoe Fission Gas Project has provided experimental data on fission gas release from high-burnup water reactor fuel. The data are well-characterized with respect to pre-irradiation measurement, irradiation and post-irradiation examination. The experimental data were obtained with 12 Zircaloy-clad UO2 pellet fuel pins, irradiated in a test assembly to an average of 32,000 MWd (tU)-1. Most of the fuel pins were submitted to short-term re-irradiation at increased power levels ('bump testing') in a test reactor in order to simulate postulated power increases late in life. The bump tests covered a range of bump terminal levels of 320 to 462 W cm-1 (peak pellet), mostly with a hold time of 24 h. Extensive hot-cell examinations were performed of base-irradiated and bump-tested fuel pins. The fission gas release resulting from the bump testing was in the range 0 to 16%, increasing with peak pellet levels above 400 W cm-1. Local fission gas releases were determined from retained-gas measurements on pellet size samples. Release of the fission product cesium as a function of local bump terminal level resembled the local fission gas release. The gas release measurements were corroborated by extensive ceramographic examinations and pore size analysis. (author)

  2. Modelisation of the fission cross section

    The neutron cross sections of four nuclear systems (n+235U, n+233U, n+241Am and n+237Np) are studied in the present document. The target nuclei of the first case, like 235U and 239Pu, have a large fission cross section after the absorption of thermal neutrons. These nuclei are called 'fissile' nuclei. The other type of nuclei, like 237Np and 241Am, fission mostly with fast neutrons, which exceed the fission threshold energy. These types of nuclei are called 'fertile'. The compound nuclei of the fertile nuclei have a binding energy higher than the fission barrier, while for the fissile nuclei the binding energy is lower than the fission barrier. In this work, the neutron induced cross sections for both types of nuclei are evaluated in the fast energy range. The total, reaction and shape-elastic cross sections are calculated by the coupled channel method of the optical model code ECIS, while the compound nucleus mechanism are treated by the statistical models implemented in the codes STATIS, GNASH and TALYS. The STATIS code includes a refined model of the fission process. Results from the theoretical calculations are compared with data retrieved from the experimental data base EXFOR. (author)

  3. Statistical model investigation of nuclear fission

    To assist in the improvement of fission product yield data libraries, the statistical theory of fission was investigated. Calculation of the theory employs a recent nuclear mass formula and nuclear density of states expression. Yields computed with a simple statement of the theory do not give satisfactory results. A slowly varying empirical parameter is introduced to improve agreement between measured and calculated yields. The parameter is interpreted as the spacing between the tips of the fragments at the instant of scission or as the length of a neck in the fissioning nucleus immediately prior to scission. With this spacing parameter semi-quantitative agreement is obtained between calculated and measured mass chain yields for six cases investigated, 233U(n/sub th/, f), 235U(n/sub th, f), 239Pu(n/sub th/, f), 235U(n+14, f), 238U(n+14, f), and 252Cf(sf). An indication of the source of mass asymmetry in fission is presented. The model developed predicts a mass and energy dependence of some of the parameters of models currently in use in data generation. A procedure for the estimation of the fission product yields for an arbitrary fissioning system is proposed. 63 references

  4. The Risoe Fission Gas Project. An overview

    The Risoe Fission Gas Project has provided experimental data on fission gas release from high-burnup water reactor fuel. The data are well-characterized with respect to pre-irradiation measurement, irradiation and post-irradiation examination, thus enabling their use in fuel performance code validation. The experimental data were obtained with 12 Zircaloy clad UO2 pellet fuel pins, irradiated in a test assembly to an average of 32,000 Mwd/tU. Most of the fuel pins were submitted to short-term reirradiation at increased power levels ('bump testing') in a test reactor, in order to simulate postulated power increases late in life. The bump tests covered a range of bump terminal levels of 320-462 U/cm (peak pellet), mostly with a hold time of 24 h. Extensive hot-cell examinations were performed of base-irradiated and bump-tested fuel pins. The fission gas release resulting from the bump testing was in the range 0-16%, increasing with peak pellet levels above 400 U/cm. Local fission gas releases were determined from retained gas measurements on pellet size samples. Release of fission product cesium as a function of local bump terminal level resembled the local fission gas release. The gas release measurements were corroborated by extensive ceramographic examinations and pore size analysis. (author)

  5. Space parity violation in nuclear fission

    Space parity violation in low energy fission was observed by the Soviet physicists in 1977 in the course of the angular distribution investigations of the light and heavy fragments in the polarized thermal neutron fission of 233,235U and 239Pu. Unexpected large values of the P-odd asymmetry coefficients (αnf ∼ 10-4) were obtained in the angular distribution W(0) = 1 + bar αnf (bar σn · pf). So large values of αnf looked very strange because of the existence of numerous different exit channels in fission process (∼108 - 1010) and a small relative value of nonconserving space parity potential of the weak NN-interaction (∼ 10-7). In addition to the P-violating asymmetry bar αnf P-conserving right-left asymmetry of the fission fragment angular distribution W (θ) = 1 + α RLnf pf · αn x pf was observed in 1979. The main goal of the new experimental investigations of P-odd and P-even effects in fission was a search of the possible relationships between the asymmetry coefficients and the characteristics of the entrance and exit channels in slow neutron fission. In this paper the brief review of the experimental results obtained by different groups is given. The main part of these results have been obtained at the WWR-M reactor of Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute (LNPI)

  6. Study of actinides fission induced by multi-nucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics; Etude de la fission d'actinides produits par reactions de transfert multinucleon en cinematique inverse

    Derkx, X.

