WorldWideScience
1

EFFECT OF TEACHING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE REGARDING PREVENTION OF OBESITY  

OpenAIRE

In 1998 the World Health Organization declared childhood obesity as a “global epidemic.” It has also been observed that the health problems of adult obesity can be prevented, if obesity is controlled in childhood. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of structured teaching programme on knowledge and attitude regarding prevention of obesity and Correlate the knowledge and attitude regarding prevention of obesity among adolescents in a selected pre-university college. A pre-experimen...

Prashanth K and Umarani J

2013-01-01

2

Preventive effect of Terminalia bellirica on obesity and metabolic disorders in spontaneously obese type 2 diabetic model mice.  

Science.gov (United States)

Visceral obesity induces insulin resistance and is recognized as an important risk factor for metabolic syndrome (MS). Therefore, inhibition of lipid absorption from the intestine is regarded as an effective way of preventing MS. Terminalia bellirica is extensively used in Ayurvedic medicine in India and neighboring countries, and the fruit of this plant has been reported to have hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a hot water extract of T. bellirica fruit (TB) on obesity and various metabolic disorders, and explored its molecular mechanisms and active ingredients. TB treatment had a preventive effect on obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia in spontaneously obese type 2 diabetic TSOD mice. To clarify the molecular mechanisms of TB in preventing obesity, we investigated the inhibitory effect on lipid absorption. TB suppressed absorption of triacylglycerol in an olive oil loading test (in vivo) and showed a strong inhibitory effect on pancreatic lipase activity (in vitro). Furthermore, a search for the active ingredients in TB revealed that gallic acid is the component primarily responsible for the inhibition of pancreatic lipase activity. Thus, our findings indicate that TB could be useful in preventing MS. The mechanisms probably involve suppression of the absorption of meal-derived lipids mediated by gallic acid. PMID:22105160

Makihara, Hiroko; Shimada, Tsutomu; Machida, Eriko; Oota, Masatomi; Nagamine, Rika; Tsubata, Masahito; Kinoshita, Kaoru; Takahashi, Kunio; Aburada, Masaki

2012-07-01

3

Effectiveness of school network for childhood obesity prevention (SNOCOP) in primary schools of Saraburi Province, Thailand.  

Science.gov (United States)

This research was designed to test the effectiveness of a school network for childhood obesity prevention (SNOCOP) in primary schools; a program that aimed to improve student behavior in terms of knowledge, attitude, intention towards obesity prevention, and their food consumption behavior. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest time series study was conducted. By 2-stage stratified sampling selection 180 students from 6 schools were assigned to the intervention group and 195 students from 6 schools to the control group at Saraburi Province, Thailand in 2006- 2007. In addition, thirty-one participants being school administrators, teachers, parents, and community members from six schools formed the social network initiating the intervention. The schoolchildren in the intervention group improved their eating behavior, knowledge, attitude, intention towards obesity preventive behavior. The six schools of the intervention group changed school policies and school activities aiming to reduce the proportion of obesity among their student. No such activities could be observed in the control group. These findings suggest that the School-Social Network of Childhood Obesity Prevention program is an effective means to prevent childhood obesity. PMID:19842420

Banchonhattakit, Pannee; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong; Pradipasen, Mandhana; Miner, Kathleen R; Nityasuddhi, Dechavudh

2009-07-01

4

Early prevention of obesity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Childhood obesity is the metabolic disorder with the highest prevalence in both children and adults. Urgency to treat and prevent childhood obesity is based on the clear evidence that obesity tends to track from childhood to adulthood, is associated to morbidity also in childhood and to long-term mortality. Early life, i.e., intrauterine life and the first two years, is a sensitive window for prevention. Anatomical and functional maturation of the hypothalamic structures devoted to regulating energy intake and expenditure and body size mainly occurs in the first 1,000 days of life. Therefore, factors affecting the foetal exposition to maternal metabolic environment and early postnatal nutrition are crucial in modulating the definition of the metabolic programming processes in the brain. Maternal diseases, mainly malnutrition for defect or excess, obesity and diabetes, placental disorders and dysfunctions, maternal use of alcohol and drugs, smoking, affect long term metabolic programming of the foetus with lifelong consequences. Similarly, early nutrition contributes to complete the long-term metabolic regulating framework initiated in the uterus. Breastfeeding, adequate weaning, attention to portion size and diet composition are potential tools for reducing the obesity risk later in childhood. Longitudinal randomized controlled studies are needed for exploring the efficacy of obesity prevention strategies initiated after conception.Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

Claudio Maffeis

2014-06-01

5

The effect of food portion sizes on the obesity prevention using system dynamics modelling  

Science.gov (United States)

The rise in income and population growth have increased the demand for food and induced changes in food habits, food purchasing and consumption patterns in Malaysia. With this transition, one of the plausible causes of weight gain and obesity is the frequent consumption of outside food which is synonymous with bigger portion size. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to develop a system dynamics model to analyse the effect of reducing food portion size on weight and obesity prevention. This study combines the different strands of knowledge comprise of nutrition, physical activity and body metabolism. These elements are synthesized into a system dynamics model called SIMULObese. Findings from this study suggested that changes in eating behavior should not emphasize only on limiting the food portion size consumption. The efforts should also consider other eating events such as controlling the meal frequency and limiting intake of high-calorie food in developing guidelines to prevent obesity.

Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal; Zulkepli, Jafri Hj; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

2014-09-01

6

Effect of childhood obesity prevention programmes on blood lipids: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  

Science.gov (United States)

We aimed to assess the effects of childhood obesity prevention programmes on blood lipids in high-income countries. We searched MEDLINE®, Embase, PsychInfo, CINAHL®, clinicaltrials.gov, and the Cochrane Library up to 22 April 2013 for relevant randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies and natural experiments published in English. Studies were included if they implemented diet and/or physical activity intervention(s) with ?1 year follow-up (or ?6 months for school-based intervention studies) in 2-18-year-olds, and were excluded if they targeted only overweight/obese children, or those with a pre-existing medical condition. Seventeen studies were finally included. For total cholesterol, the pooled intervention effect was -0.97?mg?dL(-1) [95% confidence interval (CI): -3.26, 1.32; P?=?0.408]; for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), -6.06?mg?dL(-1) (95% CI: -11.09, -1.02; P?=?0.018); for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), 1.87?mg?dL(-1) (95% CI: 0.39, 3.34; P?=?0.013); and for triglycerides, -1.95?mg?dL(-1) (95% CI: -4.94, 1.04; P?=?0.202). Most interventions (70%) showed similar significant or no effects on adiposity- and lipids outcomes: 15% interventions improved both adiposity- and lipids outcomes; 55% had no significant effects on either. Childhood obesity prevention programmes had a significant desirable effect on LDL-C and HDL-C. Two-thirds of interventions showed similar significant or no effects in adiposity- and lipids outcomes. Assessing lipids outcomes provide additional useful information on obesity prevention programme benefits. PMID:25263653

Cai, L; Wu, Y; Cheskin, L J; Wilson, R F; Wang, Y

2014-12-01

7

Comparing the Effectiveness of CDSS on Provider's Behaviors to Implement Obesity Prevention Guidelines.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity is a global epidemic demanding the use of clinical decision support tools to help clinicians in the identification, assessment and management of healthy weight gain in children. Over the last decade, numerous systematic reviews have shown that clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have positively impacted clinician's performance for drug ordering/dosing and preventive care reminders. CDSS that are built into the clinician's workflow at the point of care also have a positive impact on provider's performance. There are limited studies that examine CDSS in nursing practice. This paper describes a comparative effectiveness study being conducted in school-based clinics to examine the impact of web-based training with and without a CDSS that contains tailored recommendations. The study involves the use of a CDSS tool focused on cardiovascular risks, HeartSmartKids™. This research is an important example of an interdisciplinary team using information technology to address the global issue of obesity prevention. PMID:24199124

Skiba, Diane J; Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Gilbert, Kevin; Gilbert, Lynn; Dandreaux, Danielle

2012-01-01

8

[Childhood obesity prevention from a community view].  

Science.gov (United States)

The percentage of failure and relapse in the treatment of obesity is high. Where possible, the preferred strategy for preventing obesity is to modify eating habits and lifestyles. This article aims to provide a framework for evidence on the most effective interventions for addressing childhood obesity, both from a prevention point of view, as well as reducing it, when it is already established. After a review of the scientific literature, the issues that must be considered both in the universal and selective prevention of childhood obesity are presented. Also, in light of the controversy over the tools for measuring and controlling the problem, some clarification is provided on the criteria. Finally, the approach to the prevention of overweight and obesity with a community perspective is separated, with two short protocols being offered with diagrams of the basic procedure to follow. PMID:25835135

Ariza, Carles; Ortega-Rodríguez, Eduard; Sánchez-Martínez, Francesca; Valmayor, Sara; Juárez, Olga; Pasarín, M Isabel

2015-04-01

9

Preventing weight gain and obesity: indirect effects of the family check-up in early childhood.  

Science.gov (United States)

The early signs of obesity are observable in early childhood. Although the most promising prevention approaches are family-centered, few relevant early prevention programs exist. This study evaluated the effects of an evidence-based, home-visiting intervention, the Family Check-Up (FCU), on the trajectory of children's weight gain. The FCU was designed to prevent the development of behavior problems by improving family management practices; children's weight has not been an explicit target. On the basis of previous research and conceptual models, we hypothesized that intervention effects on parenting practices, specifically caregivers' use of positive behavior support (PBS) strategies in toddlerhood, would mediate improvements in children's weight trajectories. A total of 731 indigent caregiver-child dyads from a multisite randomized intervention trial were examined. Observational assessment of parenting and mealtime behaviors occurred from age 2-5 years. The child's body mass index (BMI) was assessed yearly from age 5-9.5 years. Path analysis with a latent growth model revealed a significant indirect effect of the FCU on the trajectory of BMI in later childhood. Improvements in caregivers' PBS in toddlerhood, which was related to the nutritional quality of the meals caregivers served to the child during the mealtime task, served as the intervening process. Furthermore, findings indicate that the FCU prevents progression to overweight and obese status amongst at-risk children. These study results add to existing evidence that has demonstrated that family-based interventions aimed at improving general family management skills are effective at preventing weight gain. Future directions are discussed. PMID:25263212

Smith, Justin D; Montaño, Zorash; Dishion, Thomas J; Shaw, Daniel S; Wilson, Melvin N

2015-04-01

10

Effectiveness of preventive school-based obesity interventions in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review  

OpenAIRE

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing rapidly in low- and middle-income countries, and informed policies to tackle the problem must be defined. OBJECTIVE: We systematically reviewed the evidence on the effectiveness of school-based interventions targeting dietary behavior and/or physical activity for the primary prevention of obesity in children and adolescents aged 6-18 y in low- and middle-income countries. DESIGN: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, CEN...

Verstraeten, R.; Roberfroid, D.; Lachat, C.; Leroy, J. L.; Holdsworth, M.; Maes, L.; Kolsteren, P. W.

2012-01-01

11

Comparing the Effectiveness of CDSS on Provider’s Behaviors to Implement Obesity Prevention Guidelines  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity is a global epidemic demanding the use of clinical decision support tools to help clinicians in the identification, assessment and management of healthy weight gain in children. Over the last decade, numerous systematic reviews have shown that clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have positively impacted clinician’s performance for drug ordering/dosing and preventive care reminders. CDSS that are built into the clinician’s workflow at the point of care also have a positive impact on provider’s performance. There are limited studies that examine CDSS in nursing practice. This paper describes a comparative effectiveness study being conducted in school-based clinics to examine the impact of web-based training with and without a CDSS that contains tailored recommendations. The study involves the use of a CDSS tool focused on cardiovascular risks, HeartSmartKids™. This research is an important example of an interdisciplinary team using information technology to address the global issue of obesity prevention. PMID:24199124

Skiba, Diane J; Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Gilbert, Kevin; Gilbert, Lynn; Dandreaux, Danielle

2012-01-01

12

Obesity prevention for Mexican American children: for whom is it most effective?  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of the current study was to determine which Mexican American children benefited most from an obesity prevention program. Data used were taken from a larger randomized clinical trial in which participants received either an intensive (IP) or a self-help (SH) program for preventing the ...

13

Cost-Effectiveness of a School-Based Obesity Prevention Program  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: A school-based obesity prevention study (Medical College of Georgia FitKid Project) started in the fall of 2003 in 18 elementary schools. Half of the schools were randomized to an after-school program that included moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, healthy snacks, homework assistance, and academic enrichment. All third graders…

Wang, Li Yan; Gutin, Bernard; Barbeau, Paule; Moore, Justin B.; Hanes, John, Jr.; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Cavnar, Marlo; Thornburg, Janet; Yin, Zenong

2008-01-01

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Comparing the Effectiveness of CDSS on Provider’s Behaviors to Implement Obesity Prevention Guidelines  

OpenAIRE

Obesity is a global epidemic demanding the use of clinical decision support tools to help clinicians in the identification, assessment and management of healthy weight gain in children. Over the last decade, numerous systematic reviews have shown that clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have positively impacted clinician’s performance for drug ordering/dosing and preventive care reminders. CDSS that are built into the clinician’s workflow at the point of care also have a positive imp...

Skiba, Diane J.; Gance-cleveland, Bonnie; Gilbert, Kevin; Gilbert, Lynn; Dandreaux, Danielle

2012-01-01

15

Adaptation and dissemination of an evidence-based obesity prevention intervention: design of a comparative effectiveness trial.  

Science.gov (United States)

Low-income youth are at increased risk for excess weight gain. Although evidence-based prevention programs exist, successful adaptation to provide wide dissemination presents a challenge. Hip-Hop to Health (HH) is a school-based obesity prevention intervention that targets primarily preschool children of low-income families. In a large randomized controlled trial, HH was found to be efficacious for prevention of excessive weight gain. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) are USDA-funded nutrition education programs offered to low-income families, and may provide an ideal platform for the wide dissemination of evidence-based obesity prevention programs. A research-practice partnership was established in order to conduct formative research to guide the adaptation and implementation of HH through EFNEP and SNAP-Ed. We present the design and method of a comparative effectiveness trial that will determine the efficacy of HH when delivered by peer educators through these programs compared to the standard EFNEP and SNAP-Ed nutrition education (NE) curriculum. Results from this trial will inform larger scale dissemination. The dissemination of HH through government programs has the potential to increase the reach of efficacious obesity prevention programs that target low-income children and families. PMID:24952282

Buscemi, Joanna; Odoms-Young, Angela; Stolley, Melinda L; Blumstein, Lara; Schiffer, Linda; Berbaum, Michael L; McCaffrey, Jennifer; Montoya, Anastasia McGee; Braunschweig, Carol; Fitzgibbon, Marian L

2014-07-01

16

Early causes of child obesity and implications for prevention  

OpenAIRE

Child obesity is becoming a serious public health concern, and major research effort is being devoted both to understand its aetiology and to improve the effectiveness of prevention strategies. Early growth patterns, both prenatally and postnatally, are emerging as important markers of later obesity risk, with rapid neonatal weight gain a clear risk factor for later obesity and metabolic syndrome. Thus, in two distinct senses child obesity is a growing problem. The paper summarises current ev...

Cole, T. J.

2007-01-01

17

Osteosarcopenic obesity and fall prevention strategies.  

Science.gov (United States)

Sarcopenia, obesity, and osteoporosis are three interrelated entities which may share common pathophysiological factors. In the last decades, overall survival has drastically increased. Postmenopausal women, due to their estrogen depletion, are at higher risk of developing any of these three conditions or the three, which is termed osteosarcopenic obesity. One of the most common health problems among these patients is the elevated risk of falls and fractures. Falls and fall-related injuries are one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in older adults, and have a significant impact on social, economical and health-related costs. Several extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors have been described that play a role in the etiology of falls. A therapeutic approach to osteosarcopenic obesity aimed at the prevention of falls must include several factors, and act on those risk elements which can be effectively modified. An adequate weight-loss diet and a good nutritional intake, with an appropriate amount of vitamin D and the right protein/carbohydrates ratio, may contribute to the prevention of falls. The recommendation of physical exercise, both traditional (resistance or aerobic training) and more recent varieties (Tai Chi, Pilates, body vibration), can improve balance and positively contribute to fall prevention, whether by itself or in combination with other therapeutic strategies. Finally, a pharmacological approach, especially one focused on hormone therapy, has shown to have a positive effect on postmenopausal women's balance, leading to a decreased risk of falls. PMID:25533145

Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Cruz-Díaz, David; Pérez-López, Faustino R

2015-02-01

18

Prevention of childhood obesity in India: Way forward  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity is a burden in developed and developing countries. Overweight and obesity are caused by numerous social and environmental factors that influence people's food habit and physical activity. Role of primary or secondary prevention is the mainstay plan for controlling this epidemic. Various adaptable best practice models are available in the developed nations. However, further research needs to be done to examine the most effective strategies of intervention, prevention, and treatment of obesity in our setting. Through this paper, we would like to highlight best practices and potential interventions to reduce the burden of obesity in India. PMID:25810628

Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Kar, Subhranshu Sekhar

2015-01-01

19

Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorders and Obesity among Female College Students: 1- and 2-Year Follow-Up Effects  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: Evaluate the effects of a prevention program targeting both eating disorders and obesity at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Method: Female college students at risk for these outcomes because of body image concerns (N = 398) were randomized to the "Healthy Weight 2" group-based 4-hr prevention program, which promotes lasting healthy…

Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

2013-01-01

20

Childhood obesity, prevalence and prevention  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in developed countries. Twenty five percent of children in the US are overweight and 11% are obese. Overweight and obesity in childhood are known to have significant impact on both physical and psychological health. The mechanism of obesity development is not fully understood and it is believed to be a disorder with multiple causes. Environmental factors, lifestyle preferences, and cultural environment play pivotal roles in the rising pre...

Merchant Anwar T; Akhtar-Danesh Noori; Dehghan Mahshid

2005-01-01

21

Childhood obesity: Determinants, evaluation, and prevention.  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity is a grave issue, which needs to be addressed urgently because it leads to several medical and psychosocial problems in children. High prevalence is being increasingly reported in children from developing countries as well. The combination of our genetic propensity to store fat, the ready availability of calorie dense foods, and sedentary lifestyle promotes overweight. The child's food environment at home and parental obesity are strong determinants. Urban poor in developed countries and urban rich in developing countries are both at risk. In developing countries, a number of beliefs passed down over generations are other important determinants. Evaluation includes assessing the child's lifestyle, excluding weight-promoting medication history; poor linear growth needs endocrine evaluation; genetic syndromes should be considered if there are clinical pointers. Overweight children should be evaluated for hypertension, dyslipidemia, T2DM, and NAFLD. Therapeutic lifestyle changes targeting food habits and physical activity through parental participation and social support are the cornerstones of preventing childhood obesity. Active travel and play by making the built environment more accessible, ban on 'junk' food advertising, and effective health education through active participation of clinicians, school systems, and the media will go a long way in reversing anticipated trends in childhood obesity. PMID:23565376

Raychaudhuri, Moutusi; Sanyal, Debmalya

2012-12-01

22

A randomised controlled trial for overweight and obese parents to prevent childhood obesity - Early STOPP (STockholm Obesity Prevention Program  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Overweight and obesity have a dramatic negative impact on children's health not only during the childhood but also throughout the adult life. Preventing the development of obesity in children is therefore a world-wide health priority. There is an obvious urge for sustainable and evidenced-based interventions that are suitable for families with young children, especially for families with overweight or obese parents. We have developed a prevention program, Early STOPP, combating multiple obesity-promoting behaviors such unbalanced diet, physical inactivity and disturbed sleeping patterns. We also aim to evaluate the effectiveness of the early childhood obesity prevention in a well-characterized population of overweight or obese parents. This protocol outlines methods for the recruitment phase of the study. Design and methods This randomized controlled trial (RCT targets overweight and/or obese parents with infants, recruited from the Child Health Care Centers (CHCC within the Stockholm area. The intervention starts when infants are one year of age and continues until they are six and is regularly delivered by a trained coach (dietitian, physiotherapist or a nurse. The key aspects of Early STOPP family intervention are based on Swedish recommendations for CHCC, which include advices on healthy food choices and eating patterns, increasing physical activity/reducing sedentary behavior and regulating sleeping patterns. Discussion The Early STOPP trial design addresses weaknesses of previous research by recruiting from a well-characterized population, defining a feasible, theory-based intervention and assessing multiple measurements to validate and interpret the program effectiveness. The early years hold promise as a time in which obesity prevention may be most effective. To our knowledge, this longitudinal RCT is the first attempt to demonstrate whether an early, long-term, targeted health promotion program focusing on healthy eating, physical activity/reduced sedentary behaviors and normalizing sleeping patterns could be effective. If proven so, Early STOPP may protect children from the development of overweight and obesity. Trial registration The protocol for this study is registered with the clinical trials registry clinicaltrials.gov, ID: ES-2010

Cao Yingting

2011-05-01

23

[Primary prevention of adult obesity. an interdisciplinary analysis].  

Science.gov (United States)

The primary prevention of adult obesity requires combined efforts by stakeholders at various societal levels, based on the knowledge from multiple disciplines. The goal of the present study was, therefore, to analyze current preventive approaches and delineate implications for future prevention research and practice by integrating knowledge from genetics, law, economics, psychology, and social ethics (Figure 1). Inconclusive evidence on the etiology of obesity, a complex, multifactorial condition, likely complicates prevention, contributing to a lack of specificity regarding target groups, focus, and techniques of prevention. Given the urgency and significance of the "obesity problem" that requires immediate and effective solutions, it is recommended that the various existing and developing prevention programs are evaluated to ensure orientation at current risk factor research. Results from genetic risk factor research can be used as a rationale to increase specificity of preventive measures regarding identification of high-risk groups, timing, and goals of prevention. Further, it is important to evaluate prevention programs for systematic application of behavior modification techniques and consideration of individual risk factors and resources to ensure promotion of long-term behavior change that leads to weight maintenance and a reduction of incidence rates of obesity in adults (Figure 3). Although the primary prevention of childhood obesity may lead to a reduction of incidence rates of obesity in adults, high rates of adult-onset obesity and the related medical and psychosocial sequelae in adulthood underscore the necessity of preventive efforts for adults. Concerning the environmental basis of obesity prevention, in many countries, the institutional and legal framework of preventive approaches requires further examination in order to improve funding, coordination between multiple stakeholders, and implementation of prevention in the health-care system. Evidence on risk factors for obesity is also crucial to inform network approaches and to justify restrictive legal options for the purpose of prevention. Here, self-defeating sanctions of the relevant industries may be a viable first step toward obesity prevention. As taxes or subsidies are limited in feasibility (Figure 2), relevant industries could be involved in the design and promotion of "healthy" products, stimulating greater request of such products. Network approaches appear suited to involve companies and other relevant stakeholders of prevention efforts on adult obesity. Yet these approaches require greater societal conscience about the severity of the obesity problem in adults and its multifactorial etiology. Recognizing the multifactorial etiology of obesity and acknowledging that weight regulation is only somewhat within personal responsibility may therefore lead to destigmatize obese individuals as the focus is shifted away from blaming them toward a more realistic understanding of this condition. Responsibility for the development of obesity and the prevention of weight gain is in multiple areas: law, policy, industry, health-care institutions, medical professions, and the individual - all should contribute to obesity prevention. Overall, the current analysis shows that an interdisciplinary perspective furthers understanding of the complexity of this condition and can inform public-health strategies on the prevention of adult obesity. PMID:17972027

Hilbert, Anja; Ried, Jens; Schneider, Daniel; Juttner, Clemens; Sosna, Marc; Dabrock, Peter; Lingenfelder, Michael; Voit, Wolfgang; Rief, Winfried; Hebebrand, Johannes

2007-10-01

24

The link between short sleep duration and obesity: we should recommend more sleep to prevent obesity  

OpenAIRE

Sleep may affect energy balance. Sleep may not be the only answer to the obesity pandemic, but its effect should be considered seriously, as even small changes in the energy balance are beneficial. Good sleep could be part of the obesity prevention approach.

Taheri, S.

2006-01-01

25

Childhood Obesity â?? Prevention Begins with Breastfeeding  

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

This podcast is based on the August, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Childhood obesity is an epidemic in the US. Breastfeeding can help prevent obesity, but one in three moms stop without hospital support. About 95% of hospitals lack policies that fully support breastfeeding moms. Hospitals need to do more to help moms start and continue breastfeeding.  Created: 8/2/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/2/2011.

2011-08-02

26

Programme and policy options for preventing obesity in China.  

Science.gov (United States)

By 2002, China's prevalence of overweight and obesity among adults was 18.9 and 2.9%, respectively. The replacement of traditional Chinese diet with 'Western diet', major declines in all phases of activity and increased sedentary activity are cited as the main reasons explaining the rapid increase in overweight and obesity, which bring major economic and health costs. The Nutrition Improvement Work Management Approach was released in 2010. Overweight and obesity prevention-related policies were added to national planning for disease prevention and control. The Guidelines for Prevention and Control of Overweight and Obesity of Chinese Adults and the School-age Children and Teenagers Overweight and Obesity Prevention and Control Guidelines in China were promulgated in 2003 and 2007, respectively. Few education programmes have been implemented. Selected academic intervention research projects dominate with a focus on reducing child obesity and promoting healthier diets; increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary time; and facilitating changes in family, school, social and cultural environments. Intervention samples are small and have not addressed the increasing rates of obesity throughout the entire population. Government provision of effective policy measures, multisectoral cooperation and increasing corporate social responsibility are keys to curbing the trend towards overweight and obesity in China. PMID:24102781

Wang, H; Zhai, F

2013-11-01

27

Obesity prevention begins at home - parents and nurses, partners in the fight against childhood obesity. : A literature review on the prevention of childhood obesity.  

OpenAIRE

Abstract As childhood obesity became the 21st century's major contributor to the development of many illnesses, dealing with overweight and obese patients/clients may pose as a great challenge for today's nurses. Hence, this literature review was conducted, firstly, to find effective strategies that could be used by nurses to help patients/clients and families in the prevention of childhood obesity. Secondly, the purpose was to investigate parental influences on children's eating behavior...

Uusi-hakimo, Judith

2011-01-01

28

EPODE approach for childhood obesity prevention: methods, progress and international development  

OpenAIRE

Childhood obesity is a complex issue and needs multi-stakeholder involvement at all levels to foster healthier lifestyles in a sustainable way. 'Ensemble Prévenons l'Obésité Des Enfants' (EPODE, Together Let's Prevent Childhood Obesity) is a large-scale, coordinated, capacity-building approach for communities to implement effective and sustainable strategies to prevent childhood obesity. This paper describes EPODE methodology and its objective of preventing childhood obesity. At a central ...

Borys, Jm; Le Bodo, Y.; Jebb, Sa; Seidell, Jc; Summerbell, C.; Richard, D.; Henauw, S.; Moreno, La; Romon, M.; Visscher, Tl; Raffin, S.; Swinburn, B

2012-01-01

29

My Student Body: Effects of an Internet-Based Prevention Program to Decrease Obesity among College Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: To determine the impact of My Student Body (MSB)-Nutrition, an Internet-based obesity prevention program for college students. Participants: Three hundred and twenty ethnically diverse undergraduate students were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: MSB-Nutrition program, an on-campus weight management course, and a comparison group.…

LaChausse, Robert G.

2012-01-01

30

A randomised controlled trial for overweight and obese parents to prevent childhood obesity - Early STOPP (STockholm Obesity Prevention Program)  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Overweight and obesity have a dramatic negative impact on children's health not only during the childhood but also throughout the adult life. Preventing the development of obesity in children is therefore a world-wide health priority. There is an obvious urge for sustainable and evidenced-based interventions that are suitable for families with young children, especially for families with overweight or obese parents. We have developed a prevention program, Early STOPP, comb...

Cao Yingting; Johansson Elin; Karlsson Håkan; Ekstedt Mirjam; Ek Anna; Svensson Viktoria; Sobko Tanja; Hagströmer Maria; Marcus Claude

2011-01-01

31

Interventions for preventing obesity in children  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prevention of childhood obesity is an international public health priority given the significant impact of obesity on acute and chronic diseases, general health, development and well-being. The international evidence base for strategies that governments, communities and families can im [...] plement to prevent obesity, and promote health, has been accumulating but remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: This review primarily aims to update the previous Cochrane review of childhood obesity prevention research and determine the effectiveness of evaluated interventions intended to prevent obesity in children, assessed by change in Body Mass Index (BMI). Secondary aims were to examine the characteristics of the programs and strategies to answer the questions "What works for whom, why and for what cost?" METHODS: Search methods: The searches were re-run in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO and CINAHL in March 2010 and searched relevant websites. Non-English language papers were included and experts were contacted. Selection criteria: The review includes data from childhood obesity prevention studies that used a controlled study design (with or without randomisation). Studies were included if they evaluated interventions, policies or programs in place for twelve weeks or more. If studies were randomized at a cluster level, six clusters were required. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. Data was extracted on intervention implementation, cost, equity and outcomes. Outcome measures were grouped according to whether they measured adiposity, physical activity (PA)-related behaviours or diet-related behaviours. Adverse outcomes were recorded. A meta-analysis was conducted using available BMI or standardized BMI (zBMI) score data with subgroup analysis by age group (0-5, 6-12, 13-18 years, corresponding to stages of developmental and childhood settings). MAIN RESULTS: This review includes 55 studies (an additional 36 studies found for this update). The majority of studies targeted children aged v 6-12 years. The meta-analysis included 37 studies of 27,946 children and demonstrated that programmes were effective at reducing adiposity, although not all individual interventions were effective, and there was a high level of observed heterogeneity (I2 = 82%). Overall, children in the intervention group had a standardised mean difference in adiposity (measured as BMI or zBMI) of -0.15kg/m2 (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.21 to -0.09). Intervention effects by age subgroups were -0.26kg/m2 (95% CI -0.53 to 0.00) (0- 5 years), - 0.15 kg/m2 (95% CI -0.23 to -0.08) (6-12 years), and -0.09 kg/m2 (95% CI -0.20 to 0.03) (13-18 years). Heterogeneity was apparent in all three age groups and could not explained by randomisation status or the type, duration or setting of the intervention. Only eight studies reported on adverse effects and no evidence of adverse outcomes such as unhealthy dieting practices, increased prevalence of underweight or body image sensitivities was found. Interventions did not appear to increase health inequalities although this was examined in fewer studies. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We found strong evidence to support beneficial effects of child obesity prevention programmes on BMI, particularly for programmes targeted to children aged six to 12 years. However, given the unexplained heterogeneity and the likelihood of small study bias, these findings must be interpreted cautiously. A broad range of programme components were used in these studies and whilst it is not possible to distinguish which of these components contributed most to the beneficial effects observed, our synthesis indicates the following to be promising policies and strategies: school curriculum that includes healthy eating, physical activity and body image; increased sessions for physical activity and the development of fundamental movement skills throughout the school week; improvements in nutritional quality of the food supply in schools; envir

Elizabeth, Waters; Andrea de, Silva-Sanigorski; Belinda J., Burford; Tamara, Brown; Karen J., Campbell; Yang, Gao; Rebecca, Armstrong; Lauren, Prosser; Carolyn D., Summerbell.

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Childhood Obesity: Update on Predisposing Factors and Prevention Strategies  

OpenAIRE

Obesity is a global epidemic and children are affected in increasing numbers. Overweight children are at increased risk of becoming overweight adults with associated chronic diseases. In this update, we present key findings from a review of the current literature focused on potential causes and strategies for preventing childhood obesity. We highlight recent evidence regarding the role of genetics, maternal body mass index, postnatal influences, and environmental effects throughout childhood ...

Vos, Miriam B.; Welsh, Jean

2010-01-01

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Childhood obesity treatment and prevention. Psychological perspectives of clinical approaches  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: This work focuses on clinical psychologist’ presence within childhood obesity prevention programmes in several countries. Method: The Authors collected articles considering psychological, biological and social aspects linked to childhood obesity. Results: Studies reveal that childhood obesity prevention programmes are based on biological, medical and educational aspects; clinical psychologists up until now have been engaged almost exclusively in the treatment of obesity. Conclusions: There is a clear need to consider psychological aspects (emotional, cognitive and relational related to the childhood obesity’s causes and involve psychologists in its prevention projects. Keywords: childhood obesity, overweight, multidisciplinary approach, clinical psychology, prevention, treatment

Maria Catena Quattropani

2013-05-01

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Translating Evidence Based Violence and Drug Use Prevention to Obesity Prevention: Development and Construction of the Pathways Program  

Science.gov (United States)

Effective school-based obesity prevention programs are needed to prevent and reduce the growing obesity risk among youth. Utilizing the evidence-rich areas of violence and substance use prevention, translation science may provide an efficient means for developing curricula across multiple health behaviors. This paper introduces Pathways to Health,…

Sakuma, Kari-Lyn K.; Riggs, Nathaniel R.; Pentz, Mary Ann

2012-01-01

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Childhood obesity treatment and prevention. Psychological perspectives of clinical approaches  

OpenAIRE

Objective: This work focuses on clinical psychologist’ presence within childhood obesity prevention programmes in several countries. Method: The Authors collected articles considering psychological, biological and social aspects linked to childhood obesity. Results: Studies reveal that childhood obesity prevention programmes are based on biological, medical and educational aspects; clinical psychologists up until now have been engaged almost exclusively in the treatment of obesity. Conclusi...

Maria Catena Quattropani; Teresa Buccheri

2013-01-01

36

The role of fruit consumption in the prevention of obesity  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The global obesity epidemic is associated with a sedentary lifestyle and diets rich in high-fat, high-energy foods. The potential role of fruit in preventing overweight and obesity is related to their relatively low energy density, high content of dietary fibre, and associated increasing satiety effect. The physical disruption of fruit is of considerable importance for satiety, as shown in studies in which fruit juices were less satisfying compared to sugar-equivalent intakes of purees and whole fruits. The potential role of fruit in the prevention of overweight and obesity may be connected to the dietary pattern of fruit intake, and with the possibility that fruit intake may substitute for other, more energy-dense foods. The majority of human prospective cohort studies in adults suggest a preventive effect of increased fruit intake oil body weight gain; whereas a few studies have suggested the opposite, in the case of fruit juices. Prospective studies oil children are few and inconclusive, but suggest associations between fruit intake and body weight that are related to the initial nutritional status. In behavioural intervention studies, subjects are often advised to undergo several changes towards a healthy diet and lifestyle, making it impossible to quantity the specific effect of fruit intake oil body weight. In the few available intervention studies in adults, the Study period was often too short to allow measures of body weight changes, and studies oil overweight or obese subjects may not apply to subjects of normal weight. Intervention studies targeted at school children showed that such schemes call be effective in increasing fruit intake, but a convincing role for increased fruit intake in the prevention of overweight and obesity in children still needs to be established. The present evidence suggests that fruit consumption has a potential role in the prevention of overweight and obesity.

Tetens, Inge; Alinia, Sevil

2009-01-01

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Indian students' perspectives on obesity and school-based obesity prevention: a qualitative examination.  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity has recently been reported as a growing problem in low- and middle-income countries. One potential prevention strategy is to apply effective obesity prevention approaches from the United States and/or other Western countries into programs that can be implemented in developing countries such as India. The purpose of this study was to explore Indian students' perceptions of social-contextual factors related to obesity and whether they perceived a role for school-based obesity prevention. This study was conducted as a first step in a model to translate interventions from one culture to another. A total of 183 fourth- and fifth-grade students of middle socioeconomic status participated in focus group discussions. Analyses were guided by the essential principles of qualitative research and informed by social cognitive and social ecological theories. Results yielded five relevant themes: (a) student health behavior knowledge, (b) parental influence on health behavior, (c) school influence on health behavior, (d) media influence on health behavior, and (e) contexts for health promotion intervention. We found that students had moderate knowledge related to health behaviors (i.e., food intake and physical activity); that parents, schools, and the media are all important contributors to healthy and unhealthy behavior; and that schools can play an important role in the prevention of obesity. Results suggest that Indian middle socioeconomic status students are already moderately aware of the health benefits to nutritious food intake and physical activity, but parents, schools, and the media can influence unhealthy behaviors. PMID:24149680

Riggs, Nathaniel; Tewari, Abha; Stigler, Melissa; Rodrigues, Lindsay; Arora, Monika; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Simmons, Rob; Pentz, Mary Ann

2013-11-01

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School-based obesity prevention in Norway:Correlates of weight statues and intervention effects on physical activity and body composition:The Health in Adolescents Study (HEIA)  

OpenAIRE

Prevention of childhood obesity is an international public health priority given the significant impact of obesity on short- and long-term functioning, health and wellbeing. Although recommended in several recent reviews, school-based obesity prevention interventions targeting physical activity and diet have been tested with mixed results. The overall aim of the HEalth in Adolescents (HEIA) study was to design, implement and evaluate a comprehensive intervention program to promote a healthy w...

Grydeland, May

2013-01-01

39

Obesity in primary care: prevention, management and the paradox  

OpenAIRE

Government and societal efforts to combat obesity are aimed at prevention, although there is a generation for whom excess weight is the rule rather than the exception. Although measures to prevent a worsening of the current epidemic are important, management of obesity must also be prioritised. Obesity management is beset with problems ranging from attitudinal to clinical and pharmacological, and the individualisation of therapy.

Haslam, David

2014-01-01

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Obesity prevention: Comparison of techniques and potential solution  

Science.gov (United States)

Over the years, obesity prevention has been a broadly studied subject by both academicians and practitioners. It is one of the most serious public health issue as it can cause numerous chronic health and psychosocial problems. Research is needed to suggest a population-based strategy for obesity prevention. In the academic environment, the importance of obesity prevention has triggered various problem solving approaches. A good obesity prevention model, should comprehend and cater all complex and dynamics issues. Hence, the main purpose of this paper is to discuss the qualitative and quantitative approaches on obesity prevention study and to provide an extensive literature review on various recent modelling techniques for obesity prevention. Based on these literatures, the comparison of both quantitative and qualitative approahes are highlighted and the justification on the used of system dynamics technique to solve the population of obesity is discussed. Lastly, a potential framework solution based on system dynamics modelling is proposed.

Zulkepli, Jafri; Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

2014-12-01

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Preventing Childhood Obesity: Tips for Parents and Caregivers  

Science.gov (United States)

Preventing Childhood Obesity: Tips for Parents and Caretakers Updated:Oct 16,2014 Balance is key in helping your child maintain ... way to change weight is gradually. Learn more: Childhood Obesity BMI in Children Making a Healthy Home Healthier ...

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Promoting obesity prevention together with environmental sustainability.  

Science.gov (United States)

There is mounting evidence that current food production, transport, land use and urban design negatively impact both climate change and obesity outcomes. Recommendations to prevent climate change provide an opportunity to improve environmental outcomes and alter our food and physical activity environments in favour of a 'healthier' energy balance. Hence, setting goals to achieve a more sustainable society offers a unique opportunity to reduce levels of obesity. In the case of children, this approach is supported with evidence that even from a young age they show emerging understandings of complex environmental issues and are capable of both internalizing positive environmental values and influencing their own environmental outcomes. Given young children's high levels of environmental awareness, it is easy to see how environmental sustainability messages may help educate and motivate children to make 'healthier' choices. The purpose of this paper is to highlight a new approach to tackling childhood obesity by tapping into existing social movements, such as environmental sustainability, in order to increase children's motivation for healthy eating and physical activity behaviours and thus foster more wholesome communities. We contend that a social marketing framework may be a particularly useful tool to foster behaviour change beneficial to both personal and environmental health by increasing perceived benefits and reducing perceived costs of behaviour change. Consequently, we propose a new framework which highlights suggested pathways for helping children initiate and sustain 'healthier' behaviours in order to inform future research and potentially childhood obesity intervention strategies. PMID:23392756

Skouteris, Helen; Cox, Rachael; Huang, Terry; Rutherford, Leonie; Edwards, Susan; Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy

2014-09-01

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Pediatric Obesity: It’s Time for Prevention Before Conception Can Maternal Obesity Program Pediatric Obesity?  

OpenAIRE

Global increases in obesity have led public health experts to declare this disease a pandemic. Although prevalent in all ages, the dire consequences associated with maternal obesity have a pronounced impact on the long-term health of their children as a result of the intergenerational effects of developmental programming. Previously, fetal under-nutrition has been linked to the predisposition to pediatric obesity explained by the adiposity rebound and ‘catch-up’ growth that occurs when a ...

Zach Ferraro; Adamo, Kristi B.

2008-01-01

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Effectiveness of a diet and physical activity promotion strategy on the prevention of obesity in Mexican school children  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Overweight and obesity in children in Mexico was among the countries with the highest prevalence's in the world. Mexico currently has few innovative and comprehensive experiences to help curb the growth of this serious public health problem. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a nutrition and physical activity strategy, called "Nutrition on the Go" ("nutrición en movimiento") in maintaining the BMI values of school children in the State of M...

Shamah Levy Teresa; Morales Ruán Carmen; Amaya Castellanos Claudia; Salazar Coronel Araceli; Jiménez Aguilar Alejandra; Méndez Gómez Humarán Ignacio

2012-01-01

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Mobile text messaging solutions for obesity prevention  

Science.gov (United States)

Cellular telephony has become a bright example of co-evolution of human society and information technology. This trend has also been reflected in health care and health promotion projects which included cell phones in data collection and communication chain. While many successful projects have been realized, the review of phone-based data collection techniques reveals that the existing technologies do not completely address health promotion research needs. The paper presents approaches which close this gap by extending existing versatile platforms. The messaging systems are designed for a health-promotion research to prevent obesity and obesity-related health disparities among low-income Latino adolescent girls. Messaging and polling mechanisms are used to communicate and automatically process response data for the target constituency. Preliminary survey data provide an insight on phone availability and technology perception for the study group.

Akopian, David; Jayaram, Varun; Aaleswara, Lakshmipathi; Esfahanian, Moosa; Mojica, Cynthia; Parra-Medina, Deborah; Kaghyan, Sahak

2011-02-01

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Engaging Low-Income Parents in Childhood Obesity Prevention from Start to Finish: A Case Study  

OpenAIRE

Prevention of childhood obesity is a national priority. Parents influence young children’s healthy lifestyles, so it is paradoxical that obesity interventions focus primarily on children. Evidence and theory suggest that including parents in interventions offers promise for effective childhood obesity prevention. This case study engaged parents’ as co-researchers in the design, implementation and evaluation of an intervention for low-income families with a child enrolled in Head Start. Pa...

Jurkowski, Janine M.; Green Mills, Lisa L.; Lawson, Hal A.; Bovenzi, Mary C.; Quartimon, Ronald; Davison, Kirsten K.

2012-01-01

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Divergent effects of obesity on fragility fractures  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Carla Caffarelli, Chiara Alessi, Ranuccio Nuti, Stefano Gonnelli Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Siena, Italy Abstract: Obesity was commonly thought to be advantageous for maintaining healthy bones due to the higher bone mineral density observed in overweight individuals. However, several recent studies have challenged the widespread belief that obesity is protective against fracture and have suggested that obesity is a risk factor for certain fractures. The effect of obesity on fracture risk is site-dependent, the risk being increased for some fractures (humerus, ankle, upper arm and decreased for others (hip, pelvis, wrist. Moreover, the relationship between obesity and fracture may also vary by sex, age, and ethnicity. Risk factors for fracture in obese individuals appear to be similar to those in nonobese populations, although patterns of falling are particularly important in the obese. Research is needed to determine if and how visceral fat and metabolic complications of obesity (type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, etc are causally associated with bone status and fragility fracture risk. Vitamin D deficiency and hypogonadism may also influence fracture risk in obese individuals. Fracture algorithms such as FRAX® might be expected to underestimate fracture probability. Studies specifically designed to evaluate the antifracture efficacy of different drugs in obese patients are not available; however, literature data may suggest that in obese patients higher doses of the bisphosphonates might be required in order to maintain efficacy against nonvertebral fractures. Therefore, the search for better methods for the identification of fragility fracture risk in the growing population of adult and elderly subjects with obesity might be considered a clinical priority which could improve the prevention of fracture in obese individuals. Keywords: bone mineral density, BMI, prevention

Caffarelli C

2014-09-01

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Patterns of Childhood Obesity Prevention Legislation in the United States  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available IntroductionBecause of the public’s growing awareness of the childhood obesity epidemic, health policies that address obesogenic environments by encouraging healthy eating and increased physical activity are gaining more attention. However, there has been little systematic examination of state policy efforts. This study identified and described state-level childhood obesity prevention legislation introduced and adopted from 2003 through 2005 and attempted to identify regional geographic patterns of introduced legislation.MethodsA scan of legislation from all 50 states identified 717 bills and 134 resolutions that met study inclusion criteria. Analyses examined patterns in the introduction and adoption of legislation by time, topic area, and geography.ResultsOverall, 17% of bills and 53% of resolutions were adopted. The amount of legislation introduced and adopted increased from 2003 through 2005. The topic areas with the most introduced legislation were school nutrition standards and vending machines (n = 238; physical education and physical activity (n = 191; and studies, councils, or task forces (n = 110. Community-related topic areas of walking and biking paths (37%, farmers’ markets (36%, and statewide initiatives (30% had the highest proportion of bills adopted, followed by model school policies (29% and safe routes to school (28%. Some regional geographic patterns in the introduction of legislation were observed. There was no statistical association between state-level adult obesity prevalence and introduction of legislation.ConclusionPublic health and health policy practitioners can use this information to improve advocacy efforts and strengthen the political climate for establishing childhood obesity prevention legislation within state governments. Expanded surveillance (including standardized identification and cataloging of introduced and adopted legislation will enhance the ability to assess progress and identify effective approaches. Future policy research should examine determinants, implementation, and effectiveness of legislation to prevent childhood obesity.