    2010-10-15

    The study of actinide fission encounters two major issues. On one hand, measurements of the fission fragment distributions and the fission probabilities allow a better understanding of the fission process itself and the discrimination among the models of nuclear structure and dynamics. On the other hand, new measurements are required to improve nuclear data bases, which are a key component for the design of new generation reactors and radio-toxic waste incinerators. This thesis is in line with different French and American experimental projects using the surrogate method, i.e. transfer reactions leading to the same compound nuclei as in neutron irradiation, allowing the study of fission of actinides which are inaccessible by conventional techniques, whereas they are important for applications. The experiment is based on multi-nucleon transfer reactions between a {sup 238}U beam and a {sup 12}C target, using the inverse kinematics technique to measure, for each transfer channel, the complete isotopic distributions of the fission fragments with the VAMOS spectrometer. The work presented in this dissertation is focused on the identification of the transfer channels and their properties, as their angular distributions and the distributions of the associated excitation energy, using the SPIDER telescope to identify the target recoil nuclei. This work of an exploratory nature aims to generalize the surrogate method to heavy transfers and to measure, for the first time, the fission probabilities in inverse kinematics. The obtained results are compared with available direct kinematics and neutron irradiation measurements. (author)

  7. Biological effectiveness of fission neutrons

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to the uranium fission neutrons with different energy spectra, and the effects of changing pattern of energy spectrum on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) were studied by analyzing dose-response relationship of chromosome aberrations. When the contribution of contaminated gamma-rays was subtracted, the efficiency of chromosomal response to the neutron dose was found to be refractory to the difference in the energy spectrum while the mean energy ranged from 2 MeV to 27 keV. This chromosomal refractoriness to energy spectrum may be explained by the similarity of energy spectrum for kerma contribution; most of the doses being given by neutrons with energy above 50 keV. Small doses given by short tracks may be less efficient. A comparison of these observations with chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of A-bomb survivors leads to somewhat higher estimate of neutron dose in Hiroshima than the estimate by the recently revised dosimetry system, DS86. (author)

  8. Fission of 209Bi, natPb and 197Au in the particle field of a fast accelerator driven system

    Highlights: ► Fission rates of Bi, Pb and Au were measured in a particle field similar to that of fast ADS. ► The experimental results on fission rates are in agreement with MCNPX calculations. ► The most up to date fission cross-sections and related parameterizations were used. ► New parameterizations were produced from the published cross-section data. - Abstract: Accelerator driven systems (ADS) are expected to have particle spectra of significantly greater energy range than that of current power reactors. The Energy plus Transmutation (EpT) set-up of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia, is designed to emulate the neutron spectrum in a fast ADS through the use of a spallation target surrounded by a blanket of natural uranium. The spectrum is further modified by a reflective layer of polyethylene and an internal absorbing layer of cadmium. The spallation target of EpT was irradiated with a beam of 4 GeV deuterons, and the fission rates of bismuth, lead and gold samples, placed in the target-blanket region were recorded using a fission track detector technique. The fission rates were also calculated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code with the INCL4 cascade model and cross sections for nucleon induced fission obtained from literature. Agreement between the measured and calculated results indicates the model’s ability to predict the particle spectra and spatial distribution

  9. Fission product release and thermal behaviour

    Release of fission products from the fuel matrix is an important aspect in relation to performance and safety evaluations. Of particular importance amongst fission products are the isotopes of iodine for radiological considerations and the isotopes of xenon and krypton for fuel thermal behaviour. It is believed that the main mechanism for fission gas release is diffusion but the magnitudes of the relevant diffusion coefficients, which exhibit strong temperature dependences, are not well established. The conductivity of the main gaseous fission product, xenon, is much lower than that of the fill gas helium and hence fission gas release may lead to a deterioration of the fill gas conductivity resulting in higher fuel temperatures and consequently higher fission product release. The two effects, thermal response of fuel to fill gas composition and fission gas/product release are thus intimately connected and have been investigated in a number of instrumented fuel assemblies in the Halden reactor. In such an assembly, the instrumentation includes fuel centre thermocouples, pressure sensors and neutron detectors. In addition pins in the assembly may be swept, whilst at power, with various gases, for example Xe, He or Ar or mixtures thereof. A gamma spectrometer is incorporated into the gas circuit to facilitate the performance of on-line fission product release measurements. At various stages in the lifetime of the assembly thermal tests and fission product release measurements have been made. At low operating temperatures and up to moderate burn-ups, no major fuel restructuring phenomena have been observed and consequently the fission product release has remained at low level dictated by the exposed surfaces of the fuel. Axial gas flow measurements indicate that fuel cracking and irreversible relocation occurred as early as the first ramps to power. The processes have continued throughout life and an absence of any change in response pressurization tests indicates that

  10. Progress on the conceptual design of a mirror hybrid fusion--fission reactor

    A conceptual design study was made of a fusion-fission reactor for the purpose of producing fissile material and electricity. The fusion component is a D-T plasma confined by a pair of magnetic mirror coils in a Yin-Yang configuration and is sustained by neutral beam injection. The neutrons from the fusion plasma drive the fission assembly which is composed of natural uranium carbide fuel rods clad with stainless steel and helium cooled. It was shown conceptually how the reactor might be built using essentially present-day technology and how the uranium-bearing blanket modules can be routinely changed to allow separation of the bred fissile fuel

  11. Experimental Determination of the Antineutrino Spectrum of the Fission Products of $^{238}$U

    Haag, N; Hofmann, M; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Schreckenbach, K; Wagner, F M

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was performed at the scientific neutron source FRM II in Garching to determine the cumulative antineutrino spectrum of the fission products of $^{238}$U. This was achieved by irradiating target foils of natural uranium with a thermal and a fast neutron beam and recording the emitted $\\beta$-spectra with a gamma-suppressing electron-telescope. The obtained $\\beta$-spectrum of the fission products of $^{235}$U was normalized to the data of the magnetic spectrometer BILL of $^{235}$U. This method strongly reduces systematic errors in the $^{238}$U measurement. The $\\beta$-spectrum of $^{238}$U was converted into the corresponding antineutrino spectrum. The final $\\bar\

  12. Realization of a flat fission power density in a hybrid blanket over long operation periods

    A straightforward numerical graphical method is applied to achieve a flat fission power density (FPD) in a hybrid blanket by using a mixed fuel (ThO2 and natural UO2) with variable fractions of the fuel components in the radial direction. The neutronic analysis is carried out on a blanket with a hard neutron spectrum in the fissionable zone by simply omitting the moderating beryllium neutron multiplier. Mainly due to this precaution in the blanket design, the FPD could be kept quasi-constant over a relatively long plant lifetime

  13. Fission dynamics in {sup 132}Ce composite nuclei: study within a stochastic approach

    Brondi, A.; Di Nitto, A.; Fiorillo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Napoli (Italy)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    It is well known that nuclear viscosity plays a fundamental role in the fission process. Although much experimental and theoretical work has been devoted to this subject, many questions still remain open. They mainly refer to a precise determination of the fission time scale as well as to the nature of the dissipation. At issue is whether nuclear dissipation proceeds primarily by means of individual two-body collisions (two-body friction), as in the case of ordinary fluid, or by means of nucleons colliding with a moving potential wall (one-body friction). The modified statistical model as well as dynamical models based on the Lagrange, Fokker Planck and Langevin equations have been used in order to gain insight on these aspects of fission dynamics. The lack of constraints to the models appears to be, in several cases, the main source of controversies. In this framework, we are carrying on a research program with 8{pi}LP apparatus at LNL, aimed at studying the fission dynamics in systems of intermediate fissility. These systems, compared to the heavier ones, have larger prescission charged particle multiplicities as well as comparable fission and evaporation residue (ER) cross sections. Therefore, the measurements of the relevant quantities in both channels allow to put severe constraints on the models, providing more reliable estimates of fission delay and of viscosity parameter. We report on the system {sup 32}S + {sup 100}Mo at E{sub l}ab=200 MeV which produces the composite system {sup 132}Ce at E{sub x}=122 MeV. The analysis of the pre-scission charged particles was already described in a previous report. We have proceeded in the analysis of this system extracting the charged particle multiplicities in the ER channel as well as the ER and fission cross sections. The whole set of extracted quantities has been compared with the predictions of a dynamical model based on the Langevin equation.

  14. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION (DEC) FISSION REACTORS - A U.S. NERI PROJECT

    D. BELLER; G. POLANSKY; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    The direct conversion of the electrical energy of charged fission fragments was examined early in the nuclear reactor era, and the first theoretical treatment appeared in the literature in 1957. Most of the experiments conducted during the next ten years to investigate fission fragment direct energy conversion (DEC) were for understanding the nature and control of the charged particles. These experiments verified fundamental physics and identified a number of specific problem areas, but also demonstrated a number of technical challenges that limited DEC performance. Because DEC was insufficient for practical applications, by the late 1960s most R&D ceased in the US. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this day, but there have been no recent programs to develop the technology. This has changed with the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative that was funded by the U.S. Congress in 1999. Most of the previous concepts were based on a fission electric cell known as a triode, where a central cathode is coated with a thin layer of nuclear fuel. A fission fragment that leaves the cathode with high kinetic energy and a large positive charge is decelerated as it approaches the anode by a charge differential of several million volts, it then deposits its charge in the anode after its kinetic energy is exhausted. Large numbers of low energy electrons leave the cathode with each fission fragment; they are suppressed by negatively biased on grid wires or by magnetic fields. Other concepts include magnetic collimators and quasi-direct magnetohydrodynamic generation (steady flow or pulsed). We present the basic principles of DEC fission reactors, review the previous research, discuss problem areas in detail and identify technological developments of the last 30 years relevant to overcoming these obstacles. A prognosis for future development of direct energy conversion fission reactors will be presented.

  15. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal

  16. The stunning nuclear fission of the mercury nucleus; La surprenante fission nucleaire du noyau de mercure

    Schaeffer, A.

    2011-02-15

    A fission experiment performed at CERN on mercury nuclei produced an unexpected asymmetric reaction. The study of the potential energy surface shows that this asymmetric reaction minimized the energy consumed in the reactions but led to 2 different elements (ruthenium-100 and krypton-80) far less stable than zirconium-90 that is the element expected in a symmetric fission. (A.C.)

  17. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Gooden, M.E., E-mail: megooden@tunl.duke.edu [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Howell, C.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Kelley, J.H. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Tornow, W. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Arnold, C.W.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Moody, W.A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Becker, J.A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.A.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  18. Microscopic Description of Nuclear Fission: Fission Barrier Heights of Even-Even Actinides

    McDonnell, J; Schunck, N; Nazarewicz, W.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the performance of modern nuclear energy density functionals for predicting inner and outer fission barrier heights and energies of fission isomers of even-even actinides. For isomer energies and outer barrier heights, we find that the self-consistent theory at the HFB level is capable of providing quantitative agreement with empirical data.

  19. Inclusive spectra of hadrons created by color tube fission 1. Probability of tube fission

    Gedalin, E. V.

    1997-01-01

    The probability of color tube fission that includes the tube surface small oscillation corrections is obtained with pre-exponential factor accuracy on the basis of previously constructed color tube model. Using these expressions the probability of the tube fission in $n$ point is obtained that is the basis for calculation of inclusive spectra of produced hadrons.

  20. Understanding of fission dynamics from fragment mass distribution studies

    Nuclear fission is a complex process involving large scale collective rearrangement of nuclear matter. The shape of the fissioning nucleus evolves in the multidimensional space of relative separation, neck opening, mass asymmetry and deformation of the fragments. Various types of nuclear shape deformation have been observed from the fission fragment spectroscopy studies, which provide crucial information in the understanding of the dynamics of the fission process. The fission fragment mass and charge distributions are decided during saddle to scission transition and are directly related to the scission configuration. Several nuclear models have been put forward to describe the fission fragment mass distribution as well as shape deformation of the fragments. The width of the fission fragment mass distribution is related to the fission process and provides information on the type of fission reactions

  1. Studies of exotic modes of fission in the lead region

    In a series of complementary experiments at the tandem of JAEA and at the mass-separator ISOLDE (CERN), new fission phenomena in the lead region of the chart of nuclei were investigated. At ISOLDE, the low-energy fission of 194,196Po was studied via the process of beta-delayed fission of the parent 194,196At nuclei. A multi-modal fission fragment mass split was observed for 194,196Po. At JAEA the higher-energy fusion-fission studies of 198Hg, 191,193Ir were performed in reactions with protons and 7Li. In the JAEA experiment, we observed a transition from mass-symmetric to mass asymmetric fission between 189Ir and 193Ir. By studying fission in these regions, we investigate the new evolution of shell structure to regulate fission (as far as fission is concerned) of the chart of nuclides. (author)