Tegan K. Boehmer, PhD, MPH

2007-07-01

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Childhood obesity-an insight into preventive strategies  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity is now a global problem throughout the world. The major factors affecting weight regulation and the development of obesity in children are the result of a large number of biological, behavioral, social, environmental, and economic factors and the complex interactions between them that promote a positive energy balance. The changes in the dietary habits with the adoption of sedentary life style increases manifold obesity-related diseases and their complications. An obese child later on grows up to become an obese adult. Therefore, the role of primary prevention along with methodical diet control, behavioral changes, and physical activity are the important strategies against the battle of childhood obesity. PMID:25298951

Kar, Subhranshu Sekhar; Dube, Rajani; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar

2014-01-01

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Obesity Prevention Opinions of School Stakeholders: A Qualitative Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: In general, schools are an important setting to implement current recommendations for obesity prevention in children because the vast majority of children attend school. This study investigated the opinions of different school stakeholders on the feasibility and acceptability of current obesity prevention strategies that could be…

Della Torre, Sophie Bucher; Akre, Christina; Suris, Joan-Carles

2010-01-01

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Study protocol: effects of the THAO-child health intervention program on the prevention of childhood obesity - The POIBC study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The speeding increase and the high prevalence of childhood obesity is a serious problem for Public Health. Community Based Interventions has been developed to combat against the childhood obesity epidemic. However little is known on the efficacy of these programs. Therefore, there is an urgent need to determine the effect of community based intervention on changes in lifestyle and surrogate measures of adiposity. Methods/design Parallel intervention study including two thousand 2249 children aged 8 to 10 years ( 4th and 5th grade of elementary school) from 4 Spanish towns. The THAO-Child Health Program, a community based intervention, were implemented in 2 towns. Body weight, height, and waist circumferences were measured. Children recorded their dietary intake on a computer-based 24h recall. All children also completed validated computer based questionnaires to estimate physical activity, diet quality, eating behaviors, and quality of life and sleep. Additionally, parental diet quality and physical activity were assessed by validated questionnaires. Discussion This study will provide insight in the efficacy of the THAO-Child Health Program to promote a healthy lifestyle. Additionally it will evaluate if lifestyle changes are accompanied by favorable weight management. Trial registration Trial Registration Number ISRCTN68403446 PMID:25174356

2014-01-01

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Obesity: the preventive role of the pomegranate (Punica granatum).  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity represents a rapidly growing threat to the health of populations in an increasing number of countries. Diet intervention has been proposed as one of the strategies for weight loss and weight maintenance. Traditionally, the pomegranate, including its roots, tree bark, fruit juice, leaves, and flowers, has been used to treat some conditions such as diarrhea, hemorrhage, acidosis, and microbial infections. Pomegranate extracts have been found to have strong anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and even antitumor properties in vivo and in vitro. More recently, positive effects on fat reduction have been shown using the pomegranate and its extracts. Many of the beneficial effects are related to the presence of anthocyanins, tannins, and very high levels of antioxidants, including polyphenols and flavonoids. Many studies have explored the effects of the pomegranate in obesity, and various mechanisms have been proposed as to how these different extracts help in fat reduction. This article provides an overview of the work done addressing the potential benefits of the pomegranate on obesity and assesses the efficacy of intervention by means of the pomegranate and its extracts. Human studies in this field are still limited and need more attention that would help in understanding the preventive and protective roles pomegranate extracts have on obesity. PMID:22342388

Al-Muammar, May Nasser; Khan, Fozia

2012-06-01

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Effectiveness of a diet and physical activity promotion strategy on the prevention of obesity in Mexican school children  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Overweight and obesity in children in Mexico was among the countries with the highest prevalence's in the world. Mexico currently has few innovative and comprehensive experiences to help curb the growth of this serious public health problem. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a nutrition and physical activity strategy, called "Nutrition on the Go" ("nutrición en movimiento") in maintaining the BMI values of school children in the State of Mexico. Methods A two-stage cluster trial was carried out. Sixty schools were selected in the State of Mexico, of which 30 were randomly assigned to the intervention group (IG) and 30 to the control group (CG). A total of 1020 fifth grade school children participated. The intervention strategy aimed to decrease the energy content of school breakfasts and include fruits and vegetables, as well as increase physical activity and the consumption of water during the time spent at school. The strategy was implemented over a 6-month period. Results The estimated probability (EP) of obesity between baseline and the final stage for the IG decreased 1% (Initial EP = 11.8%, 95%CI 9.0, 15.2, final EP = 10.8, 95%CI 8.4, 13.) For the CG, the probability increased 0.9% (baseline EP = 10.6%; 95%CI 8.1, 13.7; final EP = 11.5, 95%CI 9.0, 14.6). The interaction between the intervention and the stage is the average odd time corrected treatment effect, which is statistically significant (p = 0.01) (OR = 0.68, 95%CI 0.52, 091). This represents the interaction between intervention and stage, which is highly significant (p = 0.01) (OR = 0.68; 95%CI 0.52, 091). In addition, girls had a protective effect on obesity (OR = 0.56; 95%CI 0.39, 0.80). Conclusions The intervention strategy is effective in maintaining the BMI of school children. PMID:22381137

2012-01-01

54

Effectiveness of a diet and physical activity promotion strategy on the prevention of obesity in Mexican school children  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Overweight and obesity in children in Mexico was among the countries with the highest prevalence's in the world. Mexico currently has few innovative and comprehensive experiences to help curb the growth of this serious public health problem. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a nutrition and physical activity strategy, called "Nutrition on the Go" ("nutrición en movimiento" in maintaining the BMI values of school children in the State of Mexico. Methods A two-stage cluster trial was carried out. Sixty schools were selected in the State of Mexico, of which 30 were randomly assigned to the intervention group (IG and 30 to the control group (CG. A total of 1020 fifth grade school children participated. The intervention strategy aimed to decrease the energy content of school breakfasts and include fruits and vegetables, as well as increase physical activity and the consumption of water during the time spent at school. The strategy was implemented over a 6-month period. Results The estimated probability (EP of obesity between baseline and the final stage for the IG decreased 1% (Initial EP = 11.8%, 95%CI 9.0, 15.2, final EP = 10.8, 95%CI 8.4, 13. For the CG, the probability increased 0.9% (baseline EP = 10.6%; 95%CI 8.1, 13.7; final EP = 11.5, 95%CI 9.0, 14.6. The interaction between the intervention and the stage is the average odd time corrected treatment effect, which is statistically significant (p = 0.01 (OR = 0.68, 95%CI 0.52, 091. This represents the interaction between intervention and stage, which is highly significant (p = 0.01 (OR = 0.68; 95%CI 0.52, 091. In addition, girls had a protective effect on obesity (OR = 0.56; 95%CI 0.39, 0.80. Conclusions The intervention strategy is effective in maintaining the BMI of school children.

Shamah Levy Teresa

2012-03-01

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Ethics and prevention of overweight and obesity: an inventory.  

Science.gov (United States)

Efforts to counter the rise in overweight and obesity, such as taxes on certain foods and beverages, limits to commercial advertising, a ban on chocolate drink at schools or compulsory physical exercise for obese employees, sometimes raise questions about what is considered ethically acceptable. There are obvious ethical incentives to these initiatives, such as improving individual and public health, enabling informed choice and diminishing societal costs. Whereas we consider these positive arguments to put considerable effort in the prevention of overweight indisputable, we focus on potential ethical objections against such an effort. Our intention is to structure the ethical issues that may occur in programmes to prevent overweight and/or obesity in order to encourage further debate. We selected 60 recently reported interventions or policy proposals targeting overweight or obesity and systematically evaluated their ethically relevant aspects. Our evaluation was completed by discussing them in two expert meetings. We found that currently proposed interventions or policies to prevent overweight or obesity may (next to the benefits they strive for) include the following potentially problematic aspects: effects on physical health are uncertain or unfavourable; there are negative psychosocial consequences including uncertainty, fears and concerns, blaming and stigmatization and unjust discrimination; inequalities are aggravated; inadequate information is distributed; the social and cultural value of eating is disregarded; people's privacy is disrespected; the complexity of responsibilities regarding overweight is disregarded; and interventions infringe upon personal freedom regarding lifestyle choices and raising children, regarding freedom of private enterprise or regarding policy choices by schools and other organizations. The obvious ethical incentives to combat the overweight epidemic do not necessarily override the potential ethical constraints, and further debate is needed. An ethical framework to support decision makers in balancing potential ethical problems against the need to do something would be helpful. Developing programmes that are sound from an ethical point of view is not only valuable from a moral perspective, but may also contribute to preventing overweight and obesity, as societal objections to a programme may hamper its effectiveness. PMID:21545391

ten Have, M; de Beaufort, I D; Teixeira, P J; Mackenbach, J P; van der Heide, A

2011-09-01

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Increasing community capacity to prevent childhood obesity: challenges, lessons learned and results from the Romp & Chomp intervention  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Obesity is a major public health issue; however, only limited evidence is available about effective ways to prevent obesity, particularly in early childhood. Romp & Chomp was a community-wide obesity prevention intervention conducted in Geelong Australia with a target group of 12,000 children aged 0-5 years. The intervention had an environmental and capacity building focus and we have recently demonstrated that the prevalence of overweight/obesity was lower in intervention...

de Groot Florentine P; Robertson Narelle M; Swinburn Boyd A; de Silva-Sanigorski Andrea M

2010-01-01

57

Nutraceutical Approach for Preventing Obesity-Related Colorectal and Liver Carcinogenesis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Obesity and its related metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, alterations in the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1/IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R axis, and the state of chronic inflammation, increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, these findings also indicate that the metabolic disorders caused by obesity might be effective targets to prevent the development of CRC and HCC in obese individuals. Green tea catechins (GTCs possess anticancer and chemopreventive properties against cancer in various organs, including the colorectum and liver. GTCs have also been known to exert anti-obesity, antidiabetic, and anti-inflammatory effects, indicating that GTCs might be useful for the prevention of obesity-associated colorectal and liver carcinogenesis. Further, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA, which improve protein malnutrition and prevent progressive hepatic failure in patients with chronic liver diseases, might be also effective for the suppression of obesity-related carcinogenesis because oral supplementation with BCAA reduces the risk of HCC in obese cirrhotic patients. BCAA shows these beneficial effects because they can improve insulin resistance. Here, we review the detailed relationship between metabolic abnormalities and the development of CRC and HCC. We also review evidence, especially that based on our basic and clinical research using GTCs and BCAA, which indicates that targeting metabolic abnormalities by either pharmaceutical or nutritional intervention may be an effective strategy to prevent the development of CRC and HCC in obese individuals.

Hisataka Moriwaki

2012-01-01

58

The cost of a primary care-based childhood obesity prevention intervention  

OpenAIRE

Background: United States pediatric guidelines recommend that childhood obesity counseling be conducted in the primary care setting. Primary care-based interventions can be effective in improving health behaviors, but also costly. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost of a primary care-based obesity prevention intervention targeting children between the ages of two and six years who are at elevated risk for obesity, measured against usual care. Methods: High Five for Kids was a c...

Wright, Davene R.; Taveras, Elsie M.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Horan, Christine M.; Hohman, Katherine H.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Prosser, Lisa A.

2014-01-01

59

Healthy eating and obesity prevention for preschoolers: a randomised controlled trial  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Developing effective prevention and intervention programs for the formative preschool years is seen as an essential step in combating the obesity epidemic across the lifespan. The overall goal of the current project is to measure the effectiveness of a healthy eating and childhood obesity prevention intervention, the MEND (Mind Exercise Nutrition Do It!) program that is delivered to parents of children aged 2-4 years. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial will be...

Swinburn Boyd; McCabe Marita; Skouteris Helen; Hill Briony

2010-01-01

60

Psychosocial Perspectives and the Issue of Prevention in Childhood Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

A dramatic increase in childhood overweight/obesity has been recognized globally over the past 50?years. This observed increase may reflect genetic, as well as psychological, environmental, and socio-cultural influences. In the first part of this review, we present an updated summary of the psychosocial factors associated with this change and discuss possible ways in which they operate. Among these factors, lower socio economic status (in both industrialized and non-industrialized countries), being female, belonging to a minority group, and being exposed to adverse life events may all be associated with a greater risk of childhood overweight/obesity. These influences may be mediated via a variety of mechanisms, in particular above-average food intake of low nutritional quality and reduction in physical activity. Other important psychosocial mediators include the influence of the family and peer environment, and exposure to the media. In the second part of the review, we discuss the potential of psychosocial prevention programs to intervene in the processes involved in the rise of childhood overweight/obesity. Two points are emphasized. First, prevention programs should be multidisciplinary, combining the knowledge of experts from different professions, and taking into consideration the important role of the family environment and relevant influential social organizations, particularly school. Second, effective change is unlikely to occur without large-scale programs carried out on a public policy level. PMID:25133140

Stein, Daniel; Weinberger-Litman, Sarah L.; Latzer, Yael

2014-01-01

61

The possibility of regulating for obesity prevention--understanding regulation in the Commonwealth Government.  

Science.gov (United States)

A complex regulatory package is likely to be necessary to effectively reduce obesity prevalence in developed countries. This study investigated the barriers and facilitators to implementing regulatory interventions to prevent obesity within the executive arm of the Australian Commonwealth Government. Policy reviews were conducted on nine government departments to understand their roles and interests in obesity. From this process we identified regulatory review carried out by the Office of Best Practice Regulation as possibly posing a barrier to law reform for obesity prevention, along with the complexity of the food policymaking structures. The policy reviews informed subsequent in-depth semi-structured interviews with senior Commonwealth government officers (n = 13) focused on refining our understanding of the barriers to enacting obesity prevention policy. In addition to the two barriers already identified, interviewees identified a lack of evidence for interventions, which would reduce obesity prevalence, and the influence of politicians on executive decisions as posing obstacles. Most interviewees believed that the barriers to regulating to prevent obesity were strong and that intervention by elected politicians would be the most likely method of implementing obesity prevention policy. PMID:23171416

Crammond, B; Van, C; Allender, S; Peeters, A; Lawrence, M; Sacks, G; Mavoa, H; Swinburn, B A; Loff, B

2013-03-01

62

Program and Policy Options for Preventing Obesity in China  

OpenAIRE

By 2002, China’s prevalence of overweight and obesity among adults was 18.9 percent and 2.9 percent, respectively. The Chinese traditional diet has been replaced by the “Western diet” and major declines in all phases of activity and increased sedentary activity as the main reasons explaining the rapid increase in overweight and obesity, bring major economic and health costs. The Nutrition Improvement Work Management Approach was released in 2010. Overweight and obesity prevention-relate...

Huijun, Wang; Fengying, Zhai

2013-01-01

63

Recruitment Evaluation of a Preschooler Obesity-Prevention Intervention  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this paper was to compare the recruitment strategies of two recent studies that focused on the parental influences on childhood obesity during the preschool years. The first study was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the Mind, Exercise, Nutrition?…?Do It! 2-4 obesity prevention programme and the second was a longitudinal cohort…

Skouteris, Helen; Hill, Briony; McCabe, Marita; Swinburn, Boyd; Sacher, Paul; Chadwick, Paul

2014-01-01

64

New Resource from the CDC to Prevent Obesity: Perinatal Implications  

OpenAIRE

Research has identified pregnancy as a trigger to obesity among women; therefore, childbirth educators are encouraged to include the topic of weight gain in their classes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently published a guide on obesity that may serve as an excellent resource for both educators and their clients.

Montgomery, Kristen S.

2004-01-01

65

A meta-analysis of school-based obesity prevention programs demonstrates limited efficacy of decreasing childhood obesity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity is a global concern. The objectives of this meta-analytical study were to evaluate the effectiveness of school-based childhood obesity prevention programs, and to examine program components (moderators). The methods included searching databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, and the university's EBSCOhost Web service) as well as handsearching reference lists of articles published in English. Selection criteria for studies to be included in the meta-analysis were limited to studies that reported body mass index (BMI) or skinfold thickness as outcome measures and were school-based obesity prevention interventions; cross-sectional design studies were excluded. We hypothesized the meta-analysis would yield a summary effect size of magnitude which would indicate that school-based interventions have been effective in improving children's BMI or skinfold thickness values. A total of 26 114 children from 27 school-based childhood obesity prevention programs provided 54 effect sizes. A random-effects model calculated a small summary effect size of 0.039 (95% confidence interval -0.013 to 0.092). Heterogeneity among studies was observed which disappeared after pooling studies that used a randomized controlled trial design with one program moderator (physical activity or nutrition). We failed to accept our hypothesis and concluded that overall, school-based interventions have not been effective for improving body mass index or skinfold thickness to curb childhood obesity; however, randomized controlled trials that focused on physical activity or nutrition appeared to produce promising results. PMID:25656407

Hung, Ling-Shen; Tidwell, Diane K; Hall, Michael E; Lee, Michelle L; Briley, Chiquita A; Hunt, Barry P

2015-03-01

66

Childhood Obesity â?? Prevention Begins with Breastfeeding PSA (:60)  

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

This 60 second Public Service Announcement (PSA) is based on the August, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Childhood obesity is an epidemic in the US. Breastfeeding can help prevent obesity, but one in three moms stop without hospital support. About 95% of hospitals lack policies that fully support breastfeeding moms. Hospitals need to do more to help moms start and continue breastfeeding.  Created: 8/2/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/2/2011.

2011-08-02

67

Motivation and health behavior in the prevention of childhood obesity  

OpenAIRE

The objectives of the present thesis were to investigate self-efficacy and motivational interviewing as motivational frameworks for health behavior change in the prevention of childhood obesity, and to explore child health services as a setting for childhood obesity prevention. Specifically, the thesis aimed to (a) develop a measure of parental self-efficacy for promoting healthy physical activity and dietary behaviors in children and assess its psychometric properties, (b) evaluate the effec...

Bohman, Benjamin

2013-01-01

68

Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment Recommendations for Future Research  

OpenAIRE

This report summarizes the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group’s recommendations on future research directions in childhood obesity prevention and treatment. The Working Group consisted of leaders and representatives from public and private academic and medical institutions with expertise in a variety of health specialties. They reviewed the literature and discussed the findings as well as their own experiences in the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. The Wo...

Pratt, Charlotte A.; Stevens, June; Daniels, Stephen

2008-01-01

69

Teachers as Partners in the Prevention of Childhood Obesity  

OpenAIRE

This paper presents a community-school-higher education partnership approach to the prevention of childhood obesity. Public elementary school personnel, primarily teachers, participated in the design and delivery of a curriculum targeting primary caregivers of 8-9-year-old children. Theoretical framework and methodological approaches guided the development of a cognitive behavioral lifestyle intervention targeting childhood obesity prevention in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Island...

Bruss, Mozhdeh B.; Linda Dannison; Morris, Joseph R.; Jackie Quitugua; Palacios, Rosa T.; Judy McGowan; Timothy Michael

2010-01-01

70

Evaluation of soy hulls as a potential ingredient of functional foods for the prevention of obesity.  

Science.gov (United States)

The prevalence of obesity and its associated health problems is rising to epidemic proportions throughout the world. Soy hulls, an industrial waste from oil extraction, contain a high proportion of fiber--soluble and insoluble--and may be a potential ingredient of functional foods for the prevention of obesity. However, crude soybeans, as do all legumes, present challenges to their use because of intensive antitrypsin and antichimotrypsin activity that impairs normal growth in humans and other mammals, requiring inactivation. To evaluate possible antinutritional effects of soybean hulls, diets with 10 percent fiber from soybean hulls or cellulose were offered to weanling IIMb/Beta obese rats during their prepubertal timeframe. The fact that no significant differences were found in growth, blood parameters nor in fat depots' weight and lipid content plus the proven beneficial effects on obese adult rats suggest that soy hulls may be a useful ingredient of functional foods for the prevention and treatment of human obesity. PMID:21883083

Olguin, María Catalina; Posadas, Marta Delia; Revelant, Gilda Celina; Labourdette, Verónica Beatriz; Elías, Héctor Daniel; Venezia, María Rosa

2010-01-01

71

School-based obesity prevention interventions: practicalities and considerations.  

Science.gov (United States)

Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vitally important. Schools have an important role in the prevention of childhood obesity, however, their involvement can be limited by a number of constraints and barriers, which need to be considered when designing interventions. Members of the Prevention Stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network have extensive experience in implementing and evaluating school-based obesity prevention initiatives. Based on their collective experience and evidence from implementation research, the aim of this paper was to highlight six areas to consider when designing, implementing and evaluating obesity prevention initiatives in schools. Further, this paper aimed to provide guidance for overcoming some of the challenges and barriers faced in school-based obesity prevention research. The six key areas discussed include: design and analysis; school-community engagement; planning and recruitment; evaluation; implementation; and feedback and sustainability. PMID:25263839

Jones, R A; Lubans, D R; Morgan, P J; Okely, A D; Parletta, N; Wolfenden, L; de Silva-Sanigorski, A; Gibbs, L; Waters, E

2014-01-01

72

Obesity Prevention: Parenting Styles Make a Difference  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity is epidemic in the United States and other industrialized countries across the globe. This trend is alarming, because childhood obesity is associated with the early onset of serious health problems, including Type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, orthopedic problems, behavioral disorders, and asthma. Mounting evidence also…

Winter, Suzanne M.

2009-01-01

73

Preventing and treating obesity in girls and young women to curb the epidemic.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity and its serious comorbidities, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, have reached epidemic proportions in adults and children. Female obesity is more prevalent and, thus, has greater epidemiological importance: mothers transmit the disease epigenetically and genetically. Maternal obesity affects maternal health, pregnancy outcome, and fetal, neonatal, childhood, and ultimately adult morbidity and mortality. Obesity is easy to diagnose, as are most of its risk factors, yet very little progress has been made in preventing the disease. During a brief period of rapid early growth, there is imprinting of antecedents of adult obesity and obesity-related disease. Because of the rapidity of this early growth and the relative brevity of the critical period, early recognition and prompt intervention are necessary and possibly sufficient to prevent the development of obesity. Identification of inappropriate rapid weight gain through frequent weighing should trigger immediate adjustment of energy intake, a simple intervention in bottle-fed infants, the ones at greatest risk for becoming obese. This review presents a step-care strategy with fail-safe action levels starting with maternal education and diet, exercise, and behavior modification for mother and child and progressing to drug treatment and, in selected cases, laparoscopic surgery for young women of childbearing age in whom other measures have failed. This approach is predicated on the assumption that careful monitoring and responsive supplementation of potential deficiencies is easier to achieve, more cost-effective, and safer than effectively treating manifest obesity and its comorbidities in adults. PMID:15536217

Kral, John G

2004-10-01

74

International school-based interventions for preventing obesity in children.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this article was to review international (excluding the United States) school-based interventions for preventing obesity in children published between 1999 and 2005. A total of 21 such interventions were found from Australia (1), Austria (1), Canada (1), Chile (1), France (1), Germany (3), Greece (1), New Zealand (1), Norway (1), Singapore (1) and the United Kingdom (9). The grade range of these interventions was from pre-school to high school with the majority (17) from elementary schools. Nine of these interventions targeted nutrition behaviours followed by seven aiming to modify both physical activity and nutrition behaviours. Only five interventions in international settings were based on any explicit behavioural theory which is different than the interventions developed in the United States. Majority of the interventions (9) were one academic year long. It can be speculated that if the interventions are behavioural theory-based, then the intervention length can be shortened. All interventions that documented parental involvement successfully influenced obesity indices. Most interventions (16) focused on individual-level behaviour change approaches. Most published interventions (16) used experimental designs with at least 1-year follow-up. Recommendations from international settings for enhancing the effectiveness of school-based childhood obesity interventions are presented. PMID:17300280

Sharma, M

2007-03-01

75

Combinations of obesity prevention strategies in US elementary schools: a critical review.  

Science.gov (United States)

The prevalence of obesity among children has roughly tripled in the past 30 years. Given the numerous health risks associated with obesity, elementary schools have implemented a variety of prevention programs targeting this problem. This review examines recent studies of combinations of obesity prevention programs in US elementary schools and offers recommendations about effective strategies. We found 12 studies that met selection criteria and reviewed their findings related to obesity-related outcomes. Among the single intervention strategies, neither physical activity nor education alone demonstrated efficacy in reducing objective measures of obesity. Most studies of programs with two or three components (i.e., physical activity plus nutrition, physical activity plus both education and nutrition) reported statistically significant improvements in objective obesity-related outcomes. Studies evaluating programs with community and parental involvement suggest that these components may increase effectiveness. However, studies assessing outcomes following the cessation of the program showed a reversal of positive effects, suggesting that long-term implementation of programs is important for sustained gains. Results suggest that combinations of obesity prevention programs sustained over time are most likely to be effective. PMID:25288474

Shirley, Kaleena; Rutfield, Rachel; Hall, Nathanael; Fedor, Nicholas; McCaughey, Virginia K; Zajac, Kristyn

2015-02-01

76

Obesity Revised. Chapter at "Periodontal Disease: Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention"  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Abstract: Obesity, diabetes and oral diseases (dental cariesand periodontal diseases), largely preventable chronic diseases, are described as global pandemic due their distribution and severe consequences. WHO has called for a global action for prevention and promotion of these diseases as a vital investment in urgent need. Diabetes and obesity, showing an increasing trend, lead to disabilities and negatively impacts on the quality of life through life course along with oral diseases. WHO projects that the prevalence of diabetes and deaths/year attrituble to diabetes complications will double worldwide by 2030. Globally, more than 1 billion adults are overweight; almost 300 million of them are clinically obese. Being obese/overweight raises steeply the likelihood of developing DM2. Approximately 85% of people with diabetes are DM2, and of these 90% are obese or overweight. Obesity increases the likelihood of periodontitis which is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide, described as pandemic, and closely related to DM2. Promoting good oral health is significantly essential for prevention and reducing the negative consequences of periodontal diseases, DM2 and obesity, and to maintain good health, as proposed by European health goals by WHO.

Cinar, Ayse Basak

2011-01-01

77

CEREALS AS BASIS OF PREVENTING NUTRITION AGAINST OBESITY  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Still more alarming obesity studies show in fact that it is largely due to incorrect diet and lifestyle. For suitable alternative for prevention of this disease are now considered cereal foods, mainly based on increased fiber content. The importance of dietary fiber for human organism consist primarily in its protective function before civilization diseases. It has beneficial effects on digestive physiology and it is therefore an important factor in the prevention of obesity, but also other diseases. Fiber consumption in developed countries is low and it is below the lower limit of the recommended dose. Slovaks per day take only 10-12 g of fiber, which represents only 47% of the recommended dose. Recent large-scale epidemiological studies have shown that regular consumption of wholegrain cereals can reduce the risk of heart disease and certain cancers by 30 percent. One of the factors that increase the functionality of foods is the so-called indigestible resistant starch. For its the positive impact on the physiology of digestion is referred to as prebiotics new generation of dietary fiber. The increasing availability of tasty, whole grain products rich in fiber could be health benefits. doi:10.5219/76

Ernest Šturdík

2010-11-01

78

Behavioral counseling to prevent childhood obesity – study protocol of a pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Prevention is considered effective in combating the obesity epidemic. Prenatal environment may increase offspring's risk for obesity. A child starts to adopt food preferences and other behavioral habits affecting weight gain during preschool years. We report the study protocol of a pragmatic lifestyle intervention aiming at primary prevention of childhood obesity. Methods/Design A non-randomized controlled pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care clinics. The con...

Mustila Taina; Keskinen Päivi; Luoto Riitta

2012-01-01

79

The Pacific Obesity Prevention in Communities project : project overview and methods  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Obesity is increasing worldwide with the Pacific region having the highest prevalence among adults. The most common precursor of adult obesity is adolescent obesity making this a critical period for prevention. The Pacific Obesity Prevention in Communities project was a four-country project (Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand and Australia) designed to prevent adolescent obesity. This paper overviews the project and the methods common to the four countries. Each country implemented a community-based intervention programme promoting healthy eating, physical activity and healthy weight in adolescents. A community capacity-building approach was used, with common processes employed but with contextualized interventions within each country. Changes in anthropometric, behavioural and perception outcomes were evaluated at the individual level and school environments and community capacity at the settings level. The evaluation tools common to each are described. Additional analytical studies included economic, socio-cultural and policy studies. The project pioneered many areas of obesity prevention research: using multi-country collaboration to build research capacity; testing a capacity-building approach in ethnic groups with very high obesity prevalence; costing complex, long-term community intervention programmes; systematically studying the powerful socio-cultural influences on weight gain; and undertaking a participatory, national, priority-setting process for policy interventions using simulation modelling of cost-effectiveness of interventions.

Swinburn, B A; Millar, L

2011-01-01

80

School-Based Obesity Prevention: Research, Challenges, and Recommendations  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood overweight is one of the most serious problems currently affecting individual and public health. Schools represent a logical site for prevention because children spend 6-8 hours a day there during most of the year. Although reports of school-based overweight or obesity prevention programs exist, there are no summaries specifying which…

Budd, Geraldine M.; Volpe, Stella L.

2006-01-01

81

Obesity Prevention in Early Adolescence: Student, Parent, and Teacher Views  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Obesity is a significant health problem among today's youth; however, most school-based prevention programs in this area have had limited success. Focus groups were conducted with seventh- to eighth-grade students, parents, and teachers to provide insight into the development of a comprehensive program for the prevention of adolescent…

Power, Thomas G.; Bindler, Ruth C.; Goetz, Summer; Daratha, Kenneth B.

2010-01-01

82

School Nurses' Experiences With Motivational Interviewing for Preventing Childhood Obesity  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Motivational interviewing is a counseling method used to bring about behavior change; its application by school nurses for preventing obesity in children is still new. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses, shows how school nurses adapted motivational interviewing and integrated it into their daily practice along with other methods they knew from the past. Three dilemmas for school nurses were revealed: when the child was severely overweight and the parents did not perceive this as a problem, when the child and the parents were at different stages of motivation to change, and when applying an individualized approach such as motivational interviewing for preventing a complex societal problem, in this instance obesity. The study raises an important issue to consider, with implications for school nursing and obesity prevention: motivational interviewing as either a counseling method or a prevention strategy.

Bonde, Ane HØstgaard; Bentsen, Peter

2014-01-01

83

A framework for evaluating the impact of obesity prevention strategies on socioeconomic inequalities in weight.  

Science.gov (United States)

We developed a theoretical framework to organize obesity prevention interventions by their likely impact on the socioeconomic gradient of weight. The degree to which an intervention involves individual agency versus structural change influences socioeconomic inequalities in weight. Agentic interventions, such as standalone social marketing, increase socioeconomic inequalities. Structural interventions, such as food procurement policies and restrictions on unhealthy foods in schools, show equal or greater benefit for lower socioeconomic groups. Many obesity prevention interventions belong to the agento-structural types of interventions, and account for the environment in which health behaviors occur, but they require a level of individual agency for behavioral change, including workplace design to encourage exercise and fiscal regulation of unhealthy foods or beverages. Obesity prevention interventions differ in their effectiveness across socioeconomic groups. Limiting further increases in socioeconomic inequalities in obesity requires implementation of structural interventions. Further empirical evaluation, especially of agento-structural type interventions, remains crucial. PMID:25121810

Backholer, Kathryn; Beauchamp, Alison; Ball, Kylie; Turrell, Gavin; Martin, Jane; Woods, Julie; Peeters, Anna

2014-10-01

84

Childhood obesity prevention: a life-course framework  

OpenAIRE

Overweight/obese women are more likely to deliver newborns that also have a predisposition to store excessive amounts of fat since the early infancy period. Two evidence-based cycles are considered on the explanation of the maternal–child life-course approach for obesity prevention. The ‘maternal' cycle indicates that pre-pregnancy overweight primiparous women are more likely to gain excessive weight during gestation and to retain excessive weight postpartum. The ‘offspring' cycle indic...

Pe?rez-escamilla, R.; Kac, G.

2013-01-01

85

Effects of obesity on bone metabolism  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is traditionally viewed to be beneficial to bone health because of well-established positive effect of mechanical loading conferred by body weight on bone formation, despite being a risk factor for many other chronic health disorders. Although body mass has a positive effect on bone formation, whether the mass derived from an obesity condition or excessive fat accumulation is beneficial to bone remains controversial. The underline pathophysiological relationship between obesity and bone is complex and continues to be an active research area. Recent data from epidemiological and animal studies strongly support that fat accumulation is detrimental to bone mass. To our knowledge, obesity possibly affects bone metabolism through several mechanisms. Because both adipocytes and osteoblasts are derived from a common multipotential mesenchymal stem cell, obesity may increase adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation while decrease osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation. The increased circulating and tissue proinflammatory cytokines in obesity may promote osteoclast activity and bone resorption through modifying the receptor activator of NF-?B (RANK/RANK ligand/osteoprotegerin pathway. Furthermore, the excessive secretion of leptin and/or decreased production of adiponectin by adipocytes in obesity may either directly affect bone formation or indirectly affect bone resorption through up-regulated proinflammatory cytokine production. Finally, high-fat intake may interfere with intestinal calcium absorption and therefore decrease calcium availability for bone formation. Unraveling the relationship between fat and bone metabolism at molecular level may help us to develop therapeutic agents to prevent or treat both obesity and osteoporosis. Obesity, defined as having a body mass index ? 30 kg/m2, is a condition in which excessive body fat accumulates to a degree that adversely affects health 1. The rates of obesity rates have doubled since 1980 2 and as of 2007, 33% of men and 35% of women in the US are obese 3. Obesity is positively associated to many chronic disorders such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, and certain cancers 456. It is estimated that the direct medical cost associated with obesity in the United States is ~$100 billion per year 7. Bone mass and strength decrease during adulthood, especially in women after menopause 8. These changes can culminate in osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration resulting in increased bone fracture risk. It is estimated that there are about 10 million Americans over the age of 50 who have osteoporosis while another 34 million people are at risk of developing the disease 9. In 2001, osteoporosis alone accounted for some $17 billion in direct annual healthcare expenditure. Several lines of evidence suggest that obesity and bone metabolism are interrelated. First, both osteoblasts (bone forming cells and adipocytes (energy storing cells are derived from a common mesenchymal stem cell 10 and agents inhibiting adipogenesis stimulated osteoblast differentiation 111213 and vice versa, those inhibiting osteoblastogenesis increased adipogenesis 14. Second, decreased bone marrow osteoblastogenesis with aging is usually accompanied with increased marrow adipogenesis 1516. Third, chronic use of steroid hormone, such as glucocorticoid, results in obesity accompanied by rapid bone loss 1718. Fourth, both obesity and osteoporosis are associated with elevated oxidative stress and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines 1920. At present, the mechanisms for the effects of obesity on bone metabolism are not well defined and will be the focus of this review.

Cao Jay J

2011-06-01

86

Prevention of child obesity as a measure of preventing malignant diseases  

OpenAIRE

Numerous investigations documented that there is a significant correlation between obesity and the onset of malignant neoplasms. It has been known for decades that Vojvodina is an area characterized by frequent occurrence of obesity with adult population, which starts much earlier in childhood. Good knowledge of incidence in child obesity is a first step in the prevention of malignant diseases. The study encompassed the anthropometric measurements (body height and body weight) of 3298 boys an...

Mirilov Jelena M.; Bjelica Artur L.

2004-01-01

87

Knowledge exchange in the Pacific: The TROPIC (Translational Research into Obesity Prevention Policies for Communities) project  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Policies targeting obesogenic environments and behaviours are critical to counter rising obesity rates and lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Policies are likely to be most effective and enduring when they are based on the best available evidence. Evidence-informed policy making is especially challenging in countries with limited resources. The Pacific TROPIC (Translational Research for Obesity Prevention in Communities) project aims to implement and evalu...

Mavoa Helen; Waqa Gade; Moodie Marj; Kremer Peter; McCabe Marita; Snowdon Wendy; Swinburn Boyd

2012-01-01

88

Steps in the design, development and formative evaluation of obesity prevention-related behavior change trials  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Obesity prevention interventions through dietary and physical activity change have generally not been effective. Limitations on possible program effectiveness are herein identified at every step in the mediating variable model, a generic conceptual framework for understanding how interventions may promote behavior change. To minimize these problems, and thereby enhance likely intervention effectiveness, four sequential types of formative studies are proposed: targeted behavior valida...

Baranowski Janice; Cerin Ester; Baranowski Tom

2009-01-01

89

Enhancing self-regulation as a strategy for obesity prevention in Head Start preschoolers: the growing healthy study  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Nearly one in five 4-year-old children in the United States are obese, with low-income children almost twice as likely to be obese as their middle/upper-income peers. Few obesity prevention programs for low-income preschoolers and their parents have been rigorously tested, and effects are modest. We are testing a novel obesity prevention program for low-income preschoolers built on the premise that children who are better able to self-regulate in the face of psychosocial s...

Miller Alison L; Horodynski Mildred A; Herb Holly E; Peterson Karen E.; Contreras Dawn; Kaciroti Niko; Staples-Watson Julie; Lumeng Julie C

2012-01-01

90

Teachers as Partners in the Prevention of Childhood Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents a community-school-higher education partnership approach to the prevention of childhood obesity. Public elementary school personnel, primarily teachers, participated in the design and delivery of a curriculum targeting primary caregivers of 8-9-year-old children. Theoretical framework and methodological approaches guided the…

Bruss, Mozhdeh B.; Dannison, Linda; Morris, Joseph R.; Quitugua, Jackie; Palacios, Rosa T.; McGowan, Judy; Michael, Timothy

2010-01-01

91

The Role of Parents in Preventing Childhood Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

As researchers continue to analyze the role of parenting both in the development of childhood overweight and in obesity prevention, studies of child nutrition and growth are detailing the ways in which parents affect their children's development of food- and activity-related behaviors. Ana Lindsay, Katarina Sussner, Juhee Kim, and Steven Gortmaker…

Lindsay, Ana C.; Sussner, Katarina M.; Kim, Juhee; Gortmaker, Steven

2006-01-01

92

[Strategies for obesity prevention in children and adolescents].  

Science.gov (United States)

Few studies on treatment or prevention of obesity have shown significant results. Theoretically, in children and adolescents as compared to adults, prevention of excessive weight gain should be easy due to the energy expended during growth, associated with more time spent in leisure-time activities. However, numerous factors that stimulate overeating and sedentary behaviors are difficult to overcome. Additionally, most intervention studies have focused on a minor portion of the many factors associated with obesity. Important aspects of the obesity epidemic such as the role of the food industry, fast food chains, advertising, and a lifestyle that limits children to sedentary activities and overeating cannot be explored by a traditional clinical trial design. At any rate, among the published interventions, those including the family in weight-reduction strategies have shown the best results, as compared to children-centered approaches. Meanwhile, studies on specific nutrient or dietary composition (such as calcium, protein, or glycemic index) related to prevention or treatment of obesity have failed to yield good results. Reducing the intake of high-sugar carbonated drinks and juices has shown promising but still inconclusive results. PMID:18670698

Sichieri, Rosely; Souza, Rita Adriana de

2008-01-01

93

EPODE approach for childhood obesity prevention: methods, progress and international development.  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity is a complex issue and needs multi-stakeholder involvement at all levels to foster healthier lifestyles in a sustainable way. 'Ensemble Prévenons l'Obésité Des Enfants' (EPODE, Together Let's Prevent Childhood Obesity) is a large-scale, coordinated, capacity-building approach for communities to implement effective and sustainable strategies to prevent childhood obesity. This paper describes EPODE methodology and its objective of preventing childhood obesity. At a central level, a coordination team, using social marketing and organizational techniques, trains and coaches a local project manager nominated in each EPODE community by the local authorities. The local project manager is also provided with tools to mobilize local stakeholders through a local steering committee and local networks. The added value of the methodology is to mobilize stakeholders at all levels across the public and the private sectors. Its critical components include political commitment, sustainable resources, support services and a strong scientific input--drawing on the evidence-base--together with evaluation of the programme. Since 2004, EPODE methodology has been implemented in more than 500 communities in six countries. Community-based interventions are integral to childhood obesity prevention. EPODE provides a valuable model to address this challenge. PMID:22106871

Borys, J-M; Le Bodo, Y; Jebb, S A; Seidell, J C; Summerbell, C; Richard, D; De Henauw, S; Moreno, L A; Romon, M; Visscher, T L S; Raffin, S; Swinburn, B

2012-04-01

94

Recruitment into diabetes prevention programs: what is the impact of errors in self-reported measures of obesity?  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Error in self-reported measures of obesity has been frequently described, but the effect of self-reported error on recruitment into diabetes prevention programs is not well established. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of using self-reported obesity data from the Finnish diabetes risk score (FINDRISC) on recruitment into the Greater Green Triangle Diabetes Prevention Project (GGT DPP). Methods The GGT DPP was a structured group-based lifestyle modification p...

Hernan Andrea; Philpot Benjamin; Janus Edward D; Dunbar James A

2012-01-01

95

Prevention of childhood obesity in Spain: a focus on policies outside the health sector. SESPAS report 2010.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity is currently a global public health problem. Obesity in early life increases the risk of long-term energy imbalance and adult obesity and its comorbidities, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Since infancy and childhood are critical periods for the adoption of food preferences and physical activity, prevention strategies must intervene in these early periods to promote healthy habits and reduce risk behaviors. Trends in the prevalence of childhood obesity and overweight in Spain have continuously increased in the last three decades. Obesity and overweight currently affect 15 and 20% of Spanish children, respectively, and these percentages are among the highest in Europe. Childhood obesity is determined by social and economic factors pertaining to sectors other than the health system, such as advertising, the built environment, education and the school environment, transportation and the food environment. Following the Health in All Policies (HiAP) approach, the authors identified a series of multisector policy changes that may help to prevent and control the current rising trend of childhood obesity in Spain. The HiAP approach acknowledges that social factors including socioeconomic status, gender differences and the work-life balance are important to develop effective policy changes in the prevention of childhood obesity. A key to success in the prevention of childhood obesity in Spain through policy changes will depend on the ability to establish a policy with the explicit and primary goal of improving health outcomes, despite the anticipated resistance from various sectors and stakeholders. PMID:21074906

Franco, Manuel; Sanz, Belén; Otero, Laura; Domínguez-Vila, Adrián; Caballero, Benjamín

2010-12-01

96

Outcomes of a pilot obesity prevention plus intervention targeting children and parenting practices  

Science.gov (United States)

Prevention-Plus interventions for primary care offer a venue to intervene with both children and parents for child obesity treatment. Such interventions can promote effective parenting practices that encourage healthy eating, physical activity (PA), and lower TV use among children. Test for feasibil...

97

Prevention of child obesity as a measure of preventing malignant diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Numerous investigations documented that there is a significant correlation between obesity and the onset of malignant neoplasms. It has been known for decades that Vojvodina is an area characterized by frequent occurrence of obesity with adult population, which starts much earlier in childhood. Good knowledge of incidence in child obesity is a first step in the prevention of malignant diseases. The study encompassed the anthropometric measurements (body height and body weight of 3298 boys and 3146 girls aged from 6 to 15 years, from 10 primary schools of the wider area of the city of Novi Sad. The measurement data served as the basis to calculate the body mass index (BMI. On the basis of BMI the incidence of the overall obesity (³P85 among the examined boys on the territory of Novi Sad community was found to be 16.59%. Overweight (P85 - P95 was observed in 10.28%, and obesity (³P95 in 6.31% boys. The analysis of the nutrition status among the examined schoolgirls on the territory of Novi Sad community, on the basis of BMI, showed that overall obesity (³P85 was present in 14.69% of schoolgirls; overweight (P85 - P95 was found in 9.38%, and obesity (³P95 in 5.31% of the examined schoolgirls. The high percentage of obese schoolchildren cannot be considered as desirable, especially if it is taken into account that there has been a significant increase compared with the previous examination.

Mirilov Jelena M.

2004-01-01

98

Selection of priority groups for obesity prevention: current approaches and development of an evidence-informed framework.  

OpenAIRE

Resources for obesity prevention interventions are inevitably limited, necessitating the selection of priority groups to ensure effective and equitable use of funds. This paper aims to review published approaches to selection of priority groups ('target populations') for obesity prevention, and to present the development of a new systematic framework for organizing and assessing evidence for selecting priority groups. A review was conducted of the process and justification described for selec...

Nichols, Ms; Swinburn, Ba

2010-01-01

99

Changing the endpoints for determining effective obesity management.  

Science.gov (United States)

Health authorities worldwide recommend weight loss as a primary endpoint for effective obesity management. Despite a growing public awareness of the importance of weight loss and the spending of billions of dollars by Americans in attempts to lose weight, obesity prevalence continues to rise. In this report we argue that effective obesity management in today's environment will require a shift in focus from weight loss as the primary endpoint, to improvements in the causal behaviors; diet and exercise/physical activity (PA). We reason that increases in PA combined with a balanced diet are associated with improvement in many of the intermediate risk factors including cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) associated with obesity despite minimal or no weight loss. Consistent with this notion, we suggest that a focus on healthy behaviors for the prevention of additional weight gain may be an effective way of managing obesity in the short term. PMID:25459976

Ross, Robert; Blair, Steve; de Lannoy, Louise; Després, Jean-Pierre; Lavie, Carl J

2015-01-01

100

Design and methods for evaluating an early childhood obesity prevention program in the childcare center setting  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Many unhealthy dietary and physical activity habits that foster the development of obesity are established by the age of five. Presently, approximately 70 percent of children in the United States are currently enrolled in early childcare facilities, making this an ideal setting to implement and evaluate childhood obesity prevention efforts. We describe here the methods for conducting an obesity prevention randomized trial in the child care setting. Methods/design A randomized, controlled obesity prevention trial is currently being conducted over a three year period (2010-present. The sample consists of 28 low-income, ethnically diverse child care centers with 1105 children (sample is 60% Hispanic, 15% Haitian, 12% Black, 2% non-Hispanic White and 71% of caregivers were born outside of the US. The purpose is to test the efficacy of a parent and teacher role-modeling intervention on children’s nutrition and physical activity behaviors. . The Healthy Caregivers-Healthy Children (HC2 intervention arm schools received a combination of (1 implementing a daily curricula for teachers/parents (the nutritional gatekeepers; (2 implementing a daily curricula for children; (3 technical assistance with meal and snack menu modifications such as including more fresh and less canned produce; and (4 creation of a center policy for dietary requirements for meals and snacks, physical activity and screen time. Control arm schools received an attention control safety curriculum. Major outcome measures include pre-post changes in child body mass index percentile and z score, fruit and vegetable and other nutritious food intake, amount of physical activity, and parental nutrition and physical activity knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs, defined by intentions and behaviors. All measures were administered at the beginning and end of the school year for year one and year two of the study for a total of 4 longitudinal time points for assessment. Discussion Although few attempts have been made to prevent obesity during the first years of life, this period may represent the best opportunity for obesity prevention. Findings from this investigation will inform both the fields of childhood obesity prevention and early childhood research about the effects of an obesity prevention program housed in the childcare setting. Trial registration Trial registration number: NCT01722032

Natale Ruby

2013-01-01

101

Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses  

Science.gov (United States)

Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

2011-01-01

102

Evidence-Based Obesity Prevention in Childhood and Adolescence: Critique of Recent Etiological Studies, Preventive Interventions, and Policies123  

OpenAIRE

Prevention of obesity in childhood and adolescence remains a worthwhile and realistic goal, but preventive efforts have been beset by a number of problems, which are the subject of this review. The review draws on recent systematic reviews and evidence appraisals and has a United Kingdom (UK) perspective because there is a rich evidence base in the United Kingdom that may be helpful to obesity prevention researchers elsewhere. Recent evidence of a leveling off in child and adolescent obesity ...

Reilly, John J.

2012-01-01

103

Enhancing self-regulation as a strategy for obesity prevention in Head Start preschoolers: the growing healthy study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Nearly one in five 4-year-old children in the United States are obese, with low-income children almost twice as likely to be obese as their middle/upper-income peers. Few obesity prevention programs for low-income preschoolers and their parents have been rigorously tested, and effects are modest. We are testing a novel obesity prevention program for low-income preschoolers built on the premise that children who are better able to self-regulate in the face of psychosocial stressors may be less likely to eat impulsively in response to stress. Enhancing behavioral self-regulation skills in low-income children may be a unique and important intervention approach to prevent childhood obesity. Methods/design The Growing Healthy study is a randomized controlled trial evaluating two obesity prevention interventions in 600 low-income preschoolers attending Head Start, a federally-funded preschool program for low-income children. Interventions are delivered by community-based, nutrition-education staff partnering with Head Start. The first intervention (n?=?200, Preschool Obesity Prevention Series (POPS, addresses evidence-based obesity prevention behaviors for preschool-aged children and their parents. The second intervention (n?=?200 comprises POPS in combination with the Incredible Years Series (IYS, an evidence-based approach to improving self-regulation among preschool-aged children. The comparison condition (n?=?200 is Usual Head Start Exposure. We hypothesize that POPS will yield positive effects compared to Usual Head Start, and that the combined intervention (POPS?+?IYS addressing behaviors well-known to be associated with obesity risk, as well as self-regulatory capacity, will be most effective in preventing excessive increases in child adiposity indices (body mass index, skinfold thickness. We will evaluate additional child outcomes using parent and teacher reports and direct assessments of food-related self-regulation. We will also gather process data on intervention implementation, including fidelity, attendance, engagement, and satisfaction. Discussion The Growing Healthy study will shed light on associations between self-regulation skills and obesity risk in low-income preschoolers. If the project is effective in preventing obesity, results can also provide critical insights into how best to deliver obesity prevention programming to parents and children in a community-based setting like Head Start in order to promote better health among at-risk children. Trial registration number Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01398358

Miller Alison L

2012-11-01

104

Conversations About the Weight of America’s Children: Barriers Which Prevent Healthcare Providers from Discussing Childhood Obesity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify the barriers that prevent practitioners from identifying and counseling parents and caregivers of overweight or obese children. Once identified, barriers were organized into thematic categories (parental, provider, and professional barriers and recommendations were generated to facilitate discussion about childhood obesity between professionals and parents. Childhood obesity is a significant public health problem. Healthcare providers must be able to effectively communicate with caregivers and put childhood obesity at the front of healthcare discussions. This article provides a synthesis of the relevant literature and makes recommendations for healthcare providers to overcome the barriers allowing healthier outcomes for children.

Catherine Blow

2013-10-01

105

Where Is Obesity Prevention on the Map? Distribution and Predictors of Local Health Department Prevention Activities in Relation to County-Level Obesity Prevalence in the US  

Science.gov (United States)

Context The system of local health departments (LHD) in the US has potential to advance a locally-oriented public health response in obesity control and reduce geographic disparities. However, the extent to which obesity prevention programs correspond to local obesity levels is unknown. Objective This study examines the extent to which LHDs across the US have responded to local levels of obesity by examining the association between jurisdiction level obesity prevalence and the existence of obesity prevention programs. Design Data on LHD organizational characteristics from the Profile Study of Local Health Departments and county-level estimates of obesity from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed (n=2,300). Since local public health systems are nested within state infrastructure, multilevel models were used to examine the relationship between county-level obesity prevalence and LHD obesity prevention programming and to assess the impact of state-level clustering. Setting 2,300 local health department jurisdictions defined with respect to county boundaries Participants Practitioners in local health departments who responded to the 2005 Profile Study of Local Health Departments. Main Outcome Measures Likelihood of having obesity prevention activities and association with area-level obesity prevalence Results The existence of obesity prevention activities was not associated with prevalence of obesity in the jurisdiction. A substantial portion of the variance in LHD activities was explained by state-level clustering. Conclusions This paper identified a gap in the local public health response to the obesity epidemic and underscores the importance of multilevel modeling in examining predictors of LHD performance. PMID:22836530

Stamatakis, Katherine A.; Leatherdale, Scott T.; Marx, Christine; Yan, Yan; Colditz, Graham A.; Brownson, Ross C.

2013-01-01

106

Community-based efforts to prevent obesity: Australia-wide survey of projects.  

OpenAIRE

ISSUES ADDRESSED: Community-based programs that affect healthy environments and policies have emerged as an effective response to high obesity levels in populations. Apart from limited individual reports, little is currently known about these programs, limiting the potential to provide effective support, to promote effective practice, prevent adverse outcomes and disseminate intervention results and experience. The aim of the present study was to identify the size and reach of current communi...