  2. Model Calculation of Fission Product Yields Data using GEF Code

    Fission yields data are classified with spontaneous fission data and neutron induced fission data. The fission product yields data at several energy points for the limited actinides are included in nuclear data libraries such as ENDF/B, JEFF and JENDL because production of those is based mainly on experimental results and it is very difficult to conduct experiments for all actinides and continuous energies. Therefore, in order to obtain fission yields data without experimental data, a theoretical fission model should be introduced to produce the yields data. GEneral Fission model (GEF) is developed to predict the properties for fissioning systems that have not been measured and that are not accessible to experiment. In this study, the fission yields data generated from GEF code are compared with the measured data and the recently available nuclear data libraries. The GEF code is very powerful tool to generate fission yields without measurements. Also, it can produce the distribution of fission product yields for continuous neutron energy while measured data are given only at several energies. The fission yields data of 235U have been tentatively generated with GEF code in this work. Comparing GEF results with measurements and recently released evaluated fission yields data, it is confirmed that GEF code can successfully predict the fission yields data. With its sophisticated model, GEF code is playing a significant role in nuclear industry

  3. Fission fragment angular momentum in the neutron induced fission of 232Th and 232U

    High spin fractions (HSF) of 130,132Sb and 131,133Te have been determined in the neutron induced fission of 232Th and 232U using off-line gamma ray spectrometric technique. From the HSF, fragment angular momenta (Jrms) were deduced using statistical model analysis. From the Jrms values, deformation parameter (β) were deduced and compared with the same in the even-even and odd-even fissioning systems to examine the effect of nuclear structure and the role of odd neutron spin. In all the fissioning systems the effect of shell closure proximity and odd-even effect on Jrms was clearly observed. However, the role of odd neutron spin was not seen in even-odd fissioning systems like the odd-proton spin effect in odd-odd fissioning systems. (author)

  4. Determination of the fission coefficients in thermal nuclear reactors for antineutrino detection

    Araujo, Lenilson M. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Cabral, Ronaldo G., E-mail: rgcabral@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Anjos, Joao C.C. dos, E-mail: janjos@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. GLN - G

    2011-07-01

    The nuclear reactors in operation periodically need to change their fuel. It is during this process that these reactors are more vulnerable to occurring of several situations of fuel diversion, thus the monitoring of the nuclear installations is indispensable to avoid events of this nature. Considering this fact, the most promissory technique to be used for the nuclear safeguard for the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, it is based on the detection and spectroscopy of antineutrino from fissions that occur in the nuclear reactors. The detection and spectroscopy of antineutrino, they both depend on the single contribution for the total number of fission of each actinide in the core reactor, these contributions receive the name of fission coefficients. The goal of this research is to show the computational and mathematical modeling used to determinate these coefficients for PWR reactors. (author)

  5. Fission physics experiments at the time-of-flight spectrometer GNEIS in Gatchina (PNPI)

    The outline of and fission physics experiments at the Gatchina neutron spectrometer GNEIS based on the 1 GeV PNPI proton synchrotron are presented. The prefission gamma-ray spectrum of the (n, gamma f) reaction were investigated. The capture gamma-ray spectra for 721.6 eV and 1211.4 eV resonances in U-238 were measured and the nature of the 721.6 eV resonance in U-238 were examined. The forward-backward asymmetry in slow neutron fission of U-235 and energy dependence of the forward-backward and instrumental asymmetry coefficients were obtained. Fission cross section ratios for Th-232 to U-235 and for U-238 to U-235 in the energy range up to 200 MeV were measured. The results of the cross section ratios agreed well with those of Behrens et al. and Difilippo et al. (T.H.)

  6. Control of a laser inertial confinement fusion-fission power plant

    Moses, Edward I.; Latkowski, Jeffery F.; Kramer, Kevin J.

    2015-10-27

    A laser inertial-confinement fusion-fission energy power plant is described. The fusion-fission hybrid system uses inertial confinement fusion to produce neutrons from a fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium. The fusion neutrons drive a sub-critical blanket of fissile or fertile fuel. A coolant circulated through the fuel extracts heat from the fuel that is used to generate electricity. The inertial confinement fusion reaction can be implemented using central hot spot or fast ignition fusion, and direct or indirect drive. The fusion neutrons result in ultra-deep burn-up of the fuel in the fission blanket, thus enabling the burning of nuclear waste. Fuels include depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, spent nuclear fuel, thorium, and weapons grade plutonium. LIFE engines can meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the highly undesirable stockpiles of depleted uranium, spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials.

  7. Robert Serber's 1943 Los Alamos Primer Analysis of Fission Bomb Efficiency

    Reed, Cameron

    2013-04-01

    In an analysis of the expected efficiency of a fission bomb presented in his 1943 Los Alamos Primer, Robert Serber remarked that ``it is just possible for the reaction to occur to an interesting extent before it is stopped by the spreading of the active material.'' Due to the exponential nature of the time-dependence of a chain reaction, the efficiency of the explosion can be very sensitive to parameters such as the number of neutrons liberated per fission, the fission cross-section, and the number of critical masses of material used. In this paper I examine efficiency predictions for both uranium and plutonium bombs. Had some parameter values proven only modestly different from their true values, history may well have been very different.

  8. Determination of fission cross-section and absolute fission yields using track-cum gamma-ray spectrometric technique

    The fission cross-section of 233Pa(2nth, f) using fission track technique has been determined for the first time using thermal neutron flux of the reactor APSARA. This is important from the point of view of advance heavy water reactor (AHWR), which is to be described. On the other hand, the yields of fission products in the fast neutron induced fission of minor actinides are important from the point accelerator driven sub critical system (ADSS). In view of that, absolute yields of fission products in the fast neutron induced fission of 238U, 237Np, 238,240Pu, 243Am and 244Cm have been determined using the fission track-cum gamma-ray spectrometric technique. The total number of fission occurring in the target was estimated by track technique, whereas the activities of the fission products have been determined using gamma-ray spectrometric technique. Detailed procedure and its importance are to be discussed. (author)

  9. Utilization of fission reactors for fusion engineering testing

    Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-02-08

    Fission reactors can be used to conduct some of the fusion nuclear engineering tests identified in the FINESSE study. To further define the advantages and disadvantages of fission testing, the technical and programmatic constraints on this type of testing are discussed here. This paper presents and discusses eight key issues affecting fission utilization. Quantitative comparisons with projected fusion operation are made to determine the technical assets and limitations of fission testing. Capabilities of existing fission reactors are summarized and compared with technical needs. Conclusions are then presented on the areas where fission testing can be most useful.

  10. Derivation of Energy Generated by Nuclear Fission-Fusion Reaction

    Kayano, Hideo; Teshigawara, Makoto; Konashi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Takuya

    1994-01-01

    In the solids which contain fissionable elements and deuterium, it is expected that the energy generated by nuclear fission contributes to the promotion of the D-D nuclear fusion in the solids. When nuclear fission occurs by neutrons in the solid, the fissionable elements divide into two fission product nuclei having the energy of 100MeV, respectively. It is expected that the hige energy fission products promote rapidly nuclear fision reaction by knocking out the D atoms in the solids and by ...

  11. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Update

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and places beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited or environmental conditions are challenging (e.g., extreme cold, dust storms). NASA and the Department of Energy are maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for a fission surface power system. The Fission Surface Power Systems project has focused on subscale component and subsystem demonstrations to address the feasibility of a low-risk, low-cost approach to space nuclear power for surface missions. Laboratory demonstrations of the liquid metal pump, reactor control drum drive, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution technologies have validated that the fundamental characteristics and performance of these components and subsystems are consistent with a Fission Surface Power preliminary reference concept. In addition, subscale versions of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, using electric resistance heating in place of the reactor fuel, have been built and operated with liquid metal sodium-potassium and helium/xenon gas heat transfer loops, demonstrating the viability of establishing system-level performance and characteristics of fission surface power technologies without requiring a nuclear reactor. While some component and subsystem testing will continue through 2011 and beyond, the results to date provide sufficient confidence to proceed with system level technology readiness demonstration. To demonstrate the system level readiness of fission surface power in an operationally relevant environment (the primary goal of the Fission Surface Power Systems project), a full scale, 1/4 power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is under development. The TDU will consist of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, a sodium-potassium heat transfer loop, a power

  12. Nuclear fission induced by heavy ions

    Because the accelerators of the 50's and 60's mostly provided beams of light ions, well suited for studying individual quantum states of low angular momentum or reactions involving the transfer of one or two nucleons, the study of fission, being an example of large-scale collective motion, has until recently been outside of the mainstream of nuclear research. This situation has changed in recent years, due to the new generation of accelerators capable of producing beams of heavy ions with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of all stable nuclei. These have made possible the study of new examples of large-scale collective motions, involving major rearrangements of nuclear matter, such as deep-inelastic collisions and heavy-ion fusion. Perhaps the most exciting development in the past few years is the discovery that dissipative effects (nuclear viscosity) play an important role in fission induced by heavy ions, contrary to earlier assumptions that the viscosity involved in fission was very weak and played only a minor role. This review will be mainly concerned with developments in heavy-ion induced fission during the last few years and have an emphasis on the very recent results on dissipative effects. Since heavy-ion bombardment usually results in compound systems with high excitation energies and angular momenta, shell effects might be expected to be small, and the subject of low energy fission, where they are important, will not be addressed. 285 refs., 58 figs

  13. Rupture of the neck in nuclear fission

    We introduce a degree of freedom to describe the rupture of the neck in nuclear fission and calculate the point at which the neck ruptures as the nucleus descends dynamically from its fission saddle point. This is done by mentally slicing the system into two portions at its minimum neck radius and calculating the force required to separate the two portions while keeping their shapes fixed. This force is obtained by differentiating with respect to separation the sum of the Coulomb and nuclear interaction energies between the two portions. For nuclei throughout the Periodic Table we calculate this force along dynamical paths leading from the fission saddle point. The force is initially attractive but becomes repulsive when the neck reaches a critical size. For actinide nuclei the neck radius at which rupture occurs is about 2 fm. This increases the calculated translational kinetic energy of the fission fragments at infinity relative to that calculated for scission occurring at zero neck radius. With the effect of neck rupture taken into account, we calculate and compare with experimental results fission-fragment kinetic energies for two types of nuclear dissipation: ordinary two-body viscosity and one-body dissipation

  14. Correlation of recent fission product release data

    For the calculation of source terms associated with severe accidents, it is necessary to model the release of fission products from fuel as it heats and melts. Perhaps the most definitive model for fission product release is that of the FASTGRASS computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. There is persuasive evidence that these processes, as well as additional chemical and gas phase mass transport processes, are important in the release of fission products from fuel. Nevertheless, it has been found convenient to have simplified fission product release correlations that may not be as definitive as models like FASTGRASS but which attempt in some simple way to capture the essence of the mechanisms. One of the most widely used such correlation is called CORSOR-M which is the present fission product/aerosol release model used in the NRC Source Term Code Package. CORSOR has been criticized as having too much uncertainty in the calculated releases and as not accurately reproducing some experimental data. It is currently believed that these discrepancies between CORSOR and the more recent data have resulted because of the better time resolution of the more recent data compared to the data base that went into the CORSOR correlation. This document discusses a simple correlational model for use in connection with NUREG risk uncertainty exercises. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Heavy-ion-induced fission reactions

    Fission-cross-section excitation functions were measured from near threshold to approx. 10 MeV/nucleon using heavy-ion beams from the Brookhaven National Laboratory three-stage Tandem Accelerator Facility. The systems studied included 210Po formed in 12C and 18O induced reactions, 186Os formed in 9Be, 12C, 16O, and 26Mg reactions, 158Er formed in 16O, 24Mg, 32S, and 64Ni reactions. In addition the composite systems 204206, 208Po formed with 16O and 18O projectiles were studied. The measured fission excitation functions along with previous data from 4He and 11B bombardments for the 186Os and 210Po systems and recent data on the 200Pb system are compared to predictions from a statistical model using recent fission-barrier calculations from A. Sierk. Comparisons of calculated and measured fission excitation functions show good overall agreement between data and calculations and between calculations with two different level-density functions. It is concluded that the barriers from Sierk give a good description of both the mass and angular momentum dependence of fission barriers in this region