Nichols, Ms; Reynolds, Rc; Waters, E.; Gill, T.; King, L.; Swinburn, Ba; Allender, S.

2013-01-01

107

Obesidad: Tratamiento no farmacológico y prevención / Obesity: treatment and prevention  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish La obesidad es un importante problema de salud en nuestros días, por el riesgo aumentado de morbilidad y mortalidad, sobre todo por las enfermedades cardiovasculares que provoca. El objetivo de este trabajo fue actualizar los conocimientos acerca del tratamiento no farmacológico y la prevención de l [...] a enfermedad. Se expuso que en el 95 % de los casos la obesidad es de origen exógeno o nutricional, y en el 5 %, de causa genética o endocrina. En relación con los factores genéticos, las investigaciones plantean las diferentes mutaciones que se acompañan de fenotipos obesos. Se señalaron los diferentes métodos empleados para el diagnóstico de la obesidad, antropométricamente. Se afirmó que en la actualidad es muy utilizado el IMC y la relación cintura/cadera. Se concluyó que el tratamiento de la obesidad supone modificaciones dietéticas, actividad física e intervención conductual y/o psicológica y que la prevención sigue siendo la acción fundamental para evitar su aparición por lo que los esfuerzos de todos los médicos se deben dirigir hacia este problema de salud. Abstract in english Obesity is an important health problem at present due to the increased risk of morbidity and mortality and, mainly, to the cardiovascular diseases resulting from it. The objective of this paper was to bring up to date the knowledge about the nonpharmacological treatment and the prevention of the dis [...] ease. It was explained that in 95 % of the cases, obesity has an exogenous or nutritional origin, whereas in the other 5 % its cause is genetic or endocrine. In relation to the genetic factors, the investigations state the different mutations that are accompanied by obese phenotypes.The different anthropometric methods used to diagnose obesity were described. It was confirmed that nowadays the BMI and the waist/hip relationship are widely used. It was concluded that the obesity treatment pressuposes diet modifications, physical activity and behavioral and/or psychological intervention and that prevention is still the fundamental action to prevent the appearance of obesity. Therefore, all doctors should direct their efforts to this health problem.

María Matilde, Socarrás Suárez; Míriam, Bolet Astoviza; Manuel E., Licea Puig.

2002-04-01

108

Prevention of overweight and obesity in preschool children: an updated review  

OpenAIRE

An increasing number of children are becoming overweight and obese. Overweight and obesity are arbitrarily defined as excess adipose tissue in the body. Although many risk factors for overweight and obesity have been identified for school-age children, less is known for preschool children. Prevention of overweight and obesity in preschool children is an international public health priority given the significant impact of obesity on acute and chronic diseases, general health, development and w...

Konda, Satyanarayana G.; Giri, Purushottam A.; Otiv, Anjali S.

2014-01-01

109

Efectividad de una intervención en educación alimentaria y actividad física para prevenir obesidad en escolares de la ciudad de Casablanca, Chile (2003-2004 Effectiveness of a dietary and physical activity intervention to prevent obesity in school age children  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: With the aim of contributing to he Healthy Goal 2010 of reducing significantly the prevalence of childhood obestiy we developed and implemented during 2003 and 2004, a school-based obesity prevention intervention which included nutrition education and the promotion of physical activity. Aim To report the results of the intervention. Material and methods: The sample included 1760 children (1st to 7th grade from 3 elementary public schools in Casablanca (experimental group and 671 from a similar school located in Quillota, a neighboring city (control. Primary outcomes were body mass index (BMI Zscore, the mile and shuttle-run tests and obesity prevalence. We also compared changes in waist circumference and triceps skinfold between both groups. Effectiveness of the intervention was assessed by analyzing separately the group *age* time interaction for the first 3 outcomes (follow-up-baseline, using a mixed model of covariance and by comparing variations in obesity prevalence between both groups. Results: There was a significant decline in BMI Z scores in experimental schools for both genders, but greater in boys (p <0.001 versus p =0.0034 in girls, while in controls, BMI Z scores increased. Obesity prevalence declined significantly in experimental schools; from 17 to 12.3% and from 14.1 to 10.3% in boys and girls respectively, while in the control group, it remained unchanged. Also, triceps skinfold in girls from Casablanca increased significantly ¡ess than that of control girls. Conclusion: This intervention proved that it is possible to reduce significantly the prevalence of obesity in Chilean schoolchildren attending public elementary schools (Rev Méd Chile 2008, 136:22-30

Juliana Kain B

2008-01-01

110

A Systematic Review of Health Videogames on Childhood Obesity Prevention and Intervention.  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity is a global epidemic. Health videogames are an emerging intervention strategy to combat childhood obesity. This systematic review examined published research on the effect of health videogames on childhood obesity. Fourteen articles examining 28 health videogames published between 2005 and 2013 in English were selected from 2433 articles identified through five major search engines. Results indicated that academic interest in using health videogames for childhood obesity prevention has increased during this time. Most games were commercially available. Most studies were of short duration. Diverse player and game play patterns have been identified. Most studies involved players of both genders with slightly more boys. The majority of players were non-white. Most studies had the players play the games at home, whereas some extended the play setting to school and sports/recreational facilities. Most of the games were commercially available. Positive outcomes related to obesity were observed in about 40 percent of the studies, all of which targeted overweight or obese participants. PMID:24353906

Lu, Amy Shirong; Kharrazi, Hadi; Gharghabi, Fardad; Thompson, Debbe

2013-06-01

111

Childhood obesity in developing countries: epidemiology, determinants, and prevention.  

Science.gov (United States)

Rapidly changing dietary practices and a sedentary lifestyle have led to increasing prevalence of childhood obesity (5-19 yr) in developing countries recently: 41.8% in Mexico, 22.1% in Brazil, 22.0% in India, and 19.3% in Argentina. Moreover, secular trends indicate increasing prevalence rates in these countries: 4.1 to 13.9% in Brazil during 1974-1997, 12.2 to 15.6% in Thailand during 1991-1993, and 9.8 to 11.7% in India during 2006-2009. Important determinants of childhood obesity include high socioeconomic status, residence in metropolitan cities, female gender, unawareness and false beliefs about nutrition, marketing by transnational food companies, increasing academic stress, and poor facilities for physical activity. Childhood obesity has been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, the early-onset metabolic syndrome, subclinical inflammation, dyslipidemia, coronary artery diseases, and adulthood obesity. Therapeutic lifestyle changes and maintenance of regular physical activity through parental initiative and social support interventions are the most important strategies in managing childhood obesity. Also, high-risk screening and effective health educational programs are urgently needed in developing countries. PMID:22240243

Gupta, Nidhi; Goel, Kashish; Shah, Priyali; Misra, Anoop

2012-02-01

112

HOP'N after-school project: an obesity prevention randomized controlled trial  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background This paper reports the primary outcomes of the Healthy Opportunities for Physical Activity and Nutrition (HOP'N) after-school project, which was an effectiveness trial designed to evaluate the prevention of childhood obesity through building the capacity of after-school staff to increase physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable (FV) opportunities. Methods We conducted a three-year, nested cross-sectional group randomized controlled effectiveness trial. After a baseli...

Coleman Karen J; Geller Karly S; Rosenkranz Richard R; Dzewaltowski David A; Welk Gregory J; Hastmann Tanis J; Milliken George A

2010-01-01

113

What serious video games can offer child obesity prevention  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity is a worldwide issue, and effective methods encouraging children to adopt healthy diet and physical activity behaviors are needed. This viewpoint addresses the promise of serious video games, and why they may offer one method for helping children eat healthier and become more physi...

114

Evaluation of a multiple ecological level child obesity prevention program: Switch® what you Do, View, and Chew  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Schools are the most frequent target for intervention programs aimed at preventing child obesity; however, the overall effectiveness of these programs has been limited. It has therefore been recommended that interventions target multiple ecological levels (community, family, school and individual) to have greater success in changing risk behaviors for obesity. This study examined the immediate and short-term, sustained effects of the Switch program, which targeted three be...

Callahan Randi; Russell Daniel W; Walsh David A; Reimer Rachel A; Eisenmann Joey C; Welk Greg; Gentile Douglas A; Walsh Monica; Strickland Sarah; Fritz Katie

2009-01-01

115

Efectividad de una intervención en educación alimentaria y actividad física para prevenir obesidad en escolares de la ciudad de Casablanca, Chile (2003-2004) / Effectiveness of a dietary and physical activity intervention to prevent obesity in school age children  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish [...] Abstract in english Background: With the aim of contributing to he Healthy Goal 2010 of reducing significantly the prevalence of childhood obestiy we developed and implemented during 2003 and 2004, a school-based obesity prevention intervention which included nutrition education and the promotion of physical activity. [...] Aim To report the results of the intervention. Material and methods: The sample included 1760 children (1st to 7th grade) from 3 elementary public schools in Casablanca (experimental group) and 671 from a similar school located in Quillota, a neighboring city (control). Primary outcomes were body mass index (BMI) Zscore, the mile and shuttle-run tests and obesity prevalence. We also compared changes in waist circumference and triceps skinfold between both groups. Effectiveness of the intervention was assessed by analyzing separately the group *age* time interaction for the first 3 outcomes (follow-up-baseline), using a mixed model of covariance and by comparing variations in obesity prevalence between both groups. Results: There was a significant decline in BMI Z scores in experimental schools for both genders, but greater in boys (p

Juliana, Kain B; Ricardo, Uauy D; Bárbara, Leyton D; Ricardo, Cerda R; Sonia, Olivares C; Fernando, Vio D.

2008-01-01

116

Advocating for the Prevention of Childhood Obesity: A Call to Action for Nursing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this article the authors provide a background for the discussion of childhood obesity, examine factors contributing to overweight and obesity in children, review the literature describing interventions and prevention strategies for childhood overweight, and describe nursing skills to prevent childhood obesity. The literature supports a family-focused approach to influencing dietary habits of very young children, prevention interventions that start early in childhood prior to established poor dietary patterns, and the need for community support and involvement. Given these findings, nurses are encouraged to develop skills, such as advocacy, collaborative leadership, and social marketing skills, that will contribute to the prevention of childhood obesity.

Bobbie Berkowitz

2009-01-01

117

Lifetime Medical Costs of Obesity: Prevention No Cure for Increasing Health Expenditure  

OpenAIRE

Using a simulation model, Pieter van Baal and colleagues conclude that obesity prevention leads to a decrease in costs of obesity-related diseases, but this is offset by cost increases due to diseases unrelated to obesity in life-years gained.

Baal, Pieter H. M.; Polder, Johan J.; Wit, G. Ardine; Hoogenveen, Rudolf T.; Feenstra, Talitha L.; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.; Engelfriet, Peter M.; Brouwer, Werner B. F.

2008-01-01

118

The Role of SIRT1 in Preventing Mitochondrial Dysfunction with Obesity and Aging  

OpenAIRE

Mitochondrial function declines with aging and obesity, and has been implicated in the development of many age-related diseases. Caloric restriction (CR) prevents aging and has been shown to induce mitochondrial biogenesis and improve mitochondrial function. These effects may involve increased activity of the \\(NAD^+\\)-dependent deacetylase SIRT1. Indeed, overexpression of SIRT1 reproduces many of the health benefits of CR including induction of mitochondrial biogenesis by deacetylation...

Price, Nathan Loftus

2012-01-01

119

mHealth approaches to child obesity prevention: successes, unique challenges, and next directions  

OpenAIRE

Childhood obesity continues to be a significant public health issue. mHealth systems offer state-of-the-art approaches to intervention design, delivery, and diffusion of treatment and prevention efforts. Benefits include cost effectiveness, potential for real-time data collection, feedback capability, minimized participant burden, relevance to multiple types of populations, and increased dissemination capability. However, these advantages are coupled with unique challenges. This commentary di...

Tate, Eleanor B.; Spruijt-metz, Donna; O’reilly, Gillian; Jordan-marsh, Maryalice; Gotsis, Marientina; Pentz, Mary Ann; Dunton, Genevieve F.

2013-01-01

120

Leptin Action on GABAergic Neurons Prevents Obesity and Reduces Inhibitory Tone to POMC Neurons  

OpenAIRE

Leptin acts in the brain to prevent obesity. The underlying neurocircuitry responsible for this is poorly understood, in part due to incomplete knowledge regarding first order, leptin-responsive neurons. To address this, we and others have been removing leptin receptors from candidate first order neurons. While functionally relevant neurons have been identified, the observed effects have been small suggesting that most first order neurons remain unidentified. Here we take an alternative appro...

Vong, Linh; Ye, Chianping; Yang, Zongfang; Choi, Brian; Chua, Streamson; Lowell, Bradford B.

2011-01-01

121

Harnessing the power of advertising to prevent childhood obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Social marketing integrates communication campaigns with behavioural and environmental change strategies. Childhood obesity programs could benefit significantly from social marketing but communication campaigns on this issue tend to be stand-alone. Methods A large-scale multi-setting child obesity prevention program was implemented in the Hunter New England (HNE) region of New South Wales (NSW), Australia from 2005–2010. The program included a series of communication campaigns promoting the program and its key messages: drinking water; getting physically active and; eating more vegetables and fruit. Pre-post telephone surveys (n?=?9) were undertaken to evaluate awareness of the campaigns among parents of children aged 2–15 years using repeat cross-sections of randomly selected cohorts. A total of 1,367 parents (HNE?=?748, NSW?=?619) participated. Results At each survey post baseline, HNE parents were significantly more likely to have seen, read or heard about the program and its messages in the media than parents in the remainder of the state (p?awareness of the program and each of its messages over time in HNE compared to no change over time in NSW (p?Awareness was significantly higher (p?awareness levels were sustained for each campaign until the end of the program. At the end of the program participants without a tertiary education were significantly more likely (p?=?0.04) to be aware of the brand campaign (31%) than those with (20%) but there were no other statistically significant socio-demographic differences in awareness. Conclusions The Good for Kids communication campaigns increased and maintained awareness of childhood obesity prevention messages. Moreover, messages were delivered equitably to diverse socio-demographic groups within the region. PMID:24090174

2013-01-01

122

Teachers as Partners in the Prevention of Childhood Obesity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper presents a community-school-higher education partnership approach to the prevention of childhood obesity. Public elementary school personnel, primarily teachers, participated in the design and delivery of a curriculum targeting primary caregivers of 8-9-year-old children. Theoretical framework and methodological approaches guided the development of a cognitive behavioral lifestyle intervention targeting childhood obesity prevention in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI, a U.S. commonwealth. This project demonstrated that in populations with health disparity, teachers can be a valuable and accessible resource for identifying key health issues of concern to communities and a vital partner in the development of parent and child interventions. Teachers also benefited by gaining knowledge and skills to facilitate student and parent learning and impact on personal and familial health. Successful community-school-higher education partnerships require consideration of local culture and community needs and resources. Moreover, within any community-school–higher education partnership it is essential that a time sensitive and culturally appropriate feedback loop be designed to ensure that programs are responsive to the needs and resources of all stakeholders, and that leaders and policymakers are highly engaged so they can make informed policy decisions.

Mozhdeh B Bruss

2010-01-01

123

Preventing Long-Term Risk of Obesity for Two Generations: Prenatal Physical Activity Is Part of the Puzzle  

OpenAIRE

Background. The period surrounding pregnancy has been identified as a risk period for overweight/obesity in both mother and child because of excessive gestational weight gain (GWG). The promotion of a healthy GWG is therefore of paramount importance in the context of the prevention of obesity in the current and next generations. Objective. To provide a comprehensive overview of the effect of prenatal physical activity interventions, alone or in combination with nutritional counselling, on GWG...

Stephanie-May Ruchat; Mottola, Michelle F.

2012-01-01

124

Impact of Social Marketing in the Prevention of Childhood Obesity123  

OpenAIRE

Obesity, mainly childhood obesity, is a worldwide concern. Childhood obesity continues to adulthood, and it is associated with multiple noncommunicable diseases. One important aspect in the fight against obesity is prevention, the earlier, the better. Social marketing is a novel concept being increasingly used as an approach to address social problems and more and more included in the community-based interventions aiming to change unhealthy behaviors. Although there is limited evidence of its...

Gracia-marco, Luis; Moreno, Luis A.; Vicente-rodri?guez, Germa?n

2012-01-01

125

Community Engagement for Culturally Appropriate Obesity Prevention in Hispanic Mother-child Dyads  

OpenAIRE

Childhood obesity affects approximately 20% of US preschool children. Early prevention is needed to reduce young children’s risks for obesity, especially among Hispanic preschool children who have one of the highest rates of obesity. Vida Saludable was an early childhood obesity intervention designed to be culturally appropriate for low-income Hispanic mothers with preschool children to improve maternal physical activity and reduce children’s sugar sweetened beverage consumption. It was c...

Bender, Melinda S.; Clark, Mary Jo; Gahagan, Sheila

2014-01-01

126

Codonopsis lanceolata Extract Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity in C57BL/6 Mice  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Codonopsis lanceolata extract (CLE has been used in traditional medicine in the Asian-Pacific region for the treatment of bronchitis, cough, and inflammation. However, it is still unclear whether obesity in mice can be altered by diet supplementation with CLE. To investigate whether CLE could have preventative effects on high fat diet (HFD-induced obesity, male C57BL/6 mice were placed on either a normal chow diet, 60% HFD, or a HFD supplemented with CLE (60, 180, and 360 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks. CLE decreased body weight and subcutaneous and visceral fat weights in HFD-induced obese mice. CLE group mice showed lower fat accumulation and a smaller adipocyte area in the adipose tissue compared with the HFD group mice. CLE group mice exhibited lower serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL, glucose, and insulin compared with the HFD group mice. In addition, CLE decreased liver weight and lowered the increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine transaminase (ALT levels in HFD-induced obese mice. These results indicate that CLE can inhibit the development of diet-induced obesity and hyperlipidemia in C57BL/6 mice.

Jong Seok Lee

2014-10-01

127

Efecto residual del ejercicio de fuerza muscular en la prevención secundaria de la obesidad infantil / Residual effect of muscle strength exercise in secondary prevention of childhood obesity  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Spain | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Introducción: La elevada prevalencia de la obesidad en escolares chilenos (23,1%), hace necesario la aplicación de intervenciones que incorporen el ejercicio físico de fuerza muscular, pues éste muestra gran eficacia en niños obesos. Objetivo: Evaluar el efecto residual del ejercicio físico de fuerz [...] a muscular sobre la grasa corporal, el síndrome metabólico y la condición física en escolares obesos. Métodos: La muestra incluyó 111 escolares obesos, entre 8 y 13 años, de 3 colegios de la ciudad de Santiago. La intervención temprana (n = 60) ejecutó en paralelo ejercicio físico de fuerza muscular, educación alimentaria y apoyo psicológico durante 3 meses. La intervención tardía (n = 51), incorporó los primeros 3 meses, sólo la intervención educativa y el apoyo psicológico, y el ejercicio se agregó entre los 3 y 6 meses. A los 9 meses post-intervención, se evaluó el efecto residual del ejercicio físico. La grasa corporal se determinó por ecuaciones antropométricas. El síndrome metabólico se diagnóstico por el criterio de Cook. La condición física se evaluó por la distancia recorrida en el test de seis minutos. Resultados: El porcentaje grasa corporal disminuyó al final de la intervención y aumentó post-intervención, con la excepción de los hombres de la intervención temprana. La distancia recorrida se incrementó al final de la intervención, pero se redujo en la post-intervención. El síndrome metabólico, disminuyó al término de la intervención incrementando post-intervención (p Abstract in english Introduction: The high prevalence of the obesity in Chilean students (23,1%), necessitates the application of interventions that incorporate muscle strength exercise, as this shows great efficacy in obese children. Objective: To evaluate the residual effect of muscle strength exercise on body fat, m [...] etabolic syndrome and physical fitness in obese schoolchildren. Methods: The sample included 111 obese schoolchildren, between 8 and 13 years, of 3 schools in the city of Santiago. Early intervention (n = 60) participated in parallel intervention that included muscle strength exercise, nutrition education and psychological support for 3 months. The late intervention (n = 51) incorporated the first 3 months, only the educational intervention and psychological support, and exercise was added between 3 and 6 months. At 9 months post intervention, we evaluated the residual effect of exercise. Body fat was determined by anthropometric equations. The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed by the criteria of Cook. Physical fitness was assessed by the distance walked in six minutes test. Results: The body fat percentage decreased at the end of the intervention and post intervention increased with the exception of the men of early intervention. The distance traveled increased at the end of the intervention but declined in the post intervention. Metabolic syndrome, decreased at the end of the intervention increased post intervention (p

Fabián, Vásquez; Erik, Díaz; Lydia, Lera; Jorge, Meza; Isabel, Salas; Pamela, Rojas; Eduardo, Atalah; Raquel, Burrows.

2013-04-01

128

Lessons from a peer-led obesity prevention programme in English schools.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity in young people is a major public health concern. Energy balance, the interrelationship between diet and physical activity, is known to be a key determinant. Evidence supports the development of school-based approaches to obesity prevention. ASSIST (A Stop Smoking in Schools Trial) is an effective school-based, peer-led smoking prevention programme for 12-13-year-old students, based on diffusion of innovations theory. The AHEAD (Activity and Healthy Eating in ADolescence) study tested the feasibility of adapting ASSIST to an obesity prevention intervention. The AHEAD intervention was tested and refined during a pilot study in one school, followed by an exploratory trial in six schools. Quantitative (self-report behavioural questionnaires and evaluation forms) and qualitative (structured observations, focus groups and interviews) research methods were used to examine the implementation and acceptability of the intervention. The potential effectiveness of the intervention in increasing healthy eating was measured using self-report behavioural questionnaires. Activity monitors (accelerometers) were used to measure physical activity. Results show it was feasible to implement the AHEAD intervention, which was well received. However, implementation was resource and labour intensive and relatively expensive. Furthermore, there was no evidence of promise that the intervention would increase physical activity or healthy eating in adolescents. Although diet and physical activity are both relevant for obesity prevention, the focus on two behaviours appeared too complex for informal diffusion through peer networks. This identifies a tension, particularly for adolescent peer-led health promotion, between the desire not to isolate or oversimplify health behaviours and the need to present clear, succinct health promotion messages. PMID:24711350

Bell, Sarah L; Audrey, Suzanne; Cooper, Ashley R; Noble, Sian; Campbell, Rona

2014-04-28

129

Design and methods for evaluating an early childhood obesity prevention program in the childcare center setting  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Many unhealthy dietary and physical activity habits that foster the development of obesity are established by the age of five. Presently, approximately 70 percent of children in the United States are currently enrolled in early childcare facilities, making this an ideal setting to implement and evaluate childhood obesity prevention efforts. We describe here the methods for conducting an obesity prevention randomized trial in the child care setting. Methods/design A randomi...

Natale Ruby; Scott Stephanie Hapeman; Messiah Sarah E; Schrack Maria Mesa; Uhlhorn Susan B; Delamater Alan

2013-01-01

130

School-Based Internet Obesity Prevention Programs for Adolescents: A Systematic Literature Review  

OpenAIRE

In response to the childhood obesity epidemic, numerous studies on school-based Internet obesity prevention interventions have been conducted. The purpose of this systematic review is to describe, synthesize, and evaluate the research on school-based Internet obesity prevention programs for adolescents. Medline, CINAHL, and PsycInfo were searched from January 1995 to August 2012 to locate relevant studies. Ninety-one reports were initially identified, with 12 meeting the inc...

Whittemore, Robin; Chao, Ariana; Popick, Rachel; Grey, Margaret

2013-01-01

131

The development of a network for community-based obesity prevention: the CO-OPS Collaboration  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Community-based interventions are a promising approach and an important component of a comprehensive response to obesity. In this paper we describe the Collaboration of COmmunity-based Obesity Prevention Sites (CO-OPS Collaboration) in Australia as an example of a collaborative network to enhance the quality and quantity of obesity prevention action at the community level. The core aims of the CO-OPS Collaboration are to: identify and analyse the lessons learned from a ran...

King Lesley; Waters Elizabeth; Reynolds Rebecca; Foulkes Chad; Nichols Melanie; Allender Steven; Gill Tim; Armstrong Rebecca; Swinburn Boyd

2011-01-01

132

Louisiana (LA) health: design and methods for a childhood obesity prevention program in rural schools."  

Science.gov (United States)

There is a worldwide epidemic of obesity with far-reaching consequences for the health of our nation. Prevention of obesity, especially in children, has been deemed by public health policy makers to be one of the most important objectives for our country. This prevention project, called Louisiana (L...

133

Development of a childhood obesity prevention programme with a focus on UK South Asian communities?  

OpenAIRE

•We describe the process of development of a childhood obesity prevention programme.•We combined findings from multiple methods in an iterative process of development.•Childhood obesity prevention interventions need to be tailored to the local context.•Understanding the local context is critical for intervention tailoring.

Pallan, Miranda; Parry, Jayne; Cheng, K. K.; Adab, Peymane?

2013-01-01

134

Using the Community Readiness Model to Select Communities for a Community-Wide Obesity Prevention Intervention  

OpenAIRE

To build on a growing interest in community-based obesity prevention programs, methods are needed for matching intervention strategies to local needs and assets. We used the Community Readiness Model (CRM), a structured interview guide and scoring system, to assess community readiness to act on childhood obesity prevention, furthering a replication study of a successful intervention.

Sliwa, Sarah; Goldberg, Jeanne P.; Clark, Valerie; Junot, Bridgid; Nahar, Elizabeth; Nelson, Miriam E.; Tovar, Alison; Economos, Christina D.; Collins, Jessica; Edwards, Ruth; Hyatt, Raymond R.

2011-01-01

135

Assessing Implementation Fidelity and Adaptation in a Community-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention  

Science.gov (United States)

Little research has assessed the fidelity, adaptation or integrity of activities implemented within community-based obesity prevention initiatives. To address this gap, a mixed-method process evaluation was undertaken in the context of the South Australian Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle (OPAL) initiative. An ecological coding procedure assessed…

Richards, Zoe; Kostadinov, Iordan; Jones, Michelle; Richard, Lucie; Cargo, Margaret

2014-01-01

136

Contextual Factors Influencing Readiness for Dissemination of Obesity Prevention Programs and Policies  

Science.gov (United States)

Within the realm of obesity prevention research, there have been many promising interventions to improve physical activity and nutrition among diverse target populations. However, very little information is known about the dissemination and replication of these interventions. In 2007 and 2008 as part of a larger obesity prevention initiative,…

Dreisinger, Mariah L.; Boland, Elizabeth M.; Filler, Carl D.; Baker, Elizabeth A.; Hessel, Amy S.; Brownson, Ross C.

2012-01-01

137

Prevention of childhood obesity through motivation to physical activity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper aims to review the current worrying situation in terms of physical activity in our country and the problem that leads us to be below the European average, with the attendant problems of obesity, particularly among children, which follow from this. We analyzed the intervention programs that are being used as PIOBIN plan (The Andalusian Plan for Childhood Obesity, effective from 2007-12, based on a national strategy called Naos Strategy and how different studies support that some intrinsic motivation toward physical activity helps to create lasting habits to the practice. We also carry out an analysis of the different Motivation theories and we base our study on the Self-determination Theory of Deci and Ryan (1985, 2000

Carrillo Aguilera, Sonia

2012-07-01

138

A wild derived quantitative trait locus on mouse chromosome 2 prevents obesity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic architecture of multifactorial traits such as obesity has been poorly understood. Quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis is widely used to localize loci affecting multifactorial traits on chromosomal regions. However, large confidence intervals and small phenotypic effects of identified QTLs and closely linked loci are impeding the identification of causative genes that underlie the QTLs. Here we developed five subcongenic mouse strains with overlapping and non-overlapping wild-derived genomic regions from an F2 intercross of a previously developed congenic strain, B6.Cg-Pbwg1, and its genetic background strain, C57BL/6J (B6. The subcongenic strains developed were phenotyped on low-fat standard chow and a high-fat diet to fine-map a previously identified obesity QTL. Microarray analysis was performed with Affymetrix GeneChips to search for candidate genes of the QTL. Results The obesity QTL was physically mapped to an 8.8-Mb region of mouse chromosome 2. The wild-derived allele significantly decreased white fat pad weight, body weight and serum levels of glucose and triglyceride. It was also resistant to the high-fat diet. Among 29 genes residing within the 8.8-Mb region, Gpd2, Upp2, Acvr1c, March7 and Rbms1 showed great differential expression in livers and/or gonadal fat pads between B6.Cg-Pbwg1 and B6 mice. Conclusions The wild-derived QTL allele prevented obesity in both mice fed a low-fat standard diet and mice fed a high-fat diet. This finding will pave the way for identification of causative genes for obesity. A further understanding of this unique QTL effect at genetic and molecular levels may lead to the discovery of new biological and pathologic pathways associated with obesity.

Ishikawa Akira

2010-09-01

139

From "best practice" to "next practice": the effectiveness of school-based health promotion in improving healthy eating and physical activity and preventing childhood obesity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2005, we reported on the success of Comprehensive School Health (CSH in improving diets, activity levels, and body weights. The successful program was recognized as a "best practice" and has inspired the development of the Alberta Project Promoting active Living and healthy Eating (APPLE Schools. The project includes 10 schools, most of which are located in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas. The present study examines the effectiveness of a CSH program adopted from a "best practice" example in another setting by evaluating temporal changes in diets, activity levels and body weight. Methods In 2008 and 2010, we surveyed grade 5 students from approximately 150 randomly selected schools from the Canadian province of Alberta and students from 10 APPLE Schools. Students completed the Harvard Youth/Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire, questions on physical activity, and had their height and weight measured. Multilevel regression methods were used to analyze changes in diets, activity levels, and body weight between 2008 and 2010. Results In 2010 relative to 2008, students attending APPLE Schools were eating more fruits and vegetables, consuming fewer calories, were more physically active and were less likely obese. These changes contrasted changes observed among students elsewhere in the province. Conclusions These findings provide evidence on the effectiveness of CSH in improving health behaviors. They show that an example of "best practice" may lead to success in another setting. Herewith the study provides the evidence that investments for broader program implementation based on "best practice" are justified.

Fung Christina

2012-03-01

140

Declines in student obesity prevalence associated with a prevention initiative - King County, Washington, 2012.  

Science.gov (United States)

The United States has invested heavily, through public and private sector initiatives, in actions to prevent youth obesity by promoting healthy eating and physical activity. This report documents recent trends in youth obesity in King County, Washington, which implemented a Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) obesity prevention initiative during 2010-2012, including a school-based component. Similar large-scale obesity prevention initiatives did not occur elsewhere in Washington. Beginning in 2004, the Washington State Department of Health began monitoring youth obesity through the biennially administered Washington State Healthy Youth Survey (HYS). Based on data from this survey, neither King County nor the rest of Washington showed statistically significant changes in obesity prevalence in 2006, 2008, and 2010, relative to 2004. In 2012, however, King County youth obesity prevalence showed a statistically significant decrease, while no change occurred in the remainder of the state. Within King County, CPPW was implemented only in low-income school districts to address geographic inequities in obesity rates. Analysis within King County comparing CPPW and non-CPPW school districts before and after the intervention (2010 versus 2012) revealed a statistically significant decline in obesity prevalence in CPPW schools yet no change in non-CPPW schools. This decline in CPPW schools was significantly different than in non-CPPW schools. These findings suggest that school-based policy, systems, and environment changes might help reduce youth obesity, warranting further evaluation of short- and long-term impacts on population health. PMID:24553199

Kern, Eli; Chan, Nadine L; Fleming, David W; Krieger, James W

2014-02-21

141

THE EFFECTS OF THERAPEUTIC PHYSICAL EXERCISE ON CHILD OBESITY  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Obesity represents a world health problem, confronted by both adults and children, caused by the invasion of unhealthy foods, but also by a lack of information regarding the long term negative effects of an unbalanced diet.The aim of this research is to prove the beneficial role the correctly and constantly performed therapeutic physical exercise plays in the prevention of child obesity, but also in the fight with unwanted weight, starting from knowing the children's growth and development particularities, the obesity incidence among them, and the long term negative effects this disease has on their health.This research tries to confirm whether by applying therapeutic physical exercises in children, one can see their positive effects on obesity, and whether by applying a well-structured physical exercise program, organized and applied with regularity, one can obtain a drop in the obese children's weight.The means, methods, and procedures that are encompassed in a well structured and individualized program, then applying it perseveringly, correctly, and continuously, lead to the diminishing and correcting of the existing symptoms, preventing the installment of other complications.After applying the prophylactic physiotherapy programs, we can improve the somatoscopic aspect of the individual, the proportionality becomes harmonious, and the body's ability to adapt to the effort is improved.

Cristuta Alina Mihaela

2014-03-01

142

Efficacy of technology-based interventions for obesity prevention in adolescents: a systematic review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Jyu-Lin Chen,1 Mary Ellen Wilkosz2 1Department of Family Health Care Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA, 2Nursing Department, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA, USA Abstract: About one third of adolescents in the USA are overweight and/or obese. Obesity during the adolescent years is associated with many adverse health consequences, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and psychosocial problems. Because of substantial advances in technologies and wide acceptance by adolescents, it is now possible to use technology for healthy weight management and prevention of obesity. This systematic review used Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines and aimed to evaluate the existing literature reported on the effectiveness of technology-based intervention (web-based, e-learning, and active video games in preventing obesity in adolescents. The primary aim of this review was to explore if components of specific interventions were associated with a reduction in body mass index. Research articles obtained from CINAHL, Embase, PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane database from1990 to 2014 were reviewed. A total of 131 published articles were identified, and 14 met the inclusion criteria of a randomized or nonrandomized clinical study with body mass index as primary outcome and/or secondary outcomes of diet/physical activity and/or psychosocial function, tested lifestyle interventions to prevent obesity, used technology, and studied adolescents (aged 12–18 years. The results indicated that six of 14 studies found body mass index and/or body fat decreased at short-term (less than 12 months follow-up. Six of eleven studies that examined physical activity or physical activity-related outcomes found an improved physical activity outcome (time playing active video games and increase in physical activity time, while five of seven studies which assessed dietary outcomes indicated improvement in dietary behaviors. Five of seven studies suggested an improvement in psychosocial function (reduced depression, improved self-esteem and efficacy, improvement on Behavior Assessment Scale in adolescents involved in the technology-based intervention. All effective interventions utilized dietary and physical activity strategies as part of intervention components. Because of the variation in duration of intervention (range 10 weeks to 2 years, it is not clear what length of intervention is most effective. Future research should assess the long-term impact of technology-based interventions and evaluate mediators and moderators for weight change in adolescents. Keywords: technology intervention, obesity, adolescents, web-based, exer-gaming 

Chen JL

2014-08-01

143

Obesity intervention on the healthy lifestyle in childhood: results of the PRESTO (PrEvention STudy of Obesity) Study  

OpenAIRE

Background: Due to increasing problems with childhood and adolescent obesity in Austria PRESTO (PrEvention STudy of Obesity) created a school based intervention program for promoting a healthy lifestyle in Austrian youth.

Methods: PRESTO was carried out by a multi-disciplinary team including a physician, a psychologist, a nutritionist and an exercise physiologist. The study was carried out in 12 first grade s...

Sabine Dietrich; Angelo Pietrobelli; Sabine Dämon; Kurt Widhalm

2008-01-01

144

A parent focused child obesity prevention intervention improves some mother obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne infant program  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background The diets, physical activity and sedentary behavior levels of both children and adults in Australia are suboptimal. The family environment, as the first ecological niche of children, exerts an important influence on the onset of children’s habits. Parent modeling is one part of this environment and a logical focus for child obesity prevention initiatives. The focus on parent’s own behaviors provides a potential opportunity to decrease obesity risk behaviors in parents ...

Lioret Sandrine; Campbell Karen J; Crawford David; Spence Alison C; Hesketh Kylie; McNaughton Sarah A

2012-01-01

145

Louisiana (LA) Health: Design and Methods for a Childhood Obesity Prevention Program in Rural Schools  

OpenAIRE

There is a worldwide epidemic of obesity with far-reaching consequences for the health of our nation. Prevention of obesity, especially in children, has been deemed by public health policy makers to be one of the most important objectives for our country. This prevention project, called Louisiana (LA) Health, will test whether modification of environmental and behavioral factors can prevent inappropriate weight gain in children from rural parishes of Louisiana who are enrolled in the fourth t...

Williamson, Donald A.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Harsha, David; Han, Hongmei; Martin, Corby K.; Newton, Robert; Stewart, Tiffany M.; Ryan, Donna H.

2008-01-01

146

What accounts for good practice? Assessment of obesity prevention projects for kindergarten children in Germany  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Objective Up to now, no guideline has been set up that provides criteria for good practice in universal and selective childhood obesity prevention projects for children aged 3 to 6 in the kindergarten setting. Hence, based on guidelines for targeted prevention, the present study not only aims at assessing the current state of German universal and selective childhood obesity prevention projects in kindergartens, but also at deriving criteria of go...

Dreas, Jessica A.; Hassel, Holger

2009-01-01

147

Childhood obesity-an insight into preventive strategies  

OpenAIRE

Childhood obesity is now a global problem throughout the world. The major factors affecting weight regulation and the development of obesity in children are the result of a large number of biological, behavioral, social, environmental, and economic factors and the complex interactions between them that promote a positive energy balance. The changes in the dietary habits with the adoption of sedentary life style increases manifold obesity-related diseases and their complications. An obese chil...

Kar, Subhranshu Sekhar; Dube, Rajani; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar

2014-01-01

148

Prevention: The First Line of Defense against Childhood Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity has become an alarming problem in this country. Risk factors associated with childhood obesity include having obese parents, a history of low or high birth weight, Black or Hispanic ethnicity, and low socioeconomic background. Although most healthy American infants and toddlers have adequate diets, many parents and health…

Milano, Kimberly

2007-01-01

149

Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids: A Randomized Trial of a Pediatric Primary Care Based Obesity Prevention Intervention for At-Risk 5-10 Year Olds  

OpenAIRE

Pediatric primary care is an important setting in which to address obesity prevention, yet relatively few interventions have been evaluated and even fewer have been shown to be effective. The development and evaluation of cost-effective approaches to obesity prevention that leverage opportunities of direct access to families in the pediatric primary care setting, overcome barriers to implementation in busy practice settings, and facilitate sustained involvement of parents is an important publ...

Sherwood, Nancy E.; Levy, Rona L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Senso, Meghan M.; Crain, A. Lauren; Hayes, Marcia G.; Anderson, Julie D.; Seburg, Elisabeth M.; Jeffery, Robert W.

2013-01-01

150

Insights in Public Health: The Childhood Obesity Prevention Task Force (ACT 269): Recommendations for Obesity Prevention in Hawai‘i  

OpenAIRE

Obesity in both adults and children is a critical issue in Hawai‘i, as well as nationally and internationally. Today in Hawai‘i, 57 percent of adults are overweight or obese as are almost 1 in 3 children entering kindergarten. Each year, obesity costs Hawai‘i more than $470 million in medical expenditures alone.1 These staggering human and economic costs underscore the serious need for Hawai‘i to address obesity now.

Richards, Katie; Fuddy, Loretta J.; Greenwood, Mrc; Pressler, Virginia; Rajan, Ranjani; St John, Tonya Lowery; Sinclair, Bronwyn M.; Irvin, Lola

2013-01-01

151

"Mi voglio bene": a pediatrician-based randomized controlled trial for the prevention of obesity in Italian preschool children  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The first years of life are crucial to start preventive interventions that can have an impact on lifestyle and later overweight and obesity. Under the Italian National Health System (INHS, children are cared for by family pediatricians who perform health balances at regular intervals. The Italian Society of Preventive and Social Pediatrics (SIPPS has designed a randomized controlled trial (RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of family pediatricians for the prevention of childhood obesity in preschool children. We report the rationale and protocol of such trial, named the "Mi voglio bene" ("I love myself" study. Methods "Mi voglio bene" is a parallel-arm RCT. Family pediatricians willing to participate to the trial will be randomly assigned to a control group and to an experimental group. The control group will provide the usual standard of care while the experimental group will implement 10 preventive actions (promotion of breastfeeding, avoidance of solid foods, control of protein intake, avoidance of sugar-sweetened beverages, avoidance of bottle, active means of transportation, identification of early adiposity rebound, limitation of television viewing, promotion of movement, and teaching portion size at 10 time points during a 6-yr follow-up. The main outcome measures is the prevalence of overweight and obesity at 6 years of age. The experimental intervention is expected to reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity from 25% to 20% and the study requires a total of 3610 children. Each pediatrician will enroll 30 consecutive newborns into the study so that a total of 120 pediatricians will participate to the study. Discussion "Mi voglio bene" is expected to provide important information for the INHS and possibly other institutional child care settings about the effectiveness of a pediatrician-based approach to the prevention of childhood obesity. We published this study protocol with the aim of opening a discussion with all people interested in fighting childhood obesity and to receive useful criticisms.

Brambilla Paolo

2010-08-01

152

Girls health Enrichment Multi-site Studies (GEMS): new approaches to obesity prevention among young African-American girls.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Girls health Enrichment Multi-site Studies (GEMS) is an obesity prevention research program sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), targeting young African-American girls. Expert groups have suggested that the high prevalence of obesity in African-American women could be a contributing factor to their excess morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease compared to women from other ethnic groups. To address the issue of obesity and its origins in African-American women, the NHLBI Growth and Health Study (NGHS) was initiated to investigate factors related to the development of obesity and associated cardiovascular disease risk factors in a cohort of young African-American and White girls, aged 9 and 10 years. Findings from NGHS, and the realization that obesity had become a major public health problem, subsequently led to a 2-phase, 7-year collaborative obesity prevention research program, the Girls health Enrichment Multi-site Studies (GEMS). Initiated in 1999, Phase 1 of GEMS was conducted collaboratively among 4 participating field centers, a coordinating center, and the NHLBI project office to conduct formative assessment research and to pilot test, over a 12-week period, interventions that might be effective in reducing the rate of weight gain in African-American girls, aged 8-10 years. Over a 2-year period, Phase 2 of GEMS will test the interventions that appear most promising in preventing excessive weight gain in young African-American girls. The experiences of the GEMS pilot studies will help guide future intervention research for obesity prevention beginning in childhood. This report describes the background and rationale for the GEMS initiative. This journal supplement describes the experiences of the GEMS Phase 1 program. PMID:12713206

Obarzanek, Eva; Pratt, Charlotte A

2003-01-01

153

[Regulation of food advertising on television for the prevention of childhood obesity].  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity is a serious global epidemic and the prevention strategies implemented have been insufficient. Numerous environmental factors have been associated with risk of obesity and their full consideration in prevention policies is important. The connection between food advertising on television and childhood obesity has been demonstrated. The large number of advertisements for unhealthy foods targeted at children through television and its possible impact on health has led some countries to legislate on this matter. However, a conceptual framework of reference enabling legislation must be internationally defined in order to achieve a real impact in preventing childhood obesity. This paper reviews scientific evidence on the relationship between food advertising and childhood obesity as a basis for developing public policies to regulate food marketing on television. PMID:22696898

Hidalgo, Catalina González; Samur, Eduardo Atalah

2011-09-01

154

Efficacy of technology-based interventions for obesity prevention in adolescents: a systematic review  

Science.gov (United States)

About one third of adolescents in the USA are overweight and/or obese. Obesity during the adolescent years is associated with many adverse health consequences, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and psychosocial problems. Because of substantial advances in technologies and wide acceptance by adolescents, it is now possible to use technology for healthy weight management and prevention of obesity. This systematic review used Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines and aimed to evaluate the existing literature reported on the effectiveness of technology-based intervention (web-based, e-learning, and active video games) in preventing obesity in adolescents. The primary aim of this review was to explore if components of specific interventions were associated with a reduction in body mass index. Research articles obtained from CINAHL, Embase, PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane database from1990 to 2014 were reviewed. A total of 131 published articles were identified, and 14 met the inclusion criteria of a randomized or nonrandomized clinical study with body mass index as primary outcome and/or secondary outcomes of diet/physical activity and/or psychosocial function, tested lifestyle interventions to prevent obesity, used technology, and studied adolescents (aged 12–18 years). The results indicated that six of 14 studies found body mass index and/or body fat decreased at short-term (less than 12 months) follow-up. Six of eleven studies that examined physical activity or physical activity-related outcomes found an improved physical activity outcome (time playing active video games and increase in physical activity time), while five of seven studies which assessed dietary outcomes indicated improvement in dietary behaviors. Five of seven studies suggested an improvement in psychosocial function (reduced depression, improved self-esteem and efficacy, improvement on Behavior Assessment Scale) in adolescents involved in the technology-based intervention. All effective interventions utilized dietary and physical activity strategies as part of intervention components. Because of the variation in duration of intervention (range 10 weeks to 2 years), it is not clear what length of intervention is most effective. Future research should assess the long-term impact of technology-based interventions and evaluate mediators and moderators for weight change in adolescents. PMID:25177158

Chen, Jyu-Lin; Wilkosz, Mary Ellen

2014-01-01

155

Creating community action plans for obesity prevention using the ANGELO (Analysis Grid for Elements Linked to Obesity) Framework  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Community-based interventions are an important component of obesity prevention efforts. The literature provides little guidance on priority-setting for obesity prevention in communities, especially for socially and culturally diverse populations. This paper reports on the process of developing prioritized, community-participatory action plans for obesity prevention projects in children and adolescents using the ANGELO (Analysis Grid for Elements Linked to Obesity) Framework. We combined stakeholder engagement processes, the ANGELO Framework (scans for environmental barriers, targeted behaviours, gaps in skills and knowledge) and workshops with key stakeholders to create action plans for six diverse obesity prevention projects in Australia (n = 3), New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga from 2002 to 2005. Some sites included sociocultural contextual analyses in the environmental scans. Target groups were under-5-year-olds (Australia), 4-12-year-olds (Australia) and 13-18-year-olds (all four countries). Over 120 potentialbehavioural, knowledge, skill and environmental elements were identified for prioritization leading into each 2-day workshop. Many elements were common across the diverse cultural communities; however, several unique sociocultural elements emerged in some cultural groups which informed their action plans. Youth were actively engaged in adolescent projects, allowing their needs to be incorporated into the action plans initiating the process of ownership. A common structure for the action plan promoted efficiencies in the process while allowing for community creativity and innovation. The ANGELO is a flexible and efficient way of achieving an agreed plan for obesity prevention with diverse communities. It is responsive to community needs, combines local and international knowledge and creates stakeholder ownership of the action plan.

Simmons, A; Mavoa, H M

2009-01-01

156

School-Based Obesity Prevention: A Blueprint for Taming the Epidemic.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reviewed research on school-based obesity prevention programs to identify ways to minimize increasing obesity levels. Seven studies showed change in body mass index and differed from those not finding change in three ways: program implementers were not classroom teachers, intervention targeted middle or high schools, and inactivity reduction was…

Baranowski, Tom; Cullen, Karen W.; Nicklas, Theresa; Baranowski, Janice

2002-01-01

157

College Teaching and Community Outreaching: Service Learning in an Obesity Prevention Program  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Service learning can enrich students' knowledge, skills and commitment to occupational goals while positively affecting communities. Undergraduate students in a course on obesity engaged in service learning by assisting with a family-based obesity prevention program, Getting Into Fitness Together (GIFT). Purpose: The impact of GIFT on…

Himelein, Melissa; Passman, Liz; Phillips, Jessica M.

2010-01-01

158

CHILE: An Evidence-Based Preschool Intervention for Obesity Prevention in Head Start  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Obesity is a major concern among American Indians and Hispanics. The Child Health Initiative for Lifelong Eating and Exercise (CHILE) is an evidence-based intervention to prevent obesity in children enrolled in 16 Head Start (HS) Centers in rural communities. The design and implementation of CHILE are described. Methods: CHILE uses a…

Davis, Sally M.; Sanders, Sarah G.; FitzGerald, Courtney A.; Keane, Patricia C.; Canaca, Glenda F.; Volker-Rector, Renee

2013-01-01

159

Healthy eating and obesity prevention for preschoolers: a randomised controlled trial  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing effective prevention and intervention programs for the formative preschool years is seen as an essential step in combating the obesity epidemic across the lifespan. The overall goal of the current project is to measure the effectiveness of a healthy eating and childhood obesity prevention intervention, the MEND (Mind Exercise Nutrition Do It! program that is delivered to parents of children aged 2-4 years. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial will be conducted with 200 parents and their 2-4 year old children who attend the MEND 2-4 program in metropolitan and regional Victoria. Parent-child dyads will attend ten 90-minute group workshops. These workshops focus on general nutrition, as well as physical activity and behaviours. They are typically held at community or maternal and child health centres and run by a MEND 2-4 trained program leader. Child eating habits, physical activity levels and parental behaviours and cognitions pertaining to nutrition and physical activity will be assessed at baseline, the end of the intervention, and at 6 and 12 months post the intervention. Informed consent will be obtained from all parents, who will then be randomly allocated to the intervention or wait-list control group. Discussion Our study is the first RCT of a healthy eating and childhood obesity prevention intervention targeted specifically to Australian parents and their preschool children aged 2-4 years. It responds to the call by experts in the area of childhood obesity and child health that prevention of overweight in the formative preschool years should focus on parents, given that parental beliefs, attitudes, perceptions and behaviours appear to impact significantly on the development of early overweight. This is 'solution-oriented' rather than 'problem-oriented' research, with its focus being on prevention rather than intervention. If this is a positive trial, the MEND2-4 program can be implemented as a national program. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000200088

Swinburn Boyd

2010-04-01

160

Effects of obesity on bone metabolism  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Obesity is traditionally viewed to be beneficial to bone health because of well-established positive effect of mechanical loading conferred by body weight on bone formation, despite being a risk factor for many other chronic health disorders. Although body mass has a positive effect on bone formation, whether the mass derived from an obesity condition or excessive fat accumulation is beneficial to bone remains controversial. The underline pathophysiological relationship between obesi...

Cao Jay J

2011-01-01

161

Policy, systems, and environmentally oriented school-based obesity prevention: opportunities and challenges.  

Science.gov (United States)

Public health is increasingly emphasizing policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change as a key strategy for population-level health promotion and disease prevention. When applied to childhood obesity, this strategy typically involves school systems, since children spend large portions of their days in school and are heavily influenced by this environment. While most school systems have implemented nutrition education and physical activity programs for some time, their understanding and use of PSE approaches to obesity prevention is accelerating based on several large federally funded initiatives. As part of one initiative's evaluation, key informant interviews reveal the specific obesity prevention PSE strategies schools are attempting and the corresponding barriers and facilitators to their implementation. These evaluation findings raise several fundamental issues regarding school-based obesity prevention, including the potential role of school personnel, the influence of grant funding on school health initiatives, and the fit between public health and educational priorities. PMID:24702661

Fagen, Michael C; Asada, Yuka; Welch, Sarah; Dombrowski, Rachael; Gilmet, Kelsey; Welter, Christina; Stern, Lori; Barnett, Gina Massuda; Mason, Maryann

2014-01-01

162

A systematic review of health videogames on childhood obesity prevention and intervention  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity is a global epidemic. Health video games are an emerging intervention strategy to combat childhood obesity. This systematic review examined published research on the effect of health video games on childhood obesity. Fourteen articles examining 28 health video ames published betwee...

163

Beyond the Role of Dietary Protein and Amino Acids in the Prevention of Diet-Induced Obesity  

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Full Text Available High-protein diets have been shown to prevent the development of diet-induced obesity and can improve associated metabolic disorders in mice. Dietary leucine supplementation can partially mimic this effect. However, the molecular mechanisms triggering these preventive effects remain to be satisfactorily explained. Here we review studies showing a connection between high protein or total amino nitrogen intake and obligatory water intake. High amino nitrogen intake may possibly lower lipid storage, and prevent insulin resistance. Suggestions are made for further systematical studies to explore the relationship between water consumption, satiety, and energy expenditure. Moreover, these examinations should better distinguish between leucine-specific and unspecific effects. Research in this field can provide important information to justify dietary recommendations and strategies in promoting long-term weight loss and may help to reduce health problems associated with the comorbidities of obesity.

Klaus J. Petzke

2014-01-01

164

A Systematic Review of Health Videogames on Childhood Obesity Prevention and Intervention  

OpenAIRE

Childhood obesity is a global epidemic. Health videogames are an emerging intervention strategy to combat childhood obesity. This systematic review examined published research on the effect of health videogames on childhood obesity. Fourteen articles examining 28 health videogames published between 2005 and 2013 in English were selected from 2433 articles identified through five major search engines. Results indicated that academic interest in using health videogames for childhood obesity pre...

Lu, Amy Shirong; Kharrazi, Hadi; Gharghabi, Fardad; Thompson, Debbe

2013-01-01

165

A parent focused child obesity prevention intervention improves some mother obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne infant program  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The diets, physical activity and sedentary behavior levels of both children and adults in Australia are suboptimal. The family environment, as the first ecological niche of children, exerts an important influence on the onset of children’s habits. Parent modeling is one part of this environment and a logical focus for child obesity prevention initiatives. The focus on parent’s own behaviors provides a potential opportunity to decrease obesity risk behaviors in parents as well. Objective To assess the effect of a parent-focused early childhood obesity prevention intervention on first-time mothers’ diets, physical activity and TV viewing time. Methods The Melbourne InFANT Program is a cluster-randomized controlled trial which involved 542 mothers over their newborn’s first 18?months of life. The intervention focused on parenting skills and strategies, including parental modeling, and aimed to promote development of healthy child and parent behaviors from birth, including healthy diet, increased physical activity and reduced TV viewing time. Data regarding mothers’ diet (food frequency questionnaire, physical activity and TV viewing times (self-reported questionnaire were collected using validated tools at both baseline and post-intervention. Four dietary patterns were derived at baseline using principal components analyses including frequencies of 55 food groups. Analysis of covariance was used to measure the impact of the intervention. Results The scores of both the "High-energy snack and processed foods" and the "High-fat foods" dietary patterns decreased more in the intervention group: -0.22 (?0.42;-0.02 and ?0.25 (?0.50;-0.01, respectively. No other significant intervention vs. control effects were observed regarding total physical activity, TV viewing time, and the two other dietary patterns, i.e. “Fruits and vegetables” and “Cereals and sweet foods”. Conclusions These findings suggest that supporting first-time mothers to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors in their infants impacts maternal dietary intakes positively. Further research needs to assess ways in which we might further enhance those lifestyle behaviors not impacted by the InFANT intervention.

Lioret Sandrine

2012-08-01

166

A systematic policy approach to changing the food system and physical activity environments to prevent obesity  

OpenAIRE

As obesity prevention becomes an increasing health priority in many countries, including Australia and New Zealand, the challenge that governments are now facing is how to adopt a systematic policy approach to increase healthy eating and regular physical activity. This article sets out a structure for systematically identifying areas for obesity prevention policy action across the food system and full range of physical activity environments. Areas amenable to policy intervention can be system...

Sacks, Gary; Swinburn, Boyd A.; Lawrence, Mark A.

2008-01-01

167

Preventing child obesity: a long-term evaluation of the HENRY approach.  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels, yet many health professionals lack confidence in working with parents around lifestyle change. HENRY (Health Exercise Nutrition for the Really Young) aims to tackle this through training practitioners to work more effectively with parents of preschoolers around obesity and lifestyle issues.We evaluated the long-term impact of HENRY training on health professionals' knowledge, skills and confidence in tackling obesity prevention. All practitioners trained 2007-11 (n = 1601) were invited to complete an online survey. 237 emails (14.8%) were undeliverable; 354 (26.0%) of the remainder completed the survey. A majority (67%) reported using knowledge and skills gained on a regular basis in their professional lives. Sessions on the importance of empathy and key parenting skills were considered particularly useful, with 78% and 74% respectively reporting regular use of these skills. Effects on respondents' personal lives were also reported: 61% applied the knowledge and skills at home, identifying for example, more shared family mealtimes and reduced portion sizes. The impact endures, with 71% of those undergoing training > 12 months ago, stating that they continued to use concepts in their professional lives. The findings suggest that brief training can have a sustained impact on practitioners' professional and personal lives. PMID:23914474

Brown, Rebecca E; Willis, Thomas A; Aspinall, Nichola; Candida, Hunt; George, Jackie; Rudolf, Mary C J

2013-07-01

168

Sustainable prevention of obesity through integrated strategies: The SPOTLIGHT project’s conceptual framework and design  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Europe is high. It is a major cause of the overall rates of many of the main chronic (or non communicable diseases in this region and is characterized by an unequal socio-economic distribution within the population. Obesity is largely determined by modifiable lifestyle behaviours such as low physical activity levels, sedentary behaviour and consumption of energy dense diets. It is increasingly being recognised that effective responses must go beyond interventions that only focus on a specific individual, social or environmental level and instead embrace system-based multi-level intervention approaches that address both the individual and environment. The EU-funded project “sustainable prevention of obesity through integrated strategies” (SPOTLIGHT aims to increase and combine knowledge on the wide range of determinants of obesity in a systematic way, and to identify multi-level intervention approaches that are strong in terms of Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM. Methods/Design SPOTLIGHT comprises a series of systematic reviews on: individual-level predictors of success in behaviour change obesity interventions; social and physical environmental determinants of obesity; and on the RE-AIM of multi-level interventions. An interactive web-atlas of currently running multi-level interventions will be developed, and enhancing and impeding factors for implementation will be described. At the neighbourhood level, these elements will inform the development of methods to assess obesogenicity of diverse environments, using remote imaging techniques linked to geographic information systems. The validity of these methods will be evaluated using data from surveys of health and lifestyles of adults residing in the neighbourhoods surveyed. At both the micro- and macro-levels (national and international the different physical, economical, political and socio-cultural elements will be assessed. Discussion SPOTLIGHT offers the potential to develop approaches that combine an understanding of the obesogenicity of environments in Europe, and thus how they can be improved, with an appreciation of the individual factors that explain why people respond differently to such environments. Its findings will inform governmental authorities and professionals, academics, NGOs and private sector stakeholders engaged in the development and implementation of policies to tackle the obesity epidemic in Europe.

Lakerveld Jeroen

2012-09-01

169

Active Generations: An Intergenerational Approach to Preventing Childhood Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Over the last 3 decades, US obesity rates have increased dramatically as more children and more adults become obese. This study explores an innovative program, Active Generations, an intergenerational nutrition education and activity program implemented in out-of-school environments (after school and summer camps). It utilizes older…

Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Holtgrave, Peter L.; Brown, Stephen L.

2012-01-01

170

Childhood Obesity Prevention and Physical Activity in Schools  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: The aim of this literature review is to summarise and synthesise the research base concerning childhood obesity and physical activity, particularly in relation to teachers and schools and within a policy context of the UK. The review investigates childhood obesity, physical activity, physical education, the role of teachers, the role of…

Davidson, Fiona

2007-01-01

171

Paving the way for personalised behaviourally based prevention of obesity: systematic search of the literature.  

Science.gov (United States)

We have identified in the literature variants in 64 genes that may be involved in gene-obesity-behaviour interactions. Personalisation of behaviourally based preventive approaches against obesity seems feasible, however obesity genomics is still in the discovery phase of translational research and abundant replication studies are needed before these largely pioneering findings can be extended to practice and population impact. Automation of search algorithms and development of more efficient tools for knowledge synthesis of genomic research into gene-obesity-behaviour interactions might facilitate the advent of widely available personalised prevention approaches. Our future efforts shall therefore concentrate on developing such tools, as well as a research repository dedicated to the use of public health genomics for obesity control. PMID:22338772

Fister, Kristina; Vuleti?, Sivije; Kern, Josipa

2012-01-01

172

An ecological and theoretical deconstruction of a school-based obesity prevention program in Mexico.  

Science.gov (United States)

BackgroundEcological intervention programs are recommended to prevent overweight and obesity in children. The National Institute of Public Health (INSP) in Mexico implemented a successful ecological intervention program to to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors in school age children. This study assessed the integration of ecological principles and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) constructs in this effective school-based obesity prevention program implemented in 15 elementary schools in Mexico City.MethodsTwo coders applied the Intervention Analysis Procedure (IAP) to ¿map¿ the program¿s integration of ecological principles. A checklist gauged the use of SCT theory in program activities.ResultsThirty-two distinct intervention strategies were implemented in one setting (i.e., school) to engage four different target-groups (students, parents, school representatives, government) across two domains (Nutrition and Physical Activity). Overall, 47.5% of the strategies targeted the school infrastructure and/or personnel; 37.5% of strategies targeted a key political actor, the Public Education Secretariat while fewer strategies targeted parents (12.5%) and children (3%). More strategies were implemented in the Nutrition domain (69%) than Physical Activity (31%).The most frequently used SCT construct within both intervention domains was Reciprocal Determinism (e.g., where changes to the environment influence changes in behavior and these behavioral changes influence further changes to the environment); no significant differences were observed in the use of SCT constructs across domains.ConclusionsFindings provide insight into a promising combination of strategies and theoretical constructs that can be used to implement a school-based obesity prevention program. Strategies emphasized school-level infrastructure/ personnel change and strong political engagement and were most commonly underpinned by Reciprocal Determinism for both Nutrition and Physical Activity. PMID:25108611

Safdie, Margarita; Cargo, Margaret; Richard, Lucie; Lévesque, Lucie

2014-08-10

173

Obesity in Family Practice: Is Treatment Effective?  

OpenAIRE

Obesity is a common condition which has important effects on health status and longevity. This review examines the efficacy of treatments for both moderate and severe obesity. A plan of treatment combining diet, exercise, and behavioral strategies is outlined. Surgery and its complications are reviewed. Eight management issues, including rate of weight loss, self-help groups, and fringe therapies, are presented. Management recommendations are based on a critical review of the weight loss lite...

Sanborn, Margaret D.; Manske, Stephen R.; Schlegel, Ronald P.

1983-01-01

174

Experiences and challenges in implementing complex community-based research project: the Pacific Obesity Prevention in Communities project.  

Science.gov (United States)

Policy makers throughout the world are struggling to find effective ways to prevent the rising trend of obesity globally, particularly among children. The Pacific Obesity Prevention in Communities project was the first large-scale, intervention research project conducted in the Pacific aiming to prevent obesity in adolescents. The project spanned four countries: Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga. This paper reports on the strengths and challenges experienced from this complex study implemented from 2004 to 2009 across eight cultural groups in different community settings. The key strengths of the project were its holistic collaborative approach, participatory processes and capacity building. The challenges inherent in such a large complex project were underestimated during the project's development. These related to the scale, complexity, duration, low research capacity in some sites and overall coordination across four different countries. Our experiences included the need for a longer lead-in time prior to intervention for training and up-skilling of staff in Fiji and Tonga, investment in overall coordination, data quality management across all sites and the need for realistic capacity building requirements for research staff. The enhanced research capacity and skills across all sites include the development and strengthening of research centres, knowledge translation and new obesity prevention projects. PMID:22008555

Schultz, J T; Moodie, M; Mavoa, H; Utter, J; Snowdon, W; McCabe, M P; Millar, L; Kremer, P; Swinburn, B A

2011-11-01

175

After-School Based Obesity Prevention Interventions: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to review primary prevention interventions targeting childhood obesity implemented in the after school environment from 2006 and 2011. A total of 20 interventions were found from 25 studies. Children in the interventions ranged from kindergarten to middle schoolers, however a majority was in the 4th and 5th grades. Most of the interventions targeted both physical activity and dietary behaviors. Among those that focused on only one dimension, physical activity was targeted more than diet. The duration of the interventions greatly varied, but many were short-term or brief. Many interventions were also based on some behavioral theory, with social cognitive theory as the most widely used. Most of the interventions focused on short-term changes, and rarely did any perform a follow-up evaluation. A major limitation among after school interventions was an inadequate use of process evaluations. Overall, interventions resulted in modest changes in behaviors and behavioral antecedents, and results were mixed and generally unfavorable with regards to indicators of obesity. Recommendations for enhancing the effectiveness of after school based childhood obesity interventions are presented.

Manoj Sharma

2012-04-01

176

Reducing obesity among employees of a manufacturing plant: translating the Diabetes Prevention Program to the workplace.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity affects individuals physically and emotionally, contributing to direct and indirect employer costs. Targeted obesity interventions through the Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Core Curriculum offered at the worksite could promote healthy lifestyle decisions resulting in weight improvement among overweight and obese employees. A pretest-posttest cohort design was used to evaluate changes in weight and body mass index among 35 Diabetes Prevention Program participants; they achieved statistically significant changes in body weight (p < .001) and body mass index (p < .001). As a process measure, Diabetes Prevention Program session attendance moderately correlated with weight loss (r = .51; p = .002). Many health care professionals, including occupational health nurses, can implement evidence-based worksite obesity interventions to support employee weight loss. PMID:24702680

Giese, Karla K; Cook, Paul F

2014-04-01

177

Obesity intervention on the healthy lifestyle in childhood: results of the PRESTO (PrEvention STudy of Obesity Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

Background: Due to increasing problems with childhood and adolescent obesity in Austria PRESTO (PrEvention STudy of Obesity created a school based intervention program for promoting a healthy lifestyle in Austrian youth.

Methods: PRESTO was carried out by a multi-disciplinary team including a physician, a psychologist, a nutritionist and an exercise physiologist. The study was carried out in 12 first grade school classes in Austria (2002-2004, mainly in Vienna (N=260. The control group consisted of 231 subjects. Medical examinations were performed and the participantsf knowledge on good nutrition and dietary habits were collected. Twelve nutrition sessions, one hour per week in each class, were conducted. Teachers were advised to discuss health issues in their classes and specific exercise physiologists were informed about how to integrate appropriate exercises into their lessons.

Results: In comparison with control group, classes who performed PRESTO showed a significant knowledge of nutrition, consuming less unhealthy foods. These effects could be observed in the short term (14 weeks and at follow up (10 months. 24% subjects could be classified as being overweight (BMI .90.Perc..

Conclusions: School-oriented intervention programs/studies, like PRESTO, are a potential way to demonstrate positive effect on nutrition, physical activity and healthy behaviours in youth, especially if carried out on a long-term basis. Ultimately PRESTO has proven to be a suitable programme to be disseminated onto schools throughout Austria.

Sabine Dietrich

2008-03-01

178

Effect of Obesity on Arch Index in Young Adults  

OpenAIRE

Background: Excessive increases in weight bearing forces caused by obesity may negatively affect the lower limbs and feet but minimal research has examined the long-term loading effects of obesity on the musculoskeletal system, particularly in reference to the feet. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of obesity on medial longitudinal arch of foot in young adults. Method: 60 subjects, 30 obese & 30 non obese were assessed for height & weight using standard techn...

Sneha Sameer Ganu; Vrushali Panhale

2013-01-01

179

DEVELOPMENT OF HEALTHY FOODS TO PREVENT OBESITY AND OBESITY-RELATED DISEASES  

Science.gov (United States)

Americans pay a staggering $117 billion annually in health care costs associated with obesity-related disease, resulting in close to 300,000 deaths annually. In 2000, the World Health Organization found 300 million people around the globe were obese. The “globesity” epidemic is commonly attributed...

180

"Healthy Eating - Healthy Action": evaluating New Zealand's obesity prevention strategy  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background New Zealand rates of obesity and overweight have increased since the 1980s, particularly among indigenous M?ori people, Pacific people and those living in areas of high deprivation. New Zealand's response to the obesity epidemic has been The Healthy Eating-Healthy Action: Oranga Kai - Oranga Pumau (HEHA) Strategy ('the Strategy'), launched in 2003. Because the HEHA Strategy explicitly recognises the importance of evaluation and the need to create an evidence base to suppo...

Tanuvasa Ausaga; Ehau Terry H; Cumming Jacqueline; Croxson Bronwyn; Buckley Sue; Hoek Janet A; McLean Rachael M; Johnston Margaret; Mann Jim I; Schofield Grant

2009-01-01

181

Prevention of Malnutrition in Children, Slimming Yesterday, Obesity Today  

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Full Text Available Introduction: The future of any nation depends on how its children's care, According to their likely future health needs of the adult population model for healthy living and wealth has increased. One of the most pressing health diet. This study is done to aimed investigate the factors influencing malnutrition in children in the past for weight loss and weight gain can be seen today.   Methods and Methods: Related articles referring to achieve in the field of databases to Google scholar, Pub Med, proquest, SID, Magiran, Springer Link,… and studies until 2013 with the key words malnutrition, child, obesity and examine their English.   Results: In the past, malnutrition was associated with weight loss, but for now he has to weight gain and obesity. Childhood obesity is emerging as a phenomenon caused health problems in childhood and adolescence, including hyperlipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, early puberty, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular. In addition to the health problems of obese children will benefit from the social and psychological problems such as anxiety, fewer friends, loss of confidence, lower education, and fewer chances for marriage.... Overweight in children can be caused by poor eating habits and low activity, which is affected by the parents and the family environment.   Conclusions: Since the patterns learned in childhood affect all life on lifestyle, understand the causes of obesity and to eliminate or reduce them and reinforce the correct patterns of feeding Through education and the incidence is somewhat reduced, especially for parents to deal with this phenomenon.   Keywords: Child,Malnutrition, Obesity    

S Sharafi

2014-04-01

182

Education for childhood obesity prevention across the life-course: workshop conclusions  

Science.gov (United States)

The objectives of this paper are to present the conclusions from the workshop ‘Education for childhood obesity prevention: a life-course approach', coordinated by the Pan-American Health Organization and the Pan-American Health and Education Foundation, and held on 14 June 2012 in Aruba, as part of the II Pan-American Conference on Childhood Obesity (http://www.paco.aw/). This workshop focused on the need to recognize the life-course framework and education as a social determinant of health to address the childhood obesity epidemic through diverse education-based initiatives. Workshop participants agreed that both education per se and the education sector are key for obesity prevention and must form part of multidisciplinary interventions and collaboration between schools, families and the entire society. Capacity building in obesity prevention is required and should include the entire learning community, teachers, leaders, health-care providers, related services personnel, university professors and other interested community members. Obesity prevention initiatives should also engage key community institutions outside the formal education system, including early childhood centers, churches, pediatric/family medicine clinics, among others, to support family nutrition education, healthy food access and daily physical activity—all of which are key to promote a child's ‘healthy weight'. PMID:25018874

Pérez-Escamilla, R; Hospedales, J; Contreras, A; Kac, G

2013-01-01

183

Compositions and Methods for the Control, Prevention, and Treatment of Obesity and Eating Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

Compositions and methods for preventing, treating or controlling conditions or disorders associated with obesity, diet, and nutrition are provided. The methods provided generally involve the administration of an amylin or an amylin agonist to a subject in order to prevent, treat or controlling condi...

184

Identifying interdisciplinary research priorities to prevent and treat pediatric obesity in New York City  

OpenAIRE

It is well recognized that an interdisciplinary approach is essential in the development and implementation of solutions to address the current pediatric obesity epidemic. In two half-day meetings that included workshops and focus groups, faculty from diverse fields identified critically important research challenges and gaps to childhood obesity prevention. The purpose of this white paper is to describe the iterative, interdisciplinary process that unfolded in an academic health center setti...

Gallagher, Dympna; Larson, Elaine L.; Wang, Yun-hsin Claire; Richards, Boyd; Weng, Chunhua; Hametz, Patricia; Begg, Melissa D.; Chung, Wendy K.; Boden-albala, Bernadette; Akabas, Sharon R.

2010-01-01

185

The Central California Regional Obesity Prevention Program: changing nutrition and physical activity environments in California's heartland.  

Science.gov (United States)

The goals of the Central California Regional Obesity Prevention Program (CCROPP) are to promote safe places for physical activity, increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables, and support community and youth engagement in local and regional efforts to change nutrition and physical activity environments for obesity prevention. CCROPP has created a community-driven policy and environmental change model for obesity prevention with local and regional elements in low-income, disadvantaged ethnic and rural communities in a climate of poor resources and inadequate infrastructure. Evaluation data collected from 2005-2009 demonstrate that CCROPP has made progress in changing nutrition and physical activity environments by mobilizing community members, engaging and influencing policymakers, and forming organizational partnerships. PMID:20864732

Schwarte, Liz; Samuels, Sarah E; Capitman, John; Ruwe, Mathilda; Boyle, Maria; Flores, George

2010-11-01

186

Dietary supplementation of chinese ginseng prevents obesity and metabolic syndrome in high-fat diet-fed mice.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity and diabetes are growing health problems worldwide. In this study, dietary provision of Chinese ginseng (0.5?g/kg diet) prevented body weight gain in high-fat (HF) diet-fed mice. Dietary ginseng supplementation reduced body fat mass gain, improved glucose tolerance and whole body insulin sensitivity, and prevented hypertension in HF diet-induced obese mice. Ginseng consumption led to reduced concentrations of plasma insulin and leptin, but had no effect on plasma adiponectin levels in HF diet-fed mice. Body temperature was higher in mice fed the ginseng-supplemented diet but energy expenditure, respiration rate, and locomotive activity were not significantly altered. Dietary intake of ginseng increased fatty acid oxidation in the liver but not in skeletal muscle. Expression of several transcription factors associated with adipogenesis (C/EBP? and PPAR?) were decreased in the adipose tissue of HF diet-fed mice, effects that were mitigated in mice that consumed the HF diet supplemented with ginseng. Abundance of fatty acid synthase (FASN) mRNA was greater in the adipose tissue of mice that consumed the ginseng-supplemented HF diet as compared with control or un-supplemented HF diet-fed mice. Ginseng treatment had no effect on the expression of genes involved in the regulation of food intake in the hypothalamus. These data suggest that Chinese ginseng can potently prevent the development of obesity and insulin resistance in HF diet-fed mice. PMID:25076190

Li, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Jing; Anandh Babu, Pon Velayutham; Zhang, Wei; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Cline, Mark; McMillan, Ryan; Hulver, Matthew; Alkhalidy, Hana; Zhen, Wei; Zhang, Haiyan; Liu, Dongmin

2014-12-01

187

Effects of obesity on vascular potassium channels  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This review is focused on the effects of obesity on function and expression of potassium (K) channels in the vasculature. Five families of K channels have been identified in the vascular wall, calcium-activated K (KCa) channels, inward-rectifier K (KIR) channels, ATP-sensitive K (KATP) channels, voltage-gated K (KV) channels and two-pore domain K (K2P) channels. In endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) opening of K channels leads to hyperpolarisation followed by vasodilatation. In some vascular beds of animal models of obesity, vasodilatation mediated by KCa3.1 and KCa2.3 channels has been reported to remain unaltered or even increased, whereas vasodilatation involving KCa1.1 channel has consistently been reported to be impaired. Changes in expression and function of KIR and KATP channels have also been associated with impaired vasodilatation in animal models of obesity, and therefore activation of these channels may improve endothelial function and reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events. Expression of KV7.x channels is downregulated in small arteries from hypertensive animals and it would be interesting to assess whether these channels contribute to development of hypertension in obese patients. However, the role of KV7.x and K2P channels in regulation of blood pressure remains unexplored compared to other K channels. In conclusion, obesity and metabolic syndrome alter expression, function and sensitivity of vascular K channel subtypes causing smooth muscle dysfunction and probably endothelial dysfunction which makes these patients particularly prone to premature cardiovascular disease. Modulation of K channel activity by use of openers of e.g. KCa and KATP channels may also be attractive to counteract vascular dysfunction observed in obesity.

Climent, Belen; Simonsen, Ulf

2014-01-01

188

Effects of obesity on vascular potassium channels.  

Science.gov (United States)

This review is focused on the effects of obesity on function and expression of potassium (K) channels in the vasculature. Five families of K channels have been identified in the vascular wall, calcium-activated K (KCa) channels, inward-rectifier K (KIR) channels, ATP-sensitive K (KATP) channels, voltage-gated K (KV) channels and two-pore domain K (K2P) channels. In endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) opening of K channels leads to hyperpolarisation followed by vasodilatation. In some vascular beds of animal models of obesity, vasodilatation mediated by KCa3.1 and KCa2.3 channels has been reported to remain unaltered or even increased, whereas vasodilatation involving KCa1.1 channel has consistently been reported to be impaired. Changes in expression and function of KIR and KATP channels have also been associated with impaired vasodilatation in animal models of obesity, and therefore activation of these channels may improve endothelial function and reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events. Expression of KV7.x channels is downregulated in small arteries from hypertensive animals and it would be interesting to assess whether these channels contribute to development of hypertension in obese patients. However, the role of KV7.x and K2P channels in regulation of blood pressure remains unexplored compared to other K channels. In conclusion, obesity and metabolic syndrome alter expression, function and sensitivity of vascular K channel subtypes causing smooth muscle dysfunction and probably endothelial dysfunction which makes these patients particularly prone to premature cardiovascular disease. Modulation of K channel activity by use of openers of e.g. KCa and KATP channels may also be attractive to counteract vascular dysfunction observed in obesity. PMID:24846233

Climent, Belen; Simonsen, Ulf; Rivera, Luis

2014-05-01

189

Public Health Law and the Prevention and Control of Obesity  

OpenAIRE

Context: Obesity constitutes a major public health challenge in the United States. Obesogenic environments have increased owing to the consumption of calorie-dense foods of low nutritional value and the reduction of daily physical activity (e.g., increased portion sizes of meals eaten in and out of the home and fewer physical activity requirements in schools). Policymakers and public health practitioners need to know the best practices and have the competencies to use laws and legal authoriti...

Dietz, William H.; Benken, Donald E.; Hunter, Alicia S.

2009-01-01

190

Psychosocial Perspectives and the Issue of Prevention in Childhood Obesity  

OpenAIRE

A dramatic increase in childhood overweight/obesity has been recognized globally over the past 50?years. This observed increase may reflect genetic, as well as psychological, environmental, and socio-cultural influences. In the first part of this review, we present an updated summary of the psychosocial factors associated with this change and discuss possible ways in which they operate. Among these factors, lower socio economic status (in both industrialized and non-industrialized countries...

Stein, Daniel; Weinberger-litman, Sarah L.; Latzer, Yael

2014-01-01

191

Value creation in childhood obesity care and prevention  

OpenAIRE

Abstract The aim of the thesis is to increase understanding about creation of value in health care. Value is created through knowledge processes in multiprofessional integrated care pathways (ICP) of childhood obesity and defined as health and well-being which benefits the patients, their families, health care organisations and society. An ICP is a practice among Finnish primary and special care which in this study is regarded as the value creating network. Knowledge processes take place ...

Ka?nsa?koski, Helena

2014-01-01

192

Progress on obesity prevention over 20 years in Australia and New Zealand.  

Science.gov (United States)

The lessons learned from over 20 years of obesity prevention efforts in Australia and New Zealand are presented. The obesity epidemic started in the 1980s but poor monitoring systems meant the rise in obesity prevalence initially went undetected. In the 1990 s, experts started advocating for government action; however, it was the rapid increase in media reports on obesity in the early 2000s which created the pressure for action. Several, comprehensive reports produced some programme investment but no regulatory policies were implemented. The powerful food industry lobby ensured this lack of policies on front-of-pack food labelling, restrictions on unhealthy food marketing to children, or taxes on unhealthy foods. The New Zealand government even backpedalled by rescinding healthy school food guidelines and withdrawing funding for the comprehensive national obesity strategy. In 2007, Australian Governments started a major long term-investment in preventive health in order to improve economic productivity. Other positive initiatives, especially in Australia, were: the establishment of several advocacy organizations; successful, long-term, whole-of-community projects reducing childhood obesity; a national knowledge exchange system for practitioners; and some innovative programmes and social marketing. However, despite multiple reports and strong advocacy, key recommended regulatory policies remain unimplemented, largely due to the private sector interests dominating public policy development. PMID:24102746

Swinburn, B; Wood, A

2013-11-01

193

An Examination of Educators' Perceptions of the School's Role in the Prevention of Childhood Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity is a prevalent subject of research currently, and many researchers have studied the effectiveness of school programs in battling obesity among students. This case study, utilizing ethnographic tools of observation, interviews, and investigation of artifacts, examines educators' perceptions of the role of the school in the…

Johnson, Sharon Kay Harris

2011-01-01

194

Initiative for Future Agricultural Food Systems (IFAFS) Healthy Lifestyles Focus of Obesity Prevention Program  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity among children and adults has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. This condition has proven difficult to treat effectively, especially in terms of sustainable weight loss. The project described in this report embarked on multidimensional, community-based efforts to prompt a national discussion of the obesity issue and the…

Kish, Stacy

2008-01-01

195

Preventing childhood obesity during infancy in UK primary care: a mixed-methods study of HCPs' knowledge, beliefs and practice  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background There is a strong rationale for intervening in early childhood to prevent obesity. Over a quarter of infants gain weight more rapidly than desirable during the first six months of life putting them at greater risk of obesity in childhood. However, little is known about UK healthcare professionals' (HCPs) approach to primary prevention. This study explored obesity-related knowledge of UK HCPs and the beliefs and current practice of general practitioners (GPs) and practice n...

Swift Judy A; Siriwardena Aloysius N; Nathan Dilip; Atkinson Philippa J; Redsell Sarah A; Glazebrook Cris

2011-01-01

196

Laboratory, Epidemiological, and Human Intervention Studies Show That Tea (Camellia sinensis) May Be Useful in the Prevention of Obesity12  

OpenAIRE

Tea (Camellia sinensis, Theaceae) and tea polyphenols have been studied for the prevention of chronic diseases, including obesity. Obesity currently affects >20% of adults in the United States and is a risk factor for chronic diseases such as type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Given this increasing public health concern, the use of dietary agents for the prevention of obesity would be of tremendous benefit. Whereas many laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential eff...

Grove, Kimberly A.; Lambert, Joshua D.

2010-01-01

197

Metabolic effects of obesity: A review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available With the many recent advances in the biomedical world, vast changes are taking place in our growing knowledge of the physiological aspects of almost all the tissues and organs of the human body. One of the most prevalent topics of discussion is the question of obesity and its effect on the metabolic changes in the human body. The original classical role of adipose tissue as an energy storage organ has been greatly modified. We now know that it is an endocrine organ, producing adipokines like leptin, adiponectin, visfatin, resistin, apelin, etc, which modulate metabolic processes in the body. Since obesity is associated with an increase in the adipose tissue mass, these hormones may be expected to be produced in increased concentrations and may thus have a significant impact on the macronutrient metabolism. Further, these adipokines may interact with long term energy modulators like insulin. Even though the scientific community has started unravelling the mysteries of the close linkage between obesity, its hormones and their physiological effects, a lot still remains to be discovered. The present discussion makes an attempt to trace the basic modern day concepts of the role of obesity in various metabolic processes.

Parul Singla

2010-07-01

198

A Community-Based Intervention to Prevent Obesity Beginning at Birth among American Indian Children: Study Design and Rationale for the PTOTS Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Eating and physical activity behaviors associated with adult obesity have early antecedents, yet few studies have focused on obesity prevention interventions targeting very young children. Efforts to prevent obesity beginning at birth seem particularly important in populations at risk for early-onset obesity. National estimates indicate that…

Karanja, Njeri; Aickin, Mikel; Lutz, Tam; Mist, Scott; Jobe, Jared B.; Maupome, Gerardo; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl

2012-01-01

199

Does basing an intervention on behavioral theory enhance the efficacy/effectiveness on dietary change for obesity prevention among children? A systematic review and meta-analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

Our purpose was to test whether interventions based on theory, multiple theories, or a formal planning process were more effective in changing fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption among children than interventions with no behavioral theoretical foundation or no formal planning. The authors conducted...

200

[Nutritional laminitis--preventive measures for the obese horse].  

Science.gov (United States)

Nutrition-induced laminitis is often caused by i) fermentation of large amounts of carbohydrates in the hindgut (usually fructans from grass or starch from cereals), which cause the release and absorption of microbial toxins and ii) insulin resistance induced by being overweight (equine metabolic syndrome). Both causes can act together. Overweight horses with a history of laminitis need to reduce body weight to prevent further incidences of laminitis. Weight reduction occurs normally on a diet of late-cut hay, a hay-straw mixture (maximally one third straw to prevent constipation) or grass seed straw all at 1-1.2% of ideal body weight. However, this roughage allowance does not satisfy the need of horses to chew, for which it requires at least 1.5% of ideal body weight. This may lead to behavioural issues, such as allophagia and aggression, and in extreme cases, stereotypic behaviour. Starch concentrates should not be replaced with high fat concentrates. Used saw dust is recommended for bedding. The intake of grass from a pasture has to be considerably and efficiently reduced. If the horse is extremely prone to laminitis or if stable management is unreliable, abstention from grazing is recommended. Any supplements need to be low in energy, and should supply minerals and vitamins which are deficient in the diet. Some additional protein or amino acids may be beneficial. Regular exercise, such as a daily 30-minute speedy trot, improves insulin sensitivity. Exercise increases energy expenditure to a certain extent, allowing a slight increase in the roughage supply, thus alleviating the conflict between energy reduction and fulfilling the need to chew. Weight loss should be 0.5-1% of body weight per week, while at a higher rate there is a potential risk of hyperlipemia. The effectiveness of the reducing diet should be monitored regularly, either by weighing or measuring body, neck or girth circumference (aiming for a reduction of 1-2 cm per week). PMID:23959622

Kienzle, E; Fritz, J

2013-01-01

201

Voluntary exercise prevents colonic inflammation in high-fat diet-induced obese mice by up-regulating PPAR-? activity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity is associated with increased colonic inflammation, which elevates the risk of colon cancer. Although exercise exerts anti-inflammatory actions in multiple chronic diseases associated with inflammation, it is unknown whether this strategy prevents colonic inflammation in obesity. We hypothesized that voluntary exercise would suppress colonic inflammation in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity by modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-?. Male C57Bl/6J mice fed either a control diet (6.5% fat, CON) or a high-fat diet (24% fat, HFD) were divided into sedentary, voluntary exercise or voluntary exercise with PPAR-? antagonist GW9662 (10 mg/kg/day). All interventions took place for 12 weeks. Compared with CON-sedentary group, HFD-sedentary mice gained significantly more body weight and exhibited metabolic disorders. Molecular studies revealed that HFD-sedentary mice had increased expression of inflammatory mediators and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-?B in the colons, which were associated with decreased expression and activity of PPAR-?. Voluntary exercise markedly attenuated body weight gain, improved metabolic disorders, and normalized the expression of inflammatory mediators and activation of NF-?B in the colons in HFD-mice while having no effects in CON-animals. Moreover, voluntary exercise significantly increased expression and activity of PPAR-? in the colons in both HFD- and CON-animals. However, all of these beneficial effects induced by voluntary exercise were abolished by GW9662, which inhibited expression and activity of PPAR-?. The results suggest that decreased PPAR-? activity in the colon of HFD-induced obesity may facilitate the inflammatory response and colon carcinogenesis. Voluntary exercise prevents colonic inflammation in HFD-induced obesity by up-regulating PPAR-? activity. PMID:25701789

Liu, Wei-Xin; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Ying; Xing, Jun-Wei; Zhang, Shen; Gu, Shou-Zhi; Sang, Li-Xuan; Dai, Cong; Wang, Hai-Lan

2015-04-10

202

Recruitment into diabetes prevention programs: what is the impact of errors in self-reported measures of obesity?  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Error in self-reported measures of obesity has been frequently described, but the effect of self-reported error on recruitment into diabetes prevention programs is not well established. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of using self-reported obesity data from the Finnish diabetes risk score (FINDRISC on recruitment into the Greater Green Triangle Diabetes Prevention Project (GGT DPP. Methods The GGT DPP was a structured group-based lifestyle modification program delivered in primary health care settings in South-Eastern Australia. Between 2004–05, 850 FINDRISC forms were collected during recruitment for the GGT DPP. Eligible individuals, at moderate to high risk of developing diabetes, were invited to undertake baseline tests, including anthropometric measurements performed by specially trained nurses. In addition to errors in calculating total risk scores, accuracy of self-reported data (height, weight, waist circumference (WC and Body Mass Index (BMI from FINDRISCs was compared with baseline data, with impact on participation eligibility presented. Results Overall, calculation errors impacted on eligibility in 18 cases (2.1%. Of n?=?279 GGT DPP participants with measured data, errors (total score calculation, BMI or WC in self-report were found in n?=?90 (32.3%. These errors were equally likely to result in under- or over-reported risk. Under-reporting was more common in those reporting lower risk scores (Spearman-rho?=??0.226, p-value? Conclusions Overall FINDRISC was found to be an effective tool to screen and recruit participants at moderate to high risk of diabetes, accurately categorising levels of overweight and obesity using self-report data. The results could be generalisable to other diabetes prevention programs using screening tools which include self-reported levels of obesity.

Hernan Andrea

2012-07-01

203

Ethical Standards to Guide the Development of Obesity Policies and Programs Comment on “Ethical Agreement and Disagreement about Obesity Prevention Policy in the United States”  

OpenAIRE

The recent report by Barnhill and King about obesity prevention policy raises important issues for discussion and analysis. In response, this article raises four points for further consideration. First, a distinction between equality and justice needs to be made and consistently maintained. Second, different theories of justice highlight one additional important source of disagreement about the ethical propriety of the proposed obesity prevention policies. Third, another point of contention a...

David Buchanan

2013-01-01

204

Effect of Obesity on Arch Index in Young Adults  

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Full Text Available Background: Excessive increases in weight bearing forces caused by obesity may negatively affect the lower limbs and feet but minimal research has examined the long-term loading effects of obesity on the musculoskeletal system, particularly in reference to the feet. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of obesity on medial longitudinal arch of foot in young adults. Method: 60 subjects, 30 obese & 30 non obese were assessed for height & weight using standard technique. Radiographic images under static condition were used for calculating the arch index. Result: The arch index of obese subjects was significantly lower than the non obese subjects & there is a negative correlation between the BMI & the arch index. Conclusion: These results suggests that obesity lowers the medial longitudinal arch of foot.

Sneha Sameer Ganu

2013-01-01

205

Acceptability of a School-Based Intervention for the Prevention of Adolescent Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes the development and pilot testing of a computer-based, multiple-behavior obesity prevention program for adolescents. Using the Transtheoretical Model as a framework, this intervention offers individualized feedback based on readiness to engage in physical activity, to consume fruits and vegetables, and to limit television…

Mauriello, Leanne M.; Driskell, Mary Margaret H.; Sherman, Karen J.; Johnson, Sara S.; Prochaska, Janice M.; Prochaska, James O.

2006-01-01

206

Influence of Perceptions on School Nurse Practices to Prevent Childhood Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida…

Quelly, Susan B.

2014-01-01

207

Preventing Obesity in the Military Community (POMC: The Development of a Clinical Trials Research Network  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Obesity impacts the U.S. military by affecting the health and readiness of active duty service members and their families. Preventing Obesity in Military Communities (POMC is a comprehensive research program within Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs in three Military Training Facilities. This paper describes three pilot randomized controlled trials that target critical high risk periods for unhealthy weight gain from birth to young adulthood: (1 pregnancy and early infancy (POMC-Mother-Baby, (2 adolescence (POMC-Adolescent, and (3 the first tour of duty after boot camp (POMC-Early Career. Each study employs a two-group randomized treatment or prevention program with follow up. POMC offers a unique opportunity to bring together research and clinical expertise in obesity prevention to develop state-of-the-art programs within PCMHs in Military Training Facilities. This research builds on existing infrastructure that is expected to have immediate clinical benefits to DoD and far-reaching potential for ongoing collaborative work. POMC may offer an economical approach for widespread obesity prevention, from conception to young adulthood, in the U.S. military as well as in civilian communities.

Elena A. Spieker

2015-01-01

208

Preventing Obesity in the Military Community (POMC): The Development of a Clinical Trials Research Network  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity impacts the U.S. military by affecting the health and readiness of active duty service members and their families. Preventing Obesity in Military Communities (POMC) is a comprehensive research program within Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs) in three Military Training Facilities. This paper describes three pilot randomized controlled trials that target critical high risk periods for unhealthy weight gain from birth to young adulthood: (1) pregnancy and early infancy (POMC-Mother-Baby), (2) adolescence (POMC-Adolescent), and (3) the first tour of duty after boot camp (POMC-Early Career). Each study employs a two-group randomized treatment or prevention program with follow up. POMC offers a unique opportunity to bring together research and clinical expertise in obesity prevention to develop state-of-the-art programs within PCMHs in Military Training Facilities. This research builds on existing infrastructure that is expected to have immediate clinical benefits to DoD and far-reaching potential for ongoing collaborative work. POMC may offer an economical approach for widespread obesity prevention, from conception to young adulthood, in the U.S. military as well as in civilian communities. PMID:25648176

Spieker, Elena A.; Sbrocco, Tracy; Theim, Kelly R.; Maurer, Douglas; Johnson, Dawn; Bryant, Edny; Bakalar, Jennifer L.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Ress, Rachel; Seehusen, Dean; Klein, David A.; Stice, Eric; Yanovski, Jack A.; Chan, Linda; Gentry, Shari; Ellsworth, Carol; Hill, Joanne W.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Stephens, Mark B.

2015-01-01

209

Digging deeper into obesity  

OpenAIRE

The growing problem of obesity is associated with multiple morbidities, including increased risk of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, sleep apnea, and cancer. Obesity promotes disability, decreases productivity, and shortens life span. Although much attention has been focused on diet and exercise, these strategies alone are not effective in preventing obesity and maintaining weight loss. Moreover, the development of pharmacological approaches for obesity treatment has been dogged by poor...

Ahima, Rexford S.

2011-01-01

210

The optimal dietary fat to carbohydrate ratio to prevent obesity in the Japanese population: a review of the epidemiological, physiological and molecular evidence.  

Science.gov (United States)

The prevention of obesity, which leads to diabetes and other diseases, is a major concern for public health. There might be an optimal dietary fat to carbohydrate ratio for prevention and treatment of obesity. According to the Japanese Dietary Reference Intakes (RDA) for 2010, the optimal fat intake is 20-30% of energy for ages 1-29 y and 20-25% for ages 30 y and over. Upper boundary values of this recommendation were the median of the percentage of energy from dietary fat in Japanese. In a systematic review to estimate the optimal dietary fat to carbohydrate ratio, it was found that obese subjects with hyperinsulinemia (or insulin resistance) lost more weight on a mild low-carbohydrate (LC) (or low-glycemic load diet; 40% carbohydrate, 30-35% fat) than on a low-fat (LF) diet (55-60% carbohydrate, 20% fat), whereas those without hyperinsulinemia showed the opposite. In non-obese primarily insulin-sensitive subjects, decreasing fat rather than carbohydrate intake is generally more effective to prevent obesity. Physiological and molecular evidence supports this conclusion. Increased carbohydrate intake, especially in high-glycemic food, leads to postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, which are exaggerated in obese insulin-resistant subjects. Even in an insulin-resistant state, insulin is able to stimulate fatty acid synthesis in liver, activate lipoprotein lipase, and prevent lipolysis in adipose tissues, which all facilitate adipose tissue enlargement. Optimal dietary fat to carbohydrate ratio may differ in populations depending on their prevalence for obesity. Because the prevalence of overweight/obesity in Japanese is low, a LF diet is recommended in the general population. PMID:22472280

Ezaki, Osamu

2011-01-01

211

Evaluation of medical and health economic effectiveness of bariatric surgery (obesity surgery) versus conservative strategies in adult patients with morbid obesity  

OpenAIRE

Background: Obesity with its associated medical, psychological, social, and economic complications is considered a chronic, multifactorial disorder. Given the magnitude of the challenge obesity, there is a clear need for preventive as well as therapeutic measures and strategies on an individual and a public health level. Objectives: The goal of this health technology assessment (HTA)-report is to summarise the current literature on bariatric surgery, to evaluate their medical effectiveness/ef...

Von Schulenburg, Johann-matthias; Willich, Stefan N.; Vauth, Christoph; Roll, Stefanie; Sto?ber, Yvonne; Bockelbring, Angelina

2008-01-01

212

Assessing Cost-Effectiveness in Obesity (ACE-Obesity: an overview of the ACE approach, economic methods and cost results  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the ACE-Obesity study was to determine the economic credentials of interventions which aim to prevent unhealthy weight gain in children and adolescents. We have reported elsewhere on the modelled effectiveness of 13 obesity prevention interventions in children. In this paper, we report on the cost results and associated methods together with the innovative approach to priority setting that underpins the ACE-Obesity study. Methods The Assessing Cost Effectiveness (ACE approach combines technical rigour with 'due process' to facilitate evidence-based policy analysis. Technical rigour was achieved through use of standardised evaluation methods, a research team that assembles best available evidence and extensive uncertainty analysis. Cost estimates were based on pathway analysis, with resource usage estimated for the interventions and their 'current practice' comparator, as well as associated cost offsets. Due process was achieved through involvement of stakeholders, consensus decisions informed by briefing papers and 2nd stage filter analysis that captures broader factors that influence policy judgements in addition to cost-effectiveness results. The 2nd stage filters agreed by stakeholders were 'equity', 'strength of the evidence', 'feasibility of implementation', 'acceptability to stakeholders', 'sustainability' and 'potential for side-effects'. Results The intervention costs varied considerably, both in absolute terms (from cost saving [6 interventions] to in excess of AUD50m per annum and when expressed as a 'cost per child' estimate (from Conclusion The use of consistent methods enables valid comparison of potential intervention costs and cost-offsets for each of the interventions. ACE-Obesity informs policy-makers about cost-effectiveness, health impact, affordability and 2nd stage filters for important options for preventing unhealthy weight gain in children. In related articles cost-effectiveness results and second stage filter considerations for each intervention assessed will be presented and analysed.