  16. Anatomy of neck configuration in fission decay

    Patra, S K; Satpathy, L

    2010-01-01

    The anatomy of neck configuration in the fission decay of Uranium and Thorium isotopes is investigated in a microscopic study using Relativistic mean field theory. The study includes $^{236}U$ and $^{232}Th$ in the valley of stability and exotic neutron rich isotopes $^{250}U$, $^{256}U$, $^{260}U$, $^{240}Th$, $^{250}Th$, $^{256}Th$ likely to play important role in the r-process nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution. Following the static fission path, the neck configurations are generated and their composition in terms of the number of neutrons and protons are obtained showing the progressive rise in the neutron component with the increase of mass number. Strong correlation between the neutron multiplicity in the fission decay and the number of neutrons in the neck is seen. The maximum neutron-proton ratio is about 5 for $^{260}$U and $^{256}$Th suggestive of the break down of liquid-drop picture and inhibition of the fission decay in still heavier isotopes. Neck as precursor of a new mode of fission decay li...

  17. Some aspects of the nuclear fission process

    In the following report one can find first a short general view on the present situation of our knowledge concerning the nuclear fission process, namely on the nucleus going through the saddle-point. Then there are some aspects connected with the excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus. The measurements made at Saclay on the fast neutron fission cross-section of U233, U235, Pu239, U238 are described at the beginning of this work. It appears that for U233 there is some characteristic shape modulation of the cross-section curve, in relation with the collective excited state of the deformed nucleus at the saddle-point. Good evidence of this is also given by the study of the relative fission rate with emission of long-range particles; it appears also that this ternary fission rate does not change substantially for neutron between thermal energy and 2 MeV, but that is very lower for the compound nucleus U239 than for even-even compound nuclei. At the end there are some experiments on the strong 4,5 MeV gamma-ray originated by slow neutron absorption in U235. Time-of-flight device is used to establish that this 4,5 MeV gamma-ray seems mostly connected with radiative capture. (author)

  18. Fission product decay heat for thermal reactors

    Dickens, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    In the past five years there have been new experimental programs to measure decay heat (i.e., time dependent beta- plus gamma-ray energy release rates from the decay of fission products) following thermal-neutron fission of /sup 235/U, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 241/Pu for times after fission between 1 and approx. 10/sup 5/ sec. Experimental results from the ORNL program stress the very short times following fission, particularly in the first few hundred sec. Complementing the experimental effort, computer codes have been developed for the computation of decay heat by summation of calculated individual energies released by each one of the fission products. By suitably combining the results of the summation calculations with the recent experimental results, a new Decay Heat Standard has been developed for application to safety analysis of operations of light water reactors. The new standard indicates somewhat smaller energy release rates than those being used at present, and the overall uncertainties assigned to the new standard are much smaller than those being used at present.

  19. An improved technique for fission track dating

    The necessity of improving the fission track dating (FTD) technique both at home and abroad is illustrated. The ways of making such improvement are also proposed. It is suggested to calibrate the constant b value of the uranium standard glass by using the method of fission products activity. The 3 kinds of uranium standard glass which have been calibrated are NBS SRM962a, UB1 and UB2. An established new method σ·Φ ρd/b, to measure neutron fluence, avoids the influence of the varying neutron spectrum on measuring neutron fluence. The improved etching technique for fission tracks in zircon adopted a two-step method which includes the molten alkali system etching using NaOH + KOH and the mixed acid system etching using HNO3 + HF; this technique results in adequate track etching, increased track clarity and less interference. In this way the intensity of tracks is authentically reflected. Dividing angular zone in accordance with the angular distribution of spontaneous fission track on the crystal surface of minerals to count the tracks and using the improved etching technique to remove the non-uniform angular distribution of spontaneous fission tracks in zircon, ensure the accuracy of tracks count. The improved FTD techniques were used to finish Laboratory Standardized Calibration. The tests using international FTD age standards samples have proved that above mentioned techniques are reliable and practical in obtaining the accurate FTD data. (8 tabs.; 3 figs.)

  20. Neutron-induced fission cross-section of 231 Pa

    Beside the importance of 231 Pa for basic fission studies it is also of interest in the field of future reactor design based on the thorium-uranium fuel cycle. The 232 Th/233 U breeder cycle, where the natural resources of the main fuel thorium are estimated to last for hundred thousands of years, is contemplated to provide 'clean' and almost inexhaustible nuclear energy. Among the first priority isotopes the IAEA had pointed out 231 Pa and 233 Pa. Both are of special interest being intermediate nuclei in the formation of the fissile 233 U from the fertile 232 Th. The latter has been investigated in the recent past in great detail. In particular, 231 Pa carry a similar risk as 239 Pu does in the standard uranium-plutonium cycle due to its comparable half-life and radio-toxicity. Despite the wealth of existing experimental data important discrepancies exist, a scenario, which holds for the existing evaluated data files ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.3, too. Presently, the neutron-induced fission cross-section of 231 Pa is under investigation at the VdG neutron source at IRMM for incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV. The obtained cross-sections, representing the 3rd and higher chance fission in 233 Pa(n,f) will serve as precise input for the validation of the reaction cross-section calculations performed on 233 Pa up to 20 MeV and the envisaged extension up to 50 MeV. (authors)

  1. Reactor with very low fission product inventory

    A fast converter with one zone and an internal breeding ratio of 1.00, with liquid fuel in the form of molten plutonium- uranium- and sodium chloride, with a thermal power of 3 GW (th) allows continuous extraction of the volatile fission products (Br, I, Kr, Xe, Te) by means of helium purging in the core. The non-volatile fission products e.g. Sr and Cs can continuously be extracted in a chemical reprocessing plant at the reactor site. The impact on an accidental release of fission products is rather significant; the amounts released are 50-100 times smaller than those in a reference reactor (LWR with oxide fuel). Because the heat sink is relatively large and after heat reduced, the temperature of the fuel does not exceed 5000C after an accident, which greatly reduces the consequences of an accident. (Auth.)