Swinburn Boyd

2009-11-01

213

"Healthy Eating - Healthy Action": evaluating New Zealand's obesity prevention strategy  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background New Zealand rates of obesity and overweight have increased since the 1980s, particularly among indigenous M?ori people, Pacific people and those living in areas of high deprivation. New Zealand's response to the obesity epidemic has been The Healthy Eating-Healthy Action: Oranga Kai - Oranga Pumau (HEHA Strategy ('the Strategy', launched in 2003. Because the HEHA Strategy explicitly recognises the importance of evaluation and the need to create an evidence base to support future initiatives, the Ministry of Health has commissioned a Consortium of researchers to evaluate the Strategy as a whole. Methods This paper discusses the Consortium's approach to evaluating the HEHA Strategy. It includes an outline of the conceptual framework underpinning the evaluation, and describes the critical components of the evaluation which are: judging to what extent stakeholders were engaged in the process of the strategy implementation and to what extent their feedback was incorporated in to future iterations of the Strategy (continuous improvement, to what extent the programmes, policies, and initiatives implemented span the target populations and priority areas, whether there have been any population changes in nutrition and/or physical activity outcomes or behaviours relating to those outcomes, and to what extent HEHA Strategy and spending can be considered value for money. Discussion This paper outlines our approach to evaluating a complex national health promotion strategy. Not only does the Evaluation have the potential to identify interventions that could be adopted internationally, but also the development of the Evaluation design can inform other complex evaluations.

Tanuvasa Ausaga

2009-12-01

214

Effects of a 12-week, school-based obesity management program on obese primary school children  

OpenAIRE

Purpose:This study was designed to determine the effects of a school-based obesity-management program on obese primary school children. Methods:A total of 995 children (6&#8211;12 years old) in a primary school were screened in March 2008, and of those, 101 obese students (44 boys and 57 girls, body mass index (BMI) ?#249;5 percentile) were enrolled for a study group. The school- based, obesity management program, which includes physical exercise and nutritional education,...

Han Gyu Kim; Goh-woon Lim; Hae Soon Kim; Young Mi Hong

2010-01-01

215

Childhood Obesity in the Region of Valencia, Spain: Evolution and Prevention Strategies  

OpenAIRE

In this study there are two main aims. The first one is to model and predict the incidence of obesity in the 3-5 years old population in the coming years in the region of Valencia, Spain. The second aim of this research is to use the constructed model to analyze the possible strategies in order to prevent the spread of obesity. At first a logistic regression statistical analysis of sociocultural variables of children with weight problems is performed. The result of this logistic regress...

Morales, A.; Jodar, L.; Gonzalez, G.; Santonja, F. J.; Villanueva, R. J.; Rubio, C.

2008-01-01

216

Education for childhood obesity prevention across the life-course: workshop conclusions  

OpenAIRE

The objectives of this paper are to present the conclusions from the workshop ‘Education for childhood obesity prevention: a life-course approach', coordinated by the Pan-American Health Organization and the Pan-American Health and Education Foundation, and held on 14 June 2012 in Aruba, as part of the II Pan-American Conference on Childhood Obesity (http://www.paco.aw/). This workshop focused on the need to recognize the life-course framework and education as a social determinant of health...

Pe?rez-escamilla, R.; Hospedales, J.; Contreras, A.; Kac, G.

2013-01-01

217

Clinical effects of Bofutsushosan to obese patients  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Performed was a clinical open trial to examine the anti-obesity effect of Bofutsushosan, a Japanese OTC, oriental herbal medicine (ROHTO Pharma. Co., Ltd.) used for constipation release. Subjects were 40-65 years old, 20 females with the body mass index 25-35, who t.i.d. ingested 3 tablets of the medicine, which corresponding to 3.0 g of dried extract of the Bofutsusho material per day, for 6 months (Sep. 2006-Feb. 2007). Before, 3 and 6 months after the beginning of the study, CT imaging was done to measure the fat areas on umbilical cross section for efficacy evaluation, with Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16. Total, subcutaneous and inter-visceral fat areas were found to be significantly reduced by medication as well as improvement in other body-measure, hematological and biochemical parameters related with obesity and metabolism. No significant adverse effects were found. The medicine can be useful for improvement of the so-called metabolic syndrome not only for obesity and constipation. (R.T.)

218

Implementation of an after-school obesity prevention program: helping young children toward improved health.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity prevention programs that are delivered in after-school programs are needed as a focus on curriculum can make it difficult to include this health programming during the school day. The current study examined the implementation of 2 pilot programs in different after-school programs for young children. There were 36 children in the intervention groups and 18 children in comparison groups. Children learned about healthy eating and increasing involvement in physical activity. Lessons were based on the Traffic Light Diet. Results indicated improvement in children's reports of their eating habits. Activity levels improved in 1 school, but not in the other. Parents and children were satisfied with the program and children demonstrated good knowledge of the interventions to promote healthy eating. Future studies should include larger sample sizes and evaluation of the effectiveness of different components of the intervention. Nurses can play a key role in disseminating information and designing and leading after-school programs to improve child knowledge about healthy eating and exercise. Nursing students may also benefit from assisting with conducting these types of programs to improve their experience in health prevention programming. PMID:25365576

Nabors, Laura; Burbage, Michelle; Woodson, Kenneth D; Swoboda, Christopher

2015-03-01

219

Role of PP2C in cardiac lipid accumulation in obese rodents and its prevention by troglitazone.  

Science.gov (United States)

In obese rodents, excess myocardial lipid accumulation (lipotoxicity) of myocardium may cause cardiomyopathy that in the obese Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) fa/fa rat can be prevented by treatment with troglitazone (TGZ). To determine the underlying mechanisms, we measured total 5'-AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) protein and its activated, phosphorylated form, P-AMPK. P-AMPK was significantly reduced in both ZDF fa/fa rat and ob/ob mouse hearts compared with lean, wild-type controls. TGZ treatment of obese ZDF rats, which lowered cardiac lipid content, increased P-AMPK. Expression of protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C), which inactivates AMPK activity by dephosphorylation, was increased in untreated ZDF fa/fa rat hearts, but fell with TGZ treatment, suggesting that PP2C can influence AMPK activity. In cultured myocardiocytes, fatty acids reduced P-AMPK, suggesting a feed-forward effect of lipid overload. Our findings highlight a role of PP2C and AMPK in the derangements of cardiac lipid metabolism in obesity and provide new insights as to the mechanisms of the liporegulatory disorder leading to lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. PMID:15367397

Wang, May-yun; Unger, Roger H

2005-01-01

220

Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too ... what's considered healthy for his or her height. Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories ...

221

Obesity and the challenges of caesarean delivery: Prevention and management of wound complications.  

Science.gov (United States)

Caesarean section in obese patients is associated with an increased risk of surgical wound complications, including haematoma, seroma, abscess and dehiscence. This review focusses on the available strategies to decrease wound complications in this population, and on the clinical management of these situations. Appropriate dose of prophylactic antibiotics, closure of the subcutaneous tissue, and avoidance of subcutaneous drains reduce the incidence of wound complications associated with caesarean section in obese patients. For treatment of superficial wound infection associated with dehiscence, there are data from general surgery patients to suggest that the use of vacuum-assisted devices leads to faster healing and that surgical reclosure is preferable to healing by secondary intention, when there are no signs of ongoing infection. There is a need for stronger evidence regarding the prevention and management of wound complications for caesarean section in obese women. PMID:25457856

Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo

2015-04-01

222

Preventing Risk for Obesity by Promoting Self-Regulation and Decision-Making Skills: Pilot Results from the PATHWAYS to Health Program (PATHWAYS)  

Science.gov (United States)

The overall aim of the two school-based pilot studies was to evaluate whether an approach to prevention that focused on changing child impulse control, decision making, and social competence can be effective in changing attitudes toward food intake and physical activity as risk factors for obesity. The strategy used was to translate specific…

Riggs, Nathaniel R.; Sakuma, Kari-Lyn Kobayakawa; Pentz, Mary Ann

2007-01-01

223

Relationships between the Family Environment and School-Based Obesity Prevention Efforts: Can School Programs Help Adolescents Who Are Most in Need?  

Science.gov (United States)

Identifying factors that contribute to students' behavior and weight improvements during school-based obesity prevention interventions is critical for the development of effective programs. The current study aims to determine whether the support and resources that adolescent girls received from their families were associated with improvements in…

Bauer, K. W.; Neumark-Sztainer, D.; Hannan, P. J.; Fulkerson, J. A.; Story, M.

2011-01-01

224

Preventing childhood obesity, phase II feasibility study focusing on South Asians: BEACHeS  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective To assess feasibility and acceptability of a multifaceted, culturally appropriate intervention for preventing obesity in South Asian children, and to obtain data to inform sample size for a definitive trial. Design Phase II feasibility study of a complex intervention. Setting 8 primary schools in inner city Birmingham, UK, within populations that are predominantly South Asian. Participants 1090 children aged 6–8?years took part in the intervention. 571 (85.9% from South Asian background) underwent baseline measures. 85.5% (n=488) were followed up 2?years later. Interventions The 1-year intervention consisted of school-based and family-based activities, targeting dietary and physical activity behaviours. The intervention was modified and refined throughout the period of delivery. Main outcome measures Acceptability and feasibility of the intervention and of measurements required to assess outcomes in a definitive trial. The difference in body mass index (BMI) z-score between arms was used to inform sample size calculations for a definitive trial. Results Some intervention components (increasing school physical activity opportunities, family cooking skills workshops, signposting of local leisure facilities and attending day event at a football club) were feasible and acceptable. Other components were acceptable, but not feasible. Promoting walking groups was neither acceptable nor feasible. At follow-up, children in the intervention compared with the control group were less likely to be obese (OR 0.41; 0.19 to 0.89), and had lower adjusted BMI z-score (?0.15 kg/m2; 95% CI ?0.27 to ?0.03). Conclusions The feasibility study informed components for an intervention programme. The favourable direction of outcome for weight status in the intervention group supports the need for a definitive trial. A cluster randomised controlled trial is now underway to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Trial registration number ISRCTN51016370. PMID:24722198

Adab, Peymané; Pallan, Miranda J; Cade, Janet; Ekelund, Ulf; Barrett, Timothy; Daley, Amanda; Deeks, Jonathan; Duda, Joan; Gill, Paramjit; Parry, Jayne; Bhopal, Raj; Cheng, K K

2014-01-01

225

NET-Works: Linking families, communities and primary care to prevent obesity in preschool-age children?,??  

OpenAIRE

Obesity prevention in children offers a unique window of opportunity to establish healthful eating and physical activity behaviors to maintain a healthful body weight and avoid the adverse proximal and distal long-term health consequences of obesity. Given that obesity is the result of a complex interaction between biological, behavioral, family-based, and community environmental factors, intervention at multiple levels and across multiple settings is critical for both short- and long-term ef...

Sherwood, Nancy E.; French, Simone A.; Veblen-mortenson, Sara; Crain, A. Lauren; Berge, Jerica; Kunin-batson, Alicia; Mitchell, Nathan; Senso, Meghan

2013-01-01

226

Preventing Obesity in Canada’s Aboriginal Children: Not Just a Matter of Eating Right and Getting Active  

OpenAIRE

Obesity is a growing issue for all children. Many experts say that preventing obesity is largely a matter of eating the right foods and getting enough physical activity. This advice doesn’t recognize the fact that First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children face unique barriers to growing up healthy and strong simply because of theiridentity. This paper discusses how the social determinants of health impact the ability of Aboriginal children to grow up free of obesity. The paper highlights re...

Ferris, Melanie A.

2011-01-01

227

CHILDHOOD OBESITY  

OpenAIRE

Childhood obesity has important consequences for health and wellbeing both during childhood and also in later adult life. The rising prevalence of childhood obesity poses a major public health challenge in both developed and developing countries by increasing the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases. Despite the urgent need for effective preventative strategies, there remains disagreement over its definition due to a lack of evidence on the optimal cut-offs linking childhood BMI to dis...

Lakshman, Rajalakshmi; Elks, Cathy E.; Ong, Ken K.

2012-01-01

228

Preventing Obesity in Canada’s Aboriginal Children: Not Just a Matter of Eating Right and Getting Active  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Obesity is a growing issue for all children. Many experts say that preventing obesity is largely a matter of eating the right foods and getting enough physical activity. This advice doesn’t recognize the fact that First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children face unique barriers to growing up healthy and strong simply because of theiridentity. This paper discusses how the social determinants of health impact the ability of Aboriginal children to grow up free of obesity. The paper highlights results from a community-based research project conducted amongst Aboriginal parents and service providers in Ontario who wish to prevent obesity amongst their ownyoung children and clients. Research was carried out over two years to help develop a “toolkit” and training program to help service provides increase efforts to prevent obesity amongst First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children from the ages of 2 to 6 in Ontario.

Melanie A. Ferris

2011-05-01

229

A holistic food labelling strategy for preventing obesity and dental caries.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity and dental caries in childhood are among the major public health concerns described as a global pandemic because of their global distribution and severe consequences. A consensus has developed as to a recently emerging and alarming common risk factor that leads to the double burden of dental caries and obesity; energy-dense foods (sugar-coated cereals, high-sugar yogurt, soft drinks) are becoming very popular among children because of their dense marketing, cheaper price, increased supply and variety. Implementation of health-promoting and -supporting marketing strategies for healthy food can be one initial cornerstone for successful application of the common risk factor approach in prevention of obesity and dental caries, as also suggested by World Health Organization. Labelling healthy food with a 'health-friendly' logo, illustrating that the teeth and the heart are both parts of the whole body (standing side by side supporting each other as close friends), both happy and protected because of consumption of healthy food for the whole body, can promote the foods that are friendly to health of the whole body, implementing the common risk factor approach under a single theme. Labelling healthy food as 'health-friendly' based on an international consensus will provide a clear and uniform picture of what is healthy to eat and result in an international integrated programme for prevention of obesity and caries. PMID:19207877

Cinar, A B; Murtomaa, H

2009-05-01

230

A holistic food labelling strategy for preventing obesity and dental caries  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Obesity and dental caries in childhood are among the major public health concerns described as a global pandemic because of their global distribution and severe consequences. A consensus has developed as to a recently emerging and alarming common risk factor that leads to the double burden of dental caries and obesity; energy-dense foods (sugar-coated cereals, high-sugar yogurt, soft drinks) are becoming very popular among children because of their dense marketing, cheaper price, increased supply and variety. Implementation of health-promoting and -supporting marketing strategies for healthy food can be one initial cornerstone for successful application of the common risk factor approach in prevention of obesity and dental caries, as also suggested by World Health Organization. Labelling healthy food with a 'health-friendly' logo, illustrating that the teeth and the heart are both parts of the whole body (standing side by side supporting each other as close friends), both happy and protected because of consumption of healthy food for the whole body, can promote the foods that are friendly to health of the whole body, implementing the common risk factor approach under a single theme. Labelling healthy food as 'health-friendly' based on an international consensus will provide a clear and uniform picture of what is healthy to eat and result in an international integrated programme for prevention of obesity and caries.

Cinar, A B; Murtomaa, H

2009-01-01

231

SPRING: an RCT study of probiotics in the prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus in overweight and obese women  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is increasing in the child-bearing population as are the rates of gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is associated with higher rates of Cesarean Section for the mother and increased risks of macrosomia, higher body fat mass, respiratory distress and hypoglycemia for the infant. Prevention of gestational diabetes through life style intervention has proven to be difficult. A Finnish study showed that ingestion of specific probiotics altered the composition of the gut microbiome and thereby metabolism from early gestation and decreased rates of gestational diabetes in normal weight women. In SPRING (the Study of Probiotics IN the prevention of Gestational diabetes, the effectiveness of probiotics ingestion for the prevention of gestational diabetes will be assessed in overweight and obese women. Methods/design SPRING is a multi-center, prospective, double-blind randomized controlled trial run at two tertiary maternity hospitals in Brisbane, Australia. Five hundred and forty (540 women with a BMI > 25.0 kg/m2 will be recruited over 2 years and receive either probiotics or placebo capsules from 16 weeks gestation until delivery. The probiotics capsules contain > 1x109 cfu each of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12 per capsule. The primary outcome is diagnosis of gestational diabetes at 28 weeks gestation. Secondary outcomes include rates of other pregnancy complications, gestational weight gain, mode of delivery, change in gut microbiome, preterm birth, macrosomia, and infant body composition. The trial has 80% power at a 5% 2-sided significance level to detect a >50% change in the rates of gestational diabetes in this high-risk group of pregnant women. Discussion SPRING will show if probiotics can be used as an easily implementable method of preventing gestational diabetes in the high-risk group of overweight and obese pregnant women.

Nitert Marloes Dekker

2013-02-01

232

The molecular mechanisms of offspring effects from obese pregnancy.  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

The incidence of obesity, increased weight gain and the popularity of high-fat \\/ high-sugar diets are seriously impacting upon the global population. Billions of individuals are affected, and although diet and lifestyle are of paramount importance to the development of adult obesity, compelling evidence is emerging which suggests that maternal obesity and related disorders may be passed on to the next generation by non-genetic means. The processes acting within the uteri of obese mothers may permanently predispose offspring to a diverse plethora of diseases ranging from obesity and diabetes to psychiatric disorders. This review aims to summarise some of the molecular mechanisms and active processes currently known about maternal obesity and its effect on foetal and neonatal physiology and metabolism. Complex and multifactorial networks of molecules are intertwined and culminate in a pathologically synergistic manner to cause disruption and disorganisation of foetal physiology. This altered phenotype may potentiate the cycle of intergenerational transmission of obesity and related disorders.

Dowling, Daniel

2013-01-01

233

The effects of obesity on venous thromboembolism: A review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Obesity has emerged as a global health issue that is associated with wide spectrum of disorders, including coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, stroke, and venous thromboembolism (VTE. VTE is one of the most common vascular disorders in the United States and Europe and is associated with significant mortality. Although the association between obesity and VTE appears to be moderate, obesity can interact with other environmental or genetic factors and pose a significantly greater risk of VTE among individuals who are obese and who are exposed simultaneously to several other risk factors for VTE. Therefore, identification of potential interactions between obesity and certain VTE risk factors might offer some critical points for VTE interventions and thus minimize VTE morbidity and mortality among patients who are obese. However, current obesity measurements have limitations and can introduce contradictory results in the outcome of obesity. To overcome these limitations, this review proposes several future directions and suggests some avenues for prevention of VTE associated with obesity as well.

Genyan Yang

2012-11-01

234

Treating Child Obesity and Associated Medical Conditions  

Science.gov (United States)

With American children on course to grow into the most obese generation of adults in history, Sonia Caprio argues that it is critical to develop more effective strategies for preventing childhood obesity and treating serious obesity-related health complications. She notes that although pediatricians are concerned about the obesity problem, most…

Caprio, Sonia

2006-01-01

235

The Memphis Girls health Enrichment Multi-site Studies (GEMS): An Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Two-Year Obesity Prevention Intervention in African-American Girls  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective To determine the efficacy of a 2-year obesity prevention intervention in African-American girls. Design Memphis GEMS (Girls health Enrichment Multi-site Studies) was a controlled trial in which girls were randomly assigned to an obesity prevention or alternative intervention. Setting Local community centers and YMCAs in Memphis, Tennessee. Participants Girls ages 8-to-10 years (n=303) who were identified by a parent as African-American and had body mass index (BMI) ?25th percentile for age or one parent with BMI ?25 kg/m2. Interventions Group behavioral counseling to promote healthy eating and increased physical activity (obesity prevention intervention) or self-esteem and social efficacy (alternative intervention). Main Outcome Measure BMI at 2 years. Results BMI increased in all girls with no treatment effect (obesity prevention minus alternative) at 2 years (0.09, 95% CI: ?0.40, 0.58) kg/m2. Two-year treatment effects in the expected direction were observed for servings/day of sweetened beverages (?0.19, 95% CI=?0.39, 0.09), water (0.21, 95% CI=0.03, 0.40), and vegetables (0.15, 95% CI=?0.02, 0.30), but there were no effects on physical activity. Post-hoc analyses suggested a treatment effect in younger girls (interaction P=.081). BMI difference at 2 years was ?2.41 [?4.38, 0.02] in girls initially aged 8 and ?1.02 [?2.31, 0.27] kg/m2 in those initially aged 10. Conclusions The lack of significant BMI change at 2 years indicates that this intervention alone is insufficient for obesity prevention. Effectiveness may require more explicit behavioral change goals and a stronger physical activity component as well as supportive changes in environmental contexts. PMID:21041593

Klesges, Robert C.; Obarzanek, Eva; Kumanyika, Shiriki; Murray, David M.; Klesges, Lisa M.; Relyea, George E.; Stockton, Michelle B.; Lanctot, Jennifer Q.; Beech, Bettina M.; McClanahan, Barbara S.; Sherrill-Mittleman, Deborah; Slawson, Deborah L.

2010-01-01

236

A systematic policy approach to changing the food system and physical activity environments to prevent obesity.  

Science.gov (United States)

As obesity prevention becomes an increasing health priority in many countries, including Australia and New Zealand, the challenge that governments are now facing is how to adopt a systematic policy approach to increase healthy eating and regular physical activity. This article sets out a structure for systematically identifying areas for obesity prevention policy action across the food system and full range of physical activity environments. Areas amenable to policy intervention can be systematically identified by considering policy opportunities for each level of governance (local, state, national, international and organisational) in each sector of the food system (primary production, food processing, distribution, marketing, retail, catering and food service) and each sector that influences physical activity environments (infrastructure and planning, education, employment, transport, sport and recreation). Analysis grids are used to illustrate, in a structured fashion, the broad array of areas amenable to legal and regulatory intervention across all levels of governance and all relevant sectors. In the Australian context, potential regulatory policy intervention areas are widespread throughout the food system, e.g., land-use zoning (primary production within local government), food safety (food processing within state government), food labelling (retail within national government). Policy areas for influencing physical activity are predominantly local and state government responsibilities including, for example, walking and cycling environments (infrastructure and planning sector) and physical activity education in schools (education sector). The analysis structure presented in this article provides a tool to systematically identify policy gaps, barriers and opportunities for obesity prevention, as part of the process of developing and implementing a comprehensive obesity prevention strategy. It also serves to highlight the need for a coordinated approach to policy development and implementation across all levels of government in order to ensure complementary policy action. PMID:18534001

Sacks, Gary; Swinburn, Boyd A; Lawrence, Mark A

2008-01-01

237

Community-based interventions for obesity prevention: lessons learned by Australian policy-makers  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Interest in community-based interventions (CBIs) for health promotion is increasing, with a lot of recent activity in the field. This paper aims, from a state government perspective, to examine the experience of funding and managing six obesity prevention CBIs, to identify lessons learned and to consider the implications for future investment. Specifically, we focus on the planning, government support, evaluation, research and workforce development required. Methods The le...

Haby Michelle M; Doherty Rebecca; Welch Nicky; Mason Vicky

2012-01-01

238

A qualitative examination of home and neighborhood environments for obesity prevention in rural adults  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background The home and neighborhood environments may be important in obesity prevention by virtue of food availability, food preparation, cues and opportunities for physical activity, and family support. To date, little research has examined how home and neighborhood environments in rural communities may support or hinder healthy eating and physical activity. This paper reports characteristics of rural homes and neighborhoods related to physical activity environments, availability o...

Ballard Denise; Alcantara Iris; Escoffery Cam; Kegler Michelle C; Glanz Karen

2008-01-01

239

Understanding the Social Networks That Form within the Context of an Obesity Prevention Intervention  

OpenAIRE

Background. Antiobesity interventions have generally failed. Research now suggests that interventions must be informed by an understanding of the social environment. Objective. To examine if new social networks form between families participating in a group-level pediatric obesity prevention trial. Methods. Latino parent-preschool child dyads (N = 79) completed the 3-month trial. The intervention met weekly in consistent groups to practice healthy lifestyles. The control met monthly in incons...

Gesell, Sabina B.; Bess, Kimberly D.; Barkin, Shari L.

2012-01-01

240

Obesity in African-American Early to Middle-Aged Females: Prevention and Treatment through Education  

OpenAIRE

The objective of this study was to develop an educational program for African-American females on diet and exercise in the treatment and prevention of obesity. African-American female participants aged 30-50 with a Body Mass Index (BMI) over 25 were recruited for inclusion in the study. A qualitative assessment was completed which observed the attitudes, personal beliefs, dietary and physical risk factors regarding weight loss before and after an educational interven...

DeAllen Millender; Dnp, Nbsp; Whnp, Nbsp

2014-01-01

241

Using Social Network Analysis to Identify Key Child Care Center Staff for Obesity Prevention Interventions: A Pilot Study  

OpenAIRE

Introduction. Interest has grown in how systems thinking could be used in obesity prevention. Relationships between key actors, represented by social networks, are an important focus for considering intervention in systems. Method. Two long day care centers were selected in which previous obesity prevention programs had been implemented. Measures showed ways in which physical activity and dietary policy are conversations and actions transacted through social networks (interrelationships) with...

Jennifer Marks; Barnett, Lisa M.; Chad Foulkes; Penelope Hawe; Steven Allender

2013-01-01

242

Assessing Family Level Behaviors for Obesity Prevention: Development and Preliminary Validation of the Family Stage of Change Tool  

OpenAIRE

We applied the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) to develop the Family Stage of Change (FSOC) screening tool. Our goal was to provide practitioners an instrument that measures families’ readiness to change obesity preventing behaviors, in order to optimize family-focused obesity-prevention intervention strategies. We evaluated instrument validity by comparing responses on the FSOC to related items on a validated family behavioral and environmental assessment (Family Nutrition and Physical Acti...

Gunter, Katherine B.; Patrick Abi Nader; Klein, Brendan D.; John, Deborah H.

2014-01-01

243

Parental perceptions regarding healthy behaviours for preventing overweight and obesity in young children: a systematic review of qualitative studies.  

Science.gov (United States)

Evidence is increasingly pointing towards the importance of early life strategies to prevent childhood overweight and obesity. This systematic review synthesizes qualitative research concerning parental perceptions regarding behaviours for preventing overweight and obesity in young children. During May and June 2008, a range of electronic databases were searched and together with lateral searching techniques 21 studies were identified for review. Data extraction and synthesis using thematic content analysis revealed six organizing and 32 finer level themes. These related to child factors, family dynamics, parenting, knowledge and beliefs, extra-familial influences and resources and environment. Themes were mapped to a socioecological model which illustrated how factors at individual, interpersonal, community, organizational and societal levels interact in complex ways to impact on parental perceptions about healthy behaviours for preventing child overweight. Although parents suggested several ideas to promote healthy child weight-related behaviours, many of their views concerned perceived barriers, some of which may be amenable to practical intervention. Furthermore, intergenerational influences on parental health beliefs and knowledge suggest that health promotion strategies may be more effective if directed at the wider family, rather than parents alone. Significantly, many parents believed strategies to promote healthy weight should start early in a child's life. PMID:19780989

Pocock, M; Trivedi, D; Wills, W; Bunn, F; Magnusson, J

2010-05-01

244

The Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (INFANT an early intervention to prevent childhood obesity: Cluster-randomised controlled trial  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple factors combine to support a compelling case for interventions that target the development of obesity-promoting behaviours (poor diet, low physical activity and high sedentary behaviour from their inception. These factors include the rapidly increasing prevalence of fatness throughout childhood, the instigation of obesity-promoting behaviours in infancy, and the tracking of these behaviours from childhood through to adolescence and adulthood. The Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (INFANT aims to determine the effectiveness of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention delivered to first-time parents. The intervention, conducted with parents over the infant's first 18 months of life, will use existing social networks (first-time parent's groups and an anticipatory guidance framework focusing on parenting skills which support the development of positive diet and physical activity behaviours, and reduced sedentary behaviours in infancy. Methods/Design This cluster-randomised controlled trial, with first-time parent groups as the unit of randomisation, will be conducted with a sample of 600 first-time parents and their newborn children who attend the first-time parents' group at Maternal and Child Health Centres. Using a two-stage sampling process, local government areas in Victoria, Australia will be randomly selected at the first stage. At the second stage, a proportional sample of first-time parent groups within selected local government areas will be randomly selected and invited to participate. Informed consent will be obtained and groups will then be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. Discussion The early years hold promise as a time in which obesity prevention may be most effective. To our knowledge this will be the first randomised trial internationally to demonstrate whether an early health promotion program delivered to first-time parents in their existing social groups promotes healthy eating, physical activity and reduced sedentary behaviours. If proven to be effective, INFANT may protect children from the development of obesity and its associated social and economic costs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN81847050

Campbell Karen

2008-03-01

245

The Positive Effects of Yerba Maté (Ilex paraguariensis) in Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide over the past three decades. Global anti-obesity strategies focus on dietary and lifestyle modifications to slow the development of obesity. Research in the nutrition field has recently aroused considerable interest based on the potential of natural products to counteract obesity. Several studies have identified yerba maté (Ilex paraguariensis) as an excellent candidate. In this review, we evaluated the impact of yerba maté on obesity and obesity-related inflammation. Cellular studies demonstrate that yerba maté suppresses adipocyte differentiation and triglyceride accumulation and reduces inflammation. Animal studies show that yerba maté modulates signaling pathways that regulate adipogenesis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and insulin signaling responses. In summary, the data presented here showed that the use of yerba maté might be useful against obesity, improving the lipid parameters in humans and animal models. In addition, yerba maté modulates the expression of genes that are changed in the obese state and restores them to more normal levels of expression. In doing so, it addresses several of the abnormal and disease-causing factors associated with obesity. Protective and ameliorative effects on insulin resistance were also observed. Thus, as a general conclusion, it seems that yerba maté beverages and supplements might be helpful in the battle against obesity. PMID:25621503

Gambero, Alessandra; Ribeiro, Marcelo L.

2015-01-01

246

Community Engagement for Culturally Appropriate Obesity Prevention in Hispanic Mother-child Dyads  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity affects approximately 20% of US preschool children. Early prevention is needed to reduce young children’s risks for obesity, especially among Hispanic preschool children who have one of the highest rates of obesity. Vida Saludable was an early childhood obesity intervention designed to be culturally appropriate for low-income Hispanic mothers with preschool children to improve maternal physical activity and reduce children’s sugar sweetened beverage consumption. It was conducted at a large southwestern United States urban health center. Presented here are the methods and rationale employed to develop and culturally adapt Vida Saludable, followed by scoring and ranking of the intervention’s cultural adaptations. An empowered community helped design the customized, culturally relevant program via a collaborative partnership between two academic research institutions, a community health center, and stakeholders. Improved health behaviors in the participants may be attributed in part to this community-engagement approach. The intervention’s cultural adaptations were scored and received a high comprehensive rank. Post-program evaluation of the intervention indicated participant satisfaction. The information presented provides investigators with guidelines, a template, and a scoring tool for developing, implementing, and evaluating culturally adapted interventions for ethnically diverse populations. PMID:24595163

Clark, Mary Jo; Gahagan, Sheila

2013-01-01

247

A Meta-Analytic Review of Obesity Prevention in the Schools: 1997-2008  

Science.gov (United States)

A meta-analysis was conducted on school-based interventions to reduce obesity in children. Sixty-six (k = 66, N = 31,059) comparisons from 40 published studies from 1997 through 2008 were included in analyses. Results indicated a significant effect for school-based interventions with an overall weighted effect size of r = 0.05. Several moderating…

Cook-Cottone, Catherine; Casey, Carolyn M.; Feeley, Thomas Hugh; Baran, Jennifer

2009-01-01

248

Prevenção primária de doenças cardiovasculares na obesidade infantojuvenil: efeito anti-inflamatório do exercício físico Early prevention of cardiovascular diseases in juvenile obesity: the anti-inflammatory effect of physical exercise  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A pandemia da obesidade juvenil e do sedentarismo está relacionada com o maior risco de doenças cardiovasculares no futuro. Ambas com fisiopatologia inflamatória, essas condições têm atraído significativa atenção científica. O início dos eventos que agridem o endotélio vascular pode ocorrer na infância, porém, sinais clínicos da aterosclerose geralmente só aparecem na fase adulta. O tecido adiposo é hoje reconhecido por seu papel ativo, induzindo a produção de citocinas pró e anti-inflamatórias, como o fator de necrose tumoral-alfa, as interleucinas 1, 6 e 10, a proteína C-reativa e outras. Há várias evidências de que os níveis sanguíneos dessas citocinas se encontram mais altos em indivíduos com excesso de peso, inclusive crianças e adolescentes. A prevenção precoce, desde a infância, apresenta-se como a melhor maneira de evitar os danos da obesidade na fase adulta, enquanto o potencial da prática regular de exercícios físicos tem se mostrado surpreendente. Sua ação anti-inflamatória se manifesta através de menores concentrações séricas de interleucina 6, de proteína C-reativa e leptina, além de aumentos na adiponectina. Observa-se escassez de estudos randomizados e controlados avaliando as relações entre obesidade, inflamação e exercícios para a população jovem. Com resultados às vezes controversos, a maioria das conclusões é procedentede estudos com adultos. O objetivo desta revisão é avaliar o papel anti-inflamatório, e assim cardioprotetor, da atividade física regular na obesidade infantojuvenil.Nowadays, juvenile obesity and physical inactivity are pandemic conditions which relate to a greater future risk of cardiovascular diseases. From an inflammatory point of view, they have attracted massive scientific attention. The beginning of the events related to atherosclerosis may occur in childhood, generating endothelial and metabolic dysfunction; however, the symptoms usually only appear later on, in adulthood. The fat tissue is recognized as being metabolically active, stimulating the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as the tumoral necrosis factor, interleukines 1, 6 and 10, C-reactive protein, among others. There is plenty of evidence that the serum levels of these citokines are higher in overweight individuals, including children and adolescents. Early prevention as young as possible is the best way to avoid future consequences of obesity. In this context, the potential benefits of regular physical exercise have been surprising. Researchers have shown evidence of anti-inflammatory responses, including lower levels of interleukine 6, C-reactive protein, leptin, besides higher levels of adiponectins after engagement in regular physical activity. However, we still have few controlled randomized studies addressing the relations between obesity, inflammation and exercise for the pediatric population. There are controversial findings in this field, and many of them come from adult studies. Thus, the purpose of the present review is to evaluate the metabolic role of physical exercise in juvenile obesity, aiming at heart protection.

Márcia Braz Rossetti

2009-12-01

249

Prevenção primária de doenças cardiovasculares na obesidade infantojuvenil: efeito anti-inflamatório do exercício físico / Early prevention of cardiovascular diseases in juvenile obesity: the anti-inflammatory effect of physical exercise  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available A pandemia da obesidade juvenil e do sedentarismo está relacionada com o maior risco de doenças cardiovasculares no futuro. Ambas com fisiopatologia inflamatória, essas condições têm atraído significativa atenção científica. O início dos eventos que agridem o endotélio vascular pode ocorrer na infân [...] cia, porém, sinais clínicos da aterosclerose geralmente só aparecem na fase adulta. O tecido adiposo é hoje reconhecido por seu papel ativo, induzindo a produção de citocinas pró e anti-inflamatórias, como o fator de necrose tumoral-alfa, as interleucinas 1, 6 e 10, a proteína C-reativa e outras. Há várias evidências de que os níveis sanguíneos dessas citocinas se encontram mais altos em indivíduos com excesso de peso, inclusive crianças e adolescentes. A prevenção precoce, desde a infância, apresenta-se como a melhor maneira de evitar os danos da obesidade na fase adulta, enquanto o potencial da prática regular de exercícios físicos tem se mostrado surpreendente. Sua ação anti-inflamatória se manifesta através de menores concentrações séricas de interleucina 6, de proteína C-reativa e leptina, além de aumentos na adiponectina. Observa-se escassez de estudos randomizados e controlados avaliando as relações entre obesidade, inflamação e exercícios para a população jovem. Com resultados às vezes controversos, a maioria das conclusões é procedentede estudos com adultos. O objetivo desta revisão é avaliar o papel anti-inflamatório, e assim cardioprotetor, da atividade física regular na obesidade infantojuvenil. Abstract in english Nowadays, juvenile obesity and physical inactivity are pandemic conditions which relate to a greater future risk of cardiovascular diseases. From an inflammatory point of view, they have attracted massive scientific attention. The beginning of the events related to atherosclerosis may occur in child [...] hood, generating endothelial and metabolic dysfunction; however, the symptoms usually only appear later on, in adulthood. The fat tissue is recognized as being metabolically active, stimulating the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as the tumoral necrosis factor, interleukines 1, 6 and 10, C-reactive protein, among others. There is plenty of evidence that the serum levels of these citokines are higher in overweight individuals, including children and adolescents. Early prevention as young as possible is the best way to avoid future consequences of obesity. In this context, the potential benefits of regular physical exercise have been surprising. Researchers have shown evidence of anti-inflammatory responses, including lower levels of interleukine 6, C-reactive protein, leptin, besides higher levels of adiponectins after engagement in regular physical activity. However, we still have few controlled randomized studies addressing the relations between obesity, inflammation and exercise for the pediatric population. There are controversial findings in this field, and many of them come from adult studies. Thus, the purpose of the present review is to evaluate the metabolic role of physical exercise in juvenile obesity, aiming at heart protection.

Márcia Braz, Rossetti; Raquel Rodrigues, Britto; Rocksane de Carvalho, Norton.

2009-12-01

250

Life Course Impact of School-Based Promotion of Healthy Eating and Active Living to Prevent Childhood Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The Alberta Project Promoting active Living and healthy Eating in Schools (APPLE Schools) is a comprehensive school health program that is proven feasible and effective in preventing obesity among school aged children. To support decision making on expanding this program, evidence on its long-term health and economic impacts is particularly critical. In the present study we estimate the life course impact of the APPLE Schools programs in terms of future body weights and avoided health care costs. Method We modeled growth rates of body mass index (BMI) using longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey collected between 1996–2008. These growth rate characteristics were used to project BMI trajectories for students that attended APPLE Schools and for students who attended control schools (141 randomly selected schools) in the Canadian province of Alberta. Results Throughout the life course, the prevalence of overweight (including obesity) was 1.2% to 2.8% (1.7 on average) less among students attending APPLE Schools relative to their peers attending control schools. The life course prevalence of obesity was 0.4% to 1.4% (0.8% on average) less among APPLE Schools students. If the APPLE Schools program were to be scaled up, the potential cost savings would be $33 to 82 million per year for the province of Alberta, or $150 to 330 million per year for Canada. Conclusions These projected health and economic benefits seem to support broader implementation of school-based health promotion programs. PMID:25025581

Tran, Bach Xuan; Ohinmaa, Arto; Kuhle, Stefan; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Veugelers, Paul J.

2014-01-01

251

Support for obesity policy: The effect of perceptions of causes for obesity and national identity in Canada  

OpenAIRE

Interventions in Canada to address obesity have largely been limited to individual-level change through education rather than a population-level public policy approach. Little is known about obesity policy support in Canada, and substantial national variation in obesity policy support prevents direct transferability of these policies among nations. Our study recruited 521 young adults for an online survey through leaflets and flyers. We investigated how respondents’ demographics, health cha...

Ryan Lange; Guy Faulkner

2012-01-01

252

Transgenerational effects of obesogens and the obesity epidemic.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the last three decades there has been a dramatic, worldwide increase in the incidence of obesity, particularly in Western societies. This trend has required a significant economic investment to treat obesity-related disorders such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. There is an urgent need to understand the factors that contribute to this increase in obesity in order to find new tools that will improve quality of life in affected individuals and to avoid the propagation of obesity to future generations. Endocrine disrupting chemicals have become an important piece of the obesity epidemic puzzle but little is known about the mechanism underlying their effects. In this commentary, we highlight recent work showing that the consequences of ancestral exposure to obesogenic chemicals results in the transmission of obesity-related phenotypes through at least three generations. PMID:25460228

Chamorro-García, Raquel; Blumberg, Bruce

2014-12-01

253

Indomethacin treatment prevents high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance but not glucose intolerance in C57BL/6J Mice  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Chronic low grade inflammation is closely linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance. To examine how administration of the anti-inflammatory compound indomethacin, a general cyclooxygenase inhibitor, affected obesity development and insulin sensitivity, we fed obesity-prone male C57BL/6J mice a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet or a regular diet supplemented or not with indomethacin (±INDO) for 7 weeks. Development of obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance was monitored, and the effect of indomethacin on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was measured in vivo and in vitro using MIN6 ?-cells. We found that supplementation with indomethacin prevented HF/HS-induced obesity and diet-induced changes in systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, HF/HS+INDO-fed mice remained insulin-sensitive. However, mice fed HF/HS+INDO exhibited pronounced glucose intolerance. Hepatic glucose output was significantly increased. Indomethacin had no effect on adipose tissue mass, glucose tolerance, or GSIS when included in a regular diet. Indomethacin administration to obese mice did not reduce adipose tissue mass, and the compensatory increase in GSIS observed in obese mice was not affected by treatment with indomethacin. We demonstrate that indomethacin did not inhibit GSIS per se, but activation of GPR40 in the presence of indomethacin inhibited glucose-dependent insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. We conclude that constitutive high hepatic glucose output combined with impaired GSIS in response to activation of GPR40-dependent signaling in the HF/HS+INDO-fed mice contributed to the impaired glucose clearance during a glucose challenge and that the resulting lower levels of plasma insulin prevented the obesogenic action of the HF/HS diet.

Fjære, Even; Aune, Ulrike Liisberg

2014-01-01

254

Indomethacin Treatment Prevents High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance but Not Glucose Intolerance in C57BL/6J Mice  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Chronic low grade inflammation is closely linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance. To examine how administration of the anti-inflammatory compound indomethacin, a general cyclooxygenase inhibitor, affected obesity development and insulin sensitivity, we fed obesity-prone male C57BL/6J mice a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet or a regular diet supplemented or not with indomethacin (±INDO) for 7 weeks. Development of obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance was monitored, and the effect of indomethacin on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was measured in vivo and in vitro using MIN6 ?-cells. We found that supplementation with indomethacin prevented HF/HS-induced obesity and diet-induced changes in systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, HF/HS+INDO-fed mice remained insulin-sensitive. However, mice fed HF/HS+INDO exhibited pronounced glucose intolerance. Hepatic glucose output was significantly increased. Indomethacin had no effect on adipose tissue mass, glucose tolerance, or GSIS when included in a regular diet. Indomethacin administration to obese mice did not reduce adipose tissue mass, and the compensatory increase in GSIS observed in obese mice was not affected by treatment with indomethacin. We demonstrate that indomethacin did not inhibit GSIS per se, but activation of GPR40 in the presence of indomethacin inhibited glucose-dependent insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. We conclude that constitutive high hepatic glucose output combined with impaired GSIS in response to activation of GPR40-dependent signaling in the HF/HS+INDO-fed mice contributed to the impaired glucose clearance during a glucose challenge and that the resulting lower levels of plasma insulin prevented the obesogenic action of the HF/HS diet.

Fjære, Even; Aune, Ulrike L

2014-01-01

255

Treating Pediatric Obesity in the Primary Care Setting to Prevent Chronic Disease  

Science.gov (United States)

BACKGROUND The national and international epidemic of chronic disease, including among children, is largely fueled by increasing obesity. It is recommended that primary care play a key role in the treatment of pediatric obesity. METHODS A written survey was administered to providers and staff at 13 primary care practices across North Carolina, assessing perceptions on multiple dimensions of pediatric obesity treatment and knowledge of dietitian services. RESULTS The response rate for the survey was 66.9% (n = 273). Although providers reported feeling comfortable and confident in many areas of childhood obesity, perceived effectiveness was low. Moreover, comfort and confidence were lower for non–primary care providers (PCPs) involved in obesity treatment than for PCPs, and PCP comfort and confidence levels were low for the ability to conduct motivational interviewing and for knowledge of billing for obesity as a diagnosis. Personnel perceived that there were benefits to having a registered dietitian (RD) in their practice and generally understood RD capacity. Survey results provided no evidence that integration of an RD into the practice changed perceptions or knowledge over the course of 1 year. LIMITATIONS The present study included only 13 practices, mostly rural and all of at least moderate size. CONCLUSION Significant change is required if primary care practices are to play the role envisioned for them in stemming childhood obesity and chronic disease. Change will require identifying and addressing specific knowledge and skill gaps, such as those identified in this study. Respondents’ positive perceptions of the benefits of RD integration suggest the importance of exploring this clinical model. PMID:22619846

Silberberg, Mina; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Murphy, Gwen; Mayhew, Meghan; Kolasa, Kathryn; Perrin, Eliana M.; Armstrong, Sarah; Graham, Cameron; Menon, Nidu

2012-01-01

256

An Obesity Dietary Quality Index Predicts Abdominal Obesity in Women: Potential Opportunity for New Prevention and Treatment Paradigms  

OpenAIRE

Background. Links between dietary quality and abdominal obesity are poorly understood. Objective. To examine the association between an obesity-specific dietary quality index and abdominal obesity risk in women. Methods. Over 12 years, we followed 288 Framingham Offspring/Spouse Study women, aged 30–69 years, without metabolic syndrome risk factors, cardiovascular disease, cancer, or diabetes at baseline. An 11-nutrient obesity-specific dietary quality index was derived using mean ranks...

Wolongevicz, Dolores M.; Lei Zhu; Pencina, Michael J.; Amp Agostino, Ralph B. D.; Millen, Barbara E.; Newby, P. K.; Kimokoti, Ruth W.

2010-01-01

257

Mechanisms of the anti-obesity effects of oxytocin in diet-induced obese rats  

OpenAIRE

Apart from its role during labor and lactation, oxytocin is involved in several other functions. Interestingly, oxytocin- and oxytocin receptor-deficient mice develop late-onset obesity with normal food intake, suggesting that the hormone might exert a series of beneficial metabolic effects. This was recently confirmed by data showing that central oxytocin infusion causes weight loss in diet-induced obese mice. The aim of the present study was to unravel the mechanisms underlying such benefic...

Deblon, Nicolas; Veyrat-durebex, Christelle; Bourgoin, Lucie; Caillon, Aure?lie; Bussier, Anne-lise; Petrosino, Stefania; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Legros, Jean-jacques; Geenen, Vincent; Foti, Michelangelo; Wahli, Walter; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Rohner-jeanrenaud, Franc?oise

2011-01-01

258

UNCROC and the prevention of childhood obesity: the right not to have food advertisements on television.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses how legal rights-based discourse could inform the response of Australian State and federal governments to the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity. The authors contend that the principles in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (a treaty which has been ratified but not implemented) are capable of providing a basis for a legislative program to prevent childhood obesity. It is argued that an approach to legislation which is grounded on the basis of children's rights would require that there be restrictions on advertising food to children. The authors set out specific proposals for legislative reforms which the federal Parliament could enact to implement the Convention so as to restrict advertising to children. The scope of the discussion is then expanded to consider the implications of rights-based discourse in broader public health contexts. PMID:18807794

Ingleby, Richard; Prosser, Lauren; Waters, Elizabeth

2008-08-01

259

Effects of gastrointestinal motility on obesity  

OpenAIRE

Background: Changes of gastrointestinal motility, which are important related to the food digestion and absorption in the gastrointestinal tract, may be one of the factors in obesity-formation. Aims The changes of gastrointestinal motility were explored in the rats from diet-induced obesity (DIO), diet-induced obese resistant (DR) or control (CON) by diet intervention. Methods: After fed with a high fat diet (HFD), 100 male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into DIO, DR and CON groups. The r...

Fu, Xiao-yi; Li, Ze; Zhang, Na; Yu, Hai-tao; Wang, Shu-ran; Liu, Jia-ren

2014-01-01

260

Anti-Obesity Effect of Artemisia capillaris Extracts in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study evaluated the anti-obesity effects of Artemisia capillaris extracts in high-fat diet (HFD-induced obese rats. After six weeks feeding with HFD, Wistar male rats (12-weeks-old were divided into three groups: HFD-control group and HFD mixed with 0.4% and 0.8% Artemisia capillaris extracts treated groups. After seven weeks of treatments, the body weight gain of the 0.4% and 0.8% A. capillaris extracts treated groups were significantly less than that of the HFD-control group by 11.8% and 15.4%, respectively. Also, A. capillaris extracts treated groups showed significantly lower serum TG, TC and LDL-c levels in a dose-related manner, while causing the reverse effect in serum HDL-c, and exhibited a hepatoprotective effects in vivo, indicated by reduced hepatic lipid contents, and serum ALT and AST levels. These results show that A. capillaris extracts may prevent body weight increases and improve dyslipidemia in HFD-induced obese rats by enhancing their lipid metabolism.

Yu-Jung Jang

2013-08-01

261

Deletion of skeletal muscle SOCS3 prevents insulin resistance in obesity  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation that contributes to defects in energy metabolism and insulin resistance. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3 expression is increased in skeletal muscle of obese humans. SOCS3 inhibits leptin signaling in the hypothalamus and insulin signal transduction in adipose tissue and the liver. Skeletal muscle is an important tissue for controlling energy expenditure and whole-body insulin sensitivity; however, the physiological importance of SOCS3 in this tissue has not been examined. Therefore, we generated mice that had SOCS3 specifically deleted in skeletal muscle (SOCS MKO). The SOCS3 MKO mice had normal muscle development, body mass, adiposity, appetite, and energy expenditure compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Despite similar degrees of obesity when fed a high-fat diet, SOCS3 MKO mice were protected against the development of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance because of enhanced skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and Akt phosphorylation that resulted in increased skeletal muscle glucose uptake. These data indicate that skeletal muscle SOCS3 does not play a critical role in regulating muscle development or energy expenditure, but it is an important contributing factor for inhibiting insulin sensitivity in obesity. Therapies aimed at inhibiting SOCS3 in skeletal muscle may be effective in reversing obesity-related glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.