  2. Fission products in glasses. Pt. 2

    Glass ceramics of different composition with high leach and impact resistance can be produced for fission product solidification. In contrast to commercial glass products, they consist of a number of crystalline phases and a residual glass phase. The major crystalline phase allows a classification into celsian, diopside, encryptite, and perovskite ceramics. They all are of special importance as host phases for long-lived fission products. The paper reports on relations between product composition and melting properties, viscosity, crystallization properties, and fixation capability for fission products. Further investigations deal with dimensional stability, impact resistance, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity. The properties of the ceramics are compared with those of the basic products. The problems still to be solved with regard to further improvement and application of these products are discussed. (RB)

  3. Dissipative dynamics in quasi-fission

    Oberacker, V E; Simenel, C

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-fission is the primary reaction mechanism that prevents the formation of superheavy elements in heavy-ion fusion experiments. Employing the time-dependent density functional theory approach we study quasi-fission in the systems $^{40,48}$Ca+$^{238}$U. Results show that for $^{48}$Ca projectiles the quasi-fission is substantially reduced in comparison to the $^{40}$Ca case. This partly explains the success of superheavy element formation with $^{48}$Ca beams. For the first time, we also calculate the repartition of excitation energies of the two fragments in a dynamic microscopic theory. The system is found in quasi-thermal equilibrium only for reactions with $^{40}$Ca. The differences between both systems are interpreted in terms of initial neutron to proton asymmetry of the colliding partners.

  4. Prompt fission neutron emission: Problems and challenges

    Hambsch F.-J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some of the challenges ahead of us even after 75 years of the discovery of the fission process and large progress made since then. The focus is on application orientation, which requires improved measurements on fission cross-sections and neutron and γ-ray multiplicities. Experimental possibilities have vastly improved the past decade leading to developments of highly sophisticated detector systems and the use of digital data acquisition and signal processing. The development of innovative fast nuclear reactor technology needs improved respective nuclear data. Advancements in theoretical modelling also require better experimental data. Theory has made progress in calculating fission fragment distributions (i.e. GEF code as well as prompt neutron and γ-ray emission to catch up with the improved experiments.

  5. Phase Transition Induced Fission in Lipid Vesicles

    Leirer, C; Myles, V M; Schneider, M F

    2010-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate how the first order phase transition in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) can function as a trigger for membrane fission. When driven through their gel-fluid phase transition GUVs exhibit budding or pearl formation. These buds remain connected to the mother vesicle presumably by a small neck. Cooling these vesicles from the fluid phase (T>Tm) through the phase transition into the gel state (Tfission of the neck, while the mother vesicle remains intact. Pearling tubes which formed upon heating break-up and decay into multiple individual vesicles which then diffuse freely. Finally we demonstrate that mimicking the intracellular bulk viscosity by increasing the bulk viscosity to 40cP does not affect the overall fission process, but leads to a significant decrease in size of the released vesicles.

  6. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  7. Solar vs. Fission Surface Power for Mars

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions. The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. The 4.5 meter (m) diameter pathfinder lander's primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander's In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production using atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept's propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept's propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,116 to 2,396 kg, versus the 2,686 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses are expected to approach or exceed the fission payload mass at landing sites further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling. Next, the team developed a solar-powered point design solution for a conceptual four-crew, 500-day surface mission consisting of up to four landers per

  8. Process for fine purification of fission molybdenum

    The invention deals with a method for the fine purification of fission molybdenum, dissolved in anionic form together with the anions of the fission products of J, Sn, Ce, Ru, and Zr in an aqueous mineral acid solution; in this process the fission molybdenum is a) fixed on a metal oxide in a sorption step and b) released again in a desorption step. By the invention, a method shall be created, which is, under less favourable working conditions, almost insusceptible to failure and can be safely carried out with low expenditure of operation time, working equipment and handling technique and which delivers a highly pure Mo-99 product with a decreased volume of radioactive waste at the same time. (orig./RB)

  9. Lunar surface fission power supplies: Radiation issues

    A lunar space fission power supply shield that uses a combination of lunar regolith and materials brought from earth may be optimal for early lunar outposts and bases. This type of shield can be designed such that the fission power supply does not have to be moved from its landing configuration, minimizing handling and required equipment on the lunar surface. Mechanisms for removing heat from the lunar regolith are built into the shield, and can be tested on earth. Regolith activation is greatly reduced compared with a shield that uses only regolith, and it is possible to keep the thermal conditions of the fission power supply close to those seen in free space. For a well designed shield, the additional mass required to be brought from earth should be less than 1,000 kg. Detailed radiation transport calculations confirm the feasibility of such a shield

  10. Fission Enhanced diffusion of uranium in zirconia

    Bérerd, N; Moncoffre, N; Sainsot, P; Faust, H; Catalette, H

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison between thermal and Fission Enhanced Diffusion (FED) of uranium into zirconia, representative of the inner face of cladding tubes. The experiments under irradiation are performed at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble using the Lohengrin spectrometer. A thin $^{235}UO\\_2$ layer in direct contact with an oxidized zirconium foil is irradiated in the ILL high flux reactor. The fission product flux is about 10$^{11}$ ions cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and the target temperature is measured by an IR pyrometer. A model is proposed to deduce an apparent uranium diffusion coefficient in zirconia from the energy distribution broadening of two selected fission products. It is found to be equal to 10$^{-15}$ cm$^2$ s$^{-1}$ at 480$\\circ$C and compared to uranium thermal diffusion data in ZrO$\\_2$ in the same pressure and temperature conditions. The FED results are analysed in comparison with literature data.