Beck JØrgensen, Sebastian; O'Neill, Hayley M

2013-01-01

262

Prevention of obesity-induced renal injury in male mice by DPP4 inhibition.  

Science.gov (United States)

Therapies to prevent renal injury in obese hypertensive individuals are being actively sought due to the obesity epidemic arising from the Western diet (WD), which is high in fructose and fat. Recently, activation of the immune system and hyperuricemia, observed with high fructose intake, have been linked to the pathophysiology of hypertension and renal injury. Because dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) is a driver of maladaptive T-cell/macrophage responses, renal-protective benefits of DPP4 inhibition in the WD-fed mice were examined. Mice fed a WD for 16 weeks were given the DPP4 inhibitor MK0626 in their diet beginning at 4 weeks of age. WD-fed mice were obese, hypertensive, and insulin-resistant and manifested proteinuria and increased plasma DPP4 activity and uric acid levels. WD-fed mice also had elevated kidney DPP4 activity and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and IL-12 levels and suppressed IL-10 levels in the kidney, suggesting macrophage-driven inflammation, glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury. WD-induced increases in DPP4 activation in the plasma and kidney and proteinuria in WD mice were abrogated by MK0626, although blood pressure and systemic insulin sensitivity were not improved. Contemporaneously, MK0626 reduced serum uric acid levels, renal oxidative stress, and IL-12 levels and increased IL-10 levels, suggesting that suppression of DPP4 activity leads to suppression of renal immune/inflammatory injury responses to a WD. Taken together, these results demonstrate that DPP4 inhibition prevents high-fructose/high-fat diet-induced glomerular and tubular injury independent of blood pressure/insulin sensitivity and offers a potentially novel therapy for diabetic and obesity-related kidney disease. PMID:24712875

Nistala, Ravi; Habibi, Javad; Lastra, Guido; Manrique, Camila; Aroor, Annayya R; Hayden, Melvin R; Garro, Mona; Meuth, Alex; Johnson, Megan; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R

2014-06-01

263

Piloting proactive marketing to recruit disadvantaged adults to a community-wide obesity prevention program.  

Science.gov (United States)

Population-wide obesity prevention and treatment programs are fundamental to addressing the increasing overweight and obesity rates in socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. Innovative recruitment strategies, including proactive marketing strategies, are needed to ensure such programs have universal reach and target vulnerable populations. This study aimed to determine the success of proactive recruitment to Australia's Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) and to assess whether the recruitment strategy influenced participants' outcomes. Sociodemographic information was collected from all GHS participants who joined the service between February 2009 and August 2013, and anthropometric information regarding behavioural risk factors was collected from all GHS coaching participants at baseline and six months. Data were analysed according to the participants' referral source (self-referral and secondary referral versus proactive recruitment). Participants recruited through proactive marketing were more likely to be male, aged 50 years or older, have high school education, not be in paid employment and be from the lowest three quintiles of socioeconomic advantage. The risk factor profile of coaching participants recruited through proactive marketing did not vary significantly from those recruited via other mechanisms, although they were less likely to be obese and less likely to have a higher 'at risk' waist circumference measurement. Proactively recruited coaching participants reported significant improvements from baseline to six months (consistent with improvements made by participants recruited through other strategies), although they were significantly more likely to withdraw from coaching before they completed the six-month program.Proactive marketing facilitated use of an obesity prevention service; similar services may have greater reach if proactive marketing recruitment strategies are used. These strategies could be encouraged to assist such services to achieve optimal population impact among hard-to-reach populations. PMID:25848739

O'Hara, Blythe J; Eggins, Dianne; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Milat, Andrew J; Bauman, Adrian E; Wiggers, John

2015-01-01

264

Comparison of child obesity prevention and control content in mainstream and Spanish-language US parenting magazines.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mass media coverage of child obesity is rising, paralleling the child obesity epidemic's growth, and there is evidence that parents seek parenting advice from media sources. Yet little to no research has examined the coverage of child obesity in parenting magazines or Spanish-language media. The purpose of this study was to use qualitative and quantitative content analysis methods to identify, quantify, and compare strategies for child obesity prevention and control presented in mainstream and Spanish-language US parenting magazines. Child obesity-related editorial content in 68 mainstream and 20 Spanish-language magazine issues published over 32 months was gathered. Magazine content was coded with a manual developed by refining themes from the sample and from an evidence-based child obesity prevention action plan. Seventy-three articles related to child obesity prevention and control were identified. Most focused on parental behavior change rather than environmental change, and only 3 in 10 articles referred to the social context in which parental behavior change takes place. Child obesity-focused articles were not given high prominence; only one in four articles in the entire sample referred to child obesity as a growing problem or epidemic. Key differences between genres reflect culturally important Latino themes, including family focus and changing health beliefs around child weight status. Given mass media's potential influence on parenting practices and public perceptions, nutrition communication professionals and registered dietitians need to work to reframe media coverage of childhood obesity as an environmental problem that requires broad-based policy solutions. Spanish-speaking media can be an ally in helping Latina women change cultural health beliefs around child weight status. PMID:23260730

Kalin, Sari R; Fung, Teresa T

2013-01-01

265

A Controlled Evaluation of a School-Based Obesity Prevention in Turkish School Children  

Science.gov (United States)

This research was conducted to assess the effect of a weight management program in Turkish school children with overweight and obesity. Forty one students formed the intervention group while 40 students formed the control group in two elementary schools. Students in intervention group were given seven training sessions in a period of 2.5 months.…

Toruner, Ebru Kilicarslan; Savaser, Sevim

2010-01-01

266

Feasibility and Acceptability of an Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention: Results from the Healthy Homes, Healthy Families Pilot Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention designed to empower low-income racially/ethnically diverse parents to modify their children's health behaviors. Methods. We used a prospective design with pre-/posttest evaluation of 50 parent-child pairs (children aged 2 to 5 years) to examine potential changes in dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors among children at baseline and four-month follow-up. Results. 39 (78%) parent-child pairs completed evaluation data at 4-month follow-up. Vegetable intake among children significantly increased at follow-up (0.54 cups at 4 months compared to 0.28 cups at baseline, P = 0.001) and ounces of fruit juice decreased at follow-up (11.9 ounces at 4 months compared to 16.0 ounces at baseline, P = 0.036). Sedentary behaviors also improved. Children significantly decreased time spent watching TV on weekdays (P < 0.01) and also reduced weekend TV time. In addition, the number of homes with TV sets in the child's bedroom also decreased (P < 0.0013). Conclusions. The findings indicate that a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention is feasible, acceptable and demonstrates short-term effects on dietary and sedentary behaviors of low-income racially/ethnically diverse children. PMID:25405026

Gorham, Gemma

2014-01-01

267

Hydroxytyrosol prevents diet-induced metabolic syndrome and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in obese mice.  

Science.gov (United States)

A Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil has profound influence on health outcomes including metabolic syndrome. However, the active compound and detailed mechanisms still remain unclear. Hydroxytyrosol (HT), a major polyphenolic compound in virgin olive oil, has received increased attention for its antioxidative activity and regulation of mitochondrial function. Here, we investigated whether HT is the active compound in olive oil exerting a protective effect against metabolic syndrome. In this study, we show that HT could prevent high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice after 17 weeks supplementation. Within liver and skeletal muscle tissues, HT could decrease HFD-induced lipid deposits through inhibition of the SREBP-1c/FAS pathway, ameliorate HFD-induced oxidative stress by enhancing antioxidant enzyme activities, normalize expression of mitochondrial complex subunits and mitochondrial fission marker Drp1, and eventually inhibit apoptosis activation. Moreover, in muscle tissue, the levels of mitochondrial carbonyl protein were decreased and mitochondrial complex activities were significantly improved by HT supplementation. In db/db mice, HT significantly decreased fasting glucose, similar to metformin. Notably, HT decreased serum lipid, at which metformin failed. Also, HT was more effective at decreasing the oxidation levels of lipids and proteins in both liver and muscle tissue. Similar to the results in the HFD model, HT decreased muscle mitochondrial carbonyl protein levels and improved mitochondrial complex activities in db/db mice. Our study links the olive oil component HT to diabetes and metabolic disease through changes that are not limited to decreases in oxidative stress, suggesting a potential pharmaceutical or clinical use of HT in metabolic syndrome treatment. PMID:24316371

Cao, Ke; Xu, Jie; Zou, Xuan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Cong; Zheng, Adi; Li, Hao; Li, Hua; Szeto, Ignatius Man-Yau; Shi, Yujie; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang; Feng, Zhihui

2014-02-01

268

Make a Difference at Your School! CDC Resources Can Help You Implement Strategies to Prevent Obesity Among Children and Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reviews scientific evidence to determine which school-based policies and practices are most likely to improve key health behaviors among young people, including physical activity and healthy eating. In this document, the CDC identifies ten strategies to help schools prevent obesity by promoting…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008

2008-01-01

269

Factors associated with obesity in children  

OpenAIRE

Childhood obesity is a major public health crisis nationally and internationally. The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased over few years. It is caused by imbalance between calorie intake and calories utilized. One or more factors (genetic, behavioral, and environmental) cause obesity in children. Physical, psychological, and social health problems are caused due to childhood obesity. Hence, effective intervention strategies are being used to prevent and control obesity in children. ...

Ashwin Kumar

2012-01-01

270

The Early Prevention of Obesity in CHildren (EPOCH Collaboration - an Individual Patient Data Prospective Meta-Analysis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts to prevent the development of overweight and obesity have increasingly focused early in the life course as we recognise that both metabolic and behavioural patterns are often established within the first few years of life. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs of interventions are even more powerful when, with forethought, they are synthesised into an individual patient data (IPD prospective meta-analysis (PMA. An IPD PMA is a unique research design where several trials are identified for inclusion in an analysis before any of the individual trial results become known and the data are provided for each randomised patient. This methodology minimises the publication and selection bias often associated with a retrospective meta-analysis by allowing hypotheses, analysis methods and selection criteria to be specified a priori. Methods/Design The Early Prevention of Obesity in CHildren (EPOCH Collaboration was formed in 2009. The main objective of the EPOCH Collaboration is to determine if early intervention for childhood obesity impacts on body mass index (BMI z scores at age 18-24 months. Additional research questions will focus on whether early intervention has an impact on children's dietary quality, TV viewing time, duration of breastfeeding and parenting styles. This protocol includes the hypotheses, inclusion criteria and outcome measures to be used in the IPD PMA. The sample size of the combined dataset at final outcome assessment (approximately 1800 infants will allow greater precision when exploring differences in the effect of early intervention with respect to pre-specified participant- and intervention-level characteristics. Discussion Finalisation of the data collection procedures and analysis plans will be complete by the end of 2010. Data collection and analysis will occur during 2011-2012 and results should be available by 2013. Trial registration number ACTRN12610000789066

Simes John

2010-11-01

271

Natural food science based novel approach toward prevention and treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes: recent studies on brown rice and ?-oryzanol.  

Science.gov (United States)

The prevalences of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are dramatically increasing, and there is a strong need for more effective and safer therapies. However, some of drugs show limited efficacy and considerable adverse effects. Furthermore, artificial energy-dense foods and non-caloric foods may promote overeating and weight gain. In this context, a natural food-based approach may represent a valuable means of tackling the obesity-diabetes syndrome. Although recent studies have shown that brown rice improves glucose intolerance and prevents obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We found that one of the major components of brown rice, ?-oryzanol (Orz), plays an important role in the metabolically beneficial effects of brown rice. Orz acts as a chemical chaperone and decreases high fat diet (HFD)-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the hypothalamus, thereby leading to a significant shift in preference from fatty to healthy foods. Orz also decreases HFD-induced ER stress in pancreatic ?-cells and improves ?-cell function. Notably, Orz directly acts on pancreatic islets and enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). This evidence highlights food preference as a promising therapeutic target in obesity-diabetes syndrome and suggests that brown rice and Orz may have potential for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. PMID:23697584

Kozuka, Chisayo; Yabiku, Kouichi; Takayama, Chitoshi; Matsushita, Masayuki; Shimabukuro, Michio

2013-01-01

272

Weight loss and physical activity for disease prevention in obese older adults: an important role for lifestyle management.  

Science.gov (United States)

Weight loss in older adults has been a controversial topic for more than a decade. An obesity paradox has been previously described and the issue of weight status on health outcomes remains a highly debated topic. However, there is little doubt that physical activity (PA) has a myriad of benefits in older adults, especially in obese individuals who are inactive and have a poor cardiometabolic profile. In this review, we offer a critical view to clarify misunderstandings regarding the obesity paradox, particularly as it relates to obese older adults. We also review the evidence on PA and lifestyle interventions for the improvement of cardiorespiratory fitness, which can prevent disease and provide benefits to obese older adults, independent of weight changes. PMID:25183491

Valencia, Willy Marcos; Stoutenberg, Mark; Florez, Hermes

2014-10-01

273

Structured triacylglycerol containing behenic and oleic acids suppresses triacylglycerol absorption and prevents obesity in rats  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary 1(3-behenoyl-2,3(1-dioleoyl-rac-glycerol (BOO has been reported to inhibit pancreatic lipase activity in vitro and suppress postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia in humans. In the present study, the anti-obesity activities of BOO and its inhibitory effects on lymphatic triacylglycerol (TAG absorption were investigated in rats. Methods In Experiment 1, rats were fed either BOO or soybean oil (SO diet for 6 weeks. In the BOO diet, 20% of SO was replaced with an experimental oil rich in BOO. In Experiments 2 and 3, rats cannulated in the thoracic duct were administered an emulsions containing trioleoylglycerol (OOO or an oil mixture (OOO:BOO, 9:1. Tri[1-14C]oleoylglycerol (14C-OOO was added to the emulsions administered in Experiment 3. Results No observable differences were detected in food intake or body weight gain between the BOO and SO groups in Experiment 1. Plasma and liver TAG concentrations and visceral fat weights were significantly lower in the BOO group than in the SO group. The apparent absorption rate of fat was significantly lower in the BOO group than in the SO group. In Experiment 2, the lymphatic recovery of oleic and behenic acids was significantly lower at 5 and 6 h after BOO administration than after OOO administration. In Experiment 3, the lymphatic recovery of 14C-OOO was significantly lower at 5 and 6 h after BOO administration than after OOO administration. Conclusions These results suggest that BOO prevents deposition of visceral fat and hepatic TAG by lowering and delaying intestinal absorption of TAG.

Takamatsu Kiyoharu

2010-07-01

274

Inhibitory effects of sweet cherry anthocyanins on the obesity development in C57BL/6 mice.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the present study, purified sweet cherry anthocyanins (CACN) were evaluated to determine their inhibitory effects on adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and their anti-obesity properties in male C57BL/6 mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD). CACN prevented HFD-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice. In vivo experiment revealed that 40 and 200?mg/kg of CACN in food reduced the body weight by 5.2% and 11.2%, respectively. CACN supplementation could also reduce the size of adipocytes, leptin secretion, serum glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and liver triglycerides. Furthermore, CACN could effectively reduce the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF? genes, markedly increase the SOD and GPx activity. Our results indicated that CACN slowed down the development of HFD-induced obesity in male C57BL/6 mice. PMID:24224922

Wu, Tao; Tang, Qiong; Yu, Zhuoping; Gao, Zichun; Hu, Hao; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ting

2014-05-01

275

Obesity Prevention from Conception: A Workshop to Guide the Development of a Pan-Canadian Trial Targeting the Gestational Period  

OpenAIRE

This report summarizes a meeting, Obesity Prevention from Conception, held in Ottawa in 2012. This planning workshop was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to bring together researchers with expertise in the area of maternal obesity (OB) and weight gain in pregnancy and pregnancy-related disease to attend a one-day workshop and symposium to discuss the development of a cross-Canada lifestyle intervention trial for targeting pregnant women. This future intervention wil...

Adamo, Kristi B.; Shen, Garry X.; Michelle Mottola; Simony Nascimento; Sonia Jean-Philippe; Ferraro, Zachary M.; Kara Nerenberg; Graeme Smith; Radha Chari; Laura Gaudet; Helena Piccinini-Vallis; Sarah McDonald; Stephanie Atkinson; Ariane Godbout; Julie Robitaille

2014-01-01

276

Differential effects of dietary protein sources on postprandial low-grade inflammation after a single high fat meal in obese non-diabetic subjects  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Obesity is a state of chronic low-grade inflammation. Chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with the pathophysiology of both type-2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. Prevention or reduction of chronic low-grade inflammation may be advantageous in relation to obesity related co-morbidity. In this study we investigated the acute effect of dietary protein sources on postprandial low-grade inflammatory markers after a high-fat meal in obese non-diabetic subjects. Methods We...

Herzig Karl-Heinz; Pedersen Steen B; Mortensen Lene S; Karhu Toni; Holmer-Jensen Jens; Hermansen Kjeld

2011-01-01

277

Increasing community capacity to prevent childhood obesity: challenges, lessons learned and results from the Romp & Chomp intervention  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a major public health issue; however, only limited evidence is available about effective ways to prevent obesity, particularly in early childhood. Romp & Chomp was a community-wide obesity prevention intervention conducted in Geelong Australia with a target group of 12,000 children aged 0-5 years. The intervention had an environmental and capacity building focus and we have recently demonstrated that the prevalence of overweight/obesity was lower in intervention children, post-intervention. Capacity building is defined as the development of knowledge, skills, commitment, structures, systems and leadership to enable effective health promotion and the aim of this study was to determine if the capacity of the Geelong community, represented by key stakeholder organisations, to support healthy eating and physical activity for young children was increased after Romp & Chomp. Methods A mixed methods evaluation with three data sources was utilised. 1 Document analysis comprised assessment of the documented formative and intervention activities against a capacity building framework (five domains: Partnerships, Leadership, Resource Allocation, Workforce Development, and Organisational Development; 2 Thematic analysis of key informant interviews (n = 16; and 3 the quantitative Community Capacity Index Survey. Results Document analysis showed that the majority of the capacity building activities addressed the Partnerships, Resource Allocation and Organisational Development domains of capacity building, with a lack of activity in the Leadership and Workforce Development domains. The thematic analysis revealed the establishment of sustainable partnerships, use of specialist advice, and integration of activities into ongoing formal training for early childhood workers. Complex issues also emerged from the key informant interviews regarding the challenges of limited funding, high staff turnover, changing governance structures, lack of high level leadership and unclear communication strategies. The Community Capacity Index provided further evidence that the project implementation network achieved a moderate level of capacity. Conclusions Romp & Chomp increased the capacity of organisations, settings and services in the Geelong community to support healthy eating and physical activity for young children. Despite this success there are important learnings from this mixed methods evaluation that should inform current and future community-based public health and health promotion initiatives. Trial Registration Number ANZCTRN12607000374460

de Groot Florentine P

2010-08-01

278

Evaluation of a Coordinated School-Based Obesity Prevention Program in a Hispanic Community: Choosing Healthy and Active Lifestyles for Kids/healthy Schools Healthy Families  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Obesity is a public health concern that disproportionately affects underserved and minority communities. Purpose: To evaluate whether a comprehensive obesity prevention program that targets children and school staff in an underserved Hispanic community affects obesity related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among both students and…

Berger-Jenkins, Evelyn; Rausch, John; Okah, Ebiere; Tsao, Daisy; Nieto, Andres; Lyda, Elizabeth; Meyer, Dodi; McCord, Mary

2014-01-01

279

Evaluation of a multiple ecological level child obesity prevention program: Switch® what you Do, View, and Chew  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Schools are the most frequent target for intervention programs aimed at preventing child obesity; however, the overall effectiveness of these programs has been limited. It has therefore been recommended that interventions target multiple ecological levels (community, family, school and individual to have greater success in changing risk behaviors for obesity. This study examined the immediate and short-term, sustained effects of the Switch program, which targeted three behaviors (decreasing children's screen time, increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, and increasing physical activity at three ecological levels (the family, school, and community. Methods Participants were 1,323 children and their parents from 10 schools in two states. Schools were matched and randomly assigned to treatment and control. Measures of the key behaviors and body mass index were collected at baseline, immediately post-intervention, and 6 months post-intervention. Results The effect sizes of the differences between treatment and control groups ranged between small (Cohen's d = 0.15 for body mass index at 6 months post-intervention to large (1.38; parent report of screen time at 6 months post-intervention, controlling for baseline levels. There was a significant difference in parent-reported screen time at post-intervention in the experimental group, and this effect was maintained at 6 months post-intervention (a difference of about 2 hours/week. The experimental group also showed a significant increase in parent-reported fruit and vegetable consumption while child-reported fruit and vegetable consumption was marginally significant. At the 6-month follow-up, parent-reported screen time was significantly lower, and parent and child-reported fruit and vegetable consumption was significantly increased. There were no significant effects on pedometer measures of physical activity or body mass index in the experimental group. The intervention effects were moderated by child sex (for fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and weight status, family involvement (for fruit and vegetable consumption, and child body mass index (for screen time. The perception of change among the experimental group was generally positive with 23% to 62% indicating positive changes in behaviors. Conclusion The results indicate that the Switch program yielded small-to-modest treatment effects for promoting children's fruit and vegetable consumption and minimizing screen time. The Switch program offers promise for use in youth obesity prevention.

Callahan Randi

2009-09-01

280

Estrogen signaling prevents diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance in male mice with obesity.  

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The development of insulin resistance in the liver is a key event that drives dyslipidemia and predicts diabetes and cardiovascular risk with obesity. Clinical data show that estrogen signaling in males helps prevent adiposity and insulin resistance, which may be mediated through estrogen receptor-? (ER?). The tissues and pathways that mediate the benefits of estrogen signaling in males with obesity are not well defined. In female mice, ER? signaling in the liver helps to correct pathway-selective insulin resistance with estrogen treatment after ovariectomy. We assessed the importance of liver estrogen signaling in males using liver ER?-knockout (LKO) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). We found that the LKO male mice had decreased insulin sensitivity compared with their wild-type floxed (fl/fl) littermates during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. Insulin failed to suppress endogenous glucose production in LKO mice, indicating liver insulin resistance. Insulin promoted glucose disappearance in LKO and fl/fl mice similarly. In the liver, insulin failed to induce phosphorylation of Akt-Ser(473) and exclude FOXO1 from the nucleus in LKO mice, a pathway important for liver glucose and lipid metabolism. Liver triglycerides and diacylglycerides were also increased in LKO mice, which corresponded with dysregulation of insulin-stimulated ACC phosphorylation and DGAT1/2 protein levels. Our studies demonstrate that estrogen signaling through ER? in the liver helps prevent whole body and hepatic insulin resistance associated with HFD feeding in males. Augmenting hepatic estrogen signaling through ER? may lessen the impact of obesity on diabetes and cardiovascular risk in males. PMID:24691030

Zhu, Lin; Martinez, Melissa N; Emfinger, Christopher H; Palmisano, Brian T; Stafford, John M

2014-05-15

281

The Nutrition and Physical Activity Program to Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic Diseases: Monitoring Progress in Funded States  

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Full Text Available To help address the challenges posed by the obesity epidemic in the United States, the U.S. Congress authorized the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to establish the Nutrition and Physical Activity Program to Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic Diseases. In this article, we summarize the progress of the first 20 states funded by this program. The data presented are based on the information provided by the states in their semiannual progress monitoring reports on program activities from January through June 2004. The states have made progress in developing capacity and infrastructure for their programs, including leveraging financial resources and developing strong partnerships. In addition, they are planning and initiating environmental changes through legislation, and, although less frequently, through policies and other changes such as expanding physical activity opportunities. Collectively, the states are making progress in planning and implementing activities to prevent and control obesity and other chronic diseases.

Sue Lin Yee, MA, MPH

2005-12-01

282

Diabetes and obesity-related genes and the risk of neural tube defects in the national birth defects prevention study.  

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Few studies have evaluated genetic susceptibility related to diabetes and obesity as a risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs). The authors investigated 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms among 9 genes (ADRB3, ENPP1, FTO, LEP, PPARG, PPARGC1A, SLC2A2, TCF7L2, and UCP2) associated with type 2 diabetes or obesity. Samples were obtained from 737 NTD case-parent triads included in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study during 1999-2007. Log-linear models were used to evaluate maternal and offspring genetic effects. After application of the false discovery rate, there were 5 significant maternal genetic effects. The less common alleles at the 4 FTO single nucleotide polymorphisms showed a reduction of NTD risk (for rs1421085, relative risk (RR) = 0.73 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62, 0.87); for rs8050136, RR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.93); for rs9939609, RR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.94); and for rs17187449, RR = 0.80 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.95)). Additionally, maternal LEP rs2071045 (RR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.60) and offspring UCP2 rs660339 (RR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.64) were associated with NTD risk. Furthermore, the maternal genotype for TCF7L2 rs3814573 suggested an increased NTD risk among obese women. These findings indicate that maternal genetic variants associated with glucose homeostasis may modify the risk of having an NTD-affected pregnancy. PMID:23132673

Lupo, Philip J; Canfield, Mark A; Chapa, Claudia; Lu, Wei; Agopian, A J; Mitchell, Laura E; Shaw, Gary M; Waller, D Kim; Olshan, Andrew F; Finnell, Richard H; Zhu, Huiping

2012-12-15

283

The effect of an early childhood obesity intervention on father’s obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne InFANT Program  

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Background To investigate the effect of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention, incorporating a parent modelling component, on fathers’ obesity risk-related behaviours. Methods Cluster randomized-controlled trial in the setting of pre-existing first-time parents groups organised by Maternal and Child Health Nurses in Victoria, Australia. Participants were 460 first-time fathers mean age?=?34.2 (s.d.4.90) years. Dietary pattern scores of fathers were derived using principal component analysis, total physical activity and total television viewing time were assessed at baseline (infant aged three to four months) and after 15 months. Results No significant beneficial intervention effect was observed on fathers’ dietary pattern scores, total physical activity or total television viewing time. Conclusion Despite a strong focus on parent modelling (targeting parents own diet, physical activity and television viewing behaviours), and beneficial impact on mothers’ obesity risk behaviours, this intervention, with mothers as the point of contact, had no effect on fathers’ obesity risk-related behaviours. Based on the established links between children’s obesity risk-related behaviors and that of their fathers, a need exists for research testing the effectiveness of interventions with a stronger engagement of fathers. PMID:24524293

2014-01-01

284

Effective intragastric balloon treatment in obese adolescents  

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Full Text Available Introduction: The intragastric balloon is a minimally invasive technique used to treat obesity by reducing hunger and inducing satiety as a result of gastric volume restriction, thus it could be ideal to treat young people who are thought to be easier to change their eating behavior. Aim: The purpose of this prospective clinical study was to investigate the effectiveness of intragastric balloon on obese adolescents, after a six-month period of treatment. Material: Fourteen adolescents -aged 18,5±2,5 yrs- treated by intragastric balloon were studied prospectively. Mean baseline Body Mass Index [BMI] was 39,8 ± 5,8kg/m2 and %Fatty Mass [FM] 41,7 ± 5,4. The data collected every month for the 6mo period was: Body Weight [BW], BMI, Resting metabolic Rate [RMR] by indirect calorimetry, %FM, %Excessive Weight Loss [%EWL] and %Actual Caloric Intake [%ACI]. Appetite related sensations scores [hunger, satiety, desire for food] were also assessed monthly by visual analogue scales [VAS]. The number of follow-up visits was considered as a marker of compliance. Results: Median baseline values were as follows: BM 118kg [range 80 to 174], BMI 39,1kg/m2 [range 33 to 54] [>95th percentile],%FM 42 [range 33 to 49] and %ACI 116,6 [range 60 to 200,5]. After a 6mo period, just before the removal of the balloon, all measured parameters exhibited a statistically significant reduction: the median BW was found to be 108kg [range 62 to 162, p=0,002], the BMI 37kg/m2 [range 26 to 50, p=0,001], %FM 40 [range 20 to 49, p=0,009], the %EWL was 14,29 [range 3,33 to 69,23, p=0,021] and the %ACI=86 [range 33 to 153,96, p=0,02]. Appetite related sensation score was unchanged.The median number of follow-up visits was 4 [range 2 to 7]. Conclusions: Although the number of follow-up visits during the 6 month treatment generally reveals poor compliance,a small though significant weight loss, as a consequence of reduction in the energy intake is prominent. Based on the above findings, a better pre-procedure screening for the appropriate candidates for treatment as well as a better scheduled approach by a multi-disciplinary group, including a dietician and a psychologist is considered mandatory.

T. Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi

2009-05-01

285

Physician practices related to use of BMI-for-age and counseling for childhood obesity prevention: A cross-sectional study  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Screening for obesity and providing appropriate obesity-related counseling in the clinical setting are important strategies to prevent and control childhood obesity. The purpose of this study is to document pediatricians (PEDs) and general practitioners (GPs) with pediatric patients use of BMI-for-age to screen for obesity, confidence in explaining BMI, access to referral clinics, and characteristics associated with screening and counseling to children and their caregivers...

Polhamus Barbara; Sherry Bettylou; Wethington Holly R

2011-01-01

286

Predisposition to Obesity: Should We Target Those Most Susceptible?  

OpenAIRE

Obesity prevention should remain a priority, even if there is some suggestion that the epidemic may presently have reached a stable level. However, previous interventions have not been effective in preventing overweight and obesity, and at the same time studies suggest that some subgroups are more predisposed to future obesity. The purpose of this paper is to review interventions on obesity prevention published during the past year, and to examine if interventions targeting predisposed groups...

Olsen, Nanna Julie; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

2012-01-01

287

The Effect of Exercise in Obese Women with Bulimia Nervosa  

OpenAIRE

Purpose:Obesity has been identified as a risk factor for the development of bulimia nervosa (BN) in those who try to lose weight. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of walking exercise in order to provide a method for overcoming bulimia nervosa in obese young women suffering from bulimia nervosa.Methods: Twenty obese women with bulimia nervosa (body mass index [BMI]>30) and a mean age of 22.00 ± 1.50 years volunteered to participate in this study. They were randomly ...

Hassn Daneshmandi; Nasim Habibzadeh

2010-01-01

288

Oxytocin Treatment Prevents the Cardiomyopathy Observed in Obese Diabetic Male db/db Mice.  

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Oxytocin (OT) is involved in the regulation of energy metabolism and in the activation of cardioprotective mechanisms. We evaluated whether chronic treatment with OT could prevent the metabolic and cardiac abnormalities associated with diabetes and obesity using the db/db mice model. Four-week-old male db/db mice and their lean nondiabetic littermates (db/+) serving as controls were treated with OT (125 ng/kg · h) or saline vehicle for a period of 12 weeks. Compared with db/+ mice, the saline-treated db/db mice developed obesity, hyperglycemia, and hyperinsulinemia. These mice also exhibited a deficient cardiac OT/natriuretic system and developed systolic and diastolic dysfunction resulting from cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, and apoptosis. These abnormalities were associated with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, inflammation, and suppressed 5'-adenosine monophosphate kinase signaling pathway. The db/db mice displayed reduced serum levels of adiponectin and adipsin and elevated resistin. OT treatment increased circulating OT levels, significantly reduced serum resistin, body fat accumulation (19%; P < .001), fasting blood glucose levels by (23%; P < .001), and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. OT also normalized cardiac OT receptors, atrial natriuretic peptide, and brain natriuretic peptide, expressions and prevented systolic and diastolic dysfunction as well as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, and apoptosis. Furthermore, OT reduced cardiac oxidative stress and inflammation and normalized the 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. The complete normalization of cardiac structure and function by OT treatment in db/db mice contrasted with only partial improvement of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. These results indicate that chronic treatment with OT partially improves glucose and fat metabolism and reverses abnormal cardiac structural remodeling, preventing cardiac dysfunction in db/db mice. PMID:25562615

Plante, Eric; Menaouar, Ahmed; Danalache, Bogdan A; Yip, Denis; Broderick, Tom L; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Jankowski, Marek; Gutkowska, Jolanta

2015-04-01

289

Effects of maternal obesity on antenatal, perinatal and neonatal outcomes.  

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Abstract Objective: Obesity is critically important to maternal and fetal health during the perinatal period. We have detected an increasing prevalence of maternal obesity in recent years and investigated its complications during pregnancy. Methods: A total of 931 pregnant females were investigated between March 2012 and March 2013. The patients were divided into four groups: body mass index (BMI)?diabetes mellitus, cesarean delivery, premature rupture of membranes, shoulder dystocia, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, abnormal heart rate pattern and postpartum infection rates were found in the obese group during the perinatal period. Adverse maternal effects in obese cases were significantly more frequent than those in normal-weight cases. Preterm birth, perinatal mortality, low APGAR scores, newborn intensive care unit requirement, hypoglycemia and macrosomia rates were significantly higher in obese cases than those in non-obese cases. However, low birth weight infant rate was higher in the low BMI cases than that in the other BMI categories (p?obesity is an important factor associated with pregnancy complications and the increase in maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality. PMID:25327177

Avc?, Muhittin Eftal; Sanl?kan, Fatih; Celik, Mehmet; Avc?, An?l; Kocaer, Mustafa; Göçmen, Ahmet

2014-11-11

290

Genetic Manipulations of PPARs: Effects on Obesity and Metabolic Disease  

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Full Text Available The interest in genetic manipulations of PPARs is as old as their discovery as receptors of ligands with beneficial clinical activities. Considering the effects of PPAR ligands on critical aspects of systemic physiology, including obesity, lipid metabolism, insulin resistance, and diabetes, gene knockout (KO in mice is the ideal platform for both hypothesis testing and discovery of new PPAR functions in vivo. With the fervent pursuit of the magic bullet to eradicate the obesity epidemic, special emphasis has been placed on the impacts of PPARs on obesity and its associated diseases. As detailed in this review, understanding how PPARs regulate gene expression and basic metabolic pathways is a necessary intermediate en route to deciphering their effects on obesity. Over a decade and dozens of genetic modifications of PPARs into this effort, valuable lessons have been learned, but we are left with more questions to be answered. These lessons and future prospects are the subject of this review.

Yaacov Barak

2007-01-01

291

Anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effects of Lycium chinense leaf powder in obese rats.  

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This study aimed to elucidate the obesity control, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant effects of Lycium chinense leaf powder intake by obese rats. Obesity was induced in rats through 13 weeks of high-fat diet. The obese rats were then divided into four different groups, which were fed for 8 weeks with general diet (G), high-fat diet (F), 5% L. chinense leaf powder with a high-fat diet (FLP5), or 10% L. chinense leaf powder with a high-fat diet (FLP10). The body weight gain of the FLP5 group was significantly lower than that of the F group. Also, the obesity index of the FLP5 and FLP10 group was significantly lower than that of the F group. Serum triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels in the FLP5 group were significantly lower than those of the F group. The intake of L. chinense leaf powder did not seem to significantly affect the levels of serum homocysteine, leptin, and ghrelin compared to the control group without L. chinense leaf powder intake. The glutathione content in the liver was significantly higher in the FLP5 group than in the G group, but the glutathione S-transferase activity was significantly lower than in the F group. The thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in the liver and kidney were relatively lower in the FLP5 and FLP10 groups than in the G group. In summary, intake of L. chinense leaf powder in obese rats coincided with a lowering of body weight and levels of serum triglyceride and LDL-cholesterol. It also displayed antioxidant effects. PMID:20673056

Kang, Myung-Hwa; Park, Won-Jong; Choi, Mi-Kyeong

2010-08-01

292

Red wine polyphenols prevent metabolic and cardiovascular alterations associated with obesity in Zucker fatty rats (Fa/Fa).  

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BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with increased risks for development of cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological studies report an inverse association between dietary flavonoid consumption and mortality from cardiovascular diseases. We studied the potential beneficial effects of dietary supplementation of red wine polyphenol extract, Provinols, on obesity-associated alterations with respect to metabolic disturbances and cardiovascular functions in Zucker fatty (ZF) rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIP...

Agouni, Abdelali; Lagrue-lak-hal, Anne-he?le?ne; Mostefai, Hadj Ahmed; Tesse, Angela; Mulder, Paul; Rouet, Philippe; Desmoulin, Franck; Heymes, Christophe; Marti?nez, Maria Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

2009-01-01

293

Economic and other barriers to adopting recommendations to prevent childhood obesity: results of a focus group study with parents  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents are integral to the implementation of obesity prevention and management recommendations for children. Exploration of barriers to and facilitators of parental decisions to adopt obesity prevention recommendations will inform future efforts to reduce childhood obesity. Methods We conducted 4 focus groups (2 English, 2 Spanish among a total of 19 parents of overweight (BMI ? 85th percentile children aged 5-17 years. The main discussion focused on 7 common obesity prevention recommendations: reducing television (TV watching, removing TV from child's bedroom, increasing physically active games, participating in community or school-based athletics, walking to school, walking more in general, and eating less fast food. Parents were asked to discuss what factors would make each recommendation more difficult (barriers or easier (facilitators to follow. Participants were also asked about the relative importance of economic (time and dollar costs/savings barriers and facilitators if these were not brought into the discussion unprompted. Results Parents identified many barriers but few facilitators to adopting obesity prevention recommendations for their children. Members of all groups identified economic barriers (time and dollar costs among a variety of pertinent barriers, although the discussion of dollar costs often required prompting. Parents cited other barriers including child preference, difficulty with changing habits, lack of information, lack of transportation, difficulty with monitoring child behavior, need for assistance from family members, parity with other family members, and neighborhood walking safety. Facilitators identified included access to physical activity programs, availability of alternatives to fast food and TV which are acceptable to the child, enlisting outside support, dietary information, involving the child, setting limits, making behavior changes gradually, and parental change in shopping behaviors and own eating behaviors. Conclusions Parents identify numerous barriers to adopting obesity prevention recommendations, most notably child and family preferences and resistance to change, but also economic barriers. Intervention programs should consider the context of family priorities and how to overcome barriers and make use of relevant facilitators during program development.

Taveras Elsie M

2009-12-01

294

Effects of Exercise Therapy on Blood Lipids of Obese Women  

OpenAIRE

[Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise therapy on blood lipids of obese women. [Subjects] The subjects were 24 clinically obese women. [Methods] The subjects were divided into an exercise group (n=12), and a control group (n=12). The exercise group performed exercise for 10 weeks with diet restriction. We investigated how this type of exercise influenced blood lipids. Blood was taken before and after the intervention. The collected blood was cent...

Lee, Hyo-cheol; Heo, Tag

2014-01-01

295

Hypoglycemic effects of brassinosteroid in diet-induced obese mice  

OpenAIRE

The prevalence of obesity is increasing globally, and obesity is a major risk factor for metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Previously, we reported that oral administration of homobrassinolide (HB) to healthy rats triggered a selective anabolic response that was associated with lower blood glucose. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of HB administration on glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity, body composition, and gluconeogenic gene expression profiles i...

Esposito, Debora; Kizelsztein, Pablo; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

2012-01-01

296

The maternal womb: a novel target for cancer prevention in the era of the obesity pandemic?  

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The dramatic rise in worldwide prevalence of obesity has necessitated the search for more efficacious anti-obesity strategies to counter the increased cancer risks in overweight and obese individuals. The mechanistic pathways linking obesity status with adult chronic diseases such as cancer remain i...

297

Preventing childhood obesity during infancy in UK primary care: a mixed-methods study of HCPs' knowledge, beliefs and practice  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a strong rationale for intervening in early childhood to prevent obesity. Over a quarter of infants gain weight more rapidly than desirable during the first six months of life putting them at greater risk of obesity in childhood. However, little is known about UK healthcare professionals' (HCPs approach to primary prevention. This study explored obesity-related knowledge of UK HCPs and the beliefs and current practice of general practitioners (GPs and practice nurses in relation to identifying infants at risk of developing childhood obesity. Method Survey of UK HCPs (GPs, practice nurses, health visitors, nursery, community and children's nurses. HCPs (n = 116 rated their confidence in providing infant feeding advice and completed the Obesity Risk Knowledge Scale (ORK-10. Semi-structured interviews with a sub-set of 12 GPs and 6 practice nurses were audio recorded, taped and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was applied using an interpretative, inductive approach. Results GPs were less confident about giving advice about infant feeding than health visitors (p = 0.001 and nursery nurses (p = 0.009 but more knowledgeable about the health risks of obesity (p Six main themes emerged from the interviews: 1 Attribution of childhood obesity to family environment, 2 Infant feeding advice as the health visitor's role, 3 Professional reliance on anecdotal or experiential knowledge about infant feeding, 4 Difficulties with recognition of, or lack of concern for, infants "at risk" of becoming obese, 5 Prioritising relationship with parent over best practice in infant feeding and 6 Lack of shared understanding for dealing with early years' obesity. Conclusions Intervention is needed to improve health visitors and nursery nurses' knowledge of obesity risk and GPs and practice nurses' capacity to identify and manage infants' at risk of developing childhood obesity. GPs value strategies that maintain relationships with vulnerable families and interventions to improve their advice-giving around infant feeding need to take account of this. Further research is needed to determine optimal ways of intervening with infants at risk of obesity in primary care.

Swift Judy A

2011-06-01

298

Building a strategy for obesity prevention one piece at a time: the case of sugar-sweetened beverage taxation.  

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Obesity is a major public health issue in Canada that is reaching historically high levels in spite of efforts, targeted primarily at individual behaviour, to promote changes in diet and physical activity. Urgency for change at the population level compels moving "upstream" toward multilevel, societal approaches for obesity prevention. Public health researchers, advocates and policy makers are increasingly recognizing the current food environment, including availability, pricing, and marketing of foods and beverages, promotes overconsumption of unhealthy food and beverage choices and have identified the food environment as a point for intervention for obesity prevention. In April 2011, a consensus conference with invited experts from research, policy and practice fields was held. The conference aimed to build consensus around policy levers to address environmental determinants of obesity, including next logical steps toward further policy action. Using economic policies, such as taxation of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), was discussed as one opportunity to promote healthy eating. This article reports on the consensus discussion that led to recommendations to tax sugar-sweetened beverages as one step in a multipronged comprehensive approach to obesity prevention. This recommendation is based on a synthesis of available evidence, including evidence regarding political feasibility, and potential impacts of a tax. In addition, we present additional primary research using current SSB consumption data to model the economic and behavioural impact of such a tax in Canada. PMID:24070799

Buhler, Susan; Raine, Kim D; Arango, Manuel; Pellerin, Suzie; Neary, Neil E

2013-04-01

299

Working With Parents to Prevent Childhood Obesity: Protocol for a Primary Care-Based eHealth Study  

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Background Parents play a central role in preventing childhood obesity. There is a need for innovative, scalable, and evidence-based interventions designed to enhance parents’ motivation to support and sustain healthy lifestyle behaviors in their children, which can facilitate obesity prevention. Objective (1) Develop an online screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) eHealth tool to enhance parents’ concern for, and motivation to, support children’s healthy lifestyle behaviors, (2) refine the SBIRT eHealth tool by assessing end-user acceptability, satisfaction, and usability through focus groups, and (3) determine feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of the refined SBIRT eHealth tool through a randomized controlled trial. Methods This is a three-phase, multi-method study that includes SBIRT eHealth tool development (Phase I), refinement (Phase II), and testing (Phase III). Phase I: Theoretical underpinnings of the SBIRT tool, entitled the Resource Information Program for Parents on Lifestyle and Education (RIPPLE), will be informed by concepts applied within existing interventions, and content will be based on literature regarding healthy lifestyle behaviors in children. The SBIRT platform will be developed in partnership between our research team and a third-party intervention development company. Phase II: Focus groups with parents, as well as health care professionals, researchers, and trainees in pediatrics (n=30), will explore intervention-related perceptions and preferences. Qualitative data from the focus groups will inform refinements to the aesthetics, content, structure, and function of the SBIRT. Phase III: Parents (n=200) of children—boys and girls, 5 to 17 years old—will be recruited from a primary care pediatric clinic while they await their children’s clinical appointment. Parents will be randomly assigned to one of five groups—four intervention groups and one control group—as they complete the SBIRT. The randomization function is built into the tool. Parents will complete the eHealth SBIRT using a tablet that will be connected to the Internet. Subsequently, parents will be contacted via email at 1-month follow-up to assess (1) change in concern for, and motivation to, support children’s dietary and physical activity behaviors (primary outcome), and (2) use of online resources and referrals to health services for obesity prevention (secondary outcome). Results This research was successfully funded and received ethics approval. Development of the SBIRT started in summer 2012, and we expect all study-related activities to be completed by fall 2016. Conclusions The proposed research is timely and applies a novel, technology-based application designed to enhance parents concern for, and motivation to, support children’s healthy lifestyle behaviors and encourage use of online resources and community services for childhood obesity prevention. Overall, this research builds on a foundation of evidence supporting the application of SBIRTs to encourage or “nudge” individuals to make healthy lifestyle choices. Findings from Phase III of this project will directly inform a cluster randomized controlled trial to study the effectiveness of our intervention across multiple primary care-based settings. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02330588; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02330588 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6WyUOeRlr). PMID:25831265

Avis, Jillian LS; Cave, Andrew L; Donaldson, Stephanie; Ellendt, Carol; Holt, Nicholas L; Jelinski, Susan; Martz, Patricia; Maximova, Katerina; Padwal, Raj; Wild, T Cameron

2015-01-01

300

A population perspective on obesity prevention : lessons learned from Sweden and the U.S.  

OpenAIRE

Obesity prevalences are increasing in Sweden and the US. Obesity has many health consequences and health risks are associated with small increases in weight and marked obesity. Cross-sectional and panel surveys from northern Sweden and upstate NY provide the basis for furthering understanding of body mass index (BMI) development. BMI and weight change (+/-3%) were used to evaluate obesity and weight loss, maintenance, or gain. The 1989 prevalences of obesity were 9.6% and 21.3% in Sweden and ...

Nafziger, Anne

2006-01-01

301

Risk factors for obesity in Chinese adults. Highlights and achievements  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Obesity is now one of the public health concerns in China. Many factors are contributing to obesity. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. As it is hard to cure it once obesity occurs, the most effective and encouraging strategies is prevention. Risk factors should be identified in order to develop prevention strategies

302

The Effects of Obesity on Murine Cortical Bone  

Science.gov (United States)

This dissertation details the effects of obesity on the mechanical properties and structure of cortical bone. Obesity is associated with greater bone mineral content that might be expected to protect against fracture, which has been observed in adults. Paradoxically however, the incidence of bone fractures has been found to increase in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Femora from adolescent and adult mice fed a high-fat diet are investigated for changes in shape, tissue structure, as well as tissue-level and whole-bone mechanical properties. Results indicate increased bone size, reduced size-independent mechanical properties, but maintained size-dependent mechanical properties. Other changes in cortical bone response to obesity are observed with advancing age. This study indicates that bone quantity and bone quality play important compensatory roles in determining fracture risk, and that fracture risk may not be lessened for adults as previously thought.

Martin, Sophi

303

The effect of obesity on chronic respiratory diseases: pathophysiology and therapeutic strategies  

OpenAIRE

Sedentary lifestyles and increased pollution brought about by industrialization pose major challenges to the prevention of both obesity and chronic respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Obesity has emerged as an important risk factor for these respiratory diseases, and in many instances weight loss is associated with important symptomatic improvement. Moreover, obesity may influence the ...

Poulain, Magali; Doucet, Marie?ve; Major, Genevie?ve C.; Drapeau, Vicky; Se?rie?s, Fre?de?ric; Boulet, Louis-philippe; Tremblay, Angelo; Maltais, Franc?ois

2006-01-01

304

Process evaluation of the Enabling Mothers toPrevent Pediatric Obesity Through Web-Based Learning and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) randomized control trial.  

Science.gov (United States)

Family-and-home-based interventions are an important vehicle for preventing childhood obesity. Systematic process evaluations have not been routinely conducted in assessment of these interventions. The purpose of this study was to plan and conduct a process evaluation of the Enabling Mothers to Prevent Pediatric Obesity Through Web-Based Learning and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) randomized control trial. The trial was composed of two web-based, mother-centered interventions for prevention of obesity in children between 4 and 6 years of age. Process evaluation used the components of program fidelity, dose delivered, dose received, context, reach, and recruitment. Categorical process evaluation data (program fidelity, dose delivered, dose exposure, and context) were assessed using Program Implementation Index (PII) values. Continuous process evaluation variables (dose satisfaction and recruitment) were assessed using ANOVA tests to evaluate mean differences between groups (experimental and control) and sessions (sessions 1 through 5). Process evaluation results found that both groups (experimental and control) were equivalent, and interventions were administered as planned. Analysis of web-based intervention process objectives requires tailoring of process evaluation models for online delivery. Dissemination of process evaluation results can advance best practices for implementing effective online health promotion programs. PMID:24648285

Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj

2014-09-01

305

Combination of Spirulina with glycyrrhizin prevents cognitive dysfunction in aged obese rats  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives: To evaluate the cognition enhancing effect of the combination of Spirulina and glycyrrhizin in monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obese aged rats. Materials and Methods: Obesity was induced in rats by administration of MSG (intraperitoneally, 4 mg/g body weight) for 14 consecutive days from day 1 after birth. Subsequently, the animals were allowed to grow for 18 months with food and water ad libitum. Hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia, leptin resistance, were monitored in these animals. Cognitive status was assessed by Barne's maze task and hippocampal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels. Further, the animals were treated with Spirulina (Sp) (oral route, 1 g/Kg body weight, for 30 days) alone or glycyrrhizin (Gly) alone (intraperitoneal route, 0.1 mg/Kg, on day 15 and day 21), or their combination (SpGly). Counting of the treatment days was done by considering first day of Sp administration as day 1. After the completion of 30 days of Spirulina treatment or 2 doses of Gly administration or the combination (SpGly) treatment, the animals were left for 3 weeks. They were then were assessed for their biochemical and cognitive changes. Results: The combination of Sp with Gly showed a significant reduction (P cognitive functions with concomitant reduction in AChE activity in the hippocampal tissue homogenates (P cognitive dysfunctions associated with aging and obesity.

Madhavadas, Sowmya; Subramanian, Sarada

2015-01-01

306

Description of the Design and Implementation of a School-Based Obesity Prevention Program Addressing Needs of Middle School Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes the design and implementation of a school-based obesity prevention program, the successes associated with its implementation, and challenges with development and application of the program's curriculum base. The program is described, including purpose and goals, content and structure of the curriculum, type and training of…

Ward-Begnoche, Wendy L.; Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Harris, Margaret M.; Dean, Janice

2008-01-01

307

Online Course Increases Nutrition Professionals' Knowledge, Skills, and Self-Efficacy in Using an Ecological Approach to Prevent Childhood Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: To assess the impact of an online continuing education course on the knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy of nutrition professionals to use an ecological approach to prevent childhood obesity. Design: Quasi-experimental design using intervention and delayed intervention comparison groups with pre/post-course assessments. Setting: Online…

Stark, Christina M.; Graham-Kiefer, Meredith L.; Devine, Carol M.; Dollahite, Jamie S.; Olson, Christine M.

2011-01-01

308

An Evaluation of the Peer Helper Component of "Go!": A Multimessage, Multi-"Step" Obesity Prevention Intervention  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Obesity prevention efforts typically involve changing eating and exercise behaviors as well as the physical and social environment in which those behaviors occur. Due to existing social networks, worksites are a logical choice for implementing such interventions. Purpose: This article describes the development and implementation of a…

de Souza, Rebecca; Dauner, Kim Nichols; Goei, Ryan; LaCaille, Lara; Kotowski, Michael R.; Schultz, Jennifer Feenstra; LaCaille, Rick; Versnik Nowak, Amy L.

2014-01-01

309

Process evaluation of a community-based adolescent obesity prevention project in Tonga  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The rising burden of obesity in Tonga is alarming. The promotion of healthy behaviours and environments requires immediate urgent action and a multi-sectoral approach. A three-year community based study titled the Ma'alahi Youth Project (MYP conducted in Tonga from 2005-2008 aimed to increase the capacity of the whole community (schools, churches, parents and adolescents to promote healthy eating and regular physical activity and to reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity amongst youth and their families. This paper reflects on the process evaluation for MYP, against a set of Best Practice Principles for community-based obesity prevention. Methods MYP was managed by the Fiji School of Medicine. A team of five staff in Tonga were committed to planning, implementation and evaluation of a strategic plan, the key planks of which were developed during a two day community workshop. Intervention activities were delivered in villages, churches and schools, on the main island of Tongatapu. Process evaluation data covering the resource utilisation associated with all intervention activities were collected, and analysed by dose, frequency and reach for specific strategies. The action plan included three standard objectives around capacity building, social marketing and evaluation; four nutrition; two physical activity objectives; and one around championing key people as role models. Results While the interventions included a wide mix of activities straddling across all of these objectives and in both school and village settings, there was a major focus on the social marketing and physical activity objectives. The intervention reach, frequency and dose varied widely across all activities, and showed no consistent patterns. Conclusions The adolescent obesity interventions implemented as part of the MYP program comprised a wide range of activities conducted in multiple settings, touched a broad spectrum of the population (wider than the target group, but the dose and frequency of activities were generally insufficient and not sustained. Also the project confirmed that, while the MYP resulted in increased community awareness of healthy behaviours, Tonga is still in its infancy in terms of conducting public health research and lacks research infrastructure and capacity.

Pomana Siosifa

2011-05-01

310

Effect of Herbal Acupuncture with Sang-hwang(Phellinus linteus) on High Fat Diet-induced Obesity in Rats  

OpenAIRE

Acupuncture has fairly good weight-reducing effect in treating simple obesity due to the neuroendocrine regulation. In this study, the anti-obesity effects of herbal acupuncture (HA) with Sang-hwang (Phellinus linteus) at Fuai (SP16) were investigated in the rat fed on high-fat (HF) diet. Sang-hwang mushroom has been proven to have anti-carcinogenic effects and Sang-hwang extracts are highly effective in treatment and preventive treatment of AIDS, diabetes and high blood-pressure. To determin...

Ji Hyun Kim; Chang-Shin Park; Dae-Hyun Hahm; Hye-Jung Lee; Insop Shim

2004-01-01

311

Effects of physical exercise on butyrylcholinesterase in obese adolescents  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a 12 week program of physical exercise (PE) on butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in obese adolescents. This study compared obese adolescents (N = 54) before and after PE, regarding the relative intensity (RI) and activity of different molecular f [...] orms (G1, G2, G4 and G1-ALB) of BChE found in plasma. Waist circumference (WC) and lipid profile were also assessed before and after PE. It was shown that before PE, mean plasma BChE activity was significantly higher in obese than in non-obese adolescents and that it was significantly reduced after PE, becoming similar to that found in non-obese adolescents. Lipid profile and WC also changed in response to PE. These results are consistent with studies that found a correlation between BChE and lipid metabolism and suggest that PE may have led to a physiological regularization of plasma BChE activity. Although mean BChE activity of each isoform was significantly reduced by PE, their RI did not change. This is in accordance with a previous suggestion that this proportion is maintained under factors such as obesity, and may therefore be important for BChE functions.

Isabela M.W., Silva; Neiva, Leite; Dellyana, Boberg; Thais J., Chaves; Gerusa M., Eisfeld; Gisele M., Eisfeld; Gleyse F., Bono; Ricardo L.R., Souza; Lupe, Furtado-Alle.

312

Economic instruments for obesity prevention: results of a scoping review and modified delphi survey  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Comprehensive, multi-level approaches are required to address obesity. One important target for intervention is the economic domain. The purpose of this study was to synthesize existing evidence regarding the impact of economic policies targeting obesity and its causal behaviours (diet, physical activity, and to make specific recommendations for the Canadian context. Methods Arksey and O'Malley's (2005 methodological framework for conducting scoping reviews was adopted for this study and this consisted of two phases: 1 a structured literature search and review, and 2 consultation with experts in the research field through a Delphi survey and an in-person expert panel meeting in April 2010. Results Two key findings from the scoping review included 1 consistent evidence that weight outcomes are responsive to food and beverage prices. The debate on the use of food taxes and subsidies to address obesity should now shift to how best to address practical issues in designing such policies; and 2 very few studies have examined the impact of economic instruments to promote physical activity and clear policy recommendations cannot be made at this time. Delphi survey findings emphasised the relatively modest impact any specific economic instrument would have on obesity independently. Based on empirical evidence and expert opinion, three recommendations were supported. First, to create and implement an effective health filter to review new and current agricultural polices to reduce the possibility that such policies have a deleterious impact on population rates of obesity. Second, to implement a caloric sweetened beverage tax. Third, to examine how to implement fruit and vegetable subsidies targeted at children and low income households. Conclusions In terms of economic interventions, shifting from empirical evidence to policy recommendation remains challenging. Overall, the evidence is not sufficiently strong to provide clear policy direction. Additionally, the nature of the experiments needed to provide definitive evidence supporting certain policy directions is likely to be complex and potentially unfeasible. However, these are not reasons to take no action. It is likely that policies need to be implemented in the face of an incomplete evidence base.

LaFrance Jeffrey

2011-10-01

313

Residential Racial Composition and Black-White Obesity Risks: Differential Effects of Neighborhood Social and Built Environment  

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Full Text Available This study investigates the association between neighborhood racial composition and adult obesity risks by race and gender, and explores whether neighborhood social and built environment mediates the observed protective or detrimental effects of racial composition on obesity risks. Cross-sectional data from the 2006 and 2008 Southeastern Pennsylvania Household Health Survey are merged with census-tract profiles from 2005–2009 American Community Survey and Geographic Information System-based built-environment data. The analytical sample includes 12,730 whites and 4,290 blacks residing in 953 census tracts. Results from multilevel analysis suggest that black concentration is associated with higher obesity risks only for white women, and this association is mediated by lower neighborhood social cohesion and socioeconomic status (SES in black-concentrated neighborhoods. After controlling for neighborhood SES, black concentration and street connectivity are associated with lower obesity risks for white men. No association between black concentration and obesity is found for blacks. The findings point to the intersections of race and gender in neighborhood effects on obesity risks, and highlight the importance of various aspects of neighborhood social and built environment and their complex roles in obesity prevention by socio-demographic groups.

Kelin Li

2014-01-01

314

Public health and the prevention of obesity: failure or success? / Salud pública y prevención de la obesidad: ¿éxito o fracaso?  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available En las últimas décadas la obesidad se ha convertido en un importante problema de salud pública en las sociedades desarrolladas y economías en transición. Los rápidos cambios sociales acontecidos desde mediados del siglo 20 impulsaron importantes transformaciones en los hábitos alimentarios y estilos [...] de vida, con el progresivo abandono de los modelos alimentarios y técnicas culinarias tradicionales, importante disminución de la actividad física y aumento del tiempo de sedentarismo, dando como resultado un desequilibrio en el balance energético. La obesidad es un factor de riesgo asociado para muchas enfermedades crónicas. En los niños además de condicionar su salud como adultos, afecta su salud física, emocional y social durante la niñez. Según algunas estimaciones el coste de la obesidad puede representar hasta el 12% del gasto sanitario en algunos países. Se han desarrollado muchas acciones desde que en torno al año 2000 la OMS alertara sobre el problema. El análisis de los factores implicados en el origen del problema han llevado a reconocer la importancia de crear ambientes favorables para que las opciones alimentarias y de actividad física más saludables sean las más fáciles y asequibles en las actividades y entornos cotidianos más habituales, como colegios, medio laboral, entorno comunitario. Desde hace tiempo se dispone de evidencia de que las intervenciones más efectivas para la prevención de la obesidad infantil deben contemplar múltiples estrategias y prolongarse en el tiempo. Hoy además reconocemos la importancia de poner en marcha políticas que favorezcan entornos amables que estimulen la práctica de actividad física, favorezcan decisiones que permitan configurar hábitos alimentarios más saludables. Abstract in english In recent decades, obesity has become a major public health problem in developed societies and economies in transition. Rapid social changes that have occurred since the mid 20th century prompted major changes in eating habits and lifestyles, with the gradual abandonment of traditional dietary patte [...] rns and culinary techniques, significant decrease in physical activity and increased sedentary time, giving as result in an imbalance in the energy balance. Obesity is a risk factor for many chronic diseases. There is evidence that childhood obesity influences adult health condition. Additionally, obesity in children affects their physical, emotional and social wellbeing. According to some estimates the cost of obesity may represent up to 12% of health cost in some countries. Many actions have been developed since around the year 2000 WHO alerted about the problem. The analysis of the factors involved in the origin of the problem have led to recognize the importance of creating supportive environments for healthier food choices and physical activity to be the easiest and accessible options in common everyday environments, such as schools, workplace or community environment. Evidence is long available that the most effective interventions to prevent childhood obesity should consider multiple strategies and last longer. Today it is also recognized the importance of implementing policies that encourage supportive friendly environments for physical activity and help decisions to opt for healthy eating habits.

Javier, Aranceta Bartrina.

2013-09-01

315

Techniques, assessment, and effectiveness of bariatric surgery in combating obesity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Dimitrios K Papamargaritis, Dimitrios J Pournaras, Carel W Le RouxImperial Weight Centre, Imperial College London, London, UKAbstract: Obesity is an epidemic disease, and its prevalence is predicted to rise in the future. Many health and social comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, arthritis, infertility, eating disorders, unemployment, and low quality of life, have been associated with obesity. Nowadays, bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for severe obesity. An increasing body of literature demonstrates significant remission of obesity-related comorbidities and an increase in life expectancy after surgical treatment. Unfortunately, serious complications can appear after surgery, and the careful preoperative assessment of patients is necessary to estimate the indications and contraindications of bariatric surgery. Recent studies report the lower complication and mortality rates when bariatric procedures are performed in high-volume centers. The purpose of this review is to describe the techniques of the currently used surgical procedures and the clinical effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Additionally, the possible complications and mortality rates after bariatric surgery are discussed.Keywords: obesity, surgery, assessment, clinical effectiveness, complications

Dimitrios K Papamargaritis

2010-10-01

316

Diabetes and Obesity-Related Genes and the Risk of Neural Tube Defects in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study  

OpenAIRE

Few studies have evaluated genetic susceptibility related to diabetes and obesity as a risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs). The authors investigated 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms among 9 genes (ADRB3, ENPP1, FTO, LEP, PPARG, PPARGC1A, SLC2A2, TCF7L2, and UCP2) associated with type 2 diabetes or obesity. Samples were obtained from 737 NTD case-parent triads included in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study during 1999–2007. Log-linear models were used to evaluate maternal a...

Lupo, Philip J.; Canfield, Mark A.; Chapa, Claudia; Lu, Wei; Agopian, A. J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Shaw, Gary M.; Waller, D. Kim; Olshan, Andrew F.; Finnell, Richard H.; Zhu, Huiping

2012-01-01

317

Etiology, Treatment and Prevention of Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence: A Decade in Review  

OpenAIRE

Childhood obesity has become an epidemic on a worldwide scale. This article gives an overview of the progress made in childhood and adolescent obesity research in the last decade, with a particular emphasis on the transdisciplinary and complex nature of the problem. The following topics are addressed: 1) current definitions of childhood and adolescent overweight and obesity; 2) demography of childhood and adolescent obesity both in the US and globally; 3) current topics in the physiology of f...

Spruijt-metz, Donna

2011-01-01

318

Optimizing weight gain in pregnancy to prevent obesity in women and children  

OpenAIRE

Pregnancy is now considered to be an important risk factor for new or persistent obesity among women during the childbearing years. High gestational weight gain is the strongest predictor of maternal overweight or obesity following pregnancy. A growing body of evidence also suggests that both high and low gestational weight gains are independently associated with an increased risk of childhood obesity, suggesting that influences occurring very early in life are contributing to obesity onset. ...

Herring, Sharon J.; Rose, Marisa Z.; Skouteris, Helen; Oken, Emily

2011-01-01

319

Implications of Gene–Behavior Interactions: Prevention and Intervention for Obesity  

OpenAIRE

A vast body of research exists to demonstrate that obesity is a complex disorder with a strong genetic basis and a multifactorial etiology. Yet despite the overwhelming evidence that genes play an important role in the development of obesity, many people argue that the increasing prevalence of obesity is simply due to an abundance of palatable food and a dearth of opportunities for physical exercise. While activity and eating behaviors contribute substantially to the development of obesity, c...

Bray, Molly S.

2008-01-01

320

Shaping a Healthier Generation: Successful State Strategies to Prevent Childhood Obesity  

Science.gov (United States)

Studies show that childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Today, more than 23 million American children--or nearly one in every three--are overweight or obese. If childhood obesity is left unaddressed, a generation of individuals could face health, social, and economic challenges that promise to stress government…

Mulheron, Joyal; Vonasek, Kara

2009-01-01

321

Psychosocial aspects of obesity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obese patients have many physical limitations and much psychiatric burden to overcome. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in the obese is similar to those with normal weight. However, in obese patients seeking treatment there is an increased prevalence (40-60%) of psychiatric morbidity, most commonly depression. It is difficult to separate the effects of depression on obesity and, on the contrary, the neuroendocrine changes associated with stress and depression may cause metabolic changes that predispose and perpetuate obesity. The stigma associated with obesity causes bullying in school as well as childhood psychiatric morbidity. Prejudice is not limited to the general public but exists among health professionals too. This chapter discusses the treatment of depression in obesity and the psychiatric evaluation of the pre-bariatric surgery patient. Education of society, starting with schools and including healthcare professionals will reduce bias and stigma as well as assist this vulnerable group of patients to seek help for their obesity and the many problems that come with it. Given that by the year 2025 obesity will be the world's number one health problem with the US leading the way, it is very important that we pursue preventive measures as well as encourage research for treatments of obesity. PMID:16418544

Vaidya, Varsha

2006-01-01

322

Acute differential effects of dietary protein quality on postprandial lipemia in obese non-diabetic subjects  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Non-fasting triglyceridemia is much closer associated to cardiovascular risk compared to fasting triglyceridemia. We hypothesized that there would be acute differential effects of four common dietary proteins (cod protein, whey isolate, gluten, and casein) on postprandial lipemia in obese non-diabetic subjects. To test the hypothesis we conducted a randomized, acute clinical intervention study with crossover design. We supplemented a fat rich mixed meal with one of four dietary proteins i.e. cod protein, whey protein, gluten or casein. Eleven obese non-diabetic subjects (age: 40-68, body mass index: 30.3-42.0 kg/m(2)) participated and blood samples were drawn in the 8-h postprandial period. Supplementation of a fat rich mixed meal with whey protein caused lower postprandial lipemia (P = .048) compared to supplementation with cod protein and gluten. This was primarily due to lower triglyceride concentration in the chylomicron rich fraction (P = .0293). Thus, we have demonstrated acute differential effects on postprandial metabolism of four dietary proteins supplemented to a fat rich mixed meal in obese non-diabetic subjects. Supplementation with whey protein caused lower postprandial lipemia compared to supplementation with cod and gluten. As postprandial lipemia is closely correlated to cardiovascular disease, long-term dietary supplementation with whey protein may prove beneficial in preventing cardiovascular disease in obese non-diabetic subjects.

Holmer-Jensen, Jens; Mortensen, Lene Sundahl

2013-01-01

323

Go4it; study design of a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of a multidisciplinary group intervention for obese adolescents for prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, the first adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 2 as a result of obesity have recently been diagnosed. Therefore, it is very important that programs aiming at the prevention of type 2 diabetes of obese adolescents are developed and evaluated. Methods Go4it is a multidisciplinary group treatment that focuses on: 1 increasing awareness of the current dietary and physical activity behaviour (i.e. energy balance behaviour, 2 improving diet, 3 decreasing sedentary behaviour, 4 increasing levels of physical activity, and 5 coping with difficult situations. Go4it consists of 7 sessions with an interval of 2–3 weeks. The effectiveness of the multidisciplinary group treatment compared with usual care (i.e. referral to a dietician was evaluated in a randomised controlled trial. We examined effects on BMI(sds, body composition, energy expenditure, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance (primary outcome measure, as well as dietary and physical activity behaviour and quality of life. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective was conducted alongside the randomised trial to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the multidisciplinary treatment program vs. usual care. Discussion In this paper we described a multidisciplinary treatment program (Go4it for obese adolescents and the design of a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation to evaluate its effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (ISRCTN27626398.

Weijs Peter JM

2008-12-01

324

Inactivation of SOCS3 in leptin receptor-expressing cells protects mice from diet-induced insulin resistance but does not prevent obesity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Therapies that improve leptin sensitivity have potential as an alternative treatment approach against obesity and related comorbidities. We investigated the effects of Socs3 gene ablation in different mouse models to understand the role of SOCS3 in the regulation of leptin sensitivity, diet-induced obesity (DIO) and glucose homeostasis. Neuronal deletion of SOCS3 partially prevented DIO and improved glucose homeostasis. Inactivation of SOCS3 only in LepR-expressing cells protected against leptin resistance induced by HFD, but did not prevent DIO. However, inactivation of SOCS3 in LepR-expressing cells protected mice from diet-induced insulin resistance by increasing hypothalamic expression of Katp channel subunits and c-Fos expression in POMC neurons. In summary, the regulation of leptin signaling by SOCS3 orchestrates diet-induced changes on glycemic control. These findings help to understand the molecular mechanisms linking obesity and type 2 diabetes, and highlight the potential of SOCS3 inhibitors as a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:25161884

Pedroso, João A B; Buonfiglio, Daniella C; Cardinali, Lais I; Furigo, Isadora C; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M; Tirapegui, Julio; Elias, Carol F; Donato, Jose

2014-09-01

325

A synthesis of existing systematic reviews and meta-analyses of school-based behavioural interventions for controlling and preventing obesity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Schools are an attractive and popular setting for implementing interventions for children. There is a growing body of empirical research exploring the efficacy of school-based obesity prevention programs. While there have been several reviews on the topic, findings remain mixed. To examine the quality of evidence and compare the findings from existing systematic reviews and meta-analyses of school-based programs in the prevention and control of childhood obesity. This paper systematically appraises the methodology and conclusions of literature reviews examining the effectiveness of school-based obesity interventions published in English in peer-reviewed journals between January 1990 and October 2010. Eight reviews were examined, three meta-analyses and five systematic reviews. All of the reviews recognized that studies were heterogeneous in design, participants, intervention and outcomes. Intervention components in the school setting associated with a significant reduction of weight in children included long-term interventions with combined diet and physical activity and a family component. Several reviews also found gender differences in response to interventions. Of the eight reviews, five were deemed of high quality and yet limited evidence was found on which to base recommendations. As no single intervention will fit all schools and populations, further high-quality research needs to focus on identifying specific program characteristics predictive of success. PMID:22070186

Khambalia, A Z; Dickinson, S; Hardy, L L; Gill, T; Baur, L A

2012-03-01

326

[Effect of healthy life style in overweight and obese patients].  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Change of life style plays very important role for the management of overweight and obesity and related cardiovascular risk factors. Patients need to acquire and adopt these changes. The aim of this study was to screen practices for overweight and obese patients, to decrease their cardiovascular risk and prevent development of cardiovascular diseases. 2489 overweight patients were screened from 29 general practices since April of 2001. The authors surveyed their characteristics of life style: eating and exercise habits, body mass index, waist line, resting blood pressure, heart rate and plasma glucose, total cholesterin, triglyceride, HDL after a 12-hour fasting. A team, which consisted of an internist, a dietician and a physical instructor dealt with the patients. After ruling out secondary obesity the team tailored an individual life-style which focused on dietary interventions (low calorie diet) and increased physical activity. 12 months later the body mass index decreased significantly by 0.56 kg/m 2 on average and further 0.088 kg/m 2 by the end of the second year, the waist line first did not change significantly then decreased 0.04 cm. The rest systolic blood pressure cut down significantly on average 5.9 Hg mm in the first year, and more 0.11 Hg mm by the end of second year. The metabolic parameters also decreased significantly: total cholesterin 0.23 mmol/l in the first year, 0.07 mmol/l in the second year, triglyceride: 0.18 mmol/l; 0.08 mmol/l, blood glucose: 0.15 mmol/l; 0.19 mmol/l. The level of HDL did not change. It is very important for management of overweight and obesity that patients adopt changes of life style. The authors' results show that these patients must be followed very strictly. PMID:17344121

Móczár, Csaba; Borda, Ferenc; Faragó, Katalin; Borgulya, Gábor; Braunitzer, Ferencné; Vörös, Vera

2007-01-14

327

Developing obesity prevention interventions among minority ethnic children in schools and places of worship: The DEAL (DiEt and Active Living) study  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Childhood obesity is a major public health concern with serious implications for the sustainability of healthcare systems. Studies in the US and UK have shown that ethnicity is consistently associated with childhood obesity, with Black African origin girls in particular being more vulnerable to overweight and obesity than their White peers. Little is known, however, about what promotes or hinders engagement with prevention programmes among ethnic minority children. Methods...

Anderson Annie; Rawlins Emma; Baker Graham; Maynard Maria J; Harding Seeromanie

2009-01-01

328

Impact Evaluation of Enabling Mothers to Prevent Pediatric Obesity Through Web-Based Education and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) Randomized Control Trial.  

Science.gov (United States)

Background. The family and home environment is an influential antecedent of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to pilot test The Enabling Mothers to Prevent Pediatric Obesity through Web-Based Education and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) intervention; a newly developed, theory-based, online program for prevention of childhood obesity. Method. The two-arm, parallel group, randomized, participant-blinded trial targeted mothers with children between 4 and 6 years of age. Measures were collected at baseline, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks to evaluate programmatic effects on constructs of social cognitive theory (SCT) and obesity-related behaviors. Process evaluation transpired concurrently with each intervention session. Results. Fifty-seven participants were randomly assigned to receive either experimental EMPOWER (n = 29) or active control Healthy Lifestyles (n = 28) intervention. Significant main effects were identified for child physical activity, sugar-free beverage consumption, and screen time, indicating that both groups improved in these behaviors. A significant group-by-time interaction was detected for child fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption as well as the SCT construct of environment in the EMPOWER cohort. An increase of 1.613 cups of FVs (95% confidence interval = [0.698, 2.529]) was found in the experimental group, relative to the active control group. Change score analysis found changes in the home environment accounted for 31.4% of the change in child FV intake for the experimental group. Conclusions. Child physical activity, sugar-free beverage consumption, and screen time improved in both groups over the course of the trial. Only the theory-based intervention was efficacious in increasing child FV consumption. The EMPOWER program was robust for inducing change in the home environment leading to an increase in child FV intake (Cohen's f = 0.160). PMID:25161168

Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj; Cottrell, Randall R; Wilson, Bradley R A; Johnson, Marcus Lee

2014-08-26

329

Effects of weight-reduction on obesity-associated diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Even moderate, but persistent weight-loss ameliorates most of the related diseases in obesity. Besides the consequences of the metabolic syndrome, this includes less well-known obesity-associated changes, such as impaired fertility, menstrual disorders, psychic changes, total leucocyte-count as a parameter of immunity and the impaired pulmonary function in asthma and sleep-apnoea. Life-expectancy is prolonged by diminution of visceral fat depots, whilst weight-loss by shrinking of fat-free body-mass seems to have a contrary effect.

Liebermeister, Hermann

2003-07-01

330

Using the intervention mapping protocol to develop a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in a multi-centre European project: the IDEFICS intervention  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased during the past decades and is now considered an urgent public health problem. Although stabilizing trends in obesity prevalence have been identified in parts of Europe, preventive efforts in children are still needed. Using the socio-ecological approach as the underlying theoretical perspective, the IDEFICS project aimed to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in eight European countries. The aim of the present manuscript was to describe the content and developmental process of the IDEFICS intervention. Methods The intervention mapping protocol (IMP was used to develop the community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in 3 to 10 years old children. It is a theory- and evidence-based tool for the structured planning and development of health promotion programs that requires the completion of six different steps. These steps were elaborated by two coordinating centers and discussed with the other participating centers until agreement was reached. Focus group research was performed in all participating centers to provide an informed basis for intervention development. Results The application of the IMP resulted in an overall intervention framework with ten intervention modules targeting environmental and personal factors through the family, the school and the community. The summary results of the focus group research were used to inform the development of the overall intervention. The cultural adaptation of the overall intervention was realised by using country specific focus group results. The need for cultural adaptation was considered during the entire process to improve program adoption and implementation. A plan was developed to evaluate program effectiveness and quality of implementation. Conclusions The IDEFICS project developed a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity by using to the intervention mapping heuristic. The IDEFICS intervention consists of a general and standardized intervention framework that allows for cultural adaptation to make the intervention feasible and to enhance deliverability in all participating countries. The present manuscript demonstrates that the development of an intervention is a long process that needs to be done systematically. Time, human resources and finances need to be planned beforehand to make interventions evidence-based and culturally relevant.

Verbestel Vera

2011-08-01

331

[Obesity in Mexico].  

Science.gov (United States)

Excess body weight (overweight and obesity) is currently recognized as one of the most important challenges of public health in the world, given its size, speed of growth and the negative effect it has on the health of the population that suffers. Overweight and obesity significantly increases the risk of chronic no communicable diseases, premature mortality and the social cost of health. An estimated 90 % of cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus attributable to overweight and obesity. Today, Mexico is second global prevalence of obesity in the adult population, which is ten times higher than that of countries like Japan and Korea. With regard to children, Mexico ranks fourth worldwide obesity prevalence, behind Greece, USA and Italy. In our country, over 70 % of the adult population, between 30 and 60 years are overweight. The prevalence of overweight is higher in men than females, while the prevalence of obesity is higher in women than men. Until 2012, 26 million Mexican adults are overweight and 22 million obese, which represents a major challenge for the health sector in terms of promoting healthy lifestyles in the population and development of public policies to reverse this scenario epidemiology. Mexico needs to plan and implement strategies and action cost effective for the prevention and control of obesity of children, adolescents and adults. Global experience shows that proper care of obesity and overweight, required to formulate and coordinate multisectoral strategies and efficient for enhancing protective factors to health, particularly to modify individual behavior, family and community. PMID:25760754

Dávila-Torres, Javier; González-Izquierdo, José Jesús; Barrera-Cruz, Antonio

2015-01-01

332

Cardiovascular effects of current and future anti-obesity drugs.  

Science.gov (United States)

The prevalence of obesity increases and is associated with increases in co-morbidities e.g. type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, heart disease, stroke, asthma, several forms of cancer, depression, and may result in reduction of expected remaining lifespan. We have reviewed the adverse effects on the cardiovascular system of anti-obesity drugs now retracted from the market as well as the cardiovascular profile of current drugs and potential pathways which are considered for treatment of obesity. Fenfluramine, and sibutramine were withdrawn due to increased cardiovascular risk, while an inverse agonist at cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors, rimonobant was withdrawn due to serious psychiatric problems. At present there are only few treatments available including orlistat and, phentermine alone or in combination with topiramate and lorcaserin, although cardiovascular side effects need to be clarified regarding phentermine and lorcaserin. Drugs approved for type 2 diabetes including glucagon like peptide (GLP-1) analogues and metformin also cause moderate weight losses and have a favourable cardiovascular profile, while the anti-obesity potential of nebivolol remains unexplored. Pathways with anti-obesity potential include sirtuin activation, blockade of transient receptor potential (TRPV1) channels, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 and 2 inhibitors, uncoupling protein activators, bile acids, crotonins, CB1 antagonists, but the cardiovascular profile remains to be investigated. For type 2 diabetes, new drug classes with possible advantageous cardiovascular profiles, e.g. GLP-1 analogues and sodium-glucose co-transport type 2 inhibitors, are associated with weight loss and are currently being evaluated as anti-obesity drugs. PMID:24846238

Comerma-Steffensen, Simon; Grann, Martin; Andersen, Charlotte U; Rungby, Jorgen; Simonsen, Ulf

2014-05-01

333

Perception of Childhood Obesity and Support for Prevention Policies among Latinos and Whites  

Science.gov (United States)

A cross-sectional survey was administered to Latino and White residents of Omaha, NE, to assess perception of the childhood obesity problem, attribution of responsibility, and support for obesity-related policies. The sample included 40.8% (n = 271) Latinos and 59.2% (n = 393) Whites. Among Latinos, 25% did not see childhood obesity as a problem, compared to 6% of Whites (P < 0.001). This difference persisted after adjusting for age, gender, and education level (odds ratio (OR) 2.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07–4.14). Latinos were more likely to agree that government was responsible for addressing childhood obesity compared to Whites (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.82–4.35). Higher support for policy interventions was observed among individuals who perceived childhood obesity as a big problem compared to those who did not, independent of race, sex, age, or education level. The relationship between support for tax-based policies and perception of the childhood obesity problem was mainly evident among Latinos rather than Whites. Despite city-wide efforts to address obesity, differential penetration in community subgroups appears evident. There is room to further engage Latinos in the cause of obesity. Deepening community awareness about the consequences and complexity of childhood obesity can lead to stronger support for childhood obesity policy interventions. PMID:25045532

Puricelli Perin, Douglas M.; Frerichs, Leah; Costa, Sergio; Ramirez, Amelie G.; Huang, Terry T.-K.

2014-01-01

334

A true challenge for any superhero: an evaluation of a comic book obesity prevention program.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to pilot test the Comics for Health program, a theory-based nutrition and physical activity intervention for children. Twelve after-school programs were randomized to either a theory-based (n = 37) or a knowledge-based (n = 34 children) version of the intervention. Pretests, posttests, and 3-month follow-up tests were administered to evaluate the programmatic effects on body mass index percentile, obesity-related behaviors, and constructs of social cognitive theory. Both interventions found significant, yet modest effects for fruit and vegetable consumption (P < .005), physical activities (P < .004), and water and sugar-free beverage consumption (P < .001) and self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption (P < .015) and physical activities (P < .009). PMID:23168347

Branscum, Paul; Sharma, Manoj; Wang, Lihshing Leigh; Wilson, Bradley R A; Rojas-Guyler, Liliana

2013-01-01

335

eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: a systematic review with meta-analysis.  

Science.gov (United States)

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17?September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n?=?139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n?=?55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n?=?60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P?obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention. PMID:25753009

Hutchesson, M J; Rollo, M E; Krukowski, R; Ells, L; Harvey, J; Morgan, P J; Callister, R; Plotnikoff, R; Collins, C E

2015-05-01

336

In Preparation of the Nationwide Dissemination of the School-Based Obesity Prevention Program DOiT: Stepwise Development Applying the Intervention Mapping Protocol  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: The school-based Dutch Obesity Intervention in Teenagers (DOiT) program is an evidence-based obesity prevention program. In preparation for dissemination throughout the Netherlands, this study aimed to adapt the initial program and to develop an implementation strategy and materials. Methods: We revisited the Intervention Mapping (IM)…

van Nassau, Femke; Singh, Amika S.; van Mechelen, Willem; Brug, Johannes; Chin A. Paw, Mai J. M.

2014-01-01

337

Contribution of formative research to design an environmental program for obesity prevention in schools in Mexico City.  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective. This paper describes the methods and key findings of formative research conducted to design a school-based program for obesity prevention. Materials and methods. Formative research was based on the ecological model and the principles of social marketing. A mixed method approach was used. Qualitative (direct observation, indepth interviews, focus group discussions and photo-voice) and quantitative (closed ended surveys, checklists, anthropometry) methods were employed. Results. Formative research key findings, including barriers by levels of the ecological model, were used for designing a program including environmental strategies to discourage the consumption of energy dense foods and sugar beverages. Conclusion. Formative research was fundamental to developing a context specific obesity prevention program in schools that seeks environment modification and behavior change. PMID:25629246

Bonvecchio, Anabelle; Théodore, Florence L; Safdie, Margarita; Duque, Tiffany; Villanueva, María Ángeles; Torres, Catalina; Rivera, Juan

2014-01-01

338

PRAS40 prevents development of diabetic cardiomyopathy and improves hepatic insulin sensitivity in obesity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Diabetes is a multi-organ disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy can result in heart failure, which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. In the liver, insulin resistance contributes to hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia, which further worsens the metabolic profile. Defects in mTOR signalling are believed to contribute to metabolic dysfunctions in diabetic liver and hearts, but evidence is missing that mTOR activation is causal to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study shows that specific mTORC1 inhibition by PRAS40 prevents the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. This phenotype was associated with improved metabolic function, blunted hypertrophic growth and preserved cardiac function. In addition PRAS40 treatment improves hepatic insulin sensitivity and reduces systemic hyperglycaemia in obese mice. Thus, unlike rapamycin, mTORC1 inhibition with PRAS40 improves metabolic profile in diabetic mice. These findings may open novel avenues for therapeutic strategies using PRAS40 directed against diabetic-related diseases. PMID:24408966

Völkers, Mirko; Doroudgar, Shirin; Nguyen, Nathalie; Konstandin, Mathias H; Quijada, Pearl; Din, Shabana; Ornelas, Luis; Thuerauf, Donna J; Gude, Natalie; Friedrich, Kilian; Herzig, Stephan; Glembotski, Christopher C; Sussman, Mark A

2014-01-01

339

Effect of keishibukuryogan on genetic and dietary obesity models.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity has been recognized as one of the most important risk factors for a variety of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension/cardiovascular diseases, steatosis/hepatitis, and cancer. Keishibukuryogan (KBG, Gui Zhi Fu Ling Wan in Chinese) is a traditional Chinese/Japanese (Kampo) medicine that has been known to improve blood circulation and is also known for its anti-inflammatory or scavenging effect. In this study, we evaluated the effect of KBG in two distinct rodent models of obesity driven by either a genetic (SHR/NDmcr-cp rat model) or dietary (high-fat diet-induced mouse obesity model) mechanism. Although there was no significant effect on the body composition in either the SHR rat or the DIO mouse models, KBG treatment significantly decreased the serum level of leptin and liver TG level in the DIO mouse, but not in the SHR rat model. Furthermore, a lower fat deposition in liver and a smaller size of adipocytes in white adipose tissue were observed in the DIO mice treated with KBG. Importantly, we further found downregulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism in the KBG-treated liver, along with decreased liver TG and cholesterol level. Our present data experimentally support in fact that KBG can be an attractive Kampo medicine to improve obese status through a regulation of systemic leptin level and/or lipid metabolism. PMID:25793003

Gao, Fengying; Yokoyama, Satoru; Fujimoto, Makoto; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Saiki, Ikuo; Shimada, Yutaka; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro

2015-01-01

340

Effect of Keishibukuryogan on Genetic and Dietary Obesity Models  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity has been recognized as one of the most important risk factors for a variety of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension/cardiovascular diseases, steatosis/hepatitis, and cancer. Keishibukuryogan (KBG, Gui Zhi Fu Ling Wan in Chinese) is a traditional Chinese/Japanese (Kampo) medicine that has been known to improve blood circulation and is also known for its anti-inflammatory or scavenging effect. In this study, we evaluated the effect of KBG in two distinct rodent models of obesity driven by either a genetic (SHR/NDmcr-cp rat model) or dietary (high-fat diet-induced mouse obesity model) mechanism. Although there was no significant effect on the body composition in either the SHR rat or the DIO mouse models, KBG treatment significantly decreased the serum level of leptin and liver TG level in the DIO mouse, but not in the SHR rat model. Furthermore, a lower fat deposition in liver and a smaller size of adipocytes in white adipose tissue were observed in the DIO mice treated with KBG. Importantly, we further found downregulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism in the KBG-treated liver, along with decreased liver TG and cholesterol level. Our present data experimentally support in fact that KBG can be an attractive Kampo medicine to improve obese status through a regulation of systemic leptin level and/or lipid metabolism.

Gao, Fengying; Fujimoto, Makoto; Saiki, Ikuo; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro

2015-01-01

341

Peer Effects on Childhood and Adolescent Obesity in China  

OpenAIRE

Using data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), this study analyzes peer effects on obesity in a sample of 3- to 18-year-old children and adolescents in China. Even after a rich set of covariates and unobserved individual heterogeneity are controlled for, it is evident that such peer effects do indeed exist. These effects are stronger in rural areas, among individuals at the upper end of the BMI distribution, and especially among females. All else being equal, female adolescents...

Nie, Peng; Sousa-poza, Alfonso; He, Xiaobo

2014-01-01

342

Early intervention of multiple home visits to prevent childhood obesity in a disadvantaged population: a home-based randomised controlled trial (Healthy Beginnings Trial  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that a proportion of children as young as two years are already overweight. This indicates that obesity prevention programs that commence as early as possible and are family-focused are needed. This Healthy Beginnings Trial aims to determine the efficacy of a community-based randomized controlled trial (RCT of a home visiting intervention in preventing the early onset of childhood overweight and obesity. The intervention will be conducted over the first two years of life to increase healthy feeding behaviours and physical activity, decrease physical inactivity, enhance parent-child interaction, and hence reduce overweight and obesity among children at 2 and 5 years of age in the most socially and economically disadvantaged areas of Sydney, Australia. Methods/design This RCT will be conducted with a consecutive sample of 782 first time mothers with their newborn children. Pregnant women who are expecting their first child, and who are between weeks 24 and 34 of their pregnancy, will be invited to participate in the trial at the antenatal clinic. Informed consent will be obtained and participants will then be randomly allocated to the intervention or the control group. The allocation will be concealed by sequentially numbered, sealed opaque envelopes containing a computer generated random number. The intervention comprises eight home visits from a specially trained community nurse over two years and pro-active telephone support between the visits. Main outcomes include a duration of breastfeeding measured at 6 and 12 months, b introduction of solids measured at 4 and 6 months, c nutrition, physical activity and television viewing measured at 24 months, and d overweight/obesity status at age 2 and 5 years. Discussion The results of this trial will ascertain whether the home based early intervention is effective in preventing the early onset of childhood overweight and obesity. If proved to be effective, it will result in a series of recommendations for policy and practical methods for promoting healthy feeding and physical activity of children in the first two years of life with particular application to families who are socially and economically disadvantaged.

Alperstein Garth

2007-05-01

343

Perspectives in Practice – Motivational interviewing as a component of a school-based obesity prevention program for adolescent girls  

OpenAIRE

Over the past decade, motivational interviewing has been used by health professionals to promote health behavior changes and help individuals increase their motivation or “readiness” to change. This paper describes a preliminary study used to evaluate the feasibility of motivational interviewing as a component in a school-based obesity prevention program, New Moves. New Moves is a program for inactive adolescent high school girls who are overweight or at risk for becoming overweight due t...

Flattum, Colleen; Friend, Sarah; Neumark-sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary

2009-01-01

344

Food and Nutrition Board Update: What Do SNAP Allotments, Physical Fitness, and Obesity Prevention Have in Common?123  

OpenAIRE

The Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board had a productive year, with important expert committee reports on the Supplemental Food Assistance Program, physical fitness, and accelerating obesity prevention efforts that provided grounding for dietary guidance and nutrition policies and programs. This summary describes Food and Nutrition Board activities, including current thinking on dietary reference intakes. The summary also highlights consensus reports on defining and measuring S...

Meyers, Linda D.; Murphy, Suzanne P.; Yaktine, Ann L.

2013-01-01

345

Feasibility and Acceptability of an Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention: Results from the Healthy Homes, Healthy Families Pilot Study  

OpenAIRE

Background. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention designed to empower low-income racially/ethnically diverse parents to modify their children's health behaviors. Methods. We used a prospective design with pre-/posttest evaluation of 50 parent-child pairs (children aged 2 to 5 years) to examine potential changes in dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors among children at baseline and four-month follow-...

Akilah Dulin Keita; Risica, Patricia M.; Drenner, Kelli L.; Ingrid Adams; Gemma Gorham; Gans, Kim M.

2014-01-01

346

The Early Prevention of Obesity in CHildren (EPOCH) Collaboration--an individual patient data prospective meta-analysis.  

OpenAIRE

BACKGROUND: Efforts to prevent the development of overweight and obesity have increasingly focused early in the life course as we recognise that both metabolic and behavioural patterns are often established within the first few years of life. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions are even more powerful when, with forethought, they are synthesised into an individual patient data (IPD) prospective meta-analysis (PMA). An IPD PMA is a unique research design where several trials ar...

Askie, Lm; Baur, La; Campbell, K.; Daniels, La; Hesketh, K.; Magarey, A.; Mihrshahi, S.; Rissel, C.; Simes, J.; Taylor, B.; Taylor, R.; Voysey, M.; Wen, Lm

2010-01-01

347

The Early Prevention of Obesity in CHildren (EPOCH) Collaboration - an Individual Patient Data Prospective Meta-Analysis  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Efforts to prevent the development of overweight and obesity have increasingly focused early in the life course as we recognise that both metabolic and behavioural patterns are often established within the first few years of life. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions are even more powerful when, with forethought, they are synthesised into an individual patient data (IPD) prospective meta-analysis (PMA). An IPD PMA is a unique research design where several t...

Simes John; Rissel Chris; Mihrshahi Seema; Magarey Anthea; Hesketh Kylie; Daniels Lynne A; Campbell Karen; Baur Louise A; Askie Lisa M; Taylor Barry; Taylor Rachael; Voysey Merryn; Wen Li

2010-01-01

348

Parental Weight Perceptions: A Cause for Concern in the Prevention and Management of Childhood Obesity in the United Arab Emirates  

OpenAIRE

Parental participation is a key factor in the prevention and management of childhood obesity, thus parental recognition of weight problems is essential. We estimated parental perceptions and their determinants in the Emirati population. We invited 1541 students (grade 1–12; 50% boys) and their parents, but only 1440 (6–19 years) and their parents consented. Of these, 945 Emirati nationals provided data for analysis. Anthropometric and demographic variables were measured by standard method...

Aljunaibi, Abdulla; Abdulle, Abdishakur; Nagelkerke, Nico

2013-01-01

349

Mobile apps for pediatric obesity prevention and treatment, healthy eating, and physical activity promotion: just fun and games?  

OpenAIRE

Mobile applications (apps) offer a novel way to engage children in behavior change, but little is known about content of commercially available apps for this population. We analyzed the content of apps for iPhone/iPad for pediatric weight loss, healthy eating (HE), and physical activity (PA). Fifty-seven apps were downloaded and tested by two independent raters. Apps were coded for: inclusion of the Expert Committee for Pediatric Obesity Prevention's (ECPOP) eight recommended strategies (e.g....

Schoffman, Danielle E.; Turner-mcgrievy, Gabrielle; Jones, Sonya J.; Wilcox, Sara

2013-01-01

350

Evaluation of “One Body, One Life”: A Community-Based Family Intervention for the Prevention of Obesity in Children  

OpenAIRE

Service evaluation of a community-based healthy lifestyle programme, designed for families aimed at preventing obesity. Physiological and behaviour measures were recorded at the beginning and end of the programme. Out of a total of 454 participants, 358 (79%) completed. From these completers 293 (64%) were analysed as there was sufficient data. The use of “high visibility recruitment” led to 77% of completers being from Coventry's two most deprived population quintiles. Ethnic minorities ...

Towey, Marsha; Harrell, Ruth; Lee, Berni

2011-01-01

351

Overview of noncommunicable diseases in Korean children and adolescents: focus on obesity and its effect on metabolic syndrome.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity during childhood is a dominant risk factor for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and is itself considered a disease that needs to be treated. Recently, the growth in childhood obesity in Korea has become stagnant; however, two in every ten children are still overweight. In addition, 60% or more of overweight children have at least one metabolic syndrome risk factor. Thus, childhood obesity should be controlled through lifestyle modification. This paper reviews studies of the modifiable risk factors of obesity in Korean children. According to the life-course approach, preschool-aged children (Elementary school-aged children (6 to 11 years) are affected by overlapping individual and parental effects. This may mean that the establishment of individual behavior patterns begins during this period. The conditions of poor eating habits such as skipping meals, eating out, and high fat intake, along with low physical activity, facilitate increased obesity among adolescents (12 to 18 years). Notably, adolescent girls show high rates of both underweight and obesity, which may lead to the development of NCDs in their offspring. Therefore, the problem of NCDs is no longer limited to adults, but is also prevalent among children. In addition, early intervention offers cost-effective opportunities for preventing NCDs. Thus, children need primary consideration, adequate monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment to reduce the burden of NCDs later in adulthood. PMID:23946875

Lee, Hye Ah; Park, Hyesook

2013-07-01

352

SHAKING AND RATTLING: DEVELOPING A CHILD OBESITY PREVENTION PROGRAM USING A FAITH-BASED COMMUNITY APPROACH  

OpenAIRE

This article describes the creation of a faith-based, community action research intervention aimed at reducing childhood obesity among a vulnerable population. Of particular concern to the community was the prevalence of obesity among its minority children. Engaging parents in a childhood obesity initiative through faith-based organizations (churches, community organizations with a common religious focus) was a method to provide a research intervention. It is important for researchers to be c...

Reifsnider, Elizabeth; Hargraves, Martha; Williams, Karen Jaynes; Cooks, John; Hall, Valerie

2010-01-01

353

Obesity, Chronic Disease, and Economic Growth: A Case for “Big Picture” Prevention  

OpenAIRE

The discovery of a form of chronic, low-grade systemic inflammation (“metaflammation”) linked with obesity, but also associated with several lifestyle-related behaviours not necessarily causing obesity, suggests a re-consideration of obesity as a direct cause of chronic disease and a search for the main drivers—or cause of causes. Factors contributing to this are considered here within an environmental context, leading to the conclusion that humans have an immune reaction to aspects of ...