  11. Evaluation of covariance for fission neutron spectra

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Nakashima, Hideki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Ohsawa, Takaaki; Shibata, Keiichi

    1999-02-01

    A covariance evaluation system for the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-3.2 was established, and the covariance data for fission neutron spectra of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu were evaluated. Two methods were employed to evaluate the covariance. One is based on the experimental data, and the other is based on a model calculation including some kinds of renormalizations. The latter technique was adopted for the covariance evaluation of the fission neutron spectra in JENDL-3.2. We performed an adjustment of the evaluated fission neutron spectrum of {sup 235}U using the spectrum averaged cross sections for the {sup 27}Al(n, p), {sup 46,47,48}Ti(n, p), {sup 54,56}Fe(n, p), {sup 58}Ni(n, p), {sup 90}Zr(n, 2n) reactions. The adjusted spectrum integrated over energy was found to be unity. (author)

  12. Coincident measurements of prompt fission γ rays and fission fragments at DANCE

    Walker, C. L.; Baramsai, B.; Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J.; Kawano, T.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.

    2015-10-01

    Modern statistical approaches to modeling fission involve the calculation of not only average quantities but also fully correlated distributions of all fission products. Applications such as those involving the detection of special nuclear materials also rely on fully correlated data of fission products. Experimental measurements of correlated data are thus critical to the validation of theory and the development of important applications. The goal of this experiment was to measure properties of prompt fission gamma-ray emission as a function of fission fragments' total kinetic energy in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The measurement was carried out at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE), a 4 π γ-ray calorimeter. A prototype design consisting of two silicon detectors was installed in the center of DANCE, allowing simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and γ rays. Effort has been taken to simulate fragment kinetic energy losses as well as γ-ray attenuation in DANCE using such tools as GEANT4 and SRIM. Theoretical predictions generated by the code CGMF were also incorporated as input for these simulations. Results from the experiment and simulations will be presented, along with plans for future measurements.

  13. Solar Versus Fission Surface Power for Mars

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; McNatt, Jeremiah; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions to Mars using In-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar-power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. This “pathfinder” design utilized a 4.5 meter diameter lander. Its primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander’s ISRU payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production from atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,128 to 2,425 kg, versus the 2,751 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses increase as landing sites are selected further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling.

  14. True ternary fission of 252Cf

    Splitting of heavy radioactive nucleus into three fragments is known as ternary fission. If the size of the fragments are almost equal it is referred to as true ternary fission. Recently, Yu. V. Pyatkov et al observed/reported the experimental observation of true ternary fission in 252Cf. In this work, the possibilities of different true ternary fission modes of 252Cf through potential energy surface (PES) calculations based on three cluster model (TCM) are discussed. In TCM a condition on the mass numbers of the fission fragments is implied as A1 ≥ A2 ≥ A3 in order to avoid repetition of combinations. Due to this condition, the values of Z3 vary from 0 to 36 and Z2 vary from 16 to 51. Of the different pairs having similar (Z2, Z3) with different potential energy, a pair possessing minimum potential energy is chosen. Thus identified favourable combinations are plotted. For the PES calculations the arrangement of the fragments is considered in the order of A1+A2+A3. i.e. the heavy and the lightest fragments are kept at the ends. It is seen that the deepest minimum in the PES occurs for Z3=2 labelled as (Z2; 2) indicating He accompanied breakup as the most favourable one. Of which, the breakup with Z2 around 46 to 48 is the least (shown by dashed (Z1 = 50) and dotted (Z1 = 52) lines indicating a constant Z1 value). The other notable minima in the PES are labelled and they correspond to the (Z2, Z3) pairs viz., (20, 20), (28, 20), (28, 28) and (32, 32). Of these four minima, the first three are associated with the magic numbers 20 and 28. For Z3=20, there are two minimums at (20,20) and (28,20) among them (28,20) is the lowest minimum through which the minimum-path passes, and it is the ternary decay observed by Yu. V. Pyatkov et al. The fourth minima is the most interesting due to the fact that it corresponds to true ternary fission mode with Z2=32, Z3=32 and Z1=34. The minimum potential energy path also goes through this true ternary mode. The PES calculation

  15. Chemistry of fission products for accident analysis

    Current knowledge concerning the chemical state of the fission product elements during the development of accidents in water reactor systems is reviewed in this paper. The fission product elements which have been considered are Cs, I, Te, Sr and Ba but aspects of the behavior of Mo, Ru and the lanthanides are also discussed. Some features of the reactions of the various species of these elements with other components of the reactor systems are described. The importance of having an adequate knowledge of thermodynamic data and phase equilibria of relatively simple systems in order to interpret experimental observations on complex multi-component systems is stressed

  16. Ex-vessel fission product release modeling

    Release of fission products from core debris after reactor vessel failure is of interest in current severe accident source term research. This paper focuses on significant physical phenomena, requirements, and feedbacks in the context of integrated accident analysis for modeling these releases after initial corium distribution outside the vessel. There are many assumptions made in integrated accident analyses to which ex-vessel fission product release is sensitive. One assumption internal to the release model, the allowed species list, has been demonstrated to significantly affect release of strontium and lanthanum

  17. Ternary fission induced by polarized neutrons

    Gönnenwein Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Ternary fission of (e,e) U- and Pu- isotopes induced by cold polarized neutrons discloses some new facets of the process. In the so-called ROT effect shifts in the angular distributions of ternary particles relative to the fission fragments show up. In the so-called TRI effect an asymmetry in the emission of ternary particles relative to a plane formed by the fragment momentum and the spin of the neutron appear. The two effects are shown to be linked to the components of angular momentum perp...

  18. Influence of spin on fission fragments anisotropy

    Ghodsi Omid N.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of selected fission fragment angular distribution when at least one of the spins of the projectile or target is appreciable in induced fission was made by using the statistical scission model. The results of this model predicate that the spins of the projectile or target are affected on the nuclear level density of the compound nucleus. The experimental data was analyzed by means of the couple channel spin effect formalism. This formalism suggests that the projectile spin is more effective on angular anisotropies within the limits of energy near the fusion barrier.

  19. Dynamic properties of the Coulomb fission

    The heavy ion induced fission after quasi-elastic scattering was studied in the systems 208Pb -> 238U for central collision at energies below the Coulomb barrier and 238U -> 238U for peripheral collisions at scattering angles smaller than the grazing angle. The dynamical properties and the phase-space distributions of the reactions could be determined by the method of the kinematical coincidences where positions and time-of-flight of two fission fragments and a scattered projectile-like nucleus were measured at the same time in large-area gas-filled parallel plate counters. (orig./HSI)

  20. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)