Egger, Garry

2010-01-01

354

Nutraceutical effects of fucoxanthin for obesity and diabetes therapy: a review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity, which results from an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure, has become a major health risk factor worldwide, causing numerous and various diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases. Fucoxanthin, a specific carotenoid in brown algae, has garnered much attention for its anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects attributable to a unique mechanism. Fucoxanthin induces uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in white adipose tissue (WAT). That inner membrane mitochondrial protein, UCP1, can dissipate energy through oxidation of fatty acids and heat production. Furthermore, fucoxanthin improves insulin resistance and ameliorates blood glucose levels through down-regulation of adipocytokines related to insulin resistance in WAT and up-regulation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in skeletal muscle. Algae fucoxanthin is a beneficial compound for the prevention of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25748372

Maeda, Hayato

2015-02-01

355

Assessing Family Level Behaviors for Obesity Prevention: Development and Preliminary Validation of the Family Stage of Change Tool  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We applied the Transtheoretical Model (TTM to develop the Family Stage of Change (FSOC screening tool. Our goal was to provide practitioners an instrument that measures families’ readiness to change obesity preventing behaviors, in order to optimize family-focused obesity-prevention intervention strategies. We evaluated instrument validity by comparing responses on the FSOC to related items on a validated family behavioral and environmental assessment (Family Nutrition and Physical Activity Assessment; FNPA shown to predict child BMI. Study participants included parents and caregivers (N = 146 of children ages 2-14 years recruited through preschool, elementary, and middle school listservs. Descriptive analyses were conducted on the demographic data, and correlations were run to examine associations between FSOC and FNPA items, domains, and total scores. Strong positive correlations were observed between the individual items (0.44 to 0.75, p < 0.001, domain scores (0.57 to 0.8, p < 0.001, and mean total FSOC and FNPA scores (0.78, p < 0.001 suggesting the FSOC is measuring family level behaviors. Test-retest reliability was evaluated on a subsample of participants (n = 57, and item by item correlations ranged from 0.75 to 1.0, p < 0.001. Our findings suggest the FSOC is a valid and reliable instrument and has the potential to meet an identified need related to family-directed, obesity prevention efforts.

Katherine B. Gunter

2014-10-01

356

Turn off the TV and dance! Participation in culturally tailored health interventions: implications for obesity prevention among Mexican American girls.  

Science.gov (United States)

Our evaluation study identifies facilitators and barriers to participation among families participating in the treatment arm of Stanford ECHALE. This culturally tailored obesity prevention trial consisted of a combined intervention with two main treatment components: 1) a folkloric dance program; and 2) a screen time reduction curriculum designed for 7-11 year old Latinas and their families. We conducted 83 interviews (40 parents and 43 girls) in participant homes after 6 months of enrollment in the ECHALE trial. The Spradley ethnographic method and NVivo 8.0 were used to code and analyze narrative data. Three domains emerged for understanding participation: 1) family cohesiveness; 2) perceived gains; and 3) culturally relevant program structure. Two domains emerged for non-participation: program requirements and perceived discomforts. Non-parametric, Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the relationships with participant attendance data. Sustained participation was most strongly influenced by the domain perceived gains when parents reported better self-esteem, confidence, improved attitude, improved grades, etc. (Spearman r = .45, P = .003). Alternatively, under the domain, perceived discomforts, with subthemes such as child bullying, participation in the combined intervention was inversely associated with attendance (Spearman r = -.38, P = .02). Family-centered, school-based, community obesity prevention programs that focus on tangible short-term gains for girls may generate greater participation rates, enhance social capital, and promote community empowerment. These factors can be emphasized in future obesity prevention program design and implementation. PMID:24392608

Azevedo, Kathryn J; Mendoza, Sonia; Fernández, María; Haydel, K Farish; Fujimoto, Michelle; Tirumalai, Evelyn C; Robinson, Thomas N

2013-01-01

357

Therapeutic assessment of cytochrome C for the prevention of obesity through endothelial cell-targeted nanoparticulate system.  

Science.gov (United States)

Because the functional apoptosis-initiating protein, cytochrome C (CytC) is rapidly cleared from the circulation (t1/2 (half-life): 4 minutes), it cannot be used for in vivo therapy. We report herein on a hitherto unreported strategy for delivering exogenous CytC as a potential and safe antiobesity drug for preventing diet-induced obesity, the most common type of obesity in humans. The functional activity of CytC encapsulated in prohibitin (a white fat vessel-specific receptor)-targeted nanoparticles (PTNP) was evaluated quantitatively, as evidenced by the observations that CytC-loaded PTNP causes apoptosis in primary adipose endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas CytC alone did not. The delivery of a single dose of CytC through PTNP into the circulation disrupted the vascular structure by the targeted apoptosis of adipose endothelial cells in vivo. Intravenous treatment of CytC-loaded PTNP resulted in a substantial reduction in obesity in high-fat diet (HFD) fed wild-type (wt) mice, as evidenced by the dose-dependent prevention of the percentage of increase in body weight and decrease in serum leptin levels. In addition, no detectable hepatotoxicity was found to be associated with this prevention. Thus, the finding highlights the promising potential of CytC for use as an antiobesity drug, when delivered through a nanosystem. PMID:23295953

Hossen, Md Nazir; Kajimoto, Kazuaki; Akita, Hidetaka; Hyodo, Mamoru; Ishitsuka, Taichi; Harashima, Hideyoshi

2013-03-01

358

Obesity and cholangiocarcinoma.  

Science.gov (United States)

It is estimated that about half of the population in developed countries are either overweight or obese. In some developing nations obesity rates have increased to surpass those seen in Western countries. This rate increase in obesity has many implications as obesity has been associated with numerous negative health effects including increased risks of hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, liver disease, apnea, and some cancer types. Obesity is now considered to be one of the major public health concerns facing the society. Cholangiocarcinomas (bile duct cancers) are malignant tumors arising from cholangiocytes inside or outside of the liver. Although cholangiocarcinomas are relatively rare, they are highly lethal. The low survival rate associated with cholangiocarcinoma is due to the advanced stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis. Prevention is therefore especially important in this cancer type. Some data suggest that the incidence of cholangiocarcinoma in the western world is on the rise. Increasing rate of obesity may be one of the factors responsible for this increase. Determining whether obesity is a risk factor for cholangiocarcinoma has significant clinical and societal implications as obesity is both prevalent and modifiable. This paper seeks to provide a summary of the current knowledge linking obesity and cholangiocarcinoma, and encourage further research on this topic. PMID:23382624

Parsi, Mansour A

2013-01-28

359

Obesity and cholangiocarcinoma  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It is estimated that about half of the population in developed countries are either overweight or obese. In some developing nations obesity rates have increased to surpass those seen in Western countries. This rate increase in obesity has many implications as obesity has been associated with numerous negative health effects including increased risks of hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, liver disease, apnea, and some cancer types. Obesity is now considered to be one of the major public health concerns facing the society. Cholangiocarcinomas (bile duct cancers are malignant tumors arising from cholangiocytes inside or outside of the liver. Although cholangiocarcinomas are relatively rare, they are highly lethal. The low survival rate associated with cholangiocarcinoma is due to the advanced stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis. Prevention is therefore especially important in this cancer type. Some data suggest that the incidence of cholangiocarcinoma in the western world is on the rise. Increasing rate of obesity may be one of the factors responsible for this increase. Determining whether obesity is a risk factor for cholangiocarcinoma has significant clinical and societal implications as obesity is both prevalent and modifiable. This paper seeks to provide a summary of the current knowledge linking obesity and cholangiocarcinoma, and encourage further research on this topic.

Mansour A Parsi

2013-01-01

360

Barriers to successful recruitment of parents of overweight children for an obesity prevention intervention: a qualitative study among youth health care professionals  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background The recruitment of participants for childhood overweight and obesity prevention interventions can be challenging. The goal of this study was to identify barriers that Dutch youth health care (YHC) professionals perceive when referring parents of overweight children to an obesity prevention intervention. Methods Sixteen YHC professionals (nurses, physicians and management staff) from eleven child health clinics participated in semi-structured interviews. An intervention imp...

Mpl, Gerards Sanne; Dagnelie Pieter C; Wj, Jansen Maria; De Vries Nanne K; Pj, Kremers Stef

2012-01-01

361

Leucine supplementation increases SIRT1 expression and prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and metabolic disorders in high-fat diet-induced obese mice  

OpenAIRE

Leucine supplementation has been shown to prevent high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent studies suggest that activation of Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is an important mechanism to maintain energy and metabolic homeostasis. We therefore examined the involvement of SIRT1 in leucine supplementation-prevented obesity and insulin resistance. To accomplish this goal, male C57BL/6J mice were fed nor...

Li, Hongliang; Xu, Mingjiang; Lee, Jiyeon; He, Chaoyong; Xie, Zhonglin

2012-01-01

362

A qualitative examination of home and neighborhood environments for obesity prevention in rural adults  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The home and neighborhood environments may be important in obesity prevention by virtue of food availability, food preparation, cues and opportunities for physical activity, and family support. To date, little research has examined how home and neighborhood environments in rural communities may support or hinder healthy eating and physical activity. This paper reports characteristics of rural homes and neighborhoods related to physical activity environments, availability of healthy foods, and family support for physical activity and maintaining an ideal body weight. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 60 African American and White adults over 50 years of age in two rural counties in Southwest Georgia. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two members of the research team using standard methods of qualitative analysis. Themes were then identified and data matrices were used to identify patterns by gender or race. Results Neighborhood features that supported physical activity were plenty of land, minimal traffic and living in a safe and friendly neighborhood. The major barrier was lack of recreational facilities. The majority of participants were not physically active with their family members due to schedule conflicts and lack of time. Family member-initiated efforts to encourage physical activity met with mixed results, with refusals, procrastination, and increased activity all reported. Participants generally reported it was easy to get healthy foods, although cost barriers and the need to drive to a larger town for a supermarket with good variety were noted as obstacles. Family conversations about weight had occurred for about half of the participants, with reactions ranging from agreement about the need to lose weight to frustration. Conclusion This study suggests that successful environmental change strategies to promote physical activity and healthy eating in rural neighborhoods may differ from those used in urban neighborhoods. The findings also provide insight into the complexities of family support for physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight. Addressing socio-ecologic factors has the potential to increase healthy behaviors and decrease the prevalence of obesity among rural residents.

Ballard Denise

2008-12-01

363

Evaluation of the childhood obesity prevention program Kids - 'Go for your life'  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Kids - 'Go for your life' (K-GFYL is an award-based health promotion program being implemented across Victoria, Australia. The program aims to reduce the risk of childhood obesity by improving the socio-cultural, policy and physical environments in children's care and educational settings. Membership of the K-GFYL program is open to all primary and pre-schools and early childhood services across the State. Once in the program, member schools and services are centrally supported to undertake the health promotion (intervention activities. Once the K-GFYL program 'criteria' are reached the school/service is assessed and 'awarded'. This paper describes the design of the evaluation of the statewide K-GFYL intervention program. Methods/Design The evaluation is mixed method and cross sectional and aims to: 1 Determine if K-GFYL award status is associated with more health promoting environments in schools/services compared to those who are members only; 2 Determine if children attending K-GFYL award schools/services have higher levels of healthy eating and physical activity-related behaviors compared to those who are members only; 3 Examine the barriers to implementing and achieving the K-GFYL award; and 4 Determine the economic cost of implementing K-GFYL in primary schools Parent surveys will capture information about the home environment and child dietary and physical activity-related behaviors. Environmental questionnaires in early childhood settings and schools will capture information on the physical activity and nutrition environment and current health promotion activities. Lunchbox surveys and a set of open-ended questions for kindergarten parents will provide additional data. Resource use associated with the intervention activities will be collected from primary schools for cost analysis. Discussion The K-GFYL award program is a community-wide intervention that requires a comprehensive, multi-level evaluation. The evaluation design is constrained by the lack of a non-K-GFYL control group, short time frames and delayed funding of this large scale evaluation across all intervention settings. However, despite this, the evaluation will generate valuable evidence about the utility of a community-wide environmental approach to preventing childhood obesity which will inform future public health policies and health promotion programs internationally. Trial Registration ACTRN12609001075279

Gibbs Lisa

2010-05-01

364

Examining Methods Used to Evaluate the Cost-Effectiveness of Childhood Obesity Interventions  

OpenAIRE

This dissertation examines methods used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of childhood obesity interventions in order to help decision-makers prioritize among competing health programs using standardized outcomes. Chapter 1 generates inputs for use in cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) of childhood obesity interventions. In Chapter 1.1, I use data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to predict expenditures associated with obesity in childhood and adolescence. I found that obese childre...

Wright, Davene

2012-01-01

365

The anti-obesity effect of Lethariella cladonioides in 3T3-L1 cells and obese mice  

OpenAIRE

The aim of this study was to investigate whether a water extract of L. cladonioides (LC) has an anti-obesity effect in 3T3-L1 cells and obese mice. Treatment of differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes with LC caused a significant increase in glycerol release and reduced the protein expression of the adipogenic transcription factors, PPAR? and C/EBP?. In an animal model, obese mice were artificially induced by a high fat diet for 10 weeks. Experimental groups were treated with LC (100 mg/kg/day) by...

Sung, Ju-hyun; Chon, Jeong-woo; Lee, Mi-ae; Park, Jin-kyung; Woo, Jeong-taek; Park, Yoo Kyoung

2011-01-01

366

Keeping Kids Moving: How Equitable Transportation Policy Can Prevent Childhood Obesity--What It Is  

Science.gov (United States)

The nation faces an obesity crisis, especially among low-income children and children of color. Today, nearly one-third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese, and physical inactivity is a leading cause of this epidemic. Equitable transportation policy that fosters healthy, opportunity-rich communities has a critical role to play in…

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2012

2012-01-01

367

Etiology, Treatment, and Prevention of Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence: A Decade in Review  

Science.gov (United States)

Childhood obesity has become an epidemic on a worldwide scale. This article gives an overview of the progress made in childhood and adolescent obesity research in the last decade, with a particular emphasis on the transdisciplinary and complex nature of the problem. The following topics are addressed: (1) current definitions of childhood and…

Spruijt-Metz, Donna

2011-01-01

368

Anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effects of Boussingaultia gracilis Miers var. pseudobaselloides Bailey in obese rats.  

Science.gov (United States)

Boussingaultia gracilis Miers var. pseudobaselloides Bailey is used as a Chinese folk medicine for treatment of diabetes, inflammation, and liver disease. The present study is to investigate the anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effects of B. gracilis Miers var. pseudobaselloides Bailey ethanol extract (BGE). Six-week-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were separately fed for 6 weeks with two kinds of diets-a normal diet (ND) and a high-calorie high-fat diet (HD). Then the animals were treated with tea catechin (100?mg/kg) or BGE (300, 600, or 900?mg/kg) for another 6 weeks. BGE significantly lowered body weight gain, fat-pad weights, and serum and hepatic lipid levels in HD-induced obese rats. The lipid droplets in hepatic tissue of BGE-treated groups were also markedly lessened compared with HD group rats via oil red O staining. Significant increases were observed in the expressions of genes for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) ? and for fatty acid oxidation and thermogenesis-related proteins-acyl-coenzyme A oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, and uncoupling protein-2-in the liver of the BGE-treated groups. Moreover, BGE was found to suppress the expression of sterol response element binding protein-1, a lipogenic gene, as well as those of fatty acid synthase and PPAR? in adipose tissue and liver of HD group rats. These results indicate that B. gracilis Miers var. pseudobaselloides Bailey may have an anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effect through regulation of expression of genes involved in lipolysis and lipogenesis. PMID:21138371

Wang, Lu; Bang, Chae-Young; Choung, Se-Young

2011-01-01

369

Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects  

Science.gov (United States)

... effects of radiation therapy Preventing and managing side effects of radiation therapy When the radiation damages nearby ... radiation therapy ” section for more on this. Side effects can vary. Your doctor and nurse are the ...

370

The Effect of Exercise in Obese Women with Bulimia Nervosa  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Purpose:Obesity has been identified as a risk factor for the development of bulimia nervosa (BN in those who try to lose weight. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of walking exercise in order to provide a method for overcoming bulimia nervosa in obese young women suffering from bulimia nervosa.Methods: Twenty obese women with bulimia nervosa (body mass index [BMI]>30 and a mean age of 22.00 ± 1.50 years volunteered to participate in this study. They were randomly assigned to exercise (n=10 and control (n=10 groups. Both groups underwent anthropometric measurements and blood analysis before and after the training program. Exercise program included 30-minute walking sessions at 50-75% of maximal heart rate,3 days per week and for 2 months.Results: After 2 months significant changes were observed in all anthropometric variables (P<0.001.Percent body fat, fat mass, BMI, body weight and lean mass changes in response to training were significant in the exercise group (P<0.001.Conclusion:This study demonstrated that moderate aerobic exercises such as moderate walking are suitable behavior therapies for overcoming bulimia nervosa in obese young women.

Hassn Daneshmandi

2010-12-01

371

"The solution needs to be complex." Obese adults' attitudes about the effectiveness of individual and population based interventions for obesity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of public perceptions of obesity interventions have been quantitative and based on general population surveys. This study aims to explore the opinions and attitudes of obese individuals towards population and individual interventions for obesity in Australia. Methods Qualitative methods using in-depth semi-structured telephone interviews with a community sample of obese adults (Body Mass Index ?30. Theoretical, purposive and strategic recruitment techniques were used to ensure a broad sample of obese individuals with different types of experiences with their obesity. Participants were asked about their attitudes towards three population based interventions (regulation, media campaigns, and public health initiatives and three individual interventions (tailored fitness programs, commercial dieting, and gastric banding surgery, and the effectiveness of these interventions. Results One hundred and forty two individuals (19-75 years were interviewed. Participants strongly supported non-commercial interventions that were focused on encouraging individuals to make healthy lifestyle changes (regulation, physical activity programs, and public health initiatives. There was less support for interventions perceived to be invasive or high risk (gastric band surgery, stigmatising (media campaigns, or commercially motivated and promoting weight loss techniques (commercial diets and gastric banding surgery. Conclusion Obese adults support non-commercial, non-stigmatising interventions which are designed to improve lifestyles, rather than promote weight loss.

Castle David

2010-07-01

372

Obesity prevention and personal responsibility: the case of front-of-pack food labelling in Australia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia, the food industry and public health groups are locked in serious struggle for regulatory influence over the terms of front-of-pack food labelling. Clear, unambiguous labelling of the nutritional content of pre-packaged foods and of standardized food items sold in chain restaurants is consistent with the prevailing philosophy of 'personal responsibility'. An interpretive, front-of-pack labelling scheme has the capacity to encourage healthier patterns of eating, and to be a catalyst for improvements in the nutritional quality of food products through re-formulation. On the other hand, the strength of opposition of the Australian Food and Grocery Council to 'Traffic Light Labelling', and its efforts to promote a non-interpretive, voluntary scheme, invite the interpretation that the food industry is resistant to any reforms that could destabilise current (unhealthy purchasing patterns and the revenues they represent. Discussion This article argues that although policies that aim to educate consumers about the nutritional content of food are welcome, they are only one part of a broader basket of policies that are needed to make progress on obesity prevention and public health nutrition. However, to the extent that food labelling has the capacity to inform and empower consumers to make healthier choices - and to be a catalyst for improving the nutritional quality of commercial recipes - it has an important role to play. Furthermore, given the dietary impact of meals eaten in fast food and franchise restaurants, interpretive labelling requirements should not be restricted to pre-packaged foods. Summary Food industry resistance to an interpretive food labelling scheme is an important test for government, and a case study of how self-interest prompts industry to promote weaker, voluntary schemes that pre-empt and undermine progressive public health regulation.

Magnusson Roger S

2010-11-01

373

The effect of Cissus quadrangularis (CQR-300) and a Cissus formulation (CORE) on obesity and obesity-induced oxidative stress  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Aim Obesity is generally linked to complications in lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a proprietary extract of Cissus quadrangularis (CQR-300) to that of a proprietary formulation containing CQR-300 (CORE) on weight, blood lipids, and oxidative stress in overweight and obese people. Methods The first part of the study investigated the in vitro antioxidant properties of CQR-300 and CORE using 3 different methods, while the second...

Agbor Gabriel A; Soukontoua Yves B; Fomekong Gilles I; Enyegue Damaris; Oben Julius E

2007-01-01

374

The effectiveness of suicide prevention centers.  

Science.gov (United States)

The presence of suicide prevention centers in a state in 1970 was negatively associated with changes in the suicide rate from 1970 to 1980 in the USA, indicating a preventive effect from suicide prevention centers. This effect, though weak, was consistently found for most demographic subgroups of the population and when a strong social correlate of suicide rates (divorce rates) was taken into account by means of multiple regression analysis. PMID:8249037

Lester, D

1993-01-01

375

Medicare's Search for Effective Obesity Treatments: Diets Are Not the Answer  

Science.gov (United States)

The prevalence of obesity and its associated health problems have increased sharply in the past 2 decades. New revisions to Medicare policy will allow funding for obesity treatments of proven efficacy. The authors review studies of the long-term outcomes of calorie-restricting diets to assess whether dieting is an effective treatment for obesity

Mann, Traci; Tomiyama, A. Janet; Westling, Erika; Lew, Ann-Marie; Samuels, Barbra; Chatman, Jason

2007-01-01

376

Effect of diet control and exercise on the lipid profile of obese men  

OpenAIRE

Background: Obesity is a major health problem which might contribute to many other problems such as heart disease and hypertension as well as diabetes due to abnormal lipid profile. The main objective of the current study was to compare the effectiveness of diet or treadmill exercise on normalizing the lipid profile of obese subjects. Methods: Forty women complaining from obesity was enrolled in this study and was randomly divided into 4 groups: control group: 10 obese women which don’...

Al-zahrani, Saad S.

2014-01-01

377

Service-learning in Higher Education Relevant to the Promotion of Physical Activity, Healthful Eating, and Prevention of Obesity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Service-learning is a type of experiential teaching and learning strategy combining classroom instruction and meaningful community service and guided activities for reflection. This educational approach has been used frequently in higher education settings, including an array of disciplines such as medicine, theology, public health, physical education, nutrition, psychology, anthropology, and sociology. The purpose of the present review paper was to provide guidance on the use of service-learning within higher education, relevant to the preventive medicine and public health topics of healthful eating, physical activity, and obesity prevention. In service-learning, coursework is structured to address community needs, and to benefit students through the real-world application of knowledge. The benefits for students include positive impacts on social skills, empathy, awareness, understanding, and concern regarding community issues, plus greater confidence and skills to work with diverse populations, increased awareness of community resources, improved motivation, and enhanced knowledge. Educational institutions may also benefit through improved "town and gown" relations, as strong ties, partnerships, and mutually beneficial activities take place. The present literature review describes several service-learning applications such as nutrition education for kids, dietary improvement for seniors, foodservice recipe modification on a college campus, an intergenerational physical activity program for nursing home residents, motor skill development in kindergarteners, organized elementary school recess physical activities, health education, and obesity prevention in children. From this review, service-learning appears to have great potential as a flexible component of academic coursework in the areas of preventive medicine and public health. PMID:23112892

Rosenkranz, Richard R

2012-10-01

378

Perception of Childhood Obesity and Support for Prevention Policies among Latinos and Whites  

OpenAIRE

A cross-sectional survey was administered to Latino and White residents of Omaha, NE, to assess perception of the childhood obesity problem, attribution of responsibility, and support for obesity-related policies. The sample included 40.8% (n = 271) Latinos and 59.2% (n = 393) Whites. Among Latinos, 25% did not see childhood obesity as a problem, compared to 6% of Whites (P < 0.001). This difference persisted after adjusting for age, gender, and education level (odds ratio (OR) 2.10, 95% conf...

Puricelli Perin, Douglas M.; Leah Frerichs; Sergio Costa; Ramirez, Amelie G.; -k Huang, Terry T.

2014-01-01

379

Beneficial effects by intake of Euphausiacea pacifica on high-fat diet-induced obesity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity is a major health problem showing increased incidence in developed and developing countries. We examined the effect of Euphausia pacifica (E. pacifica) (Pacific Krill) on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice. No significant differences were observed in average food intake between the HFD and HFD with E. pacifica group, or the low-fat diet (LFD) and LFD with E. pacifica group for 18 weeks. The increased ratio of body weight in the HFD containing E. pacifica group was significantly reduced, being 10% lower than that with HFD group in the 18th week (HFD, 298.6±18.8% vs. HFD with E. pacifica, 267.8±16.2%; ppacifica group was reduced by 4% compared with LFD group (LFD, 244.2±11.6% vs. LFD with E. pacifica, 234.1±18.0%). There were no effects of E. pacifica on total cholesterol levels in serum and liver, whereas the supplement of E. pacifica tended to decrease triglyceride levels in the HFD groups. The leptin level in serum was significantly decreased in the HFD group (ppacifica. The adipocyte area (1926±1275 ?m(2)) in the HFD containing E. pacifica group was significantly reduced by 20% (ppacifica supplementation in the diet is beneficial for the prevention of HFD-induced obesity. PMID:22466562

Sadzuka, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Ikumi; Miyashita, Michiko; Ueda, Tomohiro; Kikuchi, Sayaka; Oshiro, Eriko; Yano, Akira; Yamada, Hidetoshi

2012-01-01

380

Why did soft drink consumption decrease but screen time not? Mediating mechanisms in a school-based obesity prevention program  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This paper aims to identify the mediating mechanisms of a school-based obesity prevention program (DOiT. Methods The DOiT-program was implemented in Dutch prevocational secondary schools and evaluated using a controlled, cluster-randomised trial (September 2003 to May 2004. We examined mediators of effects regarding (1 consumption of sugar containing beverages (SCB; (2 consumption of high caloric snacks; (3 screen-viewing behaviour; and (4 active commuting to school. To improve these behaviours the DOiT-program tried to influence the following potentially mediating variables: attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, and habit-strength. Results Both in boys (n = 418 and girls (n = 436 the DOiT-intervention reduced SCB consumption (between group difference in boys = -303.5 ml/day, 95% CI: -502.4;-104.5, between group difference in girls = -222.3 ml/day, 95% CI: -371.3;-73.2. The intervention did not affect the other examined behaviours. In girls, no intervention effect on hypothetical mediators was found nor evidence of any mediating mechanisms. Boys in intervention schools improved their attitude towards decreasing SCB consumption, while this behaviour became less of a habit. Indeed, attitude and habit strength were significant mediators of the DOiT-intervention's effect (4.5 and 3.8%, respectively on SCB consumption among boys. Conclusion Our findings imply that interventions aimed at EBRB-change should be gender-specific. Future studies aimed at reducing SCB consumption among boys should target attitude and habit strength as mediating mechanisms. Our study did not resolve the mediating mechanisms in girls. Trial registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register ISRCTN87127361

Brug Johannes

2008-08-01

381

Predisposition to Obesity : Should We Target Those Most Susceptible?  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Obesity prevention should remain a priority, even if there is some suggestion that the epidemic may presently have reached a stable level. However, previous interventions have not been effective in preventing overweight and obesity, and at the same time studies suggest that some subgroups are more predisposed to future obesity. The purpose of this paper is to review interventions on obesity prevention published during the past year, and to examine if interventions targeting predisposed groups or individuals seem more efficient in preventing obesity than studies targeting general populations. Among 15 identified studies, 7 targeted predisposed children or adolescents. More of the studies targeting predisposed individuals were able to show significant effects than the studies targeting general populations. Most studies targeting predisposed defined the predisposition based on ethnicity or socioeconomic status. Thus, we may be more successful in preventing obesity when targeting predisposed individuals, but morestudies are needed before a firm conclusion can be drawn.

Olsen, Nanna Julie; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

2012-01-01

382

Parents' beliefs about appropriate infant size, growth and feeding behaviour: implications for the prevention of childhood obesity  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of risk factors are associated with the development of childhood obesity which can be identified during infancy. These include infant feeding practices, parental response to infant temperament and parental perception of infant growth and appetite. Parental beliefs and understanding are crucial determinants of infant feeding behaviour; therefore any intervention would need to take account of their views. This study aimed to explore UK parents' beliefs concerning their infant's size, growth and feeding behaviour and parental receptiveness to early intervention aimed at reducing the risk of childhood obesity. Method Six focus groups were undertaken in a range of different demographic localities, with parents of infants less than one year of age. The focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis applied using an interpretative, inductive approach. Results 38 parents (n = 36 female, n = 2 male, age range 19-45 years (mean 30.1 years, SD 6.28 participated in the focus groups. 12/38 were overweight (BMI 25-29.99 and 8/38 obese (BMI >30. Five main themes were identified. These were a parental concern about breast milk, infant contentment and growth; b the belief that the main cause of infant distress is hunger is widespread and drives inappropriate feeding; c rationalisation for infants' larger size; d parental uncertainty about identifying and managing infants at risk of obesity and e intentions and behaviour in relation to a healthy lifestyle. Conclusions There are a number of barriers to early intervention with parents of infants at risk of developing obesity. Parents are receptive to prevention prior to weaning and need better support with best practice in infant feeding. In particular, this should focus on helping them understand the physiology of breast feeding, how to differentiate between infant distress caused by hunger and other causes and the timing of weaning. Some parents also need guidance about how to recognize and prepare healthy foods and facilitate physical activity for their infants.

Swift Judy A

2010-11-01

383

Prevention  

Science.gov (United States)

... Delicious Reddit StubmleUpon Print About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

384

Role of Suppressor Variables in Primary Prevention Obesity Research: Examples from Two Predictive Models  

OpenAIRE

Pediatric obesity is a pertinent public health challenge. Child physical activity and screen time behaviors enacted within the context of the family and home environment are important determinants of pediatric obesity. The purpose of this study was to operationalize five, maternal-facilitated, social cognitive theory constructs for predicting physical activity and screen time behaviors in children. A secondary purpose was to elucidate the function of suppressor variables in the design and imp...

Knowlden, Adam P.

2014-01-01

385

The relationship between obesity and prostate cancer: from genetics to disease treatment and prevention  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Recent studies demonstrated that obesity is associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and prognosis. However, the mechanisms underlying this relationship are poorly understood. Tumor microenvironment has been increasingly considered as an important determinant of cancer growth and progression. In the light of this growing evidence, Ribeiro et al., in a BMC Medicine research article, investigated the gene expression profiles of periprostatic adipose tissue of obese patients with ...

Lughezzani Giovanni

2012-01-01

386

Prevention of diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance in mice by chemical derivatives of DHA.  

Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

Ro?. 15, Suppl. (2007), A 185-A186. ISSN 1930-7381. [The Obesity Society 2007 Annual Scientific Meeting. 20.10.2007-24.10.2007, New Orleans] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA303/07/0708 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * obesity * high-fat diet * decosahexaenoic acid Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

Rossmeisl, Martin; Jílková, Zuzana; Jeleník, Tomáš; Hensler, Michal; Mohamed-Ali, V.; Bryhn, M.

2007-01-01

387

Economic instruments for obesity prevention: results of a scoping review and modified delphi survey  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Comprehensive, multi-level approaches are required to address obesity. One important target for intervention is the economic domain. The purpose of this study was to synthesize existing evidence regarding the impact of economic policies targeting obesity and its causal behaviours (diet, physical activity), and to make specific recommendations for the Canadian context. Methods Arksey and O'Malley's (2005) methodological framework for conducting scoping reviews was adopted f...

LaFrance Jeffrey; Janssen Ian; Ferrence Roberta; Dubé Laurette; Drewnowski Adam; Donnelly Peter; Cawley John; Cash Sean B; Christopher, Auld M.; Arbour-Nicitopoulos Kelly; Andreyeva Tatiana; Van De, Nguyen; Grootendorst Paul; Ej, Faulkner Guy; Lakdawalla Darius

2011-01-01

388

Determinants, consequences and prevention of childhood overweight and obesity: An Indian context  

OpenAIRE

The prevalence of obesity in adolescents and children has risen to alarming levels globally, and this has serious public health consequences. Sedentary lifestyle and consumption of calorie-dense foods of low nutritional value are speculated to be two of the most important etiological factors responsible for escalating rate of childhood overweight in developing nations. To tackle the childhood obesity epidemic we require comprehensive multidisciplinary evidence-based interventions. Some sugges...

Ranjani, Harish; Pradeepa, Rajendra; Mehreen, T. S.; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Anand, Krishnan; Garg, Renu; Mohan, Viswanathan

2014-01-01

389

Modeling Social Transmission Dynamics of Unhealthy Behaviors for Evaluating Prevention and Treatment Interventions on Childhood Obesity  

OpenAIRE

Research evidence indicates that obesity has spread through social networks, but lever points for interventions based on overlapping networks are not well studied. The objective of our research was to construct and parameterize a system dynamics model of the social transmission of behaviors through adult and youth influence in order to explore hypotheses and identify plausible lever points for future childhood obesity intervention research. Our objectives were: (1) to assess the sensitivity o...

Frerichs, Leah M.; Araz, Ozgur M.; Huang, Terry T. –. K.

2013-01-01

390

Obesity Prevention in Child Care: A Review of U.S. State Regulations  

OpenAIRE

ABSTRACT Objective To describe and contrast individual state nutrition and physical activity regulations related to childhood obesity for child care centers and family child care homes in the United States. Methods We conducted a review of regulations for child care facilities for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. We examined state regulations and recorded key nutrition and physical activity items that may contribute to childhood obesity. Items included in this review were: 1) Water...

Slining Meghan; Walker Elizabeth M; Cradock Angie; Benjamin Sara E; Gillman Matthew W

2008-01-01

391

Breast Milk Hormones and Their Protective Effect on Obesity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Data accumulated over recent years have significantly advanced our understanding of growth factors, cytokines, and hormones in breast milk. Here we deal with leptin, adiponectin, IGF-I, ghrelin, and the more recently discovered hormones, obestatin, and resistin, which are present in breast milk and involved in food intake regulation and energy balance. Little is known about these compounds in infant milk formulas. Nutrition in infancy has been implicated in the long-term tendency to obesity, and a longer duration of breastfeeding appears to protect against its development. Diet-related differences in serum leptin and ghrelin values in infancy might explain anthropometric differences and differences in dietary habits between breast-fed and formula-fed infants also later in life. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of how hormones present in breast milk affect children. Here we examine the data related to hormones contained in mother's milk and their potential protective effect on subsequent obesity.

Fissore MariaF

2009-11-01

392

Advantages of bariatric medicine for individualized prevention and treatments: multidisciplinary approach in body culture and prevention of obesity and diabetes  

OpenAIRE

Bariatric surgery is a component of the multimodal treatment of obesity, which consists of multidisciplinary evaluation and diagnosis, conservative and surgical treatments, and lifelong follow-up care. The current guideline extends the BMI-based spectrum of indications that was previously proposed (BMI greater than 40 kg/m(2), or greater than 35 kg/m(2) with secondary diseases) by eliminating age limits, as well as most of the contraindications. A prerequisite for surgery is that a structur...

Dimitrov, Dimiter V.; Ivanov, Valkan; Atanasova, Maria

2011-01-01

393

Enhanced gastric tolerability and improved anti-obesity effect of capsaicinoids-loaded PCL microparticles.  

Science.gov (United States)

Capsaicinoids show several pharmacological effects including weight loss. However, their pungency limits the long-term use through the gastrointestinal tract. In that sense, the goal of this study was to prepare capsaicinoids-loaded poly(?-caprolactone) microparticles as an oral carrier in order to improve their gastric tolerability and to make feasible the long-term treatment of obesity. Formulations containing 3, 5 and 10% capsaicinoids were successfully obtained by simple emulsion/solvent evaporation method. Values of encapsulation efficiency above 90% were achieved. Microparticles showed spherical shape and smooth surface. The particle size was suitable for oral use in order to provide an extended release through the gastrointestinal tract. No chemical bond was observed between drug and polymer. Microencapsulation led to drug amorphization. Formulations prolonged the release of capsaicinoids without changing the release kinetic (biexponential model). Microencapsulation increased the gastric tolerability of capsaicinoids because it prevented inflammatory processes in the stomach of rats. Microparticles containing 5% capsaicinoids demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of Lee index, mesenteric and retroperitoneal fat pads of rats with obesity induced by hypothalamic lesion using monosodium l-glutamate. In summary, capsaicinoids-loaded poly(?-caprolactone) microparticles are low-irritative oral controlled-release carriers for a long-term use in obesity. PMID:24857502

Almeida, Martinha A; Nadal, Jessica M; Grassiolli, Sabrina; Paludo, Katia S; Zawadzki, Sônia F; Cruz, Letícia; Paula, Josiane P; Farago, Paulo V

2014-07-01

394

Effects of aquatic exercise and nutritional guidance on the body composition of obese children and adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of aquatic exercise and nutritionalguidance on the body composition of obese children and adolescents. Thirty obese childrenaged 10 to 16 years, with a body mass index (BMI above the 95th percentile according to theclassification proposed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2000, weredivided into two groups: the first group started learning to swim (GSwim, n = 10 and the secondgroup underwent a deep water running program (GDeep, n = 20. Weight, height, BMI, BMIZ-scores, relative and absolute fat, and relative and absolute lean body mass were evaluated atbaseline and after 12 weeks. The program consisted of 12 meetings for nutritional guidance (oncea week and 36 sessions of exercise (three times per week. MANOVA and Fisher’s exact testwere used for statistical analysis, with the level of significance set at p < 0.05. After 12 weeks,GDeep showed a significant reduction in BMI, BMI Z-scores and relative and absolute fat,and an increase in relative and absolute lean body mass. Significant differences were observedbetween GDeep and GSwim in terms of the reduction in body fat (p = 0.014 and the increasein lean mass (p = 0.006. A program of deep water running together with nutritional guidancemay promote significant changes in the body composition of obese children and adolescents dueto the cyclic characteristic of this physical activity.

Gerusa Eisfeld Milano

2010-06-01

395

Using the Medical Research Council Framework for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions in a Theory-Based Infant Feeding Intervention to Prevent Childhood Obesity: The Baby Milk Intervention and Trial  

OpenAIRE

Introduction. We describe our experience of using the Medical Research Council framework on complex interventions to guide the development and evaluation of an intervention to prevent obesity by modifying infant feeding behaviours. Methods. We reviewed the epidemiological evidence on early life risk factors for obesity and interventions to prevent obesity in this age group. The review suggested prevention of excess weight gain in bottle-fed babies and appropriate weaning as intervention targe...

Rajalakshmi Lakshman; Simon Griffin; Wendy Hardeman; Annie Schiff; Ann Louise Kinmonth; Ong, Ken K.

2014-01-01

396

Childhood obesity prevention in rural settings: background, rationale, and study design of ‘4-Health,’ a parent-only intervention  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood obesity in rural communities is a serious but understudied problem. The current experiment aims to assess a wide range of obesity risk factors among rural youth and to offer an 8-month intervention program for parents to reduce obesity risk in their preteen child. Methods/Design A two-group, repeated measures design is used to assess the effectiveness of the 4-Health intervention program. Assessments include anthropometric measures, child self-evaluations, parent self-evaluations, and parent evaluations of child. County Extension agents from 21 rural Montana counties recruit approximately 150 parent–child dyads and counties are semi-randomly assigned to the active intervention group (4-Health Educational Program or a “best-practices” (Healthy Living Information control group. Discussion This study will shed light on the effectiveness of this parent-only intervention strategy in reducing obesity risk factors among rural preteens. The 4-Health program is designed to provide information and skills development for busy rural parents that will increase healthy lifestyles of their preteen children and improve the parents’ ability to intervene effectively in the lives of their families during this critical developmental period. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01510587

Lynch Wesley C

2012-04-01

397

Paediatric Obesity Research in Early Childhood and the Primary Care Setting: The TARGet Kids! Research Network  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Primary paediatric health care is the foundation for preventative child health. In light of the recent obesity epidemic, paediatricians find themselves at the frontline of identification and management of childhood obesity. However, it is well recognized that evidence based approaches to obesity prevention and subsequent translation of this evidence into practice are critically needed. This paper explores the role of primary care in obesity prevention and introduces a novel application and development of a primary care research network in Canada—TARGet Kids!—to develop and translate an evidence-base on effective screening and prevention of childhood obesity.

Catherine S. Birken

2012-04-01

398

Japanese Lifestyle during Childhood Prevents the Future Development of Obesity among Japanese-Americans  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective To evaluate whether a Japanese lifestyle during childhood could protect against the future development of obesity-associated metabolic diseases by comparing native Japanese with Japanese-Americans in whom genetic factors are the same. Methods Study subjects were 516 native Japanese and 781 Japanese-Americans who underwent medical examinations between 2007 and 2010. Japanese-Americans were divided into 444 first-generation immigrants (JA-1), who were born in Japan, and 337 second- or later-generation descendants (JA-2), who were born in the United States. The JA-2 group was then divided into the kibei subgroup (N = 79), who had moved to Japan before the age of 18 years and later returned to the United States, and the non-kibei subgroup (N = 258), who had never lived in Japan. Results The JA-2 group had the highest percentages of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes compared with native Japanese and JA-1. Furthermore, among JA-2, the prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in the kibei subgroup was significantly lower than that in the non-kibei subgroup. The prevalence of diabetes in the kibei subgroup also tended to be lower than in the non-kibei subgroup. Conclusions The prevalence of obesity and metabolic diseases differed with residence in Japan during childhood among Japanese-Americans. These findings indicate the possibility that Japanese lifestyle during childhood could reduce the future risks for obesity-associated metabolic diseases. PMID:25807391

Shiwa, Mami; Yoneda, Masayasu; Nakanishi, Shuhei; Oki, Kenji; Yamane, Kiminori; Kohno, Nobuoki

2015-01-01

399

Dietary Polyphenols and Obesity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The prevalence of overweight and obesity and their associated metabolic disorders are considered a major threat to the public’s health. While several diet and exercise programs are available for weight loss and prevention of weight regain, progress is often slow and disappointing. Recently, natural bioactive phytochemicals present in foods have been discovered for their potential health benefit effects on the prevention of chronic disorders such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory and metabolic diseases including obesity.Polyphenols are a class of naturally-occurring phytochemicals, of which some such as catechins, anthocynines, resveratrol and curcumin have been shown to modulate physiological and molecular pathways that are involved in energy metabolism, adiposity, and obesity. The potential in vivo, beneficial effects of these polyphenols on adiposity and obesity as complementary agents in the up-regulation of energy expenditure have emerged by investigating these compounds in cell cultures, animal models of obesity and in some human clinical and epidemiological studies. In this brief review, the efficacy of the above-named polyphenols and their potential efficacy to modulate obesity and some associated disorders are discussed.

Mohsen Meydani

2010-07-01

400

The Effect of Selected Walking Program on Bone Mass Density Body Composition and Serum Estrogen in OBESE Girls  

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Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoporosis and obesity two disorders of body composition are growing in prevalence. This is while a few studies have investigated the relationship between body composition and bone mass density (BMD with physical activity in obese girls. Thus this study aims at investigating the effect of walking programs in preventing osteoporosis and reducing obesity in obese girls. Methods: Twenty non-athlete obese girls volunteered to take part in this research. The participants then were randomly divided into two groups (Control: n=10 BMI=30.9±3.6 kg/m2 and experimental: n=10 BMI=30.2±1.8 kg/m2. The bone mass density body composition and serum estrogen of the participants were measured initially and after two months. Then the experimental group started a two-month exercise program which consisted of 30 minutes of walking with intensity of %50- %75 of heart rate three times a week. The data were analyzed through independent t-test (P

Seyed Nasim Habibzadeh

2009-01-01

401

Growing Right Onto Wellness (GROW): A Family-Centered, Community-Based Obesity Prevention Randomized Controlled Trial for Preschool Child-Parent Pairs  

OpenAIRE

Growing Right Onto Wellness (GROW) is a randomized controlled trial that tests the efficacy of a family-centered, community-based, behavioral intervention to prevent childhood obesity among preschool-aged children. Focusing on parent-child pairs, GROW utilizes a multi-level framework, which accounts for macro (i.e., built-environment) and micro (i.e., genetics) level systems that contribute to the childhood obesity epidemic.

Po’e, Eli K.; Heerman, William J.; Mistry, Rishi S.; Barkin, Shari L.

2013-01-01

402

Expanding the Role of Primary Care in the Prevention and Treatment of Childhood Obesity: A Review of Clinic- and Community-Based Recommendations and Interventions  

OpenAIRE

Although pediatric providers have traditionally assessed and treated childhood obesity and associated health-related conditions in the clinic setting, there is a recognized need to expand the provider role. We reviewed the literature published from 2005 to 2012 to (1) provide examples of the spectrum of roles that primary care providers can play in the successful treatment and prevention of childhood obesity in both clinic and community settings and (2) synthesize the evidence of important ch...

Vine, Michaela; Hargreaves, Margaret B.; Briefel, Ronette R.; Orfield, Cara

2013-01-01

403

Effects of macronutrient composition and cyclooxygenase-inhibition on diet-induced obesity, low grade inflammation and glucose homeostasis  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Background: Obesity and its related metabolic complications are an increasing problem worldwide. A high fat diet in combination with sucrose has been shown to induce obesity and development of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rodents. C57BL/6J mice were fed high fat diets with sucrose- or protein based background, and supplemented with either corn- or fish oil. These experiments were conducted to determine whether macronutrient composition and type of dietary fat can modulate diet-induced obesity, and associated metabolic consequences. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is escalating, and in view of the increased consumption of obesogenic diets with high levels of dietary carbohydrates and fat, the metabolic consequences of cyclooxygenase-inhibition warrants investigation. Results: High fat/high sucrose diets increased obesity development and expression of macrophage infiltration markers in the adipose tissue. By increasing the amount of dietary protein, at the expanse of sucrose, the obesogenic effect of the HF diet was prevented. The reduced obesogenic effect of the high fat/high protein diet was associated with increased expression of genes related to hepatic gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis, in addition to genes related to thermogenesis. Fish oil enriched diets with polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, are shown to prevent diet-induced obesity, however, this effect was blunted with increased sucrose content in the diet. The obesogenic high fat/high diet in combination with indomethacin, a nonselective cyclooxygenase cyclooxygenase-inhibitor, reduces energy efficiency and fat mass in C57BL/6J mice. Despite prevention of obesity development, indomethacin treatment was associated with hyperglycemia and reduced glucose tolerance. Body weight was not affected when indomethacin was combined with a low fat diet. This further highlights the importance of the background diet and macronutrient composition of experimental diets. Conclusions: In summary, our results demonstrate that the composition of background diet modulates the obesogenic effect of the high fat diet. The obesogenic effect of a high fat/ high sucrose diet can also be prevented with inclusion of indomethacin in the diet.

Fjære, Even

2012-01-01

404

Systematic review of clinical trials on dietary interventions to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy among normal weight, overweight and obese women  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive weight gain during pregnancy and subsequent postpartum weight retention may contribute to the epidemic of obesity among women of childbearing age. Preventing excessive gestational weight gain (GWG to optimize maternal, fetal and infant wellbeing is therefore of great importance. A number of dietary interventions in this area has been conducted with inconsistent results, which has made it difficult to identify effective strategies to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy among normal weight, overweight and obese women. The primary objective of this review was to evaluate the effect of dietary interventions for reducing GWG. The secondary objective was to examine the impact of these interventions on different child and maternal health outcomes. Method The PUBMED, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL and the LILACS databases were searched for relevant articles. All published randomized controlled trials (RCT and quasi-randomized controlled trials (QCT, with concurrent controls, on dietary interventions during pregnancy were considered. Results were presented using relative risk (RR for categorical data and weighted mean difference (WMD for continuous data. Data were primarily analyzed with a fixed-effect model and a random-effects model was used in the presence of heterogeneity. No date and language restrictions were applied. Results In total, 13 studies were included in this review and 10 trials contributed data on total GWG. Dietary intervention significantly reduced total GWG (n = 1434; WMD = -1.92 kg; 95% CI = -3.65/-0.19; p = 0.03, weight retention at six months postpartum (n = 443; WMD = -1.90 kg; 95% CI = -2.69/-1.12; p Conclusion Dietary advice during pregnancy appears effective in decreasing total GWG and long-term postpartum weight retention, but so far there is limited evidence for further benefits on infant and maternal health.

Adegboye Amanda RA

2011-10-01

405

Physical Activity and Balanced Diet: Basic Parameters to Prevent Obesity and Serum Cholesterol Elevation  

OpenAIRE

A comparative study of age matched 50 obese and 50 lean adults was undertaken. The blood samples were collected after overnight fast. The diet sampling was done on the spot without prior information over a period of three months. The results showed that mean serum cholesterol level of obese persons was higher than leans. The frequency of its occurrence was high in case of sedentary people. More than 70% adults were not involved in enough physical activity where as 10% were benefited from mode...

Abdul Rehman Khan; Liaquat Hussain Khan

2004-01-01

406

Development of a movement and state plan for obesity prevention, Eat Smart, Move More North Carolina.  

Science.gov (United States)

This report outlines the evolution of the Eat Smart, Move More North Carolina movement and publications in support of the movement, including North Carolina's Plan to Address Obesity: Healthy Weight and Healthy Communities, 2013-2020. This evidence-based plan guides the efforts of many organizations as they work to fulfill the mission of Eat Smart, Move More North Carolina: to reverse the rising tide of obesity and chronic disease among North Carolinians by helping them to eat smart, move more, and achieve a healthy weight. PMID:24021454

Dunn, Carolyn; Kolasa, Kathryn M

2013-01-01

407